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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00543
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: September 1976
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00543
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Foreword
        Foreword
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Main
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    Index
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    Back Cover
        Page 357
        Page 358
Full Text



































































































































































































































m


m







of


the


The


Undergraduate


Ca ta log


been adopted a


a rule of


University pursuant to the


provisions
the Florida


Chapter


Statute.


University


ies, if any,
request to
Registrar.


are
the


Addenda


Record


available


Office


VOLUME LXXI


* SERIES 1


* NUMBER 3


* SEPTEMBER,


P PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA,
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA ZIP CODE 32611 OFFICE OF


f Ser-
upon


THE


UNIVERSITY


RECORD


UNIVERSITY


OF


ORIDA


FL

























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* *








TABLE


OF


CONTENTS


University Calendar. ..................................................................... V


Florida's


First University...........................................................IX


Board of Education ...................................... .............................X
Administrative Council of the University ......... ... .......................XI
General Information ....................................................................1-
Admissions ................................................................................. 10
Expenses ..................................................................................... 16
Student Affairs ............................................................................ 18
Housing ...................................................................................... 18


Student Life


- Servi


Stutdenrt Academrii c Regu Iations................................................... 25
Time shortened degreee Opportunities........................................... .30


Colleges,


Schools


and Curricula


....................31


College of Agriculture ............ ...........................................45
College of Architecture.............. .........................................55


liege of Arts and


fences


College of Business Administration ....................................75


College of Dentistry.................
College of Education ..............
College of Engineering.............


S.*... .***** *9 **. 99 .. ... ** i** .4* f# 9.*


College of Fine Arts ................... ...................................... 113
School of Forest Resources and Conservation....................121
College of Health Related Professions .................................125
College of Journalism and Communications......................133
Center of Latin-Arnerican Studies......................................140


College of Law..........................
College of Medicine .................
College of Nursing......................
College of Pharmacy .................
College of Physical Education,


* 99.9 *** 9E.* 9 .*t*** ^. *** **s.4* mm***.t
* W* 99****9 #99999999999* 99999 99***** 99* 9


..................... 143
....................147


Health and


Recreation........................................................................


College of Veterinary Medici
Military Department............


n e .........................................


Instructional Departments and Description of Courses..............
Staff and Faculty.......................................................................
Ind ex ............................. .. ........................................................


ces, Facilities, Activities ................................. 20


University College ..........................................


...............................................63








CALENDAR


for


1976


CALENDAR for


1977








(CRITICAL DATES)

FALL TERM 1976
Registration ........................................ September 13-16
Classes Begin ...............................................September 20
Classes End ...................................................... December 3
Final Examinations ....................................... December 6-11
Grades Due (Graduating Seniors) ..................December 9
Commencement.......... ................................... December 11
Grades Due (All) .................................. .... December 13

WINTER TERM 1977
Registration................. ................ ..............January 4
Classes Begin.................................................. January 5


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CALENDAR,


1976-77


Classes


End ........................................................... M arch


Final Exam nations .. .................................. M arch


Grades Due (Graduating


14-19


Seniors) ................... ...... M arch


Commencement ...........................
Grades Due (All)....................

SPRING TERM
Registration...................................
Classes Begin...............................
C lasses End..................................


.......................... M arch
.............. .......M arch


September


......................M arch
........................M arch
........................... June


Final Exam inations.......... ............................... June 6-'
Grades Due (Graduating Seniors).............................June
Commencement ................................................... .June


Grades


SUMMER TERM 1977
Registration ............................................................June
C lasses Begin.....................................................June
Classes End ......................................................August
Final Examinations.........................................August 22
Grades Due (Graduating Seniors).....................August
Commencement................................................A.. ugust
Grades Due (Al A......................................... ..... Amuest


9 '


24, Friday,


Last day for completing late registration for Fall
one permitted to start registration on Friday
24, after 3:00 p.m.


Last day for Drop/Add and for
liable for fees for all hours


changing


sections.


Quarter. No
, September


Students


for which registered.


Last day student may withdraw from the University
receive any refund of fees unless withdrawal is


medical or military
Last day for filing S-U


September 27,


Monday,


reasons.
option


in Registrar's


Office,


2:30 p.m.


Last day for paying fees without being subject to


2-27
:25


October


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CALENDAR, 1976-77


$25. Students must have correctly


fees in


full by


this date.


assessed


Last day for filing address change in Registrar's
living in residence halls, in order to receive
at new address.


Friday,


late fee


fees and paid

Office, if not
fee statement


4:00 p.m.


Last day for filing degree application
Office for a degree to be conferred at


Quarter.
Last day to a
certificate


t


with the Registrar for an


to be awarded


Last day for removing


FALL QUARTER


preceding


term.


grades


Last day for filing application at the
to change college or division for


November


11, Thursday-Veterans Day-Classes


at the Registrar's
he end of the Fall


Associate of Arts


at the end of the quarter.


of I or X received


in the


:e of the Registrar
next quarter.


suspended.


March


, Monday,


4:00 p.m.


November


Last day for beginning Freshmen students to file application


for admission
this deadline


July 2, Friday,


for the Fall
may apply


Quarter.


Students unable to meet


on a space available


basis.


4:00 p.m.


19, Friday,


4:00 p.m.


Last day for withdrawing
receiving failing grades in


November 19-
pended


from the University
all courses.


0, Friday-Saturday-Homecoming-All
Friday.


without


classes


sus-


Last day for filing application


to change
July 30, Friday, 4


Last day
previous'


college
\:00 p.m.


or division


at the Office
for the Fall


of the Registrar
Quarter.


for those not previously in attendance or those
y in attendance at the University of Florida (except


beginning Freshmen) to file application for admission for
the Fall Quarter. Students unable to meet this deadline may
apply on a space available basis.


September


Friday,


4:00 p.m.


Last day for clearing
applications were filed by


admissions for those whose
above deadline. All credentials


must have been received and college
Those who apply or clear after this date
registration appointments.


changes approved.
will be assigned late


November


24, Wednesday,


No examination,


given after
period.


November 25-27,


pended


November

December

December


10:00 p.m.


this date and


quizzes


prior


progress
the final


tests may be
examination


Thursday-Saturday-Thanksgiving-Classes


10:00


p.m.


29, Monday,

3, Friday-All

6, Monday


November 24.


8:00 am.--Classes


resume.


classes end.


Final examinations begin.
Saturday, December 4.


Assembly


examinations


sus-


Due (All) .................................................. June






CALENDAR


March


18, Friday,


3:00 p.m.


Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
the Registrar.


March

March


19, Saturday-Commencement


21, Monday,


Convocation.


9:00 a.m


1976


All grades
Registrar.


for Winter


Quarter


due in the Office


of the


November


12, Friday,


Last day
previous


4:00 p.m.


for those not previously
Iv in attendance at the Ur


in at'
niversit


application for admission for the Winter
unable to meet this deadline may apply oi
basis.


tendance or those
y of Florida to file
Quarter. Students
n a space available


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

CALENDAR, 1976-77
SPRING QUARTER


December


10, Friday,


4:00 p.m.


Last day for clearing
applications were filed by


admissions for
above deadline,


must have been received and college
Those who apply or clear after this date
registration appointments.


ise whose
credentials


changes approved.
will be assigned late


1977


Febru


ary 18, Friday,


Last day for those


previously


p.m.


not previously


in attendance at the Un


application for admission for the S
unable to meet this deadline may ap


1977


in attendance or those
versity of Florida to file
pring Quarter, Students
'ply on a space available


January


4, Tuesday


Registration
permitted tc
3:00 p.m.


March 11,


according
: start regist


to appointments a
ration on Tuesday,


signed.
January


No one
4, after


Friday,


4:00 p.m.


Last day for clearing


admissions


applications were filed by the above


credentials must have been received and
approved. Those who apply or clear after


Wednesday


Classes begin.


January


students


regisi


11, Tuesday,


Drop/Add
tering late


begins. Late registration begins.
subject to $25 late fee.


assigned


March


4:00 p.m.


Last day for completing late registration for Winter Quarter.
No one permitted to start registration on Tuesday, January


11, after 3:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for
liable for fees for all hours


changing sections. Students
for which registered.


Last day student may withdraw from the University and
receive any refund of fees unless withdrawal is for


medical
Last day


January


I or military reasons.
for filing S-U option


in Registrar's


25, Friday
Registratio
permitted
3:00 p.m.


March 28,


late registration


appointments.


n according to appointments
to start registration on Friday,


those whose
deadline. All


college changes
this date will be


assigned
March


Monday


Classes begin. Drop/Add
students registering late


1, Friday,


begins. Late registration
subject to $25 late fee.


begins.


4:00 p.m.


Last day for completing


Office.


12, Wednesday, 2:30 p.m.


Last day for paying fees without being subject to late fee of


$25. Students must have correctly


fees in full by


this date,


Last day for filing address change
not living in residence halls,
statement at new address.


assessed fees and


in the Registra
in order to


late registration for Spring Quarter.


No one permitted to start registration i
after 3:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing
liable for fees for all hours for which


on Friday, April 1,

sections, Students
registered.


Last day student may withdraw from the University
receive any refund of fees unless withdrawal is


r's Office, if
receive fee


medical
Last day fc


or military reasons.
)r filing S-U option


card in Registrar's


Office,


January


21, Friday, 4:00 p.m. April


Last day for filing


to change


application


college


at the Office of the


Registrar


or division for the next quarter.


Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's
Office for a degree to be conferred at the end of the


Winter
Last day


Quarter.


to apply with the Registrar for an


certificate to be awarded at


Associate


the end of the


., Monday, 2:30 p.m.
Last day for paying fees without being subject to late fee of
$25. Student must have correctly assessed fees and paid


fees in


full by this


Last day for filing address change
not living in residence halls,


statement


of Arts


quarter.


April 15, Friday,


new address.


in the Registrar's Office
in order to receive f


4:00 p.m.


January


28, Friday,


4:00 p.m.


Last day for removing


preceding


February


term.


25, Friday,


Last day
receiving


grades


or X received


in the


4:00 p.m.


for withdraw


failing


grades


from the University
ill courses.


Last day for filing application at the Office of the
to change college or division for the next qu;
Last day for filing degree application at the F


Office


for a degr
Quarter,


Registrar
carter.
Registrar's


ee to be conferred at the end of the


Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate


without


certificate to be awarded at the end


of the


of Arts


quarter.


March


April 22, Friday, 4:00 p.m.


4, Friday, 10:00 p.m.


No examinations.


class quizzes


or progress


Last day


ests may be


for removing grades of I or X received


in preceding


4---


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

CALENDAR, 1976-77
WINTER QUARTER


January


I


r


i


r


*






CALENDAR


May 30, Monday-Memorial


June 3,
June 6,


Day-Classes


suspended.


Friday-All classes end.


Monday


Last day student


receive
medical
Last day f(


withdraw from


any refund of fees unless
or military reasons.
or filing S-U option card in


the University an
withdrawal is fc

Registrar's Office.


Final examinations begi
begin Saturday. june 4.


Selected


assembly


examinations


, Monday,


June 9, Thursday,

June 10, Friday, 3


10:00 a.m -Degree


candidates'


grades


p.m,


Final report of colleges on degree
Office of the Registrar.


candidates


due in the


Last day for paying fees without being subject to late fee of


$25. Student
fees in full I


must have correctly
w this date.


assessed


fees and paid


Last day for filing address change in Registrar's Office, if not
living in residence halls, in order to receive fee statement
at new address.


June 11, Saturday-Commencement


June 13, Monday,
All grades
Registrar.


Convocation.


July 4,

July 8,


a.m.


for Spring


Quarter


due in the Office


of the


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Monday-Independence


Friday,


Day-Classes


suspended.


4:00 p.m.


Last day for filing application at
to change college or division
Last day for filing degree apple


Office fV
Summer
Last day to


certificate


July 15, Friday,


CALENDAR, 1976-77

SUMMER QUARTER


the Office of


for the
location


a degree to be conferred


Quarter.
apply with


the Registrar


next quarter.
at the Registrar's
at the end of the


the Registrar for an Associate


to be awarded at the end of


of Arts


the quarter.


4:00 p.m.


Last day for removing
term.


grades of I


or X received


in preceding


July 22, Friday-Last


of Special


Five-Week


Summer


Term.


1977


August


1, Monday,


9:00 am


May 6, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for those not previously in attendance or those
previously in attendance at the University of Florida to file
application for admission for the Summer Quarter. Students
unable to meet this deadline may apply on a space available
basis.


All grades for Special
Office of the Registr


August


5, Friday,


Five-Week
ar.


Summer


Term due in the


4:00 p.m.


Last day for withdraw
receiving failing grades


from the
all courses.


University


without


, Friday,


4:00 p.m.


August


12, Friday,


Last day for clearing
applications were filed


credentials


admissions


by the


must have been received


approved. Those who apply or clear


assigned


late registration


tbo
ar
afti


appointments.


for those whose
>ve deadline. All
nd college changes


this date will be


No examinations,
given after this c
period.


August

August


June 17, Friday


19, Friday-All

22, Monday


L


class quizzes
ate and prior


or progress
to the final


tests may be
examination


classes


Registration


according


permitted to start registi
p.m.


to appointments
ration on Friday,


Final examinations


assigned. No
June 17, after


June 20, Monday


Classes begin. Drop/Add
students registering late


begins. Late registration begins.
subject to 525 late fee.


August

August


begin Saturday,


25, Thursday,


26, Friday,


begin.


August


10:00


Selected


a.m.-Degree


assembly


candidates'


examinations


grades


p.m.


Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
the Registrar.


lune 24, Friday, 4
Last day
Quarter.
June 24,


Last day
liable


4:00 p.m.


for completing late registration for Summer
No one permitted to start registration on Friday,
after 3:00 p.m.


for Drop/Add
for fees for al


and for changing sections.
I hours for which register'


Students
ed.


August

August


, Saturday-Commencement


29, Monday,


All grades for
Registrar.


Convocations.


9:00 a.m.


Summer Quarter


due in the Office


of the


10:00


p.m.


er


a


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LEADERSHIP THROUGH EXCELLENCE


University of Florida


esil


Gainesville


Excellenc
service, e:
pacesetting


e, applied
establishes


through


teaching,


research


the University of Florida


university to tomorrow


It is
wide


None


among
a scope


three universities
of professional f


in the


departments


region


in this
fields o
more


country offering as
n a single campus.


nationally


and only two or three Southern uni


are in a comparable position.


ranked
versities


Nationally it ranks in the top 50 among colleges and
universities receiving the largest amount of federal funds,
attesting the high quality of its faculty and research
programs.


This diversification and extent of


enables students to fulfill their


objectives.


campus programs


intellectual and professional


With this variety the University retains ability to


appreciate indiv


idual students and provides, through small


classes and advisement, the means to


talents and


interests.


express


their special


Undergraduates


association


fields


, plus


undergraduate


have the broadening


experience


within a university where the main professional


arts and


sciences,


are represented


and graduate studies with research


opportunity immediately


available.


A strength of the


S:L.---..- A-.- L-A-.-- _. --- --.. -_--_ r-___L --_ -- nL r


With the breadth of educational and research programs,


opportunity for interdisciplinary


effort and learning


dents and faculty investigators working together using each
i .1 a a a a .a .


e.g.


Jn


I-: p-- L




BOARD OF EDUCATION
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


REUBIN ASKEW
Governor
State of Florida


BOARD OF REGENTS


MARSHALL M. CRUISER, J.D.
Chairman
Palm Beach. Florida


JAMES WILLIAMS
Lieutenant Governor
State of Florida


BRUCE


AMES J. GARDENER, M.
Vice Chairman
Ft. Lauderdale. Florida


J. J. DANIEL, LL.B.
acksonville. Florida


SMATHERS


Secretary of State
State of Florida


CHESTER H.


FERGUSON


Tampa, Florida


ROBERT SHEVIN
Attorney General
State of Florida


ACK MCGRIFF, M.A.
Gainesville, Florida


ULIUS


PHILIP ASHLER Tallah


F. PARKER


assee,


LL.B.


Florida


State Treasurer
State of Florida


E. W. HOPKINS, B.S.E
Pensacola, Florida


MARSHALL


RALPH TURLINGTON
Commissioner of Education
State of Florida


Miami


HARRIS, LL.B.
Florida


BETTY A. STATEN
Orlando. Florida


GERALD LEWIS
Comptroller
State of Florida


STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM


DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture
State of Florida


E. T. YORK, JR.,


Ph.D.


Chancellor
State University System


LL.B.




ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL


ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY

ROBERT Q. MARSTON, M.D.
President


BLANCHE


UREY. Ed.D.


Dean of the College of Nursing
CALVIN ANTHONY VANDERWERF, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences


HAROLD PALMER HANSON, Ph.D
Executive Vice President


ROBERT ARMISTEAD BRYAN,


Ph.D.


Vice President for Academic Affairs
WILLIAM EARL ELMORE, B.S. C.P.A.
Vice President for Administrative Affairs
C. ARTHUR SANDEEN, Ph.D.
Vice President of Student Affairs
CHANDLER A. STETSON, M.D.
Vice President for Health Affairs and
Dean of the College of Medicine
KENNETH RAY TEFERTILLER, Ph.D.
Vice President for Agricultural Affairs


GEORGE STEVEN WILKERSON, B.A.
Vice President for Alumni & Development
KENNETH FRANKLIN FINGER, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs and Dean
of the College of Pharmacy
GENE WILLARD HEMP, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
DON L. ALLEN, M.S., D.D.S.
Dean of the College of Dentistry
CLIFFORD ALLEN BOYD, Ed.D.
Dean of the College of Physical Education,
Health and Recreation
CHARLES BENTON BROWNING, Ph.D.
Dean for Resident Instruction,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
JOE NEIL BUSBY, Ph.D.
Dean for Extension,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
WAYNE H. CHEN, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Engineering
CHARLES EDWARD CORNELIUS, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine
HARRY ALLEN GRATER, Ph.D.
Acting Dean of University College
JOHN LEWIS GRAY, D.F.
Director of the School of Forest Resources and
Conservation
MARK T. JAROSZEWIEZ, M. ARCH.
Dean of the College of Architecture
JOSEPH RICHARD JULIN, LL.B.
Dean of the College of Law
ROBERT FRANKLIN LANZILLOTTI, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Business Administration
RALPH L. LOWENSTEIN, Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Journalism and Communications


JOSEPH SABATELLA, M.F.A.
Dean of the College of Fine Arts
BERT LAVON SHARP, Ed.D.
Dean of the College of Education


MARILYN


Sc.D. (Alt)


.D. (Alt.)


AUSTIN B. CREEL, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Religion


JAMES CONKLIN,


Associate Professor of Physics


S. FREELY. Ph.D.


Assistant Professor of Behavioral Studies

MICHAEL E. WARREN, Ph.D. (Alt.)
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering


REPRESENTATIVES OF THE STUDENT BODY
DANIEL LOBECK
President of the Student Body

SUSAN CLINE
President of Student Senate

LAFAYETTE MAXWELL
Vice President of the Student Body

PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEES


THOMAS SANFORD BIGGCCS


University Attorney


, JR., LL.B.


FRED HILTON CANTRELL, B.S.B.A.
Director, University Relations
THOMAS WINSTON COLE, Ed.D.
Dean, Academic Affairs
HUGH W. CUNNINGHAM, JR., M.A.
Director, University Information &
Press Secretary to President


JOSHUA CLIFTON DICKINSON,


Director of the Florida State Museum
DALLAS FOX, M.S.A.
Associate Director, Division of
Planning and Analysis


RICHARD J.


Coordinator, ROTC


THOMAS G.


JR., Ph.D.


LIKES, M.B


GOODALE. Ph.D.


Dean of Student


Services


SAMUEL RAY GRAVES
Director, Intercollegiate Athletics


GUSTAVE ADOLPHUS


Director of University Libraries


LOUIS V. VOYLES, B.A.
University Registrar


HARRER, Ph.D.


ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES OF THE FACULTY

P. JOSEPH WITTMER, Ph.D.
Professor of Education


MICHAEL W. GORDON, J
Professor of Law




































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General

Information


GOVERNMENT OF THE


The University of Florida is a combined state University
and land-grant college located in the northern center of the
State. While its beginnings go back to the days previous to
Florida's admission to the Union in 1845, its first college--
the College of Arts and Sciences did not open until 1853.
A few years later the passage of the Morrill Act provided
lands for state institutions of higher learning which would
promote agriculture, mechanical arts and military science,
resulting in the beginnings of the College of Agriculture, the
College of Engineering, and the Agricultural Experiment
Station.
By 1905 there were a half-dozen state-supported institu-
tions of higher learning in Florida, located in various parts
of the State and struggling for existence. At that time the
Florida Legislature took a step unprecedented in the history
of education in any state by passing the Buckman Act, which
abolished the six State Colleges and provided for the
establishment of two new institutions, of which the
University of Florida was one. It was established for men, at
Gainesville and placed under the direction of the Board of
Control, a body created by the Buckman Act. The seven
members of the board represented the seven geographical
sections of the state, and served without compensation,
except for travel and incidental expense incurred in the
performance of duty. In 1947 the University was made
coeducational. The nine-member Board of Regents re-
placed the Board of Control in 1965.


SETTING AND ENVIRONMENT


The University of Florida is located in Gainesville, a city
of approximately 80,000, excluding University of Florida
students. Situated in north central Florida, midway between
the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, the city is known as
an agricultural and small industrial'center.
In addition to a moderate climate, Gainesville offers many
other advantages to students of the U university. A golf course
is within easy reach of the campus, and swimming and
boating accommodations are available at nearby springs
and rivers. The lakes in the vicinity abound in fresh water
fish, while the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico are
within a two hours' drive. As the seat of Alachua County, the
city is the focal point of diversified industrial and farming
activities.
Practically every religious denomination is represented in
the Gainesville area. Churches that are active include the
Presbyterian, Baptist, Lutheran, Methodist, Catholic,
Episcopal, Christian, Seventh Day Adventist, Church of
Christ Scientist, Church of Christ, Christian and Missionary
Alliance, Advent Christian, B'nai Israel, Church of Latter Day
Saints, Church of the Nazarene, Assembly of God, Apostolic
Church of Christ, Church of God, Disciples of Christ,
Pentecostal Holiness, United Church of Christ, Unitarian-
Universalists, and several of these denominations maintain


chapels
Augustil
Student
Center)
Center)
(Jewish)
Saints (
and the
on exte
a


adjacent to the campus. These include St.
ne Chapel (Catholic Student Center), the Baptist
Union, Wesley Foundation (Methodist Student
Chapel of the Incarnation (Episcopal Student
Church of Christ, B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
i, the Lutheran Student Association, the Latter Day
Mormon), Disciples Presbyterian Student Center
Society of Friends (Quaker). All the chapels carry
ensive programs of vital interest to University


UNIVERSITY


Direct supervision over the University of Florida, its
policies and affairs, is vested in the Board of Regents, a body
composed of nine citizens from different regions of the
state who are appointed by the Governor for nine-year
terms. University affairs are administered by the president
with the advice and assistance of the Administrative
Council. The legislative body of the University is the
University Senate.


ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS


THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS


the chief business officer ol
responsible for establishing po
business matters; coordinating
control of the operating budget;
funds in accordance with state si
security, auxiliary services and
physical plant and grounds; c
administrative computer, staff
control, and environmental hea


the University. He is
licy relating to university
the preparation of and
collecting and disbursing
statutes; managing campus
the maintenance of the
directing purchasing, the
personnel and property
Ith and safety.


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS


THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS is the
chief academic officer for the University. In this capacity he
supervises the allocation of resources in the academic
areas, the improvement of instruction, the correlation of
instructional activities, the development and improvement
of research activities, the evaluation of university academic
activity, and the establishment of policy with respect to
employment, promotion, and tenure of the academic staff.
In the absence of the President and Executive Vice President
he acts with the authority and responsibility of the
President.


QUARTER SYSTEM
The University of Florida operates on a quarter system. In
a twelve-month year there are four quarters running from
September through August, averaging ten weeks of class
instruction. Courses are scheduled in such a way that a
student may enter the University at any quarter and proceed
normally through an appropriate sequence of courses.
Quarters begin in September, January, March and June.


COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, a unit of the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, offers curricula in all of
the major fields of agriculture and grants the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. See Page 45.
THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE offers curricula in
architecture, interior design, landscape architecture and
building construction. It confers the degrees of Bachelor of
Design, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, and Bachelor
of Building Construction. See Page 55.
THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES offers curricula
1-*^: A- -J- ^^- ^ n -1 1 _t ft ._ ... A -I .i. I ..


HISTORICAL NOTE




General

GENERAL INFORMATION


THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY, an integral part of the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center, accepted its first students in
September, 1972. The College offers an innovative modular
curriculum leading to the degree of Doctor of Dental
Medicine. See Page 81
THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION has curricula in elemen-
tary and secondary school instruction leading to the
degrees of Bachelor of Science in Education or Bachelor of
Arts in Education. It also provides an inservice program for
the teachers of the state. The P.K. Yonge Laboratory School,


a unit of the College of Education, enrolls


kindergarten


through


the secondary


graduate teacher preparation programs


pupils from the


school.


Under-


are NCATE ap-


the degree of Master of Health Science in Occupational


Therapy and Master of Health


Counseling.


See Page 125


Science


in Rehabilitation


THE COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICA-
TIONS offers curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of


Science in J
and Bache
sequences


journalism, Bachelor of Science in Advertising,
?lor of Science in Broadcasting. It offers
in public relations, technical communication


and criminal justice public relations.


There are


areas


of specialization in reporting, news


editing, photojournalism, urban affairs journalism, journal-
ism education, broadcast news and public affairs, film


production,


and broadcast production.


See Page 133.


proved and lead to certification at pre-school, elementary,


and secondary levels


states


where NCATE


reciprocal agreements


in Florida and twenty-seven other


standards provide
See Page 83.


THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING offers c


to the degree


of Bachelor


of Science


the basis for

urricula leading
in Chemical


Engineering, in Civil Engineering, in Electrical Engineering,
in Industrial Engineering, and in Mechanical Engineering.
The Bachelor of Science in Engineering is awarded with
majors in Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural Engineering,
Ceramic Engineering, Engineering Sciences, Metallurgical
Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, and Systems Engineer-
ing. The Bachelor of Science degree is awarded with majors
in Computer and Information Sciences, Environmental
Engineering Sciences, Nuclear Engineering Sciences, and
Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies. The department of
Engineering Technology offers the Bachelor of Engineering
Technology degree. See Page 95.
THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS offers curricula in the


studio
educatil
confers


arts, history of a
on, music, music


the


degrees


irt, crafts, I
education,


Bachelor of Design,


graphic design,
and theatre,


Bachelor of Arts


In Art, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor


of Music Education and Master of Fine Arts.


See Page 113.


THE SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSER-
VATION is a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences. The school offers majors in the professional
disciplines of Forestry, Range Resources, Wildlife Ecology
and Forest Products. The School grants the degree Bachelor


of Science


in Forest Resources


and Conservation.


See Page


THE GRADUATE SCHOOL offers programs leading to the
degrees of Doctor of Philosophy in 56 fields; Doctor of
Education, Specialist in Education, Engineer, Master of


Agricultur
Resource


Master


of Agricultural


Management


Development, Master of Arts, Master of Arts in


Architecture, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts in


Health


Education


Master of


Arts in Journalism


Communications, Master of Arts in Physical Education,
Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Arts in Urban and
Regional Planning, Master of Building Construction, Master
of Building Administration, Master of Education, Master of


Engineering
Resources


g,


Master


of Fine Arts,


Master


of Forest


and Conservation, Master of Health Education,


Master of Laws in


Taxation


, Master of Vealth Science,


THE COLLEGE OF LAW offers a curriculum leading to the
degree of Juris Doctor and a graduate program in taxation
leading to the degree Master of Laws. See Page 141.


THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE


a unit of the


Hillis Miller


Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the pro-
fessional degree of Doctor of Medicine. Ph.D. degrees in


basic medical


School.


sciences


are offered through the Graduate


A special medical scientist training program lead-


ing to the combined degree of Doctor of Medicine-Doctor
of Philosophy is available jointly through the College of
Medicine and the Graduate School. See Page 142.


THE COLLEGE OF NURSING,


Health Center, offers


of Science


a unit of the


Hillis Miller


a curriculum leading to the Bachelor


in Nursing degree.


The College also offers a


curriculum leading to the Master of Nursing degree or a
Master of Science in Nursing degree. See Page 143.


THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY,


a unit of the j.Hillis


Miller Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. M.S. and Ph.D


degrees are offered in pharmaceutical
Graduate School. See Page 147.


sciences


THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION


AND RECREATION offers


the departments


services


of General


Phy


through the

I, HEALTH,


and programs through
rsical Education, Pro-


fessional Physical Education, Health Education and Safety,


and Recreation.


The department of General


Physical


Education provides programs for university students other


than majors.


The departments of Professional Physical


Education, Health Education and Safety, and Recreation
offer professional preparation programs leading to
undergraduate degrees in physical education, health
education, and recreation. Professional areas of prepara-
tion include: teachers of physical education or health


education
agencies,


health


educators


for public


and recreation directors.


or voluntary


See Page 151.


THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE is the academic home for
Freshmen and Sophomores while they prepare tor ad-
mission to one of the other colleges. It provides courses in


general
Certifical


education


and awards


the Associate


of Arts


See Page 31.


THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE


,a teaching


unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center, offers a curriculum
leading to the professional degree of Doctor of Veterinary
Medicine. See page 159.


Master of Nursing, Master of Physical Education, Master of


Science, P
Master of
Pharmacy,


Faster of
Science
Master o


Science in
in Nursing,
f Science


Building Construction,


Master of
in Statistics,


Science in
Master of


DIVISION OF


CONTINUING EDUCATION


Science


in Teaching, and Master of Statistics. All instruct-


ion is carried on by the faculties of the colleges and schools
* _..


During the last year more than 49,893 people took


I =


e,






GENERAL INFORMATION


last year. Backed by the resources of the University,
Division of Continuing Education sees the State as
campus and the people as its student body.


SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL
UNITS SERVING ALL
COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
THE INTERCOLLEGE DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER AND
INFORMATION SCIENCES. During the last two decades
electronic information processing machines with capability
many orders of magnitude beyond their predecessors have
come into being. Though still in their infancy they are
already extending man's capability to solve problems in
every field of human activity. Against this background, the
organization of a curriculum dedicated to a broad sector of
human endeavor was necessary. Toward this end the
Intercollege Department of Computer and Information
Sciences was created in 1971. The department currently
offers degree programs in the College of Arts and Sciences,
Business Administration and Engineering. Degree programs
within other colleges are under study.
Subject areas found within the CIS curricula are
concerned with representations and transformations of
information structures and with theoretical models for such
representations and transformations. In addition the
computer or information scientist is concerned with
systems having the ability to transform information and with
the methodologies derived from broad areas of applications
having common structures, processes and techniques. This
prepares the student for a wide range of careers in the
business, industrial, scientific, civic and academic worlds
wherein information flow and analysis is of critical
importance to decision making.
In addition to the degree programs, several service
courses are available for those who need experience in
computer applications for proper career preparation. For
further information, contact the CIS department office in
512 Well Hall.
THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES is the
University unit responsible for directing or coordinating
interdisciplinary instructional and research programs re-
lated to the Latin American area. It is a budgeted unit within
the L university and is administered by a Director immediate-
ly responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
The Center sponsors conferences, publishes the results
of scholarly research related to Latin America, and
cooperates with other University units in overseas develop-
ment and training programs. It administers a program with
Universidad de los Andes, Bogota, Colombia for the State
University System and offers programs in Latin American
Studies leading to a B.A. degree, and B.S., M.A. and Ph.D.
Certificates in Latin American Studies; an interdisciplinary
Master of Arts in Latin American Studies; and, a M.A. and
Ph.D. Certificate in Latin American Demographic Studies.
THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC has the responsibility for
such musical organizations as the University Bands,
Orchestras, Choruses, and Glee Clubs, and offers courses
in the following areas: (1) Theory of Music, (2) History and
Literature, (3) Applied Music, (4) Music Education, and (5)
Ensemble Music.
THE DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE offers the four
year program and the two year program of Army ROTC.
Completion of either of these programs by a student leads


payments) are available. Officer Commissions in the U.S.
NAVY OR U.S. MARINE CORPS are awarded upon
completion with assignments in various occupational fields
such as NUCLEAR POWER, AVIATION, MEDICINE, LAW,
all ENGINEERING disciplines, MANAGEMENT and RE-
and DEVELOPMENT.
THE DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES offers men
and women students four-year and two-year programs in Air
Force ROTC. Completion of either of these officer
education programs leads to a commission in the United
States Air Force. Numerous scholarships are available on a
competitive basis to students enrolled in the program. Pilot
training is given to qualified male AFROTC students electing
a pilot career in the Air Force.


INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICE UNITS


THE OFFICE OF
courage experiment
services to students
Academic Affairs, it ;
alternative approach
departments of the I
the development of
specific courses; anm


INSTRUCTIONAL
station in teaching a
. Reporting directly
providess support for
es to instruction in
University; assists fa'
instructional module
1 furnishes technical


RESOURCES en-
nd individualized
to the Office of
the innovation of
the colleges and
culty members in
es or systems for
assistance in the


development and use of teaching materials and media,
analysis and improvement of teaching and the evaluation of
student performance. Three units include an audio-visual
materials center, testing and examination services, and an
instructional improvement section.
Other units emphasizing individualized instruction in-
clude the Reading and Study Skills Center, the Personalized
Learning Center, and the Language Laboratory. Selected
self-paced credit courses are available in reading, study
habits, tutoring and language skills. Research consultation,
course enrichment and evaluation services are also offered
to interested faculty.
THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR has charge of the
admission and registration of students, the maintenance of
academic records, the scheduling of courses, and the
issuance of transcripts of student records.
THE COUNSELOR TO FOREIGN AGRICULTURE STU-
DENTS. Foreign students in Agriculture are requested to
contact the Office of International Programs in McCarty
Hall. This office aids foreign students to integrate their
American education more completely with actual condi-
tions in their homelands and also gives information to all
students interested in foreign agricultural problems and
careers in the tropics.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY SERVICE
The library system consists of two central units, Library
East and Library West, and branch libraries in the Colleges
of Architecture, Education, Engineering, Fine Arts, Law,
the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, the I. Hillis
Miller Health Center, the Departments of Chemistry and
Music, and the P.K. Yonge Laboratory School. In addition,
reading room facilities have been provided for Business
Administration, Journalism and Communications, Physical
Education, Health and Recreation and the dormitory areas.
The holdings of the libraries number over 1,730,000
cataloged volumes and a large number of uncataloged




General

GENERAL INFORMATION


papers of significant contemporary American and British
Authors. In recent years, special emphasis has been placed
upon strengthening the holdings for the Latin American
Area Studies Program, especially for the West Indies and the
Caribbean areas.
There are centers for reference service in both Library
West and Library East. The major collection of bibilio-
graphies and reference books is located on the first floor of
Library West, with librarians available to give assistance to


students ai
Photodu
schedule
Friday, 8:0
5:00 PM. S
serving the
a similar s
Around in
helpful in
services.


nd faculty.
plication services are available. The
for the central libraries is Monday
0 A.M. to 11:00 P.M.; Saturday 10:00
Sunday, 10:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M. The
various academic colleges and schools
schedule with variations. A handbook,
Your University of Florida Libraries,
formation on loan regulations and


regular
through
A.M. to
libraries
observe
Getting
provides
special


THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM


The
Legisla
Florida
the du.
the Un
The
anthro
educate
through
public
director


Florida State Museum was created by an act of the
ture in 1917 as a department of the University of
t. Through its affiliation with the University it carries
al responsibility as the State Museum of Florida and
diversity Museum.
Museum operates as a center of research in
pology and natural history. Its functions as an


ior
h
atic
r a


ial arm of the University are carried forward
interpretive displays and scientific and popular
ons. Under the administrative control of the
ire the three departments of the Museum: Natural


Science, staffed by scientists and technicians concerned
with the study and expansion of the research collections
showing adaptive variations in animal structure and
ecology; Social Science, whose scientists and technicians
are concerned with the study of human variations and
cultures, both historic and prehistoric; Interpretation
staffed by specialists in the interpretation of knowledge
through museum education and exhibit techniques.
Members of the scientific and educational staff of the
Museum holds dual appointments in appropriate teaching
departments. Through these appointments they participate
in both the undergraduate and graduate teaching programs.
Scientific reports are published in the Bulletin of the
Florida State Museum, Biological Sciences and in the
Contributions of the Florida State Museum, Anthropology
and History.
The research collections are under the care of curators
who encourage the scientific study of the Museum's
holdings. Materials are constantly being added to the
collection both through gifts from friends and as the result
of research activities of the Museum staff. The
archaeological and ethnological collections are note-
worthy. There are extensive study collections of birds,
mammals, mollusks, reptiles, amphibians, fish invertebrate
and vertebrate fossils, as well as archives of animal sounds
associated with the bioacoustics laboratory.
Opportunities are provided for students, staff, and
visiting scientists to use the collections. Research and field
work are presently sponsored in the anthropological,
paleontological and zoological fields. Students interested
paleontological and zoological fields.Students interested in
these specialties should make application to the


appropriate teaching department.
,-*_ ._ _; c .. - .-* -.i t &i- .. t a - _


Classes for children and special public programs are also
offered for members of the University community and the
general public.

GENERAL STATE AND


UNIVERSITY


AGENCIES


THE FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE.
The transfer and application of knowledge through non-
resident educational programs is the primary purpose of the
Florida Cooperative Extension Service, a division of IFAS.
The educational programs are tailored to fit the needs of
many audiences in areas of agricultural production,
marketing and utilization; home economics; community
resource development; and marine sciences. Audiences
include adults and youth, rural and urban citizens,
minorities and people from all economic levels. The
Cooperative Extension Service is administered by the
University of Florida under a memorandum of under-
standing with USDA. There is also a cooperative program
funded through federal grants to the Florida Cooperative
Extension Service with Florida A&M University. The basic
legislative authority makes provision for cooperation with
local government. In Florida, county programs are carried
out jointly between the University and respective county
governments in the 67 counties. The Extension Service
along with Resident Instruction and Research in IFAS form
a functional model typifying the tripartite organizational
structure envisioned in the Morrill Act for the Land Grant
College system.
The OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS is responsible
for the development of public relations, including visitor
reception, cooperating with all campus agencies and
organizations in the planning and implementation of their
public relations activities and serving as the University
representative with civic organizations which work with the
University and are not professionally related to a particular
school or college. University Relations coordinates with all
campus agencies dealing with off-campus publics in a
continuing effort to develop two-way communications with
the public and to encourage public support and under-
standing of the University, its programs and higher
education.
The DIVISION OF INFORMATION AND PUBLICATIONS
SERVICES serves University academic units, departments,
service offices and other campus-related organizations by
distributing information through mass media outlets, and
providing communication services for the campus com-
munity. It interprets the University's programs, policies and
objectives through newspapers and magazines, radio and
television broadcasts, motion pictures, publications,
photographs, audio-visual presentations, special displays
and exhibits, and community relations projects. The
Division produces the University Digest printed in the
Independent Alligator, and Uniscope, a 30-minute weekly
magazine format television show used by commercial
stations in the state's metropolitan areas. It assists other
units with booklets, folders, brochures, and other printed
material by coordinating copy content, design, and
preliminary production, and assists in preparing bid
specifications for printing.
The OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI AFFAIRS
is the campus headquarters for the University of Florida
Alumni Association, Inc. and the University of Florida
Foundation, Inc.
The University of Florida Alumni Association Inc., brings
together the organized efforts nf alumni and the nrnmntinn






GENERAL INFORMATION


THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY is an integral part of the
Fine Arts College. The Gallery is located on the campus
facing south 13th Street (or U.S. 441). An atrium and a
reflecting pool are two pleasing features of the Gallery's
distinctive architecture style. The gallery, with 3000 square
feet of display space, is completely modern, air-condi-
tioned and maintains a varied exhibition schedule of the
visual arts during the year. The content of exhibitions
displayed in the University Gallery range from the creations
by traditional masters through to the latest and most
experimental works by the modern avant garde. The minor
arts of yesterday and today along with the creations of
oriental and primitive cultures form topics for exhibitions
scheduled. The Gallery originates one or two of the major
exhibitions during the year. Each exhibition shows for
approximately a month and the Gallery's hours are from 9
A.M. to 5 P.M. daily except Sunday when they are 1 P.M. to
5 P.M. The Gallery is closed on Saturdays and holidays.
GALLERY X the teaching gallery of the Department of
Art, is located adjacent to the Department's office area on
the third floor of the Classroom Building (Bldg. 'C' AFA), in
the College of Architecture and Fine Arts complex. As a
direct and physical adjunct to the Art Department's
teaching program this Gallery displays smaller traveling
exhibitions of merit as well as one man shows by the
faculty artists and student exhibitions. The Gallery is open
Monday through Friday from 9 A.M. to noon and from 1:30


P.M. to 5


P.M. It is closed Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.


THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN AND TROPICAL
ARTS is an interdisciplinary Center that provides coordi-
nation, direction, and focus to strengthen existing pro-
grams related to the Fine Arts within the College of Fine
Arts. The Center's faculty is bound together by a desire to
relate their research and teaching activities to the broader
concepts concerned with the fine arts of various world
cultures. The Center broadens and strengthens existing
interdepartmental relations and provides additional stimuli
and mechanisms for translating results of research into
more viable forms that relate directly to societal needs. It
also establishes more effective lines for the training of able
students at the undergraduate, graduate, and adult


education levels in


various


aspec


ts of the fine arts.


THE UNIVERSITY BROADCAST FACILITY is operated by
the College of journalism and Communications. It includes
WUFT, an educational television station on Channel 5;
WRUF-AM, a commercial radio station on 850 KHz; WRUF-
FM, a commerical FM station on 103.7 MHz and Radio
Center. Radio Center provides University originated and
produced cultural and informational programs and features
to radio stations throughout Florida.
This group of broadcast facilities, in addition to providing
program services to the north-central Florida area, makes
available a real-world broadcast experience for students
who are in the process of acquiring the broad academic
background provided in the University's classrooms and
laboratories. Approximately 100 students are employed in
these broadcast operations, where they perform functions
ranging from director to cameraman to disc jockey, all
under the direction and guidance of professional broad-
casters. The effectiveness of this training is demonstrated by
the nationwide reputation the Collegehas achieved for the
developing of some of the country's leading announcers
and broadcast executives.
WUFT telecasts programs of PBS, the Public Broadcasting
Service, FPB, Florida Public Broadcasting Network, as well
as local studio and remote originations. As a unit of the
Ll-~c.-:J'W- dn. k. Tklkku:J-- L I.:. m..A .. :- a so *lj: :kf~l j^.-!f^_ h k A- J


addition, the Radio Center produces a continuing program
of classical music that is broadcast on WRUF-FM each
evening.
The student's proximity to, and participation in, this
diverse broadcast operation brings a greater understanding
of the opportunities and obligations that exist in the field of
broadcasting.
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PRESS functions to
encourage, publish, and promote original and scholarly
manuscripts which will aid in developing the University as
a recognized center of research and scholarship.
In addition to its broad range of state, regional, and inter-
American titles, the Press publishes books of general
interest, and six separate series: The Floridiana Facsimile
Series, the Institute of Gerontology Series, the Latin
American Monographs, (Series Two), and the University of
Florida Monographs (Humanities and Social Sciences). The
Press is also the publisher of the annual HANDBOOK OF
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES, which is sponsored by the
Library of Congress.
The Press Board of Managers, including the director and
fifteen faculty members appointed by the President of the
University, determines policies relating to the issuance of
author contracts and the acceptance of manuscripts
submitted for publication.
The University of Florida Press is a member of the
Association of American University Presses and the
Association of American Publishers.


ORGANIZED RESEARCH
THE DIVISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH was estab-
lished by an act of the legislature to support and to foster
sponsored research and training as a resource essential to
excellence in education and to provide maximum service to
the State. The Division is a development arm of the
University, coordinating its efforts closely with the Office of
Academic Affairs and the Graduate School.
All proposals for sponsorship of research, grants-in-aid,
and training grants are approved by the director. Nego-
tiations on administrative matters with potential contracting
agencies or sponsors of research and training projects are
carried out by the Division.
The activities of the Division of Sponsored Research are
intended to stimulate growth and to assist in expanding a
balanced research and training program throughout the
University. These activities are intimately related to the
support of the graduate and professional program. The
services provided are designed to relieve the principal
investigators in many departments of detailed adminis-
trative and reporting duties connected with some spon-
sored programs. The duties and responsibilities of the
Division, of course, do not supplant the prerogative of the
principal investigator who seeks sponsors for' his own
project nor upon the responsibility of the investigator for
the scientific integrity of the project. In direct contacts
between a principal investigator and a potential sponsor,
however, coordination with the Division is necessary to
insure uniformity in contract requirements and to avoid
duplication of negotiations with the same sponsor.
The Division of Sponsored Research is administratively
responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Policies and procedures for the Division are developed by
a board of directors working with the director within the
general framework of the administrative policies and
procedures of the University.




General

GENERAL INFORMATiON


units. Added administrative units are Centers for Environ-
mental Protection and Rural Development; these centers
have a broad research responsibility which extends across
departments and other research and education centers.
Many members of the research staff of the Agricultural
Experiment Stations are also members of the faculty of the
College of Agriculture as are some in the Agricultural
Extension Service. These three agricultural divisions of the
University work cooperatively in many areas under the
administration of the Vice President for Agricultural Affairs.
While agricultural research is the primary objective of the
Agricultural Experiment Stations, funds for graduate
assistants are made available to encourage graduate training
and professional scientific improvement.
Results of the research of the Agricultural Experiment
Stations are published in scientific journals, bulletins,
monographs, circulars, mimeographed reports and the
Sunshine State Agricultural Research Report and are
available to Florida residents usually without charge upon
request to the Editorial Department of the Agricultural
Experiment Station at Gainesville. The Agricultural Experi-
ment Station cooperates closely with the Agricultural
Extension Service in providing research findings for prompt
dissemination.
Research at the Main Station is conducted within 19
departments Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy
Animal Science, Biochemistry, Botany, Dairy Science,
Entomology and Nematology, Food and Resource Econom-
ics, Food Science, School of Forest Resources and
Conservation, Fruit Crops, Microbiology, Ornamental
Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Poultry Science, Soil Science,
Statistics, Vegetable Crops and Veterinary Science. In
addition to the above the Main Station has six units vital to
its research programs, namely: Editorial, Library, Field
Services and Business Service and Centers for Rural
Development and Environmental Programs.
In order to best serve the varied needs of Florida's
diversified agriculture, Agricultural Research and Education
Centers are located at numerous locations having different
climatic conditions, soil types and crops. Intensive research
is conducted in all fields of agriculture such as citrus,
vegetable, field crops, livestock, pastures and many others.
The Agricultural Research Centers and their locations are
as follows: Monticello, Brooksville, Ft. Pierce, Immokalee,
Dover, Ft. Lauderdale, Hastings, Ona, Apopka, Marianna,
Live Oak, Leesburg, Lakeland, jay and Ocala.
The Agricultural Research and Education Centers and
their locations, are as follows: Homestead, Belle Glade,
Bradenton, Lake Alfred, Quincy, Sanford, and Tallahassee.
A Research and Education Center is also located at Welaka,
Florida and is concerned largely with biological research
programs and youth programs.
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station is cooperating
with the Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station,
Brooksville, a USDA field laboratory, in its beef cattle and
pasture production and management programs, and with
the national Weather Service, Lakeland, in the Federal Frost
Warning Service for fruit and vegetable producers and
shippers, as well as cooperating with numerous Florida
agricultural agencies and organizations.
THE FLORIDA ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERI-
MENT STATION developed from early research activities of
the engineering faculty and was officially established in1941
by the Legislature as an integral part of the College of
Engineering. Its mandate is "to organize and promote the
prosecution of research projects of engineering and related
sciences, with special reference to such of these problems
2a arp imnnrtant Itn th indH ctric nf Flnrrird "


on regional water management, beach stabilization,
pollution abatement, power plant site selection, stream
improvement and technology transfer.
Since 1967, seven departments of the College of
Engineering and the Experiment Station have moved into
some 310,000 sq. ft. provided in seven modern new
buildings and one remodeled building. These improve-
ments, including equipment, have raised the value of the
physical plant of the College to over $13 million.
The laboratories, staff, and facilities of other divisions of
the University also are available to the Station research
faculty through many outstanding interdisciplinary pro-
grams. These research faculty members comprise the
teaching and lecture staff with whom the students come
into daily contact in the classroom. With the close
relationship that exists between teaching and research,
students are exposed to many engineering and industrial
problems normally not encompassed in a college program.
Moreover, the undergraduate students frequently find
employment on research projects as student assistants.
The Station receives only a small portion of its operating
revenue from the State. The major support of its research
activities is derived from contracts with government
agencies, foundations, and industrial organizations. Large
and small manufacturers avail themselves of the finest
engineering research laboratories in the Southeast. The
Station has superior facilities and staff in such fields as
microelectronics and integrated circuits; power systems;
metallurgy; ceramics; coastal and oceanographic engineer-
ing; soil mechanics; transport phenomena and fluid
dynamics; energy conversion, air and water pollution
control; electrochemistry; fast neutron physics; nuclear
rocket propulsion; dynamics and vibrations; communica-
tions; kinetics, ionics, gaseous electronics and plasmas,
and systems analysis, to name a few.


