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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00548
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1915
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00548
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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COLLEGE OF LAW BUILDING


I





\i, rn \0


Y"V


V


rsi


Gainesville


Seventh Annual Announcement

OF THE


College of


Law


rida


. ...' **


\"7 t:





















UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA


MEMBER
OF
THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE UNIVERSITIES.
THE ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS
OF THE SOUTHERN STATES.


THE


AMERICAN


ASSOCIATION


AGRICULTURAL


COL-


LEGES AND EXPERIMENT STATIONS.


THE LAND-GRANT COLLEGE


ENGINEERING


ASSOCIATION.


THE


SOUTHERN


INTERCOLLEGIATE


ATHLETIC


ASSOCIA-


TION.


THE NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION OF


AMERICA.















BOARD


CONTROL


P. K. YONGE, Chairman-......------................--..--- .....---.....
-....._...-President, Southern States Land and Lumber Co., Pensacola
T. B. KING_,..-..........-... ..President, First National Bank, Arcadia
E. L. WARTMANN .----..... ...... .. Planter and Stock Raiser, Citra
W. D. FINLAYSON.... -Planter and President, Old Town Bank, Old Town
F. E. JENNINGS -... -..------............... ...----- .... Lawyer, Jacksonville
J. G. KELLUM, Secretary to the Board .........-------.. ....... ..
n..... Clerk of the House and Business Manager, State College
for Women, Tallahassee.


STATE


BOARD


EDUCATION


PARK M. TRAMMELL, President ..-............. ...... .-.. Governor
H. CLAY CRAWFORD .............. ..-----.......---. -Secretary of State
J. C. LUNING .-- .-.. .-------- .-- -.....--- -... --. State Treasurer
T. F. WEST .........--.. ...... -.. ............. Attorney-General
W. N. SHEATS, Secretary --.....-..State Superintendent of Public Instruction


UNIVERSITY


COUNCIL


ALBERT A. MURPHREE, LL.D. ........-- ....President of the University
JAS. M. FARR, Ph.D. ----. _. ...........---Vice-President of the University
P. H. POLFS, M.S. ..........Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station
and Dean of the College of Agriculture.
JAS. N. ANDERSON, Ph.D. -. ....-Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
J. R. BENTON, Ph.D. ......-....-...... Dean of the College of Engineering
H. R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B. --.........- ....Dean of the College of Law
JOHN A. THACKSTON, Ph.D. ._..... __.-.....Dean of the Teachers' College








4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY


CALENDAR


1915-1916


1915-June 14,


Monday ...--


-Summer School begins.


1916--


August 6, Friday---.... ..--- ..--.....Summer School ends.
September 20, Monday ..... -....--- Summer Recess ends.
Examination for Admission.
Registration of Students.
September 21, Tuesday -- -... .. -..First Semester begins.
October 2, Saturday, 1:30 p. m. .... -Re-examinations.
2:30 p. m. .... .Meeting of General Faculty.
November 25, Thursday ...-----..Thanksgiving Holiday.
December 18, Saturday, 11:30 a. m._Christmas Recess begins.
January 1, Saturday .......---------....---- Christmas Recess ends.
January 3, Monday -------...... ..Resumption of classes.
Review Courses for Teachers
begin.
January 11, Tuesday ..........---...--Ten-Day Course for Farmers
begins.
January 29, Saturday ......-----------......... --First Semester ends.
January 31, Monday .......----....------... Second Semester begins.
February 12, Saturday, 2:30 p.m.M....Meeting of General Faculty.
March 4, Saturday, 1:30 p. m. ... -- Re-examinations.
June 3, Saturday, 2:30 p. m. ---.....--...Meeting of General Faculty.
June 4 to 6 ...------ ----------......... -- Commencement.
June 4, Sunday .. ..--...-----Baccalaureate Sermon.
June 5, Monday ....---........... Oratorical Contests.
Annual Alumni Meeting.
June 6, Tuesday ..........--..---....--Graduating Day.
June 7, Wednesday ----.... ...........Summer Recess begins.
June 9, Friday ................Examinations for Admission.
lune 12. Monday ----.........Summer School begins.


0 -


Y









CALENDAR


1915


CALENDAR


1916


January


S MTWTS
12
3 4 5 6 8 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 9 30
31 - -- -

February
SMTWTY S
SMW T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 -..- .. .


March
SMTWTrS
S1 2 3 4 5 6
78 9 10 11 12 113
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31.. -- --


April


SM TW T F S.
-- -. 1 2 3
4 5 67 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 .

May


2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 222
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 ..- -- --
Juone
Sa M T 24
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 2 3 2 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 -.. .. ..


July
SM T W" f S
- - - I 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
2526 27 28 2 9 30 31


August
SMTWTFS
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 2 24 2 6 2728
29 30 31 - -


September
SM T W T F S
.. ... 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 2728 29 30 ....


October


SMTW T S
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 ..- -. -.
November
S MTWT S
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 .- -..-

December
SMWT WTS
S- - 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31
-2 - - -- -- --


Janua rv


S MI T W T S

9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 -- -. -.-

February
S)TWTFS
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 2324 2526
27 28 29 ..- --


March


SMTWTFS
S.. 2 3 4
S6 7 8 9 1011
12 13 14 15 161718
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 -.


April


July


SMTgWTY
'2 3' 4 5 6 "7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 -- --

August
S Mi T W T I' a
SMT WTFS"
...12345
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 2223 4 2 5 2 6
2728 293 3031


September


S M T W T FS
S. .-. -- 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 19
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30

October


SMT W T F SSM T W T S
S1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
23 4 5 6 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
23 24 25 26 27 28 2929 30 31 ........
30 - .. - -- -- --, -


May
SMTW T FB
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 1 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 ..

June
S M T1W T S
1 a o
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 -
27 -----


November


SM TWTFS
1 2 34
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 2829 30 ....

December
S M T WTS
S-- .. 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 1i 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 2 2 1 22 23
'24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 -. -- - --








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA


GAINESVILLE



ORGANIZATION
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.


THE COLLEGE OF


ARTS AND SCIENCES:


A Curriculum leading to the A.B. degree.
A Curriculum leading to the B.S. degree.


THE COLLEGE OF


AGRICULTURE:


A Curriculum leading to the degree of B.


THE COLLEGE OF


in Agriculture.


ENGINEERING:


A Curriculum leading to the B.S
A Curriculum leading to the B.
neering.
A Curriculum leading to the B.S


degree in Civil Engineering.
1. degree in Electrical Engi-


degree in Mechanical Engi-


neenng.
THE COLLEGE OF LAW:
A Curriculum leading to the degree of LL.B.
THE TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the A.B. degree in Education.


A Curriculum leading to the B.


degree in Education.


(c) A Normal Course leading to a Diploma.
(d) The University Summer School.


THE DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY


EXTENSION:


Institutes.


Farmers' Co-operative Demonstration


Boys'


VIII.
IX.


Work.


and Girls' Clubs.


(d) Correspondence Courses.
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.
THE STATE PLANT BOARD.







