• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Foreword
 Title Page
 Main
 Front Matter
 Main
 Index
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00542
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1978
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00542
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

universityrecord731univ ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Foreword
        Foreword
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Main
        Page iii
    Front Matter
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
        Page 362
        Page 363
        Page 364
        Page 365
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
        Page 377
        Page 378
        Page 379
        Page 380
        Page 381
        Page 382
        Page 383
        Page 384
        Page 385
        Page 386
        Page 387
        Page 388
        Page 389
        Page 390
        Page 391
        Page 392
        Page 393
        Page 394
        Page 395
        Page 396
        Page 397
        Page 398
        Page 399
        Page 400
        Page 401
        Page 402
        Page 403
        Page 404
        Page 405
        Page 406
        Page 407
        Page 408
        Page 409
        Page 410
        Page 411
        Page 412
        Page 413
        Page 414
        Page 415
        Page 416
        Page 417
        Page 418
        Page 419
        Page 420
        Page 421
        Page 422
        Page 423
        Page 424
        Page 425
        Page 426
        Page 427
        Page 428
        Page 429
        Page 430
        Page 431
        Page 432
        Page 433
    Index
        Page 434
        Page 435
        Page 436
        Page 437
        Page 438
        Page 439
        Page 440
    Back Cover
        Page 441
        Page 442
Full Text










THE


UNIVERSITY


of


the


RECORD


UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA


The


Undergraduate


Catalog


has been adopted as a rule of
the University pursuant to the


provisions


Chapter


the Florida Statute. Addenda to
the University Record Series, if
any, are available upon request
to the Office of the Registrar.


0
AK K : K K KK 1K K K
OvK;Y K K
t." '< *'


*< @^! K K
K0 K KKK KKK. / .
'I" K:i K
0X K ^KI


VOLUME LXXIII


* SERIES 1


NUMBER 1


MARCH, 1978




DUBUSHED QUARTERLY BY THE UNIVERSITY
. tA su ici/ii a c fDifl A n7W irnlnc 21 C111


OF FLORIDA,


* ncftlr


f 3L


~lT


I












































































































































































































































m .-.


IIC~-









TABLE


University Calendar ...
Florida's First University
Board of Education ...
Administrative Council
General Information ..
Admissions ...........
Expenses . . . ... .
Student Affairs ......
Housing ..... . .... ...
Student Life Services, F


OF


CONTENTS


. . ..... . . . . ix

f the University . .. .. ..... xi

. a. -a*. . . . . . . . . . . 9
. a a a . . . . . . . . . .. 15
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
S. ... . .. . . . . . . ... . . 19
icilities, Activities ............ 23
tions .. .. .. i.., ..... ..


0o


:a


Student Academic Regula
Time Shortened Degree (
College, Schools, and Cui


opportunitiess
rricula


University College .......................
School of Accounting ..................
College of Agriculture ....................
College of Architecture ...................
College of Arts and Sciences ..............
College of Business Administration .........
College of Dentistry ......................
College of Education ..................
College of Engineering ....................
College of Fine Arts ......................
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
College of Health Related Professions ......
College of journalism and Communications
Center of Latin-American Studies ..........
College of Law ............................
College of Medicine .....................
College of Nursing .......................
College of Pharmacy ............. ..........
College of Physical Education, Health, and
Recreation .......
College of Veterinary Medicine ............
Military Department ......................
Instructional Departments and Description of C


Tables of Course Offerings .............
Staff and Faculty ............................
Index ..... .......... . ...... -


.* .
*4* i
*CC..
.4.. ..


32


....4,.. 33
S....... 55
........ 59
......71

........ 793


........163
........ 161
* ...**.... 131
......4. 139
........ 143
* * ........* 153


* .** :. 162
W . . . 162
........165
........169


* . 183
S....... 185
courses 187
* .. ... 32
... .... 375
.* S e ... 434


F~


.........i....... .. .i ii i|.


*: **- ^- *--'* 'V -- * *


*WX XXXXXX KK/ K/










CALENDAR


CALENDAR


for


for


1978


1979


0




rt 1.1.
S
1
145
122
289
"r2 ;
f -^; F2 .. .
*I, ^ ^ I


ANUAY
SM T
12
I15 16
29 30


9
16
23
30


JULY
S a
1
8
15 1
2 2
292


OCTOBER
SM T
1 2


FEBRUARY
SM T


MAY
S M


F S
4 5
11 .12
18 19
25 26


AUGUST
S M7


NOVEMBER
S M T


MARCH
S M


30 31


JUNE
S M


SEPTEMBER
S' M T
,"yij


10 IT
17 18
24 25


DECEMBER
SM T


F S
* :i:;,**;


""14
21
28
**E~


T*


1








I

I (CRITICAL DATES)
:FFALL TERM 1978


Registration ........
Classes Begin .... ..
Classes End ........
Final Examinations .


Grades


Due (Graduating


...September 19-21
........... September 25
.. ...... .December 8
. ....... December 11-16


Seniors)


......... December 14


Commencement


Grades


Due (All)


* . . .
.l. .l.


. .. . . ...... December 16
...... ............ December 18


Registration ....
Classes Begin ...


Classes


End ....


Final Examinations


Grades


WINTER TERM 1979
.. ................... . . January 2
.......... . .. .... January 3
S. .. .. .. . . . . . . M a r c h 9
.......... ...... . .M arch 12-17


Due (Graduating


Commencement
Grades Due (All)


Seniors)


. . . . ..... March 15


............ .. . ... .. . M arch 17
.... ...... .... . ... M arch 19


Registration ......
Classes Begin .....
Classes End ......
Final Examinations


Grades


Due (Graduating


SPRING TERM 1979
. . . .... ... ...... M arch 23
... .. . M arch 26
. . . . . . . . . . . lune 1
............. .. June 4-9


Seniors)


Commencement


Grades


Due (All)


SUMMER TERM


Registration ...........
Classes Begin ..........
Classes End ........ .
Final Examinations .....
Grades Due (Graduating
Commencement ......


Grades


Seniors)


Due (All)


. . . . . une
. . . ... June 9


. .. .. .. .. . .. .. June 11


..... .... June 15
. .... June 18
. ... August 17
... August 20-25
.. August 23
.... ... August 25
.. August 27


September


29, Friday.


4 00 pm


Lasi da) for completing late


r


one permined to star regis
after 3:00 p m
Last day for Drop/Add and I
liable for fees for all hours


Last day


student


rece.,e any


or military


eglstration for Fall Quarter. No
ration onFriday, Sepember 29,


Ior changing sections.


for which


withdraw


registered


from the


Students


University


refund ol lees unless withdrawal is for medical


reasons


Lasi day for tiling S-LI


October


option card in


Registrar's


Office


2, Monday


Last day


for paying fees


125. Students


Last day


living in


without being subject


must have correctly


in full by this date.


assessed


' to late fee of
fees and paid


for filing address change in Registrar's Office. if not


residence


halls, in order to receive fee statement


at new address


October 13,


Friday, 4 00 p.m


Last day


lor tiling degree application at the Registrar's Office


for a degree to be conferred at the end of the Fall Quarner.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of 4rts


certificate to


Last day
ceding


Last day


be awarded


removing


lerm


at the end


grades of


It not made


of the quarter


I or X recenied


up. grade


becomes


in the


lor tiling application at the Office ol the Registrar to


change college or


March 1, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m
Last day for beginning Freshmen students to
for admission for he Fall Quarter Students


this deadline


may apply


on a space


Onober 20-21
suspended


tile applical'on
unable to meet


available


November
November


division


for the next


quarter


Frida)-Salurda>-Momecoming-All
Friday


10. Fridavy-eterans


22. Wednesday


Day-Classes


classes


suspended


4 00 pm.


lune 30, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for f!lng application at the Office of the Registrar to


change college or division


luly 28. Friday, 4:00 p.m
Last day for those not


viously in


anendance


for the Fall


Quarter


Lasi day for dropping


Novembe


Linibersllp
'r 23.24.


suspended


previously


in attendance or those pre-


at the University


of Florida


(except


beginning Freshmen) io file application for admission for
the Fall Quarter. Students unable to meet this deadline may


apply on a space


available


Nosembe,

December


wrilhour
Thursday


10 00


Monday. B


a course


receiving fai


- Friday


or withdrawing
ling grades in all


- Thanksgiting


November 22


am


-Classes


from th
courses


- Classes


resume


1, Friday. 10:00 pm


No enaminatons, class quizzes or


after Ihis date and


prior


to the


progress tests may
ilnal examination


be giien
period


September


1, Friday, 4:00 p.m


Last day for clearing admissions for those whose applications


were filed by


above


deadline


been received and college changes
apply or clear after this date illl be
tion appointments


11A credentials must


approved
assigned I


Those who
ate regisira-


December 8.
December 11


December


Friday-All classes end

. Monday


Final examinations begin
Saturday. December 9


14. Thursday. 10 00


Assembly

i m.-Degref


ai nr aT...,C _'1,T1n...-A4-*.


examinations

candidates'


UNIVERSITY

CALENDA


OF FLORIDA

R. 1978-79


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CALENDAR


1978-79


FALL QUARTER


1978


a


b4.dnl l


m iaa









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR, 1978-79
WINTER QUARTER


1978


November 9, Thursday. 4:00 p.m.
Las day for those nor previously In anendance or those pre-
viously in aendance at the .University of Florida to file
application for admission for the Winter Quarter. Students
unable a mrnee this deadline may apply on a space available
basis.
December 8, Friday. 4:0 p.m.
Last day for clearing admissions for those whose applia-
tions were filled by above deadline. All credentials must
have been received and college changes approved.
Those who apply or clear after this date will be assigned
iatIe regiraton appointnws,


p er mitted

:bnaqtTin


according
toatrel


intens signed. No one
on Tuesday, January 2,after


. /M: i;lU !!*
.~ i

ianu ar 3, Wednesday
As egins DrpAdd dbegins.E IeBagutrati begins. All
students registering late subject to $2 late fee.


Mnwrv9s Teuyp, 4Md0 p n
letday for competing late registration for WinterQuarter.
No onepemed to start registration on Tuesday, January
ater" "|I apauupnt
i day fi Dop'/Add and for changing sections. Sdents
liable for ees for all hours for which regisered.
Last day student may withdraw from the Univenity and
receive any refund of fees unless withdrawal or medical
or IllItay reasons. ..
Last day fir filing $-U option card in Registrar's Office.
january 1, Wednesday, 2:30 p.m.
last day for paying fee without being subject to late fe of
$25. Students must have correctly assessed fees and paid
Sein full bythis dae.
st day for filling address change in the Registrar Office, if
not ing residence halls, in order to receive fee sta-
men t at new address.
January 19, Friday, 4:0 p.m.
Last day for filing application at the Officeof the Risrar to
change college or division for the next quter,
Last day for filing degree applictton at the s Office
for a degree to be conferred at th end the Wnter
Quarter.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an ociate of Arts
certificate to be awarded at the end of the quarter.
January 26, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for removing grades of I or X received in the preced-
ing term. If not made up, grade becomes .
February 2, Friday, 4: pam,
Last day for dropping a course or withdrawng from the Uni-
versity without rceving fallig grades in a courses.
March 2, Friday, 10:00 p.m.
Noexaminations, class quizzesor progress s maybegiven
after this date and prior to the final examinaton period.
March 9, Friday-All cases end.
Mirh 12.~. MUnwu


March 17, Sanarday-Commenem nt Convocatn.
March 19, Monday, 9:0 a.m.
All grades for Winter Quarter due in the Office of .he
Regisar.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CALENDAR, 1978-79
SPRING QUARTER

1979
February 16, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for those not previously in attendance or those
previously in attendance at the University of Florida to
file application for admission for the Spring Quarter.
Students unable to meet this deadline may apply on a
space available basis.
Mar 9, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for clearing admissions for those whose applications
were fded by the above deadline. All credentials mus have
been received and college changes approved. Those who
aly or clear after this date will be assigned late registra-
tion appointments.
March 23, Friday
Registration according to appointments assigned. No one
permittedto start registration on Friday, March 23, after 3:00
p.m.


March 26, Monday
Clases begin. Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins.
All student registering late subject to $25 late fee.
March 30, Friday, 4:@0 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Spring Quarter.
No one permitted to start registration on Friday, March 30,
after 3: p.m. -- --
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. students
liable for fees for all hours for which registered.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and
receive any refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical
or military reasons. ,
Last day for filing S-U option card in Registrar's Office.


April 2, Monday, 2:30 pn.
Last day for paying fees without being subject to late fee of
$25. Student must have correctly assessed fees and paid
fees in full by this date,
Last da for iling address change in the Registrar's Office, if
no living in residence alls, order t
ent at new address k.


April 13, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for filing application at the
change college or diio for the
Last day for filing degree application
for a degree to be conferred at
Quarter.
Last day to apply with the Registrar
certificate to be awarded at the e


at the Registrar's Office
the end of the Sprint
; i:L


ws r-m


April 20, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for removing grades of I or X received In preceding
term. If not made up, grade become tw
May 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
La day for dropping course or withdrawing
varsity without receiving falling grades in all courses.
May 25, Fridy, 10:T p.m.
No examination, class quizzes or proresstests may be given
.-t-J Lt*L J_-_ __ J __Ia-- -- 'L J


t K .X X K



AZ] K


I, ,,:E j:


!M



.:i









I June 7, Thursday, 10:00 a.m.-Degree candidates' grades due. June 25, Monday, 2:30 p.m.
n Fri Last day for paying fees without being subject to late fee of
June Friday, 3:00 p.m. 525. Student must have correctly assessed fees and paid fees
Final report of colleges on degree candidates due in the in full by this date.
Office of the Registrar. Last day for filing address change in Registar's Office. if not


June 9. Saturday-Commencement Convocation.


living in residence halls, in order to receive I
at new address


ee statement


June 11, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Spring Quarter due in the Office of the Regis-
trar.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
CALENDAR, 1978-79
SUMMER QUARTER


1979

May 4, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for those not previously in artendance or those pre-
viously in attendance at the University of Florida to file ap-
plication for admission for the Summer Quarter. Students
unable to meet this deadline may apply on a space avail-
able basis.
June 1, Friday, 4:00 p.m.


July 4. Wednesday-Independence Day-Classes suspended.
July 6, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for filing application at the Office of the Registrar to
change college or division for the next quarter.
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrar's Office
for a degree to be conferred at the end of the Summer
Quarter.
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts
certificate to be awarded ai the end of the quarter.
July 13, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for removing grades of I or X received in preceding
rerm. If not made up, grade becomes E.
luly 20, Friday-Lasi day of Special Five-Week Summer course offer-
ings
July 30. Monday. 9:00 a.m.


All grades for Special
due in the Office of


Last day for clearing admissions
tions were filed by the abovi
must have been received and
Those who apply or clear after t
registration appointments.


June 15, Friday
Registration ai
permitted tw
3:00 p.m.
June 18, Monday
Classes begin,
All students


; for those whose applica-
e deadline All credentials
college changes approved.
his date will be assigned late


according to appointments assigned.
o start registration on Friday, June


Drop/Add begins. Late registration begins.
registering late subject to $25 lare fee.


June 22, Friday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Summer Quarter
No one permitted to start registration on Friday, June 22.
after 3:00 p.m.
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sections. Students
liable for fees for all hours for which registered.
Last day student may withdraw from the University and re-
ceive any refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical
or military reasons.
Last day for filing S-U option card in Registrar's Office


August


3, Friday. 4:00 p.m.
Last day for dropping a course or withdrawing from the Uni-
versity without receiving failing grades in all courses.


August 10, Friday. 10:00 p.m
No examinations. class quizzes or
after this date and prior to the
August 17, Friday-All classes end


August 20, Monday
Final examinations
Saturday, August


begin
18.


progress tests may
final examination


be given
period.


examinations begin


August 23. Thursday. 1000 a m -Degree candidates' grades due.


August


24, Friday. 3)00 p.m
Report of colleges on degree candidates due
of rhe Registrar.


in the Office


August 25, Saturday-Commencement Convocation.
August 27. Monday, 9:00 a.m
All grades for Summer Quarter due in the Office of the Reg-
istrar.


Five-Week Summer course offerings
the Registrar.


Assembly













































































.ri
:. .*




t


.


. a


I. .
*"h^ ^ 1,. 4
A .'

4


*HH H
. .. .. ..
g : .


rh "e '\ i
. ... *
S- I. s
ur 6 :1?


* '
- I 'I-.


. . '*.


:,:'. t
..'-.^-*.z *


*. EiW" :. :

:I.r i


*~ ~ ME .I.. .. .. .. '- ,:V S '
. *. .... .* ... .

"; -" A *.

L ...* a h*C
A. 4 * *
-S :'*. **^s X :: .: I**


' ~ri ob~ -4uu> w" jv* r



hf ..,r -* s : ***


**~

CSC.

-1, ^I


i I: i.. .I .



1 ? 1 1 '
' "i,


i H4


U-
*. C.


''t
O










































LEADERSHIP THROUGH EXCELLENCE




Excellence, applied through teaching, research and
service, establishes the University of Florida as a pacesetting
university for tomorrow.
It is among three universities in this country offering as
wide a scope of professional fields on a single campus.
None in the region has more nationally ranked
departments and only two or rhree Southern universities are
in a comparable position.
Nationally it ranks in the top 50 among colleges and
universities receiving the largest amount of federal funds,
attesting the high quality of its faculty and research
programs.
This diversification and extend of campus programs
enables students to fulfill their intellectual and professional
objectives. With this variety the University retains ability to
appreciate individual students and provides, through small
classes and advisement, the means to express their special
talents and interests.


University of Florida, Gainesville


e*'.


Undergraduates have the
association within a university
fields, plus arts and science
dergraduate and graduate stud
ty immediately available. A store


broadening experience of
where the main professional
s, are represented by un-
ies with research opponuni-
.ngth of the University is that
S_*-. *i


With the breadth of educational and research programs,
opportunity for interdisciplinary effort and learning -
students and faculty investigators working together using
i -* P J* I I- _L _** I i = *-


rsl








FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


REUBIN ASKEW
Governor
State of Florida


JAMES WILLIAMS
Lieutenant Governor
State of Florida

BRUCE SMATHERS
Secretary of State
State of Florida


ROBERT SHEVIN
Attorney General
State of Florida

BILL GUNTER
State Treasurer
State of Florida

RALPH TURLINGTON
Commissioner of Education
State of Florida

GERALD LEWIS
Comptroller
State of Florida

DOYLE CONNER
Commissioner of Agriculture
State of Florida


BOARD OF REGENTS


JAMES J. GARDENER, M.S.
Chairman
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
JACK MCGRIFF, M.A.
Vice Chairman
Gainesville, Florida
MARSHALL M. CRISER, J.D.
Palm Beach. Florida


j. j. DANIEL, LL.B.
acksonville, Florida


MURRAY H. DUBBIN, LL.B.
Miami, Florida
CHESTER H. FERGUSON, LL.B.
Tampa, Florida
WILLIAM L. MALOY, Ed.D.
Pensacola, Florida
JAMES C. SMITH, j.D.
Tallahassee, Florida
BETTY A. STATEN, B.S.
Orlando, Florida

STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
E. T. YORK, JR., Ph.D.
Chancellor
State University System





ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL


ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL
OF THE UNIVERSITY

ROBERT Q. MARSTON, M.D.
President
JOHN A. MATTRESS. Ph.D.


Acting Executive


ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES OF THE FACULTY

P. JOSEPH WITTMER, Ph.D.
Professor of Education


MICHAEL W. GORDON,
Professor of Law


Vice President


ROBERT ARMISTEAD BRYAN, Ph.D.
Vice President for Academic Affairs


WILLIAM EARL ELMORE, B.S.


C.P.A.


Vice President for Administrative Affairs
C. ARTHUR SANDEEN, Ph.D.
Vice President of Student Affairs
KENNETH RAY TEFERTILLER, Ph.D.
Vice President for Agricultural Affairs
GEORGE STEVEN WILKERSON, B.A.
Vice President for Alumni & Development
KENNETH FRANKLIN FINGER, Ph.D.
Acting Vice President for Health Affairs
GENE WILLARD HEMP, Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
DON L. ALLEN, M.S., D.D.S.
Dean of the College of Dentistry
CLIFFORD ALLEN BOYD, Ed.D.
Dean of the College of Physical Education,
Health and Recreation
CHARLES BENTON BROWNING, Ph.D.
Dean for Resident Instruction.


Institute of Food and Agricultural
WAYNE H. CHEN. Ph.D.


Associate


J.D. (Alt.)


SUZANNE M. KINZER
Professor of General Teacher Education
DANNY R. MINNICK, Ph.D.


Associate


MARILYN


Professor,


IFAS (Alt.)


S. FREGLY. Ph.D.


Professor of Behavioral Studies


MICHAEL E. WARREN, Ph.D. (Alt).
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering


REPRESENTATIVES OF THE STUDENT BODY

PAUL LEINO
President of the Student Body
RICK SHARP


President of Student


Senate


GARY GUNTER
l'ice President of the Student Body


Sciences


Dean of the College of Engineering
CHARLES EDWARD CORNELIUS. Ph.D.


Dean of the College of Veterinary


PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEES


Medicine


WILLIAM B. DEAL, M.D., Ph.D.


Acting Dean of the


College of


Medicine


HARRY ALLEN GRATER, Ph.D.


Acting Dean of University


College


MARK T. IAROSZEWICZ, M. ARCH.


Dean of the


College of A


rchnecture


JOSEPH RICHARD IULIN, LL.B.


Dean of the


College


of Law


JAMES W. KNIGHT


Acting Dean of


Academic


Affairs


for Continuing Educatlon
RONALD F. LABISKY, Ph.D.
Acting director of the School of
Forest Resources and Consenatrion
ROBERT FRANKLIN LANZILLOTTI, Ph.D.


College


of Business


JAMES


C. ALLISON


Affirmative Action Coordinator


THOMAS


SANFORD BIGGS, JR., LL.B.


University Attorney
FRED HILTON CANTRELL, B.S.B.A.
Director, University Relations
THOMAS WINSTON COLE. Ed.D.


Dean.


Academy,


ic Affairs


CUNNINGHAM, JR., M.A.
Unuversiry Information &


Press Secretary


to President


CLIFTON DICKINSON


, JR., Ph.D.


JOSHUA


Director of the Florida State Museum
DALLAS FOX. M.S.A.


Associate


Director, Division of


Planning and Analysis


Administration


RALPH L LOWENSTEIN. Ph.D.


College


JOSEPF
Dean of t


of fournalihs
H SABATELL
'he College


7m
A,


and Commu


JOHN


nicarrons


M.F A


A. SMITHERMAN, M.S.


Coordinator. ROTC


THOMAS G
Dean of Sr


GOODALE, Ph.D.
udent Services
RAY CRAVES


MICHAEL


Dean of the


SCHWARTZ. Ph.D.


GUSTAVE ADOLPHUS


of Education


GAIL W. MELTON
Special Assistant to the President
LOUIS V. VOYLES, B.A.
University Registrar


Professions


College


HARRY HALL SISLER. Ph D.


Dean


Graduate


School


HOWARD K. SUZUKI, Ph.D.
e College of Health Related


S-- 0-


BLANCHE


Dean of the


UREY. Ed.D.


College


of Nursing


Assistant


HUGH W.
Director,


Dean of the


Dean of the


Dean of Pharmacy
BERT LAVON SHARP. Ed.D.


of Fine Arts SAMUEL


of the


Dean of thi


Director, Intercollegiate Athletics


Director of


Universe


HARRER, Ph.D.
ity Libraries


a A. a. a i ia---


~


i







f General

Information


HISTORICAL NOTE
The U university of Florida is a combined state University and
land-grant college located in the northern center of the
State. While its beginnings go back to the days previous to
Florida's admission to the Union in 1845, its first college -
the College of Arts and Sciences --did not open until 1853. A
few years later the passage of the Morrill Act provided lands
fnr state institutions of higher learning which would promote
agriculture, mechanical arts and military science, resulting in
the beginnings of the College of Agriculture, the College of
Engineering, and the Agricultural Experiment Station.
By 1905 there were a half-dozen state-supported in-
stitutions of higher learning in Florida, located in various
parts of the State and struggling for existence. At that time
the Florida Legislature took a step unprecedented in the
history of education in any state by passing the Buckman Act,
which abolished the six State Colleges and provided for the
establishment of two new institutions, of which the
University of Florida was one. II was established for men, at
Gainesville and placed under the direction of the Board of
Control, a body created by the Buckman Act. The seven
members of the board represented the seven geographical
sections of the state, and served without compensation,
except for travel and incidental expense incurred in the
Performance of duty. In 1947 the University was made
coeducational. The nine-member Board of Regents
replaced the Board of Control in 1965

SETTING AND ENVIRONMENT
The University of Florida is located in Gainesvllle, a city of
76,261, situated in north central Florida, midway between the
Atlantic Ocean and Gulf ol Mexico. The city is known as an
agricultural and small industrial center.
In addition to a moderate climate, Gainesville offers many
other advantages to students of the University. A goli course
is within easy reach of the campus, and swimming and
boating accommodations are available at nearby springs and
rivers. The lakes in the vicinity abound in fresh water fish,
while the Atl aticOceanand the Gulf of Mexico are within a
two hours' drive. As the seat of Alachua County, the city is the
focal point of diversified industrial and farming activities.
Practically every religious denomination is represented in
the Gainesville area including: Presbyterian, Baptist.
Lutheran, Methodist, Catholic, Episcopal, Christian. Seventh
Day Adventist, Church of Christ Scientist, Church of Christ,
Christian and Missionary Alliance, Advent Christian, B'nal
Israel, Church of Laner Day Saints, Church of the Nazarene,
Assembly of God, Apostolic Church of Christ, Church of
God, Disciples of Christ, Pentecostal Holiness, United
Church of Christ, and Unitarian-Universalists. Several of
these denominations maintain chapels adjacent to the
campus. These include St. Augustine Chapel (Catholic
Student Center),the Baptist Student Union, Wesley Founda-
tion (Methodist Student Center). Chapel of the incarnation
(Episcopal Student Center). Church of Christ. B'nai B'rirh
Hillel Foundation (Jewish), the Lutheran Student Associa-
tion, the Latter Day Saints (Mormon), Disciples-Presbyterian
Student Center and the Society of Friends (Quaker). All the
chapels carry on extensive programs of viral interest to
University students.

TRANSPORTATION
A schedule of daily bus service, with connections to all
points of the United States, is maintained by Southeastern
Greyhound Lines and Trailways Bus System. Eastern Airlines
serves Gainesville with daily flights with connections to all


composed of nine citizens from different regions of the state
who are appointed by the Governor for nine-year terms.
University affairs are administered by the president with the
advice and assistance of the Administrative Council. The
legislative body of the University is the University Senate.

ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS
THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS is
the chief business officer of the University. He is responsible
for establishing policy relating to university business matters;
coordinating the preparation of and control of the operating
budget; collecting and disbursing funds in accordance with
state statutes; managing campus security, auxiliary services
and the maintenance of the physical plant and grounds;
directing purchasing, the administrative computer, staff
personnel and property control, and environmental health
and safety.

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS is the
chief academic officer for the University. In this capacity he
supervises the allocation of resources in the academic areas,
the improvement of instruction, the correlation of instruc-
tional activities, the development and improvement of
research activities, the evaluation of university academic
activity, and the establishment of policy with respect to
employment, promotion, and tenure of the academic staff.
In the absence of the President and Executive Vice President
he acts with the authority and responsibility of the President.
QUARTER SYSTEM
The University of Florida operates on a quarter system. In a
twelve-month year there are four quarters running from
September through August, averaging ten weeks of class
instruction. Courses are scheduled in such a way that a
student may enter the University at any quarter and proceed
normally through an appropriate sequence of courses.
Quarters begin in September, January, March and June.

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, a unit of the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences, offers curricula in all of the
major fields of agriculture and grants the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Agriculture. See Page 59.
THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE offers curricula in
architecture, interior design, landscape architecture and
building construction It confers the degrees of Bachelor of


Design, Bachelor of Landscap
Building Consiruction. See F
THE COLLEGE OF ARTS A
leading tp degrees of Bach
Sciences. with opportunities I
and liberal arts fields. It offe
biological sciences, physical
humanities required in the
colleges See Page 79.
THE COLLEGE OF BUSIN
curricular programs leading


Science in Business
THE COLLEGE OF
Hills Miller Health
June, 1976 The C
curriculum leading
Mardiirna anrl k2c


e Architecture, and Bachelor of
'age 71.
iND SCIENCES offers curricula
lelor ol Arts and Bachelor of
for specializing in many science
rs the courses in mathematics,
sciences, social sciences and
curricula of the professional

ESS ADMINISTRATION offers
to the degree of Bachelor of


Administration See Page 93
DENTISTRY, an integral pan of the I.
Center, graduated its first students in
college offers an innovative modular
to the degree of Doctor of Dental
InnitalrP nrntorr2diuaIp nraor2mc in






urnMs m TuwnIQn


teacher prepamdion programs are NCATE approved and lead
to certlcatlon at pre-school, elementary, and secondary
level in Florida and thirty other states where NCATE
standards provide the basis for reciprocal agreements. See
Page 101.
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING offers curricula leading
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineer-
ing, in Civil Engineering, in Electrical Engineering, in
Industrial Engineering, and in Mechanical Engineering. The
Bachelor of Science in Engineering is awardedwith majors in
Aerospace Engineering, Agricultural Engineering, Ceramic
Engineering, Engineering Sciences, Metallurgical Engineer-
Ing, Nuclear Engineering, and Systems Engineering. The
Bachelor of Science degree is awarded with majors in
Computer and Information Sciences, Environmental
Engineering Sciences, Nuclear Engineering Sciences, and
Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies. The college also offers
the Bachelor of Engineering Technology degree with a major
in metals joining, and the Bachelor of Land Surveying
degree. See page 113.
THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS offers curricula in the studio
arts, history of art, crafts, graphic design, art education,
atUK 0minust sdclumt,,and vhat, and covers the
d gees Bachelor of Design, Bachelor ofArtsin Art, Bachelor
of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education
and Master of Fine Arts. See Page 131.
THE SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVA-
TION is a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences. The School offers majors in the professional
Wildlife Ecology, and an interdisciplinary major in Resource

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL offers programs leading to the
of Doctor of Philosophy n :f Doctor of
~p lst in Eduation, EngIneer, Meter of
Agrieute, Maser of Agricultural Management and
Source Development, Master of Arts, Mar of Arts in
Archtcr Master pfArtsj in Eduat Master of Arts in
Heat Education, Master of Arts in journalism and Co-
muncations Master of Artsi nPhysical EducationMusterof
As in Teaching, Master of Arts In Urban d Regional
Pning, Master of Building Construction, Master of
Busbies AdministratIon, Master of Education Master of
Egmeering Master of FeArts, Master of Forest Resources
d at, Master of Halth Education, Maser of
Lwsin Taxation, Mster of Health Sce, Mster of
NursIpg, Master of Physical Education, Master of Science,
Mar of Science In Building Construcion, .Mster of
Science In Nursing, Master of Sciencei Phamacy, Master of
nce in Statistic, Master of Sdnce in Telachin and
Mar of Statistics. All instruction i caied y the
faculties of the colleges and schools asted her.
THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS, a unit
of the j. Hillis Miller Heakh Center, offers curricula leading
to a achelor ofHeal Science in Allied Health, Bachelor of
Health Science in Clinical and Community Diettic,
Bachelor of Health Science in MedicalTechnology,Bachelor
of Health Science in Occupational TheraP~ anda Bachelor
of Health ScienceMir Physical Therapy.Theage offes
a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Health
Science in Occupational Therapy, Maser of I-ealth Science
in Rehablitation Counseling, and a Ph.D. ~sIaui ing n
clinical psychology. See Page 143,
ThE COLLiEG OF IOURNAUSM AND C6MMUNI-
CATIONS offers curricula leadinB tothed4gre of Bachelor
of Science in ournalism, Bachelor of Scienc Adverinng,
and Bachelor of Science in Broadcasting It offersequence~
hin public relations, technical common and criminal


THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, a unit of J. Hilli Mille
Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the pro-
fessional degree of Doctor of Medicine. Ph.D. degrees in
basic medical sciences are offered through the Graduate
School. A special medical scientist training program lead-
ing to the combined degree of Doctor of Medicine-Doctor
of Philosophy is available jointly through the College of
Medicine and the Graduate School. A Bachelor of Sdciencein
medicine degree is offered to undergraduate students
enrolled in the Physicians Assistant Program. See Page 162.
THE COLLEGE OF NURSING, a unit of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to theachelor of
Science in Nursing degree. The College also offers a
curriculum leading to the Master of Nursing degree or a
Master of Science in Nursing degree. See Page 165.
THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, a unit of the I. HilllsMiller
Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. In addition the degree
Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) is offered. M.S. and Ph.D.
degrees are offered in pharmaceutical sciences through the
Graduate School. See Page 169.
THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH, AND
RCRERAIION ofers services and If
departments of General Physical Education, Professional
Physical Education, Health Education and Safety, and
Recreation. The department of General Physical Education
provides programs for university students other than majors.
The departments of Professional Physical Education, Health
Education and Safety, and Recreation offer professional
preparation programs leading to undergraduate degrees in
physical education, health education, and recreation. Pro-
fessional areas of preparation include: teachers of physical
education or health education, health educators for public
or voluntary agencies, and recreation directors. See Page 175.
THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE is the academic home for
Freshmen and Sophomores while they prepare for admission
to one of the other colleges. It provides courses in general
education and awards the Associate of Arts Certificate. See
Page 33.
THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, a teaching
unit of the J. Hills Miller Health Center, offers a curriculum
leading to the professional degree of Doctor of Veterinary
Medicine. See Page 183.


DIVISION OF
CONTINUING EDUCATION
During the last year more than 32,000 people took
advantage of the many University sponsored opportunities
made available through the Division of Continuing Educa-
tion. More than 25,000 people participated in non-credit
conferences, workshops, institutes and seminars. More than
5,297 students enrolled in Independent Study by Cor-
respondence courses (both credit and non-credit). Over
1,300 students studied in credit extension classes throughout
the State. Additionally, three international programs were
offered through this Division last year. Backed by the
resources of the University, the Division of Continuing
Educatioif sees the State as its campus and the people as its
student body.


SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL
UNITS SERVING ALL
qnA i II~~-m a a a. .m~~ m.






GENERAL INFORMATION


of a curriculum dedicated to a broad sector of human
endeavor was necessary. Toward this end the Intercollege
Department of Computer and Information Sciences was
created in 1971. The department currently otters degree
programs in the College of Arts and Sciences, Business
Administration, Engineering and an area of specialization in
the technical communications degree program in the
College of Journalism and Communications. Degree
programs within other colleges are under study.
Subject areas found within the CIS curricula are concerned
with representations and transformations of information
structures and with theoretical models for such represen-
tations and transformations. In addition the computer or
information scientist is concerned with systems having the
ability to transform information and with the methodologies
derived from broad areas of applications having common
structures, processes and techniques. This prepares the
student for a wide range of careers in the business, industrial,
scientific, civic and academic worlds wherein information
flow and analysis is of critical importance to decision making.
In addition to the degree programs, several service courses
are available for those who need experience in computer
applications for proper career preparation. For further
information, contact the CIS department office in 512 Well
Hall.
THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES is the
University unit responsible for directing or coordinating
interdisciplinary instructional and research programs related
to the Latin American area. It is a budgeted unit within the
University and is administered by a Director immediately
responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
The Center sponsors conferences, publishes the results of
scholarly research related to Latin America, and cooperates
with other University units in overseas development and
training programs. It administers a program with Universidad
de los Andes, Bogota, Colombia and a program with the
Centro Unificabo Professional in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil for
the State University System and offers programs in Latin
American Studies leading to a B.A. degree, and B.5 M A.
and Ph.D. Certificates in Latin American Studies; an
interdisciplinary Master of 4rts in Latin American Studies;
and, a M.A. and Ph.D. Certificate in Latin American
Demographic Studies.
THE DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC has the responsibility for
such musical organizations as the University Bands,
Orchestras, Choruses, and Glee Clubs, and offers courses in
the following areas: (1) Theory of Music. (2) History and
Literature, (3) Applied Music, (4) Church Music, (5) Music
Education, and (6) Ensemble Music.
THE DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE offers the four


year program and the two year program of
Completion of either of these programs by a st
being commissioned in one of the branches
States Army Reserve or the Reg
Freshman/Sophomore AROTC carries no senr
One, two, three and four year scholarships a
interested students who can qualify.


Army ROTC.
udent leads to
of the United
ular Army.
ice obligation.
re available to


THE DEPARTMENT OF NAVAL SCIENCE offers a wide
variety of academic programs which include all major
courses available at the University of Florida. Numerous one
to four year full scholarships (plus living expense payments)
are available. Officer Commissions in the U.S. NAVY or U.S.
MARINE CORPS are awarded upon completion with
assignments in various occupational fields such as NUCLEAR
POWER, AVIATION, MEDICINE, LAW, all ENGINEERING
disciplines, MANAGEMENT and RESEARCH and DEVELOP-
MENT.


INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICE UNITS

THE OFFICE OF INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES encour-
ages experimentation in teaching and individualized
services to students. Reporting directly to the Office of
Academic Affairs, it provides support for the innovation of
alternative approaches to instruction in the colleges and
departments of the University; assists faculty members in the
development of instructional modules or systems for spe-
cific courses; and furnishes technical assistance in the devel-
opment and use of teaching materials and media, analysis
and improvement of teaching and the evaluation of student
performance. Three units include an audio-visual materials
center, testing and examination services, and an instruc-
tional improvement section.
Other units emphasizing individualized instruction in-
clude the Reading and Writing Center, the O.I.R. Teaching
Center, and the Language Laboratory. Selected self-paced
non-credit courses are available in reading, writing, study
habits, tutoring and language skills. Research consultation,
course enrichment and evaluation services are also offered
to interested faculty.
THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR has charge of the
admission and registration of students, the maintenance of
academic records, the scheduling of courses, and the
issuance of transcripts of student records.
THE COUNSELOR TO FOREIGN AGRICULTURE
STUDENTS. Foreign students in Agriculture are requested to
contact the Office of Inrernationa [Programs in McCarty Hall.
This office aids foreign students to integrate their American
education more completely with actual conditions in their
homelands and also gives information to all students
interested in Ioreign agricultural problems and careers in the
tropics.



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY SERVICE


The library


consists


two central units, Library East and


Library West, and branch libraries in the areas of Architec-
ture and Fine Arts. Education, Engineering, Law, the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, the J. Hills Miller Health
Center, Chemistry and the P.K. Yonge Laboratory School. In
addition, reading room facilities have been provided for
Business Administration, Journalism and Communications,


Music, Physical Ed
and the dormitory
The holdings o
cataloged volumes


ucation,
areas.


Health


and Recreation, Physics


the libraries number over 1,00,000
and a large number of uncataloged


documents and newspapers. Many of the
form of microfilm and microcards. A
collections in the library system are the
lion, the Belknap Collection for the Pe
P K. Yonge Library of Florida History, th
Rawlings Collection. which consists
tvoescriots. and memorabilia of one


tinguished novelists, and the Collection o
which includes work sheets, manuscripts,


materials are in the
mong the special
Rare Book Collec-
rforming Arts, the
e Marjorie Kinnan
of manuscripts,
of America's dis-
f Creative Writing,
, and other literary


papers of significant contemporary American
Authors. In recent years, special emphasis has b
upon strengthening the holdings of the Latin
Collection, especially for the West Indies and the
areas.


Reference servn
vannus branch I


and British
een placed
American
Caribbean


ce is provided in Library West and in the
lihrariP and rparldin rnnm A mmunr







tQOIMA-1N


IDA STATE MUSEUM


The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the
Legislature in 1917 as a department of the University of
Florida. Through its affiliation with the University it carries
the dual responsibility as the State Museum of Florida and
the University Museum.
The Museum operates as a center of research in
anthropology and natural history. Il functions as an
education[ arm of the University are carried forward
through interpretive displays and scientific and popular
publications. Under the administrative control of the
director are the three departments of the Museum: Natural
Sciences, staffed by scientists and technicians concerned
with the study and expansion of the research collections
showing adaptive variations in animal structure and ecology;
Social Sciences, whose scientists and technicians are
concerned with the study of human variations and cultures,
both historic and prehistoric; Interpretation, staffed by
specialists in the interpretation of knowledge through
museum education and exhibit techniques. Members of the
scientific and educational staff of the Museum hold dual
appointments in appropriate leaching departments.
Through these appointments they participate in both the
Saean graduate tea ng programs.
Scientific reports are published in the Bulletin of rhe
Florida State Museum, Biological Sciences, the Ripley P.
Bullen Monographs in Anthropology and History, and in the
Contributions of the Florida Stare Museum, Anlhropology
and history.
Search collections are under the care of curators
th sen age te scientific sudvof the Museun's
ns Materials e constantly ing added to she
cletion both Arhift from friends and as the result
of arh alcties ofth museum staff. The archaeological
and etnologl collections are noeworhy. There are
extensive study collections of birds, mammals, mollusks,
ees, amphibians, fish, invertebrate and vertebratefossils,
mswll archives of animal sounds aoiated with the
bloacoustsls kboratory.
Opportunities are povided for des, staff, and 'sting
t e to use the collections. Research and field work are
sponsoredind Iheanthropologicalpaeontological
calelds.tudents inw intheses alites
should make application to the appropriateteachingdepart-

Graduate astan ps are available in the Museum in
of specialization emphasized ira research programs.
Facitites are available for graduate students.
The Museum is located atthe conerofMuseum Road and
Newell Drive in a modem facility completed In 1970. The
public halls are open from nine until five och weekday,
i lauding Saturday, and from one to five on Sundays, and
(Christmas Day). There is no mission
d. The Museum is frequently used by Unveiy and
ubl school lasses. Classes for children and special public
programs re also offered for members of the University
community and the general public.