THE BUREAU OF REcSEARCH i,
Architecture established to foster
related to the disciplines represer
include architecture, building
architecture, interior design an
Bureau also provides assistance
students in establishing cooperati
of the University.


s a unit of the College of
r and encourage research
ited in the college. These
construction, landscape
Id urban planning. The
to faculty and graduate
ve efforts with other units


THE BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH
is the Research Division of the College of Business
Administration. A part of the work of the Bureau is to
provide economic and business information about Florida.
A major source of this information is the FLORIDA
STATISTICAL ABSTRACT published annually by the Bureau.
The Bureau, through its Division of Population Studies,
makes annual estimates of population by city and county in
Florida as well as providing other data on the components
of population and growth. By published reports of special
research and through the monthly Economic Leaflets (sent
free to any resident of Florida upon request), quarterly
release of Population Studies, the bi-monthly Business and
Economic Dimensions, and special reports, the results of
research work are available to all residents of Florida.
Consultant services are rendered the business community,
civic groups, and government. The Bureau makes it possible
for teaching professors to engage in organized research and
provides research training for graduate students.
THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CLEARING SERVICE, is a
research, publication, and service adjunct of the Depart-
ment of Political Science inthe College of Arts and Sciences.
It carries on a continuous program of research on public






GENERAL INFORMATION


advertising, and public relations. The center is housed in
Room 400, Stadium.
THE DIVISION OF PLANNING AND ANALYSIS performs
the analysis and does the planning required to ensure that
available resources will be used to accomplish the goals of
the many and "diverse programs of the University of Florida
at minimum long-range cost. Work is carried out by the staff
and related committees in the areas of campus planning,
budgeting, space assignment, and coordination of
architectural design and construction of facilities.
THE FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER
which is funded by the Department of the Interior was
established in 1964 at the University of Florida as the result
of the passage of P.L. 88-379 The Water Resources
Research Act of 1964 "to stimulate, sponsor, provide for,
and supplement present programs for conduct of research,
investigation, experiments, and the training of scientists in
the fields of water and of resources which affect water." The
Center's Director operates under the general policy
guidance of an advisory committee appointed by the
President of the University. Research projects administered
by the Center and pertaining to the achievement of
adequate state wide water resource management, water
quality and water quantity are being conducted by
professors in various departments at the University of
Florida, and other colleges and universities in the State.
Graduate assistants may be employed on these projects or
other activities of the Center.


COMPUTATIONAL FACILITIES

In addition to numerous small digital computers and at
least three hybrid computers located on the campus, the
University of Florida houses the central facilities of the
Northeast Regional Data Center (NERDC) of the State
University System of Florida. These facilities which are
available to students and faculty at the University include
an IBM System 370/165 computer with four megabytes of
high speed main memory, more than twenty IBM 3330
equivalent disk drives, six 9-track tape drives and one
7-track tape drive.


NERD
ray tube
hundred
areas of
These te
interact
addition


C supports batch processing, high-speed cathode
* terminals running under CICS, and well over a
low speed interactive terminals serving almost all
campus as well as other parts of northern Florida.
rminals support APL, FLORTRAN (a locally written
ve FORTRAN interpreter), BASIC, and ATS, in
to having an interactive file generation and


editing capability and the ability to be used for submission
and batch jobs. Limited output from batch jobs may also be


routed to such terminals. More extensive
on the two centrally located high-speed
of the high-speed remote batch terminal
available for submission of batch jobs at
on campus. Graphic output is available
electrostatic plotter operated by NERDC


of Florida. Extensive


software


support


is [


output in printed
printers or at one
Is which are also
several locations
via a Gould 5100
for the University
provided for batch


processing including the major high-level languages and a
large number of program packages and special purpose
languages. Among these are FORTRAN, PL/1, ASSEMBLER,
COBOL, a number of student oriented compilers and
interpreters, most major statistical packages, simulation
languages, several libraries of scientific and mathematical
routines, the Gould and other plotting software, and many
others.


NERDC
monthly


is available through
newsletter,/U update.


CIRCA UF cooperates with
output services, consulting
software procurement, mainten


the Univers
batch input
locations,
Open-shop
academic c
also a profe
In cooper
also offers


ity of
/outpi
with
term
ommi
session
ration


Florida stud'
ut facilities a
open-shop
nals are ava
mnity, as are
al data-entry
with NERDC


extensive


e
ir

i
c


Census


user manuals and its


NERD(
services
iance, a
nts and
e availa
keypu
lable in
onsultir
staff.


C to provide input/
, and applications
nd development, for
faculty. High-speed
Bible at three campus
nches near each,
Weil Hall for the
ng services. There is


and CIRCA, the UF Library
ata services.


INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES


THE INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCI-
ENCES is the University of Florida's statewide agricultural
research and educational organization. IFAS programs
extend into every county, and reach people in virtually
every community in Florida.
The Primary mission of IFAS is to help Florida realize its
maximum potential for agricultural development, and to
contribute to the solution of many social, economic,
environmental and cultural problems of concern to the
people of the state. This vital developmental mission is
carried out through the three functions of resident
instruction, research, and extension. These are carefully
inter-related to provide a highly coordinated effort for the
benefit of Florida its citizens and its industry. This effort
is guided by the Vice President for Agricultural Affairs.
The offices of the Vice President, as well as the Deans for
Resident Instruction, Research, and Extension are located
near the center of the campus in McCarty Hall.
Administrative offices of the School of Forest Resources
and Conservation are located in Rolfs Hall.
The resident instruction programs of IFAS, conducted
through the College of Agriculture and the School of Forest
Resources and Conservation, are concerned with educating
young men and women for the nation's growing and
increasingly complex agricultural industry. The curricula for
the different fields of study are structured to provide the
business, technological and science education necessary
for graduates to meet the ever-changing needs of a diverse
and highly specialized agriculture, as well as related
business and industry. Al! academic departments except
Veterinary Science offer an undergraduate program leading
to a Bachlor of Science in Agriculture. The School of Forest
Resources and Conservation offers an undergraduate
program which leads to the Bachelor of Science in Forest
Resources and Conservation. Graduate programs at the
masters level are offered by all academic units. The Doctor
of Philosophy degree is offered in 13 specialties.
The mission of the research Drograms of IFAS is one of


development, as
enable Florida's


wel
agr


efficient and improve
other geographic art
nutrition and to im;
being of producers
modities and resour
research and educati
the state, applied as
new and improved


lI as
ricul
e its
eas;
prov
and
ces.


improving existing technology to
tural industry to become more
competitive position in relation to
to improve consumer health and
e the social and economic well-
consumers of agricultural corn-
Through the vast network of 23


on centers, located in various areas of
well as basic research efforts develop
technology to meet the agricultural


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General
GENERAL INFORMATION


the University of Florida in cooperation with the various
Boards of County Commissioners and the United State
Department of Agriculture. Through the Cooperative
Extension offices in all 67 Florida counties, the resources
and services of IFAS and the University of Florida are made
available to the agricultural industry and all Florida citizens.
In 1972, the Center for Community and Rural Develop-
ment was established to provide statewide coordination of
the IFAS research and education programs in community
development for rural and non-rural metropolitan areas.
This center is concerned with improving the economic
conditions in these areas so that people have better
employment opportunities and will remain in small
communities rather than migrate to cities. Through support
of undergraduate and graduate education the Center is
assisting in the training of young people to provide
leadership in planning and developing local programs.
Courses of study in the economics of environmental
quality, natural resource planning and development, rural
income and employment, and regional economic planning
help them make definite contributions toward improving
the economic and social conditions of non-urban areas.
The Center for Environmental Programs and Natural
Resources was created in October, 1973, to provide
statewide coordination for the IFAS research and education
programs concerned with solving some of the serious
environmental and natural resources problems related to
agriculture throughout Florida. The Center is involved in
developing ways to protect managed agriculture
ecosystems from environmental damage, integrating en-
vironmental practices into agricultural production tech-
nology and protecting and enhancing the quality of all of
Florida's environment.
The creation of an Office of International Programs within
IFAS in 1966, formalized the international commitment of
IFAS. The Office of International Programs is responsible for
administration, coordination and development of all
activities which build or strengthen the international
dimension of IFAS. This includes participation in the
determination of contract and grant policy, development of
outside funding sources for international research and
training projects, and assistance in the initiation of new
education programs. Integration of international programs
into each department is a specific objective. This provides
a unique opportunity for focusing maximum resources
available to IFAS on the project. Both faculty in the state and
those overseas benefit by the interchange of ideas.
Education and research is handled under the same office by
the Center for Tropical Agriculture established in 1965.


CAREER


DEVELOPMENT


PROGRAM


The Career Development Program is an interdisciplinary
program offering students in all colleges an opportunity to
explore factors which will assist them in determining career
and life choices.
Courses are offered for academic credit and focus on a
systematic process for value clarification, decision-making,
goal setting and career options. Students design career
patterns to meet their personal, educational and
professional goals.


For women and minority students, the career
development program gives exposure to new, non-trad-
itional professional career options.

THE I. HILLIS MILLER HEALTH
CENTER
The J. Hills Miller Health Center at the University of
Florida in Gainesville is a modern complex of institutions
which advance human health and educate tomorrow's
leaders in the health professions.
It is housed in a building complex which includes the
College of Dentistry, the College of Health Related
Professions, the College of Medicine, the College of
Nursing, the College of Pharmacy and the new College of
Veterinary Medicine which will be accepting 40 students in
its charter class for the Fall of 1976. The Shands Teaching
Hospital and Clinics, which is the center for modern patient
care and clinical training of new health professionals, is
also located within the Health Center.
The north expansion of the Health Center's building
program, the Communicore Building, became operational
in 1974 and houses teaching laboratories, lecture halls, a
library and a learning resources center. New facilities for
the College of Dentistry became operational in 1975 and
facilities for the College of Veterinary Medicine are now
under construction as a part of the Health Center complex.
A Veterans Administration Hospital across from the
Health Center is engaged in programs of patient care,
teaching and research which are affiliated with the
programs in the Health Center's colleges.
The Jacksonville Hospitals Educational Program, Inc.,
which offers eudcational opportunity in clinical fields to
students of the Health Center's colleges is an official
division of the University of Florida.
The academic programs of the Health Center prepare
students to understand that tomorrow's health care must
focus on the community in order to achieve the com-
prehensive health care of man. The programs help them to
understand that health care involves the health team: the
physician; the nurse; the dentist; the pharmacist; persons
in health related professions; the community; the re-
searcher; the educator; the counselor; that by training
together, and later by working together, these men and
women contribute more effectively to a person's
well-being.
The health-oriented professions exchange information
within the Health Center, and draw upon the other
resources of the University to further man's understanding
of health and illness.
Since the opening of its first units the Colleges of
Medicine and Nursing in 1956, the Health Center has
become a leading center for health care, education and
research in the Southeast.
Located on the southern edge of the University of Florida
campus, the Health Center was named for Dr. J. Hillis
Miller, late president of the University whose vision and
determination helped formulate the early planning of the
health complex as an intergral part of the University.





































































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General
ADMISSIONS


Admissions


APPLICATION FOR ADMISSIONS
Application for admission to any College, School or
Division of the University must be made to the Admissions
Section of the Office of the Registrar on the forms prescribed
and by the dates indicated below. It is quite proper to
correspond with Deans, Directors or Department Chairmen
but such contact with University officers does not in any way
eliminate the necessity for filing a formal application in the
Office of the Registrar by the dates specified.
How to Apply: An applicant should address a request to
the Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar, University
of Florida asking for application forms. Forms and directions
for completing applications vary with the level of entry at the
University and the applicant should indicate that forms are
being requested for admission as a Freshman, Under-
graduate Transfer, Graduate, Dental, Law, Medical, or
Special student, as the case might be.

GENERAL STATEMENT
The University encourages applications from qualified
applicants of both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious,
and ethnic groups.
A brief summary of the general requirements for
admission or readmission to any college or division of the
University is given below:
1. A satisfactory academic record
2. Satisfactory scores on achievement tests or examina-
tions
3. A satisfactory conduct record
The specific requirements for readmission (at the same or
a different level) of a student previously enrolled at the
University of Florida are given in the STUDENT REGU-
LATIONS section of this catalog. Consult the index for page
number.
The specific requirements for admission to the University
of Florida for the first time as a Freshman, Undergraduate
Transfer, Graduate, Dental, Law, Medical, or Special
student may be found in the appropriate sections which
follow. It should be understood, however, that minimum
requirements are given and that admission to the University
is a selective process. The satisfaction of minimum
requirements does not automatically guarantee admission.
The admission requirements have been arrived at after a
very careful study of the experiences of thousands of
students over a long period of years. In every case minimum
requirements have evolved from studies of student
performance at the University of Florida. These studies have
had as a primary objective the identification of factors that
would indicate a reasonable chance for successful comple-
tion of University of Florida work.
The University Admissions Committee is the agency
responsible for administering all admissions to the
University and its various components.
Students who are planning to enter the University of
Florida for the first time will be considered for admission as
follows:
1. Beginning Freshmen: students who have never
attended college. (See following section, ADMISSION


Doctor's degrees. (See following section, ADMISSION
TO GRADUATE SCHOOL).
4. Dental Students: candidates for admission to the
College of Dentistry. (See following section, AD-
MISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY).
5. Law Students: candidates for admission to the Colle t
of Law. (See following section, ADMISSION TO TR
COLLEGE OF LAW).
6. Medical Students: candidates for admission to the
College of Medicine. (See following section, AD-
MISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE).
7. Special Students: applicants who do not fall in one of
the above categories. (See following section, AD-
MISSION AS A SPECIAL STUDENT).
8. Transient Students: applicants who wish to enroll for
one term only in order to complete work for transfer
back to parent institution. (See following section,
ADMISSION AS A TRANSIENT STUDENT).

TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM
The Traveling Scholar Program affords graduate students
at State University System institutions an opportunity to
take course work or conduct research activities at anyof the
other institutions in the System. Course work taken under
the auspices of the Traveling Scholar Program at another
university in the System will apply for graduate credit at the
student's home institution. The deans of the graduate
schools of the State universities are the coordinators of the
Program. For details regarding the Traveling Scholar
Program and approval to participate in it, a student must
apply to the dean of the graduate school on his home
campus.

UNDERGRADUATE
INTERINSTITUTIONAL
REGISTRATION PROGRAM
The Undergraduate Interinstitutional Registration Pro-
gram enables students at State University System institu-
tions to take advantage of special resources and programs
available on another campus in the System but not available
at their home institution, e.g., special course offerings,
research opportunities, unique laboratories, overseas study
programs, and library collections. Coursework taken under
the Undergraduate Interinstitutional Registration Program
will be accepted for credit at the student's home institution.
A student must be recommended to participate in the
Program by his own academic dean who will initiate a
visiting arrangement with the appropriate dean at the host
institution.

PERSONAL HEALTH
HISTORY REQUIREMENT
A personal health history completed by you and reported
on forms supplied by the University Physician are required
prior to initial enrollment at the University of Florida. If your
application for admission is approved, the health history
form will be forwarded to you for you to complete and
return to the University Physician. Your form should be
received by the University Physician at least two weeks prior
to your planned date of entrance.






ADMISSIONS


qualified applicants whose applications are received in the
Admissions Office prior to March 1st. Applications for the
September class received after March 1st will be considered
on a "space available" basis only. The deadlines for receipt
of applications for other terms are listed in the University
Calendar.
Admission of students is on a selective basis. The
availability of community junior colleges and other state
universities in Florida has caused the Board of Regents to
assign to the University of Florida a role in the total state
system of higher education which demands that the
entering Freshman Class be limited in number. Such
limitation does not prevent students from subsequently
applying for admission to upper division and professional
schools of the University since they may attend junior
colleges or other universities and if qualified, then transfer
to the University's upper division colleges in accordance
with rules printed elsewhere in this Catalog.
The requirements for admission set forth below are
designated to give priority to those applicants whose
potential on the basis of their record indicates the greatest
likelihood of success and the obtaining of maximum
benefits from the University College program at the
University of Florida.


A. Requirements for admission Florida students
For consideration a student must meet the following
minimums:
1. Graduation from an accredited secondary school.
2. Twelve academic units (such as English, Foreign
Language, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies).
3. A "C" average in academic courses.
4. A score in the top 40 percent (total score of 300) on the
Florida Twelfth Grade Tests.
5. A record of good conduct. Major or continuing
difficulty with school or other authorities may make an
applicant ineligible regardless of his academic quali-
fications.
Any Florida student who meets the above minimum
admission requirements and is interested in attending the
University of Florida is urged to submit an application. The
University will do everything possible to accept all qualified
applicants who apply before the application deadline date.
If the number of qualified applicants exceeds the number
that the University is permitted to enroll, admission will be
on a selective basis. An applicant's total high school record
including grades, test scores, educational objective and
pattern of courses completed, rank in class, school
recommendation and personal record will be considered in
the selection process.
Composite pictures of recent Freshman classes at the
University of Florida indicate that approximately 70 percent
score between 380-495 on the Florida Twelfth Grade
Placement Test which places them in the top 20 percent of
all secondary high school Seniors. Approximately 50
percent of each entering class has earned a "B" or better
average in high school academic subjects. While there is no
minimum grade average or test score which in itself assures
a student of admission or success in college, prospective
Freshmen are urged to discuss the meaning and implication
of these data with their school counselors before deciding
whether to apply for admission to the University of Florida.


B. Requirements for admission Non-Florida Students.
ft- .-----------jt *' -*_- f- _- i_-----------_ _-1--- -t


OTHER INFORMATION OF
INTEREST TO PROSPECTIVE
FRESHMAN APPLICANTS


OPPORTUNITIES FOR ACCELERATING COLLEGE
GRADUATION
Early Admission
Applicants for Early Admission (i.e. admission following
completion of the junior year in high school) from superior
students are encouraged and will be considered on an
individual basis by the University's Admissions Committee.
Applications should be submitted in accordance with
deadlines published in the University Catalog.
In addition to the application, the following items are
needed for processing Early Admission applicants.


1. A written statement by the student setting forth
reasons for requesting early admission.
2. An official transcript of the applicant's secondary
school record covering the 9th, 10th and 11 years.
Generally, an overall academic average of B+ is
expected.
3. Results of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or
the Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Tests. Generally, a
score of approximately 600 on each section of the SAT or
a total score of 450 on the Twelfth Grade Tests is
expected.
4. A letter of recommendation from the student's high
school principal or guidance counselor. The letter
should give specific reasons as to why the applicant
would profit more from Early Admission than by
completion of the Senior year in high school.
An applicant for Early Admission may be required to come
to the campus for interviews by members of the Admissions
Committee before a decision is made on the application.
The Admissions Office will advise the applicant if interviews
will be required after all of the above items have been
received and evaluated. IMPORTANT: Please note that an
applicant should NOT report for interviews until advised by
the Admissions Office.
The University of Florida provides numerous op-
portunities other than Early Admission by which a student
may accelerate graduation. For additional information,
please refer to the section of this catalog entitled Time
Shortened Degree Opportunities.


Florida Scholars Program. One
unusual students will be invited to t
studies after eleventh grade in a speci
University College and the College c
After early admission through the
above, qualified students will be inte
of the Florida Scholars Committee. E
for participation in the Program will
specialist in the student's proposed


hundred gifted and
)egin their University
al program offered by
:f Arts and Sciences.
procedure described
reviewed by members
.ach student selected
confer with a faculty
field of study. This


professor will continue as the student's mentor throughout
the undergraduate years; together they will design an
individual course of study leading to a bachelor's degree
from the College of Arts and Sciences. This early association
with a distinguished scholar-teacher is intended to
encourage andfdevelop the student's promise as a person
and potential as a scholar or professional.
For information concerning this program, contact Dean
David Stryker, 113 Anderson Hall, or Professor Frank
Sciadini, 358 Little Hall.
"- _-J _r lli_ __ ll ___ wL_*_ A -- .r__ p a




General

ADMISSIONS


Admission with Advanced Standing. The University of
Florida is a participant in the Advanced Placement Program
and in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the
College Entrance Examination Board. Under the Advanced
Placement Program a student entering the University offers
a nationally graded examination as evidence of completion
of a college level course taken in high school. Depending


on the results of the examination, the student may


University credit for


courses


receive


covering similar material or


exemption from such courses without credit. Under the
College Level Examination Program, the University grants
credit for satisfactory scores in each of the five areas of the
CLEP General Examinations. For further information, please
refer to the section of the Catalog entitled Time Shortened
Degree Opportunities.
Early Decision for Superior Students. Students with
superior secondary school records (academic average at
least 3.5) and Junior year high school SAT test scores
(approximately 600 each on the verbal and mathematics
sections) may apply for early decision. The student must


certify that this


his only application and this statement


must be supported by the signatures of his parents and
appropriate school official. The completed application must
be received by November 1 and, if admitted, the student
must make his commitment to attend the University of
Florida, accompanied by his housing payment, by Decem-
ber 1.
ADMISSION AS A TRANSFER
STUDENT TO UNDERGRADUATE
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
(APPLICANTS WHO HAVE ATTENDED ANY COLLEGE OR


UNIVERSITY


, REGARDLESS OF THE AMOUNT OF TIMF


SPENT IN ATTENDANCE OR CREDIT EARNED, ARE CON-


SIDERED


TRANSFER STUDENTS.)


When to Apply: Applications may be submitted not more
than one year in advance and applicants are strongly urged
to apply at least six months prior to the date they plan to
enter. Applications will not be accepted after the deadline


date for the term


as indicated in the University Calendar


published in this catalog. The applicant who waits until the
last possible date to file his application may find that he is
unable to furnish the necessary supporting records in time
to permit a decision for the term in which he desires to
enter.


NOTE: In the undergraduate programs of the College of
Health Related Professions and the College of Pharmacy,
*1 - A "j k -


ht e sequence of professional


courses


begins


UNLY in the


Fall Quarter of the junior year. Applications for admission
to the College of Health Related Professions for September
enrollment must be received by the preceding March 15th.
In this section are listed the general requirements for
admission of undergraduate transfer students. It should be
observed however, that ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY
IS A SELECTIVE PROCESS AND SATISFYING THESE GENER-


AL REQUIREMENT
TANCE. Attention


Division


colleges


TS


DOES


NOT GUARANTEE


ACCEP-


is also directed to the fact that Upper
of the University have established


enrollment quotas because of


facilities.


imitations of space and


Transfer applicants who meet the minimum


admission requirements will be referred to the selection
committee of the appropriate college for consideration of
their enrollment within the college's established quotas.


A transfer
I nfnrmatunn


r applicant
And CnllIpsc


should
cprtinnc


refer to the General
nf thick ratalna fnr an


quarter hours) of credit transferred from or through a junior
college may be applied toward the quantitative require-
ments for a University of Florida degree.

A. FLORIDA PUBLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE GRADUATES


This section applies ONLY to students


seeking to transfer


directly from a Florida public junior college with the
Associate in Arts degree in a university parallel program. All
other junior college applicants and undergraduate transfer
applicants from four-year or upper division colleges and


university should


consult Section


B which follows.)


The University of Florida subscribes to the Articulation
Agreement between the State Universities and Public junior
Colleges of Florida. Under this agreement, any graduate of
a State approved Florida public junior college is eligible for
admission to the University if the student has completed the
university parallel program and received the Associate in
Arts degree, provided the degree has been awarded on the
basis of the following:
1. At least 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of
academic work exclusive of occupational courses and
basic required physical education courses;
2. An approved general education program of at least 36


semester hours


(54 quarter hours);


3. A grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 system on
all college level academic courses attempted.
NOTE: All applicants for admission to the University of
Florida must present scores on an acceptable general ability
test. In the case of applicants who have graduated from a
Florida public junior college with the Associate in Arts


degree, this information


is required for counseling and


research purposes only and the score achieved on the test
will not be used as a criterion for admission. However, the


required


test information


must


be received


by the


Admissions Office before an application can be given final


approval. Please see i
following section for
tests.


tem 4


Satisfactory


scores


in the


information concerning acceptable


Within space and fiscal limitations, applicants who have
satisfied the above minimum requirements will be con-
sidered for admission at the junior level to an Upper
Division college. Such students may be required to take
additional preprofessional courses not completed at the
junior college. However, such courses will not reduce the
number of credits required in the Upper Division for a
degree.

B. TRANSFER APPLICANTS OTHER THAN GRADUATES
FROM A FLORIDA PUBLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE
This section applies to students seeking to transfer from


a Florida public junior


degree


college


in a university


undergraduates
universities.


transfer


without an Associate in Arts


parallel program
applicants from oth


and to all
er colleges or


1. Requirements for admission to the University College.
1. Eligible for admission as a beginning Freshman. An
applicant must have been eligible for admission to the
University of Florida as a beginning Freshman in order to
be considered for admission to the University College as
a transfer student. (See section, ADMISSION AS A
FRESHMAN).


2. Good standing.


An applicant must be in good standing


and eligible to return to any institution previously
attended. A student who for any reason will not be


,llnnlalftrrml *tjn Pkrat. a *n/^ 4n ^nr#4 i *n.-. nrnAnk a*rl *j


I






ADMISSIONS


length of attendance or credit earned. Official sup-
plementary transcripts are required, as soon as they are
available, for any work completed after making applica-
tion. Since an average of "C" or higher is required for
graduation from the University of Florida, one who has
failed to maintain this average at another institution is
not eligible for admission. Regardless of the average
earned, courses completed at other institutions must
reasonably parallel the curriculum at the University of
Florida.
4. Satisfactory test scores: An applicant must present
satisfactory scores on an accepable general ability test.
Any of the following tests may satisfy this test
requirement. If taken prior to first enrollment in college,
the Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test, the Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination
Board, or the American College Testing Program (ACT)
will be considered. Otherwise, the applicant should
furnish scores on the School and College Ability Test,
College Level (SCAT). The minimum acceptable score on
these tests will vary with the amount and quality of
academic study the applicant will have completed prior
to transfer.
5. Satisfactory conduct record: An applicant must
present a satisfactory conduct record. Regardless of
other qualifications, an applicant who has experienced
serious or continuing difficulty with school or other
authorities because of improper conduct may find his
application disapproved.
II. Requirements for admission to an Upper Division
College.
With the exception of item 1, an applicant for admission
to an Upper Division College must satisfy the requirements
listed above for admission to the University College. In
addition, the following requirements must also be satisfied:
1. Advanced Standing credit. An applicant must present a
minimum of 64 semester hours (or 96 quarter hours) of
acceptable college courses, not more than four semester
hours of which are in Military Science and/or basic
required Physical Education as credit for advanced
standing.
2. Specific course requirements. An applicant must
present the courses listed as required for admission by
the Upper Division college of his choice, or acceptable
substitutes, as part of the courses offered for advanced
standing credit. (See appropriate college section of this
catalog). Upon recommendation by the Upper Division
college, an applicant lacking some of the specific course
requirements may be permitted to enroll in that college
and complete them if he meets all other requirements
for admission, however, such Lower Division courses
will not reduce the number of credits required in the
Upper Division for a degree.

ADMISSION TO
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
When to Apply: Applications can be accepted as late as
the final date listed in the Graduate Catalog. Because the
final decision on admission to Graduate study has to be
made by the Colleges and time is required to prepare the
materials for their consideration, it is strongly urged that
applications be made well in advance of this final date.
Application for admission to the Graduate School must be
made to the Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar on
forms supplied by that office and at the times stipulated in
the I iniaorei h falnarIlar ArtrtltiBtnch lAirkh mct minim.,m


which the work was done. Official supplementary tran-
scripts are required, as soon as they are available, for any
work completed after making application.
In general, no student who is a graduate of a non-
accredited institution will be considered for graduate study
in any unit of the University.
All foreign students whose native tongue is not English
making application for admission to the Graduate School of
the University of Florida must present their scores on TOEFL
(Testing of English as a Foreign Language). Each applicant is
asked to write TOEFL Educational Testing Service, Prince-
ton, New Jersey, U.S.A., requesting a Bulletin of Informa-
tion and registration form. It is important to remember that
final consideration can not granted a foreign student's
application for admission until his scores on this test are
received by: Admission Section, Office of The Registrar,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, U.S.A.
Undergraduate Record: Unqualified admission to the
Graduate School is dependent upon the presentation of a
baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or
university with an average of B for the junior and Senior
years. In some units of the Graduate School and on the
more advanced levels of graduate study, an undergraduate
average considerably above B may be required. In some
units admission may be considered with an undergraduate
average slightly below B. College graduate admission
selection committees take into account not only the general
grade average, but the distribution of work and the quality
and extent of preparation for the graduate program which
the student proposes to undertake.
While the general admissions requirements described
above apply to both master's and doctoral candidates, it
should be noted that doctoral candidates must meet certain
additional requirements, which vary according to the
programs, established by the departments and colleges.
Furthermore, it is desirable for students planning to enter
certain colleges and departments to have a reading
knowledge of one foreign language.

Graduate Record Examination: A satisfactory average
score on the Graduate Record Examination is required for
admission. Each applicant for admission must submit scores
on the aptitude test of the GRE, but either at the request of
the department concerned or on his own volition, the
applicant is encouraged to submit in addition the score on
one or more advanced subject-matter tests of the GRE. The
scores on all tests taken will be weighed in regard to
admission.
The GRE is given six times a year in October,
December, January, February, April and June -- at a great
many locations in the United States, including Gainesville,
Florida. To determine exact dates and the most convenient
locations, students should write to the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, New jersey. Applications are required
several weeks prior to the examination, and scores are
received about a month after the examination. Hence, it is
necessary to apply for the GRE in early September for
admission in January, in early December for admission in
March, in early January for admission in June, and in early
March for admission in September. Other examinations are
given for which application must be made in November and
May but the ones listed above are correlated with admission
deadlines.

ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY





General

ADMISSIONS


October 15, of the year prior to anticipated enrollment in
dental school. Failure to meet this deadline will prevent the
Dental Admissions Committee from evaluating your record.
The data compiled by the AADSAS will be carefully
evaluated by the Dental Admissions Committee and
promising applicants will be sent Formal Application forms
which request additional information. The submission of a
preprofessional committee evaluation or letters of recom-
mendation from people in academics will not be necessary
until the Formal Application forms are filed. The Formal
Application forms and supporting materials should be
submitted as early as possible, but no later than November
15, of each application year.
The College of Dentistry aspires to attract students of the
highest caliber into its various programs. High standards of
scholastic achievement, moral character, and motivation
are expected of the applicant. The student of dentistry must
possess a high basic aptitude supplemented by an academic
preparation of the highest order because of the vast area of
science which must be mastered by the dentist. The highly
personal relationship between patient and dentist places
the latter in a position of trust, which demands maturity,
integrity intellectual honesty, and a sense of responsibility.
A broad representation of the ethnic mixture of the State is
sought in the student body through an active recruitment
program. The College strictly adheres to the principle of
ethnic, racial, religious and social equality among its
student body and faculty.


Generally, students applying for admission should plan to
complete the requirements for a bachelor's degree.
However, qualified students may be accepted without
fulfilling the degree requirements, provided they show
evidence of sufficient preparation for the study of dentistry.
Applicants with an overall "B" average as a minimum will
receive strongest consideration for admission to the
College of Dentistry. Applicants over the age of thirty rarely
will be given strong considerations.
Every applicant must take the Dental Admission Test,
preferably in the Spring preceding the submission of his
Initial Application or, at the latest, the Fall testing period.
The test is given three times a year at many college and
university testing centers. Following a review of all
application materials and Dental Admission Test scores by
the Dental Admissions Committee, interviews with mem-
bers of this Committee will be arranged for competitive


applicants.
(See also more detailed
Dentistry bulletin.)


description


in the College of


ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF LAW


When to Apply: Applications can be accepted as
indicated in the College of Law Catalog.
Beginning Students: All applicants for admission to the
College of Law must have received a baccalaureate degree
from a regionally accredited college or university and
achieved a satisfactory score on the Law School Admission
Test.


The minimum acceptable
Admission Test required for ad


score
missi


on tl
on van


grade point average achieved by the ai
college work attempted by the applicant
of the first bachelor's degree. The lower
average, the higher the Law School Admis
am t ar k j- La in n. a 1 S. Sn.. n .m a. ABt ......... I..


ie Law School
es with the total
applicant on all
prior to receipt
the grade point
;sion Test Score


ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
When to Apply: Because the number of places in the first
year class of the College of Medicine is limited, it is
important that a candidate make application as early as
possible during the Summer or Fall of the year preceding his
intended date of entry.
Personal qualities of high order character, responsi-
bility and maturity are the primary requirements for
admission. The student must have demonstrated superior
intellectual achievement. A bachelor's degree is strongly
recommended. The quality of the academic background as
well as the performance of the student in relation tothe load
attempted, will be weighed. A genuine interest in human
welfare is important. Efficient methods of study and
effective powers of reasoning are essential.
The College admits both men and women. A limited
number of out-of-state students, in proportion to the
number in the University as a whole, may be admitted.
Applicants over the age of thirty rarely will be given strong
consideration. Students who have failed academically or are
ineligible to continue in another medical school will not be
admitted.
Applications from students who are presently enrolled in
another medical school will be considered provided (1) the
student is eligible to continue in his present medical school,
and (2) the school he is now attending is a member of the
Association of American Medical Colleges. Applications will
also be considered from students who have successfully
completed work at an accredited two-year medical school.
Prospective applicants must take the Medical College
Admissions Test, preferably, by the Spring preceding the
submission of the application. A personal interview will be


required fi
Graduate
degree in
Graduate


or final acceptance.
e students who are
medical sciences
School.


candidates for the Ph.D.
should apply through the


(See also more detailed description in the College of
Medicine catalog.)

ADMISSION AS
A SPECIAL STUDENT
When to Apply: Each application for admission as a
special student must be reviewed by the University
Admissions Committee. Applications cannot be considered
if they are received after the dates specified in the Catalog;
and it would be desirable for a person considering
application as a special student to initiate such an
application at least three months in advance of the term he
wishes to enter, in order to allow time for additional
evidence to be presented if it should be requested by the
Admissions Committee.
Special students may be admitted to the various schools
and colleges of the Upper Division only by approval of the
University Admissions Committee. Each case will be
considered on an individual basis. Applications for
admission as a special student must include: (1) records of
previous educational experience (high school or college
transcripts); (2) a statement as to the type of studies to be
pursued; (3) a brief statement of the reason or reasons for


selecting
satisfacto
example,
& -a. -_ .-


a special program other than a regular one; (4)
ry evidence of ability to pursue these studies-for
a student to enroll as a special student for some
. .. ... -_ _J ._ _l -- _- / i_-- --_L- _r ^-_ J i -






ADMISSIONS


regular undergraduate student in good standing at another
accredited collegiate institution may be permitted to enroll
at the University of Florida as transient student in order to
complete work to transfer back to the parent institution. No
evaluation will be made of work previously completed and
it is the student's responsibility to secure such approval as
the parent institution may require.


Transient


students


are registered


as NON-DEGREE


students and no application for admission is required. The
appropriate forms of enrolling as a NON-DEGREE student
should be requested from the Office of the Registrar.
Enrollment as a NON-DEGREE student in no way implies
future admission as a regular student to the University of
Florida.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION,
SELECTIVE SERVICE, AND


No certification can be made until the Certificate of
Eligibility is on file. Benefits are determined by the Veterans
Administration and the University certifies according to
their rules and regulations.


The Office of the Registrar wil


certification to the Selective


Service


I submit enrollment
System if the student


has submitted his selective service number according to
Selective Service System regulations. The Selective Service
System will also be notified when the student is no longer
enrolled or is not eligible to continue and/or has completed
requirements for his degree.
Inquiries relating to Social Security Benefits should be


directed to the student's local Social Security Office.


Office of the Registrar will submit enrollment certificates
issued by the Social Security Administration for students
eligible to receive educational benefits under the Social
Security Act, providing the student registers for twelve


quarter hours or more.
A full time load for VA or Social


hours


per quarter.


Security benefits is twelve


SOCIAL SECURITY


The University of Florida is approved for the education
and training of veterans under all public laws now in effect,


i.e., Chapter 31


Title 38, U


Code


(Disabled Veterans),


Chapter 34, Title 38, U.S. Code (Cold War


Chapter 35, Title 38,
Disabled Veterans).


, U.S.


Bill), and


Code (Children of Deceased or


Students who may be eligible for


educational benefits under any Veterans Administration
program are urged to contact the local Veterans Adminis-
tration representative or the Veterans Administration
Regional Office, P.O. Box 1437, St. Petersburg, Florida, well
in advance of the date of their registration. Students
expecting to receive benefits under one of these programs
must file with the Office of the Registrar their Certificate of
Eligibility which is issued by the Veterans Administration.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR
FOREIGN STUDENTS
All foreign students whose native tongue is not English
making application for admission to the University of
Florida must present their scores on TOEFL (Test of English
as a Foreign Language). Each applicant is asked to write
TOEFL, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey,
U.S.A., requesting Bulletin of Information and registration


form. It


is important to remember that final consideration


cannot be granted a foreign student's application for


admission until hi
Admission Section
Florida, Gainesville


S


scores


on this test are received by:


, Office of the Registrar, University of
., Florida, 32601, U.S.A.





General

EXPENSES


Expenses


APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission to the University must be
accompanied by an application fee of $15.00. Application
fees are nonrefundable. Further instructions will be found
in the Admissions section of this catalog.

GENERAL
STUDENTS SHOULD BRING SUFFICIENT FUNDS, OTHER
THAN PERSONAL CHECKS TO MEET THEIR IMMEDIATE
NEEDS. Personal checks will be accepted for the exact
amount of fees.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS --
FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA
For the purpose of assessing registration fees, students
shall be classified as Florida and non-Florida. A Florida
student is a person who shall have resided and had domicile
in the State of Florida for at least twelve (12) months
immediately preceding the first day of classes of the current
term.
In applying this policy "student" shall mean a person
admitted to the institution. If such person is a minor, it shall
mean parents, parent, or legal guardian of his or her person.
The word "minor" shall mean a person who has not
attained the age of 18 and whose disabilities of minority
have not been removed by reason of marriage or by a court
of competent jurisdiction.
The word "domicile" for fee-paying purposes shall
denote a person's true, fixed, and permanent home and
place of habitation. It is the place where he intends to
remain, and to which he expects to return when he leaves
without intending to establish a new domicile elsewhere.
The word "parent" shall mean a minor's father; or
mother; or if one parent has custody of his person, the
parent having custody; or if there is a guardian or legal
custodian of his person, then such guardian or legal
custodian.
In all applications for admission by students as citizens of
Florida, the applicant, or, if a minor, his parents or legal
guardian shall make and file with such application a written
statement under oath that such applicant is a bonafide
citizen, resident, and domiciliary of the State of Florida
entitled as such to admission upon the terms and conditions
prescribed for citizens, residents, and domiciliaries of the
State.
A non-Florida student is a person not meeting the
requirements outlined above. A non-Florida student (or if a
minor, his parent or parents) after having been a resident
and domiciliary of Florida for twelve months may apply for
and be granted reclassification prior to the first day of
classes of any subsequent term, provided, however, that
those students who are non-resident aliens or who are in
the United States on a non-immigration visa will not be
entitled to reclassification. However, for fee-paying
purposes, Cuban nationals and Vietnamese refugees will
be considered as resident aliens. Such applications shall
comply with the provisions of the preceding paragraph. In
addition, the application for reclassification must be
accompanied by a certified copy of a declaration of
intnttinn rtn actak lick AnrfcnmiIa .nik ,k. ri..d.. at sLn


and stationed in this state pursuant to military orders is
entitled to classification as an in-state student. The
student, while in continuous attendance, shall not lose
his residence when his parent is thereafter transferred
on military orders. A member of the armed forces of the
United States stationed in this state on military orders
shall be entitled to classification as an in-state student
while on active duty in this state pursuant to such orders.
3. No person over the age of 18 years shall bedeemed to
have gained residence while attending any educational
institution in this State as a full-time student, as such
status is defined by the Board of Regents, in the absence
of a clear demonstration that he has established domicile
in the State.
4. Any person who remains in this State when his parent,
having theretofore been domiciled in this State,
removes from this State, shall be entitled to classification
as a Florida student, so long as his attendance at a school
or schools in this State shall be continuous. Attendance
at a school or schools in this State shall be deemed
"continuous" if the person claiming continuous atten-
dance has been enrolled at a school or schools in this
State as a full-time student, as such term is defined by the
Board of Regents, for a normal academic year in each
calendar year, or the appropriate portion or portions of
such years, thereof, since the beginning of the period for
which continuous attendance is claimed. Such persons
need not attend Summer sessions or other intersessions
beyond the normal academic year in order to render
attendance "continuous."
Any student granted status as a Florida student which
status is based on a sworn statement which is false shall,
upon a determination of such falsity, be subject to such
disciplinary sanctions as may be imposed by the president
of the university, which sanctions may include permanent
expulsion from the State University System or any lesser
penalty.
The following categories shall be treated as Florida
residents for tuition purposes:
1. Veterans of the United States of America retired with
twenty (20) years or more of active military service,
including dependent members of their immediate
families, who are in Florida at the time of retirement, or
who move to Florida within one year following
retirement and intend to make Florida their permanent
home.
2. Full-time elementary, secondary and junior college
faculty members under current teaching contracts in the
State of Florida.
3. Full-time faculty and career employees of the
University System and members of their immediate
families.
To establish Florida residence a student applying for
admission should complete the residence affidavit on the
application form.
To change status from non-Florida a student must present
to the Registrar's Office a copy of the Declaration of Intent
and the completed Residence Affidavit Form. To claim the
military exception the student must furnish the Registrar's
Office a copy of the military orders showing assignment to
Florida. A public school official must submit a written
statement from his superior as to his public school status. A
University employee must submit a statement from his
employer as to his employment status.






EXPENSES


DATE IT IS NOT


ALWAYS


POSSIBLE TO ANTICIPATE


CHANGES AND THE FEE SCHEDULE MAY BE REVISED.
EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO PUBLICIZE CHANGES
FOR ANY QUARTER IN ADVANCE OF THE REGISTRATION
DATE FOR THAT" QUARTER.
Fees are payable on the dates listed in the University of
Florida Calendar appearing at the front of the Catalog or
the dates shown on statements sent to those participating


in Advance Registration. Payment of fees


of the registration


process.


is an integral part


Registration (including payment


of fees) must be completed on or before the proper due


date. Student Accounts,


The Hub, must be provided


properly executed authorization for payment in


where


fees are to be paid by


scholarship,
Calendar.


cases


a previously approved loan,


etc., prior to the deadline published in the


FEE LIABILITY


LIABILITY


IS INCURRED


REMAINING ON


FOR ALL CREDIT


HOURS


A STUDENT'S SCHEDULE AT THE CLOSE


OF THE DROP/ADD PERIOD EACH QUARTER.
ASSESSMENT OF FEES


Students
UNIVERSITY


must


assess


PERSONNEL


ay their own fees.
NOT BE HELD AC-


COUNTABLE FOR PROPER ASSESSMENT OR MATHEMAT-
ICAL ACCURACY OF CALCULATIONS. Students should


assess
below:


their fees in accordance with the table charges


COURSE FEES


Charge per Credit Hour


A CORRECT CURRENT LOCAL ADDRESS IS ON FILE WITH
THE REGISTRAR AT ALL TIMES. Change of Address forms


may be obtained from the Registrar's


PICTURE ID.
A CURRENT VALID PHOTO


Office.


I.D. MUST BE PRESENTED IN


ORDER TO TRANSACT BUSINESS AT THE OFFICE OF
STUDENT ACCOUNTS.
SPECIAL FEES AND CHARGES


AUDIT FEE. Fees for audited courses


are the same as those


listed above for Florida students. The audit fee


is the same


for Florida and non-Florida students.

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAMS. Examina-


tions


are administered on campus during the third week of


each month. Applications should be completed in the
Office of Instructional Resources, 408 Seagle Bilding before
the first day of the month in which a test is to be taken. The


fee for


one general


examinations.


examination


$30.00 and for


Subject examinations


is $20.00,


3-5 examinations


$40.00.


are $20.00 each. Checks should be


payable to College Level Examination Program.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION. The Aptitude Test of


the Graduate Record Examination is reqt
to the Graduate School. A fee of $10.50


jired for admission


covers


the cost of


this examination. Students who take one of the Advanced


Tests


of the


Graduate Record Examination in combination


with the Aptitude Test


Summer 1977
Course Fees


payable to the Educational Testing
Jersey 08540.


a fee of $21.00. These


Service,


Princeton, New


Florida
Students


0-200
300-499
500-999 (exclud-
ing 699 & 799)
699 & 799 (Thesis
& Dissertation)


STUDENTS


PROGRAMS


$15.00
16.50


Non-Florida
Students
38.00
51.50


Florida
Students Non-Florida


GRADUATE SCHOOL FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEST. All


students wishing to be certified


as proficient in a reading


knowledge of French, German or Spanish must take the


Educational Testing


Language Tests. A fe
examination. The fee
Hub. Administrative


OR D.V.M.


A Florida student will pay $449.00 for each quarter of


enrollment. A non-Florida student will


each quarter of enrollment.
$10.00 Student Health Fee.)


NOTE:


pay $1,017.00 for


(These amounts include the


A student registered for twelve (12) hours per


quarter is considered
station and Social Sec
Aid.


as full-time for Veterans Admini-
:urity benefits, and Student Financial


Service


(ETS) Graduate School Foreign


e of $12.50


covers


the cost of each


is payable to Student Accounts, The


arrangements


examination will be made through the
Office.


to register for


Graduate School


LIBRARY BINDING CHARGE. Candidates for


a graduate


degree with a thesis or dissertation pay a $10.00 charge for
the permanent binding of two copies deposited in the


University of Florida Library.


Student


This charge


is payable at


Accounts, The Hub, by the date specified in the


Graduate Catalog. A copy of the receipt must be presented
at the Graduate School Office.


STUDENT HEALTH FEE REFUND OF FEES


STUDENTS REGISTERED FOR NINE OR MORE CREDIT
HOURS PER QUARTER ARE REQUIRED TO PAY A $10.00
STUDENT HEALTH FEE. The student health fee is optional
for students registered for eight hours or less.
LATE REGISTRATION
A fee of $25.00 will be assessed against students who fail to
initiate registration during the regular registration period or


who fail


to pay


fees within the time period specified.