COLLEGE OF LAW


COLLEGE


OF


LAW


ALBERT


FACULTY
MURPHREE


A.M.


, LL.D.,


President of the University.


HARRY R.


TRUSLER, A.M.,


LL.B. (Michigan),


Dean and Professor of Law.


CLIFFORD


CRANDALL, B.S.
Professor of Law.


, LL.B. (Michigan),


WALTER L. SUMMERS, A.B.,
Professor of Law.


Jur. Dr. (Yale),


SPECIAL LECTURERS


FOR


1914-1915


CHIEF


JUSTICE R.


F. TAYLOR,


Supreme Court of Florida.


JUSTICE R.


COCKRELL,


Supreme Court of Florida.


JUSTICE


ELLIS,


Supreme Court of Florida.


JUSTICE THOSE.


M. SHACKLEFORD,


Supreme Court of Florida.


JUSTICE


JAMES B.


WHITFIELD,


Supreme Court of Florida.


HON.
U.


HON.


. B. SHEPPARD
District Judge.


WILLS


Circuit Court Judge.


HON. FRED C.


Ex-U


HON.


CUBBERLY,


District Attorney


HILL,


Referee in Bankruptcy.


v.- -- --- -






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


FACULTY
The resident faculty of the College consist of three men,


who devote their entire time


law instruction.


Each pro-


fessor holds an academic degree.


a law school of


high


repute,


and


Each has graduated from
Professor, Summers holds


degree of


has


had


Doctor


valuable


Jurisprudence from


experience as


a law


teacher,


Yale.


and


Each
Dean


Trusler has taught law in Florida for


seven


years-a longer


period
gaged


than


any other teacher


active


in the


practice of


State.


law


Each


has en-


a substantial


period, and Professor Crandall has had fourteen years of ex-


perience in the profession.


Each is an expert in the courses


in which he offers instruction.


From


the first the


College


has been characterized by the stability of


tenure in office of


faculty.


The


permanency


professors


has contri-


buted materially to its success, especially in teaching Florida
law and practice.


STUDENTS


AND


GRADUATES


From the organization of the College, the character of its


students has been excellent and the


efficiency


of its


gradu-


ates noteworthy


. Strict enforcement of its requirements for


admission and for graduation has attracted


a superior


class


of men.


This has made possible


scholarship of its stu-


dents and the success of its alumni.
During its first session, 1909-10, the College required for


admission the completion of two years of high


and enrolled thirty-one students, two of whom


men.


Since then the


quirements,


and


has


has


College


much more


increased


Shas
than


number


doubled its


doubled
degree


students eight hundred and fifty per cent.


I


its
me
Lasti


twenty-seven per cent of its students held acade
Each year the number of law graduates has


school work,
were degree
entrance re-
enrollment,
n among its
year nearly
mic degrees.
substantial


/: : '
i : #;


. - r"


t











































LAW LIBRARY
































































PRACTICE COURT ROOM


-~CIYiUIY LII~III ~. .. .... .....~~~







COLLEGE OF LAW


gaged at present in the active practice of


law; and it is


believed that every one of the twenty-seven men graduated


this year also will enter the


profession.


Although the College has been organized only six


years,


members of its alumni in the State have held, or are holding,
among others, the offices of mayor, city attorney, county at-
torney, land law clerk for the United States, referee in bank-


ruptcy, state legislator, county


judge,


prosecuting


attorney,


state attorney, and counsel to the Railroad Commissioners.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


The College of Law takes


this opportunity of recording


its appreciation of the services of the Justices of the Supreme


Court


Florida and


other


leading members


of the bench


and bar of the State,


who have from


time


time delivered


special


lectures


before


students


and


faculty


These


lectures have


been


very instructive and helpful.


Both fac-


ulty and students feel exceedingly grateful


mem-


bers of the


Supreme Court


and


the other gentlemen


who


lectured


during


session


recently closed


kindly


interest they manifested in


the College of


Law and for the


resulting uplift and inspiration.


A similar


course of lectures


being


arranged


for next


year.


GENERAL


STATEMENT


1891, the


American


Bar


Association


declared


that


its opinion it was


a part


highest


every civilized state to make provision,
maintaining schools of law and for the


duty and interest of
when necessary, for


thorough


legal edu-


cation of all who are licensed to practice law.


Recognizing


the soundness of this doctrine and desiring to discharge this


duty
*fr-llV


on the


part


of the


flnn'rA


State,


CAn trnl


*I .l ll- I. .. I I**r S flt a


State


Board


rnrirlratl frtr tho


Educa-
flflfn In 17


n r ,


I* x







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


with


special


consideration of the peculiarities and


excep-


tions applicable in Florida, are many and evident.
It was the purpose of the Board of Control to establish a
law school which, by the quality of its work and the char-
acter of its equipment, would merit and command the con-
fidence and support of the bench and bar of the State and
would draw within its walls the young men who will consti-


tute the future bar of Florida.


That the hopes of accom-


polishing these results were well founded and that gratifying
progress towards these ends has been made, are shown by
the number and character of those who have availed them-
selves of the advantages offered by the College of Law.

LAW BUILDING


Originally


College


occupied


quarters in


Thomas


Hall. In 1913 it was assigned a section of Language Hall.
This also proving inadequate, the contract for the present


College of Law


Building was awarded February 9th, 1914.


Its style of architecture, Tudor-Gothic, harmonizes with that


the other buildings of the University.


The building is


one hundred seventy-two feet long, seventy feet wide, and


two


and


one-half


stories high.


contains a large,


well-


lighted library, furnished with book stacks, library tables,


librarian's office, and consultation rooms for


faculty
with


y.


It has three commodious lecture-rooms,


the offices of administration


several resident professors.


court room and


work.


and


students and


together


the offices of


It contains, also, an elegant moot


auditorium handsomely finished in


The court room has all the


panel


usual accessories, jury


box, witness stand, judge's office, jury room, and is connected


with


library


interest of the


attractive


below


College


quarters


by
has
the


been


circular


provide


Marshall


stairway
ed for,


Debating


.


Every


including
Society.


nIE -


ntnftln: z ^^d trr^M4y n*V


rrvl -, l_-, -1_r n -A rn J3







COLLEGE OF LAW


LAW


LIBRARY


Law books are the working tools of the


practicing


law-


yer.