GENERAL STATE AND
UNIVERSITY AGENCIES


THE FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE.
The transfer and application of knowledge through non-
resident educational ororams is the rmarv ours of the


THE FL


cooperative program funded through federal Irant to the
Florida Cooperative Extension Service with Florid AAM
University. The basic legislative authority makes provitn far
cooperation with local government. In Florida, county
programs are carried out jointly between the University and
respective county governments in the 67 counties. The
Extension Service along with Resident Instruction and
Research in IFAS form a functional model typifying the
tripartite organizational structure envisioned in the Morrill
Act for the Land Grant College system.
The OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS is responsible for
the development of public relations, including visitor
reception, cooperating with all campus agencies and
organizations in the planning and implementation of their
public relations activities and serving as the University
representative with civic organizations which work with the
University and are not professionally related to a particular
school or college. University Relations coordinates with all
campus agencies dealing with off-campus publics in a
continuing effort to develop two-way communications with
the public and to encourage public support and under-
standing of the University, its programs and higher
education.
The DIVISION OF INFORMATION AND PUBLICATIONS
SERVICES serves University academic units, departments,
service offices and other campus-related organizations by
distributing information through mass media outlets, and
providing communication services for the campus com-
munity. It interprets the University's programs, policies
and objectives through newspapers and magazines, radio
and television broadcasts, motion pictures, publications,
photographs, audio-visual presentations, special displays
and exhibits, and community relationsprojects. The Division
produces the University Digest printed in the Independent
Alligator, and Uniscope, a 30-minute weekly magazine
format television show used by commercial stations in the
state's metropolitan areas. It assists other units with booklets,
folders, brochures, and other printed material by coor-
dinating copy content, design, and preliminary production,
and assists in preparing bid specifications for printing.
The OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI AFFAIRS is
the campus headquarters for the University of Florida
Alumni Association, Inc. and the University of Florida
Foundation, Inc.
The University of Florida Alumni Association, Inc. brings
together the organized efforts of alumni and the promotion
of the interests and needs of the University and strives to
encourage continuous participation by alumni in the life of
the University
The University of Florida Foundation exists to encourage
support from the private sector to the University for both
operating and capital purposes. It is a private corporation
organized to hold funds for the benefit of the University, to
invest them and to insure the maximum value of the
University's private support.
THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY is an integral part of the Fine
Arts College. The Gallery is located on the campus facing
south 13th Street (or U.S. 441). An atrium and a reflecting
pool are two pleasing features of the Gallery's distinctive
architecture style. The Gallery, with 3000 square feet of
display space, is completely modern, air-conditioned and
maintains a varied exhibition schedule of the visual arts
during the year. The content of exhibitions displayed in the
University gallery range from the creations by traditional
masters through to the lastest and most experimental works
by the modern avant garden. The minor arts of yesterday and
today along with the creations of oriental and primitive
cultures frm frm nr wrxhihitinnt trh.milnld Thn "r-.mlhv






I GENERAL INFORMATION
ii


and physical adjunct to the Art Department's teaching
program this Gallery displays smaller traveling exhibitions of
merit as well as one man shows by the faculty artists and
student exhibitions. The Gallery is open Monday through
Friday from 9A.M. to noon and from 1:30 P.M. to 5 P.M. It is
closed Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.
THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN AND TROPICAL
ARTS is an interdisciplinary Center that provides coordina-
tion, direction, and focus to strengthen existing programs
related to the Fine Arts within the College of Fine Arts. The
Center's faculty is bound together by a desire to relate their
research and teaching activities to the broader concepts
concerned with the fine arts of various world cultures. The
Center broadens and strengthens existing interdepartmental
relations and provides additional stimuli and mechanisms for
translating results of research into more viable forms that
relate directly to societal needs. It also establishes more
effective lines for the training of able students at the
undergraduate, graduate, and adult education levels in
various aspects of the fine arts.
THE UNIVERSITY BROADCAST FACILITY is operated by
the College of Journalism and Communications. It includes
WUFT, Channel 5, a public broadcasting television station
(PBS), WRUF-AM, the commercial radio station 850 KHz
WRUF-FM, a commercial FM station, stereo, 103.7 MHz,and
Radio Center. Radio Center extends the cultural and
informational arm of the university through the programs
which it originates, produces, and distributes to radio
stations throughout Florida.
Approximately 100 students are employed in these
broadcasting operations. Thus, in addition to the broad
academic background provided in the university's
classrooms and laboratories, these work opportunities
provide a valuable experience in day-to-day operations
typical of the industry. Students perform such functions as
director, cameraman, and disc-jockey all under the guidance
of professional broadcasters. The college has earned a
nationwide reputation for the demonstrated effectiveness of
this academic and work experience training.
WUFT telecasts programs of PBS, the Public Broadcasting
Service, FPB, Florida Public Broadcasting Network, as well as
local studio and remote originations. As a unit of the Florida
Public Television Network, it both originates and receives
programs of particular interest to the people of Florida.
WRUF-AM serves the contemporary music audience,
while the WRUF-FM music ranges from show tunes to
classical music, with a touch of progressive rock for the late
night listener. WRUF-AM is affiliated with the NBC network;
WRUF-FM is affiliated with CBS. Student communicators
produce and broadcast regular news programs over both
stations under faculty supervision. Radio Center produces a
continuing program of classical music thai is broadcast on
WRUF-FM each evening.


The student's proximity
diverse broadcast operation
of the opportunities and obl
broadcasting.


to, and
brings a
igations


participation in, this
greater understanding
that exist in the field o


THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PRESS functions to
encourage, publish, and promote original and scholarly
manuscripts which will aid in developing the University as a
recognized center of research and scholarship.
In addition to its broad range of state, regional, and inter-
American titles, the Press publishes books of general interest,
and six separate series: The Floridiana Facsimile Series, the
Institute of Gerontology Series, the Latin American
Monographs, (Series Two), and the University of Florida
Monograohs (Humanities and Social Sciences). The Press is


The University of Florida Press is a member of the
Association of American University Presses and the Associa-
tion of American Publishers.


ORGANIZED RESEARCH


THE DIV
ed by an
sponsored
excellence
the State.
University.
Academic


ISION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH wasestablish-
act of the legislature to support and to foster
research and training as a resource essential to
in education and to provide maximum service to
The Division is a development arm of the
coordinating its efforts closely with the Office of
Affairs and the Graduate School.


All proposals for sponsorship of research, grants-in-aid,
and training grants are approved by the director.
Negotiations on administrative matters with potential
contracting agencies or sponsors of research and training
projects are carried out by the Division.
The activities of the Division of Sponsored Research are
intended to stimulate growth and to assist in expanding a
balanced research and training program throughout the
University. These activities are intimately related to the
support of the graduate and professional program. The
services provided are designed to relieve the principal
investigators in many departments of detailed administrative
and reporting duties connected with some sponsored
programs. The duties and responsibilities of the Division, of
course, do not supplant the prerogative of the principal
investigator who seeks sponsors for his own project nor upon
the responsibility of the investigator for the scientific
integrity of the project. In direct contacts between a
principal investigator and a potential sponsor, however,
coordination with the Division is necessary to insure
uniformity in contract requirements and to avoid duplication
of negotiations with the same sponsor.
The Division of Sponsored Research is administratively
responsible to the Vice President for Academic fairsr.
Policies and procedures for the Division are developed by a
board of directors working with the director within the
general framework of the administrative policies and
procedures of the University
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS, an
organizational division of the Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences. is responsible for the IFAS research
mission leading to improvement of all phases of Florida's
widely varied agricultural production. processing and
marketing. Research is administered by the Dean for
Research located on the University of Florida campus. He
works through 19 departments. 7 Agrcultural Research and
Education Centers and 14 Agricultural Research Centers
Results of IFAS research are published in scientific
journals, bulletins, monographs, circulars, mimeographed
reports and the Sunshine State Agrcultural Research Report
and are available to Florida residents usually without charge
upon request to the Editorial Department of the Agricultural
Experiment Station at Gainesville The Agricultural Experi-
ment Station cooperates closely with the Agricultural
Extension Service in providing research findings for prompt
dissemination
IF S research is conducted within 19 departments -
Agricultural Engineering. Agricultural and Extension Educa-


(ron, Agronomy,. Animal
Entomology and Nema
Economics. Food Science,
Forest Resources and
Microbiology and Cell Sc
Plant Pathology. Poultry,


Scien
itolog
and
Coa
ience
Scien


ce. Botany. Dairy Science,
y. Food and Resource
lHuman Nutrition, School of
nservation, Fruit Crops.
, Ornamental Horticulture,
ce. Soil Science, Statistics,


Vegetable Crops and Veterinary Science. In addition to the






a--fA InmnQTu lOw


conducted in all fields of agriculture such as citrus,
vegetable, field crops, livestock pastures and many others.
The Agriculural Research Centers and their locations are
as follows: Monticello, Brooksville, Ft. Pierce, Immokalee,
Dover, Ft. Lauderdale, Hastings, Ona, Apopka, Marianna,
Live Oak, Leesburg, Lakeland, Jay and Ocala.
The Agricultural Research and Education Centers and their
locations, are as follows: Homestead, Belle Glade, Branden-
ton, Lake Alfred. Quincy, Sanford and Tallahassee. A
Research and Education Center is also located at Welaka,
Florida and is concerned largely with biological research
programs and youth programs.
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station is cooperating
with the Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station,
Brooksville, a USDA field laboratory, in its beef cattle and
pasture production and management programs, and with
the National Weather Service, Lakeland, in the Federal Frost
Warning Service for fruit and vegetable producers and
shippers, as well as cooperating with numerous Florida
agricultural agencies and organizations.
THE FLORIDA ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERI-
MENT STATION developed from early research activities of
the engineering faculty and was officially established in 1941
by the Legislature as an integral part of the College of
Engineering. Its mandate is "to organize and promote the
prosecution of research projects of engineering and related
sciences, with special reference to such of these problems as
are important to the industries of Florida."
The College and the Station are inextricably intertwined -

spIny Itiances a. program Iniitltufd primrlly as a reseaclth
entity has developed into a full-fl ended academic depart-
t fn fhe Colle demonstratag th lose interlocking
relationship of the research and teaching functions.
Ia ma a wris of "Spadal1 rrect? are mind

lion abatement, power plant site selection, stream Improve-
t and~ technology transfer.
Since 197,seven department ofheCollegef Engineer-
ing and ~te Eperiment Station have moved into some
310,000 sq. It. provided in seven modern new buildings and
-remodeled budldins These imnrovimentn, incudin.
eqp mnt have raised the value often physical plant oldithe
College to over $13 million
The laboratories, af, and facilities of other dIvisions of
te University also are available to th Suaon research
faculty through many outstmnding intedlscpllnary
proams These research faculty member the
teaching and lecture staff with whom studs In
daily contact in the duasroom. With the close relationship
that e its between teaching and research, students are
exposed to many engineering and dustil problems
normal not encompassed in a college program Moreover,
the unerraduat~ students frequency fd employment
on research projects as student assIstants.
The Station receives only a small portion of its operating
revenue from the state. The major support of retch
activities is derived from contracts with government
agencies, oundat1ons, and lndustral organIzations. Large
and small manufacturers avail telvs of the finest
engineering research laboratories in the Southet The
Station has superior facilties and saff In sqchlt fields as micro-
electronics and integrated cuts; pow systems;
mertallur; ceramics; coastal and ocenogruphic enineer
Ing; soll chacs; transport phenomeaand flid
dynamics; energy conversIon, air and ater pollun


architecture, interior design, and urban planning. The
Bureau also provides assistance to faculty and giduate
students in establishing cooperative efforts with other units
of the University.
THE BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH
is the Research Division of the College of Businem
Administration. A part of the work of the Bureau isto provide
economic and business information about Florida. A major
source of this information is the FLORIDA STATISTICAL
ABSTRACT published annually by the Bureau. The Bureau,
through its Division of Population Studies, makes annual
estimates of population by city and county in Florida as well
as providing other data on the components of population
and growth. By published reports of special research and
through the monthly Economic Leaflets (sent free to any
resident of Florida upon request), quarterly release of
Population Studies, the bi-monthly Business and Economic
Dimensions, and special reports, the results of research work
are available to all residents of Florida. Consultant services
are rendered to the business community, cvic groups, and
government. The Bureau makes it possible for teaching
professors to engage in organized research and provides
research training for graduate students.
THE PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION CLEARING SERVICE, is a
research, publication, and service adjunctof the Department
of Political Science in the College of Arts and Sciences. It
carries on a continuous program of research on public
administration and public policy in Florida; it publishes
research and surveys of governmental and administrative
problems in both scientific and popular monograph form. In
addition, the Public Administration Clearing Service coor-
dinates the programs of instruction *and public service
training in cooperation with other units of the University.
THE COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CENTER OF THE
COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATIONS
conducts research in the news media, in broadcasting,
advertising, and public relations. Thie center is housed in
Room 400, Stadium.
THE DIVISION OF PLANNING AND ANALYSIS performs
the analysis and does the planning required to ensure that
available resources will be used to accomplish the goals of
the many and diverse programs of the University of Florida at
minimum long-range cost. Work is carried out by the staff
and related committees in the areas of campus planning,
budgeting, space assignment, and coordination of architec-
turaldesign and construction of facilities.
THE FLORIDA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER
which is funded by the Department of the Interior was
established in 1964 at the University of Florida as the result of
the passage of P.L. 88-379-The Water Resources Research
Act of 1964--"to stimulate, sponsor, provide for, and
supplement present programs for conduct of research,
investigation, experiments, and the training of scientists in
the fields of water and of resources which affect water." The
Center's Director operates under the general policy
guidance of an advisory committee appointed by the
President of the University. Research projects administered
by the Center and pertaining to the achievement of
adequate state wide water resource management, water
quality and water quantity are being conducted by
professors in various departments at the University of
Florida, and other colleges and universities in the State.
Graduate assistants may be employed on these projects or
other activities of the Center.


COMPUTATIONAL FACILITIES


In addition to numerous small digital computers and at
Innc three hukriIl nmntitra Iin1 -d rtaimne a


: ..i


::jE

~jP j:Ei
ii: :L EI




.1

GENERAL INFORMATION
I.:
I:
I.


THE INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
SCIENCES is the University of Florida's state'
research and educational organization.
extend into every county, and reach people
community in Florida.
The Primary mission of IFAS is to help F


AGRICULTURAL
wide agricultural
IFAS programs
in virtually every

lorida realize its


maximum potential for agricultural development, and to
contribute to the solution of many social, economic,
environmental and cultural problems of concern to the
people of the stale. This vital developmental mission is
carried out through the three functions of resident instruc-
tion, research, and extension. These are carefully inter-
related to provide a highly coordinated effort for the benefit
of Florida its citizens and its industry. This effort is guided
by the Vice President for Agricultural Affairs.
The offices of the Vice President, as well as the Deans for
Resident Instruction, Research, and Extension are located
near the center of ramnus in McCarty Hall. Administrative


NERDC supports batch processing, high-speed cathode
ray tube terminals running under CICS, and well over a
hundred low speed interactive terminals serving almost all
areas of the campus as well as other parts of northern Florida.
These terminals support APL, FLORTRAN (a locally written
interactive FORTRAN interpreter), BASIC, and ATS, in
addition to having an interactive file generation and editing
capability and the ability to be used for submission and batch
jobs. Limited output from batch jobs may also be routed to
such terminals. More extensive output is printed on the two
centrally located high-speed printers or at one of the high-
speed remote batch terminals which are also available for
submission of batch jobs at several locations on campus.
Graphic output is available via a Gould 5100 electrostatic
plotter operated by NERDC for the University of Florida.
Extensive software support is provided for batch processing,
induding the major high-level languages and a large number
of program packages and special purpose languages. Among
these are FORTRAN, PL/1, ASSEMBLER, COBOL, a number
of student oriented compilers and interpreters, most major
statistical packages, simulation languages, several libraries of
scientific and mathematical routines, the Gould and other
plotting software, and many others.
The NERDC facilities are used for administrative as well as
instructional and research computing. Since NERDC is a State
Univeristy System support facility, the staffs responsible for
computing at the University of Florida are in three
separately managed organizations which are not a part of
NERDC. These are the Shands Teaching Hospital Data
Processing Division, the University of Florida Administrative
Computing Services, and the Center for Instructional and
Research Computing Activities at the University of Florida
(CIRCA-UF). More information about the NERDC is available
through its user manuals and its monthly newsletter,
/Update.
CIRCA-UF cooperates with NERDC to provide input/out-
put services, consulting services, and applications software
procurement, maintenance, and development, for the
University of Florida students and faculty. High-speed batch
input/output facilities are available at three campus
locations, with open-shop keypunches near each. Open-
shop terminals are available in Well Hall for the academic
community, as are consulting services. There is also a
professional data-entry staff.
In cooperation with NERDC and CIRCA, the UF Library
also offers extensive Census data services.

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES


business, technological and science education necessary for
graduates to meet the ever changing needs of a diverse and
highly specialized agriculture, as well as related business and
industry. All academic departments offer an undergraduate
program leading to a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. The
School of Forest Resources and Conservation offers an
undergraduate program which leads to the Bachelor of
Science in Forest Resources and Conservation. Graduate
programs at the masters level are offered by all academic
units. The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in 13
specialities.
The mission of the research programs of IFAS is one of
development, as well as improving existing technology to
enable Florida's agricultural industry to become more
efficient and improve its competitive position in relation to
other geographic areas; to improve consumer health and
nutrition and to improve the social and economic well-being
of producers and consumers of agricultural commodities
and resources. Through the vast network of 23 research and
education centers, located in various areas of the state,
applied as well as basic research efforts develop new and
improved technology to meet the agricultural needs of
Florida.
The transfer and application of knowledge through non-
resident educational programs is the primary purpose of the
extension programs of IF AS. These educational programs are
tailored to fit the needs of the many audiences in areas of
agricultural production, marketing and utilization; home
economics; community resource development; and marine
sciences. Audiences include adults and youth, rural and
urban citizens, minorities and people from all economic
levels. This extension program is administered by the
University of Florida in cooperation with the various Boards
of County Commissioners and the United States Department
of Agriculture. Through the Cooperative Extension offices in
all 67 Florida counties, the resources and services of IFAS and
the University of Florida are made available to the
agricultural industry and all Florida citizens.
In 1972, the Center for Community and Rural Develop-
ment was established to provide statewide coordination of
the IFAS research and education programs in community
development for rural and non-rural metropolitan areas.
This center is concerned with improving the economic
conditions in these areas so that people have better
employment opportunities and will remain in small com-
munities rather than migrate to cities. Through support of
undergraduate and graduate education the Center is
assisting in the training of young people to provide
leadership in planning and developing local programs.
Courses of study in the economics of environmental quality,
natural resource planning and development, rural income
and employment, and regional economic planning help
them make definite contributions toward improving the
economic and social conditions of non-urban areas.



General

GENERAL INFORMATION

The Center for Environmental Programs and Natural
Resources was created in October, 1973, to provide
statewide coordination for the IFAS research and education
programs concerned with solving some of the serious
environmental and natural resources problems related to
agriculture throughout Florida. The Center is involved in
developing ways TO protect managed agriculture ecosystems








ttvidh which build or strengthen the international dimen-
sion of IFAS. This Includes participation in the determination
of contract and grant policy, development of outside
funding sources for international research and training
projects, and alaistane in the initiation of new education
program. Integration of international programs into each
department is a specific objective. This provides a unique
opportunity for focusing maximum resources available to
IFAS on the project. Both faculty in the state and those
overseas benefit by the interchange of ideas. Education and
research is handled under the same office by the Center for
Tropical Agriculture established in 1965.

THE J. HILUS MILLER HEALTH
CENTER
The J. Hills Miller Health Center at the University of
Florida in Gainesville is a modern complex of institutions
which advance human health and educate tomorrow's
leaders in the health professions.
It is housed in a building complex which includes the


College of Dentistry, the College ol
Professions, the College of Medidne,
Nursing, the College of Pharmacy and tl
Veterinary Medicine which accepted 4
charter class in September, 1976. The
Hospital and Clinics, which is the center f


care and


f Health Related
, the College of
ie new College of
40 students in its
Shands Teaching
or modern patient


clinical training of new health professionals, is also

vih apoudon of b*. listS Cenwfs building
, the Communicore Building, became operational
oitjsu pw n~ ,alm quat ers,
Itt alietmaq aLwuirngnces con teNew
hrI tu~oflege Deppidty beepme operational In


1975. As part of the Health Center Complex, new adliles fr
the College of Veterinary Medicine .were phased in1
operation in late 1977 and early 1978.
A Veterans Administration Hospital across from the Health
Center is engaged in grams of patient care, teaching and
research which are affiliated with the programs in the Health
Center's colleges.
The Jacksonville Health Education Program, Inc. which
offers educational opportunity in clinical fields to students of
the Health Center's colleges is an official division of the
University of Florida.
The academic programs of the Health center prepare
students to understand that tomorrow's health are must
focus on the community in order to achieve the comprehen-
sive health care of man. The programs help them to
understand that health care involves the health team: the
physician; the nurse; the dentist; the pharmacist; persons in
health related professions; the community; the researcher;
the educator; the counselor; that by training together, and
laler by working together, these men and women contribute
more effectively to a person's well being.
The health-oriented professions exchange information
within the Health Center, and draw upon theother resources
of the University to further man's understanding of health
and illness.
Since the opening of its first units the Colleges of
Medicine and Nursing in 1956, the Health Center has
become a leading center for health care, education and
research in the Southeast.
Located on the southern edge of the University of Florida
campus, the Heallh Center was named for Dr. J. Hillis Miller,
late president of the University whose vision and determina-
tion helped formulate the early planning of the health
complex as an integral part of the University.


'iir Ki !





General

ADMISSIONS


ADM ISSIO NS 3. Graduate Students: candidates for Master'sor Doctor's
degrees. (See following section, ADMISSION TO
GRADUATE SCHOOL).
APPLICATION FOR ADMISSIONS 4. Dental Students: candidates for admission to the
o. . tCollege of Dentistry. (See following section, ADMISSION
Application for admission to any College, School or TO THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY).
Division of the University must be made to the Admissions
Section of the Office of the Regstrar on the forms prescribed 5. Law Students: candidates for admission to the College
and by the dates indicated below. It is quite proper to of Law. (See following section, ADMISSION TO THE
correspond with Deans, Directors or Department Chairmen, COLLEGE OF LAW).
but such contact with University officers does not in any way 6. Medical Students: candidates for admission to the
eliminate the necessity for filing a formal application in the College of Medicine. (See following section. ADMIS-
Office of the Registrar by the dares specified. SION TO THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE).
7. Veternary Medicine Students. candidates for admis-
How to Apply: An applicant should address a request to n to e College of Veerinary Med icne. (See
the Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar. University of following section ADMISSION TO THE COLLEnE OF
Florida asking for application forms. Forms and directions for VETERINARYMEDCINE). COLLEGE OF
completing applications vary with the level of entry at the VA ET ERINA RYMEDCIN .. ., ,..


University and the applicant should indicate that forms are
being requested for admission as a Freshman, Un-
dergraduate Transfer, Graduate, Dental, Law, Medical. Vet-
erihary Medicine, or Special student, as the case might be.


GENERAL STATEMENT


u. p/-ie* u II ,n.:'1 appJ-IIt-LC n Il w noU II
the above categories. (See following sect
SION AS A SPECIAL STUDENT).
9. Transient Students. applicants who wish
one term only in order to complete work for
to parent institution. (See following section,
AS A TRANSIENT STUDENT).


Iall III UIIf UI
ion, ADMIS-

to enroll for
transfer back
ADMISSION


The University encourages applications from
applicants of both sexes from all cultural, racial,
and ethnic groups. The University does not discri
the basis of handicap in admission or access to its
and activities.
A brief summary of the general require
admission or readmission to any college or divis
University is given below:


qualified
religious,
minute on
programs

ments for
ion of the


1. A satisfactory academic record
2. Satisfactory scores on achievement tests or examina-
tions as noted
3. A satisfactory conduct record
The specific requirements for readmission (at the same or a
different level) of a student previously enrolled at the
University of Florida are given in the STUDENT
REGULATIONS section of this catalog. Consult the index for
page number.
The specific requirements for admission to the University
of Florida for the first time as a Freshman. Undergraduate
Transfer, Graduate, Dental, Law, Medical, Veterinary Medi-
cine, or Special student may be found in the appropriate
sections which follow. II should be understood, however,
that minimum requirements are given and that admission to
the University is a selective process. The satisfaction of
minimum requirements does not automatically guarantee
admission.
The admission requirements have been arrived at after a
very careful study of the experiences of thousands of
students over a long period of years. In ever) case minimum
requirements have evolved from studies of student perfor-
mance at the University of Florida. These studies have had as
a primary objective the identification of factors that would
indicate a reasonable chance for successful completion of


University of Florida work.
The University Admissions
responsible for administering al
and its various components.
Students who are planning
Florida for the first time will be
follows:


Committee is the agency
I admissions to the Universiry

to enter the University of
considered for admission as


1. Beginning Freshmen: students who have never
attended college. ISee following section, ADMISSION AS


TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM
The Traveling Scholar Program affords graduate students
at State University System institutions an opportunity to take
course work or conduct research activities at any of the
other institutions in the System. Course work taken under
the auspices of the Traveling Scholar Program at another
university in the System will apply for graduate credit at the
student's home institution. The deans of the graduate
schools of the State universities are the coordinators of the
Program. For details regarding The Traveling Scholar Program
and approval to participate in it, a student must apply to the
dean of the graduate school on his home campus.

UNDERGRADUATE
INTERINSTITUTIONAL
REGISTRATION PROGRAM
The Undergraduate Interinslitutional Registration
Program enables students at State University System in-
stitutions to take advantage of special resources and
programs available on another campus in the System but not
available at their home institution, e.g.. special course
offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories.
overseas study programs, and library collections. Course
work taken under the Undergraduate Interinstitutional
Registration Program will be accepted for credit at the
student's home institution. A student must be recommended
to participate in the Program by his own academic dean. who
will initiate a visiting arrangement with the appropriate dean
at the host institution

PERSONAL HEALTH
HISTORY REQUIREMENT
A personal health history completed by you and reported
on forms supplied by the University Physician are required
prior to initial enrollment at the University of Florida. If your
application for admission is approved, the health history
form will be forwarded to you for you to complete and return
to the University Physician. Your form should be received by
ihp Ilnnprtiriv Phvcirian at IP.I. twn woalfc nrinr in uniar








which entrance is soughL The best time to apply is the early
part of the Senior year in Secondary School. Priority in
admission to the September class will be given to qualified
applicants whose applications are received in the Admissions
Office prior to March 1st. Applications for the September
class received after March 1st will be considered on a "space
available" basis only. The deadlines for receipt of
applications for other terms are listed in the University
Calendar.
Admission of students is on a selective basis. The
availability of community junior colleges and other state
universities in Florida has caused the Board of Regents to
assign to the University of Florida a role in the total state
system of higher education which demands that the entering
Freshman Class be limited in number. Such limitation does
not prevent students from subsequently applying for
admission to upper division and professional schools of the
University since they may attend junior colleges or other
universities and if qualified, then transfer to the University's
upper division colleges in accordance with rules printed
elsewhere in this Catalog.
The requirements for admission set forth below are
designated to ive priority to those applicants whose
likelihood of success and the obtaining of maximum benefits
from the Lower Division program at the University of Florida.


M couir n S st n st eet the following
anmus


1. Graduation 1m an credited secondary ool
STwe academic uit i cofl me ray courses
it Al ra, Naturalin and Soda en
3. An overall "C average in academic courses.
4., A score in the to 40% on th florda Twelfth Grade
Tests or a comparable score on the Scholastic Aptitude
Tet (SAT) or the American College Testing Program
(ACT).
5. A record of good condu Mjor an~ Auing
dffiMdulty with So or ~ar ptI nay ake a~an
applicant ineligible regrdbs oladqintq ificati ons.
Any Florida student who weets t above minlflnum
drisson requirements and is I tuiead .ttending the
nivesy of Floria i urged to su, an application. The
nively will do everyt hng pomib e at q if
pltcans who apply before heapplcaeane e
Wi number of squalid applicants eMs sthe number that
he University is pe tted o enr e admlsn wil f n a
elective basis An applicants toal high school reord
cludin grades, est scores, educational objective and
tte of course completed, rank n clda, school
recommendation and esona record will be considered in


the selection pro - -
Composite pictures of recent Freshman classes a the
University of Florida indicate that approximratly percent
rank in the top 20 percent of all high school Seniors on the
basis of their admissions test scores. xlimatly 50
percent of each entering cas has earne a B" or ber
average in high school acadesmicsubject. While themes no
minimum grad average or test scort whichlIn Itselfassres
student of admission or ccesi in coIlnge, prospective
Freshmen are urged to discuss the meaning implication
of these data with other school counselor before deciding
whether to apply for admission to the Lfiv teiy of Florida*

B Requircvunts fo"r ad mis*on Nmur Roisa Sn dens M.
R..i..ca n#( m til4m,4 antari ck..sahasn rIta... an imscan11


OTHER INFORMATION OF
INTEREST TO PROSPECTIVE
FRESHMAN APPLICANTS
OPPORTUNITIES FOR ACCUEiATING COLLEGE
GRADUATION
Early Admission
Applicants for Early Admission (i.e. admission following
completion of the Junior year in high school) from superlar
students are encouraged and witl be considered on an
individual basis by the University's Admissions Committee.
Applications should be submitted in accordance with
deadlines published in the University Catalog.
In addition to the application, the following Items are
needed for processing Early Admission applicants.
1 A written statement by the student setting forth
reasons for requesting early admission.
2. An official transcript of the applicant's secondary
school record covering the 9th, 10th and 11 years.
Generally, an overall academic average of B+ is expected.
3. Results of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or
che American College Testing Program (ACT). Generally,
a score of approximately 600 on each section of the SAT or
a total score of 28 on the ACT is expected.
4. A letter of recommendation from the student's high
school principal or guidance counselor. The letter should
give specific reasons as to why the applicant would profit
more from Early Admission than by completion of the
Senior year in high school.
An applicant for Early Admission may be required to come
to the campus for interviews by members of the Admissions
Committee before a decisions made on the application. The
Admissions Office will advise the applicant if interviews will
be required after all of the above items have been received
and evaluated. IMPORTANT: Please note that an applicant
should NOT report for interviews until advised by the
Admissions Office.
The University of Florida provides numerous oppor-
tunities other than Early Admission by which a student may
accelerate graduation. For additional information, please
refer to the section of this catalog entitled Time Shortened
Degree Opportunities.
Florida Scholars Program. One hundred gifted and unusual
students will be invited to begin their University studies after
eleventh grade in a special program offered by the College of
Arts and Sciences. After early admission through the
procedure described above, qualified students will be
interviewed by members of the Florida Scholars Committee.
Each student selected for participation in the Program will
confer with a faculty specialist in the student's proposed field
of study. This professor will continue as the student's mentor
throughout the undergraduate years; together they will
design an individual course of study leading to a bachelor's
degree from the College of Arts and Sciences. This early
association with a distinguished scholar-teacher is intended
to encourage and develop the student's promise as a person
and potential as a scholar or professional.
For information concerning this program, contact Dean,
College of Arts and Sciences, 113 Anderson Hall.
Candidates' Reply Date. Applicants accepted for admis-
sion to the September Freshman class must indicate their.
enrollment plans within 30 days after acceptance.
Advance Housing Payment. Entering freshmen are re-
quired to make a housing deposit within 30 days after


a
I


tf
II
SI
It
n


::.j..is ff :

i1 .







ADMISSIONS


Placement Program a student entering the University offers a
nationally graded examination as evidence of completion of
a college level course taken in high school. Depending on
the results of the examination, the student may receive
University credit for courses covering similar material or
exemption from such courses without credit. Under the
College Level Examination Program, the University grants
credit for satisfactory scores in each of the five areas of the
CLEP General Examinations. For further information, please
refer to the section of the Catalog entitled Time Shortened
Degree Opporrunities.
Ealy Decdion for Superior Students. Students with
superior secondary school records (academic average at least
3.5) and Junior year high school SAT test scores (ap-


proximately 600 each
sections) may appl9 fi
certify that this is his on
be supported by the
propriate school official
received by November
make his commitment


on the verbal and mathematics
or early decision. The student must
ly application and this statement must
signatures of his parents and ap-
l. The completed application must be
r 1 and, if admitted, the student must
to attend the University of Florida,


accompanied by his housing payment, by December 1.

ADMISSION AS A TRANSFER
STUDENT TO UNDERGRADUATE
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

(APPLICANTS WHO HAVE ATTENDED ANY COLLEGE OR
UNIVERSITY, REGARDLESS OF THE AMOUNT OF TIME
SPENT IN ATTENDANCE OR CREDIT EARNED, ARE CON-
SIDERED AS TRANSFER STUDENTS.)
When to Apply: Applications may be submitted not more
than one year in advance and applicants are strongly urged to
apply at least six months prior to the date they plan to enter.
Applicants for admission to the Colleges of Health Related
Professions, Nursing, and Pharmacy should consult the
individual college's section of this catalog for specific
information regarding application deadlines. Applicants for
admission to all other colleges should consult the University
Calendar published in this catalog for information regarding
the application deadline date for each term. An applicant
who waits until the last possible date to file an application
may find that it is impossible to furnish the necessary
supporting records in time to permit a decision for the term
that admission is desired.
NOTE: In the undergraduate programs in the College of
Health Related Professions and the College of Pharmacy. the
sequence of professional courses begins ONLY in the Fall
Quarter of the Junior year.


In this section are
admission of undergra
observed however, tha
A SELECTIVE PROCESS!
REQUIREMENTS DOE
Attention is also direct
colleges of the Univ
quotas because of limit
applicants who meet tl
will be referred to t


listed the general requirements for
duate transfer students. It should be
t ADMISSION TOTHE UNIVERSITY IS
i AND SATISFYING THESE GENERAL
S NOT GUARANTEE ACCEPTANCE.
ted to the fact that Upper Division
ersity have established enrollment
rations of space and facilities. Transfer
he minimum admission requirements
he selection committee of the ap-


propriate college for consideration of their enrollment
within the college's established quotas.
A transfer applicant should refer to the General Informa-
tnon and Colleges sections of this catalog for an explanation
of the academic organization of the University.
If an applicant is accepted for admission, courses
rnmnlPt.rl at nuhnr arrrpdited instilulions with grades of


A. FLORIDA PUBLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE GRADUATES
This section applies ONLY to students seeking to transfer
directly from a Florida public junior college with the
Associate in Arts degree in a university parallel program. All
other junior college applicants and undergraduate transfer
applicants from four-year or upper division colleges and
universities should consult Section B which follows.
The University of Florida subscribes to the Articulation
Agreement between the State Universities and Public Junior
Colleges of Florida. Under this agreement, any graduate of a
State approved Florida public junior college is eligible for
admission to the University if the student has completed the
university parallel program and received the Associate in
Arts degree, provided the degree has been awarded on the
basis of the following:
1. At least 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of
academic work exclusive of occupational courses;
2. An approved general education program of at least 36
semester hours (54 quarter hours);
3. A grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 system on
all college level academic courses attempted.
Within space and fiscal limitations, applicants who have
satisfied the above minimum requirements will be con-
sidered for admission at the Junior level to an Upper Division
college. Such students may be required to take additional
preprotessional courses not completed at the junior college.
However, such courses will not reduce the number of credits
required in the Upper Division for a degree.


B. TRANSFER APPLICANTS
FROM A FLORIDA PUBLIC
This section applies to sru
Florida public junior college
degree in a university pa,
dergraduare transfer appli
unIversities.


OTHER THAN GRADUATES
JUNIOR COLLEGE
dents seeking to transfer from a
ge without an Associate in Arts
rallel program and to all un-
icanms from other colleges or


I. Requirements for admission to the Lower Division
1. Eligible for admission as a beginning Freshman. An
applicant must have been eligible for admission to the
University of Florida as a beginning Freshman in order to
be considered for admission to the Lower Division as a
transfer student ISee section, ADMISSION AS A
FRESHMAN).
2. Good standing An applicant must be in good standing
and eligible to return to any institution previously
attended. A student who for any reason will not be
allowed to return to an institution previously attended
cannot be considered for admission to the University of
Florida.
3. Satrslactory record" An applicant must have an average
of "C" or higher (as computed by the University of
Florida) on all work attempted at each institution
previously attended. No application can be considered
until complete official transcripts of all the applicant's
undergraduate work are in the possession of the
Admissions Office. An official transcript must be fur-
nished from each institution attended regardless of
length of attendance or credit earned. Official
supplementary transcripts are required, as soon as they
are available, for any work completed after making
application. Since an average of "C' or higher is required
for graduation from the University of Florida, one who
has failed to maintain this average at another institution is
not eligible for admission. Regardless of the average
earned, courses completed at other institutions must
reasonably parallel the curriculum at the University of
Florida


i









Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination
Board, .or the American College Testing Program (ACT).
Otherwise, the applicant should furnish scores on the
School and College Ability Test, College Level (SCAT).
The minimum acceptable score on these tests will vary
with the amount and quality of academic study the
applicant will have completed prior to transfer.
5. Satisfactory conduct record: An applicant must present
a satisfactory conduct record. Regardless of other
qualifications, an applicant who has experienced serious
or continuing difficulty with school or other authorities
because of improper conduct may find his application
disapproved.
II. Requirements for admission to an Upper Division
CoBege.
With the exception of items 1 and 4, an applicant for
admission to an Upper Division College must satisfy the
requirements listed above for admission to the Lower
Division. In addition, the following requirements must also
be satisfied:
1. Advanced Standing credit. An applicant must present a
minimum of G semester hours (or 90 quarter hours) of
acceptable college courses, not more than tour semester
hours of which are in Military Science and/or basic
required Physical Education as credit for advanced
standing.
foulse :*: Au. 'ppn*a ih Ug


standing credit. (See appropriate college section of this
catalog). pon recommn on by the Upper Division
college, an applicant lacking some of the specific course
requirements may be permitted to enroll in that college
and complete them if he meets all other requirements for
d .on; however, such 1&D iv ncou swillnlt
rduce the nnberi of credit requld in the Upper
jliiil^^r | iijri II 'B- a'" B I

ADMISSION TO


SWhenl A Applicatlona caaccemt teasthe
final dare listed in the Graduate Catalog. Because the final
decision on adinission to GMduatadyas tob e nae by
the Colleges and lime is required to prepare the materials for
their consideration, it is strongly urged that applications be
made l in ad#hnce of this final dit.
Vacation for admission to the Graduate School must be
the Admissi ons Section, Office te Rstrar on
forms WupIied by that o ffice ad at 9h s stipulated in
theUniversity Calendar. Ap~licions which m minimum
stadards for admission are referrE to the graduate
selection committees of the various clges ad dslons for
approval o disapproval.
No appicaton will be considered unless the complete
official transcripts o all the appllcans utid adt ~d
graduate work are in the puessonr of the Admins,
Stion and noansurpt will~ bea il l
is received dt y from the Rei darof lns I tio in
which the work was done. ,iiarojentttn cIns
are req d, as soon as they are avai able, for any work
comp~ ted after making applicaofn.
In general, no student who Is a g ute of non-
accredted institution will be considered for radua study
in any unit of the Unvtersity,


received by: Admission Section, Office of The Regstrar,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, U.S.A
Undergraduate Record: Unqualified admission to the
Graduate School is dependent upon the presentation of a
baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or universi-
ty with an average of B for the Junior and Senior years. In
some units of the Graduate School and on the more
advanced levels of graduate study, an undergraduate
average considerably above B may be required. In some units
admission may be considered with an undergraduate
average slightly below B. College graduate admission
selection committees take into account not only the geneml
grade average, but the distribution of the course work and
me quality and extent of preparation for the graduate
program which the student proposes to undertake.
While the general admissions requirements described
above apply to both master's and doctoral candidates, it
should be noted that doctoral candidates must meet certain
additional requirements, which vary according to the
programs, established by the departments and colleges.
Furthermore, it is desirable for students planning to enter
certain colleges and departments to have a reading
knowledge of one foreign language.
Graduate Record Examination: A satisfactory average
score on the Graduate Record Examination is required for
admission. Each applicant for admission must submit scores
on the aptitude tesr of the GRE, but either at the request of
the department concerned or on his own volition, the
applicant is encouraged to submit in addition the score on
one or more advanced subject-matter tests of the GRE. The
scores on all tests taken will be weighed in regard to
admission.
The GRE is given six times a year in October, December,
January, February, April and June -at a great many locations
in the United States, including Gainesville, Florida. To
determine exact dates and the most convenient locations,
students should write to the Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, New Jersey. Applications are required several
weeks prior to the examination, and scores are received
about a month after the examination. Hence, it is necessary
to apply for the GRE in early September for admission in
January, in early December for admission in March, in early
january for admission in June, and in early March for
admission in September. Other examinations are given for
which application must be made in November and May but
the ones listed above are correlated with admission
deadlines


ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY
When to Apply: The Application Request Card for the
American Association of Dental Schools Application Service
(AADSAS) may be obtained after May 15, from the Office of
Admissions, College of Dentistry. The request card should be
sent directly ro the AADSAS, P. O. Box 1003, Iowa City, Iowa
52240. Upon receiving the application materials from the
AADSAS, the completed forms and supporting documents
must be returned directly the AADSAS no later than October
15, or the year prior to anticipated enrollment in dental
school. Failure to meet this deadline will prevent the Dental
Admissions Committee from evaluating your record.
The data compiled by the AADSAS will be carefully
evaluated by the Dental Admissioris Committee and
promising applicants will be sent Formal Application forms
which request additional information. The submission of a
S* a a


"** IM i ::**


ADIifcRnnci






ADMISSIONS


expected of the applicant. The student of dentistry must
possess a high basic aptitude supplemented by an academic
preparation of the highest order because of the vast area of
science which must be mastered by the dentist. The highly
personal relationship between patient and dentist places the
latter in a position of trust, which demands maturity,
integrity, intellectual honesty, and a sense of responsibility A
broad representation of the ethnic mixture of the State is
sought in the student body through an active recruitment
program. The College strictly adheres to the principle of
ethnic, racial, religious and social equality among its student
body and faculty.
Generally, students applying for admission should plan to
complete the requirements for a bachelor's degree.
However, qualified students may be accepted without
fulfilling the degree requirements, provided they show
evidenr e of sufficient preparation for the study of dentistry.
Applicants with an overall "B" average as a minimum will
receive strongest consideration for admission to the College
of Dentistry. Applicants over the age of thirty rarely will be
iven strong considerations.
Every applicant must take the Dental Admission Test,
preferaby in the Spring preceding the submission of his
Initial Application or; at the latest, theyFall testing period. The
est is given twice a year at many college and university
testing entes. Following a review of all application
materials and Dental Admission Test scores by the Dental
Admissions Committee, interviews with members of this
Commiee will be arranged for competitive applicants.
(See aso more detailed description in the College of
Dentistry bulletin.)

ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF LAW
When to Apply: Applications can be accepted as indicated
in the College of Law Catalog.
Beginning Students: All applicants for admission to the
College of Law must have received a baccalaureate degree
from a regionally accredited college or university and
achieved a satisfactory score on the Law School Admission
Test
The minimum acceptable score on the Law School
Admission Test required for admission varies with the total
grade point average achieved by the applicant on all college
work attempted by the applicant prior to receipt of the first
bachelor's degree. The lower the grade point average, the
higher the Law School Admission Test Score must be to
qualify for admission. All applicants (including present and
former University of Florida students) must register with the
Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS) in lieu of
requesting transcripts from each institution of higher
education attended. For more detailed information on
admission to the College of Law, please see the College of
Law Catalog.
Advanced Standing Students: For information on admis-
sion to the College of Law with advanced standing see the
College of Law Catalog.

ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
When to Apply: Because the number of places in the first
year c lass of the College of Medicine is limited, it is important
that a candidate make application as early as possible during
the Summer or Fall of the year preceding his intended date of


important. Efficient methods of study and effective powers of
reasoning are essential.
The College admits both men and women. A limited
number of out-of-state students, in proportion to the
number in ihe University as a whole, may be admitted.
Applicants over the age of thirty rarely will be given strong
consideration. Students who have failed academically or are
ineligible to continue in another medical school will not be
admitted.
Applications from students who are presently enrolled in
another medical school will be considered provided (1) the
student is eligible to continue in his present medical school,
and (2) the school he is now attending is a member of the
Association of American Medical Colleges.
Prospective applicants must take Medical College
Admissions Test, preferably, by the Spring preceding the
submission of the application. A personal interview will be
required for final acceptance.
Graduate students who are candidates for the PhD.
degree in medical sciences should apply through the
Graduate School.
(See also more detailed description in the College of
Medicine catalog.)

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
When to Apply: Application forms are available between
September 1 and January 1 from the Office of the Dean for
Student Services, College of Veterinary Medicine. The
application package (residency status, application forms,
fees, letters of recommendation, GRE scores, etc.) must be
received by the Admissions Office by 5:00 P.M., January 15,
for the applicant to be considered for admission (or be
postmarked no later than January 10).
(See also the section on the College of Veterinary
Medicine on page 166).