REINSTATEMENT FEE
A fee of $25.00 will bee assessed against students reinstated
who have had their initial registration canceled during a
quarter for nonpayment of fees. The reinstatement fee shall
be in addition to the late registration fee.
DEADLINES


1. Fees will be refunded in full for:
a. Credit hours dropped during the drop/add period.
b. Courses cancelled by the University.
2. With the exception of amounts required for collection


under bond and trust obligations,
instances of:


fees may be refunded in


a. Involuntary call to active duty.


b. Death of


a student.


c. Illness of the student for such duration or severity, as
confirmed by a physician, that completion of the quarter
is precluded, or
d. Exceptional circumstances, upon approval of the


Universe


ity President.


Refunds may be obtained at Student Accounts, The Hub,
upon presentation of proper documentation.


Course


ENROLLED IN THE M.D.. D.M.D.





General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


Student Affairs

The following information describes the responsibilities
of the various offices charged with assistance to students at
the University of Florida. Additional information may be
found in the FLORIDA STUDENT HANDBOOK and THE
CAMPUS DIRECTORY.

VICE PRESIDENT FOR
STUDENT AFFAIRS


The Office of the


Vice President for Student Affairs


focal point for student concerns and strives to make the
educational experience for students at the University of
Florida as meaningful as possible. The Vice President for
Student Affairs works to maintain and improve good
communications and working relationships among and
between students, faculty, and administration.
The goals of the Division of Student Affairs include:
developing effective and efficient services and programs for
students through the various departments within Student
Affairs; integrating student affairs and academic affairs;
directly involving students in the affairs of the institution;
encouraging a sense of community among students,
faculty, and administration; and increasing accessibility to
and attractiveness of the University of Florida to a wide
variety of persons.
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is
located in 123 Tigert Hall and is open to assist individual
students and groups in matters concerning them. All
students are encouraged to share in the responsibility for
enabling the various divisions of the University of Florida
community to meet the needs of students.
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs has
administrative responsibility for the following offices and
programs at the University of Florida: Office for Student
Services, Student Housing Office, Office for Student
Financial Affairs, Career Planning and Placement Center,
the J. Wayne'Reitz Union, and the University Counseling
Center.

OFFICE FOR
STUDENT SERVICES
The basic commitment of the Office of the Dean for
Student Services at the University of Florida is to the total
development of each individual student so that he or she
might achieve their full potential as a human being. Staff
members strive to help students become self-directive in all
their activities. The staff feels it can most effectively be
helpful to students by reaching them "where they live," in
real life situations.
The purposes of the Office for Student Services are to
contribute to the attainment of the educational goals of the
University of Florida by: helping to structure appropriate
experiences for the intellectual, psychological, social and
physical development of each student; providing op-
portunities for students' need for personal attention;
assisting students in the development of their career
objectives; making students aware of and encouraging the
use of the resources of the university; interpreting the
goals, objectives, and actions of the institution to students;
encouraging the development of a sense of community
among students, faculty, and staff; helping students to
develop nurnse in their livcc -a vctim nf valicm nfA hirh


student
program
affairs,
student
The I
Black C
Student


programs, women programs, mature student
is, commuter student services, student judicial
off-campus student programs and services, and
withdrawals.
international Student Center and the Institute of
culture are also operational units of the Office for
Services.


INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES
The Office of International Student Services assists
international students in adjusting to the changing life style
and study habits in a new and sometimes perplexing
environment. Special services are provided related to
foreign educational and cultural backgrounds; language,
legal, employment, academic, and personal matters; U.S.
immigration and other government agency responsibilities
as aliens; and currency exchange. The focus is on helping
international students achieve their educational goals,
while providing an insight into the culture of the United
States through a program of social activities, orientation
seminars, and community visits.
INSTITUTE OF BLACK CULTURE
The Institute of Black Culture is an educational tool for
students at the University of Florida. It is a facility for
enlightenment and black awareness where Afro-Americans
can focus on their history, literature, art, culture, and life
style. It is also a place where whites can develop a better
understanding of blacks and an appreciation of black
contributions to American society. The center sponsors
programs, exhibits, and related activities. It is student-
staffed and located at 1510 West University Avenue.

STUDENT HOUSING
The Director of Housing administers, supervises, and
coordinates all programs and operations in the residence
halls, the apartment villages and the Off-Campus Housing
Office.
GENERAL INFORMATION
All Freshmen who apply for admission to the University
will receive Housing Agreements upon approval of
admission. No application for housing is made by begin-
ning Freshmen.
The University of Florida has no residency requirement.
Entering students are free to choose either on-campus or
off-campus accommodations. Students who voluntarily
contract for on-campus housing normally must do so for
the entire academic year (September to August) if enrolled.
All non-beginning Freshmen must initiate their arrange-
ments for housing either by (1) applying to the Director of
Housing for assignment to University Housing Facilities, or
(2) obtaining accommodations in private housing. (See
Off-Campus Housing Section.)
All correspondence concerning application for University
Housing should be addressed to the Director of Housing,
University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611. An application for
residence hall space for students other than Freshmen may
be filed at any time after an application for admission to the
University has been made. Prospective students are urged
to apply as early as possible because of the housing
demand.
Roommate requests shall be considered if the individuals
wishing to room together submit their applications on the
same date, clearly indicate their desire to room together on
their respective applications, elect the same visitation
rhnirpt and arp within similar a'rndlmir rlnccifirmtmnn


'
*
I






STUDENT AFFAIRS


contribution to the life of your hall. Programs and activities
vary from hall to hall and from year to year, since they are
based on the needs and interests of the students
themselves.
STAFF In all residence halls or housing areas,
professionally trained Directors of Residence Life, Resi-
dence Life Coordinators, Hall Advisers, and student
Resident Assistants are well qualified to assist with group
and individual activities, as well as with matters of personal
concern to student residents. In each living unit (floor or
section), resident assistants and student leaders provide
group leadership and guidance.
SELF GOVERNMENT-All students in the residence halls
are entitled to participate in organizational activities which
can play a significant part in their educational, cultural,
social, and recreational life. Officers and representatives
are elected to hall and area councils which govern group
activities and help establish standards for group living.
In all residence halls, an annual activity fee (optional) of
$5.00 is collected and administered by the hall organization
to meet expenses of activities and programs.


f _
ROOM FURNISHINGS Rooms are equipped with beds,
mattresses, mattress pads, waste baskets, desks, chairs,
closets, chest-of-drawers and venetian blinds. Residents are
encouraged to obtain their own drapes, pictures,
bedspreads, rugs, and desk lamps after arrival at the
University.
LINEN SERVICE-All students assigned to residence
halls may elect for a basic linen service. The charge is
$13.00 extra per quarter. This service entitles a student to
two sheets, one pillowcase, and three towels per week.
Extra linens or additional items such as blankets, pillows,
and desk lamps may be rented at a nominal cost.

TELEPHONE SERVICE-Room telephones are available in
all of the residence halls except those designated as co-
ops. Each room telephone provides 24-hour service on
campus and within the Gainesville area. Charges for long
distance calls are billed monthly to the room phone by the
Southern Bell Telephone Company and residents pay
directly to the company. The basic cost for local room
telephone service is included in the room rent.
RENTAL REFRIGERATORS Refrigerators will be avail-
able in some residence areas and the cost is included in the
quarterly rate. Students may bring their own individual
refrigerators to any residence area where refrigerators are
not permanently installed. Students must make their own
arrangements for installation and removal of private
refrigerators. Students who bring private refrigerators to
rooms which are already furnished with refrigerators will
not receive a refund for the University refrigerator.
SWIMMING POOLS Swimming pools are located
adjacent to the Graham Area and the Yulee Area and are
available for use of students, staff, and faculty of the
University.

RESIDENCE HALLS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS
Some variety in types of accommodations is provided by
the University. The double room for two students is the
most common type. Several of the larger rooms or suites are
designated as triple rooms. Single rooms are available in
limited number, suites for two students are available in
several of the residence halls. Each suite consists of two
connected rooms-a bedroom and a study room.
Beaty Towers, Hume Hall, Graham Area, Tolbert Area,
and jennings Hall, are totally air-conditioned. Other


include main lounges, libraries, recreation rooms,
television rooms, cafeterias, and a sundry shop. Each floor
has a community bathroom, a study room, and a
community kitchen.
JENNINGS/YULEE AREA (coeducational): The Jenningsl
Yulee residence area houses about 850 students. Jennings
Hall is air conditioned; Yulee Hall is not air conditioned. In
Jennings Hall, men and women live in opposite wings
separated by a central office and public lobby. Single and
double rooms are available and some rooms can be
converted to suites. Each floor has community bath facilities
and a study room. Community kitchens on each floor
permit students to prepare their own meals. Air conditioned
public facilities include main lounges, libraries, recreation
rooms and television rooms.
Yulee Hall, also located in the Yulee Area, is reserved for
Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students who desire single
accommodations in a coeducational setting. The rooms,
originally designed as doubles, have been converted to
singles and men and women are assigned to alternate
floors.
Mallory Hall houses approximately 160 women in double
and single rooms. The rooms are not air conditioned;
however, air conditioned public facilities include the
library, television room, recreation room, and the lobbies.
2. WEST CAMPUS
GRAHAM/HUME/TOLBERT AREA is the largest co-
educational complex on campus, housing approximately
2,300 students. Men and women live in different buildings
or in opposite wings separated by a central lobby and
administrative offices. Graham and Hume Halls accom-
modate men and women on alternate floors. Each floor or
section has community restroom and study lounge
facilities. All facilities are air conditioned. Community
kitchens on each floor permit students to prepare their own
meals. Central public facilities include main lobbies,
libraries, recreation rooms, television rooms, cafeteria, and
snack bar. Student rooms are singles, doubles, and triples.
TOLBERT AREA (1,000 students). Consists of five
residence halls including North Hall, the only coeduca-
tional luxury co-op on campus. The area is adjacent to
Florida Field and a short distance from the student union.
GRAHAM AREA (650 students). Consists of three
residence halls which are located in the center of West
Campus. The area includes the largest library on West
Campus, an exercise room, and a swimming pool.
HUME AREA (720 students). The largest coeducational
hall on campus. Several intramural fields and athletic
courts border this popular residence area.
3. NORTH CAMPUS-
MURPHREE AREA (coeducational): Murphree, Thomas,
Sledd, Fletcher and Buckman Halls are all located in this
area. They were the first residence halls built on the
University of Florida campus and accommodate about 1100
students. Suites for two or three and single, double and
triple rooms are available. Most rooms are equipped with
lavatories. These halls are divided into separate, vertical
houses accommodating from 16 to 40 students each. Male
and female students live in separate houses. There is a bath
on each floor. A rathskeller is also located adjacent to the
area.
4. TOWERS
BEATY TOWERS (coeducational, upper division and
graduate students only). Each Tower accommodates
approximately 400 students, with men and women on
alternate floors. These buildings are entirely air con-




General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


The married student must meet the ri
admission to the University of Florida, qua
student as defined by his/her college or s
tinue to make normal progress toward a
mined by the head of his/her college
minimum of 9 credit hours is required
undergraduate student).
The married student must be a part <
defined as (1) husband and wife with or witl
children, or (2) divorced or widowed
dependent children.


requirements for
lify as a full-time
school, and con-
degree as deter-
or school. (A
for a full-time
)f a family unit,
lout one or more
d persons with


The married, widowed, or divorced student must be part
of a family with a combined gross annual income (including
grants-in-aid, scholarships, fellowships, and grants) which
does not exceed during the period of occupancy, the
following maximum income limitations:


Undergraduate
Graduate
Maguire


8,110


34 person
$9,100
9,310
8,700


5&6 person
$10,300
10,510
10,000


Since on-campus apartments are intended to provide
relatively low-cost housing for married students, a family
with a combined gross annual income in excess of the above
scale cannot apply for or occupy an apartment except in
unusual circumstances. Exceptions may be granted only by
the Committee on Student Housing.
Residents in all villages must furnish their own linens,
dishes, rugs, curtains, or other similar items. Utilities are an
extra expense and are billed with the rent.


CORRY (216 UNITS) AND SCHUCHT (104 UNITS)
MEMORIAL VILLAGES, of modern brick, concrete and
wood construction, contain almost an equal number of one-
and two-bedroom apartments, with a few three-bedroom
units in Corry Village only. These apartments are carpeted
and furnished with basic equipment in the living room,
kitchen, dining area, and one bedroom.
DIAMOND MEMORIAL VILLAGE consists of 208 apart-
ments similar in construction, furnishings, and equipment
to those in Corry and Schucht Villages. Special features
include a community building with air conditioned study-
meeting room, and a study cubicle in each two-bedroom
apartment.
MAGUIRE VILLAGE and UNIVERSITY VILLAGE SOUTH
consists of 348 centrally heated and air conditioned one and
two-bedroom apartments. Community facilities include a
laundry and a community room. Individual apartments are
not furnished but are carpeted. The kitchens are equipped
with stove and refrigerator.
TANGLEWOOD MANOR APARTMENTS, located approx-
imately 14 miles south of the central campus, consists of
208 furnished and unfurnished efficiency, one bedroom,
two bedroom, and two bedroom townhouse units. All units
are carpeted, centrally heated and air conditioned. All units
have disposals and two bedroom units have dishwashers.
All one and two bedroom units have one and one-half baths.
Community facilities include a large recreation hall, laundry
facilities, and two swimming pools.

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
Inquiries about off-campus housing should be directed to
the Off-Campus Housing Office, University of Florida,
Gainesville, 32611. Telephone 904/392-2181.
The office maintains extensive listings of apartments,
houses, rooming units, trailers, and trailer park lots offered
fnr rant tn talrdnnt farnril nr ftaff mamkart Farkh nrino


availability is received from the owners. Information on
these units is posted on bulletin boards in the office, but is
not compiled for mailing or general distribution.
The balance between housing supply and demand is
usually tight for the Fall Quarter, continues so for the
Winter Quarter, but loosens for the Spring and Summer
Quarters.
Mutually satisfactory rentals usually can be arranged
only after personal inspection of facilities and conferences
with the owners. Consequently, persons seeking off-cam-
pus housing should plan to come to Gainesville at an
appropriate time in advance of the term for which they
need housing. Such visits should be made on week
days-not on a weekend-after advance information has
been procured. Appointments may be made with the office
for consultation on particular problems.
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
Nineteen sororities and thirty fraternities have chapters
at the University of Florida. Fourteen fraternities maintain
chapter houses on fraternity row (West campus). Twelve
maintain off-campus houses (along Thirteenth Street and
University Avenue), and four reside in residence halls.
Twelve sororities maintain houses in the Panhellenic
Drive area. There are four sororities with houses in the
same area but they are located on private property. In
addition, three sororities reside in residence halls.
Regardless of location, all fraternities and sorority houses
and individuals are subject to University student regu-
lations.
Social fraternities and sororities must obtain recognition
from their respective governing group and Interfraternity
Council or Panhellenic Council, before they are registered
with the University as national organizations.
COOPERATIVE LIVING ARRANGEMENTS
There are five different cooperative living groups at the
University of Florida. Three of these groups are located on
campus: The menS co-op is in Reid Hall and the co-ed
coop is in Buckman Hall. The other three are located off
campus.
Among the qualifications for membership are scholastic
ability and reference of good character. These cooperative
living groups are specifically operated by and for students
with limited financial means for attending the University.
Inquiries pertaining to cooperative living on campus are
made to the Director of Housing, University of Florida,
Gainesville, 32611. The cooperative living organizations on
campus currently include: the Reid Hall Co-op for men; the
North Hall Co-op for men and women; the Buckman Co-op
for men and women. Off-campus co-ops include: the
Collegiate Living Organization (co-ed), 117 NW 15th Street,
and Georgia Seagle Hall, 1002 West University Avenue.

STUDENT FINANCIAL AFFAIRS
The Office for Student Financial Affairs functions under
policies established by the Presidential Committee on
Student Financial Affairs. Working in cooperation with all
agencies on campus, Student Financial Affairs counselors
interview students pertaining to employment, loans, grants,
and scholarships. This office serves as an important part of
the academic and personal counseling and guidance of
students seeking financial assistance. In every case an
attempt is made to suggest a balance between self-support,
parental help and institutional loans, grants and scholar-
ships. In order to assess need of applicants on an equitable
basis, the University of Florida participates in the College
Scholarship Service of the College Entrance Examination







STUDENT AFFAIRS


Scholarships
Scholarships are available in limited numbers and within
fund limitations. Awards are given to applicants on the basis
of academic excellence, good character, leadership and
financial need. Additional awards are made by donors who
select the recipient directly. Hence, students are urged to
consult the resources of their home community, civic clubs,
service organizations, and county educators.
Employment
Employment is available to students on a part-time basis
while in school. Every effort is made to direct applicants to
positions that will complement their educational goals. In
general, first quarter Freshmen are discouraged from
seeking employment until they establish themselves
academically.
Loans
Loans are available in two forms. First, long-term loans
from the University of Florida, Federal and State sources.
Such loans are repaid on a monthly installment basis after
the student terminates college attendance. Second, small
emergency short-term loans are available to meet tem-
porary needs. Such loans must be paid on the first day of
the last month in the quarter.
Grants
Grants supported through Federal funds are awarded
(within fund limitations) to those students whose financial
need qualifies them for consideration. Awardees are
selected from the Student Financial Aid Applications
submitted during the regular application dates shown
above. Exceptions to this rule are the Federal Basic
Educational Opportunity Grant and the State Florida
Student Assistant Grant. High school and community
college counselors have applications and complete in-
formation on these programs.
Awards
Awards are made to students in recognition of excep-
tional achievement in various fields of student life. In some
instances these are cash grants; in others, medals,
certificates or keys.

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT
CENTER

The Career Planning and Placement Center, located in
Suite G-22 of the Reitz Union, provides career
development, job placement, and cooperative education
programs for all University of Florida students and alumni.
The objective of the Center is to assist students in
developing 1) viable career plans compatible with
academic interests, and 2) strategies that insure
marketability and employment opportunity upon gradua-
tion. Thus, the entire program focuses upon the
student--during early undergraduate years, approaching
graduation, and after graduation as an alumnus. The
program is designed to permit students to enter at any
point in their college careers.
Program resources include:
Individual advisement for students seeking personal
career development and job search assistance.
A career mini-school offering seventeen different career
investigations and job search preparation short courses
weekly (50-minutes each). Courses include career planning,
career information for minorities, job market projections
r. a &


more competitive when entering the job market upon
graduation.
An extensive placement service for students and alumni
comprising the largest on-campus job interviewing program
in the state representing all career fields, and a computer
program matching students and alumni with potential
employers. The program provides employers with
computer printed "mini-resumes' of qualified persons.
Students and alumni receive computer listings of
comparable employers. The Center also publishes current
employer job listings representing hundreds of positions-
full-time, part-time and summer--for students, new
graduates,and experienced alumni.


A care<
several tl


employer
education
operating
on gradua
ships and
resource
entering t
A special
Desk" coi
economic
bulletins


I
I


er resources library contu
thousand employes and
contact lists; directories
and government; lists
overseas; reference and
te and special studies prog
assistantships; and man'


lining information on
related occupations;
for business, industry,
of American firms
informational material
prams including fellow-
v other materials and


data needed by students planning a career,
he job market, or contemplating graduate school.
feature of the library facilities is the "Trends
training research data on job trends, outlook and
: forecasts, labor market statistics, manpower
for various career fields, special directories, and


publications giving reports and ratings on most employers.
An audio visual department with study carrels and a
library of over 150 slide/tape, video, and audio programs


covering career choices, employer
of academic programs, and job
techniques.
A qualification record repository
available to students and alumni. Qi
over 40,000 students and alumni
Copies of credentials sent upon requ
alumni to potential employers. In
refers qualified persons on file and s
interested employers requesting c
vacancies.


information, selection
search and interview

and referral service is
Jalification Records on
are presently on file.
est of the students and
addition, the Center
seeking employment to
candidatess to fill job


An "outreach program" in which professional staff
members are available to hold seminars for student
organizations, for lecture presentations to classes on all
phases of career planning and job search preparation, and
to develop "Career Day" programs in conjunction with
colleges.
For additional information, students, alumni, and faculty
are invited to visit the Center. Staff members will be happy
to discuss ideas, concerns and needs for individuals or
groups.


WAYNE REITZ UNION


The J. Wayne Reitz Union is the official center of campus
activities. The provision of facilities, services, and a varied
program of activities available to all persons of the
University "community" serves as the basic purpose of the
Union. Policy for the Reitz Union is established by a Board
of Managers, consisting of eight students and six faculty
members.
During May, 1967, the J. Wayne Reitz Union building
was opened. Among the facilities and services offered are
music listening rooms, art gallery areas, Arts and Crafts
Center, photographic darkrooms, browsing library, a games
area for bowling, billiards and table tennis, public
telephones, information desk, passenger and ride wanted
bulletin boards, display cases, barber shop. Union Store.





General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


Of particular significance to the educational program of
the University is the Student Activities Center located on
the third floor. A distinctive physical arrangement of offices
and work space for Student Government, the Honor Court,
and many other student groups enhances the effectiveness
of the total student activities program of the University.
The Reitz Union plans and promotes many social,
cultural, and recreational activities for the campus
community. Among the regular activities are art exhibits,
International Dinners, non-credit courses, current and
cultural films, a performing arts series, speakers' programs,
outdoor concerts, poetry readings, book reviews, arts and
crafts sales, and campus tournaments in billiards, bowling,
bridge, football and chess. Special activities such as
receptions, dances, intracampus and inter-collegiate
bridge, billiard and bowling tournaments, music apprec-
iation listening hours, poetry hours, forums and book
reviews, fashion shows, international activities, and special
holiday parties are all a part of the Reitz Union program.
A distinctive area of the Reitz Union is the H. P. Constans
Theatre, a 464-seat facility for the dramatic arts which
provides excellence in design, equipment for staging and
lighting, and acoustics.


UNIVERSITY


COUNSELING CENTER


The University Counseling Center offers free psycholog-
ical and vocational counseling to all students of the
University and their spouses. The Center is staffed by
psychologists whose primary interests are to facilitate the
growth and development of individuals in the University
setting. Psychological services are available to students
experiencing academic, personal, social, or marital
difficulties. Vocational services include testing, career
information, and counseling. The Center offers consul-
tative services to University faculty and staff who are
engages in advising or counseling students.
Students may contact the Center by coming in person to
Room 311 Little Hall.


UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE


Food Service provides food service in seven locations on
campus convenient to residence halls and classrooms.
Students are offered high quality food at reasonable
prices in campus cafeterias and snack bars, as well as the
Orange and Brew, Rathskeller, and the Arredondo Room.
It is the policy of the University to provide well-prepared
food at the lowest possible cost. Students may effect a
savings by participating in one of the three voluntary meal
plans. The seven-day plan, three meals a day; the five-day
plan (Monday through Friday) three meals a day, or the five
day plan (Monday through Friday) any two meals a day. For
further information contact the Servomation Office, 110
Johnson Hall.

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
The Student Health Service provides a spectrum of
medical services which includes primary medical care,
health education, health screening programs, and mental
health consultation and counseling.
The Service consists of an out-patient clinic and a 14-bed
in-patient unit staffed by physicians, nurses, psychologists,
pharmacists, laboratory and x-ray technicians and support-
ing personnel. It is housed in the Infirmary, which is


use of the Service as some laboratory tests. When more
complicated diagnostic studies or hospitalization is
required, additional charges are made. For this reason, the
supplemental student government health insurance plan is
highly recommended.
A personal health history questionnaire completed by
you is required before registration at the University.

SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC
The Division of Speech Pathology and Audiology,
Department of Speech, ofters services without charge to
any University student who has a speech or hearing
disorder. This assistance is available at any time during the
year and therapy sessions are adjusted to individual
schedules. The student is encouraged to visit the clinic and
to take advantage of this service located in room 442 of the
Arts & Sciences Building.


READING AND STUDY
SKILLS CENTER
The University Reading and Study Skills Center is a free
service to students at all levels. Diagnosis and opportunities
for self-improvement are offered on an individual basis in
the areas of reading speed, comprehension, vocabulary,
and study habits. There are no outside assignments, grades,
or course credits given. Students may initateordiscontinue
enrollment at any time. Consultative work and other
services are also available to staff members. Interested
persons may apply at S. W. Broward Hall during regular
daytime class periods.


Student


Life


STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND
ORGANIZATIONS


Student Government: Student Government at the
University of Florida is a cooperative organization for
advancing student interests and is based on mutual
confidence among and between the student body, the
faculty, and the administration. Considerable authority has
been granted the student body for the regulation and
conduct of student affairs. The criterion in granting
authority to the Student Government has been the
disposition of UF students to accept responsibility com-
mensurate with the authority granted them. Student
Government has several resources at its disposal to fulfill its
mission, including the allocation of approximately three
million dollars per year in student activity and service fees,
substantial authority in the regulation of co-curricular
activities, and administration of the Honor System. The
University of Florida faculty and staff feel that training in
acceptance of responsibility for the conduct of student
affairs at the University is a valuable part of the educational
growth and development of the individual student.


Student G
franchise und
to its continue
on the state a
to the local
distributed in
embodied in
a n fhiur Al ; i


government is a body politic, occupying its
er grant from the Board of Regents and subject
ed approval. Student Government is patterned
nd national form of government, but adapted
needs of the Student Body. Powers are
to the three branches: (1) legislative, which is
the Student Senate; (2) judicial, which is
tho iInnnr wrt anrl2 the Traffir rCnurth 31






STUDENT AFFAIRS


and the advancement of proposals for change.
Students may apply for various positions within the
student government structure by contacting the Student
Government offices on the third floor of the i. Wayne Reitz
Union.
Interhall Council: The purpose of the Interhall Council is
to provide an organization which will further serve as a
channel of communication between Residence Area
Councils, Student Government, and the Student Housing
Office as well as coordinating individual Area Council
activities and representing the collective interests of all
residents.
The voting membership of the Interhall Council consists
of two representatives from each of the Area Councils.


Dramatics:
in several play
Players, a dr
Department (
Student Se


Any student has an opportunity to participate
,s which are presented each year by the Florida
dramatic group under the direction of the
)f Speech.
nate: The Student Senate is comDosed of


representatives elected from the colleges and living areas
on the campus and in general act as the Legislative Branch


of Student
Religious
the contrib
community
associated
programs a
tional and
Department'
Cooperative


Government.
Activities: The University of Florida welcomes
,utions of religious traditions to the campus
. The churches, centers, and organizations
with the University offer a rich variety of
ind ministries. There are also interdenomina-
nondenominational activities fostered by the


t
e.


of Religion


and the Campus


Ministries


Fraternities: Thirty national social fraternities for


men have established chapters at the U
general work of the traternities is supe
Interfraternity Council, composed of one
each of the representative fraternities.
fraternities at the University of Florida are Al
Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Phi Alpha, Alph
Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi, Delta Chi, Delta Ta
Upsilon, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi,
Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi Beta Sigma, Phi Carn


university. The
revised by the
delegate from
The national
pha Epsilon Pi,
a Tau Omega,
iu Delta, Delta
Kappa Sigma,
ima Delta, Phi


Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Tau, Phi Kappa Theta, Pi Kappa
Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi,
Tau Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi, and Omega Psi Phi.
Nineteen women's social sororities have established
chapters at the University. Sixteen have built chapter
houses and three live in other housing arrangements. These
living quarters serve as the center of the activities of the
individual sororities. Primary jurisdition in sorority matters
is vested in the Panhellenic Council. The chapters at the
University of Florida are Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Delta Pi,
Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Omicron Pi,
Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta Phi
Epsilon, Delta Sigma Theta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa
Delta, Phi Mu, Phi Sigma Sigma, Pi Beta Phi, Sigma Delta
Tau, Sigma Kappa, Zeta Phi Beta and Zeta Tau Alpha.


Professional and Honora
AND SOILS CLUB; ALPHA
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA,
SOCIETY, Allied Health F
DELTA, Sociology; ALPHA


ry Fraternities: AGRONOMY
DELTA SIGMA, Advertising;
Pre-Medical; ALPHA ETA
'rofessions; ALPHA KAPPA
KAPPA PSI, Business


Administration; ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA, Freshmen
scholastic honorary; ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA, Medical;
ALPHA PI MU, Industrial Engineering; ALPHA SIGMA MU,
Materials Science & Engineering; ALPHA ZETA, Agricul-
ture; AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY; AMERICAN INSTI-
iTt IT C /- A clDllKi A i i-ri/TC A Litr-t A cTrn/l A I rirc. A & Arnr,


ENGINEERS; ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY, Military; ASSOC-
IATION FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION; ASSOCIATION
FOR COMPUTING MACHINERY; BETA ALPHA PSI,
Accounting; BETA GAMMA SIGMA, Business and
Economics; BILLY MITCHELL DRILL TEAM, Military;
CAMPUS DESIGN GROUP, Architecture and Planning
Design; CITRUS CLUB; COUNSELOR EDUCATION STU-
DENT ASSOCIATION; CRIMINAL JUSTICE ASSOCIATION;
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION, Edu-
cation; DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB; DELTA PI EPSILON,
Graduate Business Education; DELTA SIGMA PI, Business;
DELTA SIGMA RHO, Intercollegiate Forensics; ENDOG-
ENOUS RHYTHM. Zoology; EPSILON LAMBDA CHI,


Engineering Leadership; ETA
Engineering; FLORIDA ANTHRO
BLUE KEY, Leadership; FLORIDA
Professionalism in Engineering;
ECONOMICS CLUB; FOOD SCIE
CLUB; GAMMA THETA UPSILON
HONOR SOCIETY, Architecture


KAPPA NU, Electrical
POLOGY CLUB; FLORIDA
, ENGINEERING SOCIETY,
FOOD AND RESOURCE
ENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
'J, Geography; GARGOYLE
& Fine Arts Honorary;


INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS;
INSTITUTE OF TRAFFIC ENGINEERS; JOHN MARSHALL
BAR ASSOCIATION, Law; JUSTICE WATCH, Law; KAPPA
DELTA PI, Education; KAPPA EPSILON, Pharmacy; KAPPA
KAPPA PSI, Band; KAPPA PSI, Pharmacy; KAPPA TAU
ALPHA, journalism & Communications; LAMBDA GAMMA
PHI, Veterinary Medicine;
LAMBDA TAU, Medical Technology; MICROBIOLOGY
CLUB; MORTOR BOARD, Honor Society; NATIONAL
STUDENTS SPEECH AND HEARING ASSOCIATION,
Speech Pathologyv: NEWELL ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY


Entomolog
Entomology


Y;


OMICRON I
ORDER OF (
ship; PHI AL
PHI BETA
Education; F
Law; PHI ET
PHI, Schola
ALPHA, Pol
Engineering;
SERVICE OR
RELATIONS
Pharmacy;
Pharmacy;
SCABBARD
FIDELIS, Mi
DELTA CHI
Geology; SI
SIGMA PI SI
Tutoring; SI
ENGINEERING
OF ENGINE
nology; SC
STUDENT Al
STUDENT
HOSPITAL A
AND BUILE


OMI
DELTA
3MEGi
PHA D
KAPPA


PH
A


:C


II C


CRON DELTA EPSILON, Economics;
KAPPA, Leadership and Scholastics;
A, Honorary Fraternity/Sorority Leader-
ELTA, Law; PHI ALPHA THETA, History;
Scholarship; PHI BETA LAMBDA,
II THETA, Business; PHI DELTA PHI,


SICMA, Freshman Scholastics; PHI KAPPA
ics; PHI MU ALPHA, Music; PI SIGMA
cal Science; PI TAU SIGMA, Mechanical
PRE-LEGAL SOCIETY; PRE-PROFESSIONAL


;ANI2


STUDE
RHO
SAVAP
AND
litary;
, Jour
GMA
GMA,
GMA
JG SCI
ERING
ICIETY
MERIC
ASSO(
IDMIN
)ERS A


ACTION ; PSI CHI, Psychology; PUBLIC
:NT SOCIETY OF AMERICA; RHO CHI,
EPSILON, Real Estate; RHO PI PHI,
NT, Leadership & Service Honorary;
BLADE, Military Science; SEMPER
SIGMA ALPHA IOTA, Music; SIGMA
nalism; SIGMA GAMMA EPSILON,
LAMBDA CHI, Building Construction;
Physics; SIGMA TAU SIGMA, Honorary
THETA TAU, Nursing; SOCIETY OF
ENCES,Engineering Sciences; SOCIETY
TECHNOLOGISTS, Engineering Tech-
OF PHYSICS STUDENTS, Physics;
AN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION;
CIATION IN HEALTH CARE AND
ISTRATION; STUDENT CONTRACTORS
ASSOCIATION; STUDENT NATIONAL


MEDICAL ASSOCIATION; STUDENT OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY ASSOCIATION; STUDENT PHYSICAL THERAPY
ASSOCIATION; TAU BETA PI, Engineering Honorary; TAU
BETA SIGMA, Band; TAU SIGMA DELTA, Architecture;
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA FORESTRY CLUB; UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA LAW REVIEW; UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
REHABILITATION ASSOCIATION; UNIVERSITY OF FLOR-
IDA STUDENT AMERICAN GUILD OF ORGANISTS;
VEGETABLE CROPS ROUNDTABLE, Agriculture; WILDLIFE
SOCIETY; XI SIGMA PI,. Forestry.


Social


/


F




General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


HONOR SYSTEM
The governing system at the University gives to the
students the privilege of discipline themselves through the
Honor System. The Honor System was established in the
University in 1914 as the result of student initiative.
Among the basic principles of an Honor System are the
convictions that self-discipline is the greatest builder of
character, that responsibility is a prerequisite to self-
respect, and that these are essential to the highest type of
education.
The success of the system is dependent upon the honor
of each individual member of the student body in that: (1)
he/she is duty-bound to abide by the principles of the
Honor Code, and (2) he/she is further pledged to report to
the Office for Student Services such violations as he/she
may observe.


The Honor Code of the Student Body is striking
simplicity. Each student is pledged to refrain
cheating and other forms of academic dishonesty.
examinations, proctors may or may not be used
discretion of the professor.
The Honor Court is composed entirely of studei


Chancellor sits
elected from th<
responsible for
System. A jury i
Body to decide
Chancellor and
which can rar
probation, to su
This policy i:
sentence should


student
its ruli
Office
The


t convicted
ng to the
for Stud(


a
e
ii
s


g in its


from
During
at the


1


s judge in each case. There are justices,
various colleges on the campus, who are
vestigations and maintaining the Honor
empaneled at random from the Student


the guilt or innocence of the student. The
Vice Chancellor determine the penalty,
ige from severe reprimand, academic
jspension or expulsion.
s in accord with the principle that the
1 be educative rather than punitive. Any


d by this Cou
Honor Court
nt Services.


Honor System


rt has the right of appeal from
Board of Masters and to the


is primarily a student responsibility.


The future of the system rests with each new class of
students entering the University.
The University faculty and administration pledge their
support to the Honor System.

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
The University of Florida athletic program is a
comprehensive one with teams competing against regional
and intersectional opponents in nine intercollegiate sports.
Florida, a member of the Southeastern Conference and
the National Collegiate Athletic Association, fields athletic
teams in football, basketball, cross country, baseball, track,
golf, tennis, wrestling and swimming.
Physical facilities include Florida Field Stadium with a


seating
complex
pool, ru
champi
facility
rooms,


capacity of 62,000, a baseball diamond, a
tely equipped varsity tennis stadium, swimming
Inning track, two football practice fields, an 18-hole
onship golf course, and Florida Gymnasium, a
which houses adequate dressing and training
weight rooms, meeting rooms, four practice courts,


and the 7,200 capacity varsity court.


Women's Intercollegiate Athletics are offered in
gymnastics, golf, swimming, tennis, volleyball, softball,
basketball, track and field. The program is operated under
the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women.
Florida is in Region III, Southeast Region.


INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS AND
RECREATION
Intramurals is a significant part of the total educational
community at the University of Florida. The Intramural
program provides highly competitive and recreational
activities for every segment of the university population.
For unstructured leisure time activity, the students, faculty
and staff may picnic, boat and swim at Lake Wauburg,
check out equipment from four equipment rooms on
campus, play on any of the 18 football fields, 15 softball
fields, 12 volleyball courts, 32 tennis courts, six four-wall
handball-racquetball courts, 24 three-wall handball-rac-
quetball courts, four indoor basketball courts, five outdoor
basketball courts, swim in the Florida pool, or exercise on
the Universal Gym.
For structured competitive play, the Intramural
Department organizes tournaments in the following
leagues: All University Special Events, Co-Recreational,
Men's and Women's residence halls. Student Wives,
Engineering, Faculty/Staff, Fraternity, Men and Women
Open, Men and Women Independent, Law, Sorority, Little
Sister, and ROTC. The Club Program offers instruction,
recreational, and competition in approximately 26 clubs
including Folk Dance, Karate, Sailing, Skiing, Weight
Lifting, Archery and many more.


Student
tradition
Students (
Student C
Office, sei
Policy Boa
The cu
sports on


p
in
)ff
)ire
rve
ard
rre
Ci


participation and student administration is a
the Intramural Program at the University.
iciate the games, manage the leagues, act as
?ctor and Office Director in the Intramural
* on the Protest Board and on the Intramural

nt importance and growth of recreational
campus is unmatched in the history of the


University. We invite everyone to use this resource at the
University to fulfill their leisure time interest.





AUTOMOBILE AND TRAFFIC
REGULATIONS
Any student of the University of Florida is eligible to
register a motor vehicle for use as authorized and to operate
and park a registered vehicle on campus. The type of
parking decal issued is determined by the student's local
residence and student classification.
Students desiring to park on campus during restricted
hours must register their automobiles or motorcycles at the
University Traffic and Parking Department, 108B Johnson
Hall, during their first registration period. Failure to do so
will result in a parking citation. There is a system for fines
and a point system for on-campus vehicle violations.
Persons failing to respond to tickets will be subject to an
additional administrative fee of $5.00 and will not receive
grades or an academic transcript until delinquent fines and
fees have been paid.
A copy of the rules governing traffic, parking and
registration of vehicles on campus may be obtained from
the Traffic and Parking Department. Each student is urged
to familiarize himself with these regulations upon regis-
tering at the University.


e


Its. The







STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


Student Academic


the college concerned that all requirements of the course


of study


as outlined in the college announcement, or its


equivalent, as
offering the co


Regulations


determined by the faculty of the college


urse,


have been completed.


2. Recommendation of the faculty of the
the degree.


information relative to graduation, social


activities, failure in studies, conduct,


etc., may be found in


the Student Handbook and the sections of the catalog
containing regulations of the separate colleges and schools.
Each student should become familiar with rules and
regulations of the University.


READMISSIONS
APPLICATION FOR READMISSION
The information contained in this section applies only to
students who have previously been admitted at any level to
the University of Florida. Requirements for admission for a
student seeking to enroll in the University of Florida for the
first time will be found in the Admissions section of this
catalog. Please consult the INDEX for page numbers.
How to Apply for Readmission: An applicant should
address a request to the Office of the Registrar for
application forms. Forms and directions vary with the level
of readmission. The applicant should indicate in the request
the college and the level of last enrollment at the University
of Florida as well as the college and level for which he or she
wishes to apply. Applications must be received in the Office
of the Registrar by the deadline date for the term, as
published in the University Calendar.
READMISSION OF STUDENTS
1. Satisfactory academic record.
a. An applicant must be eligible to return to the
University of Florida on the basis of one's previous


academic record at this institution.


the applicant


has attended any college or university subsequent to
enrollment at the University of Florida, he or she
must also have an average of "C" or higher (as
computed by the University of Florida) on all work
attempted at each institution. The applicant must also
be in good standing and eligible to return to each
institution previously attended.
b. An applicant for readmission must meet the
admission requirements of the college or school he
or she expects to enter. (Consult the appropriate
college section of the catalog for specific admission
requirements.)
2. Satisfactory conduct record
a. An applicant must present a satisfactory record of
conduct. Regardless of other qualifications, an
applicant who has experienced major or continuing
difficulties with school or other authorities since the
last enrollment at the University of Florida may find
his or her application for readmission disapproved.
3. Submission bf Request
a. An applicant for readmission should indicate the
name under which he or she was registered when last
enrolled and the social security number.


rmnim:Im


U. 1~-zus1 f


3. Residence


requirements: (a) The minimum residence


requirement for the baccalaureate degree is three quarters.
(b) Students are required to complete the last forty-five
credits applied toward the baccalaureate degree during
regular residence in the college from which the student is
to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be made
only upod written petition approved by the faculty of the


college concerned, but in no


case may the amount ot


extension work permitted exceed more than eighteen of the
last fifty-four credits required for a baccalaureate degree. (c)
For residence requirements for degrees in the College of
Law, Medicine, or Dentistry, see the catalog of each college.
(d) For residence requirements of the various graduate


degrees, se
4. Physical


enters


e the Gradu,
Education


School


Catalog.


Requirements:


Each student who


as a Freshman or Sophomore must complete three


quarters of Physical Education.


5. Average
must have


Required: In order to secure a degree, a student


a


toward that degree
6. Two Degrees:
and B.S. may b


average
ee.


or better in all credits required


Two degrees of the same rank, e.g., B.A.
e conferred upon the same individual


provided that the second degree represents at least forty-


five credits


of additional


work,


with the


necessary


qualitative and residence requirements.


7. Continous Attendance: When


a student's attendance


continuous, graduation according to the curriculum under
which he or she entered is permitted, provided the courses


required are offered by the University. If


required courses are r
college concerned wi
individual students as


involved.


much


As long


some


or all of the


io longer offered, the faculty of the
II make such adjustments for the
are appropriate for the curriculum


as a student attends the University


as one quarter during any calendar


residence


is continuous.


his or her


8. Application For Degree: Students expecting to graduate
must file an application for the degree in the Registrar's
Office on or before the date indicated in the current
University Calendar of the catalog. Students must apply in
the quarter in which they expect to graduate, regardless of
previous applications in previous quarters.


9. Time Limit: To


receive


a degree a candidate must have


completed: (a) all residence work required for graduation
*-- ..


at least 24 hours


prior to the scheduled meeting of the


College Faculty voting on the candidates for degrees; (b) all
extension work at least two weeks prior to the scheduled
meeting of the College Faculty voting on the candidates for
degrees.


10. Time-Shortened


Degree


Opportunities:


A variety of


programs is offered by the University of Florida which may
enable students to shorten the length of the time necessary
for them to complete their degree requirements. These
opportunities include several credit by examination pro-
grams, and other options. For specific information, refer to
the section listed in the table of contents entitled "Time


Shortened Degree Opportunities." Also
descrintions for additional information.


refer to the college


Additional


college awarding


I


I I


1





General

STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


apply toward degree requirements may not exceed
one-fourth of the amount required for the degree. For
additional or unique restrictions on extension work
allowed toward a degree, students should refer to the
appropriate section of this catalog or consult with the
dean of the college concerned.
d. Students may not take, by'extension work, more than
eighteen of the last fifty-four credits necessary for a
baccalaureate degree.
e. Simultaneous registration in on-campus and ex-
tension work is permitted provided that approval has
been obtained from the dean of the college in which
the student is registered.
12. Registration of Graduate Students: A student must be
registered in the University for the term in which the
candidate's final examination is given and at the time he or
she receives a degree.
13. Repeat Course Work: Credit will not be allowed on
repeated course work if the course that is repeated contains
essentially the same course content as it did when the
student initially enrolled for the course. However, the grade
points can be forgiven under the forgiveness policy, which
is explained under Averages in this section.
14. Pending Charge of Honor Code or Code of Student
Conduct Violation: No degree will be conferred upon a
student against whom there is pending an unresolved
charge of either Honor Code or Code of Student Conduct
violation where the penalty for such violation would likely
be:
a. Penalty Hours
b. Suspension
c. Expulsion
d. Failing Grade
e. Any combination of the above until such time as the
charge is resolved and degree requirements are met.


MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
Some colleges have a maximum load which is stated in the
catalog. In the absence of such a statement, the general
University regulation applies. This regulation allows a
maximum load of 15 credits for a student who earned an
average below a "C" the preceding quarter of attendance.
The minimum load for all students is 12 hours.
Simultaneous enrollment in correspondence courses,
extension work at another college or university is counted
in computing the maximum, but not the minimum load.
At the time of registration, a student, upon the approval
of his or her dean, may register for less than the minimum
or more than the maximum load. After the late registration
period has closed, no student attending under the above
conditions will be permitted to drop below the minimum
load unless the student successfully petitions the college in
which he or she is enrolled. The minimum load for fulltime
benefits from the VA or Social Security is 12 hours per
quarter.


DUAL ENROLLMENT


1. Definition: Dual Enrollment, as used in this regu-


registration to the registrar at the University of
Florida.
b. A student will not be permitted to register at
the University of Florida for a course which is a


part of the curriculum at the
institution. This requirement also
are available at the parent institu
be evaluated as equivalent or
stitutes for the University of Flo
converse of these statements
University of Florida students
courses at another institution.
c. Priority in assignment to class
sity of Florida will be given to r
students.


student's parent
applies if courses
tion which might
acceptable sub-
rida course. The
also applies to
registering for

es at the Univer-
egularly enrolled


d. A student taking courses at the University of
Florida will be required to register and attend
classes under the University of Florida calendar.
e. The student will pay appropriate fees at the
University of Florida based on the number and level
of credit hours for which he or she is registered at
this institution.
It is the student's responsibility to insure that an official
transcript of work completed under a dual registration is
forwarded to the parent institution. Certification to selective
service, social security and veterans administration pro-
grams is also the responsibility of the individual student
who must request each individual institution to furnish
records as might be necessary.


NON-DEGREE REGISTRATION


A student not previously registered at the University of
Florida may with college approval register for one quarter
only as a non-degree student. Members of the faculty and
staff and those with special permission from their college
may consider registering as non-degree students for more
than one quarter. Registration will be on a space available
basis. Procedures for registering are available from the
Registrar's Office.


GRADES


Results of student's work
Office as follows:


are recorded in the Registrar's


1. Undergraduate Students: Passing grades are A, B, C,
D, in order of excellence, and S-Satisfactory. Failing
grades are E Failure, I Incomplete, U -
Unsatisfactory, X Absent from examination, EW -
Dropped for nonattendance or unsatisfactory work, and
WF Withdrew failing.
Grades of I and X are considered as failing grades.
They must be changed to passing grades in accordance
with the dates set in the University Calendar, or be
counted as grades of E in considering a student's record
for graduation or in calculating averages.
In special situations where it is not possible to assign
regular grades at the end of the term, a deferred grade
may be assigned. The symbol for a deferred grade is a
grade of H. This grade may be assigned only in special
cases, such as modular course, confined to infirmary,
and similar rirnmlmtanrc A orad nof H will not ha







STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION
It is the University's desire to allow students to receive as
broad an education as possible. Therefore, students are
encouraged to take courses in disciplines in which they may
not have the proper background. They may take such
course work as electives and receive a grade of S -
satisfactory, or U -Unsatisfactory. These grades become a
part of a students record, but do not count in the grade
point average as computed by the University of Florida.
NOTE: Other agencies or institutions might count the grade
of U as a failing grade in their grade point average
computaton.
To be eligible under the S-U option, a student must 1) be
in good standing -may not be on any type of probation, or
warning, 2) be classified as an undergraduate student, and
3) have approval from proper university officials.
Only one course will ordinarily be approved in any one
quarter. Approvals for exception to this policy must be
obtained from the dean of the college in which the student
is registered. Standard exception Required Physical
Education courses may be taken under the S-U option even
when the option has been elected in another course.
The deadline for electing the S-U option is the last day
for dropping a course as published in the calendar. In
addition, students who elect the S-U option may
subsequently request that their instructors assign a
standard grade.