To teach the


student how to


these


tools,


how to


use the digests,


encyclopedias,


work of the law school as


and


teach


reports,
him the


is as much the
general princi-


ples of the law.
The College of Law was fortunate in being


able to open


its doors
shelves
Reports


from


Digest


with


the
witl


1822


and


a good working


following
i Wurts' ]


1915,


Duval's


books:
Digest;


except from
Compilation


Revised Statutes of 1898;


1906; Florida


Compiled


library
Three


and now


sets


Session


1828


three sets of the


Laws of


1914;


of the


Laws


1834;
Laws


has on its


Florida
Florida


McClellan's


General
Thorpe's


Florida;
Statutes
Ameri-


can


Charters, Constitutions and Organic


Laws;


Hinds' Pre-


cedents of the House of Representatives;


the Northwestern,


Southwestern, Northeastern, Southeastern, Atlantic, Pacific,


and Southern Reporters;


the American Decisions, American


Reports


and


American


State


Reports,


with


digests;


American


Reports


Annotated


Annotated,


Cases,
i and


with
new


digests;


series,


with


e Lawyers'
digests; the


United States Supreme Court Reports, with digests;


the New


York


Common


Law


and


Chancery


Reports,


with


digests;


the New


York Court of Appeals


Reports, the


Michigan Re-


ports, the Massachusetts Reports, the New Jersey Equity Re-


ports, the New


and


Illinois


Jersey La
Reports


w


Reports,


Alabama


Reports,


to the Reporters; the Pacific States


Reports,


with


digests,


which


includes


California


Re-


ports, the Colorado Supreme Reports, the Colorado Appeals


Reports, the Idaho


tana


Reports,


Reports,


Nevada


Kansas


Reports,


Reports,


New


Mon-


Mexico


Re-


ports, the Oregon Reports, the Utah


ton
the


Reports, and


Reprint


the
the


Wyoming
English R


Reports,


Reports 1
sports; the


to the
Britis


Washing-
Reporters;
sh Ruling


1







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


From


Legislative


appropriation


1915


libraries of the University, $4000 has been set aside for the


enlargement


of the law library.


The College is


now ne-


gotiating the purchase of law books, which will be available


for use during the session of 1915-16.
among others, the following: Mew's


Said books include,
SEnglish Law Digest;


Halsbury's Laws


Century


Digest;


England;


English


Statutes


American Annual Digests, Key


t Large;
Number


Series; Federal Reporter; Federal Cases; Federal Reporter


Digest;


Federal Statutes


Annotated;


Southern


Reporter


Digest; and many of the state reports to the reporters.


ADMISSION


TERMS.-A candidate for admission must present, along
with his scholastic record, a certificate of good moral char-
acter; and, if he be from another college or university, the


certificate


must


show that he


was


honorably discharged.


No candidate under 19 years of age will be admitted.
METHODS.--There are two methods of gaining admission
to the College.


cates


from


College


approved senior high


will


accept


schools


certifi-
Florida;


from accredited academies and preparatory schools of the
State; from any secondary school of another State which is
accredited by its State university; and from any recognized


college or university.


These certificates must


be filed in


the registrar's office.
The certificate presented by the candidate for admission
must be officially signed by the principal of the school at-


tended.


It must state in detail the work of preparation, and,


in the case of Florida high schools, that the course through
the twelfth grade has been satisfactorily completed.


Blank


certificates,


conveniently


arranged


desired data, will be sent to all high school principals and,


Certificate. -The







COLLEGE OF LAW


REQUIREMENTS.-


"Entrance Units. "-The


requirements


for admission are measured in "Entrance Units," based upon


the curriculum of the high schools of Florida.


A unit repre-


sents a course of


study


pursued throughout


the school year


with five recitation periods of at least forty-five minutes each


per week, four courses being taken during each


years.


Thus


curriculum


standard


senior


four
high


school of Florida is equivalent to sixteen units.


Two labor-


atory periods should be counted as one recitation period.


Number


Units.-Applicants


admission


as regular


students


and


candidates


for a


degree


must


acquire


credit


for sixteen such entrance units.


These requirements


teen and one-half


at the


very


units as defined by the


least


equal


Carnegie


to four-
Founda-


tion or the National Educational Association.


Distribution of Units.--Of the


sixteen


units


required


admission, eight are specified and eight are elective.
SPECIFIED SUBJECTS


English - --- --- - -- - --
Mathematics -.----- --.---.---
History-- .----- .-------
Science------ .-,.---- ..-.-----


__- - -- ----_______ -- -- 3


--- --. - - -
a a - ---- n.
- - -- - .


- 3
_. -1


units
units
unit
unit


Elective Units.


-The elective


units


may be


chosen from


the list of elective subjects given below and from such other


subjects


as are


regularly taught


in a standard


high


school.


is provided,


however,


units may be accepted


that


more


than four


in vocational subjects,


such


of these
as type-


writing, stenography, mechanic arts, agriculture, etc.
ELECTIVE SUBJECTS
Agriculture ... ........----.... -- --------- unit
Botany --. -- --...-------.---- ---.. ----.. or 1 unit
Chemistry .----- --------. ------------1 unit
English --- ----- ------- ---- ------------ -1 unit
LatinH .........--- ----..------ ---4 units
History --a--- .- .------ ---- .-.---- -----2 units
Mathematics-- -- ------....-. ....--------1 unit


Modern Languages-French, German, or Spanish


Physical Geography _--_ .--.----- ------------I
St., I


units
unit







UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


ADVANCED STANDING


Attorneys at law who have been


admitted


the courts of this State and who comply with


trance


requirements


will


admitted


to practice in
the above en-


senior


class


without examination.
No work in law done in other institutions will be accept-
ed towards a degree, unless the applicant passes satisfactorily


the examinations held


the subjects


junior year of


this College, or unless, by special vote of the faculty, credit


given


towards senior


standing without


examination for


such


work.


In no case


will


credit


given for


work not


done in residence at an approved law school.
SPECIAL STUDENTS


Persons over twenty-one years of


to qualify
students


have


as regular students


'pon


received


presenting


such


training


age


may


satisfactory


as will


who are


admitted
evidence


not able


as special


that


enable them


they
make


profitable use of the opportunities offered in


Law.


the College of


If the entrance conditions are removed not later than


opening


of the


first


semester


students may become regular students


the senior year,


and


such


candidates for a


degree.


UNIVERSITY


PRIVILEGES


The


are open


advantages of the


to such


other


students


and are able to accept them.


colleges of the


College of


Courses in


Law


University


as desire


constitutional and


political history, international law, political economy, logic,


rhetoric


and English


composition


particularly


recom-


mended to law students.


No extra charge will be made for


such courses, but students in the College of Law will be per-
mitted to take them only with the consent of the law faculty
and of the professors concerned.


STATEMENT


OF


EXPENSES


* ' 1 ;1.






COLLEGE OF LAW


charged full tuition; those taking less than eleven hours will
be charged a proportional part of, the full tuition.
Registration Fee. -A registration fee of five dollars ($5.00)
per year is charged all students.
An additional fee of two dollars ($2.00) is required of stu-
dents who enter after the day scheduled for registration.


Damage


Deposit.-In


order


to secure


University


against damage, the sum of five dollars ($5.00) must be de-


posited at registration.


Damage known to have been done


by any student will be charged to his individual account;
other damages will be prorated among the students.


At the end of


the scholastic year this deposit, less


amount deducted, will be returned to the student.


No or-


ders for the disbursement of sums remaining to the credit of
individual students will be recognized by the auditor until
after the close of the second semester.
Infirmary Fee.--An infirmary fee of three dollars ($3.00)
is charged each student, the proceeds of which go towards


defraying the salary of a resident nurse.


This secures for


the student, in case of illness, the privilege of a bed in the
infirmary (which occupies Section A of Thomas Hall), the


services of


nurse,


and attention


from


University


physician, E. R. Flint, M. D. (Harvard).
Contingent Fee.-A contingent fee of $5.00 for physical


instruction will be charged each student.