ADMISSION AS
A SPECIAL STUDENT
When to Apply: Each application for admission as a special
student must be reviewed by the University Admissions
Committee. Applications cannot be considered if they are
received after the dates specified in the Catalog; and it would
be desirable for a person considering application asa special
student to initiate such an application at least three months in
advance of the term he wishes to enter, in order to allow time
for additional evidence to be presented if it should be
requested by the Admissions Committee.
Special students may be admitted to the various schools
and colleges of the Upper Division only by approval of the
University Admissions Committee. Each case will be con-
sidered on an individual basis. Applications for admission as a
special student must include: (1) records of previous
educational experience (high school or college transcripts);
(2) a statement as to the type of studies to be pursued; (3) a
brief statement of the reason or reasons for selecting a
special program other than a regular one; (4) satisfactory
evidence of ability to pursue these studies for example, a
student to enroll as a special student for some technical
courses and who feels qualified to do so by reason of
employment or other experience; (5) satisfactory scores on
such ability or achievement tests as may be prescribed in
individual cases by the University Admissions Committee.








at the University of Florida as transient student in order to
complete, work to transfer back to the parent institution. No
evaluation will be made of work previously completed and it
is the student's responsibility to secure such approval as the
parent Institution may require.
Transient students are registered as NON-DEGREE
students and no application for admission is required. The
appropriate forms of enrolling as a NON-DEGREE student
should be requested from the Office of the Registrar. Since
registration Is subject to the availability of space, approval to
enroll as a non-degree student cannot be given prior to the
first day of classes in the term for which the student wishes Io
enroll.
Enrollment as a NON-DEGREE student in no way implies
future admission as a regular student to the University of
Florida.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION,
AND SOCIAL SECURITY
The University of Florida is approved for the education and
training of veterans under all public laws now in effect, i.e.,
Chapter 31, Title 38, U.S. Code (Disabled Veterans), Chapter
34, Title 38, U.S. Code (Cold War G.I Bill), and Chapter 35,
Title 38, U.S. Code (Children of Deceased or Disabled
Veterans). Students who may be eligible for educational
benefits under any Veterans Administration program are


native as soon as accepted by the Unvesity. Students
expecting to receive benefits under one of these programs
must file an application for benefits. No certification an be
made until the application is on file. Benefits are determined
by the Veterans Administration and the Universitycertifes
according to their rules and regulations.
Inquiries relating to Social Security Benefits should be
directed to the student's local Social Security Office. The
Office of the Registrar will submit enrollment certfcates
issued by the Social Security Administration for students
eligible to receive educational benefits under the Social
Secuirty Act, providing the student registers for twelve
quarter hours or more.
A full time load for VA or Social Security benefits is twelve
hours per quarter for undergraduates.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR


FOREIGN STUDENTS


All foreign students whose native tongue is not English
making application for admission to the University of Florida
must present their scores on TOEFL (Test of English as a
Foreign Language). Each applicant is asked to write TOEFL,
Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey, US.A.,
requesting a Bulletin of Information and registration form. It
is important to remember that final consideration cannot be
granted a foreign student's application for admission until his
scores on this test are received by: Admission Section, Office
of the Registrar, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida,
32601, U.S.A.


>^/


*^- ;;I; *
*!'!"!! *SS


*s




General
EXPENSES


Expenses

APPLICATION FEE
Each application for admission to the University must be
accompanied by an application fee of $15.00. Application
fees are nonrefundable. Further instructions will be found in
the Admissions section of this catalog.

GENERAL
STUDENTS SHOULD BRING SUFFICIENT FUNDS, OTHER
THAN PERSONAL CHECKS TO MEET THEIR IMMEDIATE
NEEDS. Personal checks will be accepted for the exact
amount of fees.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS --
FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA
(Section 6C-7.05, Florida Administrative Code)
(1) For the purpose of assessing registration and tuition
fees, a student shall be classified as a "Florida" or "non-
Florida" student.
(a) A"Florida student" is a person who has domicile in
and who shall have resided in the state of Florida for at
least twelve (12) consecutive months immediately
preceding the first day of classes of the academic term
in which the student enrolls. In determining residency,
the university may require evidence such as voter
registration, driver's license, automobile registration,
location of bank account, rent receipts or any other
relevant materials as evidence that the applicant has
maintained continuous residency. Physical presence
for the entire twelve-month period need not be
required so long as the conduct of the student, taken
in total, manifests an intention to make Florida his or
her permanent dwelling place. If such a student is a
minor, it shall mean that the parent or parents, or legal
guardian ofthe student shall have domicile in and have
resided in the state of Florida for the period stated
above. "Florida student" classification shall also be
construed to include students who held an Immigra-
tion and Naturalization Form 1-151, Resident Alien
Registration Receipt Card, or Cuban Nationals or
Vietnamese Refugees who are considered as Resident
Aliens, provided such students meet the residency
requirement stated above and complywith subsection
(2) below. The burden of establishing facts which
justify classification of a student as a resident and
domiciliary entitled to "Florida student" registration
rates is on the applicant for such classification.
(b) In applying this policy:
1. "Student" shall mean a person admitted to the, or
a person allowed to register at the institution on a
space available basis.
2. "Minor" shall mean a person who has not attained
the age of 18 years, and whose disabilities of minority
have not been removed by reason of marriage or by a
court of competent jurisdiction.
3. "Domicile" for fee paying purposes shall denote a
person's true, fixed, and permanent home and place
of habitation. It is the place where theapplicant lives
and remains and to which he expects to return when
he leaves, without intent to establish domicile
elsewhere.
A tlf-l. 1 .L-.II an.-_ -. -*:n.nr'r $,*. or nr rnnt t a


151(e)(1)(2)(3) and (4) of the Internal Revenue Code
of 1954. A copy of these provisions in the Internal
Revenue Code of 1954 is incorporated in this rule by
reference.
6. A "non-Florida" student is a person not meeting
the requirements of subsection (a) above.
(2) In all applications for admission or registration at the
institution on a space available basis, a Florida applicant.
or if a minor, the parent or legal guardian of the minor
applicant, shall make and while with such application a
written statement, under oath, that the applicant is a
bonafide citizen, resident, and domiciliary of the state of
Florida, entitled as such to classification as a "Florida
student" under the terms and conditions prescribed for
citizens, residents, and domiciliaries of the state of
Florida. All claims to "Florida student" classification must
be supported by evidence as stated in 6C-7.05(1) if
requested by the registering authority.
(3) A "non-Florida student" or, if a minor, his parent or
guardian, after having been a resident and domiciliary of
Florida for twelve (12) consecutive months, may applyfor
and be granted reclassification prior to the first day of
classes of any subsequent term; provided, however, that
those students who are non-resident aliens or who are in
the United States on a non-immigration visa will not be
entitled to reclassification. An application for recdsifica-
tion as a "Florida student" shall comply with provisions of
subsection (2) above. An applicant who has been
classified as a "non-Florida" student at time of original
enrollment shall furnish evidence as stated in 6C-7.05(1)
to the satisfaction of the registering authority that the
applicant has maintained continuous residency in the
state for the twelve months required to establish
residence for tuition purposes. In the absence of such
evidence, the applicant shall not be reclassified as a
"Florida student."' In addition, the application for
reclassification must be accompanied by a certified copy
of a declaration of intent to establish legal domicile in the
state, which intent must have been filed with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court, as provided by Section 222.17, Florida
Statutes. If the request for reclassification and the
necessary documentation is not received by the registrar
prior to the last day of registration for the term in which
the student intends to be reclassified, the student will not
be reclassified for that term.
(4) Unless evidence to the contrary appears, it shall be
presumed by the registering authority of the institution at
which a student is registering that:
(a) The spouse of any person who is classified or is
eligible for classification as a "Florida student" is
likewise entitled to classification as a "Florida stu-
dent." This provision will not apply in the case of
students who are non-resident aliens or who are in the
United States on a non-immigration visa.
(b) If an applicant's eligibility for classification as a
"Florida student" is based on the residency of the
spouse, the spouse shall make and file with the
application a written statement under oath, that said
person is the spouse of the applicant and a bonafide
citizen, resident and domiciliary of the state of Florida,
entitled as such to classification as a "Florida student."
(c) No person over the age of 18 years shall be deemed
to have gained residence while attending any educa-
tional institution in this state as a full-time student, as
such status is defined by the Board of Regents, in the
absence of a clear demonstration that he has estab-
lished domicile and residency in the state, as provided
under subsection (3) above.
tjt A n l- *4J Jrlf l4" I I :






me-


each calendar year, or the appropriate portion or
portions thereof, from the beginning of the period for
which continuous attendance is claimed. Such a
student need not attend summer sessions or other
such intersession beyond the normal academic year in
order to render his attendance "continuous."
(5) Appeal from a determination denying Florida student
status to any applicant therefor may be initiated after
appropriate administrative remedies are exhausted by
the filing of a petition for review pursuant to Section
120.68 F.S. in the District Court of Appeal in the appellate
district in which the institution maintains its headquarters
or where a party resides.
(6) Any student granted status as a "Florida student,"
which status is based on a sworn statement which is false
shall, upon determination of such falsity, be subject to
such disciplinary sanctions as may be imposed by the
president of the university.
(7) Special Categories-The following categories shall be
treated as Florida residents for tuition purposes if
adequate documentation is provided:
(a) A member of the Armed Services of the United
States who is stationed in Florida on active duty
pursuant to military orders,the spouse and dependent
students.
(b) A veteran of the Armed Forces of the United States
f Amrinca wit twny ~ or more years of ave
ary serve, iudig the iause and dependent

that the veteran is i Forldaat time of rretmmnt or
vesto Florida within year flownretirement
and files a declaration of Florida domiile.
(c) Full-time elementary, sondary, and community
college faculty members under current teaching
contracts In the state of Foid and their spouses and
dependent students;
(d) Full-tIme faculty, administer and professional
and career service em plyesof the University System
and their spouses an dependent students.
(e) A student rt nied by hi respective statefor
particpation in the Acanmic Common Market
Program of the Southern Reg al Education Board
who s enrolled in a program approved by the Florida
Board of Regents
(f) Florida domiciliaries living in the Panama Canal
r Zone who have not established domicile elsewhere,
including the spouse and dependent students.
(g) Florida residents who had their residency in Florida
Interrupted by service in the U. S armed forces, the
Peace Corps or other similar volunteer organions
fostered by the United States government shall be
deemed to have had residency In Florida during times
of service in the aforementioned organizations.
(8) Reciprocal Agreements. The Board of Regents may
enter Into agreements with appropte agents and
institutions of higher education In oter states and
foreign countries providing for the recproca exchange
of students enrolled and prospective in higher educa-
tional institutions to facilitate utilization of public higher
educational institutions in this State and other states or
countries. Such agreements may include provisions for
waiver or reduction of ndn-resdent tuition for designat-
ed categories of students and may include contractual
payments to such other state or country, subject to the
availability of appropriations. Such agreementsshal have
as their purpose te mutual improvement of educational
advantages for residents of this State and such other states
or countries with whom agreements may be made.


Florida. A public school official must submit a written
statement from his or her superior as to his or her pubile
school status. A University employee must submit a
statement from his or her employer as to his or her
employment status.

DEFINITION OF REGISTRATION.
Registration consists of three major components:
1. The registrant must supply information requested by
the university for the purpose of establishing and
administering academic, financial and community
relationships between the university and the student;
2. The registrant must supply course and schedule
information needed to establish and administer his
matriculation in particular departments, courses and
sections;
3. The registrant must pay all assessed registration and
tuition fees as well as satisfy all current or delinquent
amounts payable to the university.
*
REGISTRATION AND
INSTRUCTIONAL FEES
The University Calendar appearing at the front of this
Catalog sets forth the beginning and ending dates of each
quarter.
THE FOLLOWING FEES AND CHARGES ARE PROPOSED
AT THIS TIME. HOWEVER, SINCE THE CATALOG MUST BE
PUBLISHED IN ADVANCE OF ITS EFFECTIVE DATE IT IS NOT
ALWAYS POSSIBLE TO ANTICIPATE CHANGESANDTHE FEE
SCHEDULE MAY BE REVISED. EVEf l"
MADE TO PUBLICIZE CHANGES FOR ANY QUARTER IN
ADVANCE OF THE REGISTRATIO DNR flkTtr
QUARTER.
Fees are payable on the dates listed in the University of
Florida Calendar appearing at the front of the Catalog or the
dates shown on statements sent those participating in
Advance Registration. Payment of fees is an integral part of
the registration process. Registration (including payment of
fees) must be completed on or before the proper due date.
Student Accounts, The Hub, must be provided a properly
executed authorization for payment in cases where fees are
to be paid by a previously approved loan, scholarship, etc.,
prior to the deadline published in the Calendar,
FEE LIABILITY
LIABILITY IS INCURRED FOR ALL CREDIT HOURS REMAIN-
ING ON A STUDENT'S SCHEDULE AT THE CLOSE OF THE
DROP/ADD PERIOD EACH QUARTER.
ASSESSMENT OF FEES
Students must assess and pay their own fees. UNIVERSITY
PERSONNEL WiLL FOT BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR -
PROPER ASSESSMENT OR MATHEMATICAL ACCURACY
OF CALCULATIONS. Students should assess their fees in
accordance with the table of charges below:
COURSE FEES Charge per Credit Hour


Florida
Course No. Students
0-299 $15.00
3000-4999 16.50
67 a & 7980) 22.00
6971 & 7980 (Thesis &
Dissertaion) 24.00


Non-Florida
Students
38.00
51.50
62.00
64.00


Summer
Course Fees
Florida
Students Non-Florida
9.00 32.00
10.50 45.50


i ,


::"::1



': **
'*.! E



':






EXPENSES


Social Security benefits, and Student Financial Aid. For all
other purposes nine hours per quarter is considered full-
time.
STUDENT HEALTH FEE
STUDENTS REGISTERED FOR NINE OR MORE CREDIT
HOURS PER QUARTER ARE REQUIRED TO PAY AN $11.00
STUDENT HEALTH FEE. The student health fee is optional for
students registered for eight hours or less.
WAIVER OF HEALTH AND STUDENT
ACTIVITY AND SERVICE FEE5
The University Controller may waive the Student Health
Fee and the Service and Activity Fee for students par-
ticipating in such off-campus credit programs as the Mexican
Law Summer Program and the Utrecht Program.
These lees may also be waived at the discretion of the
Controller for those whose studies required them to be off-
campus for an entire quarter or for such a duration as to
preclude their use of university facilities funded from these
fees.
A request for approval of such a waiver should be
originated by the dean or department chairman in charge of
the program upon request from the student enrolled in the
program.
LATE REGISTRATION
A fee of $25.00 will be assessed against students who fail to
initiate registration during the registration period or who fall
to pay fees within the rime period specified.
REINSTATEMENT FEE CANCELLATION AND REINSTATE-
MENT.


1. The university will cancel the
whose fee account for enrolled i
arrears beyond the close of busin
day after the opening day of c
registration is cancelled is not en
the circumstances covered undi
2. Reinstatement will require ap
payment of all delinquent liabi
reinstatement fee of $25.00 ,i
registration fee.
DEADLINES


registration of a student
instructional courses is in
'ess on the twenty-eighth
lasses. A student whose
titled toa refund beyond
er the refund policy.
iproval of the university.
ilites and payment of a
n addition to the late


Students are reminded that deadlines are strictly enforced.
The University does not have the authority to waive the late
and/or reinstatement fees unless it has been determined that
the University is primarily responsible for delinquency in a
student account or that extraordinary circumstances warrant
such waiver.
LOCAL ADDRESS
IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT TO BE SURE
THAT A CORRECT CURRENT LOCAL ADDRESS IS ON FILE
WITH THE REGISTRAR AT ALL TIMES. Change of Address
forms may be obtained from the Registrar's Office.
PICTURE I.D.
A CURRENT VALID PHOTO I.D. MUST BE PRESENTED IN
ORDER TO TRANSACT BUSINESS AT THE OFFICE OF
STUDENT ACCOUNTS.
SPECIAL FEES AND CHARGES
AUDIT FEE. Fees for audited courses are the same as those
listed above for Florida students The audit fee is the same for
Florida and non-Florida students.


COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAMS. Examinations
are administered on campus during the third week of each
month. Applications should be completed in the Office of
Instructional Resources. 408 Seagle Building before the first
day of the month in which a test is to be taken. The fee for
one general examination is $20.00, for two examinations.
$30.00 and for 3-5 examinations, $40.00. Subject examinations
are $20.00 each. Checks should be payable to College Level
Examination Program.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION. The Aptitude Test of
the Graduate Record Examination is required for admission
to the Graduate School. A fee of $10.50 covers the cost of this
examination. Students who take one of the Advanced Tests
of the Graduate Record Examination in combination with the
Aptitude Test pay a fee of $21.00. These fees are payable to
the Educational Testing Service, Princeton. New Jersey 06540.
GRADUATE SCHOOL FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEST. All
students wishing to be certified as proficient in a reading
knowledge of French. German, or Spanish, must take the
Educational Testing Service (ETS) Graduate School Foreign
Language Tests. A fee of $12.50 covers the cost of each
examination. This fee is payable to Student Accounts. The
Hub. Administrative arrangements to register for this
examination will be made through the Graduate School
Office
LIBRARY BINDING CHARGE. Candidates for a ,raduate


degree w
permane
University'
Accounts
Catalog.
Graduate


ith a thesis or dissertation pay a $10.00 charge for the
nt binding of the two copies deposited in the
y of Florida Library. Thus charge is payable at Student
, The Hub, by the date specified in the Graduate
A copy of the receipt must be presented at the
ISchool office.


REFUND OF FEES
1. Fees will be refunded in lull for:
a. Credit hours dropped during the drop/add period.
b Courses cancelled by the University
2. With the exception of amounts required for collection
under bond and Irust obligations, fees may be refunded in
inslances of.
a. Involuntary call to active duty.
b. Death of a student.
c. Illness of the student of such duration or severity, as
confirmed by a physician, that completion of the quarter is
precluded, or


d. Exceptional circumstances.
University President


upon


approval


of the


Refunds may be obtained at Student Accounts. THE HUB.
upon presentation ol proper documentation.


PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS
All students' accounts are due and payable at Student
Accounts. The Hub. at the time such charges are incurred.
University regulations prohibit registration. graduation.
granting of credit or release of transcript for any student
whose account with the University is delinquent























rI:.
















i~i



















































//
: m

tE.&

C'. k .


. p
... .


























: L .
:;' 8!
:P





General
STUDENT AFFAIRS


Student Affairs

The following information describes the responsibilities of
the various offices charged with assistance to students at the
University of Florida. Additional information may be found
in THE FLORIDA STUDENT GUIDE and THE CAMPUS
DIRECTORY.


VICE PRESIDENT FOR
STUDENT AFFAIRS
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is a
focal point for student concerns and strives to make the
educational experience for students at the University of
Florida as meaningful as possible. The Vice President for
Student Affairs works to maintain and improve good
communications and working relationships among and
between students, faculty, and administration.
The ,oals of the Division of Student Affairs include:


developing effective and efficient services and programs for
students through the various departments within Student
Affairs; integrating student affairs and academic affairs;
directly involving students in the affairs of the institution;
encouraging a sense of community among students, faculty,
and administration; and increasing accessibility to and
attractiveness of the University of Florida to a wide variety of
persons.
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is
located in 123 Tigert Hall and is open to assist individual
students and groups in matters concerning them. All
students are encouraged to share in the responsibility for
enabling the various divisions of the University of Florida
community to meet the needs of students.
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs has
administrative responsibility for .the following offices and
programs at the University of Florida: Office for Student
Services, Student Housing Office, Office for Student
Financial Affairs, Career Resources Center, j. Wayne Re'tz
Union, and University Counseling Center.


OFFICE FOR
STUDENT SERVICES
The basic commitment of the Office of the Dean for
Student Services at the University of Florida is to the total
development of each individual student so that he or she
might achieve full potential as a human being. Staff members
strive to help students become self-directive in all their
activities. The staff feels it can most effectively be helpful to
students by reaching them "where they live." in real life
situations.
The purposes of the Office for Student Services are to
contribute to the attainment of the educational goals of the
University of Florida by: helping to structure appropriate
experiences for the intellectual, psychological, social and
physical development of each student; providing oppor-
tunities for students' need lor personal attention; assisting
students in the development of their career objectives;
making students aware of and encouraging the use of the
resources of the University; interpreting the goals, objectives
and actions of the institution to students; encouraging the
development of a sense of community among students,
faculty and staff; helping students to develop purpose in
their lives a system of values of which they are aware and a
sense of personal integrity; and assisting in the development


programs, women's programs, mature student programs,
commuter student services, student judicial affairs, off-
campus student programs and services, and student
withdrawals.
The International Student Center and the Instirute of Black
Culture are also operational units of the Office for Student
Services.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES
The Internationadl Student Services center assists inter-
national students in adjusting to the changing life style and
study habits in a new and sometimes perplexing environ-
ment. Special services are provided related to foreign
educational and cultural backgrounds; language, legal,
employment, academic, and personal matters, U.S. immigra-
tion and other government agency responsibilities as aliens;
and currency exchange. The focus is on helping international
students achieve their educational goals, while providing an
insight into the culture of the United States through a
program of social activities, orientation seminars, and
community visits.


INSTITUTE OF
The Institute
students at th
enlightenment
can focus on I
style. It is also
understanding


BLACK CULTURE
of Black Culture is an educational tool for
e University of Florida. It is a facility for
and black awareness where Afro-Americans
;heir history, literature, an, culture, and life
a place where whites can develop a better
of blacks and an appreciation of black


contributions to American society. The
programs, exhibits, and related activities.


center


sponsors


STUDENT HOUSING
The Director of Housing and his staff administer, supervise,
and coordinate all programs and operations in the residence
halls, the apartment villages, and the Off-Campus Housing
Office.

GENERAL INFORMATION
All Freshmen who apply for admission to the University
will receive Housing Agreements upon approval of admis-
sion. No application for housing is made by beginning
Freshmen.
The University of Florida has no residency requirement.
Entering students are free to choose either on-campus or off-
campus accommodations. However, residents must be full-
time students to be eligible to reside in the residence halls.
Full-time enrollment for residency is defined as being
enrolled in 9 credit hours if an undergraduate and 8 credit
hours if a graduate student.
All non-beginning Freshmen must inmate their arrange-
ment for housing either by (1) applying to the Director of
Housing for assignment to university housing facilities, or (2)
obtaining accommodations in private housing (see Off-
Campus Housing Section).
All correspondence concerning application for University
Housing should be addressed to the Director of Housing.
University of Florida. Gainesrille, 32611. An application for
residence hall space for students other than Freshmen may
be filed at any time after an application for admission to the
University has been made. Prospective students are urged to
apply as early as possible because of the housing demand.
Roommate requests shall be considered if the individuals
wishing to room together submit their applications on the
same date, clearly indicate their desire to room together on
their respective applications, elect the same visitation
choices, and are within similar academic classification








interts. Programs and activities vary from had to hall and
from year to year, since they are based on the needs and
Interests of the students.
STAFF-In all residence halls or housing areas,
professionally trained, Residence Life Coordinators, Hall
Advisers, and student Resident Assistants are well qualified
to assist with group and individual activities, as well as with
matters of personal concern to student residents. In each
living unit (floor or section), resident assistants and student
leaders provide group leadership and guidance.
SELF GOVERNMENT-All students in the residence halls
are entitled to participate in organizational activities which
can play a significant pan in their educational, cultural,
sodal, and recreational life. Officers and representatives are
elected to hall and area councils which govern group
activities and help establish standards for group living.
In all residence halls, an annual activity fee (optional) of
5.00 is collected and administered by the hall organization
to meet expenses of activities and programs.
ROOM FURNISHINGS-Rooms are equipped with beds,
mattresses, mattress pads, wastebaskets, desks, chairs,
closets, chest-of-drawers, and venetian blinds. Residents are
encouraged to obtain their own drapes, pictures, bed-
spreads, rugs, and desk lamps after arrival at the University.
LINEN SERVICE-All students assigned to residence halls
may elect for a basic linen service. The charge is $13.00 extra
per quarter. This service entitles a student to two sheets, one
pillowcase, and three towels per week. Extra linens or
additional items such as blankets, pillows, and desk lamps
may be rented at a nominal cost.
TELEPHONE SERVICE-Room telephones are available in
all of the residence halls except Buclman and Reid Co-ops.
Each room telephone provides 24-hour service on campus
and within the Gainesville area. Charges for long distance
calls are billed monthly to the room phone by the Southern
Bell Telephone Company and residents pay directly to the
included in the room rent. : .
ROOM RRIGRATORS-Ref are provided In
some residence areas and the cost is included in the quarterly
rare. Students may bring their own individual refrigerators to
any residence hall where refrigerators are not permanently
Installed, Studentsmust kf tarrpgemnts for
installation and removal of pvae refrigurators. Students
who bring private refrigerators to rooms which are already
furnished with ffigerators will|t ee a e nd for the
University refrigerator.
SWIMMING POOLS-Sw ming poo are located adja-
cent to the Graham Area and the Yulee Area and are
available for use of students, staff, and faculty of the
University.

HALLS FOR SINGLE STUDENTS
Soe varietyin types of accowmodatiys is prildedby
the University. The double room for twstudenlstnheaos
common type. Several of te larer or sui are
designated as triple rooms Single rooms are availab in
limited number, suites for two ude.s a avai
several of the residence halls. Each suite consists of two
onnected rooms-a bedroom and a study room.
Beaty Towers, Hume Hall Graham AreaTolhertAn~nd
lennings Hall are totally air-cQnditloned Other residence
halls, where student roomare not ar-condkioned, provide
centrally located ar-conditioned sdy and recreation
rooms.
BEATY TOWERS (c ucaional): Each Tower accom-
modates approximatey students1 with men *nd wonen
np~fcalf A Tms GiL~...;^B w .a 1..| a.


while the Rawlings complex accommodates 31 male and
female students. Although student rooms are not *r
conditioned, public facilities which are air conditioned
include main lounges, libraries, recreation rooms, television
rooms, cafeterias, and a sundry shop. Each floor has a
community bathroom, a study room, and a community
kitchen.
GRAHAM/HUME/TOLBERT AREAS: Men and women
live in different buildings or in opposite wings separated by a
central lobby and administrative offices. Graham and Hume
Halls accommodate men and women on alternate floors.
Each floor or section has community restroom and study
lounge facilities. All facilities are air conditioned. Communi-
ty kitchens on each floor permit students to prepare their
own meals. Central public facilities include main lobbies,
libraries, recreation rooms, television rooms, cafeteria, and
snack bar. Student rooms are singles, doubles, and triples.
GRAHAM AREA (650 students). Consists of three
residence halls which are located in the center of West
Campus. The area includes the largest library on West
Campus, an exercise room, and a swimming pool.
HUME AREA (720 students). The largest coeducational hall
on campus. Several intramural fields and athletic courts
border this popular residence area.
TOLBERT AREA (1,000 students). Consists of five residence
halls including North Hall, the only coeducational luxury co-
op on campus. The area is.adjacent to Florida Field and a
short distance from the Reitz union.
JENNINGS/YULEE AREA (coeducational): The Jen-
nings/Yulee residence area houses about 850 students.
lennings Hall is air conditioned; Yulee Area is not air
conditioned. In Jennings Hall, men and women live
opposite wings separated by a central office and public
lobby. Single and double rooms are available and some
rooms can be converted to suites. Each floor has community
bath facilities and a study room. Community kitchens on
each floor permit students to prepare their own meals. Air
conditioned public facilities include main lounges, libraries,
recreation rooms, and television rooms.
Yulee Hall, also locatedin the YueeArea, is reserved for
Juniors, Seniors, and graduate students who desire single
accommodations in a coeducational seeing. The rooms,
originally designed as doubles, have been converted to
singles and men and women are assigned to alternate floors.
Mallory Hall houses approximately 160 women in double
and single rooms. The rooms are not air oonditioned;
however, air conditioned public facilities include the library,
television room, recreation room, and the lobbies.
MURPHREE AREA (coeducational): Murphree, Thomas,
Sledd, Fletcher and Buckman Halls are all located in this area.
They were the first residence halls built on the University of
Florida campus and accommodate about 1100 students.
Suites for two or three and single, double and triple rooms
are available. Most rooms are equipped with lavatories.
These halls are divided into separate, vertical houses
accommodating from 16 to 40 students each. Male and
female students live in separate houses. There is a bath on
each floor. A rathskeller is also located adjacent to the area.


FAMILY STUDENT HOUSING
The University operates six apartment villages for eligible
students. To be eligible to apply for and occupy apartment
housing on campus, the following are necessary:
A married student or student parent without snnine who


has minor children in
requirements for admit
qualify as a full-lime stu,


his/her legal care must meet the
mission to the University of Florida,
dent as defined by his/her college or


;;, ((((( .. W -.





SDENT A
STUDENT AFFAIRS


Residents in all villages must furnish their own linens,
dishes, rugs, curtains, or other similar items. Utilities are an
extra expense and are billed with the rent.
CORRY (216 UNITS) AND SCHUCHT (104 UNITS)
MEMORIAL VILLAGES,of modern brick, concrete and wood
construction, contain almost an equal number of one- and
two-bedroom apartments, with a few three-bedroom units
in Corry Village only. These apartments are carpeted and
furnished with basic equipment, as available, in the living
room, kitchen, dining area, and one bedroom.
DIAMOND MEMORIAL VILLAGE consists of 208
apartments similar in construction, furnishings, and equip-
ment to those in Corry and Schuchi Villages. Special features
include a community building with air conditioned study-
meeting room, and a study cubicle in each two-bedroom
apartmenL
TANGLEWOOD MANOR APARTMENTS, located ap-
proximately 1 V miles south of the central campus, consists of
206 furnished and unfurnished efficiency, one bedroom, two
bedroom, and two bedroom townhouse units. All units are
carpeted, centrally heated and air conditioned. All units have
dis a as and two bedroom units have dishwasher. AH one
and two bedroom units have one and one-half baths.
Community facilities include a large recreation hall, laundry
facilities, and two swimming pools.
UNIVERSITY VILLAGE SOUTH and MAGUIRE VIU.AGE
onsists of 348 centrally heated and air conditioned one and
two-bedroom apartments. Community facilities include a
laundry and a community room. Individual apartments we
not furnished but are carpeted. The kitchens are equipped
with stove and refrigerator.
For MAGUIRE VILLAGE only: The married, or single
student with dependents) must be part of a family with a
combined gross annual income (including grants-in-aid, VA
benefits, scholarships, fellowships, and grants) which does
not exceed, during the period of occupancy, the following
maximum income limitations: 2 persons, $9,100; 3 and 4
persons, $10700; and 5 and 6 persons, $12,300.


OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING
Inquiries about off-campus housing should be directed to
the Off-Campus Housing Office, University of Florida,
Gainesville, 32611.
The office maintains extensive listings of apartments,
houses, rooming units, trailers, and trailer park lots offered
for rent to students, faculty or staff members. Each spring the
office compiles a comprehensive list of major apartment and
rooming unit developments which have been accepted by it
for referral. This list is available to anyone who has filed a
Request for Assistance with the office. An extensive general
information and advisory bulletin is available also.
In addition to the units contained in the comprehensive
list, the office has on record several hundred units in other
establishments to which referrals are made after notice of
availability is received from the owners.
The balance between housing supply and demand is
usually tight for the Fall Quarter, continues so for the Winter
Quarter but loosens for the Spring and Summer Quarters.


Mutually satisfactory rentals usually can be arranged only
after personal inspection of facilities and conferences with
the owners. Consequently, persons seeking off-campus
housing should plan to come to Gainesville at an appropriate
time in advance of the term for which they need housing.
Such visits should be made on week days-not on a
weekend-after advance information has been procured.
Shared unit listings are handled by Student Government in
cooperation with te Off-Campus Office. Landlord-tenant
--.. L_._I J L. C..J .a. .*. rta.ma. t .e r-*n o


Among the qualifications for membership are scholastic
ability and reference of good character. These cooperative
living groups are specifically operated by and for students
with limited financial means for attending the University.
Inquiries pertaining to cooperative living on campus are
made to the Director of Housing, University of Florida,
Gainesville, 32611. The cooperative living organizations on
campus currently include: the Reid Hall Co-op for men; the
North Hall Co-op for men and women; and the Buckman
Co-op for men and women. Off-campus co-ops include: the
Collegiate Living Organization (co-ed), 117 NW 15th Street,
and Georgia Seagle Hall (men), 1002 West University Avenue,
and inquiries should be made to these addresses.


STUDENT FINANCIAL AFFAIRS
The Office for Student Financial Affairs provides financial


assistance and counseling
paying college expenses. Fii
to each individual's need in
may include loan, grants, sc
meni and may be offered
combinations. Evidence of
the College Scholarship Set


for students who need help in
nancial aid is awarded according
relation to college costs. Awards
holarships, or part-time employ-
to students singly or in various
financial need is determined by
vice on the basis of the financial


information provided in the Financial Aid Form which must
be submitted to the office indicated on the form. The
application period for financial aid is December 1 through
March 1 for the academic year beginning the following
September. Applications submitted after March 1 are
accepted on a funds available basis only. A new application
for financial aid must be submitted each year.
Applicants for financial assistance must complete a
College Scholarship Service Financial Aid form (FAF) and
University of Florida Financial Aid Supplement. Un-
dergraduate students must apply for the Basic Educational
Opportunity Grant by checking Box 83 on the FAF. An official
award cannot be made until the student has been accepted
for admission to the University of Florida. However. he/she
should not wait for notice of acceptance but should apply as
soon as possible aher December 1. Aid for graduate students
through the Office for Student Financial Affairs is limited to
part-time employment and certain loan programs.
Applications for other aid: e.g.. fellowships, assistantships
and loans, should be made to the head of the department of
the student's major or the Dean of the Graduate School.
Scholarships


Aooroxi
Office for
undergrad
mined by
scholarship
most case
awards are
Students a
community
educators.


matelv 400 scholarships are awarded throui
Student Financial Affairs to the mosi oulsia
luare students showing financial need as (
the College Scholarship Service Funds f<
p programs are. of course. extremely limited
s amount to only 1150 per quarter Addi
Made by donors vho elect the recipient dii
Ire urged to consult the resources of their
y. civic clubs, service organizations and c


ch the
nding
deter-
or the
and in
tional
rectlI
home
county


Part-time Employmnet
Par-time employment may be awarded to a student as part
of the total financial aid package. The University of Florida
offers part-time employment to approximately 2,500
students each year. In addition, many students work off-
campus in the Gainesville community. Normally a student
works only 15 hours or less each week and earns between
$750 and $1200 per year. depending upon personal skills and
experience.
Loans
Loans are available in two forms. Lonu-term loans are low






-MFI5


nwde bythe frm day of the last month of the quarter in which
the Imn obtained. Graduae udn eliibilty is $25
querly.
onus
Finnmdal amine in the form of grants from Federal and
btae sourwc bs avatie to underraduate students. Such
grants require exceptional financial need and do not have
to be repaid by the student.


CAREER


ESOU


CES CENTER


The Career Resources Center provides career develop-
ment, job placement, and cooperative education programs
for all University of Florida students and alumni.
The objective of the Center is to assist students in
developing 1) viable career plans compatible with academic
interests, and 2) strategies that insure marketability and
employment opportunity upon graduation. Thus, the entire
program focuses upon the student-during early un-
de due years, approaching graduation, and after
gnuonm as n umnu. The proqam is designed to permit
students to enter at any pint in their college careers.
Program resources include:
hdMdlS ld Idwenm t for students seeking personal
career de-elop.ent and job search assistance.
|A aM A w ring many dlifevner -n
weekly (50-minutes each). Courses include career planning,

am fe m n~ningrand
witng, i vie wn pawie and summer obb,
Up.n- using the Center, anoherspeciabzed information
hnr buulneus, Indwtry and education ob oseker .


:rr~ itt


An exte nsoe for utudens and alumni
comprising t largest on-campus job nterviewng program
n the tate representing all career fields, and a computer
program matching student and alumni with potential
employers. The program provides employers with computer
printed "nmiin-resumes of qualified persons. Students and
alumni receive computer listing of compatible employers.
The Center a.so publishes current employer job ltingst
representing hundreds of positions-full-time parttime
and summer-for students, new graduates, andexperienced
alumni.
A career sources brary contain information on
several thousand employes and related occupations;
employer contact lists; directories for business, Industry,
education and government; lists of American firms
operating overseas; reference and informaonal material on
graduate and special studies programs including fellowships
and assstantshps and many olher materils and resource
data needed by students planning a career, entering the job
market, or contemplating graduate school. A special feature
of the library facilities is the "TrendDs ek" 'ontining
research data on job trends, outlook and economicforecasts,
iabor market statistics, manpower bulletins for various career
fields, special directories and publications giving reports and
ratings on most employers.
An audio visual department with studycarrels and a library
dk-n~ I* I ,..


qualified persons on file and seeking employment to
interested employers requesting candidates to fill job
vacandcies.
An outreach prgam" in which professional staff
members are available to hold seminars for student
organizations, fr lecture presentations to classes on ilI
phases of career planning and job search preparation, and to
develop "Career Day" programs in conjunction with
colleges.
For additional Information, students, alumni, and faculty
are invited to visit the Center. Staff members will be happy to
discuss ideas, concerns, and needs for individuals or groups.


J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
The J. Wayne Reitz Union is the official center of campus
activities. The provision of facilities, services, and a varied
program of activities available to all persons of the University
"community" serves as the basic purpose of the Union.
Policy for the Reit Union is established by Board of
Managers, consisting of eight students and six faculty
members.
During May, 1967, the E. Wayne Reitz Union building was
opened. Among the facilities and services offered are music
listening rooms, art gallery areas, Arts and ras tenter,
photographic darkrooms, browsing library,agames area for
bowling, billiards and table tennis, public telephones,
information desk, passenger and ride wanted bulletin
boards, display cases, barber shop, Union Store, talent and
bhad fil. A large ballroom; an audIrorhma ano tha
and meeting rooms are available for all University
organizations. Guest rooms are available for official guests of
the University, guests of students, faculty staff and alumni.

facilities and dining opportunities. A cafeteria and snack bar,
restaurant dining area, the Orange and Brew, the Sugar
Cone, and complete catering services for small intimate
ups or for a banquet for 700 persons are included in the

Of particular significance to the educational prgraw of *
the University is the Student Activities Center located on the
third floor. A distinctive physical arrangement of offices and
work space for Student Government, the Student Court, and
many other student groups enhances the effectiveness of the
total student activities program of the University.
The Reitz Union plans and promotes many social, cultural,
and recreational activities for the campus community.
Among the regular activities are art exhibits. International
Dinners, non-credit courses, current and cultural films, a
performing arts series, speaker's programs, out-door con-
certs, poetry readings, book reviews, arts and craftssales,and
campus tournaments in billiards, bowling, bridge, football
and chess. Special activities such as receptions, dances,
intracampus and inter-collegiate bridge, billiard and bowl-
. ing tournaments, music appreciation listening hours, fashion
shows, international activities, and special holiday parties are
all a part of the Reitz Union program.
A distinctive area of the Reitz Union is the H. P. Constans
Theatre, a 464-seat facility for the dramatic arts which
provides excellence in design, equipment for staging and
ghting, and acoustics.


UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER
The UnivPrlrv (rnnmiclino ranl~r nfi.rc frea ru.


mj\DCNT




F

STUDENT ARAIRS


to University faculty and staff who are engaged in advising or
counseling students.


Student


Life


UNIVERSITY FOOD SERVICE
Food Service provides food service in nine locations on
campus convenient to residence halls and classrooms.
Students are offered high quality blood at reasonable prices
in campus cafeterias and snack bars, as well as the Orange
and Brew, Rathskeller, and the Arredondo Room.
It is the policy of the University to provide well-prepared
food at the lowest possible cost. Students may effect a savings
by participating in one of the three voluntary meal plans. The
seven-day plan, three meals a day; the five-day plan
(Monday through Friday) three meals a day, or the five day
plan (Monday through Friday) any two meals a day. For
further information contact the Servomation Office, 110
Johnson Hall.

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
Student Health Service provides a spectrum of medical
services which include primary medical care, health educa-
tion, health screening programs, and mental health consulta-
tion and counseling.
The service consists of an out-patient clinic and a 14-bed
inpatient unit staffed by physicians, nurses, psychologists,
pharmacists, laboratory and x-ray technicians, and sup-
poing personnel. It is housed in the Infirmary, which
is central lly located on campus.
The service is a unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
whose facilities are available by consultation and referral
through Student Health Service. Specialty clinics are
available in the infirmary for allergy, minor surgery,
orthopedics, mental health, and women's health care.
The health fee is part of the tuition fee paid by all full-time
students; it is optional for part-time students. Because not all
services are covered by the health fee, the supplemental
student government health insurance plan is highly
recommended.
A personal health history questionnaire completed by you
is required before registration at the University.


SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC
The Division of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Depart-
ment of Speech, offers services without charge to any
University student who hasa speech or hearing disorder. This
assistance is available at any timeduringthe year and therapy
sessions are adjusted to individual schedules. The student is
encouraged to visit the clinic and to take advantage of this
service located in the Arts & Sciences Building.