AVERAGES
1. Definitions: The term "average," as used in any
university regulations concerning probation or sus-
pension, always refers to the average on work
attempted at the University of Florida. Grades re-
ceived at other institutions are not averaged with
grades received at the University of Florida for the
purpose of meeting any University average require-
ment. Most honorary societies take into consideration
the quality of the work done at other institutions in
meeting any average requirements they may have.
2. How computed: Averages are determined by
computing the ratio of grade points to quarter hours
recorded as attempted. Grade points are established
by equating each quarter hour as follows: A with 4.0,
B with 3.0, C with 2.0, D with 1.0, and E, WF, EW, I,
and X with 0.0. In computing averages, a course
repeated is counted as many times as grades for it are
recorded, unless forgiven under the forgiveness policy
as explained in item 4. Hours for grades of S and U are
not computed in the University of Florida grade point
average.
3. Grade Point Averages: Students' graoe point aver-
ages will be based on their overall work at the
University of Florida. That is, when students are
admitted to the University of Florida their grade point
averages begin and their academic averages will be
based upon work taken at the University of Florida.
While work transferred from other institutions toward
a degree program at the University of Florida will
count in total hours earned, such hours will not be a
part of the University of Florida grade point average.
4. Forgiveness Policy: Any student while registered as
a Freshman or Sophomore at the University of Florida
may repeat any course in which he or she made a
grade of "D" or "E" with the privilege of having the


However, the privilege will be limited to a maximum of
total of five (5) quarter credit hours.

PROBATION, SUSPENSION, AND
EXCLUSION FOR
ACADEMIC REASONS
The University of Florida is responsible for providing the
best possible education in an economical and efficient
manner. In order to discharge this responsibility, the
University expects and requires reasonable academic
progress from its students. Continuation of students who
have demonstrated a lack of the necessary ability,
preparation, industry, or maturity to benefit reasonably
from a program of university study is inconsistent with the
University's responsibility as a tax supported institution.
The University of Florida Senate has enacted regulations
covering probation, suspension, and exclusion. These
regulations are directed toward enforcing the academic
standards of the University. The academic standards of the
University require both the maintenance of grade point
averages consistent with a reasonable chance of satisfactory
completion of the University programs and reasonable
conformance to the catalog description of the program of
study in which the student is engaged. Any college of the
University may specify additional academic standards and
students are responsible for observing the regulations
pertaining to such standards.

PROBATION BECAUSE OF
UNSATISFACTORY
ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
The purpose of academic probation is to recognize
formally the fact that a student is not making satisfactory
progress.
The conditions of academic probation are intended to: (1)
relate to quality of achievement below standards required
to ultimately graduate; (2) recognize unsatisfactory work at
an early date; (3) be sufficiently significant to make clear to
the student, and the administration, the shortcomings of
the student's performance; (4) provide occasion for
counseling; (5) give students whose ultimate success is
doubtful further opportunity to demonstrate adequate
performance.
All undergraduate students:
A student with less than a 2.0 grade point average overall
for University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship
warning if he or she has a grade point deficit which is less
than ten.
A student with less than a 2.0 grade point average overall
for University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship
probation if he or she has a grade point deficit of ten or
more, but less than twenty.
Any student who is eligible to return to the University
after a suspension because of academic reasons will be
placed on final scholarship probation for his or her next
quarter.
In addition to University probation, students may be
placed on probation by the colleges in which they are
registered if they do not maintain normal academic progress
in the program of study in which they are engaged.






General
STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


REMOVAL OF PROBATION
All Undergraduate Students:
Scholarship probation or scholarship warning will be
removed when a student's grade point deficit has been
reduced to zero.
Removal of college probation:
A student will be removed from college probation when
it is deemed by his or her college that the student is making
satisfactory academic progress in the program of study in
which he or she is engaged.


SUSPENSION
The purpose of suspension from the University for
academic reasons is to remove from the University
community those students who would not ultimately meet
requirements for graduation if they continued at their
current level of progress.
The conditions of academic suspensions are intended to
(1) select students whose performance indicates that they
will not fulfill the requirements for graduation; (2)
encourage students to leave the University as soon as a high
probability of failure is evident.
All undergraduate students:
Students with a grade point deficit of twenty or more in
their University of Florida work shall be suspended from the
University for one quarter.
A student re-enrolling after a one quarter suspension will
be on final scholarship probation. If the grade point deficit
is twenty or more at the end of the quarter the student re-
enrolls, he or she will be suspended without the possibility
of re-registering, except by committee action.


EARNING CREDIT
WHILE SUSPENDED

A stJdent under any kind of academic suspension at the
University of Florida may not earn credit toward a degree at
the Unriversity of Florida by taking work in residence at
another institution or through extension or correspondence
courses.
However, a student who was suspended for academic
reasons and who has not yet earned the Associate of Arts
Certificate who subsequently graduates from an accredited
Florida Community College may appeal to the Petitions
Committee for reinstatement. The Petitions Committee
may then, upon the recommendation of the college in
which the student wishes to enter, admit the student on
academic probation to that college or school. Credits
earned by such students while under academic suspension


from the
accordance
University


University of
with other
of Florida.


Florida
rules


be transferred in
regulations of the


the College responsible for the program if the student fails
or refuses to maintain normal academic progress. Such
exclusion does not prohibit the student from enrolling in
other programs or colleges if he or she meets the
requirements.
Graduate students:
Graduate students may be denied further registration in
the University or in their graduate major when their
progress toward completion of their planned graduate
program becomes unsatisfactory. Unsatisfactory progress
has been defined by the Graduate Council to include failure
to maintain an accumulative grade average of B in all work
attempted in the Graduate School.


WITHDRAWALS
All undergraduate students:
It is the responsibility of each student to make everyeffort
to complete the full quarter at the University. If any student
withdraws after the date published in the catalog, he or she
shall be assigned grades of WF (withdrew failing) in all
courses, and will be subject to the suspension and exclusion
regulations.
A student on scholarship probation who withdraws from
the University prior to the final date published in the catalog
will be continued on scholarship probation for the next
quarter.


ABSENCES OR
UNSATISFACTORY WORK
Absences count from the first meeting of the class rather
than from the date the student first registers for a class.
Students Classified 1 (Freshman)
1. If any student accumulates absences or fails to do
class work to the extent that, in the opinion of the
instructor, further enrollment appears to be of insuffi-
cient value for him or her to continue or detrimental to
the best interests of the class, it shall be the
responsibility of the instructor to warn such student in
writing that further absences or poor work will cause him
or her to be dropped from the class with a failing grade.
When possible, this warning should be delivered
personally; in addition to this procedure, a notification
should be given to the Office of the Registrar for mailing
to the proper address. All such warnings should be
reported immediately to the department chairman.
Should any subsequent absences or failure to do
classwork occur, the student shall be dropped from the
class with a failing grade. The instructor should initiate
this procedure by giving the Registrar written notice.
If the instructor is using a system whereby a given


number of absences is allowed,
authorized to give double "cuts"
incurred during the last class meeting
university holiday and the first class
an official University holiday. For ex
cuts the last class before Homeco
instructor would be authorized to
absent twice.


the instructor is
for any absence
g before an official
meeting following
ample, if a student
timing holiday, the
count the student


If the instructor does not use such a system, he or she
j krrk ~ kf j t h- w ijf jkfl~^ 4f '-j*1kn f-*-- f/ W4hJ


rwsru a arias.





STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


The nine-day rule applies to individual members of
the group rather than to the group as a whole.
Consequently, a schedule of more than nine days for
any group should be rotated so that no student is
absent from the campus for more than nine scholastic
days.


A student who has bee
unsatisfactory work in ar
additional absences in that
she has not been absent fi
scholastic days. It is the res
see that his or her class
satisfactory.


n warned for absences or
iy class should not incur
course, even though he or
rom the University for nine
ponsibility of the student to
work and attendance are


Students classified other than 7 (Non-Freshmen):
Attendance in class is optional with students after
successful completion of the Freshman year (45 quarter
hours credit). Nevertheless, students themselves remain
fully responsible for satisfying the entire range of academic
objectives as they are defined by the instructor in any
course.
Post Baccalaureate Students:
The probation, suspension, and exclusion regulations
that apply to undergraduate students also apply to post-
baccalaureate students.



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
Students will be classified by the Registrar each quarter as
follows:
0. Special transient or other non-degree students who
have been permitted to register at the University of
Florida will be classified as 0.
1. A student with less than 45 hours credit will be
classified as 1.
2. A student who has earned 45 quarter hours or more,
but less than 90, will be classified as 2.
3. A student who has earned 90 quarter hours or more,
but less than 135, will be classified as 3.
4. A student who has earned 135 quarter hours or more
will be classified as 4.


5. A student who is a candidate for degree in a program
which normally requires 15 quarters and has earned 180
quarter hours or more will be classified as 5.
6. Post-Baccalaureate students: Degree-holding stu-
dents who have been admitted to post-baccalaureate
status will be classified as 6.
7. A graduate student who is seeking a Master's degree
will be classified as 7.
8. A graduate student who is seeking a degree beyond
the Master's degree, but has not been admitted to
doctoral candidacy, will be classified as 8.
9. A graduate student who has been admitted to doctoral
candidacy will be classified as 9.


PETITIONS AND APPEALS
In case the operation of a student academic regulation
appears to result in an undue hardship on an individual
student, he or she may petition for waiver of the regulation.
When petitions pertain to requests for change of
schedule after the date authorized for change, exceptions
to minimum-maximum load regulation, or permission to
drop a course without a failing grade after the drop date,
such petitions should be presented to the School or College
in which the student is enrolled. Petitions approved by the
School or College must be reported to the Registrar's Office
before the action becomes official.
All other petitions should be presented to the Registrar
who will refer them to the University Senate Committee on
Student Petitions. No petition for readmission may be filed
after regular registration has started for the quarter.
The student seeking waiver of regulation through petition
must remember that no committee on petitions can direct
an instructor to reinstate a student dropped from a course for
absence or unsatisfactory work, nor can the Senate
Committee require any college or school to grant a degree
by waiving any of these regulations.

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
All actions taken under these regulations shall be
reflected by appropriate notations on the student's record.


CONFIDENTIALITY


STUDENT


RECORDS


The University of Florida assures the confidentiality of
student educational records in accordance with State
University System rules, state statutes, and the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, known as the
Buckley Amendment. Although final HEW regulations have
not been released, the University is undertaking to comply
in good faith with the provisions of the laws through the
application of good judgment and cooperation on the part
of students.
In general, all present and past students have the right to
personally review his or her own educational records for
information and to determine the accuracy of these
records. Parents of dependent students, as defined by the
Internal Revenue Service, have these same rights. A photo
I.D. or other equivalent documentation, or personal
recognition by custodian for record will be required before
access is granted.
iE al A AU ai A AnrP PLrbIanI a a.p




General

TIME SHORTENED DEGREE OPPORTUNITIES


Time Sh

Degree


The University


portunities
academic


:areers


ortened


Opportunities


of Florida


which


students


provides


numerous
accelerate


and reduce the overall length of time


spent in completing degree requirements.
portunities are explained below:


These op-


Placement
Examinalion
American History
European History
Mathematics
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
Languages
English
Classics


University of
Florida Course
Designation
Variable
Variable
Variable
Variable
Variable
Variable
Variable
Variable
Variable


Maximum
Minimum Score Quard
Required for Hours


Credit


Credit
10"


4 or 8*
5, 10, or 1
3, 6, or 9'


3, 4, or 5


, or 15*
or 9*


1. Early Admission: The Early Admission program allows
superior students to be admitted to the University
following completion of the junior year in high school.
Applications are encouraged and will be considered on
an individual basis by the Admissions Committee. For
additional information, refer to the Admissions section
of the catalog.


2. Dual Enrollment:


Dual Enrollment refers to a student


taking on-campus courses simultaneously at both the
University of Florida and another institution. For
example, a high school student could register at the


University


as a non-degree student. The credits earned


College Level Examination Program (CLEP): The College
Level Examination Program is another type of credit by
examination opportunity sponsored by the College En-
trance Examination Board. By oresentine aonrooriate


scores, students may receive as many as 45 hours credit
toward completion of general education requirement. Their
scores on the CLEP general examinations must meet the
minimums established by the State University System. CLEP


testing is periodically available on the campus and
administered by the Office of Instructional Resources.


prior to high school graduation could then be accepted
for advanced standing placement and degree-credit
when the student is admitted to the University. For more


information


, high school students may refer to the


description of non-degree registration within the
Student Academic Regulations sections.
University of Florida students may also earn additional
credit through the dual enrollment program. For more
information, refer to the discussion of dual enrollment
within the Student Academic Regulations section.
3. Increased Course Load: Capable students who
register for more than the normal 15 hours per quarter
may complete the traditional four-year span within three
years.


University


every


Attendance:


quarter


Students


attending the


including Summer


may advance their graduation date by


y Exam


action:


sessions,


as much as three


A student may participate in


variety of credit by examination programs in order to


earn credit toward


of Florida.


Credit


a degree awarded by the University


received


one examination


program may not be duplicated by another. The various


credit by examination program


Placement Program: Th


is are explained below:
is credit by examination


opportunity is sponsored by the College Entrance Examina-


In accord with the Articulation Agreement


between


public


community colleges and


(agreement


public


state


universities on the acceptance of credit by transfer), the


University


of Florida awards credit for CLEP


scores


at the


50th percentile based on national men-women Sophomore


norms.


We are indicating below the guideline for the


awarding of


CLEP
General
Examination
English
Social Sciences
Biology
Physical Sciences
Humanities
Mathematics


credit.


University of
Florida Course
Designation
CEH 101
SSC 101
CBS 101
CPS 101
HUM 101
CMS 101


Minimum Score
Required For
Credit
Scale Score 494
Scale Score 488
Sub Score 50
Sub Score 49
Scale Score 489
Scale Score 497


Maximun


Q
C


Additional credit may be awarded for satisfactory
on the CLEP subject area examinations.
Departmental Examinations: A student may also 1


quarter
credit
9
9
4.5
4.5
9
9
scores

receive


credit through the challenge of departmental course
examinations. For specific information, contact the depart-
ments or colleges.


tion Board. Under this program,


University


offers


a nationally


evidence of completion of


a student entering the


graded


a college level


examination


course


taken in


*The amount of credit awarded


score.


is determined by the test


high school. If the results of the examination meet the
minimum requirements listed below, the student may
receive University credit for courses covering similar


material.


I


4. Year-Round


quarters.
5. Credit b


Advanced


I


I"





The


Lower


' :


r* "
.^----^1^,.. '


-r ^^H


n-:. I..--
.. -U,


BEHAVIORAL STUDIES

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES


Division

College


University


ki -


'- I. "


p:: :,


1


't*^


'-*'* *^aBBB


.L_


L -"


e






Colleges


College


The University College offers programs in general
education and assists its students in selecting their major
prior to admission to the college from which they will obtain
their bachelor's degree. It awards an Associate of Arts
certificate to those who have successfully completed %
credits of academic work, including the general education
course work required in their major.


ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT

Initial registration as a University College Freshman for
each Fall class is conducted during the preceding Summer
months. Students and their parents have an opportunity to
attend one of several two-day programs. Notices concern-
ing this are mailed in the late Spring to those students who
have been admitted by the University Admissions Office. At
these Summer Registration Programs, students and parents
attend sessions relating to career choice, student activities,
helping services and course selection. Each student meets
with a University College academic adviser who assists in
selecting courses to take in the Fall.
Those fall students who cannot attend a Summer
Registration Program confer with academic advisers as a
part of the registration period held in the week prior to the
beginning of classes in the Fall. Students entering college
in the Winter, Spring or Summer quarters also have
advisement conferences as a part of the registration period
prior to classes.
In the latter part of each quarter, students register for
their next quarter. Again academic advisers are available to
discuss course selection. It is expected that students shall
accept responsibility for fulfilling curricular requirements as
stated in the catalog and students who are making
successful progress are not required to see an adviser when
registering. Students who are changing majors or who are
not maintaining a "C" average should talk to an adviser
about course selection.
In the first few days of each quarter (see deadlines in
calendar printed on early pages of this catalog) students
should review their course selection and add or drop
courses if needed to make a reasonable load for the quarter
in view of past grades and current goals. If, during the
quarter, a student feels he must drop a course because of
illness or other emergency he will find academic advisers in
the University College office available for discussion of the
problem. Advisers are also available to help the student
define any other academic problem and find corrective
measures.


COUNSELING AND
RELATED SERVICES

In addition to assistance from academic advisers,
University College students may find that one or more of the
following offices can be of assistance in solving personal
problems, career selection problems or problems relating
to deficiencies in academic skills. The Student Affairs section
of this catalog describes their specific services.
1. Reading and Study Skills Center
2. Speech and Hearing Center


Counseling Center offers consultative services to University
faculty and staff who are engaged in counseling students.
Close relationships are maintained with deans, University
College advisers, housing personnel, the Student Health
Service, and religious centers, for the purpose of expediting
both counseling and consultative services.


METHODS OF
COLLEGE ACCELERATION


Details concerning acceleration are provided in the part
of the catalog entitled "TIME SHORTENED DEGREE
OPPORTUNITIES".
Students who obtain credit via CLEP, Advanced
Placement or the Twelfth Grade Testing Program must
do so before starting college or, at the latest, prior to the
end of their first term at the university. Students who obtain
general education credit by examination may take further
work in the areas covered, using it for elective credit. Some
credit by examination may not serve to accelerate a
student's program because the specific course require-
ments of his major are not satisfied by general subject
matter credit.
A student may choose to attend four academic quarters
each year. This would enable him to accomplish the work
of four academic years in three calendar years. Students
may take such Summer work at their local junior college
prior to completion of 96 credits. After completion of %
credits only work taken at accredited colleges or univer-
sities (not junior colleges) is accepted as transfer credit.
Students are urged to discuss any such plans with a
University College academic adviser prior to enrolling in
courses at another school.
Unusually able students may choose to accelerate by
carrying heavier than average course loads rather than
applying themselves more deeply to normal loads. In some
majors such a student might trim one to two quarters off of
the time required for his degree; however, at considerable
risk to the depth and quality of his education.




SPECIAL COLLEGE PROGRAMS

1. THE SPECIAL SERVICES PROGRAM
This program is designed to give educationally disadvan-
taged students who qualify for admission by evidence of
strong motivation and ability, assistance in developing
those academic skills needed for successful progress in the
University of Florida. The program consists of special
assistance in reading and study skills, structured study
experience via the Personalized Learning Center and
tutoring. In addition efforts are made to obtain some
financial assistance in the form of jobs, loans or scholarships
for students engaged in the program. Admission to the
Special Services Program is selective and only a limited
number of students can be engaged.
2. THE COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM
This program is limited to students from each entering
class who are issued special invitations to participate. These
students become members of small tutorial classes. The
small size of the classes and the high quality of the students
make possible deep penetration into course materials and
anrl-nr ca indanpnrldant iA/frk Th Chtlidfntc dtvItnn thair


University






UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


3. THE FLORIDA SCHOLARS PROGRAM


Upon Early Admission to the University after completing
eleventh grade, a selected group of gifted and unusual
students may pursue individually designed programs of
study leading to a bachelor's degree from the College of


Arts and


Sciences.


For details, consult this catalog under


heading ADMISSION AS A FRESHMAN.


GENERAL EDUCATION AND THE
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS CERTIFICATE
The University College has primary responsibility for
the administration of the general education program of


the University.


genera


Associate


I education


o this en
courses


its departments


provide


and the college awards the


of Arts Certificate of the University.


ates of the university


are expected


All gradu-


to complete the


general education program specified for their


receive
action.


the Associate


major and


of Arts Certificate prior to gradu-


University college students may transfer to the


college of their major when that college approves. All


general


education


requirements will


met prior to


graduation from that college. Applications to change
college are obtained from the Registrar. Students who
maintain a 2.0 average may, barring suspension, remain
in the University College beyond 96 credits to complete


requirements for admission to the college of their


malor


but are expected to enter upper division no later than
125 credits.
In planning each quarter's program the student should
obtain some balance of general and special education, of


science


non-science.


be careful to make


The undecided student should


in his general education


Typically


progress


while trying out courses
student completes the gr
tion in the first two ye


in specific majors.


r part of his general educa-
while also taking the pre-


"eate
'ars


professional courses specified for his major.


The Associate
completion.


of Arts Certificate will be awarded upon


1. 96 credits including authorized credits in general
education as indicated for the student's major.


2. An overall


C average.


MATHEMATICS (Minimum Credits Required)................ 4
CMS 101 Elementary College Mathematics (CLEP)
CMS 111 Fundamental Mathematics


CMS 151
CMS 191


- Fundamental Mathematics: Special Topics
- Fundamental Mathematics: College Honors


Any Mathematics (MS) course
Any Statistics (STA) course


ENGLISH (Minimum Credits Required..
CEH Elementary English (CLEP)


Students


are expected to begin their


English with EH 111 and follow this


courses. EH 121,


freshmen, but


course


work in


with two other EH


122, 123 are particularly designed for


courses


numbered 200 and above are open


to them. Students should see their English instructors or an
advisor for suggestions of appropriate courses.
SOCIAL SCIENCES (Minimum Credits Required)............ 9


SSC 101 Elementary Social Sciences


The following


designed
education
electives.
SSC 211


courses


as interdisciplinary


requirements.

- American


Socializing Institutions


SSC 221


- American


CO


(CLEP)


have been specifically
urses to fulfill general
may also be used as


Institutions:


Culture


and the


Institutions: The Emergence of


Economic and Political Institutions


SSC 222


-- American


Institutions:


Political Institutions of Urban America


SSC 223 --


American


The Economic and


Institutions: Economic and Political


Institutions from Minority Group Perspectives


SSC 231


- American Institutions:


America's


Role in World


Affairs
SSC 232-American Institutions in World Perspective


SSC 251
SSC 281


- Seminar in American Institutions
- Asia and its Peoples


SSC 291, 292,293-


American Institutions: College Honors


SSC 352 American Institutions:


SSC 353


- American Institutions:


Special Topics
Special Topics


One or more of the following courses, while not
originally designed for general education, may also be


used provided the student
course from each field.


not take more than one


Application forms for the Associate of Arts Certificate
are available from the Registrar and should be returned
to him.


Instead of SSC 217 American Institutions:


AMS 200


Introduction to American Studies


APY 200- Cultural Anthropology
APY 202- Anthropology and Modern Life


SY 201


AUTHORIZED COURSES FOR


- Principles of Sociology


Instead of SSC221, 222, 223 American


GENERAL EDUCATION


The following


courses


University College for


have been approved by the


use in satisfying general education


requirements. In selecting from among these authorized
courses, the student should keep in mind that the general
education part of his university program should serve to
increase his fund of knowledge outside his major and
should broaden his intellectual horizons. He must not,


therefore, select


courses


in only one discipline nor


courses within the scope of his major to satisfy general
education requirements. Only in strongly sequential and


crowded majors such


as mathematics and


science


permissible to use courses in the major for both purposes.
In selecting his courses the student should study course
descriptions in the back of the catalog, since course titles


ES 200


- Economic Concepts


ES 211 Economic History ot the United States
HY 245 United States to 1877


HY246-


United States since 1877


PCL201 -American Federal Government


PCL 220-
Instead of


- American State and Local


SSC237,


Government


232 American Institutions:


GPY 200 --Geography of World Economies


GPY 201 Geography of World


Societies


HY 202 European Civilization since 1815
PCL 209- International Relations
PCL 207 Introduction to Comparative Government
BEHAVIORAL STUDIES (Minimum Credits Required)..... 6


The following BES


courses


are specifically designed to


satisfy general education requirements.


/-'rAilrl ,nil .rra,,';tn l Crre, TirnrL-


Institutions:


nd


nrc 1tl




Colleges

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


HUMANITIES (Minimum Credits Required).................. 12
HUM 101 Elementary Humanities (CLEP)

The following HUM courses have been specifically
designed as interdisciplinary courses to fulfill general
education requirements. They may also be sued as
electives.


- Western Humanities
- Western Humanities
- Western Humanities
- Asian Humanities
rican Humanities
- The Humanities: Special Topics
- Humanities Forum


HUM


291-292-293 -


Western Humanities: College Honors


One or more of the following courses, while not originally
designed for general education, may also be used provided
that the student does not take more than one course from a
particular field.


CH 330
CS 201
CS 202
CS 203
CS 301
CS 302
CS 303
EH 489
FA 200
MSC 21
MSC 21
MSC 21
RN 251
RN 330
RN 341
RN 362
RN 364
RN 365
THE 22


- Chinese Culture
- Myths of the Greeks and Romans
- Greek Life and Letters
- Religion of the Greeks and Romans
- Greek Drama
- Creek and Roman Epic
- Ancient Novel
- Literature and Opera
- Introduction to the Fine Arts
10- Introduction to Music
11 Masterworks
12 Structure
- Introduction to the Study of Religion
- Introduction to the Study of Judaism
- Hebrew Scriptures
- Religion and the Modern Mind
$ Contemporary Religious Thought
-(EH 496) Myth in Film and Literature
E0 Theatre Appreciation


I


PHYSICAL SCIENCES....... (6-9 credits see note below)
CPS 101 Elementary Physical Sciences (CLEP)
The following CPS courses have been specifically
designed as interdisciplinary courses to fulfill general
education requirements. They may also be used as
electives.
CPS 211 Men and Concepts
CPS 216 Fundamentals of Physical Science A
CPS 223 Our Environment
CPS 225 Man's Interactions with the Physical
Environment


226 Fundamentals of Physical Science B
231 The Scientific Basis of Technology
235 Natural Regions
236 Fundamentals of Physical Science C
241 Physical Sciences: Energy and Society
245 Physical Foundations of Environmental
251 The Physical Sciences: Special Topics
264 Laboratory in the Physical Sciences
291-292-293 The Physical Sciences: College


Sciences


Honors


Students majoring in science normally fulfill their physical
science requirement by taking chemistry (201, 211, 231
sequences) or other professionally oriented science
sequences.


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES.. (6-9 Credits See note below)


CBS 101 Elementary Biological Sciences (CLEP)
The following CBS courses are designed for
education. They may also be used as electives.
CBS 211 The Biological Sciences
CBS 221 The Biological Sciences
CBS 231 The Biological Sciences
CBS 251 The Biological Sciences: Special Topic
CBS 264 Laboratory in Biological Sciences
CBS 291-292-293 The Biological Sciences: Colli
Honors


general


CS


ege


The following courses, though more professionally
oriented, satisfy the requirement for certain science majors
and may be used by others.
AG 200 Agriculture in the Environment
APY 302 Physical Anthropology
BTY 181 Introductory Botany
BTY 203 General Botany
BTY 301 Introduction to Ecology (for CBS 221, only)
CHE 300 Technology and Survival
ENE 301 Environmental Quality and Man
FRC 250 The Ecosystem Man Resource Relationships
FS 201 Man's Food
FS 250 Human Nutrition
HRP 331 Basic Anatomy and Physiology (for CBS 231,
only)
MCY 300 Microbiology (for CBS 231, only)
SLS 333 Agriculture and Environmental Quality
ZY 201 Introductory Zoology Laboratory
ZY 202 Principles of Animal Biology
ZY 321 Evolution Today (for CBS 211, only)
NOTE: The science requirements call for a least six credits
in one science and nine credits in the other.



PLANS OF STUDY
BY COLLEGE OF MAJOR
On the following pages, specific general education
requirements are listed for each college and/or major.
Students are expected to follow the program of general
education specified for their particular baccalaureate goal.
In other words the particulars of a student's general
education depend upon his choice of majors and his choice
of courses within the limits set by that major. Associate of
Arts Certificates are awarded on this basis. Preprofessional
courses for the student's first two years are also listed.


AGRICULTURE


Students planning to enter the College of Agriculture
should take, while in the University College, the following
program of study. The sequence in which courses are to be
taken will depend upon the department in which a student
takes his major in the upper division and will be determined
by counselors in the College of Agriculture.
General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English ............................................................... 9
MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry.............................. 5
*BES Behavioral Studies... .. .......... .. .......... . ............... 4
SSC American Institutions ................. .. ..................... 9
. fl a a. 1i * -in


CPS






UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


A. Prospective majors in Animal Science, Dairy Science,
Food Science, Poultry Science, and Pre- Veterinary Med
icine should take courses listed above plus ZY 202,
BTY 203, and CY 204.
B. Prospective majors in Dairy and Poultry Management
may satisfy the Chemistry requirements by completing
CY 201 and 202.
C. Prospective majors in Agricultural Education, Agron-
omy, Fruit Crops, Mechanized Agriculture, Ornamental
Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Soils, and Vegetable
Crops should take the courses listed above plus BTY 181
and 203. Agricultural Education majors should elect EY
301 and SCH 202 in lower division. To complete Biology
requirements Entomology majors should take, in
addition to the above, ZY 202 and BTY 203.
D. Prospective majors in Food and Resource Economics
should take the courses listed above but may substitute
MS 301 or 302 for PS 120 and may fulfill Chemistry
requirements by completing CY 201 and 202 or CY 101,
and 102, and in addition should complete the Botany and
Zoology sequence listed above in C.
Suitable electives in Agriculture: FRE 310 or 320, MCA
303 and 306, AY 301, AL 309, ADP 311, EY 301, FRC 220, FS
201, 202, PT 301, SLS 330, PLS 201, OH 331, FC 341, 335,
and others according to prerequisites completed.
*Four or more credits of Mathematics or Statistics above
College requirements may be substituted.
S*Any 5 credit General Physics course may be substituted.
Prospective Mechanized Agriculture Students must take PS
211 and 221.


ARCHITECTURE
Students planning to enter
should take, while in the Un
following programs of study
departmental major adviser
regarding grade point average
in certain courses and other
Curriculum. Advisers are listed
section titled, "College of Ar


the College of Architecture
diversity College, one of the
. They should consult the
for specific information
s, minimum grades required
information relating to the
d in the catalog under the
chitecture."


AE 245 Mat. & Meth. of Constr. 1................................ 4
MS 201 Analytical Geometry and Calculus.................... 5
B. FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF DESIGN (INTERIOR
DESIGN)
General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English............................................................... 9
MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry.............................. 5
BES Behavioral Studies .... ......................................... 6
SSC American Institutions.......................................... 9
HUM The Humanities .............................................. i2
CPS Physical Sciences .............................................. 10
CBS Biological Sciences .............. ......... .................. 6
Physical Education.... ............. .................................. 3
Preprofessional Requirements


AE 121 Building Arts
AE 112 Basic Drawin
AE 113 Architectural
AE 115 Architectural
AE 235 Architectural
AE 236 Architectural
ATG 201 Elementary
Electives.................


g ...... ...................
Drawing 1...........
Communications..
Design 1.............
Design 2.............
Accounting.........
...... .. .. .. ........


C. FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR
ARCHITECTURE
General Education Requirements


Credits
EH English ............................................................... 9
SSC American Institutions .......................................... 6
SY 201 Principles of Sociology.................................... 4
HUM The Humanities.. ............................................ 12
MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry.............................. 5
CPS 223 Physical Sciences: Our Environment............... 4
'PS 201 Applied Physics................................................ 5
BTY 181 Introductory Botany 1..................................... 5
Physical Education .................................................... 3
*CPS 225 and 235 (both must be taken) may substitute for PS
201


Credits
... ..... 5
......... 5
........ 3
........ 4
.........4
......... 4
.........4
......... 4
......... 4
......... 4
.........4


To be eligible for admission to the College of
Architecture, the student is required to have at least a 2.0
(c) average in the courses listed in the appropriate
curriculum for the first two years. In addition the student
must earn a 2.0 (c) average in all preprofessional work
included in the first two years of the program. Please refer
to additional information in the section of this catalog
titled "College of Architecture", under the heading
"Requirements for Admission".

For upper division programs see the College of
Architecture section of the catalog.
A. FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF DESIGN (ARCHITEC-
TURE)
General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English............................................................... 9
MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry.............................. 5
BES Behavioral Studies .............................................. 6
SSC American Institutions........................................ .. 9
HUM The Humanities.............................................. 12
CPS 223 Physical Sciences: Our Environment............... 4
PS 201, 202 Applied Physics...................................... 10
CBS Biological Sciences............................................. 6


* ** *** *.*
ruction. .. .


OF LANDSCAPE


Preprofessional Requirements


BTY 203 General Botany.....................
MS 201 Anal. Geometry & Calculus......
AE 121 Building Arts..........................
AE 112 Basic Drawing.........................
AE 113 Architectural Drawing 1............
AE 115 Architectural Communications..
AE 235 Architectural Design 1..............
AE 236 Architectural Design 2..............
AE 245 Materials and Methods of Const
LAE 271 Landscape Architecture 1........
LAE272 Landscape Architecture 2........


D. FOR THE DEGREE IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English ................................................................ 9
MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry................................ 5
SSC American Institutions........................................... 9
HUM The Humanities .............................................. 12
PS 201, 202 Applied Physics........................................ 10
CBS Biological Sciences.............................................. 6
Physical Education ..................................................... 3
Preprofessional Requirements




Colleges

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


ARTS AND SCIENCES


The College


major
listed


Arts and Sciences


in twenty-nine


in the


offers


degrees


different major fields, which


Arts and Sciences


an interdisciplinary
College of Arts and


Education


Cour


a C or better
D in any of


ses


section of the catalog,


major. Students who expect to enter the


I Sciences shi
listed below


average.


In general,


these courses


would complete the


General


and elective courses, with


students wi


must complete


th a grade of
an Arts and


Sciences course in the same area with a grade of C or better


before


graduation.


A laboratory


Sciences


and complete requirements for certification


high school teachers in one or more academic subjects by
following one of the Arts and Sciences Education
Programs described in the College of Education section in
this catalog.
Further information may be obtained in the College of


Arts and Sciences office, 11
Computer and Information


A student ma)
Sciences through


expected,


coursee


is required


Bi(log it al i enet's before graduation


by taking
science


CBS 264


or any course


department that has


in an
a regi


in the Ph


sical


Id may be fulfilled
Arts and Sciences


U


scheduled


laboratory.


3 Anderson


Sciences


y major in Computer and


the College of


with the aid of his


Arts and Sciences


Information


Arts and Sciences.


adviser,


to satisfy


He is


the general


requirements. In addition during his


Freshman year he should decide


sequences


junior


he wishes


which of two Sophomore


to take. Prior to the start of his


year he should decide which of three general


he wishes,
ments.


each of which


carries


different


areas


course require-


General Education Requirements

EH English.. .......................
CMS or MS Mathematics............


(Botany,
mathematics


statistics,


course


chemistry,


computer


microbiology,
and zoology


science,


Years


Credits
.. ... .. 99
........ 4


economics.


premedical, predental, phys-


naJors


should


substitute


CIS 311,
MS 328.
STA 410


a MS


for CMS


BES Behavioral
SSC American


Stud ies ............................................... 3
Institutions ........................................ .. 9


HUM The Humanities.............................................. 12
CPS Physical Sciences.............................................. 10


(Botany, chemistry, microbiology,


predental,
chemistry
Students
chemistry


and zoology
for CPS.)


s majoring
sequence


CBS Biological


physics,


premedical,


majors should substitute courses in


in CIS
for CPS.


substitute


a physics


, Core Requirements


for all CIS majors:


312.....


S.............................. 4 4 . . .. .


CIS 321, 322.....


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


The College of Business


Administration offers degrees in


eight major fields which are listed in the Business
Administration section of the catalog. Students who expect


to receive
complete:


a degree


in one of the


(1) the General


business


Education


majors must


courses


and the


Preprofessional requirements listed below and elective


courses


Sciences ............................................ 9


a total of at least % hours; and (2) satisfactorily


complete the upper division requirements.


(Botany,
zoology m
botany for


microbiology,


majors should


CBS.


one course


department:


premedical,


substitute


courses


All students must earn at


in an Arts and


Science


CBS, BTY, MCY, or ZY.


Physical Education.................................................... 3


NOTE: The


"Basic


the Arts and Sciences


assure
entered
These '


Distribution Requirement" described in


section


of the catalog


is designed to


a minimum of breadth for students who


d


upper di


Basic


vision


by transfer from other institutions.


Distribution" credit


selection lists apply


College of


requirements and course


to such students


registered


in the


Arts and Sciences and do not apply to University


College students.


I


predental,
in zoology


least a gi
biological


trade of C
science


General Education Requirements


(For all majors in


Business


Administration)


Credits
.11) .


EH English .............. .........................................


*MS 301 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1...................... 5


*PPY 200


SSC American Institutions........................................... 9
HUM The Humanities ............................................... 12


**CPS Physical


**CBS


Biologic


Physical


Preprofessional Requirements


a. For Accounting,


Finance,


Economics,


Insurance,


Preprofessional Requirements
A great amount of flexibility


Certain


Management, Marketing and Real Estate and Urban


is available to the liberal


general guidelines


Analysis


are:


majors:


Accounting......


Credits
. .. ..... 5


section


degrees
,log, and
as soon


Sciences


as you


Basic Economics............. ................ ............ 10


have chosen


course


4. ( omrlete one c


successful
e course t


nurse


in science


Sciences majors:


sequence or a

ie a laboratory.


I I.


Hours
MS 301, 302, 303....................................................... 15


Logic ............................................................ 4


Sciences............................................. 7-10
al Sciences........................................... 6-9


Education ................. ............................. ...... 3






UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


**Students are expected to complete
Sciences.


***The ATG 201


, 285 sequence


16 hours


of the


is required for Accounting


Majors (Grade of "C" or better is required in these courses
to register for accounting major courses). All other Business
Administration majors require the ATC 201, 203 sequence.
Choose elective courses needed to complete the total 96


quarter hours


areas


in the university transfer program from such


as mathematics, natural


sciences,


social


science,


foreign language, and humanities.


EDUCATION


Physical Education (through either the College of
Education or the College of Physical Education)
Special Education Mental Retardation (through the
College of Education)
Speech Pathology and Audiology (through either the
College of Education or the College of Arts and Sciences)
All secondary and K-12 programs are specified in the
College of Education section of the catalog.
All University College students working toward degrees
in Secondary Education or K-12 programs with the exception


of science education
following program:


and music


education will pursue the


ELEMENTARY OR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
General Education Requirements
Credits
American Institutions (SSC) ................ ......................... 9
Physical Sciences (CPS) ............................................. 10
English (EH).............................................................. 9
Behavioral Studies (BES)............................................. 6
Mathematics (MS 310, 311). ........................................ 6
The Humanities (HUM) ............................................. 12
Biological Sciences (CBS) ............................................ 9
Physical Education..................................................... 3
One quarter of CBS or of CPS may either be omitted or


taken


as an elective. Students may not


use AC 200, APY


302, CHE 300, FRC 250, FS 201, FS 250, or SLS 333 to meet


the biological


science


requirement. Acceptable courses to


meet the English requirement are limited to EH 111, 121,


122, 123, 124,
301, 302, 303,


229, 230, 234,


235, 251, 281,


304, 305, 329, 330, 391,


291, 292, 293,
. and 403.


General Education Requirements


Americar
Physical


Credits
(SSC) ........................................ 9


Institutions


Sciences


English (EH)....................
Behavioral Studies (BES ...
Fundamental Mathematics


.. 3


(CMS)..................... ......... .. 4


Biological Sciences
Physical Education.


One quarter of CBS or of CPS may either be umitted or


as an elective. Students may not use AG 200, APY


taken


302, CHE 300, FRC 250, FS 201, FS 250, or SLS 333 to meet


the biological


science


meet the English requirement
122, 123, 124, 229, 230, 234, 2
301 302, 303, 304, 305, 329,


requirement. Acceptable courses


are limited to EH 111, 121,


251, 281, 291,


292, 293,


391, 401, and 403.


One quarter of CBS or CPS may either be omitted or taken
as an elective.


Preprofessional Requirements
A. General preparation requirements
At least 72 hours of general preparation are required to


include the


courses


outlined above, plus electives. To


obtain breadth, students may distribute their


courses


elective


among fields rather than concentrating in one.


Coursework


areas


of recognized


weakness


especially appropriate. A student must make a grade of C


or better in at least 54 of the


72 hours of general


preparation.
B. Other requirements
1. At least 96 credits are required for admission to


upper division.


The College of Education will accept


those students who present the best records and


show the most promise of


education program.


success


in a teacher


See the College of Education


Science education majors should take


and ZY and BTY instead of


courses


instead of CMS.


CY instead of CPS


They should also take MS


Because of the nature of their program, music education
majors will take their general education requirements over
a four year period rather than only during the first two years.
Pre-Professional Requirements
A. General preparation requirements
At least 72 hours of general preparation are required to
include the courses outlined above plus elective course
work outside of the proposed teaching field at the 100-,
200- or 300-level. These courses should be chosen so as


to further broaden the student's knowledge. To


breadth


, students may distribute their courses


several fields rather than concentration


work in


section of the catalog for further information relating
to admission to upper division.
C. Other considerations


1. The following


courses


may be taken in the


Sophomore year or delayed until the Junior year:
a. MSC 260 (Students must have a 2.0 average
and have completed 64 hours)
b. EH 491
2. Speech requirements may be completed in the
Sophomore year or delayed until the Junior year. This


requirement is met by


successful completion of SCH


201 or 312 or by successfully passing the speech


screen
ment.


ng test administered by the Speech Depart-


SECONDARY EDUCATION OR K-12 PROGRAMS
Secondary Education students wishing certification for
teaching in grades 7-12 may work toward degrees in either
the College of Education or the College of Arts and


areas


of recognized weakness


obtain
among


in one. Course
5s is especially


appropriate. A student must make a grade of C or better


in at least 54 of the 72


hours of general preparation.


B. Teaching field requirements


These teaching fields


are listed in the College of


Education section of the catalog together with
requirements for each field. Some of these could


course
rses can


and should be taken while in the University College.
C. Other requirements


1. At least % credits


are required for admission to


upper division. The College of Education will accept
those students who present the best records and


show the most promise of
education program. See th<


success


in a teacher


e College of Education


section of the catalog for further information relating
to admission to upper division.
D. Other considerations


1. Speech requirement may be completed


in the


SoDhomore vear ordelaed until the Junior year. This


................. ........................ 9


................... ..................


(CBS)........................................... 9
.. .. .. . . ... . . .. .. .. .. . . . ..... .. ... .. 3


(C PS) ) .......................................... 10


The Humanities (HUM) ............................................ 12




Colleges

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


a. EDF 342 tor Secondary Education
b. EDF 345 for Special Teaching Fields
3. Students who choose to work toward a teacher
education degree in a college other than the College
of Education should consult that college's portion of
the catalog for admission and graduation require-
ments.

ENGINEERING


Essential Preparation:
demands much in the


Modern engineering education
way of specific high school


preparation not required in other college programs. The
beginning engineering student should have a good
understanding of the basic physical sciences, a highly
developed ability in mathematics, and the competence to
read rapidly and with comprehension. The College of
Engineering considers that a minimum adequate prepara-
tion would be substantially as follows:
The high school program should include the following
subjects:
Essentials Year
Elem entary algebra.................................................... 1
Intermediate and advanced algebra............................. 1
Plane geom etry.................... ................................... 1
Trigonom etry. ............*...................... .........................
C hem istry....................................................... 1
Physics.................................................................... 1
Desirable
Additional M them atics ............................................ ./2
Deficiencies in the above subjects may be overcome by
registering in certain foundation courses before proceeding
with parts of the regular engineering program.
A student in University College may request transfer to
the College of Engineering at any time after completing 45
credits.
FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS
The following program is designed for those students
whose high school preparation meets the above criteria. All
Freshmen are required to consult with a College of
Engineering adviser in planning their academic programs.
High school records and test scores are reviewed and a
program of study commensurate with the student's
academic capabilities is assigned. This workload may range
from a minimum of 12 to as much as 20 credit hours per
quarter. A student of average academic capabilities and a
high order of motivation should be able to carry 15-16
credits each quarter and should thus be able to earn a
bachelor's degree in 13 quarters. If he pursues a normal
academic program of three quarters each year it will take
him four years and one quarter of the fifth to earn his B.S.
degree.
General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English ..................................................... ......... 9
SSC American Institutions........................................... 9
HUM The Hum anities .............................................. 12
MS 301, 302 Analytic Geometry and Calculus.............. 10
PS 215, 216, 217 General Physics with Calculus............. 9
PS 225, 226, 227 Physics Laboratory............................. 3
Physical Fitness......................................................... 3
Preprofessional Requirements
CY 211, 212 General Chemistry and Qualitative
An ,*%ktcc ;Q


Detailed information about departmental requirements is
found in the section on Engineering in this catalog.
A pre-engineering program, taken in one of the Florida
Community/junior Colleges, consists of courses of two
semesters, or equivalent, in the following areas: English,
social studies, humanities, general chemistry and quali-
tative analysis, and physics (taught with the use of calculus);
mathematics at least through integral calculus; and other
required or elective courses. This program totals at least 64
semester hours (96 quarter hours). Satisfactory completion
of this program leads to eligibility to apply for admission to
the College of Engineering. Community/Junior college
counselors are referred to the University of Florida Junior
College Counseling Manual sections on General Informa-
tion and Engineering for additional information.


FINE ARTS


Students planning to enter the
should take, while in the Universi
following programs of study. The
departmental major adviser for
regarding grade point averages, mir
in certain courses and other inform
curriculum. Advisers are listed in
section titled "College of Fine Art
To be eligible for admission to th
the student is required to have at le
the courses listed in the appropriate
two years. In addition the student


average in all preprofessional w
years of the program. Please ref
in the section of this catalog ti
under the heading "Requirem<
majors may apply to the Collh
quarter in University College.
For upper division program
section of the catalog.


ork i
erto
tied
ents
ege

, see


College of Fine
ty College, one of
wy should consult
specific informa
limum grades requ
nation relating to
the catalog under
s."'


Arts


ie College of Fine Arts,
ast a 2.0 (C) average in
curriculum for the first
t must earn a 2.0 (C)
included in the first two
additional information
"College of Fine Arts,"
for Admission". Music
of Fine Arts after one

. College of Fine Arts


A. FOR THE DEGREES IN ART [GRAPHIC DESIGN, ART
EDUCATION, CRAFTS, FINE ARTS, HISTORY OF ART]
General Education Requirements
Credits
H English ...............................................................
CMS Fundamental Mathematics.................. .................
BES Behavioral Studies ............................ ....... ....... .... 6
SSC American Institutions........................................... 9
HUM The Humanities............................................... 12
CPS Physical Sciences................................................. 7
CBS Biological Sciences.............................................. 9
Physical Education..................................................... 7.


Preprofessional Requirements


ART 101,102 Beginning Design 1 and 2......
ART 103, 104 Beginning Drawing 1 and 2.....
ART 205 Intermediate Design...................
ART 206 Int. Drawing and Painting............
ART 207,208, 209 Intro. to History of ART 1,
Electives ................................................


2 and 3..........


NOTE: Students intending to major in art education are
urged to become familiar with the requirements as listed
under the College of Education dealing with admission to
the Advanced Professional Sequence.
B. FOR ALL MUSIC MAJORS PROGRAMS IN THE COLLEGE
OF FINE ARTS: BACHELOR OF MUSIC AND BACHELOR
OF MUSIC EDUCATION DEGREES.







UNIVERSITY COliEGE


in the fields concerned.