The payment of


this fee will also entitle the student to a ticket admitting him


to all athletic games played on the campus by


University


teams.


Board


and Lodging.--Board


and


lodging


and


janitor


service


will be


furnished


by the


University at


a cost


sixty-two dollars ($62.00) for the first semester, not including


the Christmas


vacation,


and


sixty-six


and


a half


dollars


($66.50)


second


semester.


These sums


must


paid at the beginning of each semester.


Under no circum-


stances,


except on


account


sickness,


will


any


part


*






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


follows:


Twenty dollars on September 22, October 30, and


on December 7; $26.50 on


January 29; and $20.00 on March


14 and


on April


Under


Board


and


Lodging


eluded meals in the dining-hall and room (with heat, light


and access to a bathroom), furnished as stated below.


doors of the rooms are provided with Yale locks.


of 50 cents is required for each key,


The


A deposit


when the key is surrendered.


Janitor


Service includes the


care of rooms by maids under the supervision of competent
housekeepers.
Lodging without Board.--Students occupying a room in
the dormitories, but not taking meals in the dining-hall, will
be charged $5.00 per month for lodging.
Board without Lodging.--Board without lodging will be
furnished at the rate of $13.50 per calendar month, payable


in advance.


No part of this sum will be refunded.


The furn-


iture


consists of two iron bedsteads and


fonnier


bureau,


table,


washstand,


mattresses, chif-


and


chairs.


The


students are required to provide all other articles, including


pillows, bedding,
mosquito-bar, etc.


to a law student


tuition, but


wash-bowl, pitcher, mirror, half-curtains,


University charges


and


deposit)


(including


not including books


or damage


$181.50.
REMITTANCES.-A II


remittances should be made to the


Auditor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
TEXT-BOOKS
The text-books used will, in most cases, be found in the
law library, but it will be necessary for students to provide


themselves with books for their daily use.


Nearly all of the


books


are standard texts and will form a


nucleus


which will be returned


Furniture.-All rooms are partially furnished.


Summary of Expenses.--The actual


board and lodging, fees,


onii/lnrrt~o funr lihrar-u






COLLEGE OF LAW


public speaking.


suppose


that


excellence


public


speaking and debating is a gift of nature only and not the


result of patient and persistent effort, is a mistake.


Believ-


ing in the truth of these statements, the students in the Col-
lege of Law met early the first year and organized a society


that would secure to its members practice


debating and


public speaking and experience in arguing legal questions,


as well as drill in parliamentary law.


The society was fit-


tingly named "The Marshall Debating Society," in honor of
the memory of the distinguished Southern jurist, John Mar-
shall.
From the first, the work of the society has been notable.


The


Marshall


Debating


Society


has


never


lost


a public


debate, and last year, in a series of inter-collegiate debates,
it won the Faculty Loving Cup.
PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Fraternity was es-


tablished at the University during the spring of 1912.


This


society has for its main aim the encouragement of scholar-


ship and of high ideals.


To be eligible for membership a law


student must have


been


attendance


least three


semesters, have been guilty of no serious breaches of good


conduct,


and


have


finished


three-fourths


regular


course of study.


The number that may be elected to mem-


bership is limited to the highest ranking third of the com-
bined senior classes of the University.
MEDALS
Medals are offered (1) to the member of the junior class
of any college of the University and (2) to the member of
the senior class of any college of the University delivering
the best original oration at commencement. The speakers
are limited to four from each class and are selected by the
faculty.






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


The Blackstone Institute, of Chicago, offers


American Law, 15 vols.


Modem


This will be awarded to the senior


law


student


attendance


two


years


whose


average


grade for both years of the course is highest.


The


American


Law


Book


Company,


New


York


City, offers the Students' Edition of Cyc, 12 vols.


This will


be awarded to the junior law student
for the year is highest.


whose


average


grade


3. Bancroft-Whitney Company, of San Francisco, offers
the complete Digests and Indexes to Notes of the American


State Reports and American Annotated Cases, 9 vols.


This


will be


awarded


senior


law


student whose


average


grade in the work of the Practice Court is highest.
4. Little, Brown and Company, of Boston, offers Anglo-


American


Legal


Essays,


3 vols.


This


will


awarded


the senior law student whose grade in Brief Making and the
Use of Law Books is highest.


The


Bobbs-Merrill


Company, of


Indianapolis, offers


Jones' Legal Forms.


This will be awarded to the senior


law


student whose grade in Florida Civil Practice is highest.


Callaghan


and


Company,


Chicago,


offers


the


Cyclopedic Law Dictionary.


This


will


awarded


junior law student whose average grade for the year is next
to the highest.


EXAMINATIONS


The last week of


each semester is devoted


examina-


tions


covering


work


semester.


These exami-


nations are in writing


rigid


and


searching,


but


not


have


necessarily


final.


satisfactorily


considered,


completed


a subject,


prima -facie,


the student must


obtain a grade of at least 75 per cent.

DEGREE






COLLEGE OF LAW


gree after one year's residence, but in no case will the de-
gree be granted unless the candidate is in actual residence
during all of the second year.

ADMISSION TO THE BAR
The graduates of the College of Law are licensed by the
Supreme Court, without examination, to practice in all the


courts of Florida upon presenting their


diplomas, duly is-


sued by the proper authorities, and upon furnishing satisfac-
tory evidence that they are twenty-one years of age and of
good moral character.

THE UNIVERSITY PRACTICE COURTS


Thoroughly


organized


practice courts are regular fea-


tures of the course of instruction in the second year.


object


The


the course in the practice courts is to give the


student practical instruction in pleading and practice at law
and in equity and experience in the preparation and trial of


cases.


The work is arranged as follows:


First. -Cases


arising


upon prepared statements of fact


are assigned to the students, upon


which


they are to de-


termine what proceedings to bring and how to bring them,
issue, serve, and return process, prepare the pleadings and


bring


case


to an issue on a question


law.


Each


student must take part in at least one case at law and one


in equity.


The case is first heard on the sufficiency of the


form and the structure of the pleadings and,


when these are


approved, the issue of law is argued and decided, the stu-
dents acting as attorneys on each side drawing the order,
judgment or decree to which they deem themselves entitled.


Second.-In the second class


cases


practice


courts actual


controversies are arranged and assigned for


trial in the circuit court as issues of fact.