READING AND WRITING CENTER
The University Reading and Writing Center is a free service
offered to students at all levels. The Center is located in
Room 2107 GPA. For additional information or ap-
pointments, the office can be contacted between 8-5
Monday through Friday.
Reading. The reading program offers individual and group
courses designed to improve comprehension, rate,
vocabulary and study skills. These courses are developed, on
the basis of an initial diagnosis, to meet the needs of each
I- .. ..*


STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND
ORGANIZATIONS
Student Government: Student Government at the Univer-
sity of Florida is a cooperative organization for advancing
student interests and is based on mutual confidence among
and between the student body, the faculty, and the
administration. Considerable authority has been granted the
student body for the regulation and conduct of student
affairs The criterion in granting authority to the Student
Government has been the disposition of UF students to
accept responsibility commensurate with the authority
granted them Student Government has several resources at
its disposal to fulfill its mission, including the allocation of
approximately three million dollars per year in student
activity and service fees, substantial authority in the regula-
tion of co-curricular activities, and administration of the
Student Court. The University of Florida faculty and staff feel
that training in acceptance of responsibility for the conduct
of student affairs at the University is a valuable part of the
educational growth and development of the individual
student.
Student Government is a body politic, using its
franchise under grant from the Board of Regenis an subject
to its continued approval. Student Government is pa
on the state and national form of government but a adapted to
the local needs of dthe Student Body. Powers are distributed
into the three branches: (1) legislative, which is embodied
in the student Senate; (2) judicial, which is embodied in th
Student Court and the Traffic Court ,(3) executive,
embodied in the President and the Treasurer of the Student
Body. Members of all three branches are elected directly by
the Student Body, of which all UF students are members. In
addition to elected offices, many appointed positions have
been established in Student Government, including Cabinet
and sub-Cabinet, Student Court, and Traffic Court posts.
Student Government, recognizing its limitations as a true
"government", attempts to exercise influence on
governments at all levels through conferences, lobbying,
research, and the advancement of proposals for change.
Students may apply for various positions within the student
government structure by contacting the Student Govern-
ment offices on the third floor of the j. Wayne Reit Union.
Interhall Council: The purpose of the Interhall Council is
to provide an organization which will further serve as a
channel of communication between Residence Area Coun-
cils, Student Government, and the Student Housing Officeas
well as coordinating individual Area Council activities and
representing the collective interests of all residents.
The voting membership of the Interhall Council consists of
two representatives from each of the Area Councils.
Dramatics: Any student has an opportunity to participate
in several plays which are presented each year by the Florida
Players, a dramatic group under the direction of the
Department of Speech.
Student Senate: The Student Senate Is composed of
representatives elected from the colleges and living areas on
the campus and in general acts as the Legislative Branch of
Student Government.
Religious Activities: The University of Florida welcomes
the contributions of religious traditions to the campus
community. The churches, centers, and organizations
associated with the University offer a rich variety of programs
and ministries. There are also interdenominational and






-M AmA


Gamma Rho, Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta
PI, Chi Phi, Delta Chi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Upsilon, Kappa
Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi. Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi
Beta Sigma, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa
Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pt Kappa Phi, Pi Lambda Phi, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sgma Phi Epsilon,Tau
Epsilon Phi, Theta Chi, and Omega Psi Phi.
Twenty women's social sororities have established
chapters at the University. Sixteen have built chapter houses
and three live in other housing arrangements. These living
quarters serve as the center of the activities of the individual
sororities. Primary jurisdiction in sorority matters is vested in
the Panhellenic Council. The chapters at the University of
Florida are Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Delta PI, Alpha Epsilon
Phi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Omicron Pi, Chi Omega,
Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta Phi Epsilon, Delta
Sigma Theta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Delta, Kappa Kappa
Gamma, Phi Mu, Phi Sigma Sigma, Pi Beta Phi, Sigma Delta
Tau, Sigma Kappa, Zeta Phi Beta and Zeta Tau Alpha.
Professional and Honorary Fraternities: AGRONOMY
AND SOILS CLUB; ALPHA DELTA SIGMA. Advertising;
ALPHA EPSILON DELTA, Pre-Medical; ALPHA ETA SOCIETY,
Allied Health Professions; ALPHA KAPPA DELTA, Sociology;
ALPHA KAPPA PSI, Business Administration; ALPHA LAMB-
DA DELTA, Freshmen scholastic honorary; ALPHA OMEGA
ALPHA, Medical; ALPHA PI MU, Industrial Engineering;
ALPHA SIGMA MU, Materials Science and Engineering;
ALPHA ZETA,. Agriculture; AMERICAN CERAMIC SOCIETY;
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS &
ASTRONAUTICS; AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS;
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS;
AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CONSTRUCTORS; AMERICAN
INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS; AMERICAN IN-
STITUTE OF MINING, METALLURGICAL AND PETROLEUM
ENGINSIS; AMERICAN NUtLEAR SOCIETY; AMERICAN
SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERS; AMERICAN
SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS; AMERICAN SOCIETY OF
INTERIOR DESIGNERS; AMERICAN SOCIETY OF
MECHANICAL ENGW#St ARNOLD AIR SOCIETY.
Military; ASSOCIATION FOR CHILDHOOD EDUCATION;
ASOATION FOR COMPUTING MACHINERR ETA
ALPHA PSI, Accounting; BETA GAMMA SIGMA, Business
and Economics; BILLY MITCHELL DRILL TEAM, Military;
CAMPUS DESIGN GROUP. Architecture and Planning
Design; CITRUS CLUB; COUNSELOR EDUCATION STU-
DENT ASSOCIATION; CRIMINAL jUSTICE ASSOIATON;
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION, uca-
don; DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB; DELTA Pt EPSILON, Graduate
Business Education; DELTA SIGMA P, Busines; DELTA
SIGMA RHO Intercollegiate Forlcs; ENDOGENOUS
RHYTHM, Zoology; EPSILON LAMBDA CHI, Engineering
Leadership; ETA KAPPA NU, Electrical Engneerin;
FLORIDA ANTHROPOOGY CLUB; FLORIDA BLUE KEY;
Leadership; FLORIDA ENGINEERING SOCIETY, Profession
alism in Engineering; FOOD AND RSOUCEECONOMICS
CLUB; FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CLUB;
GAMMA THETA UPSILON, eography GARGOYLE
HONOR SOCIETY Ariltct re A ine Arts H or
INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL & ELECTRONC ENGINEERS
INSTITUTE OFTRAFFIC ENGINEERS; OHNMARSHALL BAR
ASSOCIATION, Law; JUSTICE WATCH, Law; KAPPA DELTA
PI, Education; KAPPA EPSILON, Pharmacy KAPPA KAPPA
PS, Baid; KAPPA PSI, Pharmacy; KAPPA U ALPHA, or-
lis & Communlcalons LAMBDA GAMMA PHI,
Veterinary Medicine; LAMBDA TAU, Medical Tehnolo;
"MICROBILOGY CLUB; MORTAR BOARD Honor Sacuy;
NATIONAL STUDENTS SPEECH &HEARING ASSOCIATION
Speech Pathology; NEWELL ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Entomology; OMICRON DELTA EPSILON, Economic
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA Leadershin and SEhodistim


ORGANIZATION; PSI CHI, Psychology; PUBLIC RELATIONS
STUDENT SOCIETY OF AMERICA; RHO CHI, Pharmacy;
RHO EPSILON, Real Estate; RHO PI PHI, Pharmacy; SAVANT,
Leadership & Service Honorary; SCABBARD & BLADE,
Military Science; SEMPER FIDELIS, Military; SIGMA ALPHA
IOTA, Music; SIGMA DELTA CHI, Journalism; SICGMA
GAMMA EPSILON, Geology; SIGMA LAMBDA CHI,
Building Construction; SIGMA PI SIGMA, Physic; SIGMA
TAU SIGMA, Honorary Tutoring; SIGMA THETA TAU,
Nursing; SOCIETY OF ENGINEERING SCIENCES, Engineer-
ing Sciences; SOCIETY OF ENGINEERING
TECHNOLOGISTS, Engineering Technology; SOCIETY OF
PHYSICS STUDENTS, Physics; STUDENT AMERICAN PHAR-
MACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION; STUDENT ASSOCIATION IN
HEALTH CARE AND HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION; STU-
DENT CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS ASSOCIATION;
STUDENT NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION; STUDENT
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION; STUDENT
PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION; TAU BETA PI,
Engineering Honorary; TAU BETA SIGMA. Band; TAU
SIGMA DELTA, Architecture; UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FORESTRY CLUB; UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LAW REVIEW;
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA REHABILITATION ASSOCIA-
TION; UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA STUDENT AMERICAN
GUILD OF ORGANISTS; VEGETABLE CROPS ROUNDTABLE,
Agriculture; WILDLIFE SOCIETY; XI SIGMA PI, Forestry.
Clubs and Societies: There are more than 225 student clubs
and organizations on the campus representing varied
interests and activities. These include academic interest
clubs; social, religious, and professional j~em'. hbby.
groups; and organizations dedicated to a wide variety of
personal and community concerns. Many of the
organizations are funded by Student Covernment through
the allocation of the student activity and service fee monies.

ACADEMIC HONESTY
Th Uni of Florida p sdens kp
all of their University class work. Therefore, students are
required to commit themselves to academic honesty by
signing the following statement as part of the admissions
process:
"I understand that the University of Florida expects its
students 1 be honest in all of their academic work. I agree to
adhere to this commitment to academic honesty, and
understand that my failure to comply with this commitment
may result in disciplinary action, up to and including
expulsion from the University."
This statement serves to remind students of the obligation
they assume as students at the University of Florida. Matters
of violations of academic honesty are adjudicated by the
Student Court.


STUDENT CONDUCT CODE
Students enjoy the rights and privileges that accrue to
membership in a university community and are subject to the
responsibilities which accompany that membership. In order
to have a system of effective campus governance, it is
incumbent upon all members of the campus community to
notify appropriate officials of any violations of relations,
and to assist n theirenforcement. All conduct re
the Unvety are printed and made avalablto td
and are applicable upon publication in the Independent
Florida Alligator, the University Catalog, the Student
Handbook, or other reasonable means of notification,
Violation of the Code of Conduct. A student may be
expelled or receive any lesser penalty for the following




EN

STUDENT AFFAIRS


4. Actions or statements which by design or conse-
quence amount to intimidation or hazing.
5. Participation in or continued attendance at, after
warning to disperse by a University official, a raid on a
University living unit.
6. Disorderly conduct.
7. Disrupting the orderly operation of the University as
defined in Florida Statutes, Board of Regents' Policies,
and the Demonstration Policy of the University.
8. Failure to comply with a University rule or regulation.
9. Violations of Housing, Interhall, and Area Council
regulations.
10. Violation of conduct probation.
11. Possession, use,or delivery of illegardrugs as defined
in Florida Statutes; and use of exploding fireworks as
defined in Florida Statutes.
12. Possession of a firearm on the University campus
except as specifically authorized by University Policy on
the Possession and Use of Firearms.
13. Actions or conduct which hinders, obstructs, or
otherwise interferes with the implementation or en-
forcement of the Student Conduct Code.
14. Failure to appear before the Committee on Student
Conduct or the Director of Student judicial Affairs and
to testify as a witness when reasonably notified to do so.
Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to compel
self-incrimination.
15. Violation of any municipal ordinance, law of the
State of Florida, or law of the United States.
For additional information regarding conduct procedures
contact the Office for Student Services or consult theStudent
Guide


INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
The University of Florida athletic program is a comprehen-
sive one with teams competing against regional and
intersectional opponents in nine intercollegiate sports.
Florida, a member of the Southeastern Conference and
the National Collegiate Athletic Association, fields athletic
teams in football, basketball, cross country, baseball, track
golf, tennis, wrestling, and swimming.
Physical facilities include Florida Field stadium with a
seating capacity of 62000, a baseball diamond, a completely
equipped varsity tennis stadium, swimming pool, running
track, two football practice fields, an 18-hole championship
golf course and Florida Gymnasium, a facility which houses
ample dressing and training rooms, weight rooms, meeting
rooms, four practice courts and the 5,500 capacity varsity
court.
Women's Intercollegiate Athletics are offered in gym-
nastics, golf, swimming, tennis, volleyball, softball, basket
ball, track and field. The program is operated under the
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women. Floridais
in Region III, Southeast Region.


program provides highly competitive and recreational
activities for every segment of the university population. For
unstructured leisure time activity, the students, faculty, and
staff may picnic, boat and swim at Lake Wauberg, check out
equipment from three equipment rooms on campus, play on
any of the 18 football fields, 15 softball fields, 12 volleyball
courts, 34 tennis courts, 12 four-wall handball-racquetball
courts, two squash courts, four indoor basketball courts, five
outdoor basketball courts, swim in the Florida pool, or
exercise on the Universal Gym.
For structured competitive play, the intramural depart-
ment organizes tournaments in the following leagues: All
University Special Events, Co-Recreational, Men's and
Women's residence halls, Student Wives, Engineering,
Faculty/Staff, Fraternity, Men and Women Open, Men and
Women Independent, Law, Sorority, Little Sister, Married
Students, and ROTC. The Club Program offers instruction,
recreational and competition, in approximately 43 clubs,
including Folk Dance, Karate, Sailing, Skiing, Weight Lifting,
Archery, and many more.
Student participation and student administration is a
tradition in the intramural program at the University.
Students officiate the games, manage the leagues, act as
Student Director and Office Director in the Intramural
Office, serve on the Protest Board and on the Intramural
Policy Board.
The current importance and growth of recreational sports
on campus is unmatched in the history of the University. We
invite everyone to use this resource atthe University to fulfill
their leisure time interest.

AUTOMOBILE AND TRAFFIC
REGULATIONS
Any student of the University of Florida Is eligible to
register a motor vehicle for use as authorized and to operate
and park a registered vehicle on campus. The type of parking
decal issued is determined by the student's local residence
and student classification.
Students desiring to park on campus during restricted
hours must register their automobiles or motorcycles at the
University Traffic and Parking Department, 10B8 johnson
Halt, during their first registration period. Failure to do so will
result in a parking citation. There is a system for fines and a
point system for on-campus vehicle violations. Persons
failing to respond to tickets will be subject to an additional
administrative fee of $5.00 and will not receive grades or an
academic transcript until delinquent fines and fees have
been paid.
A copy of the rules governing traffic, parking and
registration of vehicles on campus may be obtained from the
Traffic and Parking Department located in lohnson Hall, Each
student is urged to familiarize himself with these regulations
upon registering at the University.


INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS AND
RECREATION
Intramurals is a significant part of the total educational
community at the University of Florida. The intramural


























..W


:, 1 ..*.. .


- 1..-

. . .


1.
'- i
^* L3(


I -.


'^- ?;

," L C
.._. -
.: -'a- *44
S.*- .-'t
''i i$^.


^ aa.
a4
4.
C
4
^ * ..'
!1*.J!S^
*.^" jri~Lf


* 'i.


i~^:1r y ?. ,


m.. ,
mm a V -


r






STIOENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


Student Academic

Regulations

Additional information relative to graduation, social
activities, failure in studies, conduct, etc., may be found in
the Student Handbook and the sections of the catalog
containing regulations of the separate colleges and schools.
Each student should become familiar with rules and
regulations of the University.

READMISSIONS
APPLICATION FOR READMISSION
The information contained in this section applies only to
students who have previously been admitted at any level to
the University of Florida. Requirements for admission for a
student seeking to enroll in the University of Florida for the
fir time will be found in the Admissions section of this
catalog. Please consult the INDEX for page numbers.
How to Apply for Readmission: An applicant should
address a request to the Office of the Registrar for
application forms. Forms and directions vary with the level of
readmission. The applicant should indicate in the request the
college and the level of last enrollment at the University of
Florida as well as the college and level for which he or she
wishes to apply. Applications must be received in the Office
of the Registrar by the deadline date for the term, as
published in the University Calendar.
READMISSION OF STUDENTS
1. Satisfactory academic record
a. An applicant must be eligible to return to the
University of Florida on the basis of one's previous
academic record at this institution. Ifthe applicant has
attended any college or university subsequent to
enrollment at the University of Florida, he or she must
also have an average of "C or higher (as computed by
the University of Florida) on all work attempted at
each institution. The applicant must also be in good
standing and eligible to return to each institution
previously attended.
b. An applicant for readmission must meet the
admission requirements of the college or school he or
she expects to enter. (Consult the appropriate college
section of the catalog for specific admission re-
quirements.)
2. Satisfactory conduct record
a. An applicant must present a satisfactory record of
conduct. Regardless of other qualifications, an
applicant who has experienced major or continuing
difficulties with school or other authorities since the
last enrollment at the University of Florida may find
his or her application for readmission disapproved.
3. Submission of Request
a. An applicant for readmission should indicate the
name under which he or she was registered when last
enrolled and the social security number.


Credits
The word credit as used in this catalog refers to one quarter
hour.

rCF l er-r A Lin rn A nm A T .ILI


2. Recommendation of the faculty of the college awarding
the degree.
3. Residence requirements: (a) The minimum residence
requirement for the baccalaureate degree is three quarers.
(b) Students are required to co the last iv
credits applied toward the a au te
regular residence in the college from which the students to
be graduated. Exception to this regulation maybe madeonly
upon written petition approved by the faculty of the col#eg
concerned. (c) For residence requirementsforderees in
College of Law, Medicine, Dentistry, or Verinary
Medicine, see the catalog of each college. (d) For residence
requirements of the various graduate degrees, see the
Graduate School Catalog.
4. Physical Educat on Requirements: Each student who
enters as a Freshman or Sophomore must complete one
quarter of Physical Education.
5. Average Required: In order to secure a degree, student
must have a "C' average or better n all credits required
toward that degree,
6. Two Degrees: Two degreofme srank,e.g.,.A. and
B.S. may be conferred upon the same individual roded
that the second degree represents at least fortyfvecreditsof
additional work, with the necessary qaliveand
requirements.
7. Continuous Attendance: When a student's attendance is
continuous, graduation according to the curriculum under
which he or she entered is permitted, provided the courses
required are offered by the University. If some or all of the
required courses are no longer offered, the faculty of the
college concerned will make such adjustment for the
individual students as are appropriate or the curriculum
involved. As long as a student attends theUniversity as much
as one quarter during any calendar year, hisor her residence
is continuous.
6. Summer Quarter Enrollment: Effective September 1,19
all students entering a university in the State University
System with less thanhourscredit shall be required toearn
at least 15 credit hours prior to graduation by attendance at
one or more summer quarters. University Presidents may
waive the application of this rule in cases of unusual hardship
to the individual.
9. Application For Degree: Students expecting to graduate
must file an application for the degree in the Registrar's
Office on or before the date indicated in the current
University Calendar of the catalog. Students must apply in
the quarter in which they expect to graduate, regardless of
previous applications in previous quarters.
10. Time Limitr To receive a degree a candidate must have
completed: (a) all residence work required for graduationat
least 24 hours prior to the scheduled meeting of the College
Faculty voting on the candidates for degrees; (b) all
extension work at least two weeks prior to the scheduled
meeting of the College Faculty voting on the amlndidates for
degrees.
11. Time-Shortened Degree Opportunities: A variety of
programs is offered by the University of Florida which may
enable students to shorten the length of the time necessary
for them to complete their degree requirements. These
opportunities include several credit by examination
programs, and other options, For specific information, refer
to the section listed in the table of contents entitled "Time
Shortened Degree Opportunities." Also refer to the college
descriptions for additional information.
12. Extension Work Permitted: (Note: Extension work as
used below refers to both extension classes and cor-
respondence study.)


. Co.y *.A fn ht .*.... t . ..X L.. -


- _. _






CIDETR ACROW UI BUAloCS


a proproate section of this catalog or consult with the
dean of the college concerned.
d. Students may not take, by extension work, more than
eighteen of the last lifty-four credits necessary for a
baccalaureate degree.
e. Simultaneous registration in on-campus and extension
work is permitted provided that approval has been
obtained from the dean of the college in which the
student is registered.
13. Registration of Graduate Students: A student must be
registered in the University for the term in which the
candidate's final examination is given and at the time he or
she receives a degree.
14. Repeat Course Work: Credit will not be allowed on
repeated course work if the course that is repeated contains
essentially the same course content as it did when the
student initially enrolled for the course.
15. Pending Charge oa Academic Dishonesty or Code oat
Student Conduct Violation: No degree will be conferred
upon a student against whom there is pending an unresolved
charge of either Academic Dishonesty or Code of Student
Conduct violation where the penalty for such violation
would likely be:


c. Failing Grade
d. Any combination of the above until such time as the
e jis ol an nicrainasens .a met.

MIMUM AND MINIMUM AD
bmwcoflgwha v mn ad whith isaed Inthe
ialogt Ir th teens of such a atmeb?, the ge era I
University gutlaon plest This regulation allows a
mahu d of 15 eieor a sde who erned an
a below a "C" th preceding que of attendance.
The minimum load for all undergraduate students 12
hours.
Simultaneous enrollment in coorespondence courses,
ette~sion work at another college or university is counted in
computing the maximum, but not the minimum load.
Atthe eof registration, student, upntheappal of
his or her dSan, may rr for ~ h t h mnlnmu or
mo than the maximum oad After the late regstraton
period has clowd, no student amending under the above
conditions will hbe permitted to drop below the minimum
load unless the student succusfully petitions the colege in
which he or she is enrolled. The minimum load fr fulime
benefits from the VA orSocdal sewty 12 hours perquarter
for undergraduate students.


DUAL ENROLLMENT
1. Definition: Dual Enrollment, as used in this regulation,
refers to a student taking on-campus course smutaneously
at BOT8 the University f Florida and another InstitutIon.
2 Dual Enrollment will be poe ted OLY unden the
followIng conditions:
a. Approval in writing for the dual enroment must have
been secured by the studentrotheappropriate official
at EACH institution, A copy of such approval must be
furnished at the time of registration totheegstrar the
University of Florida.
b. A student will not e permitted to register at the
University of Florida for a course which is a art of the
curriculum it the udat" narant intutint. This


d. A student taking courses at the University of Florida
will be required to register and attend classes under de.
University of Florida calendar.
e. The student will pay appropriate fees at the University
of Florida based on the number of credit hours for which
he or she is registered at this institution.
It is the student's responsibility to insure that an official
transcript of work completed under a dual registration is
forwarded to the parent institution. Certification to social
security and veterans administration programs is also the
responsibility of the individual student who must request
each individual institution to furnish records as might be
amecencl y.

NON-DEGREE REGISTRATION
A student not previously registered at the University of
Florida may with college approval register for one quarter
only as a non-degree student. Members of the faculty and
staff and those with special permission from their college
may consider registering as non-degree students for more
than one quarter. Registration will be on a space available
basis. Procedures for registering are available from the
Registrar's Office.



Results of student's work are recorded in the Registrar's
Office as follows:
1. Undergraduate Students: Passing grades are A, B+, B,
C+, C, D+, D, in order of excellence, and S-Satisfactory.
Failing grades and E Failure, I Incomplete, U -
Unsatisfactory, X Absent from examination, EW -
Dropped for nonamendmnor
WF Withdrew falling,. : :
Grades of I and X are considered as failing grades. They
must be changed to passing grades in accordance with
the datesst in th Uni| verityCal d n
to grades of E. i ti t a s in::"
In special situations where it iS not possible to assn
regular rades at the end$f ote a df*
may be assigned. The symbol for a deferred grade is a
grade of H. This grade may be assigned only in special
cases, such as modular course, confined to infirmary, and
similar circumstances. A gradeHwill nae b mputed
in a student's grade point average.
2. Graduate students: Passing grades for graduate
students are A. B+, B, C+, C and 5. Grades of "C+," and
"C" In courses below 500-level are acceptable for credit
toward graduate degrees only if the l pragrmit-ts
the B-average requirement. C+ and C grades in 500-level
courses and above count toward a graduate degreeonly if
an equal number of credit hours in courses numbered 500
or above have been earned with grades of B+ and A,
respect|vely
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION
It is the University's desire to allow students to receive as
broad an education as possible. Therefore, students are
encouraged to take courses in disciplines in which they may
not have the proper background. They may take such course
work as elect ives and receive a grade of S satisfactory or U
- Unsatisfactory. These grades become a pan of a student's
record, but do not count in the grade point average as
computed by the University of Florida. NOTE: Other
agencies or institutions might count the grade of U as a failing
grade In their grade point average computation.
Tn a aIllikla *n aninIl ,.nin.dr wh ClI I nrean a ce..Ann


E


~Ri~l~;t
~EEBEEE;:"E" ::


*





SIDENT ACADMI R
STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


tion courses may be taken under the S-U option even when
the option has been elected in another course.
The deadline for electing the 5-U option is the last day for
dropping or adding a course as published in the calendar. In
addition, students who elect the S-U option may subse-
quently request that their instructors assign a standard grade.

AVERAGES
1. Definitions: The term "average," as used in any
university regulations concerning probation or suspen-
sion, always refers to the average on work attempted at
the University of Florida. Grades received at other
institutions are not averaged with grades received at the
University of Florida for the purpose of meeting any
University average requirement. Most honorary societies
take into consideration the quality of the work done at
other institutions in meeting any average requirements
they may have.
2. How computed: Averages are determined by com-
puting the ratio of grade points to quarter hours recorded
as attempted. Grade points are established by equating
each quarter hour as follows. A with 4.0, B+ with 3.5, B
with 3.0, C+ with 2.5, C with 2.0, D* with 1.5, D with 1.0,
and E, WF, EW, I, and X with 0.0. In computing averages, a
course repeated is counted as many times as grades for it
are recorded. Hours for grades of S and U are not
computed in the University of Florida grade point
average.
3. Grade Point Averages: Students' grade point averages
will be based on their overall work at the University of
Florida. That is, when students are admitted to the
University of Florida their grade point averages begin and
their academic averages will be based upon work taken at
the University of Florida. While work transferred from
other institutions toward a degree program at the
University of Florida will count in total hours earned,such
hours will not be a part of the University of Florida grade
point average.

PROBATION, SUSPENSION, AND
EXCLUSION FOR
ACADEMIC REASONS
The University of Florida is responsible for providing the
best possible, education in an economical and efficient
manner. In order to discharge this responsibility, the
University expects and requires reasonable academic
progress from its students. Continuation of students who
have demonstrated a lack of the necessary ability, prepara-
tion, industry, or maturity to benefit reasonably from a
program of university study is incc ,istent with the
University's responsibility as a tax supported institution.
The University of Florida Senate has enacted regulations
covering probation, suspension, and exclusion. These
regulations are directed toward enforcing the academic
standards of the University. The academic standards of the
University require both the maintenance of grade point
averages consistent with a reasonable chance of satisfactory
completion of the University programs and reasonable
conformance to the catalog description of the program of
study in which the student is engaged. Any college of the
University may specify additional academic standards and
students are responsible for observing the regulations
pertaining to such standards.


The conditions of academic probation are intended to: (1)
relate to quality of achievement below standards required
ultimately to graduate; (2) recognize unsatisfactory work at
an early date; (3) be sufficiently significant to make clear to
the student, and the administration, the short-comings of the
student's performance; (4) provide occasion for counseling;
(5) give students whose ultimate success is doubtful further
opportunity to demonstrate adequate performance.
All undergraduate students:
A student with less than a 2.0 grade point average overall
for University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship
warning if he or she has a grade point deficit which is less
than ten.
A student with less than a 2.0 grade point average overall
for University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship
probation if he or she has a grade point deficit of ten or more,
ut less than twenty.
Any student who is eligible to return to the University after
a suspension because of academic reasons will be placed on
final scholarship probation for his or her next quarter.
In addition to University probation, students may be
placed on probation by the colleges in which they are
registered if they do not maintain normal academic progress
in the program of study in which they are engaged.


CONTINUATION OF PROBATION
All Undergraduate Students:
A student's scholarship warning shall becontinuedas long
as he or she has a grade point deficit of less than ten. A
student's scholarship probation shall be continued as longas
he or she has a grade point deficit of ten but less than twey.
If the grade point deficit places him or her in another
probation category, the student shall be subject to the
provisions of that category.


REMOVAL OF PROBATION
All Undergraduate Students:
Scholarship probation or scholarship warning wtil be
removed when a student's grade point deficit has been
reduced to zero.
Removal of college probation:
A student will be removed from college probation when it
is deemed by his or her college that the student is making
satisfactory academic progress in the program of study in
which he or she is engaged.


SUSPENSION
The purpose of suspension from the University for
academic reasons is to remove from the University com-
munity those students who would not ultimately meet
requirements for graduation if they continued at their
Current level of progress.
The conditions of academic suspensions are intended to
(1) select students whose performance indicates that they
will not fulfill the requirements for graduation; (2) en-
courage students to leave the University as soon as a high
probability of failure is evident.
All undergraduate students:






maatiw CIPu H lUotAm


EARNING CREDIT
WHILE SUSPENDED
A student under any kind of academic suspension at the
University of Florida may not earn credit toward a degree at
the University of Florida by taking work in residence at
another institution or through extension or correspon-
dence courses.
However, a student who was suspended for academic
reasons and who has not yet earned the Associate of Arts
Certificate who subsequently graduates from an accredited
Florida Community College may appeal to the Petitions
Committee for reinstatement. The Petitions Committe may
then, upon the recommendation of the college in which the
student wishes to enter, admit the student on academic
probation to that college or school. Credits earned by such
students while under suspension from the University of
Florida may be transferred in accordance with other rules
and regulations of the University of Florida.



A University College student who has attempted 125
rter hours tinudes all work acceptedbytransfer and
attempted at the University of Florida) shall be
eliWie for egraton at the Univesity unless he
or se adm tte bS upp di sln degree p amrogram.

Aswu aybee dd from aprogramoistudyby the
g ronsble for the program If the student falls or
eure to maintan normal mdec progress, Such
euion does not prohibited student from enrolling in
@0r programs or colleges if Ahe or she meot the re-

Graduate s sudens:
Graduate students may be denied further registration in
the Universityor in their graduate major whn their progress
toward completion of their. planned graduate prog
becomes unsatisfactory. U tisfactory progss has
dened by the Graduate Councl Ao include failure to
maintain an accumulative grade average of B in.all work
ampted in the Graduate Schoo

DROPPING COURSES
No student will be allowed to drop a couuedurlng thelast
two weeks of regularly scheduled daises without recevng
falling grades. Any studentseeking an exception to this
policy must petition the University Petitions Committee.

WITHDRAWALS
AI undergraduate students:
It is the responsibility of each student to make every effort
to complete the ful quarter at the Universlty. If any student
whdraws after the date published in the catalo, he or she
shall be assigned grades of WF withd falling) in all
courses, and will be subject to the suspension and exclusion
regulations.
A student on scholarship probation who withdraws from
the University prior to the finaldatepublishen the catalog
will be continued on scholarship probation for the next
quarter.


work to the extent that, in the opinion of the instnuctr,
further enrollment appears to be of insufficient alue for
him or her to continue or detrimental to the best interests
of the class, it shall be the responsibility of the instructor
to warn such student in writing that further absences or
poor work will cause him or her to be dropped from the
class with a failing grade. When possible, this warning
should be delivered personally; in addition to this
procedure, a notification should be given to the Office of
the Registrar for mailing to the proper address. All such
warnings should be reported immediately to the depart-
ment chairman.
Should any subsequent absences or failure to do
classwork occur, the student shall be dropped from the
class with a failing grade. The instructor should initiate
this procedure by giving the Registrar written notice.
If the instructor is using a system whereby a given
number of absences is allowed, the instructor is authoriz-
ed to give double "cuts" for any absence incurred during
the last class meeting before an official university holiday
and the first class meeting following an official University
holiday. For example, if a student cutsthe last class before
Homecoming holiday, the instructor would be authoriz-
ed to count the student absent twice.
If the instructor does not use such a system, he or she is,
after warning the class, either at the beginning of the
course or several periods in advance of the forthcoming
holiday, authorized to drop the offending students) at
once. When a student is dropped after a class warning,
the notice to the Registar must so. state
2. NINE-DAY RULE: No student shall absent himself or
herself from the University for more than nine scholastic
days per quarter in order to participate in athletic or in
extracurricular activities. (A scholastic day is any day on
which regular class work is scheduled.)
The nine-day rule applies to individual members of the
group rather than to the group as a whole. Consequently,
a schedule of more than nine days for any group should
be rotated so that no student is absent from the campus
for more than nine scholastic days.
A student who has. been waneld lot saint or
unsatisfactory work in any class should not incur
additional absences in that course, even though he or she
has not been absent from the University for nine
scholastic days. It is the responsibility of the student to see
that his or her class work and attendance are satisfactory.
students classified ther thanT pBens mni
Attendance in clas optional with siwdents" te
successful completion of the Freshman year (45 quarter
hours credit). Nevertheless,students themselves remain fully
responsible for satisfying the entire range of academic
objectives as they are defined by the instructor in anycourse.
Post Baccalaureare Students:
The probation, suspenson, and exusion ulathat
apply to under aate sudenms also ally to
baccalaureate students.

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS


Students will be classified by the Registrar each quarter as
follows:
0. Special transient or other non-degre students wh
have been permitted to register at the University of
Florida will be classified as 0.
1. A student with less than 45 hours credit will be
classified as 1.


2. A student who has earned 45 quarter hours or more,


: ::


';"aE~


j;B


t


Sf






STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


6. Post-Baccalaureate students: Degree-holding students
who have been admitted to post-baccalaureate status will
be classified as 6.
7. A graduate student who is seeking a Master's degree
will be classified as 7.
B. A graduate student who has earned a Master's degree,
or has earned 54 or more hours while seeking a degree
beyond the Master's degree (but has not been admitted
to doctoral candidacy), will be classified as 8.
9. A graduate student who has been admitted to doctoral
candidacy will be classified as 9.


PETITIONS AND APPEALS
In case the operation of a student academic regulation
appears to result in an undue hardship on an individual
student, he or she may petition for waiver of the regulation.
When petitions pertain to requests for change of schedule
after the date authorized for change, exceptions to
minimum-maximum load regulation,or permission to drop a
course without a failing grade after the drop date, such
petitions should be presented to the School or College in
which the student is enrolled. Petitions approved by the
School or College must be reported to the Registrar's Office
before the action becomes official.
All other petitions should be presented to the Registrar
who will refer them to the University Senate Committee on
Student Petitions. No petition for readmission may be filed
after regular registration has started for the quarter.
The student seeking waiver oi regulation through petition
must remember that no committee on petitions can direct an
instructor to reinstate a student dropped from a course for
absence or unsatisfactory work. nor can the Senate Com-


mirtee require any college or school to grant a degree by
waiving any of these regulations.

ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
All actions taken under these regulations shall be reflected
by appropriate notations on the student's record.

MAINTENANCE OF
STUDENT RECORDS
The Registrar's Office maintains students' academic
records. A progress report is sent to each student at the end
of the term indicating his or her grades, cumulative hours
and grade points, probationary status, if any, and degrees
awarded, if any.

CONFIDENTIALITY OF
STUDENT RECORDS
The University of Florida assures the confidentiality of
student educational records in accordance with State
University System rules, state statutes, and the Family
Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, known as the
Buckley Amendment.
In general, a present or former student has the right to
personally review his or her own educational records for
information and to determine the accuracy of these records.
Parents of dependent students, as defined by the Internal
Revenue Service, have these same rights. A photo I.D. or
other equivalent documentation, or personal recognition by
custodian for record will be required before access is
granted.






TIMm mHO!RiD Daum Oa..OKTa-nt.


Time Shortened

Degree Opportunities


The University of Florida provides numerous oppor-
tunities by which students may accelerate their academic
careers and reduce the overall length of time spent in
completion degree requirements. These opportunities are
explained below:
1. Early Admission: The Early Admission program allows
superior students to be admitted to the University
following completion of the Junior year in high school.
Applications are encouraged and will be considered on
an individual basis by the Admissions Committee. For
additional information, refer to the Admissions section of
the catalog.
2. Dual Enrollment: Dual Enrollment refers to a student
taking on-campus courses simultaneously at both the
University of Florida and another institution. For exam-
ple, a high school student could register at the University
as a non-degree student. The credits earned prior to high
school graduation could then be accepted for advanced
standing placement and degree-credit when the student
is admitted to the University. For more information, high
school students may refer to the description of non-
degree registration within the Student Academic
Regulations section.
University of Florida students may also earn additional
;t though" lkth, dual enrollment program. For more
ationrefer to the discussion of dual enrollment
iththe Student Academic Regulations section.
3. ncrasedCourse Load: Capable students who register
h: r a re.than theinormal 1 hours per quarter may
complete the traditional four-year span within three

4. Vearound Attendance: Students attending the
Unverstevery quarter including Summer sessions, may
advance their graduation date by as much as three
quarters.
- 5. Credit by xaminaiRon: A student may participate in a
variety of credit by examination programs n order toearn
credit toward a degree awarded by the University of
Florida. Credit received from one examination p ram
may not be duplicated by another. The various c it by
examination programs are explained below:
Advanced Placement Program: This credit by examination
opportunity is sponsore by the Collee Entrance Examina-
don Board. Under this program, a student entering the
University offers a nationally graded examination as
evidence of completion of a college level course taken in
high school. If the results of the examination meet the


::
i:E j
:E


1 EE"E""
:EE" EE



""":i:


minimum requirements listed below, the student may
receive University credit for courses covering similar
material.


Advanced
IacemenI
rmaidnaalk
American History
European History
Mathematics
Biology
Chemistry
Physics
Languages
English
Classics


atewMe
Coun-
AMH
EUH
MGF
BSC
CHM
PHY
Variable
ENG
CLA


MhILnmum Seome
Required fai
3, 4, or 5
3, 4, or 5
3, 4, or S
3, 4, or 5
3, 4, or 5
3,4,or 5
3, 4, or 5
3, 4 or S
3, 4, or 5


Ho-m
arr

i, or P
IP
1, 10, or lP
io
.10, or 15P
1. 6, or 9a


College Level Examination Program (CLEP): The College
Level Examination Program is another type of credit by
examination opportunity sponsored by the College Entrance
Examination Board. By presenting appropriate scores,
students may receive as many as 45 hours credit toward
completion of general education requirements. Their scores-
on the CLEP general examinations must meet the minimums
established by the State University System. In addition,
students who plan to apply for credit must do so before
enrolling or, at the latest, priorto theend of theirfirstterm at
the University. CLEP testing is periodically available on the
campus and is adminhterEdlyftihFrOffttLhU fletoflut
Resources.

between public community cofeges anl puuic state
universities on the acceptance of credit by transfer), the
University of Florida awards credit for CLEPscores atthe 50th
percentile based on national men-women Sophomore
norms. We are indicating below the guideline for the
awarding of credit.

CLIEP Statewide Min.mue Score Qiurta
General Coune Required lor tumm
Eaminadion Dedgnation Credl Credt
English ENG Scale Score 494 9
Socal Sciences S51 Scale Score 486 9
Biology BSC Sub Score 50 4.
Physical Sciences PSC Sub Score 49 4.
Humanities HUM Scale Score 489 9
Marhematics MGF Scale Score 497
Additional credit may be awarded for satisfactory scores
on the CLEP subject area examinations.
Departmental Examinations: A student may also receive
credit through the challenge of departmental course
examinations. For specific information, contact the
departments or colleges.
*The amount of credit awarded is determined by the test
score.


i




The Lower Division

University College


SW m
*r


BE
BIC


*HAVIORAL STUDIES
)LOGICAL SCIENCES


^r J'


F


7"^Y.'









University College

The University College offers programs in general
education and assists its students in selecting their major
prior to admission to the college from which they will obtain
their bachelor's degree. It awards an Associate of Arts
certificate to those who have successfully completed 96
credits of academic work, including the general education
course work required in their major.
The University College is a constituent part of the
University of Florida. Its special mission is to provide students
with a critical understanding of the major fields of human
knowledge and their interrelationships. To furnish this
undemanding, therefore, the College provides a system of
general education courses that cuts across specialized fields
to supply an introduction to the methods and conceptual
structures in physical sciences, the social sciences, the
behavioral sciences, and the humanities.
The Department of Physical Sciences explores the
interaction of man and nature and investigates the impact
and meaning of physical reality for the individual and society.
The Department of Social Sciences examines social systems
and major social institutions, tracing the historical develop-
ment of these institutions und the collective whole which
produces them. The Department of Humanities seeks to
explore the experiential and aesthetic dimensions of human
existence by focusing on classical and contemporary works
in the arts and literature. The Department of Behavioral
:; ;~i e* res major perspectives on the individual and his


S e ipto hisenwronmensed through various
social scientific disciplines. Course work in English,
mathematics and the biological sciences is also part of the

is cuicular stcture u to p ide a basic un-
... ..... a. ..,a m n t ** a d.a IKn
..*:: '^Ri~E:1 ^iiii~tt~iiliii !~lVNB'l^l^^ mll~BK&l'ti~iQ~~ili i fl d i:: ii'~i


intellectual exploration and a grasp of the

ADEMIC ADVI E huan
ACADEMIC AD iSEMET


it 13 s lrlen e e ni

S tch ugeof
tools, techniques,
mhi


initial registration as a University Ca Freshman for
each Fall cass is conducted during the precedinSumer
months. Students and their parents h a9e ~ opportunity to
attend on. of several two-day proga Notces c~ncen
this are mailed in the la Spring tot sesdetswho have
been admitted bythe Luniversity Admissions Office. At these
Summer Regiat o Programs, students and are. atend
sesions relating to career choic-- student activity hBelping
setices and course selection. Each student meets with a
University COiege academic adviser who assist In selecting
codres to take in the Fall.
Those fall students who cannot attend a Summer Registra-
tion Program confer with academic advisers as a part of the
registration period held in the week prior to thebeginningof
classes in the Fall. Students entering college in the Winter,
Spring or Summer quarters also have advisement con-
ferences as a part of the registration period prior to classes.
In the latter part of each quarter, students register for their
next quarter. Again academicadvisers are available to discuss
course selection, it is expected that students shall accept
responsibility for fulfilling curricular ure events as stated
in the catalog and students who are making successful
progress are not required to see an advisor when registering.
Students who are changing major or who are not main-


other emergency he will find academic advisers in the
University College office available for discussion of the
problem. Advisers are also available to help the student
define any other academic problem and find corrective
measures.

COUNSELING AND


RELATED SERVICES


In addition to assistance from academic advisers, Universi-
ty College students may find that one or more of the
following offices can be of assistance in solving personal
problems, career selection problems or problems relating to
deficiencies in academic skills The Student Affairs section of
this catalog describes their specific services.
1. Reading and Writing Center
2. Speech and Hearing Center
3. Student Health Service
4. University Career Planning & Placement Center
In addition, the University Vocational and Psychological
Counseling Center provides professional psychological
services to students. These include vocational guidance,
career information, assistance with academic problems,
specialized testing, marriage counseling and personal
counseling. Any student may apply in person for such
services as he deems necessary. No charge is made. The
Counseling Center offers consultative services roUniversity
faculty and staff who are engaged in counseling students.
Close relationships are maintained with deans, University
College advisers, housing personnel, the Student Health
Service, and religious centers, for the purpose of expediting
both counseling and consultative services.


METHODS OF
COLLEGE ACCELERATION


Details concerning acceleration are provided in the part of
the catalog entitled "TIME SHORTENED DEGREE OPPOR-
11N TlS

Students who obtain credit via CLEP or Advanced
Placement must do so before starting collegeor,at the latest,
priorjo the end of their first term as the University. Students
who obtain general education credit by examination may
take further work in the areas covered, using it for elective
credit Some credit by examination may not serve to
accelerate a students prograeu because the specific tourse
requirements of his major are not satisfied bygeneral subject
tter tredit. -
A student may choose to attend four academic quarters
each year. This would enableiim to accomplish the work of
four academic years in three calendar yeas,4Stdeamap
"take such Summer work at their local community college
prior to completion of 96 credits. After completion of 96
credits only work taken at accredied colleges or universities
(not junior colleges) is accepted as transfer credit Students
are urged to discuss any such plans with a UvertyCollege
academic adviser prior to enrolling in courses at another
school,
Unusually able students may choose to accelerate by
carrying heavier than average course loads rather than
applying themselves more deeply to normal loads. In some
majors such a student might trim one to two quarters o of
the time required for his degree; however, at considerable
risk to the depth and quality of his education.


1:


:"-
*" M
.


*/


B






UNIVERSIn COLLEGE


special assistance in reading and study skills, structured study
experience via the Office of Instructional Resources
Teaching Center and tutoring. In addition efforts are made to
obtain some financial assistance in the form of jobs, loans or
scholarships for students engaged in the program. Admission
to the Special Services Program is selective and only a limited
number of students can be engaged.
2. THE COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM
This program is limited to students from each entering
class who are issued special invitations to participate. These
students become mebeers of small tutorial classes. The small
size of the classes and the high quality of the students make
possible deep penetration into course materials and
encourage independent work. The students develop their
critical faculties through extensive reading, work on research
papers, and oral performance in class.
The Associate of Arts with Honors is given to students in
the College Honors Program who qualify for the certificate
and who complete at least 27 quarter hours in the program
and have an overall 3.0 average. The Associate of Arts with
High Honors is given to students in the Program if they
complete at least 36 quarter hours in the Program and have
an overall 3.0 average.


majors such as mathematics and science is it permissible to
use courses in the major for both purposes. In selecting his
courses the student should study course descriptions in the
back of the catalog, since course titles alone give insufficient
information. Stated preprequisires must be adhered to. A
student who wishes to use a course not listed below for
satisfaction of general education requirements must have it
authorized by a University College academic adviser.
University College academic advisers are authorized to
approve courses in addition to those listed in satisfaction of
general education requirements when reasonable. They
routinely do so in the case of courses transferred from junior
colleges and other universities.
NOTE: Students are urged to study the course descriptions in
the back of the catalog so as to take courses in their proper
sequence.
MATHEMATICS (Minimum Credits Required) ........ 4
MGF 1113 Fundamental Mathematics
MGF 1114 Fundamental Mathematics: Special Topics
Any Mathematics course
Any Statistics course
ENGLISH (Minimum Credits Required) .............. 9


Students


GENERAL EDUCATION AND THE
ASSOCIATE OF ARTS CERTIFICATE


The University College
administration of the ge
University. To this end
education courses and th
Arts Certificate of the
university must complete
specified for their malor
Certificate prior to gradu
may transfer to the college
approves. All general edu
prior to graduation from th
college are obtained fro
maintain a 2.0 average m


the Universit
requirements


y College
for admissi


except that no student may
beyond 125 credits.


has primary responsibility for the
neral education program of the
its departments provide general
e college awards the Associate ol
University All graduates of the
the general education program
and receive the the Associate of Arts
action. University college students


e of their


canon req
lat college
)m Ihe Re
av. barring
beyond 96
on to the


maior when


that college


uiremenls must be met
Applications to change
registrar Sludents who
: suspension, remain in
credits to complete
college of their malor


remain in the University College


In planning each quarter's program the student should
obtain some balance of general and special education, of
science and non-science The undecided student should be
careful to make progress in his general education while
trying oul courses in specific majors. Typically a student
completes the greater part of his general education in the
first two years while also taking the preprofessional courses
specified for his major.
The Associate of Arts Certificate will be awarded upon
completion of:
1.96 credits including authorized credits in general
education as indicated for the student's major
2. An overall C average
Application forms for the Associate of Arts Certificate are
available from the Registrar and should be returned to him.