Bachelor of Music


Of the 8


221, 23


courses:


CMS 211, CPS 211


,223, 231; CBS 211,


1; PS 485; the student must elect 3 courses, normally


In the Junior year. The student may elect these courses in


the Sophomore


and take CHN


253 in the


Junior year.
Bachelor of Music Education


Of the 7 courses: CPS 211
485; the student must earn


,223,231; CBS 211,


231; PS


a minimum of 15 credits which


include credits in both CPS and CBS.


course


in Mathematics


A minimum of one


is required, and may be taken in


either the junior or Senior year.
Physical Education ..................
Preprofessional Requirements


.............. 3


A. PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN FOREST RESOURCES
MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION-CURRICULUM I.
General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English ................................................................ 9
*MS 301, 302 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1, 2........... 10


SSC Social


Sciences.. ............................ ..................... 9


HUM H201 umand 202 or Cti211 and 212 General Chemistes..................................................... 12
CY 201 and 202 or CY 211 and 212 General Chemistry....... 8


Biological


Science


Elect either:


(a) BTY 181, 203 and ZY 201
or
(b) ZY 201, 202 and BTY 203.....
Physical Education ..........................


Freshman Year
Music Performan
Applied Music: P
Instrument or
Ensemble: Band,


ce Area
principall
Voice.....
Chorus,


Credits


or Orchestra


MSC 71, 72, Piano Skills......,
MSC 283, Voice Skills 1.......
Music Theory Sequence
MSC 101,102,103, 104,105,
Sophomore Year
Music Performance Area
Applied Music: Principal


Instrument or


Preprofessional Requirements

**CY 203 and 204 or CY 213 Qualitative


Credits
Analysis............... 4-8


***ES 201,202 or ES 203, 204, 205 Basic Economics............ 9-10
****' Electiv.es......................................................................................................4
Either PS 211, 212, 221, 222, Physics and
Lab or PS 201, 202 ........ ...................................... ......... 10


STA 320 Introduction to Statistics 1.....


.......................... 4


96-101


Credits


*Students with inadequate backgrounds in mathematics


have to complete MS 102


Voice.........


credits) or


Ensemble: Band, Chorus, or Orchestra.


MSC 73, 74
Music Thee


,75,


Piano Skills..


ury Sequence


equivalent o


- Algebra and Trigonometry
n a non-credit basis prior


scheduling the indicated math requirement.


"BTY 370, Organic an
scheduled in place of


id Biological


Chemistry,


may be


CY 203, 204 by students who are


MSC 201, 202, 203, 204,


Electives ..... .... ....... ................................................


NOTE:


The Bachelor of


Arts degree


in music


through the College of Arts and Sciences
cooperation of the Department of Music. See t


of Arts and Sciences sections of the catalog for that


is offered
with the
he College


degree.


following
chemistry.


programs


in areas


not requiring additional


***FRE 301 Principles of Food and Resource
may be substituted for ES 202.


Econ.


(5 credits)


**""May be used to satisfy required upper-division Advanced


Communications


course


work.


C. FOR THE DEGREE IN THEATRE
General Education Requirements


EH Engl


CMS Fundamental Mathematics...
BES Behavioral Studies...............
SSC American Institutions ...........


Credits
* .. .. .. 9
......... 9
1(1() 4
)1111( 6
111111 9


B. PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN
FOREST PRODUCTS CURRICULUM II.
General Education Requirements

EH English ..................................... ......... ..............


Mathematics (elect


one of the following


seq uences) ................... ................... ................ 10-15
*(a) MS 301, 302 Analytic Geometry and
Calculus 1, 2.................... .................................... 10


CPS Physical Sciences ..................
CBS Biological Sciences...............
Physical Education .....................
Preprofessional Requirements


......... 7


*-(b) MS 301


302, 303 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1,


2 3................................... .......... ............... ......... .. 15


SSC Social


THE 220 Theatre Appreciation.............


THE 225


Oral Interpretation 1...............


THE 240 Voice
THE 331 Stage
THE 320 Actin,


THE 327


............................4
.............................4


and Articulation .........................................


Movement 1.......
S1.......................


Stage Makeup..............


......................................, 4
..... .. .... ....................4
.................... ................. 3


FOREST RESOURCES AND


CONSERVATION


Students desiring to prepare for professional


careers


CY 201 and 202


Biological


(a) BTY 181


or CY 211 and 212 General Chemistry....


Science


one of the following


sequences) ...................................................... 10-14


(b) BTY 181, 203 and ZY 201..........
(c) CBS 211, 221, 231 and BTY 203..
Physical Education ..........................
Preprofessional Requirements


CY 203 and 204 or CY 213 General Chemistry
STA 320 Introduction to Statistics 1.................
*ATG 201, 203 Elementary Accounting 8 cr. or
F('R 1Q1 EFninan rino .lrarnhirc 1 cr


.... 10
.... 14
.... 14
. *. . .


Credits
..... 4-8


and BTY 203................


Credits


......................... 3


106.................................. 12


206.................................. 12


is h................................


. ..... ... *. .......


...............................
...............................


Sciences.................................................. 9


*. ** *...** ** *.**** It


Electives ...................................


S. ... . r 1 -. . ..


HUM The Humanities................................................... 12


HUM The Humanities,............................................... 12


HUM Humanities................................................... 12


L-R








Colleges

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


** Students who plan to follow the Technology or Wood
Science options should schedule EGR 193 and sequence (b)
in both Math and Physics.


HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS

University College students planning to apply for Upper
Division status in the College of Health Related Professions
are urged to study the section of the catalog dealing with
the College and its programs in Clinical and Community
Dietetics, Medical Technology, Occupational Therapy, and
Physical Therapy. Special attention should be given those
paragraphs on admission policies.
Limitations in available staff, faculty and facilities make


it necessary
n j -


that the College reluctantly establish quotas


for the admission of students.


Each department has its own application procedures.
Preprofessional students should contact the department of


their major objective


as early


Community Dietetics, Room A-3 in
Hospital, Medical Technology, Roo
Hall; Occupational Therapy, Room


as possible (Clinical and


the Shands Teaching
,m 4111 in Jennings
A-92; and Physical


Therapy, Room A-98 in the Shands Teaching Hospital). The


sequence of professional courses


in all programs begins


only in the Fall quarter of the junior year. The deadline for


receipt of applications
preceding March 15.


for September enrollment


is the


Students who plan to earn a baccalaureate degree in the
College of Health Related Professions elect one of the
following programs:

A. FOR THE DEGREE IN CLINICAL AND COMMUNITY
DIETETICS
General Education Requirements
Credits


EH English ............... .................
CMS Fundamental Mathematics...
BES Behavioral Studies ...............
SSC American Institutions ...........


.. A. *. S S. .. .. ... ... S 5 . .- *
.. S.. ....... .. ... .... A 5..... .. .. .* ** '5*.
S. S S 5 *tS .* S S S .5* . *St .t. S A
SA S* A SA S ....* S ** *~*l~l *A) *


HUM Humanities..................................................... 12
CY 201 General Chemistry ................... ................ ........ 4
Physical Education ................... ................................. 3


Preprofessional Requirements


Credits
ZY 201, 202 General Zoology ....................................... 9
CY 202, 203,204 General Chemistry............................. 12


BTY 203 General Botany......................
FS 250 Fundamentals of Nutrition.........
PSY 201 General Psychology................
HRP 101 Introduction to Health Related
Professions ..... .... .. ...........
Electives...........................................


... ... .***** **1 *5* *

* A t .***. 5 .S ** ... 5..


B. FOR THE DEGREE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY


C. FOR THE DEGREE IN OCCUPATIONAl THERAPY
General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English............................................................... 9


CMS Fundamental
BES Behavioral Stu
SSC American Inst
HUM The Humani
CPS Physical Scien


Mathematics .................................. 4
Idies ................................... ........... 6
itutions .............. .......................... 9


CBS 211, 221, 231 and 264, Biological


Physical


Sciences............ 10


Preprofessional Requirements
HRP 101 Introduction to Health Related Professions...... 3
PSY 201 General Psychology....................................... 4
PSY 345 Psychology of Personality............................... 4
OCT 201 Introduction to Occupational Therapy............ 2
Electives................................................. ................ 23

D. FOR THE DEGREE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY
General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English .................................................. ........... 9
MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry (or more advanced
m atmat atics) ........................................................ .5


BES Behavioral
SSC American


Studies............................................... 6
Institutions .......................................... 9


HUM The Humanities ........................
*CY 201 Introductory General Chemistry.


*PS 201, 202 Applied Ph


* A *.. .* *.. *A5...tS .
..*.... *.At..*.......


ysics..........


'ZY 201, 2G2 General Zoology........
Physical Education.....................
Preprofessional Requirements


CY 202,203 Gene
PSY 201 General


*ral Chemistry.....
Psychology........


....*............5 .... 559 .*...S .
* S. *.. AA* S...*.... .. *......


HRP 101 Introduction to Health Related Professions........ 3
ZY 309 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy ....................... 5
PSY 345 Psychology of Personality.. ....................... ........... 4
Electives ................................................................. ..
*These are also preprofessional requirements.

JOURNALISM AND
COMMUNICATIONS
The College of journalism and Communications offers
curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in
Advertising, Broadcasting, or journalism, and sequences in
Public Relations, Technical Communications, Urban Affairs
Reporting, and Criminal justice Public Relations. Detailed
information about upper division course requirements is
given in the section on journalism and Communications in
this catalog.
In the University College, the program for students
expecting to enter the College of journalism and Com-


munications at the start of their


Junior


General Education Requirements


EH Engl


Credits
ish .. ....... ......................................... ............ 9


MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry...................................5


BES Behavioral
SSC American


HUM The


CY 211 General


Studies ............................................. 3
Institutions..................................... 9


General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English .............. ..... .............. ................... ........ .. 9
CMS Fundamental Mathematics.................................. 4
BES Behavioral Studies.............................................. 4


SSC American


HUM The Humanities................................................ 12


*CPS Physical Sciences ........... ................... .........


'CBS Biological


STA 320 Introduction to Statistics..............................


ZY 201, 202 General


Physical


Eduratinon..


Sciences...... ....... ....... ....................


"Three credits of one of these may be omitted.
PreDrofessional Requirements


* .. .. 79
.....* ,


Education .................................................... 3


Institutions .......................................... 9


Humanities.............................................. 12


Chemistry ......................................... 4


Zoology......................................






UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


Physical Education ..................................................... 3
Electives to make a total of 96 hours.
tPublic Relations majors see block marked "General
Education Requirements" in PR Upper Division program.

LAW
The College of Law offers a program leading to the degree
of juris Doctor. Admission is limited to those with a


bachelor's degree from an
who have satisfactory un
attained a satisfactory scor
Test. Also offered is a or
degree of Master of Laws i
to those students who holi
significant potential for suc
detailed information on a


and programs,


accredited college or university
Idergraduate records and have
re on the Law School Admission
ne-year program leading to the
n Taxation. This program is open
d the J.D. degree and who show
access in the L.L.M. program. For
mission requirements, course


see the College of Law catalog.


PRELAW PROGRAMS
Admission to law school is highly selective. A
selected primarily on these factors: the
Admission Test, which should be taken in 1
Senior year; a writing ability score, which is a
of the LSAT; the overall grade point average;
activities and maturing experiences. Most
including Holland Law Center, also require r
tions by persons familiar with the applicant's a'


applicants are
Law School
the junior or
separate part
co-curricular
law schools,
ecommenda-
chievements.


The College of Law advises that to be admitted students
should have at least a 3.3 overall average on a 4.0 system,
well over 640 on the LSAT, and well over 55 on writing
ability test. The class entering in September, 1975, averag-


ed 3.40 CPA, 647 LSAT and 61 writing abi
well over 600 on the LSAT, and well over 55
ability test. The class entering in September
3.38 GPA, 640 LSAT, and 60 writing ability.
While any undergraduate specialization
student for law school, the beginning law
possess the fundamental skills necessary fo


and written communication.
skills should study advance
course that tests one's ability
reason from it will be benefic
in constitutional law, Eng
economics, political process
basic accounting principles
Prelaw students should
Handbook prepared by the
Council and the Associatior
one-credit course, ASC 18(
Profession, is available unde


ility.
on the writing
1974 averaged

will prepare a
student must
r effective oral


e student who lacks writing
English composition. Any
organize a body of data and
. Also useful will be courses
1 and American history,


es, and sociology.
is recommended.


A course


consult the current PreLaw
Law School Admission Test
i of American Law Schools. A
0, Introduction to the Legal
;r the S-U option.


Advisers for prelaw students are available in University
College and in the Departments of Economics, English,
History, Philosophy, Political Science, and Sociology.


MEDICINE,
OPTOMETR


DENTISTRY,


AND


The University of Florida, rather than having a separate,
organized premedical, predental or preoptometry degree
program, allows a preprofessional student to major in a
program offered by any department or college within the
University. Dental, medical and optometry schools expect
applicants to have received a liberal education and to have
performed at a high level of academic accomplishment,
including work in the required science core courses listed
below. Selection for admission to these professional
schools is usually based primarily on overall grade point
average, (GPA), science CPA, admission test scores, letters
nf evaluation of the annlicant from faculty familiar with


the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The average
GPA for students accepted into regional schools of
optometry was 2.9 in 1974.
Freshman students planning careers in medicine,
dentistry and optometry should register with the Office of
Preprofessional Education, 113 Anderson Hall, during their
first quarter at the University, and normally should apply
for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences at the end
of their first quarter of residence. Admission may occur at a
later time, but the student may lose valuable curricular
flexibility associated with the programs described below if
the transfer is greatly delayed. Students transferring from
other colleges and universities should also register with this
office during the first quarter of residence. In order to
inform themselves fully of requirements, procedures and
other factors relating to preprofessional preparation,
students should obtain a current of the PREPROFESSIONAL
GUIDE* prepared by and available through the Office of
Preprofessional Education.
In addition to serving as a central source of information


on all matters per
the Office of P
clearing-house for
forms relating to
requirements an
provides students
central office for


training


to the preprofession


al


reprofessional Education
information, catalogues and
medical, dental and optome
d admission procedures. T
with academic advisers and s
collecting and forwarding


curricula,
acts as a
application
try school
he office
;erves as a
letters of


recommendation, evaluation and certification to the
schools selected by the students.
The Office of Preprofessional Education coordinates the
activities of the preprofessional advisers located in various
departments and provides them with current data and


procedures needed for effective
initial contact with this office, the
to an adviser who will help
upper-division major best suited t
abilities. The adviser will remain


advisement. Following
student will be assigned
plan a program and
o the student's aims and
aware of the student's


progress, and will inform the Office of Preprofessional
Education of academic difficulties and particularly of
academic excellence. In the latter case, the adviser may
recommend a student for the Junior Honors Medical
Program described below and/or for a departmental honors
program.
PREMEDICAL, PREDENTAL, PREOPTOMETRY
CURRICULAR OPTIONS
The preprofessional student must :atisfy the following
core requirements (usually prior to application to the
professional schools):

Required Core Courses:
1) A complete general chemistry sequence (terminating
with CY 204, 213, 330 or 223)
2) A complete organic chemistry sequence (terminating
with CY 385 and 382 or 388)
3) 14 credits in zoology (usually ZY 201, 202 and 301)
4) A complete physics sequency (terminating with PS 213
and 223 or PS 217 and 227)
5) Analytic geometry and calculus (MS 301 and 302)
6) One year of English
These courses will also meet the basic requirements for
schools of osteopathic and podiatric medicine.
Premedical students wishing to qualify for the University
of Miami must also complete ZY 310 and CY 341 or BCH
411 and 412 prior to graduation.
The usual timetable for application to the professional
school is:
1) Complete the preprofessional course requirements
within the first three years of college, preferably by the
C. rn* rw.n. n .* t -. .f. n...n. .* *.% ra :..J...* n-





Colleges

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


scores and letters of evaluation) to the
by the end of August or the first part
latest) of the year preceding the year
in completion of applications beyond
chances of admission.
5) Maintain a high academic pern
transcripts of subsequent quarters to
at which your application is being c


professional schools
of September (at the
of graduation. Delay
that date may reduce

formance and send
professional schools
considered ,


6) Interviews for applicants being seriously considered are
conducted in the fall and winter by professional schools.
7) Notices of acceptance or rejection are usually received


by the
acceptU
classes
Besic
ments,
experie
career


ng of
may


the following y
be offered as late


although some
the week before


les meeting the preprofessional course require-
students are strongly recommended to gain some
nece in the health care delivery environment of their
choice. Such experience may be obtained by


participation in the programs of the Preprofessional Honors
Society-Alpha Epsilon Delta, and the Preprofessional
Service Organization-PSO at the University of Florida.
More details about these programs and applications are
available at the Office of Preprofessional Education.


STANDARD PROGRAM FOR YEAR 1


students reach a deci


sion to prepare


a career


medicine or dentistry during or after one year of college.
ich students will usually have to complete requirements
a more accelerated rate if they wish to graduate on
hedule. The degree of acceleration should be discussed


with a preprofessional adviser.
Any sequence of general chemistry is
basis for choice among CY 201, 211, 221 (I
is outlined in the catalog section prec
course listings. For qualified students pc
background in chemistry, physics and mat
231 sequence offers a number of advar
time flexibility. MS 301, MS 302 and Z'
completed this year. American Instituti
requirements should be completed
appropriate courses or via College Le
Program (CLEP) credit. Liberal arts ele
foreign language, and physics are am
students who have completed American
English by CLEP credit.


acceptable. The
Honors), and 231
eding chemistry
)ssessing a good
hematics, the CY
stages, including
Y 201 should be
ons and English
by taking the
vel Examination
active courses, a
ong options for
Institutions and


STANDARD PROGRAM FOR YEAR 2
If a student has not finished general chemistry, it should
be completed in this year. Organic chemistry should be
begun and completed this year. CY 362 is not acceptable.
Qualified students are advised to consider application to
the honors sequence (CY 387 and 388). Three quarters of
zoology (ordinarily ZY 201, 202 and 301) should be
completed by the end of this year. BCH 351 may be elected


during the se
molecular biol
complete the
unless they h
available time
or foreign lan
having a back
the University
language requi
which is offer


foreign la


cond


as an introduction


and biochemistry. Student


humanities req
ave previous CI
might consider c
iguage sequence
round in a foreign
may satisfy al
rement by taking


uirements by
LEP credit. S
completingg eit
during this
n language pri'
II or part of
a placement


'ed several times during the


nguage


departments.


n to human
:s should also
coursework
students with
her a physics
year. Those
or to entering
the foreign
examination,
year by the


Second-year premedical students who have a 3.5 average
or higher and who have completed the above core


YEARS 3 AND 4

During year 3 students generally complete any core
requirements as yet unfilled. During year 3 or 4 the foreign
language requirement must be completed.
The remainder of years 3 and 4 is devoted to completion
of a departmental major and elective courses in science


and other


areas.


Profe;


any particular major.
in one of the sciences,
major in some other
student's record during
latitude that student %
most students do majc
common preprofessic
below,


ssional schools attach no bias toward
Thus, although most students major
it is equally possible and desirable to
r area. In general, the better the
Sg the first two years, the greater the
vill have in a choice of major. Since
or in one of the sciences, the various


onal


1) Botany Majo
botany through
should schedule I
year (preferably
During the third
342 or 542, and
completed. Durir
be scheduled. Re


in botany will
the specific


science


r -Students
the College
BTY 203 by
sooner if
year BTY 31
ZY 325 or
ig the four
maining hot


be chosen
interest (


options are outlined

planning a major in
* of Arts and Sciences
Fall quarter of the third
scheduling permits).
10, BTY 380 or 532, BTY
AY 362, 363 should be
th year BTY 301 should
Jrs needed for the major
elective credits to meet
the student. Students


interested in research or departmental honors should
schedule BTY 4% during the fourth year.
2) Chemistry Major If quantitative analysis, CY 330,
has not been taken as part of the CY 231 sequence,
then quantitative analysis CY 331 or 332 is required.


A student may elect e
sequence CY 451-454 (MS :
341-343. Students who
sequence must also take
-436. Students interested
should consider taking C
3) Microbiology Major -
microbiology major should
at least one quarter of or
ZY 301. BCH 411 is a
microbiology major. In a
following courses constit
major program: MCY 405,
In some cases which
microbiology undergradu
may be substituted for MC
in undergraduate resear
departmental honors shot


either physical chemistry
305 is a co-requisite) or CY
choose the CY 341-343
either CY 433-434 or 435
in a research experience
Y 496 in their last year.
Students interested in a
d schedule MCY 302 after
ganic chemistry and after
required course for the
addition to MCY 302, the
ute the remainder of the
406, 410, 419, 420 and 421.
are determined by the
ate coordinator, BCH 412
:Y 420. Students interested
ch projects as well as
jld discuss MCY 496 with


the undergraduate coordinator. In addition, quanti-
tative analysis (either CY 330, 331 or 332) is a
required background course for this major.
4) Zoology Major A preprofessional zoology major
must take ZY 325 and at least one course from each
of the following three sets:
a. ZY 309, 310
b. ZY 306, 308, 309, 318, 516
c. ZY 510 or 405
(Suggested course selections for preprofessional
students are: 309, 310, 510).
At this point, the student will have 34 major
credits. Zoology courses in physiology (ZY 570, 574)
or histology (ZY 521) are appropriate electives to
complete the major requirements of 39 credits in
zoology. The student should also be aware of the
possibility of research experience through ZY 496.


Two quarters of ZY 496
honors.
-il ' I & a


are required for departmental
U I A.. -


a


I I


t





UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


professional schools students having taken a
biochemistry as undergraduates may exempt them-
selves from the biochemistry course taught as part of
the basic medical science sequence.
6) Interdisciplinary Major This major, described
elsewhere in the Arts and Sciences section of the
catalog is available for superior preprofessional
students.
Transfer students who have received credit for the first


two years of college at another institution
difficulty in adapting themselves to the a
the help of an adviser. Since relatively
placed by professional schools upon th
transfer students in their third year, suc
plan on taking at least 30 hours in scien
three or four quarters at the University
transfer students who have completed
preprofessional course requirements
taking additional courses in either ch
microbiology, biochemistry, physics,
statistics. By doing well in courses which
preprofessional students at the Unive
transfer students can enhance their acac
provide admission committees with a ba
of their academic abilities with other a


Choice of Electives:
have any significant
students. These scd
students who have s
development durir
selected science el
351, BCH 411-412, '
Students who have
the required core


h
s


in should have no
tbove format with
I heavy weight is
e performance of
h students should
ce during the first
of Florida. Those
all of the basic
should consider
emistry, zoology,
mathematics or
are taken by many
ersity of Florida,
lemic records and
isis of comparison
applicants.


Professional schools do not appear to
bias toward elective courses chosen by
lools, in fact, look with favor upon
hown broad interests and educational
g their college career. Commonly
ectives include senior research, BCH
iCY 302, ZY 521, ZY 570 and ZY 574.


displayed academic weakness in any of
:ourse areas (especially chemistry or


zoology) generally are advised
by stronger performances at
should be reemphasized that
University of Miami School of h
310 and either CY 341 or CY 33
graduation regardless of their rr
South Florida Medical School
have taken a course in statistic


Credit:
does


to offset such weaknesses
a more advanced level. It
students applying to the
medicine must complete ZY
1, BCH 411 and 412 prior to
iajor. Also the University of
will require applicants to
s and a course in genetics.


generally agreed that receipt of such
mply the equivalent of educational


experience received in a University level course. CLEP
credit does not substitute for any ot the core requirements


listed above. In
give students so
education requi
take the form o1
Preprofessional
general educate
for liberal arts
humanities, at


general, the utilization of CLEP credit will
ime additional flexibility in completing their
irements. In some cases, this flexibility will
f accelerated entry into professional school.
students using CLEP credit to satisfy
on requirements are encouraged to register


courses in English, social
the 200 level or above.


sciences and


Biology
CBS 211, CBS 221, CBS 231 ................. .........................9
Physical Education ................................................... ..3
Electives . . . ...................... .. .. ....... . . . . . .......... 12


Preprofessional Requirements
Microbiology
M C Y 300 ............................. ...........
Fundamentals of Human Nutrition
FS 250 ......... ........... ..... ...........
Development Psychology (PSY 303) or
Growth and Development (EDF 345]..
**Human Anatomy and Physiology
M ED 331...... . .. . .


Human


*CPS 216 is needed prior to CPS 226
**lf MED 331 is not available it may be deferred and taken in
the first quarter of upper division. Should MED 331 not be
taken in lower division, a total of 16 credit hours of
electives must be taken.
PHARMACY
The program of study leading to the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Pharmacy is divided into two parts two years
of prepharmacy in the University College and three years in
the College of Pharmacy.
In keeping with the accreditation requirements of the
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, all stu-
dents must be enrolled in one or more required pharmacy
courses for a minimum of nine quarters, regardless of the
number of studies completed in other fields. Upon
applying for admission to the College of Pharmacy, it is
advised that the student see the College of Pharmacy
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (MSB,room P-111) to be
sure that all recommended prepharmacy courses will be
completed by September.
The program for the first two years is as follows:


General Education Requirements

EH English ......... ..... .. ..... ...........
MS Mathemati cs.........................


* .........................*.*..


Credits
.... ... 9
.... 5-10


Recommended courses are MS 102 and at least one of the
following: MS 201, MS 204, or the MS 301-302 series.
Students planning to pursue the industrial or research
option in pharmacy should take the MS 301-302 series.
BES Behavioral Studies ................................ .. ......... 3
SSC American Institutions ........................................... 9
HUM The Hum anities............................................... 12
CY 211 General Chemistry .......................................... 4


PS 211, 221 General Physics and Laboratory.
ZY 201,202 General Zoology.....................
Physical Education..................................


Post-baccalaureate undergraduate work: Students who
have received a BS or BA degree and have not qualified for
professional school because of a lack of quality and/or
quantity of preprofessional work may want to consider
additional work at the undergraduate level to make up
these deficiencies. Students interested in this possibility
should consult the Director of the Office of Preprofessional
Education, 113 Anderson Hall.


NURSING


General Education Requirements


Credits


English.............................................................. . . . . .9
. j .. / 1. ^ A


Preprofessional Requirements
CY 212,213 GeneraI Chemistry............
(Students not qualified for the CY 211
202, 203, 204)
PS 212 or 213 and 222 or 223................


series


......... 8
CY 201,

. ........ S5


A minimum of 10 credits of physics is required for
students planning to pursue the community and hospital
pharmacy areas. Students wishing to major in industrial and
research pharmacy should complete the entire sequence.
CY 381, 382 Organic Chemistry ........ ............................ 7
CY 384, 385 Organic Chemistry. ................. ................... 3
Approved Electives................................................ 9-14


CLEP
credit





Colleges

UNIVERSITY COU.fGE


and/or pharmacy courses. Ninety-six quarter hours or 64
semester hours of course work are required for admission to
the College of Pharmacy. Students deficient in certain
basic courses, such as organic chemistry, biology,
mathematics and physics and having at least 96 quarter
hours of credit, may be admitted to the College of
Pharmacy on approval of the Admissions Committee upon
application. However, in such instances the student must
make up the deficiencies in the first professional year.
The professional sequence of courses is on an annual
basis only beginning in September each year. Students are
admitted to the College of Pharmacy annually, in
September only, when the fall quarter begins.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH
AND RECREATION
University College students expecting to earn a degree in
the College of Physical Education, Health, and Recreation
should pursue one of the following programs:
A. FOR MEN AND WOMEN INTENDING TO MAJOR IN
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
General Education Requirements
Credits
EH English ............................................................... 9
CMS Fundamental Mathematics .................................. 4
"BES Behavioral Studies......................................... ... 6
SSC American Institutions .......................................... 9
HUM The Humanities................................................ 12
*CPS Physical Sciences............................................... 10


CBS Biological Sciences ........................
Physical Education...............................


Preprofessional Requirements for Men
PHR 100 Men's Team Sports . ......... ..................
PHR 101 Men's Soccer and Related Sports.........
PHR 126 Swimming. ........................................
PHR 201 Football Fundamentals .......................
PHR 202 Men's Basketball Fundamentals ...........
PHR 203 Men's Track and Field ........................
PHR 205 Wrestling and Conditioning Programs..
PHR 207 Men's Gymnastics .............................
PH R 224 G olf................................................
PH R 225 Tennis.............................................
PHR 261 Individual and Family Health...............
PHR 266 First Aid and Medical Self-Help............
SCH 312 Public Speaking...................................
Second Teaching Field Electives......................
Preprofessional Requirements for Women


Women's Soccer and
Women's Track and F
Women's Softball.....
Swimming .................
Women's Volleyball a
Women's Gymnastics
Recreational Sports...
G olf ........................
Tennis .....................


Related
ield......
"''4444 *4**
nd Field
.. *.** *4**


Sports
* *. *. .1
..,...... .


PHR 231 Folk and SocialDance.....................
PHR 232 Modern Dance................... ..........
PHR 261 Individual and Family Health............
PHR 266 First Aid and Medical Self-help.........
SCH 312 Public Speaking................................
Second Teaching Field Electives.....................
"Three credits of one of these may be omitted.


B. FOR MEN AND WOMEN INTENDING TO MAJOR IN
HEALTH EDUCATION
General Education Requirements


Credits
S........... 9


EH English ................................ .....................
MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry.....................
BES Behavioral Studies ......... ..........................
SSC American Institutions ......... . ....... ...........
HUM The Humanities......................................
CPS Physical Sciences ......................................
GY 201 Physical Geology ..................................
CY 201 Introductory Chemistry.........................
ZY 201 Introductory Zoology Laboratory..............
BTY 181 Introductory Botany (or CBS-9).............
Physical Education..........................................
Preprofessional Requirements
PHR 261 Individual and Family Health.................
PSY 201 General Psychology.............................
SCH 312 Public Speaking......................................
SY 201 Principles of Sociology...........................
PHR 262 Community and Environmental Health...
PHR 266 First Aid and Medical Self-Help..............
Approved Electives..........................................
C. FOR MEN AND WOMEN INTENDING TO M
IN RECREATION
General Education Requirements


.......... 10
IAJOR


Credits
EH English .................. .................. .......................... ..... 9
CMS Fundamental Mathematics ................. .................. 4
*BES Behavioral Studies ............................................... 6
SSC American Institutions......................................... .. 9
HUM The Humanities............................................... 12
CPS Physical Sciences ............................................. 10
CBS Biological Sciences.................. ............ ................9
Physical Education..................................................... 3
Preprofessional Requirements
MSC 311 Music in the Field of Recreation..........................4
PHR 204 Baseball or PHR 114 Women's Softball............... 2
PHR 203 orPHR 113 Track and Field ............................... 2
PHR 220 Recreational Sports..................... ................... 3
PHR 231 Folk and Social Dance .................................... 3
PHR 100 Men's Team Sports ................... ....................... 2
PHR 245 Leadership in Recreation. ....................4
SCH 312 Public Speaking. ............. ..............................4
Elect ives . .... .... .... .. .. .... . .............. ............................. 17

*Three credits of one of these may be omitted


I






College


Agriculture


AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING


(See College of Engineering


AGRONOMY


ANIMAL


ENTOMOLOGY


SCIENCES


ANIMAL SCIENCE
BOTANY
DAIRY SCIENCE
AND NEMATOLOGY


FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
FOOD SCIENCE
SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION
FRUIT CROPS
MECHANIZED AGRICULTURE
MICROBIOLOGY
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
PLANT PATHOLOGY
PLANT SCIENCES-GENERAL






Colleges


College of Agriculture
The aim of the College of Agriculture is to provide
students with the best education possible for service in
agricultural business, technology, and science.
The departments in the College are: Agricultural and
Extension Education, Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy,
Animal Science, Dairy Science, Entomology and
Nematology, Food and Resource Economics, Food Science,
Fruit Crops, Ornamental Horticulture, Plant Pathology,
Poultry Science, Soil Science, Vegetable Crops, and
Veterinary Science. Degree programs are available through


the College of
Statistics depar
and Sciences.
Conservation is
Agriculture.


Agricu
tments
The
a spec


ilture in Botany, Microbiology and
administered in the College of Arts
School of Forest Resources and
ialized faculty within the College of


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSIONS
The University of Florida and the College of Agriculture
encourage applications from qualified students from all
cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below
are the specific requirements for admission to this college.
University College Students: Any student in University
College who has finalized his decision to study Agriculture
may transfer to the College of Agriculture after completing
one quarter in University College. To be eligible for
admission students must have a minimum of a C average on
all work completed and have demonstrated by selection of
pre-professional courses their intent to pursue a program in
agriculture.


Transfer Students:


To be considered for admission to the


College of Agriculture, a transfer student must satisfy the
minimum requirements for admission to an Upper Division
College that are set forth in the ADMISSIONS Section of this
catalog. Additionally, the applicant must satisfy the
following specific requirements for consideration by the
College of Agriculture: (1) Complete the courses required
for the desired curriculum as indicated in the program for
the Freshman and Sophomore years in the University
College section of this catalog or their equivalent, and, (2)
pass all required preprofessional courses with a minimum
grade of C. The following conditions will serve as a guide
in expediting transfer to the College of Agriculture in
compliance with the above requirements. In the event
enrollment quotas become necessary because of limited
space or teaching resources, selection of those admitted
will be on the basis of past academic performance.
A. Students attending four-year colleges, who wish to
transfer after two years, should follow a program of
general education and preprofessional courses similar
to the Basic Curriculum for the Freshman and
Sophomore years for students planning to enter the
College of Agriculture as outlined in the University
College section of this catalog.
B. Junior College students should:
1. Complete the two-year college parallel program at
the junior college.
2. Satisfy the general education requirements
established for the junior college.
3. Complete a program of chemistry through
qualitative analysis and mathematics through college
algebra and trigonometry.
A r1 t ..- . ..


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
BASIC CURRICULUM


In addition to the 96% credits required
College of Agriculture, % credits mus
College of Agriculture curriculum for a


for entrance to
t be earned in
combined tota


192 credits required for the Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture degree. The following curriculum common to
all areas of agriculture designates specific requirements and
electives for the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
Some of these courses may be taken as electives in the lower
division. It is especially important that students in junior
colleges, planning to transfer to the College of Agriculture,
select courses from the core requirements as electives.


Curriculum
Core


- College of
Requirements


Agriculture 96
- 8 Credits


Courses Credits
Com m unications ...................................................... 8
Electives selected from SCH 202, EH 302, 303, 403, and
JM 420
Other Requirements and Electives 88 Credits


Requirements and electives in student's
departm ent .................................. m
Other requirements, free and approved


major
in. 20
elective


-- max. 40
es.... 48-68


PRACTICAL WORK EXPERIENCE
By prior arrangement with individual Department
Chairmen and approval of the Dean, students may, during
their course of study, receive credit for practical work under
competent supervision in any recognized and approved
agricultural or related pursuit relevant to their college
program. Credit is normally earned at the rate of one credit
per month of full-time work and may not exceed a total of
four in any combination of experiences. A formal written
report must be submitted before a grade (S-U) will be


issued.
Departments offering this option
number 400 in their catalog listing
are available from the College and i
establishing minimum criteria for
performance.


have listed the course
of courses. Guidelines
individual departments,
credit eligibility and


DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS
A student who carries 15 hours per quarter with a grade
point average of 3.3 or better and no grade less than C in
any course will have his name placed on the Dean's list for
that quarter.
Students completing the requirements for the B.S. in
Agriculture degree are eligible to be considered for
graduation with Honors or High Honors.
To graduate with Honors a student must have a University
of Florida Upper Division grade point average of 3.5, or
above. (For purposes of honors the University of Florida
Upper Division courses are defined as all courses taken at
this University after the student has earned % credits,
wherever taken.)


To graduate with High Honors the same
apply as for Honors except that the grade
must be 3.75 or above.
GRADUATE TRAINING IN AGRICULTURE


rements
average


The College of Agriculture offers five advanced degrees:
Master of Agriculture, Master of Science, Master of
Agricultural Management and Resource Development, and
nnrtor nf Philnmnnhu






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


in Agriculture.
For a specialization in Agricultural Science at least 18
credits of the 192 total are required in one or more of the
areas of the Physical (CY,GY, PS) and Biological Sciences
(MCY, BTY, EY, PT, AY 362) and Mathematics (MS), in
addition to those required in the University College.
For a program in Agricultural Technology a choice of
courses in applied agriculture is planned by the separate
departments of the College of Agriculture in areas of the
student's special interest.
For Agricultural Business Specialization at least 20 credits
of the 192 total required must be completed from the areas
of Food and Resource Economics (FRE) and Business
Administration (ATG, ES, FIl, MGT, MKG), in addition to
those required in the University of College plus a
departmental major.
The chairman of the department in which the student
majors (or his appointee) will act as the student's adviser,
assist the student in arranging his course of study, and make
necessary recommendations to the Dean. The student's
courses for each quarter are subject to the approval of the
Dean and the Department Chairman.


TROPICAL AGRICULTURE


A program for a specialization (with certificate) in Tropical
Agriculture for undergraduate and graduate students in the
College of Agriculture is available. The program provides
course selection to broaden the normal degree require-
ments for those interested in specializing in Tropical
Agriculture. Students enrolled in any one of the existing
major programs in the College of Agriculture may pursue
this specialization.
The Certificate in Tropical Agriculture specialization will
include courses from four basic groups as follows: Area
Studies, International Economics, Tropical Ecosystems, and
Tropical Agriculture. A total of at least 20 quarter credits
from courses which relate to non-U. S. tropical areas of the
world is required from Area Studies, International Econom-
ics and Tropical Ecosystems with at least 4 credits from each
category. In addition, minimum of 20credits from Tropical
Agriculture courses related to production of agricultural
commodities in tropical areas of the world is required.
The courses required for this specialization will bt
determined by the student in consultation with a de-
partmental adviser from an approved list of courses as
indicated in the Tropical Agriculture Specialization
guidelines. In most cases the requirements may be met
through a wise choice of electives. Students interested in
this specialization should consult their departmental


adviser.


A certificate program for non-agriculture students
desiring to broaden their major program with courses
relating to Tropical Studies with an emphasis in Agriculture
is also available.
The Certificate in Tropical Studies will require 20 quarter
credits in courses from the four basic groups as indicated
above but with a minimum of 15 credits from Tropical
Agriculture courses.
The courses required for this Certificate will be
determined by the student in consultation with a de-
partmental adviser and approved bythe Dean of the College
of Agriculture. Students interested in this program should
consult the Dean of Agriculture.
The departments or disciplines from which courses may
be selected are listed below. The specific courses as well as
all details of the program are given in a Tropical Agriculture
-- -: -l l..:.-:-- er* jirn f^ .- *. l


Law
Political Science
Sociology
Others as appropriate
Food and Resource Economics
Fruit Crops
Ornamental Horticulture
Plant Pathology
Soil Science
Vegetable Crops
Veterinary Science
Others as appropriate


PEST MANAGEMENT AND PLANT PROTECTION
Students in the Pest Management and Plant Protection
Specialization will receive instruction in the principles of
Entomology, Nematology, Plant Pathology, and Weed
Science. An understanding of the component parts of the
crop-plant ecosystem as related to management of all
groups of pests through the application of biological,
chemical and integrated systems compatible with a quality
environment will be provided.
Students who select the Pest Management and Plant
Protection Specialization will major in one of the following
programs in the College of Agriculture: Agronomy,
Entomology and Nematology, Fruit Crops, Ornamental
Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Plant Sciences, or Vegetable
Crops. Students who complete the requirements for the
Bachelor of Science degree with this specialization should
find many employment opportunities in agri-business
enterprises or government agencies concerned with plant
pest management, crop production, and/or environmental
protection. In addition the successful completion of this
undergraduate program will place the student in excellent
competitive position as a candidate for graduate studies in
any one of the programs cooperating in the undergraduate
major program at the University of Florida or any other
university.


Interested students should
and should complete the fol
addition to the major program
the requirements of this special
the course requirements of
choice of electives and within
the Bachelor of Science in Ai


contact an academic adviser
lowing required courses in
requirements. In most cases
Ilization may be met through
the major program, a wise
the 192 credits required for
riculture.


*


I
I
I.


Credits
PM 313 Fundamentals of Plant-Pest Management.......... 3
PM 321 Seminar in Basic Plant-Pest Management.......... 2
PM 340 Internship in Plant-Pest Management............... 3
PM 421 Seminar in Applied Plant-Pest Management....... 1
PM 435 Systems of Pest Management and Plant


Exercises in Pest Management.....
tals of Crop Production................


BTY 301 Introduction to Ecology................................. 5
BTY 310 Elementary Plant Physiology ........................... 5
BTY 370 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry... 5
SLS 330 G general Soils ................................................ 5
AY 362 G enetics ........................................................ 4
Required Electives, AY, PLS, FC, OH, VC
(Production Courses)............................................. 8
CERTIFICATE MINOR IN
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
A program for a minor (with certificate) in environmental
studies has been developed. The program provides course
cpl-ntinn tn n th ain a hrndl knnwtwiop nf thp pnvironment.


Tropical Agriculture
Agricultural Engineering
Agronomy
Animal Science
Entomology
Tropical Ecosystems
Agronomy
Biological Sciences
Botany
Forestry
Zoology
Others as appropriate


Protection .........
PM 436 Laboratory
PLS 201 Fundamen






Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


minimum of 18 quarter hours credit is required for the
minor. Courses required for the major cannot be counted
toward the minor requirement. A minimum of three hours
outside the College of Agriculture is required.
The courses required for this minor will be determined by
the students in consultation with their departmental adviser
from an approved list of courses prepared by the
department, the College of Agriculture and the University.
In most cases these requirements may be met through a
wise choice of electives. students interested in this minor
should consult their departmental adviser.

PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE

The College of Veterinary Medicine, University of
Florida, admits a limited number of students each fall for
the pursuit of a degree Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. The
following courses must be completed with no grade less
than C and a minimum grade point average of 2.5:
Quarter Credits


Principles of Animal
laboratory (ZY 201, ZY
Microbiology (MCY 30
Genetics (AY 362 or ZY
Chemistry:
Inorganic Chemistr
lecture and laborat
CY 203 and CY 204
CY 213)................
Organic Chemistry;
(CY 381-384; CY 382
Quantitative Analys
Physics (PS 211, PS 212
Mathematics: Calculus
Animal Science:
Introduction to Anir
Feeds and Feeding (,


Humanities (l
or 233 3.......
Social Science
352; SSC 231
English (EH 1
EH 121; EH
Oral Commun
Electives. .......
(e.g, Agric


IUM


Biology, lecture and
202) ................... .......
2)................................
325) ..........................


.........9
........-5
.. .4 5
27


y (General and Qual,);
ory (CY 201, CY 202,
I; or CY 211, CY 212 and
........ ,...... .. .... ........................... 12-16
lecture and laboratory
-385).................................. 10
is (CY 330 or CY 331) ....................... 5
i, PS 221, PS 222)...........................10
s* (M S 301).................................. .5


nal Science (ADP 311)
A D P 312)....................


211; HUM 221;


HUM


(SSC 111; SSC 221, 222, 2
,232, 281 or 353..................
11; Comprehensive English;
122 or EH 123......................
ic:ation (SCH 202).................


ult'


ure, Compute


231, 232,
.............. 9-12**


........9

.........9


Science.


Economics, Humanities, journalism,
Political Science, Psychology, Social
Sciences, Statistics. etc.)


*Trigonometry and Algebra at the high school or college
level are required for admission to courses in Calculus.
"**Nine quarter credits will be accepted if taken as a
requirement for an Associate of Arts degree.
Because of the rigid course requirements, most students
require somewhat more than two years to complete this
curriculum. Also, since admission to Veterinary School is
competitive, students usually need to make considerably
more than the minimum grade point average of 2.5.
Pre-veterinary students should consult the Dean of the
College of Agriculture before registering for the pre-
veterinary curriculum.
Residents of Florida who will have completed the pre-
veterinary requirements in lune of the year that entrance


AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION
EDUCATION
The curriculum in Agricultural and extension Education
meets the requirements for those interested in professional
courses in agricultural education and the cooperative
extension service. It is designed to offer students a
combination of courses in technical agriculture, pro-
fessional education and extension methodology which will
prepare them for future employment and advanced study in
the field of agricultural and extension education. Students
majoring in this department will be advised by the
department chairman or his appointee to be sure that the
courses in their program meet the requirements.
Students registering in this curriculum will take the
program of study recommended in the University College
for Agricultural and Extension Education.
The student planning to qualify in this program will need
to satisfy the College of Agriculture core requirements.
The student planning to qualify to teach in the public
schools will complete a minimum of 46 quarter hours from
the following list of professional courses. The courses
indicated by an asterisk (*) are required.
A student preparing for a career in agricultural extension
will complete a program designed by the student's adviser.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8 credits
Departmental Requirements 46 credits
Credits
AED 180 Introduction to Careers in Agricultural


Sciences ...............................................
*AED 321 Development and Philosophy of
Agricl. & Vocl. Programs ......................
*AED 324 Instructional Techniques in
Agricl. & Vocl. Education.....................
*AED 419 Organization of Agricultural
& Vocational Programs........................
*AED 421 Special Methods in Teaching
Vocational Agriculture.........................


'AED
AD
*AED


* . . . . 4 *. 4 .


*- **~*4* WA P4W &4* 4


4P* **4P ******P*~*WP P
....................

1......... .(.1.....


& Extension


Other Requirements and Electives 42 credits *
MCA 303 Agricultural Mechanics 1 ..............................4
MCA 407 Agricultural Mechanics 2................................ 5
FRE 301 Principles of Food and Resource Economics........ 5
ADP 311 Introduction to Animal Science........................ 5
PLS 201 Fundamentals of Crop Production..................... 4
SLS 330 General Soils ................... ............................... 5
EY 301 Principles of Entomology.................................. 4
Electives in Agriculture ............................................... 10
"Substitutions must be approved by the Chairman of
Agricultural & Extension Education
* *To be planned by department counselor.

ACr.RI II TI IRAI IFNICINIFr:RINIC


423 Laboratory Practices in Teaching
;riculture & Vocl. Educ.....................................
439 Agricultural and Extension
location Practicu m ..........................................
342 The Adolescent (or equivalent) ....................
428 Agricultural & Vocational Career Education...
301 Development and Role of
tension Education . . .. ..... ...............................
407 Agricultural Youth Programs.......................
430 Individual Work in Agricultural


Education .......................................... 1-8







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


relate to biological production and processing of biological
products, training in agricultural and biological courses is
obtained. Students desiring careers in Agricultural Engi-
neering will register in the College of Engineering. See


College of Engineering

AGRONOMY


for curriculum.


CURRICULUM I DAIRY SCIENCE


This curriculum


is designed for students


interested


dairy production, pre-veterinary medicine or post-graduate
study.


College


Plant Sciences)


ANIMAL


Animal
Animal


SCIENCES


Science,
Science,


certain options


courses.
options


Science


- GENERAL


, Poultry


Dairy and Poultry


ofAgricultu


Animal Sciences C
Departmental


re Core Requirements 8 Credits
ore Requirement 49-50 Credits


Requirements


DY 301 Dairy Cattle Management.........
DY 405 Dairy Cattle Nutrition...............
DY 407 Physiology of Lactation or
ADP 407 Reproduction in Farm Animals.


Science


Science


students in


have a common core requirement of


Additional requirements and electives


should


be discussed


Electives
Approved


in Dairy


Science...................


18 Credits


Credits
..... 4
........3

........ 4
.. .. ..... 7
...20-21


within all


with the Chairman


Counseling representatives of the Department in which the


chooses


of


to maior.


Agriculture Core


Sciences


Requirements


Requirements


ADP 311 Introduction to Anima
ADP 322 Principles of Animal B


ADP 312 Feeds and


- 8 Credits


-- 39-50 Credits


Credits
I Science...... ................ 5
reeding ................... ..... 5


CURRICULUM II -
The curriculum
managing dairies
agribusinesses.


College


-DAIRY MANAGEMENT
is designed for students
or dairy enterprises, or ca


ofAgricultu


Required Courses


(ADP311,


ADP 312,


interested


ireers


in allied


re Core Requirements 8 Credits


from Animal Sciences Core 34 Credits
AY362, AY 432,8TY370, SLS330, VY321)


Management Core


Requirements -21


Credits


ADP 421


*SLS 330 General Soils.............................


VY 321 Anatomy and Ph


ysiology..............


AY 362 Genetics....................................