After determining


what action to bring, the students assigned to the case are







20 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

the trial of at least one common law, one equity and one
criminal case, and is instructed in appellate procedure.
The work of the Practice Court in Equity Pleading and
Procedure is conducted by Dean Trusler; that in Common
Law Pleading and Procedure by Professor Crandall; that in
Criminal Pleading and Procedure by Professor Summers.
COURSE OF INSTRUCTION
The course of instruction extends through two years of
thirty-five weeks each, exclusive of vacations. The aca-
demic year is divided into two semesters, the first having
eighteen weeks and the second seventeen.
The method of instruction combines the use of text-books,
court rules, statutes and selected cases. Each case is careful-
ly studied by the student, and in the classroom he is required
to analyze it, giving in his own language a clear and concise
statement of the essential facts, the issues involved in the
case, the law governing it and the reasoning of the court for
the conclusion reached. This practice tends to thorough-
ness in reading, care in reasoning and accuracy on the part
of the student in the art of expression.
In connection with this case work, the student studies a
well written text-book on the subject under consideration.
This gives him a systematic summary of the same, more de-
tailed information concerning the application of the law
in particular instances and an outline of the exceptions to
and limitations upon the general principles considered in
the cases.
Particular stress is placed on the statutory modifications
of the common law in Florida and the decisions of the Su-
preme Court of the State. This is true in every subject in the
curriculum; but it is especially emphasized in Pleading,
Practice and Evidence, as the course of study is designed to
instruct the student thoroughly in the peculiarities of sub-






COLLEGE OF LAW


FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER
TORTS.--History and definitions; elements of torts; con-
flicting rights; mental anguish; parties to tort actions; reme-


dies; damages; conflict of laws; method of discharge.


books:


Burdick on


Torts and Burdick's


Cases


Text-
Torts.


(3 hours.


Dean Trusler.)


ELEMENTARY LAW AND REAL PROPERTY.-Study of the
elementary principles of the law as given in Books I, II and


III of the first edition of Robinson'


Elementary


Law and


Burdick on Real Property.


(3 hours.


Professor Crandall.)


DOMESTIC RELATIONS.-This course considers thorough-
ly the law of husband and wife, parent and child, guardian


and ward, infants,


Text-book:


persons non compos mentis and aliens.


Tiffany on Persons and Domestic Relations and


the Statutes of Florida.
CONTRACTS.---Place


(2 hours.


Professor Crandall.)


contract in jurisprudence;


for-


nation of contract;


offer and acceptance; form and con-


sideration; capacity of parties; reality of consent; operation


contract; interpretation of


contract; discharge of


con-


tract.


Text-books:


Anson's


Law


Contract,


Huffcut's


Edition,
(5 hours.


and Huffcut


and Woodruff's


Cases


on Contract.


Professor Summers.)


CRIMINAL LAw.-Sources of criminal law; elements of


crime;


criminal intent; negligence supplying intent; intent


affected by ignorance and mistake of law and fact, infancy,


insanity, intoxication, and incorporation; the criminal


act;


combinations of persons in crime; classification and study of


specific


crimes.


Text-book:


Mikell's


Cases on Criminal


Law and the Statutes of Florida.


(2 hours.


Professor Sum-


mers.)


SECOND SEMESTER


SALE OF


PERSONAL


PROPERTY. -Sale and


contract


sell; statute of frauds; illegality; conditions and warranties;







UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


among


others,


false


and abuse of process;


imprisonment:
conspiracy; sli


malicious


prosecution


ander and libel; trespass;


conversion; deceit; nuisance; negligence.


Text-books:


Bur-


dick
Dean


on Torts
Trusler.)


and


Burdick's


Cases


on Torts.


hours.


AGENCY.-Definition and


divisions;


purposes


which


the relation may be created and how; who may be principal


or agent and evidence of the existence of the


relation; rati-


fiction;


delegation


authority


agent;


termination, na-


ture and extent, construction and execution of the authority;


rights, duties and liabilities of agent, principal and


third per-


sons, the one to the other; particular cases of


agents.


Text-


books:


Mechem's


Outlines


Agency;


Mechem's


Cases on


Agency and the Statutes of Florida.
mers.)


(2 hours.


Professor Sum-


COMMON


LAW


PLEADING.-Definition and


classification


of actions; proceedings


in an action;


analysis of the


decla-


ration;


Stephen's


Stephen's Rules of Pleading.


Common


Law


Pleading,


Text-book: Andrews'
ie Statutes of Florida


and the Supreme and Circuit Court


Rules


in Common Law


Actions in Florida.


EQUITY


(3 hours.


JURISPRUDENCE


Professor Crandall.)


I.-History and definition; juris-


diction; general maxims;


equitable estates, interests and pri-


mary rights,


including a study of trusts;


and liabilities of trustees; mortgages;


ments.


Text-book:


Eaton


powers, duties


equitable liens;


Equity


and


Florida


assign-
cases.


(2 hours.


Dean


Trusler.)


REAL


PROPERTY


Property and
Crandall.)


II.-Text-book:


Statutes of


Florida.


Burdick
(2 hours.


Real


Professor


CRIMINAL


ecution;


arrest;


PROCEDURE.-J jurisdiction


and


extradition; proceedings before


venue; pros-
magistrates;


bail; the
motions;
a tS


grand


jury;


presence of
I 4


indictment;


arraignment,


defendant at trial;


* 4


A


pleas


and


verdict; new trial;
.i .... -_. ,


* :" i ii i ;;i *I:






COLLEGE OF LAW


ble estate; who may make a will; error, fraud, undue influ-


ence, mistake; who may take by will; formal


requisites of


wills; revocation; re-publication; by what law wills are gov-


earned; construction and effect of wills;


lapse and substitu-


tion; rights and liabilities of devisees and legatees; descent


and


distribution.


Text-book:


Costigan's


Cases on


Wills


and the Statutes of Florida.


(2 hours.


Professor Crandall.)


SECOND


YEAR


FIRST SEMESTER
EQUITY PLEADING.-Nature and object of pleadings in
equity; parties to a suit in equity; proceedings in a suit in


equity; bills in equity;


the disclaimer; demurrers and pleas


in equity; replication and answers in an equitable suit.


Text-


book: Shipman's Equity Pleading, Rules of the Circuit Court


in Chancery in Florida and the Statutes of Florida.


(2 hours.


Dean Trusler.)
EVIDENCE.-Judicial notice; kinds of evidence; burden of


proof;


presumptions;


law


and


fact;


judge


and


jury;


best


evidence


rule;


hearsay


rule;


admissions;


confessions;


clusions
tion; pa


based on


trol evidence


public policy and privilege;


rule;


corrobora-


witnesses; attendance in court;


examination;


impeachment;


cross examination and privi-


lege;


public


documents;


records


and


judicial


writings;


private writings.
1, 16th edition; '


Text-books:


Vigmore'


Greenleaf on Evidence, vol.


Cases on the Law of Evidence,


2nd edition, and the Statutes of
fessor Summers.)


Florida.


(3 hours.


Pro-


BRIEF MAKING AND THE USE OF LAW


BOOKS.-Where


to find the law; how to use


statutes and


decisions; how to


find the law; the


preparation.


trial brief;


Text-book:


Cooley's


brief


Brief


1 appeal
Making


and


and


Use of Law Books.


(1 hour.


Professor Crandall.)


EQUITY


JURISPRUDENCE


II.-Accident,


mistake


and







24 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


book:


Eaton on Equity and Florida cases.


(2 hours.


Dean


Truster.)
BAILMENTS AND CARRIERS.-Nature and classification of


bailments;


rights and liabilities of the parties;


innkeepers;


carriers of goods as to liability, discrimination, compensation,
lien; carriers of passengers as to duty to accept, accommoda-
tion, ticket, ejection, personal injuries; actions against car-


riers.