AUTHORIZED COURSES FOR


are expected


English with ENC 1102 and follow this with two other English
courses Students receiving a grade ofC or below in ENC 1102
are advised to take ENC 1418. ENGC 1200. ENG 1400, ENG 1710,
and ENG 1210 are particularly designed for freshmen, but
courses numbered 2000 and above are open to those who are
qualified. Students should see their English instructors or an
adviser for suggestions of appropriate courses.

SOCIAL SCIENCES (Minimum Credits Required) .. 9
The following Social Sciences courses have been
specifically designed as interdisciplinary courses to fulfill
general education requirements They may also be used as
eleclives
551 2110 American Institutions: Culture and the Socializing
Institutions
551 2120 American Institutions: The Emergence of the
Economic and Political Institutions
5SI 2122 American Institutions The Economicand Political
Inslilutions ol Urban America


551 2121 American Institutions
Institutions from Minority Grou
551 2221 American Institutions.
Affairs
551 2201 American Institutions
SSI 2935 Seminar in American I
ASN 2001 Asia and its Peoples
551 2114, 2124.2224 American Ins
SPC 3710 Patterns of Intercultu


- American
- American


: Economic and Political
p Perspectives
America's Role in World

in World Perspective
institutions

titutions: ColleRe Honors
ral Communication


One or more of the following courses, while not originally
designed for general education, may also be used
provided Ihe student does not take more than one course
Irom each field


Instead of
AMS 2030
ANT 2410
ANT 2402
SOC 2000


GENERAL EDUCATION


The following co
University Cnllpee f


JI LJ, r


have
in sati


approved
general e


I 1. i. I


by the
education


AMH 2010


551 2110 American Institutions.
- Inlroduclton to American Studies
- Cultural Anthropology
- Anthropolog) and Modern Life
- Principles of Soclology
551 2120. 2122, 2121 American Institutions:
- Economic Concepts and Institutions
- Economic History of the United States


- United


to begin their


course


work


Institutions. Special Topics
Institutions- Special Topics


to 1877


____~


I


to 18,77,






UNIVmITY COUC GE


BEHAVIORAL STUDIES (Minlmum Cmdil Required) ... S
The following BES courses are specifically designed to
saisfy general education requirements.


BES 1310 -
BES 2522 -
BES 2121 -
BES 2132 -
BES 2013 -
MAF 2402 -
BES 2351 -
BES 2431 -
BES 2412 -


Issues In Human Behavior
The African Experience
Creative and Critical Thinking
Decision Making
Behavioral Studies: Special Topics
- Human Sexuality and Society
Power and Violence
Simulated Societies
Cybernetics and Society


BES 2391, 2392, 2393 Behavioral Studies: College Honors
BES 3141 The Individual and the Religious Experience
BES 3241 Advanced Topics in Human Sexual Behavior
Other courses which may be used are:
PCO 3714 Personal Growth
MAF 2200 Marriage and the Family

HUMANITIES (Minimum Credits Required) ............ 12
b oSwing HUM cenus have been sedall
designed as interdisciplinary courses to fulfill general
dmtq squtrenn Thermay a obe used electives.


UM S


HUM

HUM
HUM
HUM
HUM
HUM


2190

2230

2410
243
2229


HUM 3221
HUM 3251
HUM 3420
HUM 3473
MUM st


--The Humanities Forum
- Ascent of Man
- Western Humanities
- Western Humanities
- Western HumaNs
- Asia HumaniS
- African Humanitis

, 2239, 2r9 Western"Humnkler
* .4 t a *w t
--Helleni/jcudae-Christlian Trad.
- Conmeipor fHuwanite
- Humanies of Avn Garde
-A illanism


thth the studio
partciuiar bield.


Colwnge


PHYSICAL SCIENCBS ..... (6-9 credits -e note hdow)
The following CPS courses have been specifically dmigmed
as interdisciplinary courses to fulfill general education
requirements. They may also be used as electives.
ISC 2400 Fundamentals of Physical Science A
ISC 2401 Fundamentals of Physical Science B
ISC 2402 Fundamentals of Physical Science C
15C 2452 Man's Interactions with the Physical
Environment


ISC 2453
ISC 2454
ISC 3455


Honors
PSC 2701
PSC 2936
PSC 3402
.PhhC 3900J~ ^^u~ J H


s


- Physical Sciences: Energy and Society
- Physical Foundations of Environmental Sciences
- Water and Society
) The Physical Sciences
I The Physical Sciences
) The Physical Sciences
- Natural Regions
L Laboratory in the Physical Sciences
- Our Environment
; 2707; 2901 The Physical Sciences: College


- The Scientific Basis of Technology
- Physical Sciences: Special Topics
- Space and Society
- Men and Cot"


Students majoring in science normal
science requirements by taking Chemi
queen, c .


One or more of the following courses
designed for general education, may al
the student does not use more than or
field.

CHM 1020C Chemistry and Socety
GLY 1000 Exploring the Geological!
MfT 1010 Introduction to Weather
Hv vma Phyi cai r .a


yi fulfill t
stry (204


heir physical
10, 2045, 2055


i, while not originally
so be used provided
ne course from
;;,pN CLe^ifi
i, .. ::N
iN*:: :


sciences
ind Climate


,, . i
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (6 Cmdil See I
CLF Elementary Bologiqcal Scincm (CL
Th following CBS caeneM deigd i
education. They may also be used as electdve


- Chinese Culture
- Myths of the Greeks and Roman
- Greek Life and Ltt
- Religion of the Greeand Roma
- Greek Drama
- Greek and Roman Epic
- Western Civlzation: From Eary Ti Through
Ages
- Wmrn Civiiration) From Rlta nce h t


18ah Centur
EUH 202 Wstern Civilization: From 18th Cent
Present
FRT 226 The French Novel of 19th & h Cent
English Translatlon
HUM 2510 Introduction to the Fine Arts
LIN 2000- Language and Man
LIT 4930 Literature and Opera ariable Topics)
MUL 2011 Introduction to Music
MUL 2112 Masterworks
MUL 2113 Structure


-F -4n


- Conemporary Moral Issues
- Introduction to the Study of Religion
- (LIT 4930) Myth in Film and Literatue
-_ -


ryto


uris In


APB 2150 --The Biooical a


AP 2150L Laboratory in Biological Sciences
APR 81, 3 29M2,9 93 T. Sotlog al
Honor
The following courses, hou h more professional

and may be use by other


AGO 2501 Agriculture In the Environmiet
ANT 3511 Physical Anthropology
BOT 1020C Introductory Botany
BOT 021C CGeneal Botany
PCB 3033C Introduction to ecology
ECH S73 Technology and Survival
ENV 33 Envronmental Qufity and Man
FOR 2010 The Ecoystem -- Man- IReburce
Relationships
FOS 26 Man's Food
HUN 2201 Human Nutrition
APR 3223 Basic Anatomy and Physiology
s &_ y -- --


CH! 3500
CLT 2370
CLA 0
CLT 2371
CLT 32
CLT 340
EUH 200
Middle
EUH 2001


:x 9 ~ 1>,a


tK K K. K.a K "<
notebdow)

Farl enurd


x: x: xx x


j:E


IM E il

..!M
KKKK

KKKK


1, *
*i






UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


PLANS OF STUDY
BY COLLEGE OF MAJOR
On the following pages, specific general education
requirements are listed for each college and/or major.
Students are expected to follow the program of general
education specified for their particular baccalaureate goal.
In other words the particulars of a student's general
education depend upon his choice of majors and his choice
of courses within the limits set by the major. Associate of Arts
Certificates are awarded on this basis. Preprofessional
courses for the student's first two years are also listed.
Suggested course sequences are not at all rigid. Each
student should adjust his program to fit his ability and
background. Academic advisers will help do this.


SOPHOMORE YEAR


MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calc
ECO 2013 Basic Economics ........
Humanities .. . . . . . . .........
Biological Sciences .................


ACC 2001 Elementary Financial Accounting
MAC 3312 Analytic Geometry and Calculus
ECO 2023 Basic Economics ........ ...
Elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


ACC 2103 Financial Accounting I
CAP 2010 Intro. to EDP .........
STA 3023 Intro. to Statistics .....
PHI 2100 Logic .......... ......


ulus ......... 5


. . . . . . . . 3


. . . . . . 5

. .... . .... 5
111111111111
111111


... ...... ...... . .... 4
.....................4i
. .. ... .. .. .. .. . ... 4
. . .. . .. . .. .. 4
. . . . . 4


ACCOUNTING


AGRICULTURE


Students planning to enter the School of Accounting
should take, while in the University College, the following
program of sdy. Students with questions concerning dthe
Preproessional Requirements may wish to contact an


adviser n the School of Accounti


*ENC English ........... ......
**MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry an
**PHI 2100 Logic ................
American institutions .........
The Humraities *i **
Tu...............
ni***hl Scieices **........

PhllI EaC ............


ing.


d Calculus 1


4. C*r4*4*4
....mic.ul
. *. ... 5 *


4.* 4* 4 44* .* 4 *4*4*
*4 4444U ****** *4* f
* 4* ** ,,*4* *.49,**4,
********* r* *4* ,,. 444
.................

................


****ACC 1 ementay Financial Accounting .
***ACC 210fnadal Accounting .........
CAP 210 Inouction o EDP ..............
ECO 31323 Basic Em ,...........
MAC 3312 Aeahydc eomsy an Calmly. 2
STA 3am 2 UW SQtk- ...4....
ecIiv t make a tol of 9 hlu


4 4 * 4 4
- Q
,. 9W

.... 2
* *, 12
..7-1*

Cr~te

* .*4* *


Students planning to enter the College of Agriculture
should take, while in lower division, the following program
of study. The sequence in which courses are to be taken will
depend upon the department in which a student takes his
upper division major and will be determined by counselors
in the College of Agriculture.
General Educa Requmen
Credits
English ...................*.......*......* ......... 9
MAC 32 Algebra and Trigonometry .............
Behavioral Studies ,**.*****.****** ****,********** 4
t ierkh an tI stitiE s .*... ... ......*.. .....* ..*... ,.

O4M 040 Introductory General Chemistry ........... 4

BSC 21nC Organ ismic Bilogy ............... ...... 4
PEM 1100 Phtyscl Educatin ............*...... ....., 2


9~ ~ *A^f -^^^*^^"^W^-^I^lB^ -^i^'~t'^


.43*44*44*
* 4.4,.,,,,
t4* *t**. .
. .........


wing mouses students are rquid to take ENC 1102 and
ENC 1418.

**MAC 3311 and PHI 2100 are also considered preprofessional
courses.
***Students are expected to complete 16 hours of the Sciences.

*"The ACC 2001 and ACC 2103 sequence is required for
Accounting Majors. A grade of "C" or better is required in
these courses to register for accounting major courses.

Sugged Come Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR


ENC 1102 Expository Writing.
Social Science ::::..:.. .
Physical Sdcience ............
Humanities ...............
Physical Education ..........


ENC 1418 ... ........ ...................
Social Science .. ...... ..... ... ...
Physical Science ......,.. ...*.......* ..


Credits
*44 **3


S... ... ..... .. 3
S......... ..* 2


. *. 4 44*4* 3 .T
* I4*444t .* 4
* * ** < fl < "*


CM 3041C and 2042C Caneal Cemt ry and




A. Prospective majors in Animal Science, Dairy Science,
Food Science, Poulty Science, Pre-Veterinary Medicine
and Microbioo and Cell Science should take courses
listed above plus BSC 201C, 2012C and CHM 243C.
B. Prospective majors in Dairy and Poultry Management
may satisfy the Chemisry requirements by completing
CHM 2040 and CHM 2041C.

C. Pospective majors in Agronomy, Fruit Crops, Or-
namental Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Soil Science, and
Vegetable Crops should take the courses listed above
plus BSC 2011C and BOT 2021C.

D. Entomology majors should take BSC 211C and BSC
2012C in addition to the above to complete biology
requirements.

E. Prospective majors in Food and Resource Economics
should take the courses listed above but may substitute
MAC 3311 or MAC 3312 for PHY 204C and may fulfill
Chemistry requirements by completing CHM 2040 and
2041C or CHM 1020C and CHM 1021.

F. Prospective majors in Agricultural Education,









Suitab electives in Arlculture: AEB 3133 or 3300, MAC
32 and 3312, AN5 3007, ASM 3003. EN 3005, FOR 2003, FOS
2001 and 2002, PLP 3002, SOS3022, PLS2031,ORH 3S13C,FRC
3221, 3212 and other according to prerequisites completed.
*Four or more credits of Mathematics or Statistics above
College requirements may be substituted.
SugRested Coune Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR


English ....... ........ .. ...... .
SSI American Institutions ...........
MAC 1132 Algebra and TriBgonometry
BES Behavioral Studies .............
PEM 1100 Physical Education .......


English . . . . . . . . ...
SS American Institutions ....
CHM 2040 General Chemistry
BES Behavioral Studies ......
Elective . . . . . .... .


.. . .
*. .. . .
.m...i.


.i.....l.
. ......i.


S*4ibb I. O 4... 04.4. 44t4 .*r
551 American Institutions .............
anM I S4C Ow ,Chsm p... ..
-SC IC .O..ismic B-ology .
SOPHOMORE flAK


hSt umanium iewm '' **' : : : ::
M 2C Chemistry .....l ,...
BSC 2011C Molecules and Cells ....


* *
* t*


HfM Humantisdes 4., 4... ...,
Mt 2043C ChemIry ... ...,.li.
3103 Food Resoure Ec onom

HIM umtani .t .* .5.4, .,.
P Y 4C Physicsr .
Electves of Upper Dsio Ces


ARCHITECTURE
Students planning to nter the College of Architecture
should take, whije in the university College e of the
following programs of study. They should consult the
departmenal major adviser forcific information regard-
ing grade point averages, minimum grades required in
certain courses and ote information relating to the
Curriculum. Advisers are listed in the catalog i~der the
section titled "College of ArchltetureY '
To be eligible for admission to theCollege ofArchict,
the student is required to have at least a 2.0 (c) average in the
courses listed in the appropriate curriculum for the first two
years. In addition the student must earn a 2.0 (c) average all
preprofessional work included in the first two years of the
program. Please refer to additional information in the
section of this catalog titled "College of Archltecue,"
under the heading "Requirements for Adnlsslon,
For upper division programs see the College of Architec-
ture section of the catalog:

A. FOR THE DEGREE, IACHUCR OF DEON 1(ARCHAC-
TURE)
General Education Req uiremenus


Polesdeonl equle nl
ARC 1211 Building Arts ...................
ARC 1115C Basic Drawin .................
ARC 116C Architectural Drawing .........
ARC 1131C Architectural Communications ..
ARC 2311C Architectural Design 1 .........
ARC 2313C Architectural Design 2 .........
ARC 2461 Mat. & Meth. of Constr. 1 ... ...
ARC 2500 Architectural Structures 1 . . ...
MAC 2223 Analytical Geometry and Calculus


Suggested Coure Sequence


FRESHMAN YEAR
MAC 2223 Analytic Geom/Calc ....................... 5
Physical Sciences ...... . . . ......... . . ..... .... 4
ARC 1115C Basic Drawing ................... ......... 4
ARC 1211 Building Arts .............................. 3
Behavioral Studies ................... ............. 4
PHY 2004C Applied Physics I .......................... 5
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

English ................. ................ .......
ARC 1126C Arch. Drawing| ........................ 4


ARC 1131C Arch. Communications .................... 4
Hum n S e .. ... .. . ...4 a .*.. .* .4 4. Ni..... .A.A4

umani 4
ngis ......h.......... h. ... ....................

ARC 2311C Ach. S I......:.
Biological Sciences .........,... .......,..., 3


ARC 2313C Arch i Des.ign N t::::.: tw..
Biological Sciences .&... ..4. . 4. ... .
ARC f250 Arch. Structures I ...;.in -..u~. ~ I.:n;.
alSoci Sciences
Behavioral Studies i.i.
ARC 2461 Materials&Methodsof Co strc io ...

FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF DESIGN (INTERIOR
DESIGN)
Ku1~:.:-
:d ..j L ji~l5 ui i j ^L j~im :-u~hm H i ii m~iL-m-:*:*: :* .. i:'::"^^:- :**:'::** K KK KK *::* :-'::'-^
"IB~~~~~~~f-K^^'^1~~~~~~~~~~~ ~ :T** '^*^- *^*XB^ iX^ E :,"M '*''*~ '*'''**** .*^V'"''"'' :**** KKKKK^:K


English .... ...... .. ........
MAC 1132 Agebra and Trigo etry
Behavioral Studies .............
American Institutions ,.*... i.t

PhyM en... .............
Biological kien .............
PfML11rhysilu ducmtion Ca.....


-profe R


ARC 1211 Building Arts ......,.,.....
ARC 11I SC Basic Dawl ..........
ARC 11 Architectural Drawing 1 ,. ,
ARC 111iC Architectural Communications
ARC 2311C Architectural Degn 1 ....
ARC 213C Archtectural heulRn z .....
ACC 21 Elementary Accounting .......
Electlves ......, ....B*..


flflu


. . **- ii
rC*** y~:* Iw *< f *
**I,,,~~*, V5

: r ii. W-'-* ^'^ *&*
.. it'l 41 i f1a *Wn
4 4 XX 4:.. XXXX
XX4j4 *X XXX X XX"XX X


Creo is


Suggested Coure Sequence


,ii
4;ii~i


a : ... i -
S4.
lt ^ ah F~ilF | |11 i ..


* 5 44 0
A:'I
X oX X X*X
'.*^.


.!,


: *


*"_ _* _1L







UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


ARC 111SC Basic Drawing .......
Social Sciences .................
Physical Sciences ..... ........ ..
English . .... . . . . . . . . .
Behavioral Studies ..............

ARC 1126C Architectural Drawing
Social Sciences .................
Physical Sciences .... ...... ...
English ........................
Behavioral Studies ..............


S. . . i . .. . . . . 3
.................. . 3
. . i . . i . . 3


S. . .. . . . . .. . 3

. .................... 3
. . . . . .


ENG English ........... ....... .................. 3
PSC 2501 Physical Sciences ........................ 4


ARC 1131C Arch. Communic. ................... ..... 4
ENG English ................ .. ........ ........... . 3
**PSC Physical Sciences ...... ..................... . . .. 3
SOC 2000 Princ. Sociology. ............... ...........4
COP 3110 Intro. Computer Pr. ........................ 2


SOPHOMORE YEAR SOPHOMORE YR


HUM Humanities n......... .... .... ......
MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonometry .........
ARC 131C Ardhitectural Communications .....
ELECT Eledive .** .... .... ..... .... .. ......


iooical Sciences *.... ...........
ACC 2001 Accounting ................ ..,.........
ARC 2311C Architectural Design 1 ......... ..........
Humanities ............ .. . ...... ..... ... ... .
Biological Sciences .....................r............
ARC 2313C Architectural Design ......................
ELECT lective .. :*. i ...... . .... .......


C. FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE
General Education Requirements
Credits


..... 9
* ..... 6


English .............................. ....
American Institutions ......................
SOC 2000 Princidles of Sociolovg ...........
*The Humanities ........................
PSC 2501 Physical Sciences: Our Environment
**PHY 204C Applied Physics ................
BSC 2010C Organismic Bio. ......... ......
PEM 1100 Physical Education ...............


LAE 2710 Land. Arch. 1 ......
ARC 2311C Arch, Design 1 ..
*HUM Humanities ...........
ENG English .. ..ce.......
**PSC Physical Sciences .......


A 27A11 L3and. Arch. 2 ............................. :
ARC 2313C Arch. Design 2 ........ ... ... ... ....4* 4
*HUM Humanities .......... ............... ........... 4
SI Social Sciences .. ... ... ... ... .... .......... 3


ARC 2461 Mat/Meth. Const. 1 .... ........... .. ....... 4
ARC 2500 Arch. Structures 1 .......................... 4
* Humanities 4 t* t * t .t 4 . 4 4 M4 .
SSI Social Sciences *........ ..... ......... .... .... 3


...t.4t4.w 4
4**ttm.te.e 5
...*.... 4
* ** * ** :i I Ei
:* * **: *
.* * * *J
* # # fl t f 1-


Preprofesional Requirements


BOT 2710C Pract. Plant Taxon. ...................
MAC 2223 Anal. Geometry & Calculus ...........
COP 3110 Intro. Comp. Prog. ........ ...... .
ARC 1211 Building Arts ............... ............
ARC 1115C Basic Drawing .... ....................
ARC 1126C Architectural Drawing 1 ..............
ARC 1131 C Architectural Communications ......
ARC 2311C Architectural Design 1 ...............
ARC 2313C Architectural Design 2 .............
ARC 2461 Materials and Methods of Construction .
ARC 2530 Arch. Struct. I . .... ...... ...... ..
LAA 2710 Landscape Architecture 1 ..............
LAA 2711 Landscape Architecture 2 .... ........


Credits
* . .. 3
* a a *
* .. 2
* .. 3


D. FOR THE DEGREE IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION

General Education Requirements


English .... ........ ....
MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonometry
American Institutions ..............
The Humanities .... .... ...........
PHY 2004C, 2005C Applied Physics ..
Biological Sciences ................
PEM 1100 (PL 101) Physical Education
ECO 2013 Basic Econ. 1 ...........


Credits



... ... .... . 1
................. 10
i. * * ** *1* 1- w *>*i i
lr ** ii-* * ** : * **:i i


Preprofessional Requirements


* f 4 4
*t *4
S,... 4
* C 4 4
a* * 4
* a 4
* 4. 4


96 hours (minimum) lower division must be completed prior
to entry to the professional program.
*Integrative Studies in Architecture may be substituted for
one Humanities.
*"PHY 2004C may be substituted for PSC 2452 and 2401


Suggested Course Sequence

FRESHMAN YEAR


ARC 1211 Building Arts .....


.........................3
*


BCN 1210 Construction Materials ..........
MAC 2223 Analytical Geometry and Calculus
GLY 2026 Engineering Geology ..........
ARC 1126C Architectural Drawing .........
Cybernetics and Society ........... .......
ACC 2001 Elementary Financial Accounting .
ENC 3351 Business Communications ........
BCN 2400 Construction Mechanics 1 ......
Electi ves . ... .... .... ..... ..... ....


4* * .4 **
........... 4
44449,4t,. 5
4., a .4 *s. 4
........*.. 4
( M* *R R.-tt - l
C *444 a 4 44 4



* .a 4 4. 9 : 4 4 5
a xr ate, 3


ARTS AND SCIENCES

The College of Arts and Sciences offers degrees with
majors in twenty-nine different major fields, which are listed
in the Arts and Sciences section of the catalog, plus an
interdisciplinary major. Students who expect to enter the
College of Arts and Sciences should complete the General
Education Courses listed below and elective courses,with a C


*(.( ... 9 *
. . 5 ** *









ecdian of the catalog must also be me prior to graduation.
Many courses will serve in satisfying both requirements.
Some will not. Further, the number of credits required in
each differs somewhat but BOTH requirements must be met.
A laboratory course is required in the Physical or Biological
Sciences before graduation and may be fulfilled by taking
APB ZISOL or any course in an Arts and Sciences science
department tha hat a regularly scheduled laboratory.

General Educaon Requirenmenb
Credits
M the ati .. ... . . . . . . .. .. ... . . 4
Mathematics .........................._....... .....


areas he or she wishes, each c
requirement.
Years 1, 2, Core Requirem'


MAC 3311,3312, 3313
CDA 3101 ...........
MAS 3114 ..........
STA 4033 ............
CDP 3530, 3550 .. ..


if which carries different ture

ents for all COC majors:


. . i . i i n i i i i i i i g i i . i i i .i 15
............. .............. ...

.. .. . . . . . . . .. ..., .

. . . . . . . ............ 8
n i a a m i i n a a i a i a J


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


(Botany, chemistry, computer s
mathematics, microbiology, premedici
statistics, and zoology majors should Is
for MGF 1113.
Behavioral Studies ..... .. ........
American Institutions ... .........
The Humanities ... ............ .
Physical Sciences ... ... . ....
(Botany, chemistry, microbiology,
predental, and zoology majors should
chemistry for PSC.)


science, economics,
al, predental, physics,
ubstitute a MS course

. .. . . . . . . . 32

. .... ... . .. ... 1

physics, premedical.
substitute courses in


Students majoring in COC may substitute a physics or
chemistry sequence for PSC.
Biological Sciences ............. ........ ......... .9


(Botany, microbiology, premedical, predental, and
stayl ffjor. should substitute course In zaiqytid
botany for BSC. All students must earn at least a grade of C in
one course in an Arts and Science biological science depart-
ment: BSC, BOT, MCB, ZOO.)
PEM 1100 Physical Education . .. .. ... ... .. ........ 12


The College of Business Administration offers degrees in
seven major fields which are listed in the Business Adminis-
tration section of the catalog. Students who expect to receive
a degree in one of the business majors must complete: (1) the
General Education courses and the Preprofessional require-
ments listed below and elective courses for a total of at least
96 hours: and (2) satisfactorily complete the upper division
requirements.
Students who plan to major in Accounting please see the
section headed School of Accounting.


General Education Requirements
(For all majors in Business Administration)

English ...................................
*MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 1 ..
*fI 210 Logic ......as.....
Smerican Institutions ... .. . ... ... U .
The Humanities . . . . . . . . .... ..
*Physical Sciences ,..., ........ .,..,...,
*Biological Sciences . ... .... .... .. .. ....
PEM 1100 Physical Education .................


Credits
. . . . 9



....... 12
S. ., .. ... .
.... . 6-9
^. ... ... 2^


Preprofesmional Requirements
A great amount of flexibility Is available io the liberal arts
student. Certain general guidelines are:
1. Study the materials on admission, advisement, and
requirement tsfor degthe Art and clkitncessevibo
of the catalog, and consult with the proposed major
department as soon as you have chosen a major field.
2. Take couses in your major and take electives.
3. Ben foreign language. iortograduatont astudent
must show profency in a forei language i by
examination or by success co pipp of te thid
course of.the three course beginning sequence or a
higher level course.
4. Co~ plMet one course in scene having a laboratory,
prior to graduation (not necessarily prior to admission to
the upper division). A student may satisfy this require-
ment while he is in the lower division by taking APB 21SOL,
or by succssfullycompleting an Arts and Sciences course
In science which has a laboratory. A ge o at lep C6"
required,.

Teacher Preparation In Arts and Sciences
Students may earn their degrees in the College of Arts and
Sciences and complete requirements for certification as high
school teachers In one or more academic subjects by
following one of the Arts and Sciences Education
Programs described n the Colege of Educatio section in
this catalog.
Further nformaton may be obtained n the College rt
and Sciences office, 2008D GPA.


erP professional Requirpmen


a. For
Market

ACC 2001
ACC 2301
ECO 2013,
MAC 3312
STA 3023 I
ECO 3411


Finance, Economics, Insurance, Management,
:ing and Real Estate and Urban Analysis majors:
Credits
Elementary Financial Accounting .......... 5
Elementary Managerial Accounting .......... 3
2023 Basic Economics .. .................. 10
Analytic Geometry and Calculus II .......... 5
introduction to Statistics .... ... .... ....... 4
Economic and Businn ssSati& ..; ussi y ....
Electives to make a total of 96 hours


b. For Computer Information Sciences majors:


ACC 2001. 2301 Elementary Accounting
ECO 2013, 2023 Basic Economics ......
Introduction to Computlng. .. ......
COP 3530 Data Structures ...........
MAC 3312 Analytical Geometry and Ca
Matrices and Vector Spaces .:.......
STA 4033 Mathematical Statistics with C
Annlir-tinnc


. ..
. . . .


lculus
ompu. .
computer


Credits

. .

. ....... 4
*I . .- .


Electives to make a total of a hours
SMAC 3311 and PHI 2100 are also considered preprofessional
courses.
e'Students are expected to complete 16 hours of the Sciences,
Choose elective courses needed to complete the total 96
quarter hours in the university transfer program from such
areas as mathematics, natural sciences, social science,
foreign language, and humanities. .


Suggested Course Sequence


I


i~iiii~r;~i i i


**-i c .^ *^


.
.


r


n






UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


SOPHOMORE YEAR


. . . . . . . . . . 4 ,4 .. :


The Humnhities *.
*BIologIcul Science
MAE 3810,31 ..
Electives 4 + .4.


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Humanities .
ECO 2013
C0 3411 .. ,.f*
BiIogical Sience


Humanities ...... .. ... .... ............ .... .... .... 4
ECO 2023 ......... 4........ ............ ........ 5
ACC 2001 . .. ..., ....e.... .......... ...... ...
Biological Science ,.....................-...........3

Humanities ..... .... .... ... ... ... ..... ... .... .. 4
PHI 2100 ....,,1. .. .. ........ ..... .. .. .. ..... 4
ACC 2301, 2401 ..................................... 3
COP 3110 ................. ... .. .... . .... . . 2
Elective u. ................... ......... .... ... .


EDUCATION
ELEMENTARY OR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
General Educad. Requirements
Credits
American Institutions ...................... ........ 9
S ical 10 ........ .......................10
Enl sh .................... ...... . ... ..* . 9
avioral Studies ....... ........... .... .........6
MAE 3810, 3811 Mathematics ................... ...... 6
The Huimanities ...............M.....9....9... .--4. S12
Biological Sciences .... ...1.... ....E..... ............ 9
PEM 1100 Physical Education ........................ 2
One quarter of Biological Science or of Physical Science
may either be omitted or taken as an elective. Students may
not"use AGG 2501,ANT 3511, ECH 3783, FOR 2010, FOS 2001,
HUN 2201, SOS 3215 to meet the biological science require-
ment. Acceptable courses to meet the English requirement
are limited to ENC 1102, ENC 1418, ENG 1200, ENG 1400, ENG
1710, ENC 1256, CRW 2321,CRW 2221, LIT 2160, LIT 2930,ENG
2120, ENG 2932, ENC 3464, ENC 3343, ENC 3351, ENG 3500,
ENG 3551, CRW 3330, CRW 3230, ENC 3532, ENG 4511, ENC
4356.
Preprofessional Requirements
1. At least 96 credits are required for admission to upper
division. The College of Education will accept those students
who present the best records and show the most promise of
success in a teacher education program. See the College of
Education section of the catalog for further information
relating to admission to upper division.
2. The following courses may be taken in the Sophomore
year or delayed until the Junior year:
a. MUE 2402 (Students must have a 2.0 average and have
completed 64 hours)
b. ENG 4161
3. Speech requirements may be completed in the Sopho-
more year or delayed until the Junior year. This requirement
is met by successful completion of SPC 230 or 3601 or by
successfully passing the speech screening test administered
by the Speech Department.
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR


rraitc


Credib
.4e.....,... .4 ... 12
* -**4*.. ,. ,...:, 6-9

* 444*** * 44 4 4 M4422


Physical Science ...
MAC 3312 ........


SodaI cienc ..*
Physical Science ..
STA 3023 .........


Credits

S* * ...... ........... 10
* 44.#449 4... 4,*4.44. #4 4.4
* .. *. . .- .4 4 MM# # # 6
MM 4..#4# ,#44..MM 4499. 4,4..
44 4 4 # *44 -44 M #4 Mt 4 *i 4 12 -
* MM #4 MM #4 M. t 444-# 4 9.-4 i,49 *"
4. . . 4 4. .4# 4 .9 4 42


*i S I a 4 *


One quarter of Bioogical Science or of Physical ~ence
may either be omitted or taken as an elective. Students may
not use AGG 2501, ANT 3511, ECH 3783, FOR 2010, FOS 201,
HUN 2201, SOS 3215 to meet the biological science
requirement. Acceptable courses to meet the English
requirement are limited to ENC 1102, ENC 1418, ENG 1200,
ENG 1400, ENG 1710, ENC 1256, CRW 2321, CRW 2221, LIT
2160, LIT 2930, ENG 2120, ENG 2932, ENC 3464, ENC 3343, ENC
3351, ENG 3500, ENG 3551, CRW 3330, CRW 3230, ENC 3532,
ENG 4511, ENC 4356.
Science education majors should take CHM instead of
PSC and ZOO and BOT instead of APB. They should also take
MAC coursed instead of MGF.
Because of the nature of their program, music education
majors will take their general education requirementsover a
four year period rather than only during the first two years.
Preprofesonal Requirements
A. Teaching field requirements
These teaching fields are listed in the College of
Education section of the Catalog together with course


*One quarter of Biological Se or Physical Scieces may
either be omited or taken as an elective.
*See statement under General Education Requirements for
acceptable English courses.

SECONDARY EDUCATION OR K-12 PROGRAMS
Secondary Education students wishing certification for
teaching in grades 7-12 may work toward degrees in either
the College of Education or the College of Arts and Sciences.
Certain other programs prepare students for careers at all
levels of teaching from kindergarten through grade 12 (K-
12). These special programs are:
Art (through either the College of Education or the
College of Architecture and Fine Arts)
Music (through either the College of Education or the
College of Fine Arts)
Physical Education (through either the College of Educa-
tion or the College of Physical Education)
Special Education Mental Retardation (through the
College of Education)
Speech Pathology and Audiology (through either the
College of Education or the College of Arts and Sciences)
All secondary and K-12 programs are specified in the
College of Education section of the catalog.
All University College students working toward degrees in
Secondary Education or K-12 programs with the exceptionof
science education and music education will pursue the
following program:
General Education Requirements


American Institutions ....
Physical Sciences ........
En lish ................
Behavioral Studies .......
Fundamental Mathematics
The Humanities .........
Biological Sciences ......
PEM 1100 Physical Educatic


3









aalog four r Informaton relating to admiuion
to upper divblon.
C. Other considerations
1. Seech requirement may be completed in the
Sophomore year or delayed until the lunlor year. This
requirement is met by uccassful completion of 5PC
2300 or 3601 or by successfully pasdng the speech
screening test administered by the Speech Depart-
ment. English and Language Ar majors may meet this
requirement only by successful completion of SPC
230 or 3W1.
2. Psychological Foundations Course. (Students must
have completed 80 credits)
a. EDF 3135 for Secondary Educationl
b. EDF 3110 for Special Teaching Fields
3. Students who choose to work toward a teacher
education degree in a college other than the College
of Education should consult that college's portion of
the catalog for admission and graduation re-
quirements.


Suggeted Coune Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR


American Institutions ......
*Physical Sciences ..........
E english ................ . .
Behavioral Studies .........
PEM 1100 Physical Education
Electives ..................


Credits
. ... .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. 9
. . . . . . . . . . 7-10
.................... g


. . . . . . . . . . . . 6
..... .. .. .. ... .. ..... 2-
. ... .. ... .. .. ... .. 12
0 m m i m i i m m ii nn n i
n n m i m O m O mg i| B |
| | | n ni im nm mm m m


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Credits
a iic B i'i O O O aw O O U | iqi i i Ir ir i aihiii dg ^ a O *B i *A m
............. .... ... .. -... 6-9
......,.......... .........6-
, if r n- r r r -* - rr r it rrr nr r --^* 1|, *^ r- ^ *
:*::* **tc:*: ll^.ri..i at~ ? i r ;r 1 1 ? :^l*^ilXll";7iJ*% )P-p


*Bological Sdncas

ghd4 4B .......


~

*One quarter of Biological Sciences or Pysical sciences may
ekher be omitted or taken as an elective.
*See statement under General Education Requirements for
a t Eng isbh ourses..


ENGINEERING


Essential Preparation: Modern engineering education
demands much n the way of specific igh school para-
tion not required in other college programs. The being
enuieinm dem should have t

mathematics, and the competence to read rapidly and with
comprehension. ThEpe of Enw ne gonsi asPat
minimum adequate preparation would be sumtaluly a
follows:
The high school program should indede the tolowing
subtcs : ^ ear
*mntials ** r
Elementiay algebra ..* *r* .. ...... .. .. .. 1 ;
Intermediate nd advanced algebra ........ 1
Plane geomet ........ ., ....,. ............... 1
T.ig omery .............i.. *..t.. ...*........... 1
Chemistry ** ....* ......., ..* *l*... .. ...*
Physics ..... ... .......1... ..


nPWMAN AND SOPHOMOU REQUI.EMSIu
The following program is designed for those students
whom high school preparation meets the above criteria. All
Freshmen are required to consult with a College of
Engineering adviser in planning their academic programs.
High school records and test scores are reviewed and a
program of study commensurate with the student's
academic capabilities is assigned. This workload may range
from a minimum of 12 to as much as 20 credit hours per
quarter. A student of above average academic capabilities
and a high order of motivation should be able to carry 15-16
credits each quarter and should thus be able to earn a
bachelor's degree in 13 quarters. If he or she pursues this
academic program for three quarters each year it will take
him or her four years and one quarter to the fifth to earn his
or her B.S. degree.


General Eucation Requdremenb


English ..... .... ...... . . ... . . . . .....
American Institutions ...........................
*The Humanities ................................
*"MAC 3311, 3312 Analytic Geometry and Calculus ..
PHY 2040, 2041, 2042 General Physics with Calculus
PHY 2040L, 2041L, 242L Physic Laboratory .......
PEM 1100 Physical Fitness ................. .....


Credits
. . 9
.... 12
S.... 10
..... 9

.. .. 2


Preprofeadonal Requdlrmenks
Credits
**"CHM 2045C, 2046C General Chemistry and
Q ualitative Analysis ................................ 8
**CHM 2047C or Biological Science Elective ............. 4
MAC 3313, 3314 Analytic Geometry and Calculus ...... 10
EGM 3311 Introduction to Engineering Analysis or
MS-305 MAP 3302 Elementary Differential Equations .. 3
*""*EIN 3114 Computer Programming for Engineers ........ 3
ENG 1002 Introduction to Engineering, Electives and
Departmental Requirements ....................... 14


S Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR

English . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .
American Institutions .... .................
**MAC 3311, 3312, 3313 .................. ,.
+"Chemistry ..... ...........................
ENG 1002 ............ ..... .. .... ........
PEM 110 . ..... .
SOPHOMORE YEAR

"Humanim ies ..............................
M AC 3314 ..... ... ...... ...............
PHY 4U U|i I .* *0 1 *4 *: W ** ** * S ****o *
PHY 2040L, 2041L. 2042L ...................
Other Courses ee Kenneerin? a-dvise) ,


Credits
. . . 9
. ... 9
..... 15
.... 12

......1


Credits
..........12


. .. . . . 3
SE5
rot II1 S
nirgh:g


*Humanities may be delayed till junior year.
**Students who are weak in algebra or trigonometry should
take MAC 1132 before attempting MAC 3311.
..'Only well-prepared students qualify for admission to the
CHM 2045C sequence. Other students take the CHM 2040
sequence. See the chemistry course descriptions in the back
of the catalog for minimum criteria for admission to CY
courses. Students weak in mathematics may need MAC 1132
prior to CHM 2040. Student chemical and enro
engineering are required to take CHM 2047C.
""*Students entering Chemical Engineering take ECH 3841. EIN
3114 is not required in the CIS program.
Detailed information about departmental requirements is
found in the section on Engineering in this catalog.







UNIVERTY COUEGE


quarter hours). Satisfactory completion of this program leads
to eligibility to apply for admission to the College of
Engineering. Community/Junior college counselors are
referred to the University of Florida Junior College Counsel-
ing Manual sections on General Information and Engineer-
ing for additional information.


FINE ARTS
Students planning to enter the College of Fine Arts should
take, while in the University College, one of the following
programs of study. They should consult the departmental
major adviser for specific information regarding grade point
averages, minimum grades required in certain courses and
other information relating to the curriculum. Advisers are
listed in the catalog unrider the section titled "College of Fine
Arts."
To be eligible for admission to the College of Fine Ars,the
student is required to have at least a 2.0 (C) average in the
courses listed in the appropriate curriculum for the first two
years. In addition the student must earn a 2.0 (C) average in
all preprofessional work included in the first two yearsof the
program. Please refer to additional information in the
section of this catalog titled "Collegeof Fine Arts,"underthe
heading "Requirements for Admission". Music majors may
apply to the College of Fine Arts after one quarter in
University College.
For upper division programs, see the College of Fine Arts
section of the catalog.

A. FOR THE DEGREES IN ART [GRAPHIC DESIGN, ART
EDUCATION, CRAFTS, FINE ARTS, HISTORY OF ART]
General Education Requirements


Fundamental Mathematics
Behavioral Studies .......
American Institutions ......
The Humanities ..........
Physical Sciences ..........
Bical Sciences .......
PEM 110 Physical Education


Credits
*I. t i* W* m **4 *t t. *.. 4 .4 ,

I ** ... ...:. 4 5S: S *:
.. . ... .. . .. II 1IIX.II 9111

* k * .* ** J 12 ** i--2
........................ 1)11
. ... . . ..... .... ... 9


-- R ie


ART 120IC, 123C Beginning Design 1 and 2 ....
ART 10C, 131C Beginning Drawing 1 and 2 ..
ART M5C Intermediate Design ...............
ART 23C nt. Drawing and Painting ... .....
ARH 2U, 2051, 2052 Intro. to History of
ART 1. 2. and 3 ..... ...*......... ..........
ECtdiiVeS .. .. -* *


Credits

* ..t .. 6
4 5 , 3


* 1 * 1 1


NOTE: Students intending to major in art education are
urged to become familiar with the requirements as listed
undertheCollegeof Education dealing with admission to the
advanced Professional Sequence.


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Humanities


Biological Science .. .............
Physical Science .... ....... ......
ART 2205C Intermediate Design ...
ARH 2050 Introd. to History of Art 1
Humanities . . . . . . . . . . .
Biological Science ................
Physical Science ................
ART 2302C Inter. Drawing & Pnl. ..
ARH 2051 Introd. History of Art 2 ..
Humanities . . . . . . . . . . .
Biological Science ..............
ARH 2052 Introd. History of Art 3 ..
General or An Electives ...........


.


B. FOR ALL MUSIC MAJORS PROGRAMS IN HE
OF FINE ARTS: ACHELOR OF MUSIC A BACHELOR O
MUSIC EDUCATION DEGREES.
NOTE: Music majors must be admitted to the music major
program by the Department of Music. Prospective majors
should see the Department of Music Chairman early a
possible in their college careers.

General EducalSon Requiremens

ci Science .................... .............. 9
English .. .... ..................................
Behavioral Studies .............................. .62
The Humanities ..............................**.. .12
Bachelor of Music:
Of the 8 courses: NMGF 1113, PSC 2501,SC20, PSC 2121,
APB 2150, APB 2151, APB 2153, PHY 2063, the student must
elect 3 courses, normally in the Junior Year. Thestudent may
elect these courses in the Sohomore year, and take HUM
2210, HUM 2230, HUM 2250 in the Junior year.
Bachelor of Music Education:
Of the 7 courses: PSC 2501, PSC 271,APB 2150, APB 2151,
APB 2153, PHS 4850, the student must earn a minimum of 1S
credits which include credits in both CPS and CB. A
minimum of one course in Mathematics is required, and may
be taken in either the Junior or Senior year. MUL 2111 does
not satisfy Humanities requirements.
PEM 1100 Physical Education ........,,............. 2


Preprofesional Requirements
FRESHMAN YEAR
Music Performance Area
Applied Music: Principal
Instrument or Voice ...... ........
Ensemble: Band, Chorus, or Orchestra
MVK 2111, 2111 Piano Skills .,.......
MUE 2431 Voice Skills 1 ..............
Music Theory Sequence
MUT 1111, 1112, 1113, 1241, 1242, 1243
SOPHOMORE YEAR


Credits


FRESHMAN YEAR

Comp. English ......................
Am. Institutions .....,.... .......
Behavioral Studies ..................
ART 121C Beginning Design 1 ......
ART 1300 Beginning Drawing 1 .....
PEM 11 Physical Education ........
rnmn &r-nlkh .............