*AY 432 Forages and Pastu


* *.. *..... ............


re Science.........


MCY 302 Basic Biology of Microorganisms..................... 5
ATG 201 Elementary Financial Accounting...................... 5
or
FRE 310 Farm Firm Management................................... 5
BTY 370 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry..... 5
Approved Electives AL, DY, PY.................................... 12-26


Free Electives.........................................


*Students in Poultry


Science


are not required to take


and Laboratory Animal


AY 432 and SLS 330.


22-26


science


Credits
FRE 304 Computer and Linear Programming for
Agriculture............................................................ 3
FRE 310 Farm Firm Management ................................... 5
MS 204 Calculus for Economics and Business or
MS 301 Analytical Geometry and Calculus I.................... 5
ATG 201 Elementary Financial Accounting...................... 5
ATG 203 Elementary Managerial Accounting................... 3


Departmental Requ


irements -


18 Credits


DY 301 Dairy Cattle Management.............
DY 405 Dairy Cattle Nutrition...................
DY 407 Physiology of Lactation or
ADP 407 Reproduction in Farm Animals.....


Electives


Approved


ANIMAL SCIENCE


in Dairy


Electives ..........................


POULTRY SCIENCE


Curricula


Free and approved electives


Students


selecting


required to take 1


the Animal


Animal


requirements for those


Science


Science


meet


the educational


interested in options in Animal


and in Laboratory Animal


Science.


Animal


Science


is designed to give students a foundation in the basic
sciences and fundamental training in the various phases of
the beef cattle, swine, horses, sheep, laboratory animals
and meat industries. Early in their college planning,
students should discuss the programs and their implications
with the Department Chairman or his counseling represent-
atives.


College of


Agricultu


Animal Science


re Core Requirements 8 Credits
>re Requirements 39-50 Credits


Science


option


hours in the following courses:


AL 413, AL 414, AL 415, AL 434, and AL 423.


AL 411,


Two curricula are offered by the Department of Poultry


Science. Students should
departmental counselor ft


consult the Chairman


or the


guidance in making their


curriculum choice and for approval of electives.


CURRICULUM I
This curriculum


- GENERAL OR SCIENCE
n is designed for those students interested


in training in poultry production, pre-veterinary medicine
or in preparing for graduate study.


College
Animal


of Agriculture


Sciences


Core


Requi


Departmental Requirements


Requirements -8


rements -
- 15-29


- 39-40
credits


Students selecting this curriculum are required to take a
minimum of 15 hours from the following Poultry Science
and related courses: PY 312, PY 415, PY 453, ADP 420, ADP


422, VY 401


Electives


Students selecting the Laboratory Animal Science option
are required to take AL 332, AL 430, AL 431, VY 405, EY 301,
MGT 350 (or STA 320) and may also omit ADP 311 but should


elect one additional Animal


Science course.


Flirthdprmnr it il th= nr^rniorativ ef the ct. iannt tn calon-t


PY 414 and PY 222.


(Free and Approved)............................... 20-34


CURRICULUM II


This cu
a career
industries!


- MANAGEMENT OR BUSINESS


rriculum is designed for those students who plan
in any of various phases of the poultry or allied
s with major emphasis on the management or


student


College
Animal


irements for options in Animal Science 12-26 credits


- 22-26 Credits


Electives.............................


Feed in g .......................................


Sem in ar ............................. .........................


Science ...........................


I .


w


w


w





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


MS 204 Calculus for Economics


& Business or


MS 301 Analytical Geometry and Calculus


I .. ........ ..


FRE 310 Farm Firm Management ..................................
ATG 201 Elementary Financial Accounting....................
ATG 203 Elementary Managerial Accounting.................


Departmental


Students


are required to take PY 41


-- 15 credits


5


11 hours from the following Poultry S
courses: PY 312, PY 453, ADP 420, ADP
and PY 422.


Approved


and
cien<


a minimum of
:e and related
VY 401. PY 414


- 17 credits


Approved electives are to be taken from Poultry
and related courses listed above or from the f
courses: STA 320, FRE 320, FRE 330, FRE 460, FRE 4
350, BA 402, ADP 322, MCY 300 and AL 527.


Science
allowing
65, MGT


BOTANY


A major
Agriculture.


in botany is offered through the College of
Students should consult with the Under-


graduate Coordinator for curriculum.
of Arts and Sciences for course listin


Botan


y, College


ig.)


FRE 301 Principles of Food and Resource Economics......
FRE 310 Farm Firm Management ................... ............. .
FRE 320 M arketing....................................................
FRE 401 Food and Resource Economics Senior Seminar..
FRE 425 Agric. Price Analysis and Consumer Behavior....
FRE 440 Public Policy in Agric .....................................


Electives


in Food and Resource


Other Requirements and
S E 201 Basic Economics


ELS 4.J a ThIeoy ....i -.
ES 401 Macro Theory....
ES 402 Micro Theory.....
MS 301 Calculus 1........
MS 302 Calculus 2........
STA 320 Statistics.........
STA 420 Sampling........
Free and Approved Elec
CURRICULUM II AG


BUSINESS MANAGEMENT


This curriculum


in administrative and


related


businesses.


. Economics
Electives -


57 Credits


*4*4 4*4* 44.... .** .. 4. 4....4. 4 4*44* *44* 44. -.
...................... ..................... 5
.*4******* 44...***** 4. **t*** .*.* *5*****94*54. 5
.4 *~* ** ****t ***4*4^* 4*4*4*44*4 *4*4*44* ** *4*.* 5'
4 *444***4 FB4. )* 4*** J 5*&4* 44 .4.,, 4,4. 4,4, 5* I ** *
** 4*4 4*4* 54*** 4* 4 .5* *** *94**** *44** ** 44 44449* 5 *
.4 ....*4.... -*4*********4 4 44*4 *4*4*4*4JlJ 4*I4 4^
:tives........4............................. 5
....R........U...L..T....................


tfives...4*.....4****.. *........ *4 .4 25
RICULTURAL


is designed for those students interested


service


aspects of agriculture or


Students who elect this curriculum and


later decide to do graduate study will be required to take
without credit toward a graduate degree courses required


under Curriculum
Curriculum II.


DAIRY SCIENCE


(For Dairy Foods see I
(For Dairy Production


ood Science-General)
see Animal Science-General)


ENTOMOLOGY & NEMATOLOGY
Entomology and nematology are biological sciences
dealing with two principal groups of Invertebrate animals.
The curricula are designed to give basic training in
entomology and nematology and specialized programs in


various
College


areas


of these two


'e of Agriculture
Departmental R4


sciences.


Core


Requirements


- 8 credits


requirements 30 Credits


EY 301 Principles in Entomology or EY 318 General
Entom ology .................................................. 4 or


EY 410 Insect Physiology and Morphology...................
EY 412 Insect Ecology, Behavior, and Systematics.........
EY 460 Insect Identification .......................................
EY Electives........................................ ... ........ ... 10 or


I that they have not taken under


Core


Requirements


Requirements


FRE 300 Food and Resource


- 8 Credits


- 31 Credits


Credits
Economics lunior Seminar.. 1


FRE 301 Principles of Food and Resource
FRE 310 Farm Firm Management............


FRE 320


Economics......
*4*4*.4 *4.*.*...*..*..*


Marketing .....................................................


FRE 401 Food and Resource Economics Senior Seminar


FRE 425 Agric. Price Analysis
FRE 440 Public Policy in Agri


'Quantitative Methods........
Electives in Food and Resou


and Consumer Behavior....
c .. ..... ..............................


.......................... .... ... .. 3-4


rce Economics...............


2or3


Other Requirements and Electives 57 Credits


ES 201 Basic


MS 204 Calculus for Economics &


MS 301 Analytical Geometry &


4
I


Business.....................


Calculus 1....... ................


ES 301 National Income Determination


Requirements


and Electives


Other


BTY 370 Organic & Biochemistry or equivalent............. 5
Electives in Agriculture andlor Biological
Sciences.............................................................. 32


Suggested Courses:


Approved


AY 362,


ZY 308


Electives.................................................. 21


For the Pest Management and Plant Protection Special-
ization, students must consult the department chairman for


approved


courses.


FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS
Six curricula are offered by the Department of Food and
Resource Economics. The curriculum selected by the


student will depend upon the nature


Students


should


consult


of his interest in the


the chairman


of the


department or the departmental counselor for guidance in
making their choice of a curriculum and for approval of
-I. _. -.


ES 302 Prices & Markets .................................
STA 320 Statistics ....... ............ .. ................
ATG 201 & 203 Elementary Accounting.............


BA 402


FRE 305 Law Applied to Agriculture........
Free and Approved Electives.................


* *


I* *5**~*4***4**
I ** . . *


................. 24-25


*This requirement can be satisfied with FRE 465, STA 420,
MGT 470.


CURRICULUM III


- CO-MAJOR WITH


OTHER DEPARTMENTS
Students majoring in other departments who feel the


need for


a better understanding of the economics of


agriculture and the relationship of agriculture to the general
economy can also take a Co-Major in Food and Resource
Economics. The curriculum for such Co-Major includes 23


quarter hours of required


courses


in Food and Resource


Economics, 9 quarter hours in related fields, and 62 hours to
meet the requirements of other participating departments
and for electives. Elective courses will be selected to fit the
nppdtc and intPrest nof the student.


Requirements


Electives


College of Agricultui
Departmental


58 Credits


Free Electives..........................................................


Economics.................................


Business Law..................................


& Policy..............







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Other Requirements and Electives 61 Credits
STA 320 Introduction to Statistics.................................. 4
ES 201 Basic Economics............................................... 5
Free and Approved Electives...................................... 54
'Students taking a Co-Major in Food and Resource
Economics and graduating in some other college will not be
required to meet the curriculum core requirements of the
College of Agriculture. Such students will have 69 instead of
61 hours of free and approved electives.
CURRICULUM IV--RURAL SOCIOLOGY
This curriculum is designed to train rural sociologists for
teaching, research, and as consultants because of rapid
social and economic changes on the national and
international levels.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8 Credits
Departmental Requirements 25 Credits
Credits
FRE 300 Food and Resource Economics Junior Seminar..... 1
FRE 301 Principles of Food and Resource Economics........ 5
FRE 310 Farm Firm Management................................... 5
FRE 320 M marketing ................... ................... ................ 5
FRE 401 Food and Resource Economics Senior Seminar.... 1
FRE 430 Land Economics..............................................4
FRE 440 Public Policy in Agric....................................... 4
Other Requirements and Electives- 63 Credits *


STA 310 Statistics for the Social Sciences.......
SY 355 Rural Sociology. ..... . . ...... ..............
SY 442 Methods of Social Research..............


* .. .. .** * **
***...*.....r....


SY 471 Population...................................................... 4
SY 464 Comparative Sociology Theory and Methods........ 4
Free and Approved Electives ...................................... 43
SY 201, Principles of Sociology, required during second
year.

CURRICULUM V FOOD MARKETING AND
DISTRIBUTION
This curriculum is designed for students interested in
employment at the managerial level in the Food Industry.


College of Agricultui
Departmental


Requirements 8 Credits


Requirements


- 31 Credits


Credits
Food and Resource Economics Junior Seminar.. 1
Principles of Food and Resource Economics...... 5
Agric. M marketing ................... ..................... .....
Food and Resource Economics Senior Seminar.. 1


Terminal Markets ...............
Agric. Price Analysis............
Food Wholesaling...............
Food Retailing ..................
Case Studies of Agricultural
Activity Analysis Decision


Marketing Firms....
Making. ................


Other Requirements and Electives 57 Credits


ES 201 Basic Economics......................
ES 302 Prices and Maarkets..................
MS 204 or
M S 301 Calculus...............................
STA 320 Introduction to Statistics........
ATG 201 & 203 Elementary Accounting.
BA 402 Business Law .........................


Free and Approved


.. ..............** *** ** .. *
.J**.......... I... **. *..


CURRICULUM VI NATURAL RESOURCE AND
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed for those students interested


Principles


of Agric.


FRE 310 Farm Firm Management...................
FRE 320 M marketing ... .......... .......................
FRE 401 Food and Resource Economics Senioi
FRE 425 Agri. Price Analysis and Consumer B(
FRE 465 Activity Analy. for Econ. Decisions....
FRE 460 Quantitative Methods in Agri. Econ..
FRE 332 Economics of Environmental Quality.
FRE 430 Land Economics.............................
Other Requirements and Electives 51
ES 201 Basic Economics ..............................


............... 5
............... 5
............... 5
r Seminar.. 1
ehavior..... 4


Credits


ES 301 National Income Determination & Policy............ 3
ES 302 Prices & M markets .. . .. ........... . ....................... 3
STA 320 Statistics...................................................... 4
ATG 201 & 203 Elementary Accounting......................... 8
MCA or
SLS 333 Agri. and Environmental Quality...................... 4
Free and Approved Electives..................................... 24
*At least three electives must be chosen from courses that
include the following: MCA 301, SLS 330, EY 301, FRC 353,
ENE 301, ES 331, GPY 351, GPY 438, RE 350, RE 470, BTY 301.

FOOD SCIENCE

The Department of Food Science offers three curricula,
Food Science, Food and Consumer Protection, and
Nutrition and Dietetics. These curricula are designed to
provide an understanding of the applications of basic
sciences, engineering and management to the handling,
processing, manufacturing, marketing and utilization of
human foods and the effects of these functions upon our
environment. Wholesomeness, nutritive value, safety,
convenience and availability of foods are stressed, with
further emphasis on ecological and environmental effects.
Students in all curricula take a common core of courses,
required courses for their area of concentration, and
electives.
The Food Science curriculum offers ample opportunity
for electing courses in areas of special interest, such as
food processing and manufacturing, management or sales;
and graduate study and research in Food Science or related
fields. For those wishing to specialize in the manufacture,
handling and evaluation of products of dairy, fruit, meat,
poultry and vegetable origin, an opportunity is available for
cooperative programs with the commodity departments.
Students interested in the environmental aspects of food
and life systems should choose the Food and Consumer
Protection curriculum. This curriculum will prepare
students for employment in the areas of food regulation,
quality control, and environmental control. The Nutrition
and Dietetics curriculum is designed to prepare students
for a general dietetics internship program upon graduation.
Students should consult the departmental counselors for
guidance and approval of electives.


College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8
Department Core Requirements 38 credits


FS 250 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition......
FS 301 Introductory Food Science .................
FS 402 Food Chemistry............... ...............
FS 403 Food Microbiology............................
FS 412 Food Analysis................................
CY 362-363 Organic Chemistry.....................
MCY 302 Basic Biology of Microorganisms.....
STA 320 Introduction to Statistics ...................


Credits
........ 4
......... 4
..........5
..........5
........ 6
........ 5
........ 4
*,. ,,, 4*4


Electives..................................... 27






Colleges

COU LGE OF AGRICULTURE


Electives (including one commodity-oriented processing
co urse) ............................. ................... . . . . ... . . . .... .. 29
CURRICULUM II FOOD AND CONSUMER
PROTECTION
Additional requirements and electives 50 credits
Credits
FS 411 Government Regulations and the Food Industry...... 2
FS 414 Statistical OualtiY Control and Sensory


iluation of Foods.................................................3
Environmental Toxicology and Public Health....... 4
Food Science Semina r..................................... 1
Food Epidemiology .......................................... 4
Principles of Food Processing ............... ..................5..
Principles of Entomology................................. 4


MS 301 Analytical Geometry & Calculus....................... 5
Electives.......................................................................... 22
NOTE: Recommended Electives for Curriculum II -AG200
- Agriculture in the Environment; FS 203 Toxic
Substances in Foods; EY 420 Medical and Veterinary
Entomology; MGT 401 Business Law; ZY 505 General
Ecology; ENE 420 Environmental Biology; ENE 422 -
Public Health Engineering.
CURRICULUM III NUTRITION AND DIETETICS
Additional requirements and electives 50 credits
Credits
FS 350 Introduction to Human Nutrition...........................4
FS 406 Nutrition and Disease ...........................................4
FS 407 Food Systems Management............................. 4
FS 421 Food Science Seminar............................................ 1
BCH 351 Introduction to Human Biochemistry...............3
EDF 442 Educational Psychology .....................................5
HRP 331 Basic Anatomy & Physiology (MED 331)............... 4
MGT 310 Principles of Management.................................4
MGT 350 Personnel Management..................................... 4
PSY 201 General Psychology .......................................... .... 4
SY 201 Principles of Sociology .......................................4...
Electives .......................... ...... .... ....... ............... ........ ..5
FOREST RESOURCES
AND CONSERVATION
(For Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements, See Listings
Under School of Forest Resources and Conservation.
FRUIT CROPS
(See Plant Sciences)

MECHANIZED AGRICULTURE
Students who major in mechanized agriculture become
specialists in the area of agricultural machines and
management. The curriculum provides basic and practical
training relating to agricultural machines, processing
systems and structures and mechanized processing and
handling systems. Graduates from this program are well
prepared for careers in those parts of the agribusiness
industry where mechanization of agricultural production
and operations are involved. Consultation with counselors
in the Department of Agricultural Engineering permits the
students to wisely select elective courses so that their career
objectives are satisfied.
For a major in mechanized agriculture the following
program is offered.
rnliso nf Apriculture Core Reouirements --8 Credits


EY 301 Principles of Entomology................................... 4
SLS 330 General Soils .................................................. 5
CY 204 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis......... 4
*PS 212-222 General Physics ................. ................... ...... 5
*PS 213-223 General Physics ... .. ................ ... 5
FRE 310 Farm Firm Management................................... 5
F* *ree and approved electives ................... ..... . . . . . ... ........ 31
*These courses, including PS 211-221 should be taken as
electives during the first two years.
"Approved electives within the 192 credits required include
the following courses: AL 309, MKG 352, MGT310, MGT 410,
FC 341, PLS 201, AY 311, and others.

MICROBIOLOGY
A major in Microbiology is offered through the Collegeof
Agriculture. Students should consult with the Under-
graduate Coordinator for curriculum. (See Microbiology,
College of Arts and Sciences, for course listing.)

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
(See Plant Sciences)


PLANT


PATHOLOGY


The curriculum in Plant Pathology permits students to
learn the principles of Plant Pathology and their applications
to scientific agriculture. The following program is offered
for a major in Plant Pathology with specialization in either
Agricultural Science or Agricultural Technology. For the
Pest Management and Plant Protection Specialization,
students must consult the department chairman for
approved courses.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8 Credits
Departmental Requirements 20 Credits


PT 301
corequ
PT 311
PT 313
PT 402
PT440
EY 303


Lectures in Basic Plant
isite : . ................ .... .
Laboratory in Basic Pla
Laboratory in Forest Pa
Principles of Plant Dise
Transmission of Plant I
Principles of Nematolc


Credits
Pathology ...................... 2


nt Pathology,
thology
rase Control..
Pathogens by
gy...............


- - - - - - - - -
or


Vectors.......
*-.****99999 *--.*-


MCY 302 Basic Biology of Microorganisms.
'PT 490 Problems in Plant Pathology .............


Other Requirements 32 Credits


AY 362 Genetics..................
BTY 203 General Botany.......
BTY O10 Plant Physiology......
BTY 370 Elementary Organic
EY 301 Principles of Entomol
PLS 301 Plant Propagation....
SLS 330 General Soils..........


* 9 . .. . .. . ...........9** * *9* *A*
9*99**.*9. ..9.9&. 99. *94. 99. 9.. 9.....
and Biological Chemistry...
ogy.................................
. .* *. . . . . i .* *.** *. .
* *~... ............................... . .


Approved Electives 16 Credits
*Departmental elective.

PLANT SCIENCES
(Agronomy, Fruit Crops, Ornamental Horticulture, Vege-
table Crops)
In addition to the departmental options in Agronomy,
Fruit Crops, Ornamental Horticulture and Vegetable Crops,
a curriculum is available for students interested in majoring
in the broad area of Plant Science. The curriculum is
designed to give an adequate foundation in both the basic
and applied plant sciences.


3





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


PT 311 Laboratory in Basic Plant Pathology.................... 3
EY301 Principles of Entomology................................... 4
SLS 330 General ols .................. . . . . . ...... ......... 5
AY 362 G enetics ....................................................... 4
BTY 310 Elementary Plant Physiology............................. 5
BTY 370 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry..... 5
PLS 201 Fundamentals of Crop Production..................... 4
PLS 301 Plant Propagation ...... . ............................. .. ...... 3
or
PLS 442 W eed Science............................. ...........................4
PLS 311 Plant Propagation Laboratory ............................ 2
Approved Electives: PLS, AY, FC, OH, VC................. 20-30
Free Electives..................................................... 21-31

AGRONOMY
Curricula in Agronomy provide a sound educational
experience for students in Agronomic Science, Technology
or Business, Pest Management for Plant Protection or
General Agronomy. Det ailed programs are available in crop
production including field, forage and pasture crops as well
as weed science, genetics and plant breeding. To discuss
these programs and the implications of each, students
should consult the Agronomy Department Coordinator of
Resident Instruction as early as possible.

Core Requirements of the College of Agriculture
and of Plant Science 46 Credits
Departmental Requirements 20 Credits
AY 311 Field Crop Science...............................................4
AY 465 Plant Breeding. .....................................................4
AY 484 Agronomy Seminar .............................................. 1
Electives in Agronom y........................................................11


Other Requirements 7 or 8
PLS 442 Weed Science...................................................
*PLS 452 Field Plot Techniques .....................................
**STA 320 Introduction to Statistics ...............................


Approved Electives (See Specializations Below
Science Specialization (18 Credits):
BCH 411-412; CY 331-381-382-384-385; MCY 302;
PS 211-212-221-222.


Technology Specialization (20 Credits):
ADP 311-312; EY 303; FRE 310; FC 335; MI
321.
Business Specialization (20 Credits):
ATG 201; Fl 322; FRE 304-310-320-410;
General Agronomy (20 Credits):
ADP 312; EY 303; FRE 304-305-310; MCT
201.
Pest Management for Plant Protection
Credits):


) 22


or


23


MS 301-302;


CA 306; SLS 426; VY


MGT 310; PSY 201.

310; MCY 300; PSY

Specialization (17


specializations in technology, science and business are
available. It is important that students consult with the
departmental counselor as early in their university careers
as possible.
Core Requirements of the College of Agriculture
and of Plant Science 45 credits
Departmental Requirements 21 credits
Credits
FC 335 Introduction to Citrus Culture............................ 4
FC403 Physiology of Fruit Production............................ 5
FC 437 Citrus Maturity and Packinghouse Procedure........ 4
FC 441 Citrus Production............................................. 4
FC 450 Fruit Crops Laboratory 1 .............. ..................... 2
FC 451 Fruit Crops Laboratory 2.................................... 2
Approved Electives................................................... 30
For the Agricultural Technology Specialization students
must select appropriate electives in technical agriculture
and related courses to give them the proper background for
careers in fruit production.
Those choosing the Agricultural Science Specialization
will select electives in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and
biology as a background for graduate work and careers in
research, teaching, and extension.
For the Agricultural Business Specialization students will
select approved electives in the fields of business,
economics and management.
For the Pest Management and Plant Protection Special-
ization, students must consult the department chairman for
approved courses.

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
Plant Science majors selecting an option in Ornamental
Horticulture receive scientific or technical training in the
production of flower, foliage, nursery and turf crops.
Students should consult a departmental counselor as early
in their university careers as possible.
Core Requirements of the College of Agriculture
and of Plant Science 44 Credits
Departmental Requirements 28 Credits
Credits


OH 331
Classic
OH 420
OH 441
Plant
OH 442
OH 462
OH 403


Fundamentals of Ornamental Plant
fica tion............................................
Principles of Nursery Operations or....
Physiological Aspects of Ornamental
Prod uction.......................................
Production of Floricultural Crops.......
Management of Southern Turfgrasses.
Ornamental Horticulture Seminar.......


.....--...---
.............

............
.............
.............
.............


Ornamental Horticulture electives............ ................. .. 7
Approved electives.................................................. 23


PM 313 Fundamentals of Plant-Pest Management.............3
PM 321 Seminar in Basic Plant-Pest Management............2....
PM 340 Internship in Plant-Pest Management.................... 3
PM 421 Seminar in Applied Plant-Pest Management.......... 1
PM 435 Systems of Pest Management and Plant
P ro tectio n ............. ... .....................................................
BTY 301 Introduction to Ecology.............. ......................... 5

*Technology, Business and Pest Management for Plant
Protection Specializations and General Agronomy.
**Science Specialization.


Each student has the prerogative of choosing
electives from the respective group of courses lis
to meet the requirements of a specialization in A
Science, Technology or Business or in General /
Students electing the Pest Management


approved
;ted above
Agronomic
Agronomy.
for Plant


Emphasis on science, technology or business training on
the basis of student career interest is possible by proper
selection of electives under supervision of the departmental
counselor.


Ornamental Horticulture electives: (may also be


approved electives)
Nursery Specialization OH
and LAE 353
Floriculture Specialization
499, and 511
Turf Specialization OH 332
499


used as


332, 333, 363, 364, 400, 421,499,

OH 332, 333, 340, 400, 443, 444,

,333, 363, 364, 400, 421,463, and


Landscape Horticulture Specialization OH 332, 333, 343,
363, 364, 365, 400, 499, and LAE 353
For the Pest Management and Plant Protection Special-
a S *





Colleges

COLLEGE Of AGRICULTURE


for primary employment in any phase of the specialized
vegetable industry.


Core


Requirements
and of Plant


Department


of the
Science


College of Agr
e -- 44 Credits


Requirements -


culture


SLS 421 Soil Chemistry............................................... 4
SLS 422 Soil Microbiology ..... ................... ............ ... 4
SLS 426 Fertilizers & Soil Fertility.............................. 4


Electives


20 Credits


in Soil


Other Requirements and Electives 62 Credits


Students selecting the Vegetable Crops options are
required to take 20 credit hours selected on the advice of


the faculty adviser from the following


FC 442.


Electives............


courses:


VC 415, VC 420, VC 451, VC 499,


Credits
....... 32


MCA301 Agricultural Water Management..................... 4


AY 432


Forage and Pasture


FC 341 Cit


MCY 30 Microbiology ................... .................. .......... 5
EY 301 Principles of Entomology................................... 4
PT 301-311 Lectures and Laboratory in Basic Plant
Pathology ........................... ................................... 5
*Free and Approved Electives*..................................... 35


Sufficient
agricultural


elective
science c


hours
or busin


enable students to study


ess


specialization.


For the Pest Management and Plant Protection Special-


izatlion


approved


, students must consult the department chairman for


courses.


4Suggested Electives:
AL309, CY331,EH302, PLS201,GPY300, GY201,


GY 202. SLS


423, SLS 424, SLS 428, FRE 310, PLS 301.
SOIL CONSERVATION AND LAND-USE PLANNING


This curriculum


recommended for students desiring a


POULTRY SCIENCE


Animal


Sciences)


fundamental knowledge of soils requisite to their conserva-
tion and the formulation of sound land-use decisions for a
wide variety of purposes to meet the needs of our rapidly


SOIL SCIENCE


The Department
(Soil Science, Soil
Land-Use Planning
specific needs of t


the chairman
counselor for
specialization.
SOIL SCIENCE


expanding population.


dustrial,


of Soil Science


T
)


offers three


technology and Soil Conservation and
each of which is designed to meet the


he


individual.


of the department


appro


Students


val of electives


This program of study emphasizes


Students
study anm


following th
j research


Microbiolgy, Soil Physi


should


consult


r the departmental
in their field of


the basic


sciences.


lis curriculum can qualify for graduate
in Soil Fertility, Soil Chemistry, Soil


cs, or


a careful selection of elective


Core Requirements


in College


Genesis and Classification
courses.


of Agricultl


Departmental Requirements


ire -


-- 22 Credits


8 Credits


urban,


These


inclu


and recreational


de agricultural,
developments.


ployment opportunities exist with federal, state, and local
governmental as well as private organizations involved in
building and highway construction, land appraisal and


assessment,


land zoning, and other activities related to


ecology and the environment, sanitation,
capability.


Requirements ii
Departmental


n College


of Agricultur


Requirements


- 24


Credits


SLS 330 General........... ... ...........................
SLS 333 Agriculture and Environmental Quality


SLS 421 Soil


SLS 423 Soil Genesis


and Classification.....


SLS 428 Soil Surveyt.......... ..................
SLS 437 Soils of Florida...........................


Electives


in Soil


[...........!.........


Credits


SLS 330 General Soils..........................
SLS 421 Soil (hemist ......................
SLS 422 Soil Microbiology................


SLS 423 Soil Genesis
SLS 424 Soil Pnysics..
Electives in Soil Sciei


Other Requ
GY 201 Physical


& Classification...
ne.............. ........
nice....... ...............


iremnents and Electives
Geology...................


MCY 300 Microbiology.......................
BTY 310 Elementary Plant Physiology...
MS 301 Analytic Geometry and Calculu


PS 211-221
PS 212-222
PS 213-223


General Physics


General Physics II.................


General Physics


III ,,,. .............


CY 204 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis.......


CY 331 Quantitative Analysis ....................
*Free and approved electives* ......................


...... 23


..o. ... .... ... .. ....



- 66 Credits*



Is I....................


Other Requirements


and Electives


MCA 301 Agricultural Water Management.
GY 201 Physical Geology.........................


GPY 300 Physical Geograph


BTY 301 Introduction to Ecology.............
ENV 301 Environmental Quality and Man...


- 64 Credits


Credits


.* ....... ** ***... **

4* **. .....* ..


OH 364 Relationships of Ornamental Plants to Urban
Environm ent ............. ........................ ....................


RE 470 Urban Growth, Land


Free and Approved
"Suggested Electives:


Use, and Regional


Electives* ..............


AG 200, AY 301, AL 309, AL 316, APY 200, APY 435, CIS 300,
BTY 375, FRE 305, FRE 310, FRE 330, FS 201, FRC 450, GPY 331,
CPY 35, CGY 400, MTY 307, PCL 323, RE 350, RE 390, SLS
312, SLS 422, SLS 424, SLS 426 SY 350, SY 355, STA 320.


"Suggested electives
VY 301, EY 303, PT 301


453, GY 407,


GY 408,


428, SLS 430.
SOIL TECHNOLOGY


,CY 362-363, CY 341-342,
GY 418, MS 302, GPY 30


or CY 451-452-


0,


SLS 426,


STATISTICS


program of study


student who


desires


is designed primarily for the


employment in


one of the many


-- *.. r a I I a


in Statistics
Students sha


3ou


- *. I 1


VC 310, VC 409, VC


PLS 442,


Approved


and land-use

e 8 credits


Credits


A major
Agriculture.


offered through
d consult with


the College of
the Undergrad-


Science .............................................. 9


Science............................... 5


rus Growing ................................................ 4


*. ... . ....


Chemistry...........................


............. ....

. . . . ........ ...


Science......... .............


y...................


I................ ..


... ....o .. o ... ..o..


=


1


Planning .......................................................


I


r/- -- - .: _ ^*' 11^ -




College of


Architecture





Colleges


College of Architecture

GENERAL STATEMENT


The College of Architectul
students who seek professional
The College has developed fror
established in 1925. Its orgal
Department of Architecture a
struction; Programs in Int
Architecture, and Urban and
uate); the Bureau of Researcl


re provides instruction for
careers in the Building Arts.
n the School of Architecture
nization now includes-the
nd School of Building Con-
erior Design, Landscape
Regional Planning (Grad-


PROGRAMS


Professional Instruction The College offers pro-
fessional curricula leading to appropriate undergraduate
degrees in:

Architecture (Preprofessional)
Building Construction
Interior Design
Landscape Architecture

The College also offers at the Graduate level professional
programs in Architecture, Building Construction and
Urban and Regional Planning. Each undergraduate and
graduate program stresses thorough mastery of the
principles underlying its field and the development of
professional skill in their creative application to practice.

Bureau of Research: The Bureau fosters and encourages
research in all areas of the building arts. It also provides an
opportunity for graduate students and faculty members to
engage in research and cooperate effectively in research
with other University departments and with other
institutions.

LIBRARY FACILITIES
The University Libraries and the Architecture and Fine
Arts Library together provide an important working
collection of publications and audio-visual materials for
undergraduate and graduate studies. These resources
include books, government documents, leading American
and foreign periodicals color prints, and slides.

COUNSELING
Students planning to major in any program of study in
the College of Architecture should see the proper Upper
Division departmental chairman, program director or
adviser as soon as possible in their college program.
The counseling program of the College is designed to
make available to all students the services of faculty
members highly qualified in their respective professions
who can assist in the selection of a field of study, give
understanding and sympathetic counsel regarding the
student's personal or academic problems, and advise on the
selection of employment after graduation.


STUDENT


AID


particular field, or in some allied work which will give an
insight into the problems of professional practice. Such
employment provides an introduction to the methods of
actual practice, and enables the student to derive increased
benefit from advanced work in school. Students should
seek the counsel of their faculty adviser as to the type of
practical experience best suited to their individual needs.


FIELD TRIPS
Each year a number of field trips are arranged to give
students an opportunity to broaden and extend their
educational experience through study of construction
projects of unusual interest or of outstanding works of
architecture. Students frequently combine such studies
with attendance at state and national meetings of the
professional organizations in their respective fields.


STUDENT WORK


The College reserves
the purpose of record,


the right to retain student work for
exhibition, or instruction.


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS


Student organizations take an active part in the
educational program of the College. Included in these
organizations are the student chapter of the American
Institute of Constructors, the Gargoyle Society, Sigma
Lambda Chi. the Students Contractors and Builders
Association, the student chapter of the American Institute
of Architects, and Tau Sigma Delta. The College
encourages and assists students in promoting close
relations with professional groups and societies.


GRADUATE DEGREES
The college offers the degrees
Architecture, Master of Arts in
Planning, Master of Science in I
Master of Building Construction. T
goals of each student, graduate pr<
consultation with a designated me
Faculty of the College of Arcl
information, see the Graduate Sch


of Master of Arts in
Urban and Regional
Building Construction,
o meet the needs and
grams are prepared in
;mber of the Graduate
hitecture. For further
iool catalog.


Architecture: Those students with a Bachelor of Design
(Architecture) degree who wish to obtain a professional


degree
program
archite
special
history,
ogies or
Unde


in architecture
n which is a p
ctural practi
zed areas of
architectural
r architectural
r special circu


e must pursue the two year graduate
prerequisitee for seeking licensing for
ice. It permits further study in
architectural design, architectural
structures, environmental technol-
preservation.
mstances the graduate faculty of the


department may elect to admit students who have a
Bachelor of Architecture degree from a five-year program,
for a one-year graduate program leading to the Master of
Arts in Architecture,
Building Construction: A program focusing on managing
construction. Areas of intensive study and research include
construction management, advanced construction tech-
niques, industrialized building and systems, construction
materials and structured concepts. Holders of a four-year
undergraduate degree in Building Construction or its
equivalent in related fields such as Architecture and
Engineering, may normally complete the program in one


0 -_ _-,






COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


program leading to a Master of Arts in Urban and Regional
Planning. Planners strive for integrated social, economic,
and physical development of communities, urban or rural
regions, and states. The planning program stresses analysis
of issues and problems in formalization of policies, plans,
and implementing programs, for both public and private
organizations. Policies and plans are used to direct or
influence change-change which leads to development of
resources, and development or redevelopment of
communities. This program is particularly important as
Florida and the South look to days of coping with rapid
development and growth.
The southern region has spoken through regional growth
policies and individual state legislation expressing the need
for growth planning and management as an alternative to
no-growth strategems. This program offers a unique
location in Florida to provide a base for research and
student in this dynamic southern region.
Students may begin this graduate program any quarter,
including summer. Applicants are encouraged from such
undergraduate programs as architecture, landscape
architecture, engineering, social sciences, and other fields.
Minorities are encouraged to apply, for as planners they
will have a vital role in understanding and solving the
urban problems of city dwellers. Those finishing the
program will be prepared to enter the planning profession
and take the membership examination of the American
Institute of Planners.
For more information, see the Graduate School catalog,
or contact the program office in 208 Flint Hall, (904)
392-2445.


ADMISSIONS section of this catalog. Additionally, the
applicant must satisfy the following specific requirements
for admission to the College of Architecture:
A. Transfers from four-year colleges.
Students attending four-year colleges should take
courses similar to the appropriate program as outlined in
this catalog.
B. Community College Transfers to Departments within
the College.
1. Curricula in Architecture: Transfer students from
community colleges not having approved pre-arch-
itecture programs should expect to take up to three
quarters of work at the University of Florida to
complete the preprofessional courses not available
at the community college. Mathematics, including
calculus, and one year of physics with laboratory,
should be taken at the community college if
available. In addition, courses in free-hand drawing,
and perspective drawing with instruments are
recommended.
2. Curriculum in Interior Design: Same as 1. above
except calculus and physics are not required. If
available, economics or accounting, free-hand draw-
ing and trigonometry should be taken at the
community college.
3. Curriculum in Landscape Architecture: Transfer
students should expect to take a minimum of three
quarters to complete preprofessional courses not
available at the community college. Mathematics


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION


The University of Flo
encourage application
cultural, racial, religion
are the specific require


It should
requirement
a selective
requirement
Limitations
that the C
students. T
for admiss
established
education
completed ,
data will b
admission.
applicants


be under
its are given
e process.
ts does not
in staff, fac
college estal
therefore, eli
ion to the
quotas. A
I objective
quality of I
e consider
Priority in
whose pot<


rida and the College of Architecture
s from qualified students from all
us and ethnic groups. Listed below
ments for admission to this College.
itood, however, that minimum
and that admission to the College is
The satisfaction of minimum
automatically guarantee admission.
ulty and facilities make it necessary
blish quotas for the admission of
igible applicants will be considered
College of Architecture within
student's total record, including
pattern or courses previously
previous academic record, and test
d in evaluating an application for
admission will be given to those
ential, on the basis of their total


record, indicates the greatest likelihood of
program requested.


success


in the


University College Students: To be eligible for admission
to the College of Architecture, a University College student


must have: 1) earned at least 92-99 quarter h(
with curricula) with the minimum average of "C
in the courses required by the appropriate
specified for the Freshman and Sophomore ye
passed all required preprofessional courses w
two years with a minimum grade average of "C".
to programs restricting enrollment because


(varies
r higher
riculum
and 2)
n those
mission
: space


limitations may require that the student earn higher than
the 2.0 (C) average minimum. Quotas will limit the
admission of students based upon the overall academic
record, grade point average and apparent potential for


including calculus, introductory botany and
botany should be taken at the community
This physical science requirement may be
by one term of physical science and one
general physics (see program as listed
University College section of the catalog.)


general
college.
fulfilled
term of
in the


4. Curriculum in Building Construction: Transfer
students, in addition to obtaining an Associate of Arts
degree and completing general education require-
ments, should satisfactorily complete the following
at the junior or community college: mathematics,
including calculus through basic integration; one
year of physics with laboratory; one course each in
accounting, business communications or technical
report writing, and drawing with instruments such as
architectural or engineering drawing.
The three remaining Freshman and Sophomore
preprofessional courses, one each in physical
geology, construction materials, and statics should
be taken at the junior or community college if
available. If not available they must be satisfactorily
completed in the first term of registration at the
University of Florida before the student can proceed
to the junior level courses.
Each Florida junior and community college has been
furnished a copy of a suggested pre-Building
Construction program listing those local courses
which satisfy Freshman and Sophomore prerequisite
requirements for the University of Florida program.
Any student may write the Department of Building
Construction for a copy.
Provisional Admission: The professional programs of the
College demand that preprofessional course-work begin
with the Freshman year. Realizing that most of the schools
from which transfer students come do not offer all such
ernnrcpC the CnHllao nrnvkix an nonnnrtanitv fnr ad-





Colleges


COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


average to be eligible for continued registration and may be
prevented from registering for courses numbered 300 or
above.

MAXIMUM AND
MINIMUM LOADS
Fifteen to eighteen quarter hours in any regular quarter
shall be considered a normal load. A student may be
permitted to register for more than eighteen quarter hours
when, in the opinion of his adviser, the quality of his record
justifies this. The minimum loadfor a full-time student in the
University during a regular quarter is 12 hours. At the time of
registration a student, with the approval of the Dean, may
register for less than twelve quarter hours. If a student
wishes to drop courses during the quarter, he must have the
approval of the College Committee on Student Petitions.

NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS
The student will have maintained normal academic
progress when he earns a minimum grade point of 2.0 (C)
average for all work attempted in the Upper Division. In
addition, he is required to take courses in a sequence as
specified by his departmental chairman or adviser. The
student may be excluded from a program of study in the
College of Architecture if he fails or refuses to maintain
normal academic progress.
DEAN'S HONOR LIST
Undergraduate students who demonstrate excellence in
their academic work by completing a full course load
(minimum of 12 quarter hours credit) in a quarter term and
achieving a grade point average of 3.5 or better will earn a
position on the Dean's Honor List. Students whose term
averages are below 3.5 due to grades of I or X are not
eligible.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS


To be eligible
minimum grade
attempted in the
the College. Cou


for graduation, the student must earn a
point average of 2.0 (C) for all work
appropriate curriculum while classified in
rses taken while enrolled in another Upper


Division College may not apply toward the calculation of
the College of Architecture average. Specific grade
requirements for the various curricula may be obtained
from the department or Dean's Office.
Students planning to enter the Graduate School must
maintain a 3.0 (B) average in Upper Division work.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS


AND HIGH HONORS


The faculty will consider recommending students for
graduation with HONORS or HIGH HONORS on the
following criteria: (a) grade point average, (b) distribution
and quality of subject matter studied, (c) evaluation of the
students by the faculty, and (d) other pertinent qualities of
the student and his work.
The student will be considered for HONORS or HIGH
HONORS upon his earning a minimum academic average
established by his department or program. The average will
be calculated on all work attempted while the student is
classified in the Upper Division. Transfer credits will be
nrl.rlcA frnr thk 2uarroa W-fNfR' nR WIClH H 'NORSr


Butt, A.F., Chairman; Morse, R. H., Adviser
This curriculum is for students who desire to obtain a
preprofessional education in architecture. It is the under-
graduate preparation for the two-year graduate program for
those interested in professional practice, teaching, and
similar careers of creative and intellectual activity. For other
careers in architecture the course of study leading to the
Bachelor of Design is a terminal program.
Students participate in a 2-year program of general edu-
cation in architecture. Also in consultation with depart-
mental counselors the student selects electives which will
strengthen and reinforce individual interests and object-
ives. Elective study permits the student to begin a
background for the 2-year professional graduate program.
In the graduate program, optional courses of study are
architectural design, architectural structures, architectural
environmental technologies, architectural history and
architectural preservation. For details of the graduate
professional program, see the Graduate catalog.
The undergraduate and graduate programs form a
curriculum of study accredited by the National Architec-
tural Accrediting Board.
The program of study is included below to show a typical
sequence in which courses are taken. In the first and
second years, courses are offered frequently in quarters in
addition to those shown. First-quarter courses for the third
year are offered only in the fall or spring quarters, with
subsequent courses offered in the appropriate quarters to
maintain the desired sequences. Admission into the third
year is determined by the Department Selection
Committee.
The Department reserves the right to retain student work
for the purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction.


FIRST YEAR


CREDITS


AE 121 The Building Arts............................................ 3
AE 112 Basic Drawing............................................... 4
MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry.............................. 5
CPS Physical Sciences ............. ............... ............. ..... 4
16
AE 113 Architectural Drawing...................................... 4
EH English............................................................... 3
MS 201 Analytical Geometry and Calculus.................... 5
PS 201 Applied Physics I ............................................ 5
17

AE 115 Architectural Communications.......................... 4
EH English............................................................... 3
CBS The Biological Sciences..................................... 3
PS 202 Applied Physics 2............................................ 5
PL Physical Education ...................................... ......... 1


SECOND YEAR
AE 235 Architectural Design I........................... .......... 4
EH English............................................................... 3
HUM Humanities...................................................... 4
SSC Social Sciences.................................................. 3
PL Physical Education................................................ 1
15


AE 236 Architectural Design I
CBS The Biological Sciences.
HUM Humanities ................
CCC^ Cnr[it Canlrnr


4


COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


l.....................ll........t.....
............ .............* ** ***.***..... **.
*** . ** . < . . .* .. *. ***.***** .. ..






COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


THIRD YEAR CREDITS
AE 333 Architectural Design 3.................................... . . . .4
AE 355 Architectural Structures 1 .... .. .. ..................... . . . ... 4
AE 364 Environmental Technology 1............................ 4
Elective.................................................................... 4

16
AE 385 Site Analysis................................................... 4
AE 366 Environmental Technology 2............................ 4
AE 375 Survey of Architecture History 1....................... 4
Elective.................................................................... 4


AE 335 Architectural Design 4...................................... 4
AE 356 Architectural Structures 2.. .................................... 4
AE 346 Mat. & Methods of Construction 2.................... 4
Elective................... ...................................... ................... 4

16


AE 113 Architectural Drawing...............
SSC Social Sciences...........................
CPS Physical Sciences ................... ......
EH English ........................................
BES Behavioral Studies.......................
PL Physical Education ...........................


S.***** **..i*4m*. ** *4*. .

. *. ** *4 ** ** | .
.*44. .*.4 .** .4. .. .....
. ......


SECOND YEAR
HUM Humanities....................................................
MS 102 Algebra and Trigonometry ............................
AE 115 Architectural Communications ........................
ELECT Elective.......................................................


HUM Humanities ...................................................
CBS Biological Sciences ..........................................
ATG 201 Accounting4 .......... ................................
AE 235 Architecturai Design 1 .................................


FOURTH YEAR


AE 435 Architectural Design 5 ........................................
AE 467 Environmental Technology 3...............................
AE 475 Survey of Architectural History 2.....................
Elective ..................................................................


AE 442 Applied Design Connections..........................
AE 445 Mat. and Methods of Construction 3...............
AE 456 Architectural Structures 3...............................
Elective.......... .. .....................................................


HUM Humanities......................................................
CBS Biological Sciences ......................................... ....
AE 236 Architectural Design ........................................
ELECT Elective..........................................................


THIRD YEAR
IR 331 Interior Design 1 ...................................
IR 341 Interior Furnishings 1.............................
IR 315 Interior Architectural Drawing .................
AE 245 Mat. & Methods of Construction 1..........


4
3
4
4


15
CREDITS
.......... 5
.....t.17. 4
.......... 4


17


AE 436 Architectural Design 6...........................................4
AE 465 Professional Administration, Specs. &
Estim ating............................................................. 4
AE 476 Survey of Architectural History 3....................... 4
Elective .................................................................... 4

16

II. CURRICULUM IN
INTERIOR DESIGN

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Design. Butt, A.F.,
Chairman; MacFarlane, J., Program Director and Adviser.
This curriculum is for students who desire to become
professional interior designers in the domestic, commer-
cial, and institutional fields, or who desire to engage in the
design, and manufacture of furniture and accessories.
For Freshman and Sophomore programs of study consult
section of catalog entitled Lower Division.
The Department reserves the right to retain student work
for the purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction.
Students must begin the third and fourth year program
during the Pall Quarter only.

FIRST YEAR CREDITS
AE 121 The Building Arts............................ ......... . ... 3
SSC Social Sciences ................................. ............ 3
CPS Physical Sciences ........... ............... .................. 4
EH English................................ . .3..................
PL Physical Education................ ...................................... 1
14


IR 332 Interior Design 2............................................. 5
IR 342 Interior Furnishings 2.......... .......................... 4
IR 372 History 1........................................................ 4
AE 346 Mat. & Methods of Construction 2.......................4

17
IR 333 Interior Design 3........................ ..................... 5
IR 343 Interior Furnishings 3....................................... 4
IR 373 History 2......................................................... 4
IR 375 Textiles.......................................................... 4

17
FOURTH YEAR
IR 431 Advanced Interior Design 1.............................. 8
AE 442 Applied Design Connections............................ 4
ELECT Elective......... ................. .. ........ .. .. ..... ....... 4

16


IR 432 Advanced I
IR 443 Practice of
ELECT Elective.....