Text-book:


Carriers.


(1 hour.


Goddard's Outlines
Professor Crandall.)


Bailments


and


ORGANIZATION OF


AND


PROCEEDINGS IN THE COURTS


OF FLORIDA IN CIVIL ACTIONS.-


General. -Disqualification,


resignation, and


moval of judges; judge's power in vacation; judge ad litem;
parties to suits at law; locality and consolidation of actions;


joinder of causes of action; rule


days;


commencement of


suits at common law; appearances, defaults and. judgments
upon default; pleadings at law; witnesses and evidence;


jurors;


-- - - AZ -- ~'" r ~ ~0~I~


judgments and


- -,


executions;


motions


new trial


and in arrest of judgment; lis pendens;


appellate proceed-


ings at law and in probate matters; limitation of actions.
b. Supreme Court.-Statutory powers; members of the
court; its terms, record, clerk, seal, decisions, and reports.
c. Circuit Court.-Statutory powers and duties of judges,
terms; records and dockets to be kept by the clerk; seal and
records.
d. Circuit Court in Chancery.-Its power in vacation.


locality of action; process, its service


and


return;


bill, de-


murrer, plea and answer; practice and evidence; masters in
chancery; decrees; rehearings and appeals; injunctions; ne
exeat; divorce and alimony; partition of property; quieting
titles; disability of minors and married women; liens.
e. Statutory Jurisdiction of Circuit Court.-Ejectment;
reestablishing lost papers; adoption of children; eminent do-
main; court commissioners.


f. County


Court.- -Jurisdiction;


terms;


clerk;


seal;


2?
x4 i
r K ,XK


"C










...,... ,mm1
IIIB


mum






amm..
Lmm TmI





!






,..'R H L D----


"- . ". '


MA.RSH ALL DEBATING SOCIETY







































DORMITORY-THOMAS HALL






COLLEGE OF LAW


jurisdiction; proceedings before, at, and after trial; proceed-
ings on appeal.
i. Special Statutory Proceedings at Law. -Attachment;
garnishment; forcible entry and detainer; replevin; statu-
tory liens; landlord and tenant.
j. Extraordinary Legal Remedies.-Habeas corpus; quo
warrant; prohibition.
Text-books: General Statutes of Florida, decisions of
Florida Supreme Court and the Common Law and Equity
Rules of Practice of the Circuit and Supreme Courts of
Florida. (3 hours the first Semester and 1 hour the second
Semester. Professor Crandall.)
THE UNIVERSITY PRACTICE COURT.-(One hour a week
throughout the year. Dean Trusler, Professor Crandall and
Professor Summers.)
FLORIDA CONSTITUTIONAL LAW.-Declaration of rights;
legislative, executive and judicial departments of govern-
ment; suffrage and eligibility; census and apportionment;
counties and cities; taxation and finance; homestead and ex-
emptions; married women's property; education; public in-
stitutions; miscellaneous provisions. Text-books: The
Constitution, Statutes and Judicial Decisions of Florida. (1
hour. Dean Truster.)
DAMAGES.-General principles; nominal, compensatory,
exemplary and liquidated damages; interest; value; pleading
and practice; breach of contract for sale of goods; actions
against carriers; death by wrongful act; wrongs affecting
real property; damages in tort action; breach of marriage
promise. Text-book: Rogers' Law of Damages and Florida
cases. (1 hour. Dean Trusler.)
BROOM'S LEGAL MAXIMS.-A reading course running
throughout the year. (Dean Trusler.)
SECOND SEMESTER
UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL LAW.-General prin-
ciples; distribution of governmental powers; congress; the
chief executive; the judiciary; police powers; eminent do-
main; checks and balances; guarantee of republican gov-
ernment; civil rights; political privileges; guarantees in
criminal cases; impairment of contractual obligations; muni-






26 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

rules; relation of federal to state courts; jurisdiction of the
different federal courts; admiralty and bankruptcy practice;
removal from state to federal courts. Text-books: Sanborn's
Courts-Federal and State, and the Judicial Code of the
United States. (1 hour. Professor Summers.)
NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS.---Law merchant; definitions
and general doctrines; contract of the maker, acceptor, certi-
fier, drawer, indorser, vendor, accommodator, assurer; pro-
ceedings before and after dishonor of negotiable instruments;
absolute defenses; equities; payments; conflict of laws. Text-
book: Bigelowon Bills, Notes, and Cheques, and the Negotia-
ble Instrument Act of Florida. (2 hours. Professor Cran-
dall.)
LEGAL ETHICS.-A consideration of the profession of the
law in its relation to society, embracing the duties the
lawyer owes to the commonwealth, to the court, to his pro-
fessional brethren, and to his clients. Text-books: War-
velle's Legal Ethics and the Code of Ethics adopted by the
American Bar Association. (1 hour. Professor Summers.)
EXECUTORS AND ADMINISTRATORS.-When necessary;
appointment and qualification; acceptance or renunciation;
foreign and interstate administration; powers, duties and
liabilities of executors and administrators; inventory; assets
of estate; insolvent estates; distribution; accounting and al-
lowances. Text-book: Croswell's Executors and Adminis-
trators and the Statutes of Florida. (2 hours. Dean Trusler.)
PARTNERSHIP.-What constitutes a partnership; the
creation of a partnership; nature and characteristics of the
partnership relation; nature, extent and duration of partner-
ship liability; powers of partners; rights, duties and reme-
dies of partners inter se; rights and remedies of creditors;
termination of partnership; limited partnerships. Text-
books: Gilmore on Partnership and Gilmore's Cases on
Partnership. (2 hours. Professor Summers.)
PRIVATE CORPORATIONS.-Nature of a corporation; cre-
ation and citizenship of corporations; defectively organized
corporations; promoters of corporations; powers and liabil-
ities of corporations; corporations and the state; dissolution
af4 nnnrtVn nn a.r n r nn r'nrnr^^t-jrnf 1 nn oiFno1 a nrrfcxrnnn rntnQTIrf'








COLLEGE OF LAW


ROLL


J


Name
Barrs, N. .--..


OF


STUDENTS


1914-191
Seniors
Postoffice
Gainesville _


5


County or State
-Alachua


Bowers, R. D. --....
Boyer, C. A. .---...
Bryant, T. W., B.S.


- --- a ---
--- - --


-Gainesville -
-Jacksonville
.Lakeland ___


- - -- --- --- -
-------- ------
--- ---- ---


-Alachua
_Duval
.Polk


Carter, F. B., Jr. -..........-Pensacola -----...... --Escambia
Futch, L. E. ------..--.------ St. Petersburg..---.- .---Pinellas
Hale, F.............--------....--- -..- Brooksville ...------- Hernando
Hampton, F. J., A.B. (Washington and Lee University)
-.... Gainesville ..---..-----------..........Alachua
Jarrell. R. L.. A.B.------............ Kissimmee-----....- ........-... ---Osceola


Johns, E. M. ..........--...-- -Starke ..----.....-..------....
Johnson, Lee, B.S. (Nat'l Greek Acad. of Constantinople)


Leitner, S., A.B.
Lotspeich, A. A.
Maguire, R. F..
May, P. S., A.B.
Newman, L. B.-
Petteway, H. C.,


Petteway,


- a ---- . -
---- --- - --
- ----- ------
------- ----


. Gainesville .........---...--- -
SKissimmee. --.-.-- ---. ---
-Gainesville .......----...----....
-Ocoee .....-- ---..----- -------
_Jacksonville ..... ---------........