Credits

* * .* . . 3
*#i 5* 4 *4Cr S##l -- 3"' B
4.. * t * '3
. .K .I ,. .I . | ., . . .* . -3
.......,.......... 2
.. .* * . i . j: :


Music Performance Area Credits
Applied Music: Principal
Instrument or Voice .. ........................ 9
Ensemble: Band, Chorus, or Orchestra ........,....,.3
MVK 2111, 21, 2121 Piano Skills .................,... 3
Music Theory Sequence
MUT 2116, 2117, 2118, 2246, 2247, 2248 ....... ....,. 12
Electives ...................4,,,....... .... ....
NOTE: The Bachelor of Arts degree in music is ffrd
thrnur h thp rCnlIp nf Arts and Sciencs with the oaner-


Credits
. . ...... .... . *
. .. . .. ... .. . 3
. . . . . . . . . . 3
. . . . . . . .. . 3
*. . . . . . . . .* 3
. . . . . . . . . . 3

. ... . . . . . . . . 3

.. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. 3
. . . . . . . . . . 4
.. .. .. ... .. . .. .. 3
. . . . . . . . . . 6










MUE 2431 Voie SUI ...................... ... ..... 2
(Voice majors and voice principals take MUS 421 Language
and Diacon for singers.)
Applied Music Prlncipal ............. .. ........ ............ ...
Band, Orchestra or Chorus .......................... 1
English . ..... ..... .............. . ... ..... . 3
American Institutions ........................ .... 3
PEM 1100 Physical Eduation ..... .. ..... .... .. ... 2
Winter Quarter (2) Credlts
MUT 1112 Theory of Music (2) ........................ 3
MUT 1242 Theory of Music Lab (2) .................... 1
MVK 2111 Piano Skills (1) ............................. 1
Applied Music Principal ..... .......... ............. 3
Band, Orchestra or Chorus ................... ........ 1
English .................. .................. ....... 3
American Institutions ......... ....................... 3
Spring Quarter (3) Credits
MUT 1113 Theory of Music (3) .............. .... ..... 3
MUT 1243 Theory of Music Lab (3) .................... 1
MVK 2112 Piano Skills (2) ...... .... ..... ........ . 1
Applied Music Principal .. ........................... 3
Band, Orchestra or Chorus .................. ........ 1
English ........ ........... ................... .....3
A mu ric a n t u . . .It io . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Ame rican Institulions ................ ............. .. 3.
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Fall Quarter (4) Credits
MUT 2116 Theory of Music (4) ........ .......... ...... 3
MUT 2246 Theory of Music Lab (4) .................... 1
MVK 2113 Piano Skills (3) ..... .... ..... ... ........... 1

Band, Orchestra or Chorus ............ ..............
eiip+ ..ri..:. .......... :.. ... ..... ..... 4

Witer Quarter (S) Credits
MUT 2117 Theory of Music (5) ............... ....... 3
MUT 2247 Theory of Music Lab (5) .................... 1
AVK fIltf Piano Skills () ta .l I. ., . .
Ap ied MAu Priclfl

8aranir a tSor Cons

Sping Qiifev j CCedics
MUT 2118 Theory of Music (6) .......... ........... 3
MUT 2248 thne O ryof Muic Lab 8 ........,.,.. 1




Ele tie .2........ .. J; .* ': .... 2
Acceptable courses are: ENC 11 ENC 18, ENC 12
ENG 1400, ENG 1710, ENC 1256 CW 32 CRW 222, LIT
2160, LIT 2930, ENG2120, ENC 2,ENC 464, EN 343,ENC
351, ENG 35, E 3551, CRW 3330. CRW 3230, ENC 3532,
NC 4511, ENC t ,


C. OR THE DEGREE IN THEATRE
General Education requirements


En tlish **** **.. ** ..** **
Fundamental Mathematics ...
Behavioral Studies ..*.,
American Institutions .
The Humantties
Physical science .,..........
Biological Sciences .......
PEM 1100 Physical Education ..
-a-.r -m--g.--n -ey I suaa n d ninr^


......
*** ***


* ,* # *
,.4,,,
'a,,,,
'S.,..
I.....
......


Credi
,,,,,, -:*3
6^ ... *
* * ** *

** ..
.. .*.i jr
,.12.
*r~ l. :


ggeled Cme Sequen
FRESHMAN YEAR

American Institutions (Social Sciences)
Comprehensive English ..............
Physical Science . . . . ............ .
THE 2000 Theatre Appreciation .......
Physical Education (Dance, Movement,
Fencing Gymnastics) ...............
American Institutions (Social Sciences)
Physical Science ............. ...... ..
Comprehensive English ..............
ORI 2001 Oral Performance I .........
Physical Education (Dance, Movement,
Fencing, Gymnastics) ..............
Elective ....... ... .... ... ............
American Institutions (Social Sciences)
Comprehensive English ..............
TPP 2700 Voice and Articulation ......
MGF 1113 Mathematics .............
Physical Education (Dance, Movement,
Fencing, Gymnastics) .............
SOPHOMORE YEAR


Humanities


Biological Sciences .........
TPP 3510 Stage Movement I
TPP 3110 Acting ..........
Behavioral Studies .......
Humanities ..............
Biological Sciences .......
TPA 3250 Stage Makeup ....
Elective . . . . . . . .
Behavioral Studies ........
Humanities ..... . ........
Biological Sciences ........
c ve *, ................


. * . . . .


* . . . . . .
...a..- . .
. . .. ... . . *


. . . . . . . *


.. .. .
* . .
- . . .
......

:

* . m
*. .. ...


Crediut

. . . 3
. .l .. 4l
S. . .. 4



I . . 3
. . . 4


NOTE; A student may choose to omit one quarter from the
three quarter sequence of either Physical Sciences or
Biological Sciences.


FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION
Students desiring to prepare for professional careers in the
many areas of resources management and conservation
(including majors in Forestry, Range Ecosystem Management
and Wildi fe Ecolgy) should select the approprateproa
from those listed below. In addition, theyshould contactthe
Directorof the School of Forest Resources and Conservation
at the earliest possible date for assignment to an adviser.
Students with adequate preparation in fundamental
subjects may upon approval of their adviser bypass certain
listed basic courses and proceed with more advanced work
in the fields concerned. To be eligible for direct admission
applicants must have completed courses as shown below, a
total of at least 96 quarter hours and have a grade point
average (GPA) of 2.3 or above.


PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN FOREST RESOURCES
MANAGEMENT AND CONSERVATION
General Educadon Reqi ement".


English ................... ............... .....
ILIAd"I IF4 1 i A--.I..: ? -- r ... J I--.I.... 4 *


3K K


S. . 9
4i


Credit


............... 1
................ 3

................ 3
. . . . ...... 4
l l
i | ll | ll |lilj


l......
*. .. .
.. .....







UNIVERSITY COLLEGE


(c) BSC 2010C, 2011C, 2012C (Wildlife) ........... 13-15
PEM 1100 Physical Education ................... .. 2
Preprofessional Requirements
Credits
"CHM 2042, 2043C, 2047C Qualitative Analysis .... 4-8
""ECO 2013, 2023 Basic Economics ................ ... 10
Either PHY 2004C. 2005C or PHY 2050. 2050L. 2051. 2051L
Physics .. . 10
STA 3023 Introduction to Sraistics 1 4
Electives .. ... . . . . . . . . .. 5. 5
Total 96-102

*Students with inadequate backgrounds in mathematics will
have to complete MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonometry (5
credits) or equivalent.
"*BCH 3023 Elementary Organic & Biological Chemistry may be
substituted for CHM 2042C. 2043C, 2047C. Students should
note this is a terminal chemistry course.
"*AEB 3103 Principles oi Food and Resource Econ. (5 credits)
may be substituted for ECO 2023.


HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS

University College students planning to apply for Upper
Division status in the College of Health Related Professions
are urged to study the section of the catalog dealing with the
College and its programs In Clinical and Community
Dietetics, Medical Technology, Occupational Therapy, and
Physical Therapy. Special attention should be given those
paragraphs on admission policies.
Limitations in available staff, faculty and facilities make it
necessary that the College reluctantly establish quotas for
the admission of students.
Each department has its own application procedures.
Preprofessional students should contact the department of
their major objective as early as possible (Clinical and
Coinnunity Dietetics, Room N1-8 in the Medical Sciences
Building, Medical Technology, Room 4111 in Jennings
Annex; Occupational Therapy, Room DG-83 in Shands
- Teaching Hospital; and Physical Therapy, Room A-92 in the
Medical Science Building). The sequence of professional
courses in all programs begins only in the Fall quarter of the
junior year. The deadline for receipt of completed
applications for September enrollment is the preceding
I March 15.
Students who plan to earn a baccalaureate degree in the
College of Health Related Programs elect one of the
following programs:
A. FOR THE DEGREE IN CLINICAL AND COMMUNITY
DIETECS


General Education Requirements

English ... .... ....... ... ...........
MGF 1113 Fundamental Mathematics ....
Behavioral Studies ....................
So1 Siences .... .......... .... ....
lum anities .. ........... ........
CHM 2040 General Chemistry ..........
PEM 1100 Physical Education ...........
Preprofessional Requirements

BSC 2010, 2011, 2012 Biological
Sciences Integrated Sequence ...,..
CHM 2041, 2042, 2043 General Chemistry
HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Nutrition ...
PSY 2013 General Psychology ..........


Credits
* . *- 9 CI
. 444 4 4. 44 . 4





**.- "r---|'" * i
* 4........ * # 9



* 4 .. .* ,- 4
.. ..... ....... 4
Credits



44( ( *444 r r


CHM 2040 General Chemistry
BSC 2010 Biological Sciences
PEM 1100 Physical Education


Social Sciences ...
English ... .... .
BSC 2011 Biological
CHM 2041 General
Social Sciences ...
English ....... ..
BSC 2012 Biological
CHM 2042 General


Chemistry
. . . .. .



Sciences
Chemistry
Chemistry


S . . . . . . . . . . . 5

.... . . . .. 3
. . . . . . . .
S .. . .. ..
4


. ... .. .. . . 3
. . ... . 3
... . ... . ... ... 5


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Hum anities . . . . . . . . . .
CHM 2043 General Chemistry ...
HSC 1001 Introduction to Health
Related Professions .. ......
Elecrives ........ . .. .
Hum anities .......... . .....
MGF 1113 Fundamental Mathemati'
HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Nutritic


Behavioral Studies .....,......
Humanities ....................
PSY 2013 General Psychology ....
Behavioral Studies ..............
Electives ..... ................


cs
n


Credi(5

. . . .. . .. 4

..5
. . . . . . . 4
S. . .

I ..................... .....................4
... ..... ... .... 4i 4
4*444.444 ,4,*,,4*, 3


.* ,. *, 44t 4r *


English ..................... .. *
MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonometry
Behavioral Studies .,,..............
American Institutions ..............
The Humanities ..................
CHM 2045C General Chemistry ....
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ..
BSC 2010C, 2011C, 2012C Biological S4
Integrated Sequence ............
PEM 1100 Physical Eddcation ......


Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Quarter
American Institutions ..................,....
English .. ...... . ...............
CHM 2045C, 2040 General Chemistry .,......
HSC 1001 Introduction to the Health Related Pi
PEM 1100 Physical Education ................
Winter Quarter
American Institutions ..................
English ............................. . .
CHM 2046C, 2041C General Chemistry ......
MLS 2030 Introduction to Medical Technology
Elective .... .... .... .... ..... .........


Spring Quarter
American Institutions .....
English ..................
CHM 2047C, 2042C General
44 4-. 4* 4 *


.44.4* 44.. 4..


r


Chemitry


Credits

k r ** lr :1
* 4 4,, 9
--* 4 4 4
4444* 9
4, 12


4.,.. 4 **. 4 *4


sciences -


4. 4 444


S4 .,. . 12
............


Credits
......... 3
. .4444,, 3

ofessions 3
,...,... 2
Credits
444,.,.. 3

4 ,4 4,. . 4

444 4 #.... 4
Credits
1I i,i _1* ^








4 4 .... 3
. Cre..e
:. ** ( * *-
1( I 1((-


B. FO, THE DEGREE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY
General Education Requirements


Preprofessional Requirements
Credits
CHM 2046C General Chemistry .................... 4...4
CHM 2047C General Chemistry ...................... 4
CHM 3200, 3 L Organic Chemistry ;.................6
CHM 3120 Quantitative Analysis ...**................. 5
HSC 1001 Introduction to Health Related Professions ... 3
MLS 2030 Introduction to Medical Technology ......... 2
Electives ........................................... 12


1J










SOPHOMORE YEAR
Fb Queue Cntedi
aM 330 Orpc Chem ry ......... ...4. ..... 4
OIM 320 Orpnk Chemay Laboratory ........... 2
**MAC 1132 Alebm and Triponometry ................. 5
ISC l logl Smence Integrated Sequence 4
mwer Qmr Credits
OaM n31ZC Quantltive Analysis .............. ... 5
The Huemnities .. ................ ... ........ 8
SM3 1C B gal n- Integrated Sequence 4
prl Qatewr Credits
The Hum lties ...... ....... ...... ................ 4
STA 023 Introduction to Statistks .................. .. 4
BC W1K Biologlcal Sciences Intregrated Sequence 4

"Students who qualify should take an advanced mathematics
course Instead of MAC 1132. Consult University counselor.

C. OR THE DEGREE IN OCCUPATIONAL IH ERAPY
Geram rdks Iuaouhs. .Bem A


E tg ih ................... ........... .
Fundamental Mathematics .... .....
htavral Sudies. .. ............. .....
Amern Imthutions ..................
The Humanitles ..... .... ........ ... ..
Physical Sdciences ... . . ... .. ........ ...
AP 2150, 2151, 2153. Biological Sciences
PEM 11Q0 Physical Education ...........


Credits
S. . 9
S. . . 4


Credits
l 1 Introduction to Health Related Professions .. 3
SS ly I ioo ........ :. .. .......... ;. ..4
PPl3 Psychology of Personality ....................4
aH 200 Introducion to ipmational Therapy...... 2



FRESHMAN YEVR

S2$10 Z Amr~ ...u.....u....s,,,,..,,t 3
Mn endp ....., ++e.p .b,....,.. ., 4
C1102 p oou y and Argu -atne Wrting ..+.... 3



SI 2110, 2122 1 Ecnomc and Political
Fundat etls of Physical Sce .................... 4
E1QG I ntrductin to Fiction ., +. . . 3
Deckon aking .... ...+.. :.+ +..+++ 3
C 01 Isntroduction to Health Related Professions 3
NG 1402, I; ml j f JFhttfe l3i -- I

WQuater Credits
SN 221 A imniea nis It ........un...s .B .. 3
E ,1710Dama rPoetry .... .......... **** .3

Eci ... ...... ........... ........ ....7
Sum er are Optional-o complete prerequisites

Credits
HtJM 210 Wem Humanities(or MUsic or Art) ...... 4
ZOO 2010C Introductory Zoology Laboratory .,...... 4
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Fa ll Quater Credits
HUM 2210, 22 Wesern Humanities i.........+..., 4
AP 21lSia TheR i ,ll im ............. ................


Spring Quarter C s
(Selected from Music or Art) ... ........... ........ 4
APB 21S3 The Biological Sciences ..................... 3
APB 215 Laboratory in Biologcal Sciences ........... 1
Electives ................... ...................... I
Summer Quarter
Students accepted for the Occupational Therapyogram
may elect available courses in the Department of Oc-
cupational Therapy.


D. FO THE DEGREE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY
Central Educmadn Requiremen


English . ................... .*.*.*.
*MAC 1132, Algebra and Trigonometry (or


more advanced math) .........
Behavior Studies . . . .......
Social Sudies .. . . . . ....
Humanities ....................
*CHM 2040C. Introductory General
"PHY 204C, 2005C Applied Physics
*BSC 2010C, Molecules and cells ..
*BSC 2011C, Organisms ..........
PEM 1100 Physical Education ....
Electives . . . . . . . .. . .


*OedU
. . . . .


. . . . . *. . . ... 4
. . . . . .. . .. . . .. 6
. .. . .. . . *... ... ... 9
.................... 12
Chemistry .......... 4
................... 10

. . . . . . . . . . .
m m | mm mm m m mm mm m m


Preprofeuional Requimemenb
CrdIts
CHM 2041C, 2042C General Chemistry ................. 8
PSY 2013 General Psychology ......: ................... 4
HSC 1001 Introduction to Health Related Profeiom ... 3
ZOO 3703C, Functional Vertebrate Anatomy ...........5
PPE 3004, Psychology of Personality .................. 4
*Th are also pmprofesonul q
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR


English ...................................
Social Science . . . . . . . . . . . ..
CHM 2040C .. ... ..........................
HSC 1001 (or MAC 1132 or PSY 2013) ........


PEM 1100 Physical Education
English . .. .. .. .. . .
Social Science ...........
CHM 2041C .............
MAC 1132 (or see above) ..
English ... ...... ...
Social Science . . . .....
CHM 2042C ...............
PSY 2013 (or see above) ....


* . . .. .
* . .
* U * *
* U * *


rallm^1^g


.
.
.
.*
.
.*
*
.


C
.U....









i.. . .

ral i a
......


rudb
* . 3


.... 3
.. .3
....


U...
* .
I....
* . .

* . .
* . -
llmrm
...m


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Humanities ,,,,, . .. ,+.
8sC 2t-010C .. +...LIL.
PHY 2004C .. * ..* * .. . .
Behavioral Sciences .........
Humanities .,..............
BSC 2010C or ZOO 370C ...
PHY 2005C ..................
Behavioral Studies .. ........
Humanities . . ... ..... .
BSC 2010C or ZOO 3703C ....
PPE 3004 .. .... ....... .....


* U U * U U *
S . . .. ... .
.. *... .. .. ..


Credits
S...r i. r r i i 4 i

.A . P . .. ij
. .U. . . .. .3



............ 3


!!!


Elective (or CLP 4144 Abnormal Psychology)







LMwEln cotj.#


General Education Requirements and a considerable part of
the Basic Distribution and Pre-Professional Requirements.
The remainder will be completed as early as possible upon
admission to the College of Journalism and Com-
munications. A suggested course sequence is provided for
the first two years. This can be altered to fit the student's
circumstance but students are urged not to delay their
foreign language or quantitative option.
General Education Requirements
Minimum Credis
*English .. . ... . . ... . . .. . . .... ....... 9
ENC 1102 Expository Writing
ENC 1418 Argumentative and Persuasive Writing
One 1000 or 2000 level English course
M them atics ........... .................. . 4
MGF 1113 Fundamental Mathematics (for students tak-
ing foreign language option) or
MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonometry or (if qualified)
MGF 2202 Basic Mathematics for the Social Sciences (for
students taking the quantitative option)

Social Sciences ......... . ... .. ... .... ........... 9
551 2110 Culture and the Socializing Institutions
SSI 2122 The Economic and Political Institutions of
Urban America
SSI 2221 America's Role in World Affairs


Quantitative Option
Take any combination of the following courses; ACC
2001, 2301, 2401
STA 3013. 3023, STA 3024, 4222
COP 3110 3111, 3120 ................... ........ .. 10
4. Professional courses see appropriate sequence


Total Hours Required for Graduation


FRESHMAN YEAR
First Quarter


Credits
ENC 1102 Expository Writing ..... ............... ..... 3
551 2110 American Institutions: Culture and the
Socializing Institutions ...................... ...... 3
PSC 2501 Our Environment ........................... 4
M them atics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
PEM 1100 Physical Education ......................... 2


Second Quarner


ENC 1418 Argumentative and Persuasive Writing .
SSI 2122 American Institutions: The Economic and
Political Institutions of Urban America ........
ISC 2452 Man's Interactions with the Environment
**BES 2351 Power and Violence .. .........


Behavioral Studies ............
**BES 2351 Power and Violence
Humanities ... . ....... ....
(See list of Humanities options)


'Physical Sciences


. . . 6-9


PSC 2501 Our Environment
ISC 2452 Man's Interactions with the Physical Environ-
ment
PSC 2121 Natural Regions of the United States


Elective


. . . 4


Third Quarter


EH (1000 or 2000 level) ........
55 2221 American Institutions: Am
in World Alfairs ..............
PSC 2121 Natural Regions of the U
(or Biological Science Option)
SPC 3601 Public Speaking .....
Economy cs .... .. .. ...


erica's Role

united States


:::::


. .. . ...... ... 3


'** Biological Sciences ............ ...
(See list of Biological Sciences Options)


Total
Yearly Total


SOPHOMORE YEAR


"Students may substitute ANT 2410, SOC 2000 or PSY 2013
*"Three quarter hours in either of these areas may be omitted


Basic Distribution Requirements
**English ................... ..... ....... ...... .. 4
Social Sciences
ECO 2000, 2013, 2023 or ECP 3303 .. ...4 or 5
AMH 2010, 2020 ............... ...... .... .. 10
5 2041, 2112 ... ............. .. 8. ... ... 8
Additional Social Science Electives ... ........ 15


41 or 42


'Only grades of C or higher are acceptable


These courses should be taken as soon as possible,
preferably before admission to the College of Journalism and
Communications. They are required for graduation,

1. MMC 2100. Writing for Mass Communications. Grade
of C or higher must be earned; prerequisite for course is a
typing proficiency of at least 20 words per minute;
student may be exempted from and earn creditfor course
by oassin a roficiency exam in writing at UF ...... 3


First Quarter
H um anities ...... ........ ..............
APB Biological Sciences ..... ... .
Foreign Language or Quantitative Option ..
MMC 2100 Writing for Mass Communications


Second Quarter
Hum anti es ......... . . . ..
APB 2151 Biological Sciences ....... .
Foreign Language or Quantitative Option
AMH 2010 U.S. History .................

Third Quarter
Humanities ,, .,, ,, ,,,
Foreign Language or Quantitative Option
AMH 2020 U.S, History i.. ..*........,
English(2000 level) ................. ...

VI


.. . . . 4

. . . .. 3
Total 15


..... . . 4

.. .. .5
. . ... .......... 5
Total 17


*. .1: t .. e f * e

Total
early Total


.5
.4
18
50


LAW
The College of Law offers a program leading to thedegree
of luris Doctor. Admissions s limited to those with a
hk Irtrk lnhte Aea t an r.. -nw...ad ndlaaa ar tlLrri.


S. . . 3

S. . . 3
S. . . 3
. . 4


....... .. . ... .. ... 4


. . . . . . . . . . . 12






-UNrmwGUGE


PRBAW PROGRAMS


Admission to law school is a highly selective process.
Applicants are selected primarily on the basis of quantitative
(actors which demonstrate the potential for success in law
school, the legal profession, and in other law related careers.
One of these factors is the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)
which should be taken at the end of the junior or beginning
of the senior year, and which has a separate writing ability
test score. Another primary selection factor is the student's
overall grade point average (GPA). Approximately 70 percent
of those accepted to law school are chosen by reference to
these two factors alone. About 20% of those accepted are
chosen from a "hold" category. Applicants whose LSAT
scores and CPA's do not put them in either the "accept" or
"reject" categories are placed in the "hold" category, and
have their records carefully examined in detail. Decisions to
admit any applicant from the "hold" category are based on
factors in addition to the factors mentioned above such as
trends in academic effort and performance (ascending or
descending), the types of courses and level of difficulty of
academic loads, the college and discipline of the major,
leadership and extracurricular activities, and maturing
experiences such as employment or military service. Letters
of evaluation from teachers or employers will usually be
requested only from those applicants placed in the "hold"
category.
The class entering law school in September 1977 averaged
a 3.50 CPA, 650 on the LSAT, and 60 on the written ability test
portion of the LSAT.
While any undergraduate specialization will prepare a
possess the fundamental skills necessary for effective oral
and written communication. The student who lacks writing
skids should study advanced English compstib. Any
urse that tests one's ability to orani ofdata and
eon from itwill be bendil, Ab.uwidll Course in
constitutional law, English and American history, economics,
political pp ses, and sociology, A course in basic
accounting principles is recommended.
Prelaw students should consult the current Prelaw
Handbook prepared by the law Schol Admissions Coundl
and the Association of American Law Schools. A one credit
course, AC 180, Introductort the egal Profession, is
available under the S-U option.
Freshmen and transfer students planning careers in law
should register with the Office ofPreprofessonal Education.
28E GPA Building during their first quarter on campus and
maintain a record of theiractivitieseach succeeding quarter.
in addition to serving as a central source of information onall
matters relating to prelaw advisement the Office of
Preprofessional Education acts as a deaing-house for
information, catalogues, and LSAT Bulletins relating to
prelaw preparation and application procedures. The Office
provides students with academic advisers, and serves as a
central office for collectin and forwarding letters of
evaluation for those applicants placed In the "hold"
category. In addition the Offic of Preproessonal Education
coordinates the activities of the prelaw advisers located in
the various departments and colleges listed below, and
provides them with current data and information needed for
effective advisement.
Advisers for prelaw students are available In University
College, College of Business Administration, and in the
Departments of Economicsi English, History, Philosophy,
Political Science, and Socioolg.


program offered by any department or college within the
University. Dental, medical and optometry school e
applicants to have received a liberal education and to have
performed at a high level of academic accomplishment
including work in the required science core courses lied
below. Selection for admission to these professional schools
is usually based primarily on overall grade point average,
(CPA), science CPA, admission test scores, letters of
evaluation of the applicant from faculty familiar with the
applicant's qualifications In comparison with other
preprofessional students, and interviews conducted by the
professional schools' selection committees. Students from
the University of Florida admitted to dental schools in 1976
averaged 3.3 in overall and science CPA, with scores of 5 or
more in the academic and perceptual pars of the Dental
Admissions Test (DAT). University of Florida graduates who
were admitted to medical schools in 1976 averaged 3.6 in
overall and science CPA, with an average score of 590 on the
Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). The average GPA
for students accepted into regional schools of optometry was
3.0 in 1976.
Freshman students planning careers in medicine, dentistry
and optometry should register with the Office of
Preprofessional Education, 200BE General Purpose A
Building, during their first quarter at the University, and
normally should apply for admission to the College of Am
and Sciences at the end of their first quarter of residence.
Admission may occur at a later time, but the student may lose
valuable curricula flexibility associated with the programs
described below if the transfer is rea del St

register with this officedurinlefirsbeiiriluI
procedures and other factors relating to preprofessional
preparation, students should obtain a current copy of the
PREPROFESSIONAL GUIDE prepared by and available
through the Office of Preprofessional Education.
A one-credit course ASC 181, Introduction to Medicine
and Dentistry, is available under the S-U option.
In addition to serving as a central source of information on
all matters pertaining to the preprofessional curricula, the
Office of Preprofessional Education acts as a clearinghouse
for information, catalogues and application forms relating to
medical, dental and optometry school requirements and
admission procedures. The office provides students with
academic advisers and serves as a central office for collecting
and forwarding letters of recommendation, evaluation and
certification to the schools selected by the students.
The Office of Preprofessional Education coordinates the
activities of the preprofessional advisers located in various
departments and provides them with current data and
procedures needed for effective advisement. Following
initial contact with this office, the student will be referred to
an adviser who will help plan a program and upper-division
major best suited to the student's aims and abilities. The
adviser should remain aware of the student's progress, and
inform the Office of Preprofessional Education of academic
difficulties and particularly of academic excellence. In the
latter case, the adviser may recommend a student for the
Junior Honors Medical Program described below and/or for
a departmental honors program.
PREMEDICAL, PREDENTAL, PREOPTOMETRY
CURRICULAR OPTIONS
The preprofessional student must satisfy the following
core requirements (usually prior to application to the
professional schools):
Required Core Courses:
It A nmfln 9 oa.n ..1 rt~a...;e~. n ^" '. nr fes ;_n.:r .Ie


. .. ....






UNIVEREsIT COLLEGE


6) One year of college level English.
These courses will also meet the basic requirements for
schools of Chiropractic, Osteopathic, and Podiatric
medicine.
Premedical students wishing to qualify for the Schools of
Medicine at the University of Miami and the University of
South Florida must also complete PCB 3253C or PCB 3253,
or PCB 3060C or AGR 3303, STA 3023 and either CHM 3120C
or CHM 3400 or BCH 4313 or BCH 4203.
The usual timetable for application to professional school
is:
1) Complete the preprofessional course requirements
within the first three years of college, preferably by the
summer of the year preceding the year of graduation.
2) Apply for and take the admission test (DAT, MCAT, or
OCAT), preferably in the spring of the year preceding the
year of graduation. Delay in taking the test until the fallmay
reduce chances of admission.
3) Have letters of evaluation collected in a confidential file by
the Office of Preprofessional Education (see procedure
described in instructions to Preprofessional Students in the
PREPROFESSIONAL GUIDE available at the Office of
Preprofessional Education) during the third year of college.
4) Submit completed applications (including admission test
scores and letters of evaluation) to the professional schools
by the end of August or the first part of September (at the
latest) of the year preceding the year of graduation. Delay in
completion of applications beyond that date may reduce
chances of admission.
5) Maintain a high academic performance and send
transcripts of subsequent quarters to professional schools at
which your application is being considered.
6) Interviews for applicants being seriously considered are
conducted in the fall and winter by professional schools.
7) Notices of acceptance or rejection are usually received by
the spring of the following year although some acceptance
may be offered as late as the week before classes start.
Besides meeting the preprolessional course requirements,
students are strongly recommended to gain some ex-
perience in the health care delivery environment of their
career choice. Such experience may be obtained by
participation in the programs of the Preprofessional Honor
Society-Alpha Epsilon Delta, and the Preprofessional Service
Organization-PSO at the University of Florida. More derails
about these programs and applications are available at the
Office of Preprofessional Education
STANDARD PROGRAM FOR YEAR 1
Many students reach a decision to prepare for a career in
medicine or dentistry during or after one year of college.
Such students will usually have to complete requirements at
a more accelerated rare if they wish to graduate on schedule.
The degree of acceleration should be discussed with a
preprofessional adviser in their major department.
Any sequence of general chemistry is acceptable The basis
for choice among CHM 2040, 2045C, 2050C (Honors), and
CHM 2055C is outlined in the catalog section preceding
chemistry course listings. For qualified students possessing a
good background in chemistry, physics and mathematics.
the CHM 2055C sequence offers a number of advantages,
including lime flexibility. MAC 3311, 3312 and (STA 320) STA
3023 should be completed Ihis year. American Institutions
and English requirements should be completed by taking the
appropriate courses or via College Level Examination
Program (CLEP) credit. Liberal arts elective courses, and a
foreign language, are among options for students who have
completed American Institutions and English by CLEP credit.
STANDARD PROGRAM FOR YEAR 2
If a student has not finished general chemistry, it should be


quirements by coursework unless they have previous CLEP
credit. Students with available time might consider beginning
either a physics or foreign language sequence during this
year. Those having a background in foreign language prior
to entering the University may satisfy all or part of the foreign
language requirement by taking a placement examination,
which is offered several times during the year by the foreign
language departments.
Second-year premedical students who have a 3.5 average
or higher and who have completed the above core
requirements may want to apply for admission to the Junior
Honors Medical Program. This program allows early
acceptance to the University of Florida College of Medicine
and participation in third-year medical school seminars.
Interested students should contact the Assistant Dean for
Preprofessional Education in the College of Medicine (128
Medical Sciences Building). Applications for this program
are accepted during the winter quarter, and final selection is
made during the spring quarter of the sophomore year.
YEARS 3 AND 4
During year 3 students generally complete any
preprofessional core requirements as yet unfilled. During
year 3 or 4 the foreign language requirement must be
completed.
The remainder of year 3 and 4 is devoted to completion of a
departmental major and elective courses in science and
other areas. Professional schools attach no bias toward any
particular major. Thus. although most students major in one
of the sciences, it is equally possible and desirable to major in
some other area. In general, the better the student's science
and overall academic averages during the first two years, the
greater the latitude that student will have in a choice of
major. Since most preprofessional students do major in one
of the sciences, the various common preprofessional science
options are outlined below
1) Botany Major Students planning a major in botany
through the College of Ars and Sciences should schedule
BOT 2021C by Fall quarter of the third year (preferably
sooner if scheduling permits). During the third and fourth
years PCB 3033C, BOT 3503C. and BOT 3503L, BOT 3303C
or BOT 5225C, BOT 3153C or BOT 5725C. and PCB 3060C
or AGR 3303, AGR 3305L should be completed. Remain-
ing hours needed to complete the minimum of 36 hours
for the major in botany will be chosen as elective credits
to meet the specific interest of the student Students
interested in research or departmental honors should


schedule B(
2) Chemistr
taken as I
quantitative
required A
sequence C
(MAP 3302


3T 4905 during the f
y Major If quanistat
part of the CHM
analysis CHM 31.
student may elect e
HM 4410, CHM 4411
is co-requisite) or


ourth year
ive analysis has nor been
2055C sequence, then
20C or CHM 3125C is
n her physical chemistry
,CHM4412. CHM 4411L
CHM 3400, CHM 3401,


CHM 3401L. Students who choose the CHM 3400 to CHM
3401L sequence must also take either CHM 4130 and CHM
CHM 3125C) is a required background course for this
take PCB 3060C PCB 3060L and at least one course from
in their last year.
31 Microbiology and Cell Science Major Students
interested in a microbiology and cell science malor
should schedule MCB 3013, MCB 3013L after at least one
quarter of organic chemistry. BCH 4313 is a required
course for the microbiologyv maior In addition to the
above, the following courses constitute the remainder of
the major program: PCB 3136 and at least 21 credits of
departmental course offering in the 4000 series In some
cases which are determined by the microbiology un-
dergraduate coordinator, BCH 4203 may be substituted
for MCB 4413. Students interested in undergraduate









a. ZOO 303C, ZOO 33C
b. ZOO 373C, PCB 32S3C
C. PCB 4040C or PCB 4675
d. ZOO 4755 or PCB 4745
(Suggested courselecions for preprofeasional students
are ZOO 303C. ZOO 3703C, PC8 353, PCB 4675, ZOO
4755, or PCB 4745.
At this point, the student will have 36 major credits which
should include the BSC 2010C, BSC 2011C, BSC 2012C
sequence and will complete the major requirements in
zoology. The student should also be aware of the possibility
of research experience through ZOO 4905. Two quarters of
ZOO 4905 amre required for departmental honors.
5) Biochemistry Major Although an undergraduate
major is not currently available, the undergraduate
biochemistry program (see description under
Biochemistry) offers a comprehensive series of courses
providing a concentration in biochemistry and molecular
biology. Courses in the sequence BCH 3713, BCH 4313,
BCH 4203, BCH 5050, and PCB 4535 may supplement or
substitute for comparable courses in related major
programs. Students desiring research experience in this
area should consider BCH 4910. At some professional
schools students having taken a biochemistry as un-
dergraduates may exempt themselves from the
biochemistry course taught as part of the basic medical
science sequence.
6) Interdisciplinary Major This major, described
elsewhere in the Arts and Sciences section of the catalog
is available for superior preprofessional students.
Transfer students who have received credit for the first two
years of college at another institution should have no
difficulty in adapting themselves to the above format with
the help of a Preprofessional adviser. Since relatively heavy
weight is placed by professional schools upon the perfor-
mance of transfer students in their third year, such students
should plan on taking at least 30 hours in science during the
first three or four quarters at the University of Florida. Those
transfer students who have completed all of the basic
preprofessional course requirements should consider taking
additional courses in either chemistry, zoology,
microbiology, biochemistry, physics, mathematics or
s rtiut By doing well in coursewhich are taken by many
ofssional students at the University of Florida, transfer
suents an enhance their academic records and provide
admission committee with a basis of comparison of their
academic abilities with other applicants.
Choice of electies: Professonal schools do not appear to
h any sinficant bias toward elective courses chosen by
students. These schools, n fact, look with favor upon
students who have shown broad interests and educational
development during their college career. Commonly
selected science ectives inudesenlorres earch,CH 3713,
BCH 4313, 4203, MCB 3013, 3013L, ZOO 475, 5745.
Students who have displayed academic weakness in any of
the required Preprofessional core course areas (ecial
chemistry or biology) generally are advised to offset such
weaknesses by stronger performances at a more advanced
level. it should be reemphasized that students applying to
the University of Miami School of Medicine and to the
University of South Florida College of Medicine should
complete additional advanced courses as listed above before
graduation regardless of their major.
CLEP Credit: t is generally agreed that receipt of such credit
does not imply the equivalent of educational experience
received In a University level course. CLEP creditdoes not
substitute for any of the preprofessonal core requirements
listed above. In general, the utilization of CLEP bedit will
uive students some additional flkihbilitv in enmoetinn their


professional school beau. se ofa lac quality andr
quantity of preprofessional woik may want cnidr
additional work at the undergraduate wlev mnum upt nes
defidencies. Students interested in this possibility should
consult the Director of the Office of Prprofemonal
Education, 2006E General Purpose A Building.


NURSING


General Educaln Iequemen
credits
English ............................................. 6
Social Science (SSI 2110 and SSI 2120 or 5SI 2122) ...... 4
ANT 2410 or 50C 2000 .. ................. .... 4-5
Physical Science ISC 2400 and ISC 2401 or CHM 10Z and
CHM 1021 or ISC 2452 or PSC 2701 ..................
Biological Science (AP8 2150, APB 2151, APB 2153, MBC 2010,
ANT 3511 are recommended) ....................... 8
Humanities ........ ... ................... ....... ... 12
Behavioral Studies BES 2241, BE5 2351. MAF 2200, PSY 2013
or PCO 3714 are recommended .................... 8
PEM 1100 Physical Education ......................... 2

Sub-total 52
*Preprofedonal
Microbiology APB 2170-APB 21701 .......... ...... 5
**Human Nutrition HUN 2201 ................. ...... 4
Developmental Psychology or Human Growth
and Development DEP 3002 or EDF 3110 .............4
Human Anatomy and Physiology PET 3320 and PET 3350 8
Expository Writing .................... ............... 3
Statistics or Algebra .................................. 4
Chem istry ....... .... ... ..... .............. .. ..... 4


Electives ....


sub-total 32
.................... ... 12


*Preprofessional courses cannot be met by CLEP.
*"HUN 2201 may be taken by correspondence.
NOTE: General Education Requirements are completed
only when the last three courses listed under Pre-professional
have been completed.
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR


Credits
.................. 3
.................. 3
.................. 3
................. 5
..... ......... .... 2


ENC 1102 English ..................
APB 2150 The Biological Sciences ...
SSI 2110 The American Institutions ..
MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonometry
PEM 1100 Physical Education .......


Scieni


English ......... .... ..
APB 2151 The Biological
SSI 2120 or SSI 2122 ....
CHM 1020 ............
Elective ............. ..


ces; Ecolo


. . . .. . . . . 3
gy & Behavior .. 3
...... ......... 4
. . . . .


English . . . . .... . ......... . ....
APB 2153 The Biological Sciences:
Cell and Organism Biology .........
EDF 3110 or DEP 3002 ................
SOPHOMORE YEAR


.... ... .... ... 3


Credits
c


ADD Y -f .".jJ ADD Yl n I


t~at~itt~it~






UNIVBSim COLLEGE


HUM 2250 Western Humanities
PET 3320 Applied Anatomy ....
PET 3350 Applied Physiology ...
Elective . . . . . ........ .
PSC 2701 or ISC 2452 .... ..


. . . . .. . . . ... . ... 4
....................... 4
. . . . . . . . . . . . 4
.............. 4-8
. . . . .. .. .. . . . . 3


PHARMACY
The program of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Pharmacy is divided into two parts-two years of
prepharmacy in the University College and three years in the
College of Pharmacy.
In keeping with the accreditation requirements of the
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education, all students
must be enrolled in one or more required pharmacy courses
in the College of Pharmacy for a minimum of nine quarters,
regardless of the number of studies completed in other
fields. Upon applying for admission to the College of
Pharmacy, it is advised that the student see the College of
Pharmacy Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, (PHM, room P-
111) to be sure that all recommended prepharmacy courses
willbe completed by September.

Prepharmacy Program
To be considered for admission to the College of Pharmacy
the applicant must have: (1) earned at least 96 quarter hours
of acceptable college credit with an overall average of "C" or
higher on all course work attempted; (2) completed all lower
division courses required for the desired curriculum as
indicated below in the program for the Freshman and
Sophomore years in University College; (3) passed all the
required preprofessional courses (general and organic
chemistry, physics, biological sciences and mathematics)
within the prepharmacy curriculum with an average of "C"
or higher; and (4) submitted scores on the Pharmacy College
Admission Test (PCAT) to the College of Pharmacy. See
College of Pharmacy for further information on Re-


quirements for Ad
The courses listed
two years of prepi
other information
Pharmacy (Room
pleased to assist
application.

SSC American Inst
EH English .....
Behavioral Studies


mission an


id PCAT.


d below are recommended for the first
harmacy. For academic advisement and
the Office for Student Affairs, College of
P-111), J. Hillis Miller Health Center, is
students as well as to facilitate their

Credrts
itut, ons . ... .. .. .. . ...... 9

or Equivalent ................. .. 3


*CHM 2045C, 2046C, 2047C Gen. Chem & Qual. r
The Humanities . .. .. . ... . ..
BSC 2010C, 2011C, 2012C, BIO 203. Integrated Bio
o r . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .
ZOO 2010C Introd. Zoology Laboratory and ....
ZOO 2011C Principles of Animal Biology .......
PHY 2050, 2051. 2052 General Physics ........
-'PHY 2050L. 2051L, 2052L Physics Laboratory .....
CHM 3210, 3211 Organic Chemistry ............
CHM 3210L, 3211L Organic Chemistry Laboratory
PEM 1100 Physical Education ... ...


***Approved Electives


. .


Anal. 12
.. . 12
logy Core
. . . 12

.. . . 5
. . . 2

...... 3

... 16-19


The professional sequence of courses is on an annual basis
only beginning in September each year. Students are
admitted to the College of Pharmacy annually, in September
only, when the fall quarter begins. Students in prepharmacy
in University College should plan their course schedules for
each term so that the minimum g6 credits and specific course
requirements are satisfied by June of the year expected to
enter the College of Pharmacy.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH
AND RECREATION
University College students expecting to major in the
College of Physical Education, Health and Recreation should
pursue one of the following programs:

A. FOR MEN AND WOMEN INTENDING TO MAJOR IN
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
General Education Requirements
Credits
American Institutions
POS 2041 American Federal Gov't. or
POS 2112 American State and Local Gov't ......... 3-5
551 American Institutions ..................... .... 6
Behavioral Studies
PSY 2013 General Psychology or
PCO 3714 Personal Growth ..... ..... .. ............ 4
Biological Science
APB 2153 Biological Science Cell and Organism Biology 3
PET 3320 Applied Human Anatomy ...................... 4
PET 3350 Applied Human Physiology .. .... ........ 4
English Composition (ENC 1102. ENG 1200. ENG 1400 or
ENG 1710 . .. . . .. . 11
H um anities .. ........... ......... . .. 12
M them atics ......... .. . . . ... .... . 4
Health Education:
HES 2000 Personal and Family Health ....... 4
HES 2400 First Aid and Personal Safety .... ... 3
PEM 1100 Physical Education: Basic Concepts .......... 2
Physical Science
ISC 2400 Fundamentals of Physical Science or
PHY 2004 Applied Physics or
PHY 2050/2050L General Physics and Lab ....... 4-5
ISC 2401 & 2402 Fundamentals of Physical Science 6


Speech.
SPC 3601 or SPC 2300


. 4-5


Preprofessional Requirements
Credits
DAE 2320 Modern Dance .... ... ..... ........ 3
DAE 2360 Folk and Social Dance ........ ...... 3
HES 2000 Personal and Family Health . .. . .4
HES 2400 First Aid and Personal Safery ... ... .... 3
PEO 1011 Softball and Flag Football ........ ..... 2
PEO 1511 Soccer and Related Sports ... 2
PEO 1521 Volleyball and Team Handball .. .. .. 2
PEO 2031 Recreational Activities I .... ...... 2
PEO 2032 Recreational Activities II ........ ......... 2
PEO 2121 Golf .. .. . 2
PEO 2341 Tennis .. . . .. . . . . . . . 2
PEO 2561 Field Hockey, Weight Training and


Total 96
*Students not qualified for this sequence should take the
CHM 2040, 2041C, 2042C, 2043C series (16 credits).
**A minimum of 10 credits is required for studentsplanningto
pursue the community and hospital areas. Students wishing
to major in industrial and research pharmacy should
complete the entire sequence.
.SS*TLA a l..jM i.: rix.Il .n .-Ila rna,,* sansamn# in mnt a;m* c


Conditioning .............
PEO 3621 Basketball ..........
PEP 1301 Track and Field ......
PEP 2201 Gymnastics .........