IR 433 Advanced I
BA 401 Business I
ELECT Elective.....


interior Design 2..................................8...
Interior Design................................ 4


16
Interior Design 3.............................. 8



16


III. CURRICULUM IN
a Iatnra nr Anmaw mar** i--re





Colleges

COU.EGE OF ARCHITECTURE


Landscape Architecture,


American


Society


the program is accredited by the


of Landscape Architects, and


essential first step toward legal identity in those states
which regulate the practice of landscape architects. Since


Florida


is one of these states,


embarked on


a professional


career


ethical commitment are construed


interests of public


The program


entering students are
r where discipline and


as being in the best


health, safety and welfare.


is based


on the core knowledge


landscape architecture which is enhanced through


subsequent professional practice.


Students become


THIRD YEAR
LAE 331 Landscape Architectural Design 1...


LAE 341 Landscape Construction


AE 385 Site


OH 331 Fund. Orn. Plant


LAE 332 Landscape Architectural Design


LAE 342 Landscape Construction
OH 332 Ident. Basic Orn Plants.
Elective...................................


familiar with the art of design, planning or management,
and the arrangement of natural and man-made elements on
the land through application of cultural and scientific
knowledge. There is concern for resource conservation and
stewardship to the end that the resultant environment


serves usef


ul and enjoyable purposes. Graduates are largely


16-17


LAE 333 Landscape Architectural Design


LAE 353 Planting Design...............
LAE 3t3 Grounds Maintenance (or
Elective......................................


employed by professional offices and municipal, state or


federal recreation,


agencies.


Many


programs at other


Since


landscape architectural or planning


continue


graduates


............................. 5
elective)......... ...... 3-4
.. ......................... 3-5


in graduate


institutions throughout the country.


landscape architecture


is a quota program, please


see Requirements For Admission, College of Architecture.


FOURTH YEAR


CREDITS


Arts .................... .. .................. 3


AE 112 Basic Drawing.................. ........
MS 102 Algebra & Trigonometry............
EH English............. .............................
PL Physical Education..........................


AE 113 Architectural Drawing......
SY 201 Principles of Sociology....


CPS Physical Sciences .............. ............
EH English ................. .........................
PL Physical Education.............................


LAE 431 Advanced Landscape Architectural Design 1.....
LAE 481 Recreation Planning.......................................


CIS 302
Elective.


...... 4
...... 5
...... 3


Intro. to Computer Programming.


17-19


LAE 432 Advanced Landscape Architectural Design
LAE 442 Professional Administration.....................
Elective .............................................................


..g..e.e. .....,.....g.... *e **'
.* S ***. ** **g*** e .* g *. Ce.


....... 3
.....,,..1


2.....


...... 5
*. 3-4


16-17


LAE 433 Advanced Landscape Architectural Design 3.....


LAE 421 Senior Seminar
Elective.......................


.... 3-5


AE 115


Architectural Communications..


SSC Social


Sciences ............


S... 3


BTY 181 Introductory Botany.
EH English .......... ............
PL Physical Education............


*A field ti
students.


96-105


p is required of all


junior and/or Senior level


SECOND YEAR
LAE 271 History & Theory of Landscape Architecture.....
AE 235 Architectural Design 1.....................................
MS 201 Analytical Geometry & Calculus.......................
HUM Hum anities......................................................


CURRICULUM IN BUILDING


CONSTRUCTION


Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Building
Halperin, D.A., Chairman; Johnson, L.A., Tr


Grim, D., Jr.,


Advisers.


Construction.


acey,


V.G. and


LAE 272 History & Theory of Landscape Architecture.....


AE 236 Architectural Design 2..............
BTY 203 General Botany......................
HUM Humanities...............................


This four year program is for students who are interested


in preparing


science,


......*...e.. *eS*****
g.e.....*.* ...*-g#...eee


for professional


careers


in construction


management, techniques, operations, products


research, and related


areas


in the construction industry


rather


than in architectural


Graduate programs leading to the


Science


and engineering design.


degrees


of Master of


in Building Construction and Master of Building


Construction


are offered, see Graduate catalog.


AE 245 Mat. & Methods of Construction


SSC Social


Sciences .................................................. 3


*PS 201 Applied Physics


1 .............. .... .


The Freshman and Sophomore program of study


section
provide


1 5
1In .......g.e.*...***** ,g.. *. gie ,*g....g*g g*g
A


of catalog entitled Lower Division)


easy


is designed to


transfer for junior and community college


CREDITS


....g..... . e e .eI
CC**.** ** * .. *


C..,. ** **g*** g ..g.g.
.I... g.... ..g.. C.....


2......


FIRST YEAR


AE 121 The Building


1 ...............


Analysis.............................


Class.............


**


v







COlLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


The construction industry and its related fields are in dire
need of young men and women educated in the arts of
communications and interpersonal relations and in areas of
construction science, management, techniques, and opera-
tions. This curriculum provides education in all these areas.
Students are especially attracted to construction because
of the creative excitement, the challenging and rewarding
opportunities offered and the sense of tangible accomplish-
ments. Opportunities for advancement and increasing
responsibilities are unlimited in all areas of the industry, a
few of which include land development; home building;
public building; industrialized building and systems;
commercial, industrial, marine, and heavy construction;
underwater and space age facilities; materials and equip-
ment distribution sales, and installations; construction
product research, development, sales, and applications.
Typical company titles of jobs accepted by graduating
Seniors are: assistant project manager, field engineer,
project planner, cost engineer, project scheduler, and cost
analyst.
The department includes a chapter of Sigma Lambda Chi,
National Honorary Construction Fraternity, and the Student
Contractors and Builders Association. This association is an
affiliated student chapter of the National Association of
Home Builders and also of the Associated General
Contractors of America.
For the Freshman and Sophomore program of study,
consult the section of the catalog entitled Lower Division.


JUNIOR YEAR


1st Quarter
BCN 301 Construction Surveying & Drawing....
BCN 311 Construction Mechanics 2................
BCN 321 Construction Techniques 1...............
2nd Quarter
BCN 312 Structures 1....................................
BCN 322 Construction Techniques 2...............
BA 402 Business Law....................................


Credits
....... 5
....... 5
....... 5


3rd Quarter
CIS 302 Introduction to Computer Programming..
BCN 313 Structures 2........................................
BCN 323 Construction Techniques 3...................
BCN 331 Quantity Surveying.............................


SENIOR YEAR
1st Quarter
BCN 4.14 Structures 3.........................................
BCN 432 Construction Estimating........................
BCN 441 Environmental Technology 1..................
BCN 451 Construction Management 1.................


* .......
. .,, .....


Credits
........ 4
....... 4

........ 4


2nd Quarter
BCN 402 History of Construction ................................ 4
BCN 443 Environmental Technology 2.......................... 4
BCN 452 Construction Management 2......................... 4
BCN 454 Construction Planning & Control................... 4
3rd Quarter
BCN 403 Site Development........................................ 4
BCN 445 Environmental Technology 3.......................... 4
BCN 453 Construction Management 3......................... 4
*Professional Technical Elective.................................. 4

Total 48


*There are two options on Professional Technical Electives:
Option 1: One course, 4 credits or more, in Junior year
and one course, 4 credits or more, in Senioryear, both to be
taken under the conditions of the satisfactory or unsatisfac-
tory (S-U) grade option.
OR
Option 2: One course, 4 credits or more to be taken for a
grade in the Junior or Senior year.
Electives must have prior approval of the Department
Adviser.
















































































































r


/"xa-xxx x~ -


x- xx :
xx* -x x










The


College of
and Scie


Arts
nces


ARTS AND

AT

I



COMPUTER AND INI


GERMANIC AN


INDIVIDUAL


AMERICAN STUDIES
ANTHROPOLOGY
ART
SCIENCES GENERAL
ASIAN STUDIES
ASTRONOMY
MOSPHERIC SCIENCES
BIOCHEMISTRY
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
BOTANY
CHEMISTRY
CHINESE
CLASSICS
FORMATION SCIENCES
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
GEOGRAPHY
GEOLOGY
ID SLAVIC LANGUAGES


HEBREW
HISTORY
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
JAPANESE
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
LINGUISTICS
MATHEMATICS
MICROBIOLOGY
MUSIC
PHILOSOPHY
PHYSICS
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSYCHOLOGY
RELIGION
ROMANCE LANGUAGES






Colleges


The


College of


Arts


Microbiology X
(Degrees also offered through


x x
College of Agricultu


and Sciences


GENERAL STATEMENT
Culturally and historically the programs of the College of
Arts and Sciences represent the core of all higher education.
The humanities, the social sciences, the natural and
biological sciences all are studied in the College and all
contribute to the richness of its program.
The major aim of the College is to impart the ideas,
concepts, motivations, and skills of a liberal education to its
students to enable them to assume leadership positions in
society. Intellectual inquiry, the intelligent evaluation of
ideas, an appreciation of the dominant thought patterns of
the world are the tools the College insists that its graduates
possess. Upon these fundamentals they can build person-
ally rewarding lives and careers. They will also be prepared
to pursue a field to its frontier through further study in the
graduate and professional colleges.
The College grants the traditional Bachelor of Arts and
Bachelor of Science degrees.



SUBJECT-MATTER FIELDS
The subject-matter fields regularly offered to students in
the College of Arts and Sciences and the extent of these
offerings are indicated in the table below:


Subject
American Studies
Anthropology
Art


Major
X
X
X


Masters
X


Ph.D


Electives
X
X


Music*
Philosophy
Physics
Polish
Political Science
Portuguese
Psychology
Religion
Russian
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
Statistics
Swahili
Theatre
(Graduate work offered
Department of Speech.)


Zoology


X
through

X


College of


*Except for music majors, a maximum of 9
ensemble music may be included in the
hours required for the degree.
**Interdepartmental Major in Biology. Av
working toward the Teacher Certification
Certification program see College of Edu
the catalog.


hours of credit in
minimum of 186


ailable for those
only. For Teacher
ication section of


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE PROGRAM
University College students who plan to enter the College
of Arts and Sciences should consult the Arts and Sciences
material in the University College section of the catalog.


[Graduate work offered


through


Asian Studies X
Astronomy -
Atmospheric Sciences -
Biochemistry -
Biology X
Botany X
(Degrees also offered through
Chemistry X
Chinese
Classics X
Computer and In-
formation Sciences X
Criminal Justice X
Economics X
(Graduate work offered th
Administration.)


College


of Fine


x x
College of Agricultu


rough


English X X
French X X
Geography X X
Geology X X
German X X
Greek -
Hebrew -
History X X
Individual/Inter-
disciplinary Studies X -


x
X
X

x
x

of Business

X
X
X'
X
X
X
X
X


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Arts and
Sciences encourage applications of qualified students from
all cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed
below are the specific requirements for admission to this
college. It should be understood however that minimum
requirements are given and that admission to this college is
a selective process. The satisfaction of minimum require-
ments does not automatically guarantee admission. A
student's total record including educational objective,
pattern of courses previously completed, quality of
previous academic record, and test data will all be
considered in evaluating an application for admission.
Priority in admission will be given to those applicants whose
potential on the basis of their total record indicates the
greatest likelihood of success in the program requested.
University College Students: Admission to the College of
Arts and Sciences is normally approved if the student has (1)
earned at least 96 quarter hours of acceptable college credit
with an overall average of "C" or higher on all college level
work attempted; (2) completed all lower division courses
required for the desired curriculum as indicated in the
program for the Freshman and Sophomore years in the
University College section of this catalog; and (3) passed all
required preprofessional courses within the lower division
curriculum with a minimum of "C."
However, the College welcomes applications of students
ir~nLjbfct-k-rjrifk IIr J^J &m r ^k6l~r j-~IF hi Kf-~~ frr):nr nl^A.WA^ j-.i hi A ^ji **-!


College


--







COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


Transfer Students: To be eligible for admission to the
College of Arts and Sciences, a transfer student must satisfy
the minimum requirements for admission to an Upper
Division College that are set forth in the ADMISSIONS
Section of this catalog.
A. Students attending four year colleges, who wish to
transfer after two years, should follow a program of
general education and preprofessional courses similar
to the General Plan as outlined in the University College
section of this catalog. Particular attention should also
be given to that portion of the University College section
of this catalog that deals with programs for students
planning to enter the College of Arts and Sciences since
that section contains information regarding language,
science and mathematics requirements as well as
recommended substitutions for comprehensive courses
for certain majors.

B. Junior College students should:


1. Complete a university transfer program at the
junior college.
2. Complete the general education requirements
established for the junior college.
3. Indicate an intended major field of concentration,
using the exact terminology as on the list of majors at
the beginning of the Arts and Sciences section of this
catalog.
4. Pre-medical, pre-optometry, or pre-dental stu-
dents, or students who plan to major in
mathematics, biological or physical sciences, are
advised to substitute subject-matter courses in
mathematics, botany, zoology, chemistry, or physics
for survey courses in these areas.
5. Attempt to satisfy the foreign language require-
ment of the College prior to transfer. Fifteen quarter


hours of a single
or better, include
level, will meet


foreign language with grades of "C"
ing course work at the intermediate
this requirement.


6. Complete sequential courses prior to transfer.
Some courses are cumulative and represent a direct
continuation of work done in a previous course. It is
difficult to guarantee complete articulation of such
courses when they are offered in different institu-
tions.


7. Choose


elective


course


es needed to complete 96


quarter hours of credit in the university transfer
program from courses that are offered at the
Freshman or Sophomore level at the University.
8. Earn a grade of "C" or better in each course
attempted. No course in which a grade of less than
"C" has been earned may be used to satisfy any
graduation requirement in the College of Arts and
Sciences.


9. Wait
courses
expects


until after transfer to the University to take
in professional education if the student
to work toward certification to teach.


Special post-baccalaureate student (6AS): A student who
has received a baccalaureate degree but who is not seeking
admission to the Graduate School may, under certain
conditions, be admitted as a special student (6AS). The
-_-I:/,^- -. .r& r j-.in- J e n.r4ln Ar t th I Ini tnrdc ,


ADVISEMENT
Upon admission to the College of Arts and Sciences, the
student should contact the office of Student Academic
Affairs of the College, 113 Anderson Hall, for referral to an
academic adviser. The faculty member's role is only to give
advice. The student assumes the responsibility for fulfilling
college anddepartmental degree requirements. A computer
printout of the student's academic record will be furnished
for use during Advanced Registration each term. These
printouts, available in the departmental office of the
student's designated major, enable the student to elect self-
advisement. Printouts are reliable only if the student has
designated a major precisely according to the wording of
the list of major fields at the start of the Arts and Sciences
section of this catalog. The student is responsible for
informing the keypunch operator in 113 Anderson of
corrections to the printout.
Preprofessional Counseling: Like all other undergraduate
students, preprofessional students are referred to an
academic adviser through the office of Student Academic
Affairs of the College, Room 113 Anderson Hall. For a
detailed description of core requirements and major
options, see PREMEDICAL, PREDENTAL, PREOPTOMETRY,
AND PRELAW PROGRAMS in the University College
section of this catalog.


GENERAL REGULATIONS


Student Responsibility: Stu
responsibility for registering for
fulfilling all degree requirement
for completing all courses for


[dents must assume full
the proper courses and for
:s. Students are responsible
which they are registered.


Courses may be added any time during the first 3 days of
the quarter if this does not increase one's registration to
more than 19 hours. Courses may be dropped up to the last
day of class if this does not lower one's registration to less
than 12 hours, but a student is limited to a total of three such
drops during his upper division career. Any course dropped
or added after the normal University drop-add period must
be accompanied by an approval slip from the Dean's Office
(Anderson 113).
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the
Office of the Registrar early in the quarter in which they
expect to receive the degree. The official calendar shows
the latest date on which this can be done.
Additionally, Seniors who plan to graduate must have
their academic file reviewed in Room 113 Anderson Hall one
to two quarters prior to their graduation.


Maximum, Minimum and


Normal


Loads:


The normal


course load in this College is 15 credit hours, and all
students are expected to carry a normal load. Loads which
are either lighter or heavier than normal must be justified
and approved by the student's academic adviser. Loads in
excess of the College maximum of 19 hours or below the
University minimum of 12 hours for a full-time student
require approval of the Dean as well as the student's
adviser.


I





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


the faculty that the fields listed are in general those which
are conducive to a liberal education. However, a student
may select for degree credit up to 15 hours of work from
other subject matter areas.
Special Cases:
I. The minimum total of 186 hours required for the
bachelor's degree may include not more than 24 hours
credit in education provided the student follows an
approved program and becomes NCATE Certified. If a
student is in a certification program, therefore, the only
hours outside the college which could apply would be the
24 hours of education.
2. No more than 9 hours credit of ensemble music may be
included in the minimum total of 186 hours. (This does not
apply to Music majors).
3. In the first 96 hours of course work presented for
admission to Arts and Sciences a student may receive credit
for his degree for not more than 38 hours of work offered
in other upper division colleges.
4. An approved interdisciplinary major may include more
than 15 hours of course work in another College.
Registration in Graduate Courses: In accordance with the
rules of the Graduate School, undergraduate students may
not register in graduate courses (500 level and above)
without permission of the College Dean. This permission is
normally given only to students in their Senior year who are
carrying not more than 17 hours and have an average of at
least 2.8. Students must present written approval from both
the instructor of the course and the graduate coordinator of
the department offering the course.
Registration beyond normal period for completion of
degree: Any student who has completed all of the academic
requirements for the Baccalaureate degree but has not
obtained the degree will be denied further registration in
the College. A student who has completed more than 15
hours beyond the normal minimum requirement for his


degree
mission


without receiving the degree, must obtain per-
of the Dean for further registration.


these subjects will lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree if the
majority of subsidiary and elective credits in the student's
entire undergraduate program are earned in the humanities
and/or social sciences, and will lead to the Bachelor of
Science degree if such subsidiary and elective credits are
science credits. The requirements for graduation with
either of these degrees are as follows:
A minimum of 186 quarter hours credit normaly 96 in the
lower division and 90 while registered in this College) with
an overall average of "C" or better in all work transferred
to or completed in the College and an overall average of"C"
in all work attempted at the University of Florida. NOTE:
Some credits approved by the Registrar as acceptable may
not be applicable toward the minimum degree require
ments of this College. For example, no credit earned
through courses in the Cooperative Education Program
(CEP) or through the College Level Examination Program
may be applied towards satisfaction of degree require-
ments once a student has earned 96 quarter credits at any
college.
The degree program must include (1) a basic distribution,
(2) a departmental or interdisciplinary major (3) a foreign
language proficiency (4) elective requirement and (5)
residence requirement.


A. Basic Distribution Requirement
Normally this work will be completed while earning the
Associate of Arts certificate, before admission to the
College of Arts and Sciences. For transfer students actually
registering in the College, whose general education did not
include at least the basic distribution credits listed below,
alternate courses are specified which may be used by
students classified 3AS or 4AS to make up deficiencies in the
distribution requirement. The student must earn a grade of
"C" or better in each of the courses taken to fulfill the
distribution requirements, and these courses may not be
taken under the S-U option.


Student Petitions: A student who feels that the College
regulations work a particular hardship or injustice may
petition for waiver of the regulation involved. Information
on procedure in submitting such petitions is available in
the Office of the Dean.
Other Student Regulations: The University issues a
bulletin entitled Student Handbook which contains much
information of essential importance to any student. For
example, the general regulations governing military training
and student employment are covered. Each student in the
College of Arts and Sciences should be familiar with this
material. Copies of the bulletin may be obtained at the
Office of the Registrar.


REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES
BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

The programs which lead to the degrees Bachelor of Arts
or Bachelor of Science are alike in all basic requirements.


The degree Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those
who fulfill the requirements for degrees with majors in one
of the fields of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, Asian
Studies, Classics, Criminal justice, Economics, English,
French, German, History, Music Philosophy, Political
Science. Religion. Russian. Socioloey, Spanish, Speech,


The requirement includes:


8 hours


credit


8 hours credit


8 hours
8 hours


credit
credit


8 hours credit


social sciences
English
humanities
physical sciences
biological sciences


One course in mathematics No credit towards an Arts
and Sciences degree will be given for any course in
mathematics which is largely a repetition of high school
algebra.
A minimum of one laboratory course in either the physical
or biological sciences must be included in the above
distribution.
The following list is not a recommendation to students in
other colleges nor is it intended to satisfy the requirements
of any other college. To qualify for the Associate of Arts
certificate, University College students should complete
general education requirements as described in the
University College section of this catalog.
Social Sciences: Any course in AMS, AS 281, APY, CRJ, ES,
GPY, HY, PCL, PSY, SSR, SY. Except: GPY 300, PSY 303, PSY
320, PSY 334, PSY 335, PSY 371, PSY 420, PSY 439, PSY 444,
PSY 472, PSY 500, PSY 510, PSY 571, PSY 572; APY 302.
Physical Sciences: Any course in CY, PS, GY, ATS, ATY
and C.PY 00







COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


University of Florida: PSY 303, PSY 334, PSY 335, PSY 371, PSY
500, PSY 571.
NOTE: To meet the requirement in Biological Science at
least one course must be in a Biological Science Depart-
ment. The other may be Anthropology 302 or one of the
approved Psychology courses.
Laboratory Requirement: Any course in Arts and
Sciences science department that has a regularly scheduled
laboratory. Also GPY 300; CBS 264, PSY 420, PSY 439, PSY
444, PSY 472, PSY 510 PSY 572.
B. Foreign Language Requirement
All candidates for degrees awarded by the College of Arts
and Sciences are required to have at least a minimum
proficiency in some foreign language. The requirement may
be met by the satisfactory completion of a sequence of 3
five-hour courses including coursework at the intermediate


level. Students who plan to contain
language which they began at another
a placement test before registering. T
may be taken by the satisfactory-un
option as long as they are not part of
language requirement may be s
examination. Intensive summer stu
Spanish is available for students wl
previous foreign language credit in c


ue the study of a
institution must take
he language courses
satisfactory grading
a major. The foreign
satisfied, also, by
idy in French and
ho have earned no
:ollege.


C. Elective Requirement
Of the minimum of 186 quarter hours required for a
bachelor's degree in the College of Arts and Sciences, 96 are
normally earned before the student is admitted to this
College; of the remaining minimum of 90 quarter hours, at
least 45 must be earned in courses outside of the student's
major department.
D. Residence Requirement
The last forty-five hours to be applied toward a degree
must be completed in residence in the College of Arts and
Sciences. In special cases this requirement may be waived,
but in no case may the amount of extension or
correspondence work permitted exceed eighteen of the last
fifty-four hours required for the degree.
E. The Major
1. Departmental Majors: A departmental major consists
of a concentration of course work in a specific
department. On the application for admission the
student must indicate an intended major, usingthe exact
terminology as on the list of majors at the beginning of
the Arts and Sciences section of this catalog. Computer
printouts for self-advisement cannot be prepared for
students who fail to indicate a major precisely as listed.
The number of credit hours required for a major will vary
from department to department, but in no case may the
number of hours required be fewer than 36 hours or
more than 60 hours in the major department. The
student should check the major requirements in the
section of the catalog which lists the courses offered by
the major department. Some departments may require
subsidiary courses from subject-matter fields other than
the major. No courses in the major in which the grade
earned is below "C" will be counted toward the
fulfillment of the minimum major requirement nor may
they be taken under the S-U grading option. Work in the
major taken in the University College or transferred to
the University from another institution is included in
evaluating the student's record for this requirement.
U.a .t .n.. I ...n.r. ...n- -kJ 4ln:n. r. fr .n


F
app
sec


under the appropriate I
Descriptions" section of
I. American Studies
2. Asian Studies
3. Classics
4. Criminal Justice
or a description of each c
)ropriate heading under t
tion of this catalog.


leadlngs in
this catalog.


the "Course


)f these programs, see the
:he "Course Descriptions"


b. Individual interdisciplinary programs which are
initiated and designed by the student in consultation
with faculty members from different departments,
supervised by those faculty members, and approved
by the Committee on Interdisciplinary Studies. The
major consists of not less than 36 credit hours of
related course work taken in two or more depart-
ments and may include more than 15 hours of course
work in another college. A student electing to offer
such a concentration must meet the foreign language
requirement, take 45 credit hours of course work in
areas of study not directly related to her or his
concentration, take 10 credit hours of ASC 498 or
equivalent courses, under either or both faculty
members who agree to supervise the student's
program, and produce a Senior thesis.

c. The following interdisciplinary programs have
been developed as a result of recent student interest
in these concentrations.
Atmospheric Sciences
Biochemical and Neural Sciences


Linguistics
Neurobiological
Urban Studies
Film Studies


Sciences


ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES
Undergraduate students in the College of Arts and
Sciences may be approved to develop an individualized
interdisciplinary major in Atmospheric Sciences leading to
the B.S. degree. The program is designed to provide the


student with a background in the atmospheric s
their applications to such problems as ai
economic impact of weather on agriculture, ii
anthropogenic chemical releases on weather,
radiation, transmission of solar radiation t
atmosphere, and soil-water-air interfaces. The
includes courses from such departments as
Astronomy, Environmental Engineering Scie
Crops, Mechanical Engineering, Agricultural I
and Chemical Engineering.
For further information, consult Dr. Alex E.
Space Sciences Research Building.


BIOCHEMICAL AND NEURAL SCIENCES
Undergraduate students interested in advar
biochemistry and neuroscience, as well as in
ciplinary area of neurochemistry, may
acceptance into the individual interdiscipl
program of Biochemical and Neural Sciences ii
of Arts and Sciences. The program offers
breadth by virtue of its flexibility and the br4
required and elective courses. Graduates of 1
would have excellent backgrounds for research
of the basic medical sciences, and would be v


sciences and
r pollution,
Influences of
atmospheric
through the
curriculum
Physics and
ences, Fruit
Engineering,


Green,


Iced work in
the interdis-
apply for
linary major
n the College
considerable


F '


ad range of
Sis program
in a variety
'II Qualified


V^


I





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


other programs which can be developed in other
departments within the basic medical sciences, consult Dr.
James A. Deyrup, Assistant Dean, College of Medicine,
M128, Medical Science Building, J. Hillis Miller Health
Center.


LINGUISTICS


An individualized major in Linguistics may be approved
for undergraduate students in the College of Arts and
Sciences. This program is designed to provide the student
with a background in the study of language, dialects,
communication, and particular languages. It will prepare
the student for graduate work in linguistics or the study of
languages, the teaching of English as a foreign language,


and advanced work in the
curriculum includes certain
optional courses from a va
Interested students may
478 Grinter Hall.


neurobehavioral sciences. The
n required core courses and
riety of fields.
consult Dr. jean Casagrande,


NEUROBIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
An individual interdisciplinary major in Neurobiological
Sciences may be developed by academically strong
undergraduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences
through the faculty of the Center for Neurobiological
Sciences. The program is intended to provide the student
with a fundamental and broad-based academic foundation
for graduate and professional programs and related areas.
The curriculum includes core requirements covering
humanities; social sciences; and physical, natural, and
biological sciences. In addition to the core requirements,
students select courses in either a very broad or a more
specialized program in, for example, such areas as animal
behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, sensory mec-
hanisms, neuroendocrinology, brain and behavior, or
neuroembryology. In order to focus their academic work in
the various areas, all students in the program are required
to participate in research with a member of the faculty of
the Center for Neurobiological Sciences, coupled with a
research seminar.
For further information about this program, consult Dr.
Carol Van Hartesveldt, 359 Psychology Building.

URBAN STUDIES
Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who wish to
pursue a major concentration in urban studies may apply to
do so as an individual interdisciplinary major. The Urban
Studies major is designed to provide a sound and broadly
based program in the social sciences for students who plan
to enter professional planning schools, graduate urban
studies programs, or expect to work upon receipt of the
baccalaureate degree.
The core of courses required of all students in the major


provides the broadest possible exposure to the several
disciplines concerned with urban problems and also to the
broadest range of methodologies used in urban analysis.
The major includes ASC 498, a ten-credit course designed
to provide the student with an opportunity to integrate his
or her disciplinary knowledge. If possible, the research
project in that course is carried out in conjunction with an
internship in a firm or agency suitable to the students
interests.
A number of faculty members from departments in the
social sciences serve as a panel from which the student
chooses a committee of at least two members to supervise
his or her progress through the program and the ASC 498
project.


BR 318 Broadcast Writing (4)*
BR 324 Broadcast Production I. (4)*
BR 325 Broadcast Production II. (4)*
BR 326 Broadcast Production III. (4)*
BR 424 Cinematography for TV (4)*
BR 442 Documentary for TV (4)*
BR 358 Radio. Television and Film Writing (3)*
EH 281 Introduction to the Film (4)
EH 350 Movies as a Narrative Art (3)*
EH 355 History of the Film 1 (4)*
EH 356 History of the Film 2 (4)*
EH 381 The Theory and Practice of Modern Criticism (3)*
EH 489 Myth in Film and Literature (4)
EH 495 Film Studies (4)
EH 613 The Language of Film (4)*
PPY 370 Philosophy of Art (5)
EH 675 Studies in Movies (4)*
THE 220 Theatre Appreciation (4)
Students interested in the program are referred to
Professor William C. Childers, 215 Building D, for
information and advisement.
*Courses have prerequisites.

College Honors or High Honors will be awarded to any
student who completes an individual interdisciplinary
major program; earns in upper division work a grade point
average of 3.3 or higher for Honors, or 3.5 or higher for
High Honors; earns in the major work a grade point average
of 3.3 or higher for Honors, or 3.5 or higher for High
Honors; and is recommended by two members of his or her
supervisory committee (including the principal supervisor)
as having conducted an individual project in ASC 498
which is of high quality and reflects the interdisciplinary
nature of the student's program.


Detailed
McQuown,


information is available
102 Anderson Hall.


from Dean


ARTS AND SCIENCES
HONORS PROGRAMS
Consistent with its view that higher education should
result in the development of each student as an intellectual
individual, this college gives its students individually
tailored degree programs of formal courses. In addition the
College offers a variety of opportunities for independent
and seminar honors work to those of its undergraduates
who have demonstrated appropriate qualifications.
Superior students should take initiative in planning
undergraduate and graduate programs. They should
consult advisers about Departmental and High Honors, Phi
Beta Kappa, and scholarships like Rhodes, Danforth,
Marshall, Fulbright-Hays, and the National Science Founda-
tion. For further information, see Professor Sidney Homan
in 104 Building D.
1. Departmenal Honors
A student may be recommended for this distinction by
his major department. Each department will set its own
requirements for departmental honors work and will be
required to print them explicitly in the catalog.
2. Baccalaureate College Honors
College Honors will be awarded to all students who earn
a grade point average of 3.3 or higher in their upper
division work and either (1) successfully complete a
rPnArtmPntal hnnnr nrnoram or (21 satisfactorily complete






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


High Honors Seminars: High Honors Seminars bring
together outstanding faculty and students from the four
major divisions in the College: Humanities, Social and
Behavioral, Biological, and Physical and Mathematical
Sciences. Some seminars explore the inter-relation of the
disciplines; one week a poet may be the guest, the next
week a nuclear physicist. Other seminars focus on a specific
topic, such as impeachment or the concept of rhythm in
music and the biological world. Students share the
responsibilities of working with the guests, devising new
seminars, inviting visiting campus speakers and dignitaries
to the program. There is a special room and library for the
participants, as well as an expense fund for books and
travel. Work is done both in the seminar room and in the
field.


A candidate for High Honors normally registers
487 for three quarters, preferably consecutive, and
hours creditable towards the elective requirement.
is to have a place in a High Honors seminar for all c
and interested students. Membership is open to ji
Seniors with at least one quarter of residence
College; students are chosen on the basis of a
average, service to the university and the commur
an informal interview with the High Honors B
Directors. But the main criterion is: what unique gif
individual student bring to the discussion?


for ASC
earns 12
The aim
qualified
iniors or
H in the
academic
nity, and
toard of
t can the


SPECIALIZATION IN AUDIOLOGY
AND SPEECH PATHOLOGY
A preprofessional academic/clinical program precedes
the master's degree study which is accredited by the
American Board of Examiners in Speech Pathology and
Audiology. This program may be arranged through the
College of Arts and Sciences or the College of Education.
For admission to either program the student must consult
a faculty adviser assigned by the Department of Speech (442
Arts and Sciences Building). Program requirements are
described in the Speech Department section of this catalog.
To qualify for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in
Audiology or in Speech Pathology awarded by the American
Speech and Hearing Association or to obtain endorsement
by the College of Education and the Department of Speech
for State Department of Education certification in Speech
Correction, it is necessary to complete a master's degree or
equivalent.


SPECIALIZATION IN THE FINE ARTS


MUSIC: Students interested in majoring in
should consult the faculty adviser, Music Building,
as possible in their college program.


music
as soon


Qualified students may get application forms in 113
Anderson Hall. Applicants should consult the High Honors
Director, Professor Sidney Homan, in 104 Building D at least
a quarter in advance of that for which they seek admission.
The High Honors Seminars are designed to complement
University College and Departmental honors programs. For
students and faculty, participation is recognition of their
high standing in the College and of their desire to be useful
members of society.

PHI BETA KAPPA
Phi Beta Kappa is a scholastic honor society for students
of high intellectual ability with a broad liberal education.
The first chapter was founded in 1776 at the College of
William and Manr. The UF chanter was established in 1938.


Election is by invitation, not application.
Not over 10 percent are chosen from those
academically in the upper 15 percent of the senior
the College of Arts and Sciences who also meet thr
ing criteria: at least 68 quarter hours of course
College of Arts and Sciences; completion of the


ranking
class in
e follow-
5s in the
* foreign


language requirement; a broad distribution of letter-graded
upper division electives outside the major subject (notably,
in the humanities, social sciences, mathematics, and the
physical and biological sciences); and superior academic
performance in lower and upper division generally, as well
as in the major field.
Students in colleges other than Arts and Sciences who
meet these requirements may be recommended in writing
by the dean of their College. The Society also considers a
selected number of graduate students in the arts and
sciences who have been awarded the Ph.D. degree during
the previous year.
For further information, communicate with the Chapter
Secretary, whose name and address can be obtained from
the Office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS


The student who selects a Major in Music must earn a total


of sixty quarter hours in the following


courses.


Hours
Applied Music in approved courses numbered
above 100............................................................ 12
Theory of Music, MSC 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 201
202, 203, 204, 205, 206.................. ....................... 24
Survey of Music History, MSC 317, 318, 319................ 12
Upon completion of the above courses, the student must
select an area of concentration, i.e., Applied Music, Theory
of Music or History and Literature, and earn twelve credits
in that concentration. (These required twelve credits are in
addition to those listed above and must be specifically
approved for each student). The student must also register
for and participate each term in ensemble music groups.
A piano proficiency examination is required of all music
majors. The student must take Piano Skills until he has met
this requirement.
A Senior student concentrating in the area of Applied
Music will present a Senior Recital. In the areas of Theory
and History and Literature, the Senior will present a project
which demonstrates his competence in his area of
specialization.
For graduation with departmental honors in music, the
student should apply to the chairman of the teaching faculty
in his intended area of concentration at the beginningof his
Junior year. In addition to the grade-point average
requirement, the student concentrating in the area of
Applied Music will present a Senior Recital which is
adjudged by the music faculty as having reflected honors-
level work in applied music in the upper division. The
student in Theory of History and Literature must present an
honors project in his specialized area. This project will be
prepared in connection with twelve credit hours from Music
Theory courses MSC 303, 304,305, 306,307,308,403,404 or
407; or from History and Literature courses, MSC 311, 312,
314, 315, 316, 317, 411, 413, 414, 415, 416; and with the
approval of the music faculty.
ART: The student who elects a Major in Art must earn a
total of not less than forty-five quarter hours including the
$nlln,.Ann rn..-jrrar. fIX A OCT -itt4 4Af ACT 4ftt 4n4^\ A fl'r nt





Colleges

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


advance with Professor E. James Hooks.
Transfer students must earn at least 18 credits in the
department. Transfer credits will be evaluated in terms of
their appropriateness to the degree requirements. In special
cases, auditions or tests may be conducted.
Core Curriculum required of all B.A. candidates: THE 225
-Oral Performance of Literature; THE 320 Acting 1; THE
324 Stagecraft and Design 1; THE 328 Play Analysis;
THE 329 Directing 1; THE 330 Directing 2. Total: 24
credits.
Additional requirements: 1) Student must complete at
least three of the two or three course sequences in Theatre
(excluding the 329, 330 Directing sequence). 2) Student
must complete at least eight credits in courses numbered
400 or above.
Curriculum limitations: 1) Student may not earn more
than eight credits in Acting. For B.A. candidates, Acting 1
and 2 (320, 321) will constitute a course sequence. 2)
Student may not earn more than eight credits in
Movement. For B.A candidates, Movement 1 and 2 (331,
332) will constitute a course sequence.


CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
AMERICAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM
In addition to the major in American Studies (see
description under interdisciplinary studies in this section)
the College of Arts and Sciences offers a certificate program
for students majoring in a conventional discipline who wish
to focus their work on America. The student fulfills the
requirements for a departmental major, elects 36 credits
from among American related courses, including those in
his major field, and takes AMS 200, Introduction to
American Studies; AMS 454, Studies in American Civ-
ilization; and AMS 455, Senior Seminar in American
Civilization. Interested students are referred to Professor
Stephen S. Conroy, 219 Building D, for information and
advisement.
LATIN AMERICAN STUDY PROGRAM
For students interested in Latin American area studies, the
College of Arts and Sciences offers two options:
1. a special curriculum, based on a single departmental
major (selected from the fields of Anthropology,
Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Soci-
ology, and Spanish), leading to a B.A. degree and a
Certificate ii Latin American Studies. (See Latin
American Studies section of this catalog); or
2. an individual interdisciplinary program, developed
and coordinated through the Center for Latin American
Studies and approved by the Interdisciplinary Commit-
tee of the College of Arts and Sciences, and leading to a
B.A. degree. (See section on degree requirements for
College of Arts and Sciences.)
Through special arrangements, undergraduate students
in the College of Business Administration, the College of
Education, and the College of Journalism and Communica-
tions may participate in the above programs.
SOVIET AND EAST EUROPEAN AREA STUDIES
The College of Arts and Sciences offers to undergraduate
students an integrated certificate program in Soviet and
East European studies. The program provides a broad
foundation for those preparing for graduate work in the
field and for those who plan a career in government
service.
The program is based on a major in one of the following
departments: Economics. Geoerahvy. History, Philosoohv.


135, 202, 250, 304, 406, 412, 413, 414, 427, 428, 440, 441,
496, 506, 512, 513, 514, 527, 528, 540, 551, 596; PPY 363.
Fifteen credits of German may also be accepted for
students who are specializing in the German Democratic
Republic or comparative communist systems.
All students interested in this program, including lower
division students, should consult with Dr. Marvin Entner,
Room 105 Grinter Hall or with Dr. James F. Morrison, Room
439 Grinter Hall.
AFRICAN STUDIES PROGRAM
The African Studies Program is administered by an African
Studies Center responsible for the direction and coordi-
nation of interdisciplinary instructional and research
activities related to Africa. It cooperates witn University
departments, schools and colleges in administering and
staffing a coordinated certificate program. The Center does
not offer an interdisciplinary degree. With the cooperation
of participating departments, it offers a certificate in African
Studies in conjunction with the B.A., M.A. and Ph.D.
degrees.
To receive a Certificate in African Studies in conjunction
with the B.A. degree a student must: 1) take ASC/BES 202
Introduction to African Studies, HUM 233 African
Humanities, FLE 302 Introduction to African Linguistics,
ASC 450 African Studies Senior Integrative Seminar; 2)
three of the following: APY 443 Africa Traditional Peoples
and Cultures, GPY 496 Geography of Africa, HY 343 Africa
to 1800, HY 344 Africa Since 1800, HUM 250 The Language
of Art, Literature, and Religion in West Africa, PCL 343
African Government and Politics; and 3) 11-12 credits of
distribution requirements which may be met by courses
with specific African content excepting SI 133. A irt of
approved courses for requirement 3) is available on request


from the Center
For Certificate
see the Graduat
on the Center's
majors based on
contact Professo
African Studies,


office.


requirements at the M.A. and Ph.D. levels
e School Catalog. For further information
Certificate requirements, interdisciplinary
African themes, and other related matters
r Haig Der-Houssikian, Director, Center for
470 Grinter Hall, University of Florida,


Gainesville, Florida 32611.


AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM
An interdisciplinary program leading to a certificate in
Afro-American Studies is offered by the College of Arts and
Sciences. The program is designed to furnish students an
inclusive knowledge of the historical experience and
condition of peoples of African origin in America. Courses
in the program are offered by a number of departments
including Anthropology, Economics, English, History,
Political Science, and Sociology. In order to be awarded the
certificate the student must complete at least thirty-six
credits from the courses offered, constructing in consulta-
tion with the program adviser a pattern of classes which best
fits his interests and needs. In addition, the student must
complete a departmental major and fulfill the requirements
for graduation from the College of Arts and Sciences.
Requirements for the certificate include: (1) one or two
courses from the African Studies Program plus HY 343,
Africa to 1800, 4 credits; (2) the introductory foundation
course, ASC 201, Introduction to Afro-American Studies, 4
credits, normally taken in the Sophomore year; (3) ASC453,
Afro-American Studies Senior Integrative Seminar 1, 4"
credits, which serves to further identify and explore
problems in the Afro-American field; (4) ASC 454, Afro-
American Studies Senior Integrative Seminar II, 4 credits,
nrlaulin cri ant.h nc rta lAn, .nk rtl-* n rsliee n A


.b







COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


WESTERN EUROPEAN STUDIES PROGRAM


The College of Arts and


Sciences


of the University of


Florida offers an undergraduate interdisciplinary program
leading to the Certificate in Western European Studies. The
program is designed for students interested in Western
European culture, language, history, society, and politics. It
should also be of value to students who wish to become
European regional specialists or who are contemplating
careers in such fields having to do with Western Europe as
government service, international law, business or trade.
Each student works with an adviser in constructing a
program of courses suited to his own specific interests,
needs, and background. The student majors in the
department of his choice but selects courses with Western
European content from a number of the following
departments involved in the program: Anthropology, Art,
Economics, English, Geography, Germanic Languages and
Literature, History, Music, Philosophy, Political Science,
Religion, and Romance Languages and Literatures.
In order to receive a Certificate in Western European
Studies, a student is required (1) to complete courses
totaling at least 36 credits (up to 15 of which may be from
his major department) from among appropriate courses
with Western European orientation in the participating
departments; 2) to take a minimum of two courses from the


European history


offer an equivalent


program adviser;
knowledge of
requirement may
with a special e:
however, be
requirement of
participate in


sequence


substitute
to demor
Western
* satisfied
lination;
ered sim
ne other


3)
a
Sbe
xan
offe
son


HY 320,


321, 322, 323, or to


selected in consultation with
istrate a reading and speaking
European language (this
either through course work or
the same language may not,
lultaneously to meet the
area study program); (4) to


ISC 460, the interdisciplinary


Western


European Studies Seminar during Winter Quarter of his
Senior year.
Students desiring further information about the program
are urged to contact any member of the Western European
Studies Committee: Professor Douglas Bonneville, Ro-
mance Languages; Professor David Denslow, Economics;
Professor David Conradt, Political Science, chairman;
Professor Ernst Schurer, Germanic Languages; or Professor
John Scmmerville, History.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES MINOR PROGRAM
A program for a minor (with certificate) in Environmental
Studies is available for anyone with a major in the College
of Arts and Sciences. The program is designed to be of
interest to students concerned with environmental issues.
Electives can be structured around an environmental
theme, giving experience in an area that may expand career
opportunities and make education more meaningful.
The course selection will serve to increase the student's
knowledge of the interaction of man and his environment.
A number of environmentally related courses requiring no
prerequisites are included to help non-science majors
become environmentally aware. Science majors will be able
to relate their major discipline to current environmental
problems through more advanced course work.
The Environmental Studies minor requires a minimum of
18 credits of approved environmentally oriented courses
with at least one each from the Social, Physical and
Biological Sciences to total 12 to 15 credit hours.
Courses required for the student's major cannot be
counted toward the minor requirement. Courses both
within and outside the College which bear on various


It is also possible to devehl
Studies under the College's
major program, where one is a
appropriate course areas in
Students interested in an
Environmental Studies are ref
major description under the
this catalog. Those interested


a major


in Environmental


individual interdisciplinary
ibke to formulate a major from
two or more departments.
interdisciplinary major in
erred to the interdisciplinary
Arts and Sciences section of
in the major should contact


Dean Ruth McQuown, 102 Anderson Hall.


CORE PROGRAMS
SOCIAL INTERVENTION SYSTEMS
This interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to give the
student knowledge of the nature and interrelationships
among various social and community organizations. At the
outset, coursework will emphasize general topics such as
urbanization, minority group relations, and social change.
The student may then emphasize a more specialized area
such as medical sociology, deviant behavior, gerontology,
or educational sociology.


This program will:
effectively participate


(1) enable the student to more
in community living, (2) prove


valuable for students wishing to pursue community work,
and (3) provide an adequate foundation for students
planning graduate work in Sociology or Social Work.
The Social Intervention program leads to the degree of
Bachelor of Arts and all requirements for the departmental
major in Sociology must be met. The strength of the
program, however, lies in its interdepartmental nature. The
student will be expected to include courses in An-


thropology, Economics, History, Political
Psychology among his or her electives.