.---....-..... Jacksonville ----.. -.
A.B. (University of North Carolina)
-.a.- Brooksville- -------.


W. R., A.B. (University of North Carolina)
-- -- Tampa -.-..- -.---


Rabinovic, A. M. - .. .- - Tampa ....---------
Rush, H. L. -- ----......... Gainesville -- ----
Sawyer, H. S., A.B. (Guilford College, Guilford, N. (


Shuman, J. H
Solomon, J. B


Stewart, J. B.
Talley, R. E. -
Trammel, C. (
Upchurch, F. ]
White, R. R.,
Wiggins, E. E.
Williams, J. E.


- - - - - .
----- - - - a -
-- - - .. .. .-..-


G.
D.
A.
. -
~,1


- a . -.. -.
----- -- -- a-a-
B. -. -- 5 -. 5 - -
- -- ---- -- ---
A.B. _-_ -.5..


Wilson, B.


Merritt -----
Monticello---
Hilliard -_-
Hilliard ....
St. Petersburg
Lakeland - -
Jacksonville -
Starke ..-.-.
Hawthorne
Haskell-----
Bartow -.-.-


---- - -



- - - --
a - . .
- - -
.. a -
---- a


- -


.Bradford


Alachua
Osceola
Alachua
Orange
Duval
Duval


-- -Hernando

---- Hillsboro
-..-.. Hillsboro
.... Alachua
..)
,-- North Caroline
_.- Jefferson
----- Nassau
--- _Nassau
- --Pinellas
...--. Polk
.----. Duval
------ Bradford
_...Alachua
_- Polk
...---. Polk


Juniors


Barco. ]


E. T.. A.B.


- ----- -


-Tamna ...


.--....-_ ------Hillsboro


I.
.









UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


Name


Burger, D. E. -
Campbell, J. R


Furguson,


R.B.


Hamrick, R. E.


Hatton, J.


W._


Postoffice


-New Rochelle


A.B. (Palmer College, DeFuniak Springs)
-.-- .DeFuniak Springs----....- -


-Ocala---
.Aucilla -
_Tampa -


County or State
.. New York


Walton
Marion
Jefferson
Hillsboro


Holland


S. L.


Ph.B. (Emory College,
---....Bartow


Oxford, Ga.)
~. .. -- ..-- a


Polk


Knowles, G. B. ----- -----
Lamson, H. ....-------------
MacWilliams, R. E. -----


McGuire,


T. W.


_ Greenwood -
_Jacksonville -
_St. Augustine
_Chicago ... -


- -l---- --
- - - -


Jackson
Duval


Johns


Illinois


A.B. (Princeton University, Princeton, N.
------Tallahassee- -----..-----


J.)
--Leon


Olliphant, H. K.


Robles


Schofield, M. C.


Sikes, J.


- ----------- --


.Bartow --.
_Tampa -.-
_Inverness --


Punta


- - -- -- -- --
- --- -
----- -


Gorda


_Polk
_Hillsboro
-Citrus
_DeSoto


Swanson,


I


Thompson, H. L.
Thompson, H. VX


Upchurch,


Walden, L. I._ .
Whitehurst, G.


Whitehurst,
Wilkinson.


Williams, O. E. -


LB.
.B.S


I* -- ---


Gainesville
Gainesville -


- -- -- -
- --- --- ---


Milton


....r M
. ..--- --- -- -


. W.


_Jacksonville
_Dover------
_Wauchula --
_Wauchula --
_Jacksonville
_Haskell ..


--- -- -
- -- - -- -
- --- a


Alachua
Alachua


_Santa Rosa
_Duval
lHillsboro
DeSoto


_DeSoto
-Duval


_Polk


Yonge, J.


E.. A.B.


(Washington and Lee University)
--... Tallahassee -_ ------


-Leon


Specials


Andrews, G. A., A.B. (Dartmouth),


LL.B. (University of Nebraska)


......Bartow


--Polk


Cornelison, R.
Cowles, J. S. -
McGeachy, W.


Oates, W
Ott, R. V
Poppell,
Reed, C.
Shaw, WN


Williams, L. R.


.Lakeland -----
Jacksonville .-
_Dade City ---.
_Hendersonville


----- --- ---


-- L. - -- -
--- - -- - .- --


_Gainesville
.New River
_Bartow...
_Ybor City


--Wilmarth-


- - -
- - -
- ----- --


_Polk
.Duval
_Pasco


- Calhoun


. --- ------ -



---------llC- --- -


Alachua
Bradford
Polk
Hillsboro
Suwanee


Myers,


S. A. B.


F. _


I


"1__







COLLEGE OF LAW


Thomas W. Bryant, B.S.
Francis Bauregard Carter, Jr.
Everett Earle Futch
Fritzugh Lee Hale
Fred Jordan Hampton, A.B.
Robert Lee Jarrell, A. B.
Everett Markley Johns
Sumter Leitner, A.B.
Raymer Francis Maguire
Phillip Stockton May, A.B.
Leonard Bartlett Newman
Hubert Connor Petteway, A.
Walter Raleigh Petteway, A.
Hasket Lynch Rush


(Washington and Lee University)


B. (University of North Carolina)
,B. (University of North Carolina)


John Henry Shuman, Jr.
Benjamin Liddon Solomon
James Bailey Stewart, Jr.
Ralph Elred Talley
Clyde Germany Trammel
Frank Drew Upchurch
Richard Ray White, A.B.
Earle Edward Wiggins
Joseph Emory Williams, A.B.
Bradley Carlyle Wilson


PHI


KAPPA


PHI


Class of 191


Clarence A. Boyer
Thomas W. Bryant
Robert L. Jarrell
Everett M. Johns


Sumter Leitner
Phillip S. May
Raymer F. Maguire
Bradley C. Wilson


PRIZES
Class of 1915
Callaghan and Company (Cyclopedic Dictionary) -...-. Phil S. May
Blackstone Institute (Modern American Law, 15 vols.)LR. F. Maguire


OTHER


HONORS


WON


LAW


STUDENTS


1915


W. C. T. U. Essay Prize--_


- -- -


-...---...... S. A. B. Wilkinson


..