.*k. 4 42
.........3


*PEP 2401 Martial Arts, Weight Training and
Conditioning ............. ......a............... 3
'PEP 2421 Wrestling, Weight Training and
Conditioning *............ ..... ...... .... .... 3






-WB wO ain


L-aquw


FRESHMAN YEAR
Credits
SSI 2110 American Inshtitions Culture and
The SocIalizing luhInsltoums ......................... 3
ENC 1120 English Expository Writing .................. 3
ISC 2400 Fundamentals of Physical Science ............ 4
PEM 1100 Basic Concepts ............... .......... 2
Choice of preprofessional courses listed above ....... 2-4

SS1 2120 American Institutions The Emergence of the
Economic and Political Instihutions .................. 3
ENG 1200, 1400, 1710 English Intro. to:
Fiction, Drama, Poetry ..............................
ISC 2401 Fundamentals of Physical Science ........ 3
PEM 1201, PEN 1121, PEL 1121, PEL 1341 as needed
Gymnastics, Golf, Swimming, Tennis ................1
Choice of preprofessional courses listed above ....... 2-5
POS 2112 American State and Local Gov't. or
POS 2041 American Federal ov't. .............. .. 3-5


ENG 1200, 1400, 1710 English Intro. to:
Fiction. Drama, Poetry ....................
ISC 2402 Fundamentals of Physical Scence .......
PEM 1201, PEN 1121, PEL 1121, PEL 1341 as needed
Gymnastics, Golf, Swimming Tennis ..........
Choice of preprofesional courts listed above ...
SOPHOMORE YEAR


.. .. . 4
. ..... 3

...... 1
.... 2-5


MGF 1113 Fundamental Mathematic .................. 4
HUM 2210 Western Humanities ....................... 4
APE 2153 Biological Science Cell and Orranism Biology 3

Chole .1 preprofeslona wrms abee w. .. *




SFie puiencein Phu Edu at nI,......1
P Ser ~Y 21 or
PCO 3714 PersonaGth .. ,..,.. ........ 4
Choice of preprofessional cou as Istedabove .... 2.4
Choice of eneralphysical education coursesas
needed ........ ..,....,..... ...,......,,.,.. 0.1

HUM 2410, 2420 Humanities
Western, Asian, and African ... ........... ..... 4
PET 330 Applied Human Physaliagy 4..,. 4 4
PET 3944 Field Exerie in Physiical dual I ......
SPC 3601 Public peaking or
SPC 230M lntro on to S .peech mi uniBe'o .. 4-5
ChOice of prprofessional courses tsled aove 24
Choice of general physical education couresas needed 04

I, FOR MEN AND WOMEN IN DN TO MA IN
HEALTH EDUCATION
General Edo bdRequirements

G Englik ..s............. ....... ....Ct ,, .* ..4 9
MAC orAMGF 4
HM1UM 2Th Halu 2n .,,,,,,,,,, ....... ....
HUMThe H urnanitle 13
PSC Physical Sences . . . .I, t,,,, ,...... 4
c n ..,..C.. .., ..... ....n ...,,,. 4
Gnr Educa*io Requiremento
C rlrr 6.l|f1 . * ai^*-*if .# # i^k c^ ffiB fi rri~ifir tr l
rw nk Orld Jnuilr ., - ..i** , * :: < :* 1 *|^ap i^ ^ a~


kah'-l Cmme


ENC English ................... .
Fundamental Mathematics .....
Behavioral Studies ..........
American Institutions ;........
The Humanities ...........
*Physical Sciences ............
*Bological Sciences .............
PEM 1100 Physical Education
Preprofesional Requirements


* I . * .. p

. * . .
*.4 4 C C #
m | m mm m m |


* ....11. .
........ 4
. . *. . ..

. . .. *. .


* U *! i* .U ** U *.* :. l! U U US
. . . . . . . . . . . 9
. ,^ ...,. .,...,2
1': 11: ~,'x'J;i


Cred ts
MUY 360 Music in the Feld of Recreaton 1....
DAE 2360 Folk and Social Dance ,..,,,..,,,,,.. .
P 1121 Swimming , ,, ,, .,,i ,.... 2
HES 2400 First Aid ......... . . . *. 3
SPC 2300 Introduction to Speech Communications ..... 4
Fh avity hours requiring at least one from each of the
owing five areas:
a. omasia. tumbling mdm dae or bod n


Sc Speech .................................... ..."
S2000E Prindples of Sodohgy .....................4
Elective for concentration areas) .............. ....... 1


FRESHMAN YEAR
Credls
SSI Social Science .................................... 3
EN En Glish ........................................3
AP 2150 Iologicl Science .......................... 3
HES 2000 Personal and Family Health .......... .......4
PEM 1100 Basic Concepts of Physical Education ........ 2

5I 2120 Social Science The Emergence of the Economic and
Political Institutions . . . . . .. . .. .... .. . ..... 3
APB 2150 Biological Science Genetics and Evolution .... 3
ENG English ..... ... .. ... ........ ... .... . .
PSC Physical Science ................................4
Electives for concentration areas) ....... ........... .. 4

MC F or MAC .......................................4
ENG English .................. ...................... 3
APB 2153 Biological Sdence Cell and Organim Biology 3
APB 2150L Lab Biological Science Lab .................1
Electlves kr concentration areas) ..................... 9
SOPHOMORE E YEAR

HUM 22 Humanits Westen ..:...... ..$:. .
soC M00 uncipee of Socilogy ...... ;;;;;-.... -,.;;,.- -- .....- -*. ---
GLY Geology .................................... ..4
HES 2001 Community & EnvmnMalMeaI Hea. h ......... 4

HUM 2230 Humanities ,.... .................., 4
CHM Chemistry ..................... ..........4
SPC Speech ................... ......................4
HES 2400 First Aid and Penonal Safety .................3

APB 2170 Microbiology .............................. 3
APB 2170L Discussion Laboratory in Microbiology ...... 2
HUM 2250 Humanities Western ....................... 4
PSY 2013 General Psychology ....... ........ ....... 4
Electives for concentration areas) ............:........ 4

C FOR MEN AND WOMEN INTENDING TO MAJOR IN
RECREATION
General Education Requirements
Credits







UNIVERSITY COUJCE


Suggesed Course Sequence
(Public Recreation Concentration)
FRESHMAN YEAR


*SSI 2110 Soc. Science ...........
English ... . .. .. ..... .......
PSC 2501 Phys. Sci. .............
LIS 2001 Use of Books and Library
PEM 1100 Physical Education
Activity Requirement ...........

551 2120 Soc. Sci .. ... ...........
ENC English .......... . . . ..
PSC 2701 Physical Sci. ........
POS 2112 Amer. State & Local Gov
Activity Requirement .........
PEQ 1121 Swimming ............


Credits

. . 3
. .. . 4
. .. 2
mm m I


. . . . . . .... 1


551 2122 Soc. Sci. . . . . . .. . . . . . .. .. . .
English ..... ...... . . . .. ... . . . ..
SPC 2300 Introduction to Speech Communications
HES 2400 First Aid ..... .. .. . . .. ........
Activity Requirement ..........................
Electives .......................... . ..... .....


APB 2153 Biological Science .............. ... ..... 3
PSY 2013 General Psychology .................. 4
(Therapeutic Recreation Concentration)
FRESHMAN YEAR


SSI 2110 (SOC 2000) ......... . ...
Eng lish ......................... .. . .
SSI American Institutions ... .... ........
ENC English .. ... . . ... . ..... ... .
.PSC 2501 Physicial Science Our Environment
PL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


HES 2400 First Aid .............
SSI 2120 Social Sdence .........
ENC English ...................
PSC 2701 Physical Science ......
Electives . . . . . . . .

PSY 2013 Introduction Psychology
*SSI 2122 Social Science .........
ENC English ....... ..........
PEQ 1121 Swimming ...........
SPC 3601 Public Speaking ......


Credits
. .. .. . .
. . . . 3.
.. .. .. . 4
. . . . . . 3


. . . . . . . . .


I I: I : i I i i i I. i
..... ........ ..

. . . . . . . .m .


SOPHOMORE YEAR


SOPHOMORE YEAR
Credits
Behavioral Studies . ...... ........................ 3
HUM 2210 Humanities ...............................4
APB 2150 Biological Science ........... ............. 3
DAE 2360 Folk & Social Dance ....,................... 3
Activity Requirement .................... ..... .. 1
LEI 3507 Special Events: Administration and Programming 3


Behavioral Studies or CPS Physical
HUM 2230 Humanities ..........
APB 2151 Biological Science .....
SOC 2000 Principles of Sociology
Activity Requirement .,.,,,....


Science ..
44 #s,,- ** 4
.*rr.c . *:
.......*. :

* f* 1. :


44 4,,,
'....,.
'. 4 ,,,,
* ,,,,, ,
* * :


MGF 1113 Fundamental Math ........................ 4
HUM 2250 Humanities .............. ................ 4


ZOO 2010C (APB 2150) .. .,,.... 4,... ,
HUM ZO0 Hupsnities ............ ..
DAE 23#6 Folk & Soal Dance ......,..
HES 20 iind kual & Fa lfy Health ....

HUM 220 Humani ..............
LEI 3330 Camp Counseling ....a .....

Elective ....... ....... .............


MGF 1113 Fundamental Math
HUM 2250 Humanities ......
APB 2153 Biological Science .


Credits
i :.* ^
.4 4* 4. 4
nt,4.* 3
* , 4, 5
:. :. ;* 1


*4,4,,,


4.,..,


*4 4** 4 4*
. . *4 U *i


*Many choices in CPS, SSC, HUM, and CBS are acceptable,
The science requirement calls for at least six credit hours rn
one science and nine credit hours in the other.


















*:
i i.


II
I








































.2ii




School


Accounting









The School


Accounting

GENERAL STATEMENT
The School of Accounting of the University of Florida was
established July 1, 1977. The objective of the School of
Accounting is to provide the technical and general educa-
tion for graduates to assimilate the proficiency necessary to
enter the accounting profession and progress rapidly through
levels of increasing responsibility. The field of accounting
offers outstanding opportunities in such areas as public
accounting (financial/auditing), industrial accounting (cost/
managerial/systems) nonprofit accounting and tax account-
ing.
The accountant deals with complex problems in the
business world. This requires a thorough knowledge of
business operations and the environment of business as well
as accounting knowledge. In addition to the demanding
technical skills, an ability to communicate clearly in both
verbal and written form is essential. The accountant interacts
with people constantly and must develop interpersonal skills
as well. Accounting is more of an art than a science and
professional judgment is an important element in the
practice of accountancy. Although accounting is unusually
demanding and requires a high achievement motivation in
order to succeed, the rewards are high.
The field of accounting for many years was primarily
thought of as exclusively a man's domain. However, in recent
years an increasing number of women have been entering
the field and today the opportunities are substantial. This
same opportunity exists for all minorities.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS
Information about general financial aid can be obtained
She c oftudnt nl Aid, Unrsit of
Florida, Cinesville, Florida. Information concerning
scholarships available specifically for fourth and fifth year
accounting students can be obtained by writing to the School
of Accounting, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS
Beta Alpha Psi
This professional accounting fraternity has 115 chapters
nationally. Upsilon Chapter was the 18th chapter to be
founded (in 1938) and is recognized as one of the best
chapters in the country. An active professional program is
conducted qdch year including guest speakers, panel
dlscussoS field trips, and other activities designed to
promote rofessionalawareness. Beta Alpha Psi cosponsors
the Graduate Accounting Conference which annually
attracts more than 100 accounting practitioners.
Membership requirements include high ethical standards
and a minimum grade pointaverage Additional information
concerning these requirements may be obtained from the
School of Accounting,
Beta Gamma Sigma
Election to this national business honorary society is based
on scholarship and character. For additional information
apply to the Office of the Dean, College of Business
Administration.


basis. Occasionally research projects provide a similar
opportunity for undergraduate students. The Center
publishes research results in a working paper series. For
information contact the Director of the Accounting
Research Center, School of Accounting, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida.


PROGRAM OF STUDY
Graduates of the undergraduate program will receive the
degree Bachelor of Science in Accounting. The un-
dergraduate accounting program Is highly structured in
order to provide students with a working knowledge of the
basic accounting framework and each of the different
professional areas of accounting in addition to the underly- .
ing business and related disciplines.
The widespread range of subjects necessary for the
adequate preparation of an individual preparing for a
professional career in accounting does not leave room for
specialization within the undergraduate accounting
program. National agencies such as the American Institute of
Certified Public Accountants' Board on Standards for
Programs and Schools of Professional Accounting and the
American Accounting Association Education Committee
recommend a five year program of study. Students arp urged
to consider the five year professional program leading to the
degree Master of Accounting. Details concerning the five
year program including the specialization areas of finan-
cial/auditing, managerial/cost, systems and tax are included
in the Graduate School Catalog which can be obtained by
writing the Director of Admissions, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida. Additional information an also be
obtained by contacting the School of Accounting, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

I
REQUIRENTIO

encourages l
cultural, racial, religious, and ethnicgroups. Listed beloware
the specific requirements for admission to this School. It
should be undems qd
process. The satisfaction of minimum requirements does not
automatically guarantee admission. A student's total record
including educational objective, pattern of courses
previously completed, quality of previous academic record,
and test data will all be considered in evaluating an
application for admission. Priority in admission will be given
to those applicants whose potential on the basis of their total
record indicates the greatest likelihood of success in the
program requested.
University College Students: To be eligible for admission
to the School of Accounting, a University College student
must have completed at least 18 quarter credits of
preprofessional courses. Acceptance to the School of
Accounting will be.based upon the grade point average
earned and prerequisite courses completed.
Transfer Students: To be eligible for admission to the
School of Accounting, a transfer student must satisfy the
minimum requirements for admission that are set forth in
the transfer admissions section below. Additionally, the ap-
plicant should complete, as far as possible, the courses e
quired for the desired curriculum as indicated in the
program for the Freshman and Sophomore years the
versity College section. A minimum of 18 quarter credits of






SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING


general education and preprofessional courses similar to
the Basic Curriculum for the Freshman and Sophomore
years for students desiring to enter the School of
Accounting which is outlined in the University College
section of this catalog. Prerequisite courses in business
subjects during the first two years should be completed as
indicated in paragraphs B.3 and B.4 below. Courses
should not be taken during the firsi two years which are
offered only at the upper division level at the University
of Florida.
B. junior College and Community College students
should:
1. Complete the university transfer program at the
junior college.
2. Complete the general education requirements
established for the junior college.
3. Complete, insofar as possible, all of the following
courses which are prerequisite to any advanced
professional work in the School: an introductory
course in accounting, a one-year sequence in
economics, a one-year sequence in analytical
geometry and calculus, an introductory course in
statistics, an introductory course in EDP, a course in
logic.
4. Complete the one-year courses in analytical geome-
try and calculus and in economics at the junior college
Differences in the order of presenting material in basic
one year courses make it highly undesirable to rake
parts of such courses in different institutions.
5. Choose elective courses needed to complete the
total 64 semester hours in the university transfer
program from such areas as mathematics, natural
sciences, social science, foreign language,and humani-
ties.
6. Avoid professional coursework that is available at
the University of Florida only as 3rd and 4th year
courses. TRANSFER STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO
AVOID SUCH COURSES AS BUSINESS LAW, PRIN-
CIPLES OF MARKETING, PRINCIPLES OF MANAGE-
MENT, PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE, PRINCIPLES OF
REAL ESTATE, PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT, AND
COMPUTER MANAGEMENT COURSES. A maximum
of six quarter credits may be allowed for courses taken
during the first two years which are available only as
third and fourth year professional courses in the
College of Business Administration at the University of
Flonda.
Any credit granted for such work will be in the form of
undistributed elective credit without reference to
specific courses taken. In no case may such courses be
in accounting. In the case where a student wishes to
waive an upper division core course and substitute a
community college course, waivers may be granted on
an individual basis but the student will be required to
take another course in the area being waived. The
course will be specified by the Department Chairman
of the area.
Provisional Admission: Within space limitations, students
who do not meet precisely the admission requirements
indicated in the appropriate section above may be granted
provisional admission to the School of Accounting. The
Director of the School of Accounting will specify thecourses
to be completed and minimum grade points to be earned by
the student during the term of his provisional admission.
Provisional status will be removed and the student fully
admitted to the School of Accounting provided he fulfills the
conditions set forth in his provisionaladmission. The student
will be excluded from further enrollment in the School of


responsible for completing all courses for which he Is
registered.
Courses may be dropped with advisor approval until the


end of the first week (
the first week course
penalty only through
(by petitions) and thi
Seniors must file f
Office of the Registr
expect to receive the
latest date on which


f the quarter without petitioning. After
s may be dropped or changed without
the administrative office of the School
e Registrar.
ormal application for a degree in the
'ar early in the quarter in which they
degree. The official calendar shows the
this can be done.


NORMAL LOADS. The average course load in the School
of Accounting is 15 credit hours. A student may be permined
to register for additional hours if in the opinion of his
academic adviser, his academic record justifies this. Students
who wish to take less than 12 hours should be aware that
certain university privileges and benefits require a minimum
registration. It is the student's responsibility to verify the
minimum registration necessary for these benefits.
RESIDENCE. The last 45 quarter hours to be applied toward
a degree must be completed in residence in the School of
Accounting. In special cases this requirement may be waived
if the student has a 2.9 average or better, and his petition to
take non-resident work has been approved in advance by the
faculty of the School. In any case, no student may take more
than nine quarter credit hours by extension or cor-
respondence among the 97 quarter credits of upper-division
work required for the baccalaureate degree; and such work
must have prior approval for each individual student by the
Petitions Committee of the School. However, accounting
courses may not be taken by extension, by correspondence.
or at another university for transfer.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFAC TORY GRADE OPTION An
undergraduate student in the School of Accounting may take
on the S-U basis only those courses which will be counted as
tree electives in fulfilling the requirements for his degree.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION" Students who do not
make satisfactory academic progress may be excluded from
further registration.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS.
To receive the degree Bachelor of Science in Accounting a
student must satisfactorily complete the following:
1 96 quarter hours of lower division requirements
2. An approved program mn accounting.
3. Upper division core courses.
4. Elective requirements.
A minimum of 193 quarter hours is required for gradua-
tion. The waiving of any required course does not reduce the
hours required for graduation. A student must maintain an
overall average of 2.0 and a 2.0 average on all courses which
count toward his or her upper-division degree require-
ments. A 2.0 average must also be maintained for all
accounting courses.

DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS:
A student who carries 14 hours per quarter with a grade
point average of 3.5 will have his name placed on the Dean's
list for that quarter.
To graduate With Honors, a student must make at least a
3.2 average on all course work accepted as Upper Division
creditand all course work (except as noted below) attempted
while registered in the Upper Division. To graduate With
High Honors, a student must make at least a 3.6 average on all
work accepted as Upper Division credit and all course work
Ipnrsnt *a nnta4rl hklo-,w atepmnmtal whfla roietareAl If thke










GRADUATE DEGREES AND
ADMISSION TO GRADUATE WORK
Courses ae offered in the School of Accounting leading to
the degree of Master of Accounting. For requirements for
these degrees and for admission to Graduate School, consult
the graduate School Catalog.


CURRICULUM
The upper division curriculum in Accounting requires 97
quarter credits.

UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS
Required Nonaccountnl Couses:


QMB 3700 Quantitative Methods for Business
and Economic Analysis ..................
MAN 3010 Principles of Management ......
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing .......
FIN 3403 Business Finance .... ............


Credits

S. . . . .. 5
* . . . . i 4
. . . . . 4
. . . . . 4


COP 3120 Introduction to COBOL Programming ....... 4
'ECO 3251 National Income Determnaton
and Policy ..... .. ....... ... .... . .............. .. 5
*ECO 3100 Prices and Markets ..........................3
BUL 4121 Business Law ...... ........ ........ .......
ECO 3411 Economic and Busness Statistic ............ 4
Elecives ................................. ..... ..... 31


*Students in the five-year accounting program are required to
take ECO 3101, ECO 4205 in lieu of ECO 3100 and ECO 3251.
Required Accounting Counes:


Financial Accoundng 2 ...............
Financial Accounting 3 ...............
Cost and Management Accounting 1 ....
Cost and Management Accounting 2 ....
Income Tax Accounting ................
Auditing Theory and internal Control 1 ..
Information Systems for Management


Planning and Control


:redits


i. . 4

.... 4
* . 4
* * 4


>:*I; ~"i>s:iibP;"l


+ + +


;~;


K. KX : K- KKKK.K K KK <


""I: ""1~,, ~~Fn~




College of


Agriculture


AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION
EDUCATION
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
(See College of Engineering)
AGRONOMY
ANIMAL SCIENCE
BOTANY
DAIRY SCIENCE
ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS
FOOD SCIENCE
SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND
CONSERVATION
FRUIT CROPS
MECHANIZED AGRICULTURE
MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL SCIENCE
ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
PLANT PATHOLOGY
PLANT SCIENCES-GENERAL
POULTRY SCIENCE









Col


Rof


Agriculture


areas of general
mathemads.. .


education, basic science, and


The aim of the Collee of Agriculture is to provide students
with the best education possible for service in agricultural
business, technology, and science.
The departments in the College are: Agricultural and
Exension Education, Agricultural Engineerlng, Agronomy.
Animal Science, Dairy Science, Entomology and
Nematology. Food and Resource Economics, Food Science,
Fruit Crops, Microbiology and Cell Science, Ornamental
Horticulture, Plant Pathology, Poultry Science, Soil Science,
Vegetable Crops, and Veterinary Science. Degree programs
are available through the College of Agriculture in Botany
and Statistics departments administered in the College of
Arts and Sciences. The School of Forest Resources and
Conservation is a specialized faculty within the College of
Agriculture.

REQUIREMENTS FOR' ADMISSIONS
The University of Florida and the College of Agriculture
encourage applications from qualified students from all
cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below are
the specific requirements for admission to this college.
University College Students: Any student in University
College who has finalized his decision to study Agriculture
may transfer to the College of Agriculture after completing
one quarter in University College. to be eligible for
admission students must have a minimum of a C average on
all work completed and have demonstrated by selection of
pre-professional courses their intent to pursue a program in
agriculture.
Transfer Students: To be eligible for admission to the
Cig. 4 Aricuure, a transfer student must satisfy the
Suwm rquinrieements for admission to an Upper Division
Cde-g.e e o a. ADMISSIONS Section of this
catalog. Additionally, the appHtcant must satisfy the following
specific eqire'menu for consideration by the College of
Agrfcture: (1) Complete the courses required for the
d ei curMriculur indicated In the program for the
Freshman and Sihomo re years in the University College
section of this catalog or heir quivae, and, (2) pass all
-eed preprofessonSacrs wihamidimum rade of
C. The following conditions will serve as a guide in
expediting transfer to the College of Agriculture in
complnce with the above requirements. In the event
enlmet qu b me necessary because of limited
space oreaching resoures, selection th admitted will
be od hof past ~aaeeifornmqce.
.S datuens atenng four-year colleges, who wish to
tia~ier two yas, should follow a program of
eneraedcatonand pprofessonal courses similar to
tne Uasic Ciurrichim for the Freshman and Sophomore
yrs tor students planning to eqte, the Colege of
Aiculture as outined thUni versit College section
f this cata log.
B. Junior College students should:
1. Complete the two-year college parallel program at
the junior college
2 tisy the -gtral education requirements es-
tablished for the junior college.
3. Complete a program of chemistry through
nAlrstaiua anlakr haflarmnthflmt.if tkrnuiok ni mllei


7. Avoid specialized professional courses. Professional
courses can be taken to much better advantage after
the student has acquired the appropriate background
in general education and basic science courses.
BACHELOR OF SCHIEC IN AGRICULTURE
BASIC CURRICULUM
In addition to the 96 credits required for entrance to the
College of Agriculture, 96 credits must be earned in the
College of Agriculture curriculum for a combined total of
192 credits required for the Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture degree. The following curriculum common to all
areas of agriculture designates specific requirements and
electives for the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture.
Some of these courses may be taken as electives in the lower
division. It Is especially important that students in junior
colleges, planning to transfer to the College of Agriculture,
select courses from the core requirements as electives.
Curriculum College of Agriculture 96
Core Requirements Credits
Courses Credits
Communications .................................... 8
Electives-selected from SPC 2300, ENG 3343, 3351,
4356, and AGG 4603
Other Requirements and Electives-88 Credits
Requirements and electives in student's major
department .................. ...... min. 20--max. 40
Other requirements, free and approved electives .. 48-68
PRACTICAL WORK EXPERIENCE
By prior arrangement with individual Department
Chairmen and approval of the Dean, students may, during
their upper division course of study, receive credit for
practical work under competent supervision in any
recognized and approved agricultural or related pursuit
relevant to their college program. Credit is normally earned
at the rate of one credit per month of full-timeworkand may
not exceed a total of four in any combination of experiences.
A formal written report must be submitted before a grade (5-
U) will be issued.
Departments offering this option have listed the course
number 400 in their catalog listing of courses. Guidelines are
available from the College and individual departments,
establishing minimum criteria for credit eligibility and
performance.
DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS
A student who carries 15 hours per quarter with a grade
point average of 3.3 or better and no grade less than C in any
course will have his name placed on the Dean's list for that
quarter.
Students completing the requirements for the B.S. in
Agriculture degree are eligible to be considered for
graduation with Honors or High Honors.
To graduate with Honors a student must have a University
of Florida Upper Division grade point average of 3.5, or
above, (For purposes of honors the University of Florida
Upper Division courses are defined as all courses taken at this
University after the student has earned 96 credits, wherever
taken.)
Wa, -_ - .-: L U!L L I -- .*L- - - -- - __- --


-







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Students contemplating graduate study should consult
with their adviser as early as possible to insure proper
program planning.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND BUSINESS
Students in agriculture may specialize in one of three
broad areas of knowledge Agricultural Science,
Agricultural Technology, and Agricultural Business, all
within the framework of 192 credits for the degree Bachelor
of Science in Agriculture.


For a
credits o
areas of
Sciences
(MAC),
College.


specialization in Agricultural Science at least 18
f the 192 total are required in one or more of the
the Physical (CHM, GPY. PHY) and Biological
(APB, BOT, ENY, PLP, AGR 3303) and Mathematics
in addition to those required in the University


For a program in Agricultural Technology a choice of
courses in applied agriculture is planned by the separate
departments of the College of Agriculture in areas of the
student's special interest.
For Agricultural Business Specialization at least 20 credits
of the 192 total required must be completed from the areas of
Food and Resource Economics (AEB) and Business Ad-
ministration (ACC, ECO, FIN, MAN, MAR). In addition to
those required in the University College plus a departmental
major.
The chairman of the department in which the student
majors (or his appointee) will act as the student's adviser,
assist student in arranging his course of study, and make
necessary recommendations to the Dean. The student's
courses for each quarter are subject to the approval of the
Dean and the Department Chairman.

TROPICAL AGRICULTURE
A program for a specialization (with certificate) in Tropical
Agriculture for undergraduate and graduate students in the
College of Agriculture is available. The program provides
course selection to broaden the normal degree re-
quirements for those interested in specializing in Tropical
Agriculture. Students enrolled in any one of the existing
major programs in the College of Agriculture may pursue
this specialization.
The Certificate in Tropical Agriculture specialization will
include courses from four basic groups as follows: Area
Studies, International Economics, Tropical Ecosystems, and
Tropical Agriculture. A total of at least 20 quarter credits from
courses which relate to non-U.S. tropical areas of the world is
required from Area Studies, International Economics and
Tropical Ecosystems with at least 4 credits from each
category. In addition, a minimum of 20 credits from Tropical
Agriculture courses related to production of agricultural
commodities in tropical areas of the world is required.
The courses required for this specialization will be
determined by the student in consultation, with a
departmental adviser from an approved list of courses as
indicated in the Tropical Agriculture Specialization
guidelines. In most cases the requirements may be met
through a wise choice of electives. Students interested in this
specialization should consult their departmental adviser.
A certificate program for non-agriculture students desir-
ing to broaden their major program with courses relating to
Tropical Studies with an emphasis in Agriculture is also
available.


The departments or disciplines from which courses may be
selected are listed below. The specific courses as well as all
details of the program are given in a Tropical Agricuhure
Specialization guideline statement to be used by departmen-
ral advisers.


Area Studies
Anthropology
Education
Geography
History
Journalism
Latin American Studies
Law
Political Science
Sociology
Others as appropriate
International Economics
Economics
Food and Resource Economics
Marketing
Others as appropriate
Tropical Ecosystems
Agronomy
Biological Sciences
Botany
Forestry
Zoology
Others as appropriate
Tropical Agriculture
Agricultural Engineering
Agronomy
Animal Science
Entomology
Food and Resource
Economics
Fruit Crops
Ornamental Horticulture
Plant Pathology
Soil Science
Vegetable Crops
Veterinary Science
Others as appropriate


PEST MANAGEMENT AND PLANT PROTECTION
Students in the Pest Management and Plant Protection
Specialization will receive instruction in the principles of
Entomology, Nematology, Plant Pathology, and Weed
Science. An understanding of the component parts of the
crop-plant ecosystem as related to management of all groups
of pests through the applicationof biological, chemical, and
integrated systems compatible with a quality environment
will be provided.
Students who select the Pest Management and Plant
Protection Specialization will major in one of the following
programs in the College of Agriculture: Agronomy, En-
tomology and Nematology, Fruit Crops, Ornamental Hor-
ticulture, Plant Pathology, Plant Sciences, or Vegetable
Crops. Students who complete the requirements for the
Bachelor of Science degree with this specialization should
find many employment opportunities in agri-business
enterprises or government agencies concerned with plant
pest management, crop production, and environmental
protection. Moreover, the successful completion of this
undergraduate program will place the student in an
excellent competitive position as a candidate for graduate
studies in any one of the departments cooperating in the









Credits
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Plant-Pmt Management .... 3
PMA 3931 Seminar in Basic Plant-Pest Management ..:. 2
PMA 3941 Internship In Plant-Pest Management ........ 3
PMA 4401 Systems of Pest Management and Plant
Protection .... . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . 3
PMA 4402L Laboratory Exercises in Pest Management ... 2
PLS 2031 Fundamentals of Crop Production ............ 4
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ...... ............. 3
ENY 3006L Principles of Entomology Laboratory ....... 2
ENY 3701 Principles of Nematology ................... 4
PLS 4601 Weed Science ..... ....................... 4
PLP 3002 Lectures in Basic Plant Pathology ............. 2
PCB 3033 Introduction to Ecology .................. .. S
BOT 3503C Elementary Plant Physiology ............. 4
BOT 3503L Elementary Plant Physiology Laboratory ..... 2
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological
Chemistry ................... ................... ..5
SOS 31022 General Soils ............................... 5
AGR 3033 Genetics ...... ... ... .... .... . ..... 4
CERTIFICATE MINOR IN
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
A program for a minor (with certificate) in environmental
studies has been developed. The program provides course
selection to obtain a broad knowledge of the environment,
especially the inter-relationships between the activities of
man and environmental quality. Students enrolled in one of
the existing major programs in the College of Agriculture
and for this minor will learn to apply their major discipline to
the solution of environmental problems.
The environmental studies minor will nude en-
vironmental courses in three basic groups as follows:
biological sciences, physical sciences, and social sciences. At
least one course from each of these three groups is required.
A minimum of 18 quarter hours credit is required for the
minor. Courses required for the major cannot be counted
toward the minor requirement A minimum of three hours
outside the Colege of Agriculture i required.
The oursek required for this minor wil determIned by
the students in consulilon with their departmental adviser
from an approved list of courses p by the depart-
ment, the College of Agriculture and the Uniersity. In most
cases these requirements may be met through a wise choice
of electives Students interested in his minor should consult
their departmental adviser.
PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE
;The CoIeg of Veterinary Medic, Univesity of Florida,
admits a limited number of students each fall tfor the pursuit
of a degree Doctor of Veterinary Mdiine. The following
courses mst becompletedth n grade less than C and a
minimum nrade point average of 2
Quarter Credits


Principlesof Animal Biology, lecture and
laboratory (ZOQ2010, ZOOT 11) .. ...... ..........
Microbiology (MCB 33013L) ..,...,L, ..,,., .,, ,.
Cenetics (AGR 30or PCB ) .r..C........,....
Inorganic Chemistry (General and Qualt)
lecture and laboratory (CHM 2 041C,
CHM 2042 and CHM 203; CHM 25C,
CnIM 46, CHM Z347C)- .~. ...., *.......~.. .. 12-
Organic Chemistry; lecture and laboratory
(CHM 30, 0 3210L; CHM 31421 ... ........ 3
Quantitative Analysis (CHM 31) ... ....
Physics (PHY 2 PHY 21, Y 0 L, PHY L) ...
Matheatics: Calculus* (MAC 3311) * ..*
Animal Science:


.9
.5
4-5
27


-16

10
.5
10


*AEE 3323
Agricu
*AEE 3200
Agricu
*AEE 4504
Progra
*AEE 4224


Development and Philosophy of
lturaJ Education .. . .. ..... ..
SInstructional Techniques in
Itural Education .... .. .... . .
Organization of Agricultural Educa
Special Methods in Teaching


Vnrarinnal Aorir~n lrar


. . . . .. . 4
. . . .. . . 4
tion
............4


(e.g., Agrlculture. Computer Sdena,
Economic, Humanities, Journalism,
Political Science, Psychology, Social
Sciences, Statistics, etc.) Total 120
*Trigonometry and Algebra at the high school or college level
are required for admission to courses in Calculus.
*Nine quarter credits will be accepted if taken as a
requirement for an Associate of Arts degree.
Because of the rigid course requirements, most students
require somewhat more than two years to complete this
curriculum. Also, since admission to Veterinary Schodol Is
competitive, students usually need to make considerably
more than the minimum grade point average of 2.75.
Pre-veterinary students should consult the Dean of the
College of Agriculture before registering for the preo-
veterinary curriculum.
Residents of Florida who will have completed the pre- .
veterinary requirements in June of the year that entrance i
into the School of Veterinary Medicine is desired in the Fall,
and who wish to be included in the State's list of eligibles,
should contact the Dean of the College of Veterinary
Medicine.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING (AtfkCI*ed
Engineering)
The Agricultural Engineering curriculum is offered
cooperatively by the College of Agriculture and the College
of EnuinqeerinngSudrin ..
solve the specialized and unique engineering proemsof
agricultural production and processing systems and the
management and conservation of agricultural land and water
resources. Since engineering problems in agriculture relate
to biological production and processing of biological
products, training in agricultural and biological courses is
obtained. Students desiring careers in Agricultural Engineer-
ing will register in the College of Engineering. See College of
Engineering for curriculum.

AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION
EDUCATION
The Agricultural and Extension Education curriculum is
designed to prepare students for careers in agricultural
education and the cooperative extension service. Students
majoring in this department have a common core curriculum
which combines courses in technical agriculture, profes-
sional education, and/or extension methodology. The
department chairman or one of the departmental counselors
will advise students majoring in this department in the
selection of electives and requirements to meet the students'
career goals.
The student completing this program will be required to
satisfy the College of Agriculture core curriculum re-
quirements.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8 credits
Departmental Requirements 46 credits Credits







COLLEGE OF AGRICULJ.TURE


AEE 4906 Individual Work in Agricultural and
Extension Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8


DAIRY SCIENCE


Other Requirements and Electives 42 credits*w

MAG 3220 Agricultural Mechanics I .............
MAG 4225 Agricultural Mechanics II ...........
AEB 3103 Principles of Food & Resource Economics
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Science .......
PLS 2031 Fundamentals of Crop Production .......
SOS 3022 General Soils ...................... ...
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ...............
ENY 3006 Principles of Entomology Laboratory ....
*"Electives in Agriculture ........ ..... .... ......
*The student planning to qualify to teach in the public
will complete a minimum of 46 quarter hours from thi


Credits
S. . 4

S. . 5
. . 5
. . . 4


. . 2
* . .. 9
schools
above


list of professional courses. The courses indicated by an
asterisk (*) are required.
**Substitutions must be approved by the Chairman of
Agricultural and Extension Education.
"To be planned by department counselor.


AGRONOMY
(See Plant Sciences)


ANIMAL SCIENCE
The curriculum in Animal Science meets the educational
requitements for the Bachelor of Science degree. Animal
Science is designed to give students a foundation in the basic
sciences and fundamental training in the various phases of
beef cattle, swine, horse,sheep and meat Industries. Early
In their college planning, students should discuss the
programs and their implications with the Department
Chairman or his counseling representatives.
Credits
College of Agriculture Communications Requirements 8
reptental Requirements ....,.................... z
Other Requirements and Electives ................... 61


Departmental Requirements
ASN 307 Principles of Livestock Production ..
ASG 3113 Principles of Animal Breeding ......
ASC 343 Principles of Animal Nutrition ......
AS. 3404 Applied Animal Nutrition .........
ASN 4634 Meats ............................
ASG 4931 Seminar ...a... .................
Minimum of B additional Department Credits
from the following courses:


ANS 4234
ANS 4244
ANS 4264
ANS 4274
ANS 4614


AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ..................... 5
AR 3303 Genetics .. ................... ... .... .
AGR 4231 Forage and Pature Science ................. 5
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry 5
MCB 3013 Basic Biology of Microorganisms ............ 3
MCB 3013L Microorganisms laboratory ................. 2
SOS 3022 General Soils .............................. 5
VES 3202C Anatomy and Physiology .................. 5
Free Electives . . . . . . ... .. .. ...... 2
Students are encouraged to elect additional courses in
c.-- Tr*ranfalas... CrW#nmAnt aind Rifcinxlac ratlns t*n a


.4...4....54

( 1 tf -II I*1

44 *AW4 ell
s.ee .cted 3


sheleted


Farm Firm Management ........
Genetics . . . . . . .. ..
Forage and Pasture Science ....
Introduction to Animal Sciences
Principles of Animal Breeding ..
Principles of Animal Nutrition ..
Applied Animal Nutrition ......
Sem inar ........ ........ ....
Elementary Organic and Biologic
I Basic Microbiology of Microorg
IL Basic Microbiology of Microorl


ASG 4334 Reproduction in Farm Animals
DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation ......
DAS 3211 Dairy Cattle Management ....
DAS 4411 Dairy Cattle Nutrition ...
Electives in Dairy Science .............
Approved Electives ...................


a


Credits
. . . . . . 5
*..........5
.. .......... 5
. . . . 5
. . . . 3
. . . . 2.
. .. . . 1
al Chemistry 5
inisms ...... 3


ganisms


......4
. 4 * 3.
*. C 4
* * 20


CURRICULUM I-DAIRY MANAGEMENT
The curriculum is designed for students interested In
managing dairies or dairy enterprises, or careers in allied
agribusinesses.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8 Credits
Electives Selected from AGG 4603. EC 3343, ENC 3351, ENC
4356 and SPC 2300
Management Core Requirements 55 Credits


Credits


*C*C i3*r3
. .* .. 4




hemistry 5
sor
,,4,,CC. 3


Animals
,ts


The two curricula give broad foundations in science and
technology of the dairy industry. Students should consult
with the chairman or departmental counselor for assistance
in choosing the curriculum and selecting electives.

CURRICULUM I-DAIRY SCIENCE
The curriculum is designed for students interested in dairy
production, pre-veterinary medicine or post-graduate study.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8 Credits
Electives Selected from AGG 4603. ENC 3343, ENC 3351,
ENC 4356 and SPC 2300
Science Core Requirements 50 Credits


Laboratory ............. .. .................. .... 2
SOS 3022 General Soils . .. . .. . ....... .. ...
VES 3202 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestc Animals 5
Departmental Requirements- 78 Credits
Credits


Horse Enterprise Management .............. 4
Beef Cattle Enterprise Management .......... 5
Swine Production ......................4... 3
Sheep Production ........ ................. 2
livestock and Carcass Evaluation ........... 3
Other Requirements and Electives


ACC 2001 Elementary Financial Accounting ...
ACC 2301 Elementary Managerial Accounting.
AEB 3111 Computers and Linear Programming
for Agriculture ...........................
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ...........
AGR 3303 Genetics .........................
AGR 4231 Forage and Pasture Science ........
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences ....
ASG 3403 Principles of Animal Nutrition ......
ASG 3404 Applied Animal Nutrition .......
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological C
MAC 2233 Calculus for Economics and Businesa
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I .
SOS 3022 General Soils .....................
VES 3202 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic
Departmental Requirement -- 18 Crec


Credits
ASG 4334 Reproduction in Farm Animals or
DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation .... ........... .... 4
DAS3211 Dairy Cattle Management ................... 4
fiAs 4411 flairv ttl Ntrinn ..... ......










entomology and nematology and specialized programs in
various areas of these two sciences.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8 credits
Departmental Requirements 30 Credits
Credits


3005 Prindples of
3006 Principles of
or


3004
4353
4201
4161


Entomology .............
Entomology Laboratory ...


General Entomology ..................
Insect Physiology and Morphology ......
Insect Ecology, Behavior, and Systematics
Insect Idenlification .. ...............


* . 3
I* . .

* .. 4
. . . S
. . . 5
. .. S


ENY Electives .. ................ ..............10 or 11
Other Requirements and Elecrives-58 Credits
BCH 3023 Organic & Biochemistry or equivalent ....... 5
Electives in Agriculture and/or Biological
Sciences ......................................... 32
Suggested Courses: AGR 3303, ZOO 3203
Approved Electives .. ................ ............ 21
For the Pest Management and Plant Protection Specializa-
tion, students must consult the department chairman for
approved courses.

FOOD AND RESOURCE
ECONOMICS
Six curricula are offered by the Department of Food and
Resource Economics. The curriculum selected by the student
will depend upon the nature of his interest in the field.
Students should consult the chairman of the department or
the departmental counselor for guidance in making their
eoice of a curriculum and ft wrnvaI a*elect lr
CURRICULUM I FOOD AND RESOURCE

Th curriculum is designed for those studrlts interred
primarily in traln!in as piroesional agricultural ~conqsut
or in preparing for grad htd ridy.
College et grltdtre Core Aequirements-a8 Credits
S Departmental Requirements-37 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics 5
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Mangeient F.... F ,5........,, S
AEB 3300 Marketinf ... :...,...,.+ ... ... ,. .;... 5
AEB 3934 Food an Resource Economics "
junior Seminar ......... ......+ a,,+.. .........++ 1
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agric. .......* .., ..+... ",.+4-
AEB 4334 Agric. Price Analysis andConsumer Behavior 4
AEB 4511 Quantitae Analyss in Food and
Resource Economics ...,............. . .*. 4
AEB 4935 Food and Resource Economics s senior Beinar 1
Elective in Food and Resource Economics .........; 2
Other Requirements and Electves-S7 Credit


ECO 2013 Basic Economics .,. ., ,.
ECO 4101 Microeconomic+Theory ...... ...,
ECO 4205 Macroeconomic Theory .. ..+....
MAC 311 Analytical Geometry and Calculus I
MAC 3312 Analytal Geometry and Calculus II
STA 3023 Introuction to Statistics .... .,..
STA 4222 Sample Survey Design..........
Free and Approved Electives .............