Science,


Interested students should contact Professor Pamela
Richards, Department of Sociology, Room 309 Peabody
Hall, for assistance in planning their programs.
GOVERNMENT ADMINISTRATION,
MANAGEMENT, and PLANNING


The undergraduate


core program in public administra-


tion provides students with
the management practices and r
public policy implications of adrn
contemporary American govern
recommended for students who w
level career positions in govern
programs of professional training
Students in the public adminis
ordinarily major in Political Scie
on administrative and related co
and in their electives. Studen
authorized to take up to 15 hours
the College of Arts and Sciences i


a broad foundation in
elated issues, and in the
linistration at all levels of
iment. This program is
'ill be seeking either entry
iment or graduate level
in public administration.
tration core program will
nce and will concentrate
urses both in their major
ts in this program are


of coursewc
n order to o


in the management area. Recommended
students in the public administration core are


;rk outside of
ursue studies
courses tor
listed below:


A. Strongly recommended PCL courses: PCL 411, 413.
B. Recommended PCL courses: PCL 220, 321, 323, 325,
412, 414, 427.
C. Strongly recommended courses outside PCL: ATC 201,
STA 310, or 320, ES 201, ES 202, ES 534.
D. Recommended courses outside PCL: PSY 201, PSY


340, ES 431, SY 201,
306, BA 300, SCH


Actual work


experience


,SY 391, MGT 350, MGT 450, CIS

in government is an invaluable


adjunct to a students program of formal study in the field
of public administration. For this reason students are


i




Colleges

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


Center in Reitz Union. Students who are interested in
working out a program of study and analysis to
complement their work experience in these kinds of jobs
may receive up to 5 hours of credit under a PCL 430 Special
Topics course.
JEWISH STUDIES
Administered by the Center for Jewish Studies, this
program provides an interdisciplinary and interdepartmen-
tal curriculum which serves as a basis for understanding the
broad sweep of lewish civilization. Through course work in
various departments, including Religion, Foreign Lan-
guages, English and Philosophy, students may acquaint
themselves with and specialize in areas within Jewish
studies including Biblical Studies, Jewish history, Jewish
philosophy and Jewish literature. It is expected that
students in the program will demonstrate or acquire
competence in Hebrew. The program may serve as
preparation for graduate work in Jewish Studies, whether in
a university or seminary setting.
The Jewish Studies program leads to the degree of
Bachelor of Arts and requires completion of a departmental
major. Working with advisers from the Center for Jewish
Studies, students may construct individually oriented
programs best suited to their needs, programs that take full
account of previous preparation. Interested students
should consult with Professors B. Mesch or S. Isenberg, 368
J. Wayne Reitz Union.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE
A full-time noncredit, nondegree program in English as a
second language is available to foreign students with some
knowledge of the language who wish to increase their
competence. The program, which may be taken any of the
quarters of the academic year, emphasizes the oral and
written skills needed by students from abroad who plan to
attend a university in the United States. Further information
is available from Dr. Jayne C. Harder, Director, English
Language Institute, 162 Grinter Hall, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611.
CHAIR OF AMERICAN STUDIES
Through the generosity of the American Legion, Depart-
ment of Florida, which has provided a fund of $40,000 for
this purpose, supplemented by legislative appropriation,
there was established a Professorship in the Department of
History of the College of Arts and Sciences known as the
"Chair of American Studies." This chair was established to
present courses and lectures on American ideals, American
government, American institutions, and American
citizenship.
The Professor of American Studies was designated to
teach courses in American History and to promote special
programs on American ideals. Although the University
offers for Freshmen a nine credit, three quarter course
entitled, "American Institutions," a number of additional
courses in American History are offered as electives. A
central theme in many American History courses is the
struggle of the people of the United States for a more
perfect democracy.
Part of the income from the endowment of the Chair of
American Studies is used to bring outstanding Americans to
the University of Florida for a series of addresses on the
theme of American traditions. Many of the lectures are
published and distributed as a part of the American Studies
program of the University.
PLACEMENT SERVICE
The Career Planning and Placement Center, located in
C.:,da fr r I tAM..n Dni.. I l. Zn *L-a .ana n.art.-fr ..n :


career plan, organizing a personal job search program and
improving your communication skills in interviewing,
resume and application letter writing.
The objective is to aid you in putting your education to
work in a field that will be both satisfying and rewarding to
you. In this regard, the Center hosts several hundred
representatives from business, industry, education and
government each year. These persons are on campus to
interview job candidates in fields ranging from bachelor
liberal arts graduates to science doctorates.
Undergraduates should register with the Center im-
mediately upon starting their Senior year of college.
Graduate students should register as they enter the final
year of their studies.
For additional information visit the Center or contact Mr.
Maurice E. Mayberry, Director.
STUDENT COUNCIL
Of all types of student organizations on campus, few are
concerned specifically with enhancing the academic and
intellectual environment within the college community.
The Arts and Sciences Student Council claims such concern.
Composed of student representatives from each of the
college's departments, the Council acts to initiate and
promote effective two-way communication between stu-
dents and faculty and administration. Further, it provides
students an opportunity to creatively participate in the
decision-making processes within the College through their
role as an advisory body to the Dean.
In recent years, the areas of faculty-student interaction,
student rights, teaching excellence, and quality of educa-
tion have received special scrutiny by the Council. As a
result, several ongoing programs have been established.
These include a fully equipped Calculator Laboratory and a
Peer Advising Staff. To encourage and honor teaching
excellence, the Council presents the annual Teacher of the
Year Award. And for the protection and furthering of
student rights, a student grievance board has been made
available. Many other projects are undertaken on a quarter-
to-quarter basis such as bringing distinguished
personalities-of-note to campus and the sponsoring of
debates and seminars on a wide range of topics.
The Council's growth and effectiveness depends upon
student involvement. Interested participants should con-
tact the Student Council office, 190 Building E, or the Arts
and Sciences office, 103 Anderson Hall.


STUDY


ABROAD (BOGOTA)


An agreement between the State University System of
Florida and the Universidad de los Andes in Bogota,
Columbia, allows undergraduate students to study in Latin
America for up to one year. The program is administered
through the Center for Latin American Studies.
The Universidad de los Andes is a private university with
an organization similar to that found in U.S. institutions of
higher education. Bogota, the city in which the Universidad
de los Andes is located, is the capital of Colombia. It offers
a variety of music, art, theater and museums and enjoys a
year-round Spring-like climate.
The principal features and requirements of the program
are:
Length of Program: Interested students may attend an
Intensive Course in Spanish for Foreign Students offered for
six weeks during June and July annually. In addition, they
m~, fst ian *n hun ranola r cnmactorc in rpcitdpnrp- AIot1ect






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


General Educational Requirements: Applicants must have
completed at least 48 quarter hours of college or university
work.


Academic Prerequisites: An academic average of
better on all work completed at U.S. institutions,
period of four quarters.


2.5 or
over a


Language Prerequisites: A minimum of four quarters of
college level Spanish, completed before departure, or a
certificate stating that student has completed a functional
Spanish language test.
Tuition: Same as for Colombian students, approximately
$175 US for the Summer Intensive Language course and
approximately $400 US for each semester.
Housing: While in residence at Universidad de los Andes,
U.S. students will be housed and fed in approved private
Colombian homes. Cost will be approximately $100 US per
month for room, meals and laundry.
Health Insurance: Students may be covered by the same
Blue Cross-Blue Shield Student Preferred Contract available
to students of the State University System of Florida,
approximately $8.36 bimonthly for an individual and $23.92
tor a family.
Travel Costs: Spring 1976, rates subject to change: Round
trip Miami-Bogota, valid for one year, $283. APPLICATION
DEADLINES: Two months prior to departure. Special group
rates available for summer course.
For additional information write to Assistant Director,
Center for Latin American Studies, 319 Grinter Hall,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (904 392-0186).


STUDY ABROAD (UF-POZNAN
EXCHANGE)
The University of Florida has had an exchange program
with the Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznan, Poland,
since the fall of 1973. It is the largest and most comprehen-
sive program between an American university and a
university in the communist world. Within the framework
of the program there are a number of opportunities for Flo-
rida undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty to
spend from 3 to 12 months in Poland-in Poznan or in other
Polish higher educational institutions elsewhere in the
country.
Up to 14 fellowships are available for UF graduate
students (or exceptionally well-qualified and highly
motivated mature undergraduates) to spend 9 months
studying or doing research in Poland during the academic
year. Stipends cover Polish university tuition, dormitory
room, health care, the opportunity to purchase meals at a
reduced rate ($12/month) in student cafeterias, 1/3
reduction on urban public transportation and inter-city rail
fares, other privileges of Polish students, plus 2400 zloty
($80 at the 33:1 tourist rate of exchange) per month for ex-
penses. Students are able to pursue almost any course of
study under the direction of a Polish faculty sponsor who is


normally selected after


the students arrival in Poland.


Students participating in the exchange should have as
much knowledge of Polish as possible and can build up
their knowledge of Polish in the following ways: taking
Polish 133-134-135 at UF during the academic year; taking
an intensive 10-15 credit Polish course at UF in the spring;
participating in the UF summer program in Poznan (see
next item below), which is normally a requirement for
participation in the year-round program; and taking part in
the intensive Polish lannuaue oroaram offered during the


of English of the A. Mickiewicz University of Poznan. Full
participation in this summer program is worth up to 15 UF
quarter hour credits. Students may sign up for 5-15 credits
of Polish language, 5 credits of Polish literature, 5 credits of
political science (Polish political and social institutions), 5
credits of history (modern Polish history), or 5-10 credits of
economics (socialist economic systems and economic
planning). This program is open to anyone-including
out-of-state students who may take the course on a
non-credit basis or arrange credit at their own institutions
on the basis of a letter provided by the A.M.U. staff and UF
summarizing their "non-credit" work). The approximate
cost of the 8-week program is $600 (including UF tuition or
non-credit fees, room, meals, visa, and required field trips
in Poland) plus transportation to and from Poland and the
cost of any travel in Poland or elsewhere in Europe before
or after the summer program. (If there is sufficient interest
shown by the students, a 10-14 day informal tour of Poland
will be arranged at the end of the 8-week program).


It is also possible for UF fac
to a year in Poland under t
program, either lecturing (ir


both. I
faculty
few UF
such a
either
Polish
percent


t is easiest to work
member from Polanc
faculty members to g(
direct exchange. The
a small per diem (for s
zloty, plus housing,
t reduction on train tr


:ulty to spend from one month
:he auspices of our exchange
n English), doing research, or
)ut a direct exchange with a
d, but it is also possible for a
o to Poland each year without
UF faculty member receives
hort-term visits) or a salary in
health insurance, and a 50
avel in Poland. In some cases


travel grants can also be arranged for the grantee (but not
for his family).
For further information contact: Dr. James F. Morrison,
439 Grinter Hall. or Dr. William Sullivan. 433 Grinter Hall.


STUDY


ABROAD (UTRECHT)


The University of Florida offers a foreign study program
at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands, for its own
and other undergraduates in the State University System of
Florida. The 1975-76 program consisted of intensive Dutch
language instruction during the Fall, together with several
orientation sessions developed by Professor Jorge Martinez
of the University's Mathematics department, who was
Program Director. From January to June, 1976, the students
took courses offered by University of Utrecht professors,
some in the English language, others in Dutch. These were
in several disciplines, such as sociology, English literature,
economics, and psychology. In every case the University of
Florida major departments worked with the student to
guide his or her selection of courses and insure credit
toward graduation. Credit is transferred to the student's
record at his or her home university in the Florida system.
Clearly one of the advantages of the Florida Abroad at
Utrecht program is the opportunity to experience Dutch
and European culture directly by studying and living with
foreign students.
The basic cost to participate in the program in 1975-76
was $1,465 to cover tuition, medical insurance, and
nominal service charges. Trans-Atlantic travel, housing,
food, and incidental expenses are the student's own direct
responsibility. The estimated total expense for the entire
9-month period was $3,700.


In addition to the overseas Director
Coordinator, Professor Samuel S. Hill, Jr.,
assist. Further information may be obtain
Coordinator (Department of Religion).


, a Program
is available to
led from the








VK


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II~~~~~~~~ -----%x x ::"I::; ;:;"


xxxx














The


College of


Business


Administration


ACCOUNTING


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


- GENERAL


ECONOMICS
FINANCE, INSURANCE, REAL ESTATE AND URBAN LAND STUDIES






Colleges


The


College of


Business


Administration


specific research projects.
undertaken which permits
undergraduate students.


From time
a similar


The Bureau publishes the results of
undertakings as these are completed. It
periodically a publication, Economic leaflets,
and Economic Dimensions.


to time work
opportunity


its research
also issues
and Business


GENERAL STATEMENT


The College of Business Administration of the University
of Florida was organized in 1926-27. The divisions of the
College are: Department of Accounting; Department of
Economics; Department of Finance, Insurance, Real Estate
and Urban Land Studies; Department of Management;
Department of Marketing; and Bureau of Economic and
Business Research.
The College of Business Administration has broad
objectives; to provide the foundation for competent,
responsible participation in business, the professions and
government; to stimulate interest in social, economic and
civic responsibilities; to develop competence in making
business decisions and in evaluating policy; to offer fields
of specialization in business or economics, and, especially,
to encourage intellectual inquiry.
Specific arts and detailed information are necessary parts
of the curriculum, but the guiding principle of this College
is to stress broad fundamentals in terms of the above
objectives, and to prepare the student to develop
subsequent specialization. To this end, every curriculum of
the College is constructed around a core of courses in
economics and the major functional areas of business.
The College also has other functions. It contributes to
knowledge through the research activities of its faculty and
students. Graduate programs are provided for advanced
students and prospective teachers in business adminis-
tration and economics. The College participates in pro-
grams of adult education both on and off campus. It
recognizes its responsibilities to students in other colleges
of the University by giving them an opportunity to
complement their education with courses in economics and
business administration.
The College maintains a computer facility for instructional
and research pi rposes. Advanced students also have access
to the University Computing Center, which contains high-
capacity equipment.


SCHOLARSHIPS AND


The Bureau is a member of the Associated University
Bureaus of Business and Economic Research.


MEMBERSHIP IN NATIONAL AND
REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
The College of Business Administration is a member of
the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business,
the Southern Economic Association, the Southern Business
Administrative Association and the National Retail
Merchants' Association. Its baccalaureate and MBA pro-
grams are accredited by the American Assembly of
Collegiate Schools of Business.


BETA GAMMA SIGMA
Election to this national honorary society is based on
scholarship and character. It fills the place in education for
business that the society of Phi Beta Kappa holds in the field
of classical education. Duly elected members have the right
to wear the insigne of the society the Beta Gamma Sigma
gold key. For further information apply to the Office of the
Dean.


PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
AND CLUBS


There


are six professional


fraternities


members from students in the
Administration. These are Alpha Kal
Pi in commerce and business,
Accounting, Omicron Delta Epsilon
Theta for business women, and Rho
Several clubs also give students with
opportunity to participate in their ac
Society, AIESEC -US and a student


for Advancement for Management elects
both from this College and the College


which


College of Business
pa Psi and Delta Sigma
Beta Alpha Psi in
in economics, Phi Chi
Epsilon in real estate.
specialized interest an
tivities: The Insurance
chapter of the Society


memberships
Engineering.


ASSISTANTSHIPS


Scholarships are available for students in Business
Administration. Full information about these scholarships
may be obtained from the Director of Student Financial Aid,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Graduate assistantships and fellowships are available for
students working toward the degrees of Master of Business
Administration, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy.
Information about these assistantships may be obtained
from the Director of Graduate Studies, College of Business
Administration, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND
BUSINESS RESEARCH


WOMEN IN BUSINESS
Rapidly increasing opportunities exist for women gradu-
ates in many business fields. Illustrative areas are market-
ing, banking, accounting, economic analysis, insurance,
real estate, personnel administration, statistics and invest-
ments.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Business
Administration encourages applications from qualified
students from all cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic
groups. Listed below are the specific requirements for
admission to this college. It should be understood however






COLlfGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


University


College Students:


To be eligible for admission


to the College of Business Administration, a University
College student must have completed at least one quarter
in University College. Acceptance to the College of
Business Administration will be based upon the grade point
average earned and prerequisite courses completed.
Transfer Students: To be eligible for admission to the
College of Business Administration, a transfer student must
satisfy the minimum requirements for admission that are
set forth in the transfer admissions section below.
Additionally, the applicant should complete as far as
possible, the courses required for the desired curriculum as
indicated in the program for the freshman and sophomore
years in the University College section. Completion of
these courses and receipt of an AA degree does not
guarantee acceptance to the College of Business
Administration. Acceptance to the College of Business
Administration will be based upon prerequisite courses
completed and the student's earned grade point average.
A. Students attending four year colleges, who wish to
transfer after two years, should follow a program of
general education and preprofessional courses similar
to the Basic Curriculum for the Freshman and
Sophomore years for students desiring to enter the
College of Business Administration which is outlined in
the University College section of this catalog. Prere-
quisite courses in business subjects during the first two
years should be completed as indicated in paragraphs
B.3 and B.4 below. Courses should not be taken during
the first two years which are offered only at the upper
division level at the University of Florida.
B. Junior College and Community College students
should:
1. Complete the university transfer program at the
junior college.
2. Complete the general education requirements
established for the junior college.


3. Complete, insofar
courses which are


profession,
sequence
economics
geometry
statistics,
statistics, a
4. Comple
economics
order of F
courses ma


course


as possi
prerequ


al work in
in accountir
, a one-ye
and calculus
a course ii
course in loi
te one-year
at the junior
)resenting n
ike it highly
es in differe


5. Choose elective cou
total 64 semester hou
program from such ar
sciences, social scien


humanities.


ble, all of the following
isite to any advanced


the College: a one-year
,g, a one-year sequence in
.ar sequence in analytical
*, an introductory course in
n economic and business
Ric.
course in accounting and
r college. Differences in the
material in basic one year
undesirable to take parts of
nt institutions.
rses needed to complete the
rs in the university transfer
eas as mathematics, natural


ce,


foreign


language,


6. Avoid professional coursework that is available at
the University of Florida only as 3rd and 4th year
courses. TRANSFER STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO
AVOID SUCH COURSES AS BUSINESS LAW, PRIN-
CIPLES OF MARKETING, PRINCIPLES OF MAN-
AGEMENT, PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE, PRIN-
CIPLES OF REAL ESTATE, PERSONNEL MAN-
AGEMENT, AND COMPUTER MANAGEMENT
COURSES. A maximum of six quarter credits may be
allowed for courses taken during the first two years
which are available only as third and fourth year
professional courses in the College of Business
Administration.


waived.


course


will be specified


Department Chairman of the


area.


Provisional Admission: Within space limitations, students
who do not meet precisely the admission requirements
indicated in the appropriate section above may be granted
provisional admission to the College of Business Adminis-
tration. The Dean of the College of Business Administration
will specify the courses to be completed and minimum
grade points to be earned by the student during the term of
his provisional admission. Provisional status will be
removed and the student fully admitted to the College of
Business Administration provided he fulfills the conditions
set forth in his provisional admission. The student will be
excluded from further enrollment in the College of Business
Administration if he fails to satisfy the conditions of his
provisional admission.
GENERAL REGULATIONS
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY: The student must assume
full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. He is also
responsible for completing all courses for which he is
registered.
Courses may be dropped through the offices of the Dean
until the end of the third week of the quarter without
petitioning. After the third week courses may be dropped or
changed without penalty only through the offices of the
Dean of the College (by petitions) and the Registrar.
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the
Office of the Registrar early in the quarter in which they
expect to receive the degree. The official calendar shows
the latest date on which this can be done.
NORMAL LOADS: The average course load in the College


of Business


Administration


is 15 credit hours.


may be permitted to register for additional hou
opinion of his academic adviser and the
academic record justifies this. Students who w
less than 12 hours should be aware that certain
privileges and benefits require a minimum registl
the student's responsibility to verify the


A student
rs if in the
Dean, his
ish to take
university
ration. It is
minimum


registration necessary for these benefits.
RESIDENCE: The last 45 quarter hours to be applied
toward a degree must be completed in residence in the
College of Business Administration. In special cases this
requirement may be waived if the student has a 2.9 average
or better, and his petition to take non-resident work has
been approved in advance by the faculty of the College. In
any case, no student may take more than nine quarter credit
hours by extension or correspondence among the 90
quarter credits of upper-division work required for the
baccalaureate degree; and such work must have prior
approval for each individual student by the Petitions
Committee of the College. However, courses to be
included in the major field may not be taken by extension,
by correspondence, or at another university for transfer.

SA TISFACTORY-UNSA TISFACTORY GRADE OTPION: An
undergraduate student in the College of Business Adminis-
tration may take on the S-U basis only those courses which
will be counted as free electives in fulfilling the require-
ments for his degree.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION: Students who do not
make satisfactory academic progress may be excluded from
further registration.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS:
To graduate from the College of Business Administration
a student must satisfactorily complete the following:
.




Colleges

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


does not reduce the hours required for graduation. A
student must maintain an overall average of 2.0 and a 2.0
average on all courses which count toward his upper-divi-
sion degree requirements. (Accounting majors must also
maintain a 2.0 average on all major course work.)
DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION WITH HONORS
OR HIGH HONORS:
A student who carries 14 hours per quarter with a grade
point average of 3.5 will have his name placed on the Dean's
list for that quarter.
To graduate With Honors, a student must make at least a
3.2 average on all course work accepted as Upper Division
credit and all course work (except as noted below)
attempted while registered in the Upper Division. To
graduate With High Honors, a student must make at least a
3.6 average on all work accepted as Upper Division credit
and all course work (except as noted below) attempted
while registered in the Upper Division. In calculating
requirements for graduating With Honors or With High
Honors, the following policies are followed: the student
must have completed at the University of Florida at least 60
quarter hours for Upper Division credit toward a degree in
Business Administration, transfer credits and S-U grade
credits will be excluded; and credits for Lower Division
courses taken while registered in the Upper Division will be
excluded.

ADVANCED ACCOUNTANCY
DEGREE
Upon completion of 45 quarter credits of advanced
business subjects beyond the undergraduate level with an
overall grade average of 2.0 (C), students will be awarded
the professional accountancy degree AAB, Bachelor of
Advanced Accountancy.
The purpose of this fifth year program is to offer
specialized accounting training at an advanced level. The
courses, while professionally oriented, are taught with a
broad philosophical approach which is concerned not only
with a thorough understanding of accounting principles
and practices but also an appreciation of their interrelation
with principles of other fields of business. Its objective is to
provide the student with a depth of educational background
both in accounting and other business subjects which will
encourage him to continue career development in prepara-
tion for future leadership in the profession.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
Admission will be granted to graduates from a college or
university with a grade point average of 2.7 (C+) or better
and with the equivalent of a major in accounting, ordinarily,
with the completion of from 36 to 45 quarter credits of
accounting subjects. No entrance examination is required.
Practical business experience is not required for ad-
mission to the program but students having such a
background will find that it enhances their professional
study. Internship programs of three or four months are
available and will add much to the professional develop-
ment of the student.
CURRICULUM IN ADVANCED ACCOUNTANCY:
Course requirements of 45 quarter credits must include
at least 22 quarter credits of advanced accounting subjects
to be selected from 500 or 600 level accounting courses. At
least 20 quarter credits of advanced business courses also
are required. These are to be chosen to supplement the
student's undergraduate work in business subjects related


ES 572 Economics of the Labor Market
FI 524 Investment Analysis
FI 528 Corporation Finance
Fl 486 Estates, Trusts and Insurance
Fl 590 Business Financial Management
MGT 570 Production Management Problems
MGT 471 Managerial Operations Analysis 2
MGT 472 Managerial Operations Analysis 3
MKG 531 Marketing Principles and Institutions
FLORIDA ACCOUNTANCY REQUIREMENT:
An approved one year post-baccalaureate business
program with a major in accounting in addition to
requirements to sit for the CPA examination will be
accepted by the Florida State Board of Accountancy in lieu
of the one year experience requirement for the CPA
certificate.


GRADUATE DEGREES AND
ADMISSION TO GRADUATE WORK
Courses are offered in the College of Business Adminis-
tration leading to the degree of Master of Business
Administration, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Philosophy.
For requirements for these degrees and for admission to
Graduate School, consult the Graduate School Catalog.


CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
The upper division curriculum in Business Administration
requires 90 quarter credits (97 in the Accounting major). The
program centers around a core which is required of all
students. In addition, each student is required to select one
of the eight major fields as an area of concentration. The
pattern of the Upper Division requirements is as follows:
UPPER DIVISION CORE REQUIREMENTS
Courses Credits
BA 300 Quantitative Methods for Business and
Econom ic Analysis................................................. 5
*ES 301 National Income Determination and Policy........... 5
*ES 302 Prices and Markets .. ....... ............................. ..... 3
FIl 326 Business Finance ............................................... 4
MGT 310 Principles of Management............................. 4
MKG 331 Principles of Marketing................................ 4


Total Core Requirements


*Students majoring in Economics are required to register for
ES 401 and ES 402 instead of ES 301 and ES 302.
OTHER UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
In addition to the upper division core just described, each
student must follow the curriculum pattern indicated
below:
MAJOR FIELD
Required courses are listed under the appropriate
"major" headings, beginning in the next section. Minimum
requirements range from 18 to 32 hours depending upon
major.
FREE ELECTIVES
Electives may be within or outside the College of Business
Administration, but must be outside the major field. A
maximum of thirteen hours may be specified by major







COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


Required Courses Credits
ATG 301-302 Intermediate Accounting......................... 10
ATG 305 Cost and Management Accounting II................ 4
ATC 407 Income Tax Accounting ........ .......................... 4
Accounting Electives...................... ........... .... ...... 14-16


Group II
ES 410 Development of Modern Western Economy............5
ES 411 Development of Modern Western Economy............5
ES 414 United States Economic Development ..............5


32-34


For further information, contact
Room 106, Matherly Hall.


a departmental adviser,


Accounting electives may be selected from: ATG 401, ATG
405, ATG 408, ATG 409, ATG 418, ATG 504, ATG 505, ATG 507,
ATG 508, ATG 517.


In addition
administration
take CIS 302, I
credits, BA44C
credits, and B/
27-29 credits.


to the core courses required of all business
students, accounting majors are required to
Introduction to Computer Programming 2
I, Computer Based Business Management -4
A 402, Business Law 5 credits. Free electives
Total 97 credits.


Accounting majors intending to sit for the CPA examina-
tion are advised to become familiar with the Florida State
Board of Accountancy educational requirements

II. COMPUTER AND
INFORMATION SCIENCES
This curriculum is designed to prepare students for
technical and managerial positions in science in public and
private organizations. The curriculum emphasizes three
aspects pertinent to the student's professional career; the
functions to which computers are applied in organizations,
the professional skills for the design of computing
applications, and the decision-making techniques for the
efficient and effective utilization of computing resources.


IV. FINANCE


This currici
background in
on analysis
curriculum pr
which can be
business as we
interest to


iulum is designed to give students a broad
1the business finance function with emphasis
and the decision making process. The
ovides a general academic base in finance
useful for decision-makers in all aspects of
II as more specialized courses that may be of
those students considering careers in


commercial banking


or other ty


pes of financial institutions.


*FI 420Financial Management of Financial Institutions......4
*FI 424 Investm ent Analysis ................................................ 4
*FI 428Applied Business Finance...................................... 4
*FI 429 International Finance .. ............. ........... ............... 4


BA 401 or BA 402 Business Law ......................................... 5
CIS 302 Introduction to Computer Programming............. 2
and a minimum of four additional hours of
Business Administration courses............................... 4


Courses
CIS 406 Data Processing Languages...
CIS 484 Info. Resources in Bus and Ec
CIS 440 introduction to Management
Balance of 14 to 16 credits in courses
numbered above CIS 311 .................


onomics..... ...
Systems,......


Credits

.. .. 4
...... 4


.14-16


Total


Students majoring in CIS are required to take the folk
courses:
ATG 418 Info. Systems for Management Plannii
C ontrol........................................ ............... ...........
MGT 472 Managerial Operations Analysis III............
Free electives in the College of Business
Administration or elsewhere................................. .....
Total


26-28

owing


Required Electives


V. INSURANCE
The curriculum in risk and insurance is designed primarily
to give students an understanding of risk and the means of
treating risk. Some students may find positions in the
administration of risk and insurance programs of business
and governmental units. Others may enter the insurance
industry. Most students will probably follow careers in
other fields in which an understanding of risk and insurance
is helpful, though of secondary importance.
The major must consist of a minimum of 18 credits in the
field of risk and insurance but may not exceed 24 credits.
The major must include FI 360, at least one course from
both Group A and Group B, plus Fl 496 for 2 credits.


ng


III. ECONOMICS


This curriculum is designed to provide students with a
basic core of courses in Economics, while, at the same
time, enabling them to select their electives from among a
wide variety of courses adapted to their needs and
interests.

The economics major is required to substitute ES 401 and
ES 402 for ES 301 and ES 302 in the College of Business core
program. In addition the major must complete 18-28 credit
hours of economic electives elected from courses
numbered 300 or above. Three courses must be selected
from the list below. At least two of these courses must be
selected from Group I, but one course may be selected


Courses
FI 360 Risk and Insu
*FI 496Independent


Credits
rance ... ,................ ........ .. ............ 4
R esearc h ....... .. ............ .................. ........ 2


Group A
FI 365 Property and Liability Insurance 1....
FI 366 Property and Liability Insurance 2.....
Fl 487 Risk Management ..........................
Group B:
FI 363 Life Insurance...............................
FI 462 Group Insurance and Pension Plans.,
Fl 464 Health Insurance............................
FI 486 Estates, Trusts, and Insurance..........


Total (Minimum)


*The independent work will consist of a research paper.


** *........* ....I..*





Colleges

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


MANAGEMENT


This curriculum is designed for students interested in
overall management problems, industrial management,
industrial relations or personnel management. By selection


of appropriate


courses,


a student may obtain


a solid basis


for quantitative analysis of business.


Credits


Courses
MGT 410 Principles of


MGT 450 Problems in Personnel Management..............
MGT 470 Managerial Operations Analysis 1..................


MKG


472 Advanced Marketing


Research ...................... 4


MKG 481 Credit and Collections..................
MKG 491 Physical Distribution Management..
MKG 493 Special Topics in Marketing...........


..... 4


A*4*#*** *4*** *4 t


24-28


Students majoring in Marketing are required to take the


following


course:


CIS 302 Introduction to Computer Programmi


ng...........


one course


from each of the following groups:


Required Electives


(a) MGT 460 Collective Bargaining.................


MGT 471 Managerial Operations Analy


b) MGT 480 Business


Policies .........................


sis 2..


4...........
....4..***44 *


MGT 481 Management Philosophy and
Practice...........................................


REAL


ESTATE


AND


4 ANALYSIS


MGT


472 Managerial Operations Analysis 3..


c) MGT 430 International Management...


or any


course


not selected in (a)


or (b) above.


This curriculum


is designed to prepare students to enter


a general real estate business,


branches


such as appraising,


or any one of its special


finance,


property man-


24 agement, and brokerage.


Students majoring


the following


in Management


are required to take


g course:


Courses


Credits


Credits


CIS 302 Introduction to Computer Programming..
and one of the following:


MGT 355


Human Relations


in Administration


PSY 201 General Psychology
SY 201 Principles of Sociology
APY 200 Cultural Anthropology


RE 350 Real Estate Analysis...............
RE 440 Real Estate Law.......... .............
RE 450 Real Estate Valuation ...........
RE 460 Real Estate Investment............
RE 470 Urban Land Use Analysis..........


RE 480 Real Estate Financial


Anal


Required Electives


The student


following


is required to take two


g list, totaling


at least 7


courses


from the


hours.


This curriculum
the distribution
and economic f


is designed to


system


forces


develop


for goods


an undersi


and services,


standing of
the social


which act on that system and on the


determinants of consumer choice behavior. The program


emphasizes quantitative


and social


marketing management and
Courses
MKG 352 Consumer Behavic
MKG 471 Marketing Researc


consu


science


approaches to


mer behavior.


Credits


APY 202 Anthropology and Modern Life
BCN 101 Construction Materials..........
CE 492 Engineering and Public Works...
ES 581 Urban Economics.....................
Prereq: SY 201 or Consent
FRC 220 Introduction to Forestry..........
GPY 305 Geography of Florida .............
GPY 401 Air Photo Interpretation.........
Prerea: GPY 300, or Consent


4


GPY 426 Urban


MKG


.... *44 ** *** ** *$4 *4> * V
...........*......,.... 3
....................... 5

....................... 3
*.................... .. 4
....................... 5


Geography........


352 Consumer Behavior.....


MKG 431 Marketing


and any three or four of the following courses:


362 Marketing


Channels.....................................
al Marketing................................


Prereq: MKG 331
MKG 471 Marketing Research.....


Prereq: MKG 331,


BA 300


MKG 421 Internation


MKG 441


Sales


PCL 325 Urban Politics.......................
Prereq: PCL 201


M anagement.......... ..... ................
tion Management...............................
M anagement......................................


MKG 451 Promc
MKG 461 Retail


Required


electives


URBAN


MARKETING


MKG


Organization............................


r........... ............... ...........
h .....;...............................


Management...............................





Colleges


College of Dentistry


The College of Dentistry is one of the six colleges which
constitute the J. Hillis Miller Health Center. The College of
Dentistry, as well as the other units of the Health Center, is
an integral component, both geographically and function-
ally, of the University of Florida. Even though it is in its
early stages of development, many conjoint projects
between the College and other units of the Health Center
and University have been formulated and implemented.
The 1957 Florida Legislature authorized the development
of a College of Dentistry in Gainesville, but it was not
until the late 1960's that faculty members were recruited
and program development initiated.
The thirteen departments which make up the College of
Dentistry are Basic Dental Sciences, Community Dentistry,
Dental Biomaterials, Dental Education, Endodontics,
Occlusion and Fixed Prosthodontics, Operative Dentistry,
Oral Medicine, Oral Surgery, Orthodontics, Pedodontics,
Periodontics, and Removable Prosthodontics. A modular


curriculum has been developed in
departments teach in a multidisci
curriculum is so designed as to
maximal degree in flexibility and ind
program. It is a competency based
behavioral objectives, rather than
primary guidelines for student adc
there is no definite length of tim'


which these several
plinary fashion. The
permit students the
ividualization in their
curriculum in which
time, serve as the
vancement. Although
e in the curriculum,


outstanding students should be able to
program in three calendar years. Self-instr
tutes a significant part of the teaching me
The institutional goals of this college are t
graduate to enter private dental practice, to
programs of any of the dental specialties,
research activities, and to be prepared for
continuing education.
The first class of students enrolled in 197
Sciences Building was first occupied in Aug


complete the
auction consti-
sthodology.
o prepare the
enter graduate
to enter into
a lifetime of

2. The Dental
ust, 1975, and


was officially dedicated March 6, 1976. The College offers
the Doctor of Dental Medicine (D.M.D.) degree. (The
D.M.D. and D.D.S. degrees are synonomous.) The College
offers Advanced Educational Programs (residencies) in Oral
Surgery and Dental Public Health.
The College of Dentistry aspires to attract students of the
highest caliber into its various programs. High standards of
scholastic achievement, moral character, and motivation
are expected of the applicant. The student of dentistry
must possess a high basic aptitude supplemented by an
academic preparation of the highest order because of the
vast area of science which must be mastered by the dentist.
The highly personal relationship between patient and
dentist places the latter in a position of trust, which
demands maturity, integrity, intellectual honesty, and a
sense of responsibility. A broad representation of the
ethnic mixture of the state is sought in the student body
through an active recruitment program. The College strictly
adheres to the principle of ethnic, racial, religious and
social equality among its student body and faculty.
Generally, students applying for admission should plan
to complete the requirements for a bachelor's degree.
However, qualified students may be accepted without


fulfilling
evidence
personal
dentistry.
minimum


the degree
of suffice
character
Applicants
will receive


requirements, provided they shl
*nt academic preparation and t
istics necessary for the study
s with an overall B average as
e strongest consideration for admit


ion to the College of Dentistry. A lim
out-of-state students, in proportion to the
university as a whole, may be admitted,
the age of thirty rarely will be given stror
Applicants should initiate the appli
approximately fifteen months prior
enrollment by submitting an applicati
centralized American Association of
Application Service (AADSAS) P.O. Box


lited number of
e number in the
Applicants over
ig consideration.
cation process
to anticipated
on through the
Dental Schools
1003, Iowa City


Iowa 52240.
Further detailed information will be found in the College
of Dentistry Bulletin. Copies may be obtained by writing to
the Office of Admissions, College of Dentistry, University
of Florida, Box J-445, JHMHC Cainesville, Florida 32601.















































































Sx "


/


m





College


>-.***


Education


I^*- j
- .4 "


4


.7


r
p


/"r
I.
~iLS


ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION
COUNSELOR EDUCATION
FOUNDATIONS
GENERAL TEACHER EDUCATION
IIMCTDI ICFTIlnAl I FAnIFRCHIP AND J IJPPORT


I
-*% i





Colleges


College of Education


GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Education, a professional college, has as
its purpose the preparation of qualified personnel for
positions in service, leadership, and research in education.
The College has undergraduate programs leading to the
preparation and certification of teachers in elementary
education, secondary education, and K1-12 programs in art,
music, physical education and special education (mental
retardation). Programs of study in guidance and counseling,
school administration, and college teaching are available at
the graduate levels only. Undergraduate students in-
terested in these area will usually complete their bachelor's
degree in one of the teaching fields found on the following
pages.
Class room teaching is only one of the many careers
available to graduates from the College of Education.
School administrators, supervisors, counselors, school
social workers, school psychologists, attendance workers,
speech therapists, and reading clinicians are among the
many careers found in education. Other career op-
portunities for those having degrees in education are in the
areas of development and distribution of educational
materials, educational television, personnel work, counsel-
ing, foreign service, peace corps, as educational specialists
and training officers in industry, and in educational
research.
The University of Florida teacher education programs are
designed to assist students with developing three broad
areas of competence: (1) general preparation consisting of
a background of liberal education; (2) the professional
sequence consisting of work in psychological and social
foundations of education, the school program, and
internship or student teaching; and (3) the teaching fielder
specialization in the area of subject matter to be taught.
The College of Education is fully accredited by the
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.
Graduates from approved programs in teacher education
are granted certification to teach in twenty-eight states as a
recognition of this accreditation.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Education
encourage applications from qualified students from all
cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below
are the specific requirements for admission to this College.
It should be understood, however, that minimum require-
ments are given and that admission to this College is a
selective process. The satisfaction of minimum require-
ments does not automatically guarantee admission. A
student's total record, including educational objectives,
pattern of courses previously completed, quality of
previous academic record, and test data, will be considered
in evaluating an application for admission. Priority for
admission will be given to those applicants whose potential
on the basis of their total record indicates the greatest
likelihood of success in the program requested.
Limitations in available faculty and facilities have made it
necessary that the College of Education establish quotas for
the admission of new students in certain undergraduate
programs. Therefore, eligible applicants will be considered
for admin on tn tthe (nallau nfra Fdrtinn within Pctahblichdi


a prescribed quota. To be considered for admission to the
College, students will be required to:
1. Complete one of the basic programs outlined in the
University College section of the catalog under Educa-
tion. University College students with transferred credit
from other institutions will be required to take
comprehensive courses according to the University
College regulations.
2. Applicants presenting the best overall credentials in
terms of grade point average and other predictive
indices are given first priority. When quotas are filled, no
additional students can be accepted.
3. Meet minimum standards of physical and mental
health.
4. Have the approval of the Committee on Admission of
the College of Education. The Committee will reviewthe
application of each candidate with respect to qualities
considered to be essential for effective teaching. The
student is expected to speak, read, and write the English
language effectively.
Transfer Students:
A. From other upper division colleges, University of
Florida
University of Florida students desiring to transfer from an
upper division college to the College of Education must file
applications with both the Registrar's Office and the
Undergraduate Studies Office, Room 124, Norman Hall. To
be considered for admission applicants will be expected to
meet the requirements for admission outlined above for
University College students.
B. From other institutions
To be eligible for admission to the College of Education, a
transfer student must satisfy the minimum requirements for
admission to an Upper Division College that are set forth in
the ADMISSIONS section of the catalog. Additionally, the
applicant must satisfy the following specific requirements
for admission to the College of Education:
1. Complete a personal data sheet for permanent
records in the College of Education.
2. Meet general preparation requirements (See General
Preparation section for College of Education).
3. Applicants presenting the best overall credentials in
terms of grade point average and other predictive
indices will be given first priority. When quotas are
filled, no additional students can be accepted.
4. Meet minimum standards of physical and mental
health.
5. Have the approval of theCommitteeon Admissionsof
the College of Education. The Committee will reviewthe
application of each applicant with respect to qualities
considered to be essential for effective teaching. The
student is expected to speak, read, and write the English
language effectively.
The following information will serve as a guide in
expediting transfer of a junior college student to the College
of Education in compliance with the above requirements.
The junior college transfer student must:
1. Complete the Associate of Arts degree program at the
junior college.


2. Complete the general education
established for the junior college.


requirements


3. Present a satisfactory academic record. Since quotas
have been established in certain teaching areas, those
students presenting the best overall records will be
UJ JfK






COUEGE OF EDUCATION


Sciences ....... ..........................*.*..**.**......... 6


Humanities .............................. *. . . . ......... .. .. ... 8
*Mathematics........ ...................................... . .... ....... 3
Science (to include work in both physical and


biological
*Students


planning to major


in Elementary


Childhood Education must have two courses


or Early


in mathema-


tics, to include at least one course specifically designed for
elementary school teachers. If a student is unable to take a


mathematics


course


for elementary teachers at the junior


college, it may be taken after admission to the University.


Under any circumstances, one mathematics


course


(See General Preparation).
4. Completion of the speech requirement by successful-
ly completing a public speaking course (SCH 201 or 312)


or by


passing


the speech


screening


administered by the Speech Department. Al


examination


English


and Language Arts students must meet this requirement
by completing the speech course.
5. A "C" average, or better.
6. A "C" average, or better in specific professional
courses and in the area of specialization.
Special Education majors and Secondary Education
majors in either the College of Education or the College
of Arts and Sciences should note that no grade less than


should


be successfully completed at the junior college.
6. Choose elective courses to complete the required 64
semester hour total in the university transfer program in


the basic


areas


of general or liberal education fields.


"C" mee
courses


ts


a requirement in the professional education


or in the field of specialization.


Students majoring in secondary education may earn
credit in their teaching field at the junior college in
courses which are equivalent to the 100 and 200 level
courses at the University of Florida. Students enrolling in


the College of Education
foreign language. Studei
Education in the College


satisfy


the foreign


are not required to take


nts who enroll


of Arts and


language


in Teacher


Science<


requirements


es must
of that


College.


7. Complete a course in public speaking.


Admission:


Due to limited


faculty and


facilities, the College is not able to accept all students who
meet its minimum admission requirements. Therefore, the
College does not provide provisional admission at the
present time.


ADMISSION TO PHASES OF THE
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM


I. Admission to the


Teacher Education Program for


students enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences.
Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who wish to


enroll


a Teacher


Education


Program


must


make


III. Admission to Student Teaching in any


Teacher


Education Program
Assignments to student teaching for each quarter are
made by the Undergraduate Studies Office in the College of


Education.


Students


in the College of Education are


assigned a quarter for student teaching when they are
admitted to the College. Students from the College of Arts


and Sciences are assigned


a quarter for student teaching


when they are admitted to the Teacher Education Program.
Students in other colleges should see the Coordinator of


Undergraduate Studies, R
student teaching quarter


124 Norman Hall


for a


as early in their junior year


possible. Assignments are made on the basis of a quota
which is usually filled at least one year in advance.
Prior to acceptance to student teaching in a Teacher
Education Program, a student must have fulfilled the
following requirements:

1. Have completed all general preparation require-
ments.

2. Have satisfied the speech requirement.


application for admission to the program. Application forms
may be obtained in Room 113 Anderson Hall or Room 124
Norman Hall.


Application should be made


as soon


as possible after


admission to the College of Arts and Sciences; application
to the program cannot be made before a student has been
accepted into the College of Arts and Sciences. The student
must be admitted to the Teacher Education Program before
he can apply for the Advanced Professional Sequence.
The criteria used in considering students from the


College of Arts and


Sciences


for the


Program will be the same as those
students into the College of Education.


Teacher Education
used for admitting


3. Have at least


average


in all course


work at the


University of Florida, the area of specialization courses,
and professional education courses. Foreign Language
majors must demonstrate proficiency in all languages
for which they seek certification.

4. Have been admitted to the Advanced Professional
Sequence and have completed the following work:


(a) Early Childhood Education


PHR 361 and 373;
344; and ED 480


EH 491


-- MSC


EDE 311


260 and 390;


, 323, 333, and


II. Admission to the Advanced Professional Sequence.
A student who proposes to enter a Teacher Education
Program, whether through the College of Education or one
of the cooperating colleges, must be admitted to the
Advanced Professional Sequence prior to enrollment in


certain professional courses.
Elementary Education this is I


For Early Childhood and
EDE 333; for K-12 Education


programs this is EDE 400 and EDS 400; for Secondary
Education this is EDS 400, and for Special Educaiton this is


at the time of enrollment for the second methods


Admission


to the Advanced


Professional


(b) Elementary-MSC 260 and 390; PHR 361 and 373;


EH 491


; EDE 311, 333, and 344; and ED 480.


(c) Teaching Fields K-12


- EDF345;


EDE 400; EDS 400;


at least two-thirds of the coursework in the teaching
area in which student teaching is to be done and the
following courses:
Art: SCA 401 and 402.


Music: MSC 367


course.


Sequence


rinnnres:


, 368, 369, 460, 461 or 462.


Special Education: EDH 300, SCH 340; EDH 310, 311,
400, 401,402,403,404.
Physical Education: PHR 373 and 473.


Social


Provisional


sciences)................................................. 10




Colleges

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


440 and 441
coursework


or 442, and at least two-thirds of the


in the


area of specialization.


Students must make special application to the Director of
Student Teaching, Room 146 Norman Hall. Applications
must be received no later than October 1 for the Winter
Quarter, January 10 for the Spring Quarter, and April 1 for
the Fall Quarter.
Students have the responsibility for making arrangements
to live in the community where student teaching is to be
done and to assume living expenses in addition to regular
on-campus expenses.


University College students making substitutions and
using transfer credit from other institutions will be required
to take comprehensive courses according to University
College regulations. Students transferring into the upper
division of the College of Education as Juniors and Seniors
are expected to have completed comparable com-


*


prehensive
stitutes.


courses


or to have taken appropriate sub-


PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION


Early Childhood Education


Programs


Include:


Credits
..............50


EDE 311, 322, 333,


GRADUATION =REQUIREMENTS


To graduate from the College of Educat
satisfactorily complete the following:


ion a student must


355............................


ED 480..............................................................................4

Elementary Programs Include:
EDE 311,322, 333, 344, 355 ..................................... .... 50
EDE 405 ............................................................ ......... ..16
ED 480 ................................................................... ..........4


1. 72 quarter hours of general preparation.


2. A College approved program
study.


in his


major field of


3. Required professional education courses appropriate
to his field of study.
4. Speech requirement.


A minimum


graduation.
grade point


of 188 quarter


hours is required


A student must have at least a 2.0 overall


average


and have at least


a 2.0


average


professional education courses and in his area


ization.
grades


of special-


In Secondary Education and Special Education,


below "C" will


fessional


education


not fulfill
or in the


requirements


in either


area of specialization.


Special Edu
Include:


cation (Mental Retardation) Programs


ED F 345......... .......... .................................................. 5
EDF 300 or EDF 320 or EDF 410 or EDF 431....................... 5
EDH 300, 310, 311, 400, 401,402,403, 404...................... 35


Music Education Programs include:
EDF 341 or EDE 342 or EDE 345..................................... 5
EDF 300 or EDF 320 or EDF 410 or EDF 431 ...................... 5
EDE 400 and EDS 400.................................................. 9
EDE 405 and EDS 405................................................. 16

Other Kindergarten through Twelfth Grade Programs
Include:
ED F 34 5 .................................. ................................ .. 5
EDF 300 or EDF 320 or EDF 410 or EDF 431 ....................... 5
EDE 400 and EDS 400................................................... 9


EDE 405


GENERAL PREPARATION


Seventy-two


(72) quarter hours of credits in the


EDS 405 (Phys'cal Education)...................................... 16
or
EDH 300 and EDS 414 (Speech Therapy)......................... 8


area of


general preparation are required of all students in a Teacher
Education Program. Students must have earned a grade of


"C" or above in 54 of the


72 credits.


The minimum requirements in general preparation for


majors in
Education


Social


Elementary
are:


Education


and Early Childhood


Quarter hours
SSC .................................................. 9


Sciences:


Secondary Education Programs Include:
ED F 342.............................. ..............
EDF 300 or EDF 320 orEDF 410 or EFDF 431 ....
ED S 400..................................................


*9*^ ** **^***
**. . a. .....
. . .. . .. .


EDS 403 and an appropriate methods course.................. 9
EDS 405 or EDV 405............................... ...................... 16
Elective in Education (College of Education students
onlyj i ) .................................................................. 3-5


HUM .............................. ...... .. .......... 12


Physical Sciences: CPS and* ........................................ 15
Biological Sciences: CBS ...............................................
M mathematics: M S 310-311...... ....................... ....... 6
Electives in general preparation......................................21

The minimum requirements in general preparation for all
undergraduate Education Programs other than Elementary
Education and Early Childhood Education are:


Quarter


Social


ACADEMIC ADVISORY SERVICES


To assist students


in their educational and vocational


planning the College of Education maintains an Advisory
Panel composed of faculty members representing the
various teaching fields. In addition to the Advisory Panel
other advisory facilities in the College of Education include
the Undergraduate Studies Office, Graduate Studies Office,
and the Placement Service in the Reitz Union.


hours


Sciences:


Cnmmr inirtstinn -


Humanities:


EDE 405...........................................................


(A rt) ............................................................ 16


SSC.................................................. 9


H .... q


*


*


..............16


Communication: EH.................................................. 9




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