UNIVERSITY


REGISTER


OF FLORIDA


ALUMNI


Each of these men has received the degree of LL.B. It
is believed that no other law school within the same period
of time since its organization can show so large a proportion
of its graduates so well established and occupying so many
positions of public trust.
Class of 1910

Name Occupation Address
E. C. Calhoun-..... Attorney ....---- ----------.----Perry
L. P. Hardee ....--- -Attorney, Williams & Hardee....Gainesville
C. C. Small..__------ ...Attorney, Small & Small..---.... --Lake City
Class of 1911


Name


Occupation


Address


L. E. Wade, Jr.
S. L. Carter Jr. -.
Obie Crocker..-
A. M. Roland .
C. O. Rivers*
-A. S. Crews.. -
H. P. Osborne.-
R. B. Huffaker..
Floyd Green ..
J. L. Lester-. --
C. I. Stewart --


W. H. Surrency
C. C. Epperson_
R. G. Johnston..


-a


o -J --
--- ..


-.Attorney---......---------
- .Attorneey --.. -------- .
- County Judge; Attorney
-_Attorney ---- - -----


----- --


-Jacksonville
_Gainesville
_Vernon
-Bushnell


S- .._ Attorney ------ .--- .. ----... ..... Starke
.-- ... Attorney, with E. J. L'Engle-.. Jacksonville
-...... Prosecuting Attorney; Attorney _Bartow
...._---- -- --- ----------------- ----New River
-. ... -Attorney ..---......-------------- Key West
- .... Treas. Board of Trade; Secy. Dem-
ocratic Executive Committee; At-
torney --------.--------- --- --Fort Myers
-.......Attorney, with W. H. Toomer_- _Jacksonville
-..... _-Attorney .....----------- ---- --Williston
..---..-Attorney, Johnston & Garrett ...-Kissimmee


b
*


Class of 1912


Name
F. W. Cason_
D. M. Buie .--


- ------ - -
- - -- a- -


Occupation Address
.Attorney, Hudson, Woolf & CasonMiami
_Attorney -. ..---- .----.... .---. Gainesville


E. B. Donnell
H. A. Ferrell
W. P. Fields..


a - -*
--..
--.-


...----- Attorney,
---....Attorney -
..- ...Prosecutin
tourney -


Register & Donnell._- Jacksonville
.....----- -----------__Apalachicola
tg Attorney; Mayor; At-
- --_-._------ a -_--.Blountstown


I ; i ":








COLLEGE OF LAW


Name
M. L. Mershon
C. A. Moon ..
A. E. Philips _


Occupation


Address


_City Attorney,Leesburg; Attorney- Ocala


-Attorney, Candler


.District


Grape


Sales


& Moon


Manager,


Juice Company._


--.....Atlanta, Ga.
Welch
.-.....Baltimore, Md.


C. Price _._


Randall -
Walker ,


- a - -
--------
--m a a a -e -


Trantham,


Attorney, Price & Price -


-Attorney, Randall & Lawler
-Attorney ---- ---- ------
.Assistant Attorney for the
Commissioners; Attorney-.


Marianna


__Ft. Myers
-.Jacksonville


Tallahassee


Class of 1913


Name


Occupation


Address


A. C.
O.J.


B. A.


Attorney


Brooks
Clayton


_City


Gibson & Brooks_


Attorney


County


Attorney;


County Prosecutor; Attorney


State Representative


Cox ....


Attorney


Quincy
Vernon


E. DeVane


Diamond


Attorney -. --- ..---- -----.........
Attorney, Davis & Diamond.--


_Attorney


Johnston & Garrett


. Tampa


Perry


Kissimmee


B. Gibson, Jr.


L. Godwin .._


--........Attorney, Gibson & Riherd, Mul-
berry; Gibson & Brooks, Tarpon
Springs -------....--..----..--....... ..Tampa
-. ---- Attorney -- ----.--------- -- -.. Lyons, Ga.


E. F


Hocker ..--
Housholder


City


Attorney


Attorney,


HousholderSanford


Kennedy


Attorney .....-- --- .-----..... .Tavares


B. G. Langston


Lawler.


------ -
----- ---


_Attorney, with R. E. Davis ..-..
.Attorney, Randall & Lawler.--


.Gainesville
_Ft. Myers


E. M. Magaha


Bascom Mathis
I. M. McCaskill


-County
Chairman


Committee;


City


Attorney,


Magaha ----- -- -a.-. ----- --Milton
.County Demonstrator,Bay County-Panama City


-President
cial Club


Director;of Chamber of


Commerce and Everglades Drain-
age and Development League; At-


torney, McCaskill & McCaskill_


O. S. Miller..
C. M. Phipps


-Attorney .--. ..............----West Palm B'ch


.Attorney,


Frank Riherd


Phippsa a . a---a.
.Attorney, Gibson & Riherd


_Tampa


-.Mulberry


II- -A -


S9-u-- -_r *s ** f .61


C.P


Tarpon Springs


P. Garrett


Wilson


Attorney..... .----- Ocala


Attorney;


Democratic


Attorney;
Executive
Clark &


Young Men's


Commer-


McKay,


- Miami


Withers


.


1




N" ",, T .:r .' A1I'""AA ao : . .

' : .f;- B~ .ji 'Z i'


UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


Name
A. P. Buie__---
Maxwell Baxter
R. A. Henderso
W. L. Hill ..
A. W. Knight
T. W. Moore..
L. N. Lischkoff
P. D. Mobley_
P. D. McGarry
P. R. Perry---
F. E. Owens_--
T. P. Pruitt .-_
J. H. Peterson


n, J-r.
U, Jr.


- ------ -


* - --- -


-- a -
-. a ----
--- *


J. C. Poppell -- -----.
T. C. Ray -----------..
R. W. Shackleford--...


T. H. Smith-
J. B. Sutton-
R. R. Taylor,


C. M.
A.D.


Wigge
Wilder


C. L. Welch_


-PI-----* W1-- <- I-- -- -- l--

Jr-------a
Jr. ......

- .-.. -
------- --


Occupation
Attorney -----
Attorney .----
Attorney, with M.
Referee in Baqkru


- -- -- - -


- a1- -------
H. Long_
ptcy; Attorr


Attorney, Knight & Adair_.


-Attorney ..
-Attorney-- .
Attorney-
_Attorney, Rice
Attorney----


_ Attorney -
SAttorney -.


. Land
States


- ---


Law Clerk
Attorney -


_ Attorney ..-- --
. Attorney .-..---
. Attorney, Shackl<
ford ---------.... -
.Attorney, Wilson
.Attorney ......
-Attorney.. ---.. --
._Mayor; Attorney
- Attorney-------
- Attorney ----


- .- -
. ... -


Address
__. Gainesville
-.- .Tampa
-Jacksonville
iey. Gainesville
_Jacksonville
- Jacksonville


- -


& McGarry--..


a- - -- -- ---- -


for the Unite


ford & S
- -mi- th
& Smith
- - .-- : a
- - a a -


. - -- -
* - fr- -1 ak -^ -: :-


_Pensacola
- Punta Gorda
-Jacksonville
_St. Augustine
.Lakeland
aHickory, N. C.
d


- - _Lakeland
--_ Starke
- ---- -Blountstown
hackle-
.......Tampa
-..--. -Marianna
-----Tampa
.--.-.. Miami
.-. -,-Bartow
.-.--. -Plant City
..--.. Tampa


I


:' i




































UNIVERSITY COMMONS














































































































































IY 1




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