* 4 * t ,
M 1(1).1.


*4t *
** * ..


CURRICULUM II AGRICULTURAL
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
This curriculum is designed for thosestudentsinterested in
administrative and service aspects of agriculture or related


AEB 3300 Marketing .................................. 5
AE8 3934 Food and Resource Economic Junior Seminar 1
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture .... ... ....... .4
AER 4334 Agrlc. Price Analysis & Consumer Behavior ... 4
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and
Resource Economics ............................... 4
AEB 4935 Food and Resource Economics Senior Seminar 1
*Quantitative Methods ................ ............. 3-4
Electives in Food and Resource Economics .. ......2 or 3
Other Requirements and Electives 53 Credits


ACC 2001 & ACC 2301 Elementary Accounting ..
BUL 4121 or AEB 3123 Business Law or Agric. Law


ECO 2013 Basic Economics ..........
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic
ECO 3251 or ECO 4250 Macroeconomic
MAC 2233 or MAC 3311 Calculus .....
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ....
Free and Approved Electives .........
*This requirement can be satisfied with Al
or STA 4222.


Theory
Theory


EB 4172, QMB 4701,


.. . . 1

..... 3-5

..... 4-5
.. .... 5-
. . .. 4
... 17-19


CURRICULUM III CO-MAJOR WITH
OTHER DEPARTMENTS
Students majoring in other departments who feel the need
for a better understanding of the economics of agriculture
and the relationship of agriculture to the general economy
can also take a Co-Major in Food and Resource Economics.
The curriculum for such Co-Major includes 25 quarter hours
of required courses in Food and Resource Economics, 9
quarter hours in related fields, and 62 hours to meet the
requirements of other participating departments and for
electives. Elective courses will be selected to fit the needs and
ine t SiALueiequiremenis .
College of Agriculture Core equiements'-Zt is
Department at Be mrepeqA sw iyS


3133
3300
3934
4224
4334
4935
Ori


Farm Fim Maname
arketng ....... ....,.. ........ ......,,,..
Food and Resource Economics Junior Seminar
Public Policy in Agriculture ..................
Agric. Price Analysis & Consumer Behavior ...
Food and Resource Economics Senior Seminar
ier Requirenents and Electives-63 Credits


1
4
4
1


ECO 2013 Basic Economics .... .......................5
STA 3033 Introduction to Statistics .................... 4
Free and Approved Electives ........................ 54
*Students taking a Co-Major in Food and Resource Economics
meet the curriculum core requirements of the College of
Agriculture. Such students will have 62 instead of 54 hoursof
free and approved electives.

CURRICULUM IV RURAL COMMUNITY AND
REGIONAL ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed to train professionals to work
on problems affecting people and their communities.
Students will be trained to deal with the identification and
solution of such problems as inadequate housing, inefficient
or nonexistent public transportation, substandard education
and technical training, limited job opportunities, poor
recreation facilities, and improper and inefficient land use
and human resource development.
College o Agricultre Core Requwen
Department Requirements-29 Credits


AEB 3103


Principles of Food and Resource Economics .. 5


I'


.
.


;; :B


........







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


ECO 2013 Basic Economics ......
ECO 3100 or 4101 Microeconomic
ECO 3251 or 4205 Macroeconomic
ECO 4504 Public Finance .. ....
ECP 4602 Urban Economics .. ..
MAC 2233 or MAC 3311 Calculus
SOC 2000 Principles of Sociology


Theory ..... ..3-5
Theory ........ 4-5

... .. . ... ... .. 5
. .. . . . . . . . 5


STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics .. ............ 4
*Free and Approved Electives .. .... ...... ... 23-25
*Suggested electives include: AEB 3133. AEB 4172. AEB 4224,
AEB 4905, AMH 4460, DHE 4200, EGN 4822, ENV 3003, GEO
(032. CEO 3602. MAG 3503 PAD 4003 POS 2112. PUP 4104.


- - - l w w w r w F w w ... .
REE 3042, REE 4434, REE 4704. SOC 3300,
SOS 3215, STA 4222.


3310. SO55 3003


CURRICULUM V FOOD MARKFTING AND
DISTRIBUTION
This curriculum is designed for students interested ir
employment at the managerial level in the Food Industry.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements-8 Credits
Departmental Requirements-32 Credits


AEB 3103
AEB 3300
AEB 3934
AEB 4172
AEB 4314
AEB 4334
AEB 4343
AEB 4344
AEB 4511
Food a
AEB 4935


Credits
Principles of Food and Resource Economics .. 5
Marketing ............ .... ... .... ... .. ..5
Food and Resource Economics Junior Seminar 1
Basic Activity Analysis for Econ. Decisions .. 4
Terminal Markets .... .. .. .. ...... 2
Agric. Price Analysis and Consumer Behavior 4
Food W holesaling ............ ... ........ 3
Food Retailing ..... .. ...... 3
Quantitative Analysis in
nd Resource Economics .. .... 4
Food and Resource Economics Senior Seminar 1


Other Requirements and Electaves-56 Credits


ACC 2001 &


ACC 2301 Elementary Accounting


BUL 3121 Business Law .... .. .. .... .
ECO 2013 Basic Economics ...... ..
ECO 3100 or ECO 4101 Microeconomic Theory
ECO 3250 or ECO 4205 Macroeconomic Theory
MAC 2233 or MAC 3311 Calculus .....
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ...
Free and Approved Electives .... ........


~. 8
. . -. 5

3-5

. . 5
. . . 4
.... 20-21


CURRICULUM VI NATURAL RESOURCE AND
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
This curriculum is designed for students interested in
natural resources and environmental quality. This field
includes the study of the ownership. utilization, develop-
ment. management, and conservation ol natural resources.
Emphasis is on economic problems and decision making
relating to these areas.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements-8 Credits


Department


AEB 3103
AEB 3133
AEB 3413
AEB 3934
AEB 4224
AEB 4434
AEB 4444
AEB 4511
Resour
AEB 4935


Requirements-33


Credirs


Credirs
Principles of Food and Resource Economics 5
Farm Firm Management .... .. . 5
Economics of Environmental Qualiry .. 4
Food and Resource Economics junior Seminar 1
Public Policy in Agriculture .. .... 4
Land and Water Economics .. .... ... 4
Regional Economics and Policy Analysis 5
Quantitative Analysis in Food and
ce Economics . .. . 4
Food and Resource Economics Senior Seminar 1


Other Requirements and Elecrives-55 Credits
ECO 2013 Basic Economics .. .. .5


4504. ECP 3423, ECP 4403, ECP 4602. EES 3006, ENV 3003. ENY
3005, FOR 2010, FOR 4030, FOR 4612, MAG 3503. MAG 3732,
OCE 4016. REE 3042. REE 4434. 505 3022, SOS 3215. WIS 3200.
WIS 3401.


FOOD SCIENCE AND
HUMAN NUTRITION


The Department of Food
offers three curricula. Food


Science and Human Nutrition
Science, Food and Consumer


Protection, and Nutrition and Dietetics. These curricula are
designed to provide an understanding of the applications of
basic sciences, engineering and management to the han-
dling, processing, manufacturing, marketing and utilization
of human foods and the effects of these functions upon our
environment. Wholesomeness, nutritive value, safety,
convenience and availability of foods are stressed, with
further emphasis on ecological and environmental effects.
Students in all curricula take a common core of courses,
required courses for their area of concentration, and
electives.
The Food Science curriculumoffersampleopportunityfor
electing courses in areas of special interest, such as food
processing and manufacturing, management or sales; and
graduate study and research in Food Science or related
fields. For those wishing to specialize in the manufacture,
handling and evaluation of products of dairy, fruit, meat,
poultry and vegetable origin, an opportunity is available for
cooperative programs with the commodity departments.
Students interested in the environmental aspects of food and
life systems should choose the Food and Consumer
Protection curriculum. This curriculum will prepare
students for employment in the areas of food regulation,
quality control, and environmental control. The Nutrrtion
and Dietetics curriculum is designed to prepare students for
a general dietetics internship program upon graduation
Students should consult the departmental counselors for
guidance and approval of electives.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8
Department Core Requrrements 38 Credits
Credits
HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition ... 4
FOS 3042 Introductory Food Science .. .. .. 4
FOS 4311C Food Chemistry . ... .. .. .. 5
FO5 4222C Food Microbiology .. .... 5
FOS 4321C Food Analysis .. .. . 5
CHM 320-3200L Organic Chemistry .... 6
MCB 3013-3013L Basic Biology of Microorganisms ... .5
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics .. ... .. 4


CURRICULUM I BASIC FOOD SCIENCE
Addrrional requirements and elecaives -


50 Credits
Credirs


MAC 4062C Principles of Food Engineering
FOS 4731 Government Regulations and the Food Industry
FOS 4722C Statistical Quality Control and Sensory
Evaluation of Foods .. .
FOS 4931 Food Science and Human Nutrition Seminar
FOS 4427C Principles of Food Processing
MAC 3311 Analytical Geometry & Calculus
Electives (including one commodity-oriented processir


course)


5
2

3
1
5
5
'g


_ ... .. ... ..... ... 29


CURRICULUM II-FOOD AND CONSUMER
PROTECTION
Additional requirements and electives 50 Credirs
Credits
rat a.1 r a-~. .1 ..,t r ILa ~C An nil* a nlr










Elts ives .. .. ...... .. .... .. . . .. . .... 22
NOTE: Recommended Electives for Curriculum II-AGG
2501-Agriculture in the Environment; FOS 2003-Toxic
Substances in Foods; ENY 40--Medical and Veterinary
Entomology; BUL 4101-Business Law; PCB 4040-General
Ecology; EES 4401-Public Health Engineering.

CURRICULUM Ill-NUTRITION AND DIETETICS
Additional requirements and electives-50 Credits
Credits
MLIN 1711 Inrrndiartinn In Human Nutrition ........... 4


HUNI 4241 Human Nutrition ....... ... .... .. ....
DIE 4244 Nutrition and Disease ......................
DIE 4125 Food Systems Management ....... ........
FOS 4931 Food Science and Human Nutrition Seminar .
BCH 3713 Introduction to Human Biochemistry .......


MAG 3503 Agriculural
**Approved Electives ...
*These required courses
the first 96 credits.
**The curriculum.,192 cred
A minimum of 20 elect
consultation with the Di
student's career objecrh


.3


EDF 4210 Educational Psychology ....
APB 3223 Basic Anatomy & Physiology
MAN 3010 Principles of Management
MAN 3301 Personnel Management ...
PSY 2013 General Psychology .........
SOC 2000 Principles of Sociology ....
Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . ..


MICROBIOLOC
The curriculum is d'
knowledge of bacteria, p
provides a background
microbiology, cel. biolo.
-L I.. -


and Environmental Quality ....4 :4
......................... ..14
should be taken as electives within

lit hours, contains 33 elective credits.
ive credits specifically selected, in
epartmental advisor, to support the
ve is required.


Y AND CELL SCIENCE
designed to develop fundamental
lant and animal cells, and viruses. It
for pursuing graduate work in
gy, or biochemistry as well as other
a im al atIL


areas or agricultural stienies. It arou ouv a .au., vu
necessary for work in research or dia nostic laboratories,
both governmental and industrial. The curriculum also
provides a background for entry into the professions of
dentistry, medicine and veterinary medicine.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8 Credits
Departmental Requirements 36 Credits
.'* ^- v- ^*"/M iS^i^ "^ :*:1"3S*SM**! :* -v" '* ^ flr t~ l t


.


UEIB:E""E


FOREST RESOURCES
AND CONSERVATION


(For Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements, See Listings
SSchool of Forest Resources and Conserva-lon4


FRUI CROPS
h Plant Sciences)


tWh,


4313 Introduction to Physical Biochemistry ........ 5
1 3013 Basic Biology of Microorganisms ............ 3
i 3013L Basic Biology of Microorganisms Laboratory 2
3136 Cell Structure and Function ................. 5
I Electives ... .. . ....... .. ... .... ......... 21
(BCH 4203 may count toward the 21 credits)
Other Requirements and Electives 52 Credits
Credits
S112fl fo antitativp Analwis .. ...... ..... ...... 5


CHM 3210 Organic Chemistry ...........
CHM 3210L Organic Chemistry Laboratory
CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry .........
CHM 3211L Organic Chemistry Laboratory
Electives ............. .............. ...


. .. . . . . 4
. .. .. .. .. ... 1
.. .. .. ... .. 3
. ... .. .. ... 2
. . . . . . 37
| n m n n n

........... 37


MECHANIZED AGRICULTURE


The obectiveof this curriunum is to prepaethe graduate
for a career in one of foiur general areas: (1) operations
manager in production agriculture (2) sales and service
representation for organizations which service the
agribusiness industry, (3) assistant agricultural extension
agents, (4) specialists with insurance companies, banks,
agricultural organizations and governmental agencies. The
curriculum is structured to.encourage concentration in one
of the career areas. Concentration is achieved through wise
election of electives. Electivewhich suppottne of the folul
career objectives are selected in consultation with the
Agricultural Engineering Departnent academic advisor.
Graduates from this program are well prepared for careers in
the agribusiness Industry where the Management of
mechanized production operations is involved.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements-8 Credits
Credits
ENC 4356 Report Writing ......... .... ...... ....... 4
SPC 3601 Public Speaking .....,. ................. ...4
Mechanized Agricuture Requrments-88 Credits
AC 2223 Analytic Geonetry and Catculus ..........s 5
*PHY 2005 Applied Physics ............................ 5
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics .. 53
ENY 300 Principles of Entomology ....... .......... 3
ENY 3531 Animal Insec ........,..... ..........4...
*PSY 2013 General Psychology ................. ..... 4
Animal Science Requirement ...................... 4
Plant Science Requirement ...... ...... .. ..... 8


ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
(See Plant Sciences)


PLANT PATHOLOGY
The curriculum in Plant Pathology permits students to
learn the principles of Plant Pathology and their applications
to scientific agriculture. The following program is offered for
a major in Plant Pathology with specialization in either
Agricultural Science or Agricultural Technology. Students
must consult the catalog statement for courses approved for
the Specialization in Pest Management and Plant Protection.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements I Credits
Depatmental Retquirements 2 Credlts


PLP 3002 Lectures in Basic Plant Pathology ....
PLP 3003L Laboratory in Basic Plant Pathology .
PLP 4102 Principles of Plant Disease Control ..
PLP 4931 Seminar in Plant Pathology .........
*BOT 5435C introductory Mycology ........ .
ENY 3701 Principles of Nematology ... .....
MCB 3013 Basic Biology of Microorganisms ...
MCB 3013L Baui Biology of Microorgani ms
Laboratory 4 .....*..* ... i e... ., 4 .4
PLP 4906 Problems in Intermediate
Plant Pathology ..... .... .. .......


Credit.
.. . . . 2
. . . . . 3
. . . . 4
..... 1 to
. . . . . 4
. . . . . 3
Bi ; ,y^^l";^i; ~*.
* '' .


..1 to 5


. . . . . . S
. . . . . . . . . 4
. . . . . ... . 4
. .. . .. .. .. .. . . 4
. .. n . .n 4
... ... . . . 4
. . . . . . . . 5







COLLEGE OF AGIICULTURE


. ............... 2
. . . ... . .. ... 3
. . .. ... . .. ... 2
........ ....... 5


Approved Electives 33 Credits
*Departmental electives.


PLANT SCIENCES


(Agronomy, Fruit Crops. Ornamental Horticulture,
Vegetable Crops, Plant Science)
Students in the Plant Sciences have the option of majoring
in Agronomy, Fruit Crops, Ornamental Horticulture,
Vegetable Crops or the broad area of Plant Science.
Curricula in each of the four departments and Plant Science
include common College of Agriculture and Plant Sciences
core requirements, departmental requirements and ap-
proved electives totalling 96 credits. Students should consult
a counselor in their respective major department as early as
possible for program planning; students electing a Plant
Science curriculum rather than a departmental major should
consult the Department of Agronomy.
College of Agriculture Core Requirements 8 Credits
Plant Sciences Core Requirements 40 Credits


Crec
AGR 3303 Genetics . . ..... ..............
BOT 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry
BOT 3503C Elementary Plant Phvsiology .............


BOT 3503L Elementary Plant Physiology Labori


ENY
ENY
PLP
PLP
PLS
PLS
PLS
SOS


3005 Principles of Entomology .. ......
3006L Principles of Entomology Laborator
3002 Basic Plant Pathology .........
3003L Laboralory in Basic Plant Pathology
2031 Fundamentals of Crop Production ..
3221 Plant Propagation .. . ......
3221L Plant Propagation Laboratory ......
3022C General Soils . .. .. .. ..


its
. 5
5
.4


atory ..... 2
...... .... 3
y ....... 2
.. .
. . .. 34
. . . . 4
. . 3
...... . .. 2
. . .. . 5


*Technology, Business, Pest Management for Plant Protection
and General Agronomy Specializarions.
**Science Specia lization.
Each student has the prerogative of choosing approved
electives from the respective group of courses listed above to
meet the requirements of a specialization in Agronomic
Science, Technology, or Business, Pest Management tor
Plant Protection and in General Agronomy.


FRUIT CROPS
Plant Sciences majors selecting an option in Fruit Crops
receive a broad foundation in the science and technology of
fruit production, handling and marketing, with emphasis on
citrus and tropical fruits. Programs of study leading to
specializations in technology, science and business are
available.
Departmental Requirements 22 Credits


Credits


FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture ............... 4
FRC 4223 Citrus Production ................... ...... 4
FRC 4224L Fruit Crops Laboratory I .................... 2
FRC 4225L Fruit Crops Laboratory II ...... .... ...... 2
FRC 4411 Physiology of Fruit Production ............... 5
FRC 4612 Citrus Maturity and Packinghouse Procedure 4
FRC 4931 Undergraduate Seminar in Fruit Crops ....... 1
Approved Electives ....... .................... ... 26
Students choosing the Agricultural Technology Specializa-
tion must select appropriate electives in technical agriculture
and related courses to give them the proper background for
careers in fruit production.


Specialization
chemistry, and
and careers in

n the fields of
he Agricultural


Students must consult the department chairman as to
approved courses for the Pest Management and Plant
AGRONOMY Protection Specialization.


Curricula in Agronomy provide a sound educational
experience for students in Agronomic Science, Technology,
Business, Pest Management for Plant Protection or General
Agronomy. Detailed programs are available in crop produc-
tion including field, forage, and pasture crops, as well as
weed science, genetics, and plant breeding.
Departmental Requirements 20 Credits


ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
Plant Sciences majors selecting an option in Ornamental
Horticulture receive scientific or technical training in the
production of flower, foliage, nursery and turf crops.
Departmental Requirements 27 Credits


AGR 3210 Field Crop Science .....
AGR 4321 Plant Breeding ........
AGR 4906 Problems in Agronomy .
AGR 4931 Agronomy Seminar ....
Electives in Agronomy ...........
Other Requirements
SPLS 4601 Weed Science ..........
*PLS 4701 Field Plot Techniques ...
**STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics


Credits
* 444.4444 4.. 44

44m44***444*4*.**444 3
44 44. w 444* 444.4441:****:*:* u
444444 *.t. . . 81
. .. .. .... 8, -
* ** ** ^* ** -*- .-* *^ ** -*


- 7or


444.4*444444
* 4. 4*4* 444*
. .. > ---::.* *: .


V-1 * i T
4i44.. m 4 3
4,44,.. 44


Approved Electives (See specializations below) ..... 20-21
Science Specialization (21 Credits):
BCH 4203-4313; CHM 3120-3210-3210L-3211-3211L; MAC
3312-3313-3314; MCB 3013-3013L; PHY 2050-2050'-2051-
2051L; SOS 4115.
Technology Specialization (22 credits):
AEB 3313; ASG 3003-3403-3404; ENY 3701C; MAG 3312; SOS
4115; VES 3202C.
-- fl 4 *d n S...j **


ORH 3513C Ornamental Plant identification ....
ORH 4221 Turfgrass Culture ...................
ORH 4251 Principles of Nursery Operations .....
ORH 4263 Production of Floricultural Crops ....
ORH 4411 Physiological Aspects of Ornamental
Plant Production ..........................
ORH 4931 Ornamental Horticulture Seminar ....
Ornamental Horticulture Electives .............
Annrvmur Fle Irtluk


Credits



.4 44.. 44
1 r)1E 1 B:'



* 444 4 .4 1
'.4.44,7
1 21
* tt *:M
* * *' -. -


Emphasis on science, technology, or business training on
the basis of student career interest is possible by proper
selection of electives under supervision of the departmental
counselor.
Ornamental Horticulture electives: (May also be used as
approved electives)
Nursery Specialization:
ORH 3231, 3514C, 3516, 3534, 4232, 4242L, 4932, 4941.
Fl~nrlSlhlin Cnarkiinflnn'^a


ENY 3006L Principles of Entomology
Laboratory ...... . ...............
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation .. .... ......
PLS 3221L Plant Propagation Laboratory
SO5 3022C General Soils .........


Those choosing the Agricultural Science
will select electives in mathematics, physics,
biology as a background for graduate work
research, teaching, and extension.
Students will select approved electives ii
business, economics and management for tl
Business Specialization


. . .









VEGETABLE CROPS
The option in Vegetable Crops is designed to give students
an adequate foundation of basic plant science which,
together with specific courses in the principles of production
and marketing of vegetables, will be prepare them for
primary employment in any phase of the specialized
vegetable Industry.
Departmental Requirements 21 Credits
Credits
VEC 3224 Principles of Vegetable Production ........... 3
VEC 4225 Commercial Cool Season Vegetable Crops ... 3
VEC 4226 Commercial Warm Season Vegetable Crops .. 4
VEC 4410 Vegetable Crops Nutrition .................. 3
VEC 4432 Growth and Development of Vegetable Crops 4
VEC 4452 Principles of Postharvest Horticulture ... ..... 4
Approved Electives ........................ ............ 27
Elective hours, chosen with the advice of departmental
counselors, enable students to study in an agricultural
science or business specialization.
For the Pest Management for Plant Protection Specializa-
tion, students must consult the department chairman for
approved courses.

PLANT SCIENCE
Students interested in majoring in the broad area of Plant
Science rather than one of the four component departments
receive an adequate foundation in both in the basic and
applied plant sciences. Electives should be selected with the
advice and approval of the assigned Plant Science counselor.
' T ^ * _^'V .aP'S,


vsdecinAG in ARCRfl0ki WC ..,fl.*Ak*20
r approved electivee.r....i. :.. *4.^-2B


POULTRY SCIENCE
Two curicla are offed by the Department of Poultry
Sace. Students should consult the Chairman or the
departmental counselor for guidance in making their
curriculum choice and for approval of electives


CURRICULUM I--orwt SIenc


,", '


PSE 4611C Poultry
PSE 4914 Problem!
PSE 4941 Full Tirm
in the Poultry i
VES 4162 Poultry I
Electives (Free an
CURRICULUM II-
This curriculum
career in any of
industries with n
business aspect.
College of Agri
Electives Selec
ENC 4356 and SP(
Managemer

ACC 2001 Elemen


Products Technology ............... 4 j
s in Poultry Science ................ 1-4
e Practical Work Experience
industry ......................... 14
Diseases ...............* .. ......... 3
d Approved) ........................- 32
-Manageent or Burne.
is designed for those students who plan a
various phases of the poultry or allied
najor emphasis on the management or

ulture Core Requirements 8 Credits '
ted from AGG 4603, ENC 3343, ENC 3351,
:2300 1
nt Core Requirements 45 Credits
Credits
itary Financial Accounting ............ 5
l 3-- a* -


fC 2L I Elemr1entary EvMatuTtn[ iia coiu ntn .......... ,
AEB 3111 Computers and Linear Programming
for Agriculture .. ....... ......... ., . ... .... 3
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ..................... 5
AGR 3303 Genetics. ........ .... .. ............ .. 4
ASG 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences ............. 5
ASG 3403 Principles of Animal Nutrition ............... 3
ASG 3404 Applied Animal Nutrition ................... 2
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry 5
MAC 2233 Calculus for Economics and Business or
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I .. ......... 5
VES 3202 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals 5
Departmental Requirements 15 Credits
Students are required to take PSE 4223 (Poultry Manage-
ment) and a minimum of 11 hours from the following Poultry
Science and related courses:


ASG 4992 Poultry Judging ....................
: PSE 3211C Incubation, Brooding and Rearing ..
PSE 411 Poultry Breeding ...................
PSE 4411 Poultry Nutrition ...................
PSE 4611C Poultry Products Technology .. ....
PSE 4914 Problems in Poultry Science ..........
PSE 4941 Full Time Practical Work Experience in
the Poultry Industry .......... ... . ...
VES 4162 Poultry Diseases ....................
Free Electives .. . . .. . . . . . .


Credits
. . . .. *1
. . . . 4
. . . . 3
. . .. 4
. . . . 4
S. . . 14

. . . 1-4
. . . . 3
. . .. . 11


This curriculum is designed for those students interested in
trailing in paltry productln,pre-veteinarymedinin
preparing tfo graduate study ,
College of Agriculture Core Requiremes 8 Credits
Electives Selected from AGG 4603 tN ; ENC 3351,
ENC4356 and SPC 23
Science Core Requirements --41 Credits
Credits
ACC 20M1 Elementary financial Accxntiing or
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management *.. ....., .... ..


Genetics -*.. ..
Introduction to Anima Sciencs .,
Principles of Animal Breeding ...
Principles of Animal Nutrition ....
Applied Animal Nutrition ,......,
Cane ir


*4.t..*#t .S


CH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biological Chemistry 5
MCB 3013 Basic Microbioogy of Microorgansms ...... 3
MCB 3013L Basic Microbology of Microorganisms
Laboratory ...... .... ........ :....2 2
VES 3202 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals S
Departmental minimum requirements- 15 credit
eifjhj *fj. UM r t .I J wr.wl4. nB *. L s a.l Lw .s i -M


Approved Electives 17 Credits
Approved electives are to be taken from Poultry Science and
related courses listed above or from the following courses:
AEB 3141, AEB 3300, AEB 4172, AEB 4511, ANS 5446, ASG 3313,
BUL 4121, MAN 3301, MCB 3013, MCB 3013L, and STA 3023.


SOIL SCIENCE
The Department of Soil Science offers three curricula (Soil
Science, Soil Technology, and Soil Conservation and Land-
Use Planning) and each of which is designed to meet the
specific needs of the individual. Students should consult the
chairman of the department or the departmental counselor
for approval of electives in their field of specialization.
SOIL SCIENCE
This program of study emphasizes the basic sciences.
Students following this curriculum can qualify for graduate
study and research in Soil Fertility, Soil Chemistry, Soil
Microbiology, Soil Physics, or Soil Genesis and Classification
by a carefuselection of elective courses.
Ct* jtnk ^-flaMatt daan* in CaJhIta.anA .~.A f r.* IA _._ fin A r.4ij~






COLLEGE Of AGRICULTURE


Other Requirements and Electives 67 Credits*
Credits
GLY 2015 Physical Geology .... .................... 4
APB 2170 Microbiology .... .. ...................... 3
A PB 2170L .. . . .. . . . . .. . ....... .... .. 2.
BOT 3503 Elementary Plant Physiology ................. 4
APB 2170L Microbiology Laboratory ... ... ......... 2.
ROT 3503 Elementary Plant Physiology ................. 4
BOT 3503L Elementary Plant Physiology
Laboratory .......................... ... ......... 2
MAC 3311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I .......... 5
PHY 2050-2050L General Physics with Laboratory ....... 5
PHY 2051-2051L General Physics with Laboratory ....... 5
PHY 2052-2052L General Physics with Laboratory ....... 5
CHM 2043 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis 4
CHM 3120 Quantitative Analysis ................... 5
*Free and Approved Electives ............ ..... ... .. 23
"Suggested electives. CHM 32320L, CHM 30 or
CHM 4410-4411-4412, ENY 3M, ENY 3006, ENY 3701, GLY
4210, GLY 4200, GLY 4301,.GEO 320,MAC3312,P1 SPLP
3003, 505 4115, 505 4718, 505 4732, SOS 406.

SOIL TECHNOLOGY
This program of study is designed primarilyforthestudent
who desires employment in one ofth manyapplie fldof
agriculture after obtaining the bachelors degree. By a
careful selection of electives one may prepare o a career
according to his or her specific interests.
Core Requirements in College Agriculture 8 Credits
Departmental Requirements -- 26 Credits


SOS 3022 General Soils ................
SO5 4404 Soil Chemistry .. ..............*
SOS 4303 Soil Microbiology .............
SOS 4115 Fertilizers & Soil Fertility ........
Electives in Soil Science . ..... ..........
Other Requirements and Electives 6

MAG 3732 Agricultural Water Management


AGR 4231 Forage and Pasture Science .
FRC 3221 Citrus Growing ........
APB2170 Microbiology .............
APB 2170L Microbiology Laboratory ...
ENY 0 Principles of Entomology ....
ENY Princples of Entomology
Laboratory ........................
LP 302-3003L Lectures and Laboratory
holy ...... Electies.................
'.e and Approved Electives ... .......


4...


'3 C
CreCredidit
Credets


4*, 4,,,*,r, *4


3. 4. 4... ..*t :
in Basic Plant
i ,,, 3,.... *4 f5
* *''* #4*.4 ***4 *34


SOIL CONSERVATION AND LAND-USE PLANNING
This curriculum is recommended for students desiring a
fundamental knowledge of soils requisite to their conserva-
tion and the formulation of sound land-use decisions for a
wide variety of purposes to meet the needs of our rapidly
expanding population. These include agricultural, industrial,
urban, and recreational developments. Employment oppor-
tunities exist with federal, state, and local governmental as
well as private organizations involved in building and
highway construction, land appraisal and assessment, land
zoning, and other activities related to ecology and the
environment, sanitation, and land-use capability.
Core Requirements in College of Agriculture 8 Credits
Departmental Requirements 24 Credits


SOS 3022 General Soils ........ ...... ....
SOS 3215 AIcuktural and Envronmental Quality
SOS 4404 I Chemistry .
OS 47i5 Sol GeesIs and Classification ..... .
SOS 4 Sol Survey .......... .... .....
S c418 Soils of Floridn .... .. .......,...,...
Electives in 5i1 Sc enc 1* .. ..........,4....


*


Credits
S. . 5


.. 3

4 a 44 4 1
......4C
......tr


Other Requirements and Electe --4 Credits
Credits


MAG 3732 Agricultural Water Management ,,
GLY 5 yical oloy ..y....e...,.....
GEO 32 Pysical Geography ..........,..
PCS 3033 Introducton to Ecology ..........
ENV 3033 Environmental Quality and Man ...
ORH 3534 Relationships of Ornamental Plants
Environment .................. .......
REE 4704 Urban Land Use Analysis ..,..,,,,.
*Free and Approved Electives ........,,..,


*rl.......4

*.'4 ...4* 5*

* : * 4 **^
to Urban


*Suggested Electives: AGG 2501, AEB 3103, AEB 31, AEB
3133, ANS 3007, ANT 2410, ANT 4304, BOT 3800, CO 34,
FOR 4612, FOS 21, GEO 3370, CEO 3430, GLY 4155, MET
1010, PUP 3204, REE 3042, SOC 3310, SOC 3320, STA 3023, SOS
3003, SOS 4115, SOS 4303, SOS 4602.


STATISTICS
A major in Statistics is offered through the College of
Agriculture. Students should consult with the Un-
dergraduate Coordinator for curriculum. jSee College of
Arts and Sciences for requirements)


*Suggested Electives: AEB 3133, ANS 3007, CHM 3120, ENC
3343,GEO 3200, GLY 2015, GLY 2100, PLS 2031, PLS 3221-
3221L, SOS 4602, SOS 4715, SOS 4732.


VEGETABLE CROPS
(See Plant Sciences)


-i




















































































































,j, [:,tf ::,
I :: *X ... :i


~* ...i **B..
....u-^i~c -r#'.
'I "


* 4


1.

j *


*. ,h f


r *I '
S- *


f I


.1*,:'
'. *

i"


r ./,j -^




College of


Architecture









College of


GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Architecture provides instruction for
students who seek professional careers in the Building Arts.
The College has developed from the School of Architecture
established in 1925. Its organization now includes the
Department of Architecture and School of Building Con-
struction; Programs in Interior Design, Landscape Architec-
ture, and Urban and Regional Planning (Graduate); the
Bureau of Research.

PROGRAMS
Professional Instruction The College offers professional
curricula leading to appropriate undergraduate degrees in:
Architecture (Preprofessional)
Building Construction
Interior Design
Landscape Architecture
The College also offers at the Graduate level professional
programs in Architecture, Building Construction and Urban
and Regional Planning. Each undergraduate and graduate
program stresses thorough mastery of the principles
underlying its field and the development of professional
skills in their creative application to practice.
Bureau of Research: The Bureau fosters and encourages
research in all areas of the building arts. It also provides an
opportunity for graduate students and faculty members to
engage in research and cooperate effectively in research
with other University departments and with other in-
stitutions.


LIBRARY FACILITIES
The University Libraries and the Architecture and Fine Arts
Library together provide an important working collection of
publications and audio-visual materials for undergraduate
and graduate studies. These resources include books,
government documents, leading American and foreign
periodicals, color prints, and slides.

COUNSELING
Students panning to major in any program of study in the
College of Architecture should see the proper Upper
Division departmental chairman, program director or
adviser as soon as possible in their college program.
The counseling program of the College is designed to
make available to all students the services of faculty members
highly qualified in their respective professions who can assist
in the selection of a field of study, give understanding and
sympathetic counsel regarding the students personal or
academic problems, and advise on the selection of employ-
ment after graduation.

STUDENT AID
Students interested in part-time employment,
assistantships, fellowships, loans, prizes, and awards are
referred to individual departments and information provid-
ed by the Student Financial Aid Office, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida.


b
e
II
I


I


S
e
a
a
o


I
St


tI


Architecture


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Student organizations take an active part in the
educational program of the College. Included in these
organizations are the student chapter of the American
Institute of Constructors, the Gargoyle Society, Sigma
Lambda Chi, the Students Contractors and Builders Associa-
tion, the student chapter of the American Institute of
Architects, and Tau Sigma Delta. The College encourages
and assists students in promoting dose relations with
professional groups and societies.

GRADUATE DEGREES
The college offers the degrees of Master of Arts in
Architect ure, Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning,
Master of Science in Building Construction. Master of
Building Construction. To meet the needs and goals of each
student, graduate programs are prepared in consultation
with a designated member of the Graduate Faculty of the
College of Architecture. For further information, see the
Graduate School catalog.
Architecture: Those students with a Bachelor of Design
(Architedure) de.ree
degree in architecture mu pursue e o year graua e
program which is a prerequisite for seeking licensing for
architectural practice. It permits further study in specialized
areas of architectural design, architectural history, architec-
tural structures, environmental technologies or architectural
preservation.
Under special circumstances the graduate faculty of the
depart ment may elect to admit students who have a Bachelor
of Architecture degree from a five-year program, for a one-
year graduate program leading to the Master of Arts in
Architecture.
Building ConmunonA programfah.unr i
construction. Areas of intensive study and research include
construction management, advanced construction tech-
niques, building systems, construction materials and struc-
tural concepts. Holders of a four-year undergraduate degree
in Building Construction normally can comp ete the program
in one academic year (3 quarters). Students with undergrad-
uate degrees in related fields, such as Architecture and
Engineering can normally complete the program in one year
(four quarters).
The construction industry needs managers with a knowl-
edge of business. To meet this need there is a special


benefit from advanced work in school. Students should seek
he counsel of their faculty adviser as to the type of practical
experience best suited to their individual needs.

FIELD TRIPS
Each year a number of field trips are arranged to give
students an opportunity to broaden and extend their
educational experience through study of construcin
projects of unusual interest or of outstanding works of
architecture. Students frequently combine such studies width
Ittendance at state and national meetings of the profemional
organizations in their respective fields. )

STUDENT WORK
The College reserves the right to retain student work for
he purpose of record, exhibition, or instruction. i






COLLEGE OF ARCHITECIJRE


issues and problems in formalization of policies, plans, and
implementing programs, for both public and private
organizations. Policies and plans are used to direct or
influence change-change which leads to development of
resources, and development or redevelopment of com-
munities. This program is particularly important as Florida
and the South look to a future coping with rapid
development and growth.
The southern region has spoken through regional growth
policies and individual stale legislation expressing the need
for growth planning and management as an alternative to
no-growth strategems. This program offers a unique location
in Florida to provide a base for research and study in this
dynamic southern region.
Students may begin this graduate program any quarter,
including summer. Applicants are encouraged from such
undergraduate programs as architecture, landscape
architecture, engineering, social sciences, and other fields.
Minorities are encouraged to apply, for as planners they will
have a vital role in understanding and solving the urban
problems of city dwellers. Those finishing the program will
be prepared to enter the planning profession and take the
membership examination of the American Institute of
Planners.
For more information, see the Graduate School catalog, or
contact the program office in 211 Flint Hall, (904) 392-0997.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Archilecture
encourage applications from qualified students from all
cultural, racial, religious and ethnic groups. Listed below are
the specific requirements for admission to this College. II
should be understood, however, that minimum re-
quirements are given and that admission to the College is a
selective process. The satisfaction of minimum requirements
does not automatically guarantee admission. Limitations in
staff, faculty and facilities make it necessary that the College
establish quotas for the admission of students. Therefore,
eligible applicants will be considered for admission to the
College of Architecture within established quotas. A
student's total record, including educational objective,
pattern or courses previously completed, quality of previous
academic record, and test data will be considered in
evaluating an application for admission. Priority in admission
will be given to those applicants whose potential, on the basis
of their total record, indicates the greatest likelihood of
success in the program requested.
University College Students: To be eligible for admission
to the College of Architecture, a University College student
must have: 1) earned at least 92-99 quarter hours (varies with
curricula) with the minimum average of "C" or higher in the
courses required by the appropriate curriculum specified for
the Freshman and Sophomore years; and 2) passed all
required preprofessional courses within those two years with
a minimum grade average of "C". Admission to programs
restricting enrollment because of space limitations may
require that the student earn higher than the 2.0 (C) average
minimum. Quotas will limit the admission of students based
upon the overall academic record, grade point average and
apparent potential for successful completion of the program.
Minimum grades required in certain courses and other
special requirements for admission to variouscurricula in the
College of Architecture should be obtained from the Dean's
Office or from the departmental adviser.
Transfer Students: To be eligible for admission to the
Cnll ,po nf Arrkhiterf.i a tram ftr student must satisfy the


B. Community College Transfers to Departments within
the College.
1. Curricula in Architecture: Transfer students from
community colleges not having approved pre-
architecture programs should expect to take up to
three quarters of work at the University of Florida to
complete the preprofessional courses not available at
the community college. Mathematics, including
calculus, and one year of physics with laboratory,
should be taken at the community college if available.
In addition, courses in free-hand drawing, and
perspective drawing with instruments are
recommended.
2. Curriculum in Intereor Design: Same as 1. above
except calculus and physics are not required. If
available, economics or accounting, free-hand draw-
ing and trigonometry should be taken at the com-
munity college.
3. Curriculum in Landscape Architecture: Transfer
students should expect to take a minimum of three
quarters to complete preprofessional courses not
available at the community college. Mathematics
including calculus, introductory botany and general
botany should be taken at the community college. This
physical science requirement may be fulfilled by one
term of physical science and one term of general
physics (see program as listed in the University College
section of the catalog).
4. Curriculum in Building Construction: Transfer
students, in addition to obtaining an Associate of Arts
degree and completing general education re-
quirements, should satisfactorily complete the follow-
ing at the junior or community college: mathematics,
including calculus through basic integration; one year
of physics with laboratory; one course each in
accounting, business communications or technical
report writing, and drawing with instruments such as
architectural or engineering drawing.
The three remaining Freshman and Sophomore
preprofessional courses, one each in physical geology,
construction materials, and statics should be taken at
the junior or community college if available. If not
available they must be satisfactorIly completed in the
first term of registration at the University of Florida
before the student can proceed to the Junior level
courses,
Each Florida junior and community college has ben
furnished a copy of a suggested pre-Building Con-
struction program listing those local courses which
satisfy Freshman and Sophomore prerequisite re-
quirements for the University of Florida program. Any
student may write the Department of Building
Construction for a copy.
Provisional Admission: The professional programs of the
College demand that preprofessional course-work begin
with the Freshman year. Realizing that most of the schools
from which transfer students come do not offer all such
courses, the College provides an opportunity for admissble
students to remove these deficiencies. Qualified transfer
students, indicating potential, but not having completed all
preprofessional prerequisites, may be admitted provisionally
based upon space available. Due to limitations in space and
faculty all qualified students may not be admissabl. Students
admitted provisionally will register for the courses necessary
to eliminate deficiencies in the shortest time ible. Until
these deficiencies are removed students will required to
maintain a "C" (2.00) average to be eligible for continued
registration and may be prevented from reistering for







COEsI OF


permitted to register for more than eighteen quarter hours
when, in the opinion of his adviser, the quality of his record
justifies this. The minimum load for a full-time student in the
University during a regular quarter is 12 hours. At the time of
registration a student, with the approval of the Dean, may
register for less than twelve quarterhours. If a student wishes
to drop courses during the quarter, he must have the
approval of the College Committee on Student Petitions.


NORMAL ACADEMIC PROGRESS
The student will have maintained normal academic
progress when he earns a minimum grade point of 2.0 (C)
average for all work attempted in the Upper Division. In
addition, he is required to take courses in a sequence as
specified by his departmental chairman or adviser. The
student may be excluded from a program of study in the
College of Architecture if he fails or refuses to maintain
normal academic progress.


DEAN'S HONOR LIST
Undergraduate students who demonstrate excellence in

dmum of l2quarterh s cdit) a q artr term and
aga grad veragJef3 or ar will earn a
posion on the Dean's HonorList. Students whose term
age ar beow due to radeof I orXare notei9gble,.


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To b ible for radaton~ he student must arn a
minimum ade nt a ge of 0 (C) for all work
attem in the appropriate curriculum wile assifed in
t College while enrolled in another Upper
Division College may not apply toward the calculation of the
College of ArchWitere average. Specific grade re
uirements for. te vars cur~cll may be obtained from
the department Or Dean's Offl e.
Students planning to enter the Qaduate Scool should
maintain a 3.0 (B) average in Upper Division work.


GRADUATION WITH HONORS


ARCMI


FIRST YEAR
MAC 2223 Analytic Geometry/Calculus ....
PSC 2501 Physical Sciences ...............
ARC 1115C Basic Drawing ................
ARC 1211 Building Arts ..................


BES Behavioral Studies ..........
PHY 2004C Applied Physics I ....
English . . . . . . . . . . .
ARC 1126C Architectural Drawing


PHY 2005C Applied Physic II ..........
English .. ...... . . . . ...... ...... ...
ARC 1131C Architectural Communications
HUM Humanities .......... .........
Physical Education ......................


Credits
............ 5

. i . i i i .


..................... 4
. ... . . .. . .. ... .. 5
. . . . . . . . .. . 3
... .................4


. ... ....... 4
. .*.. ....... 4
. . . . . . . 4


AND HIGH HONORS


The faculty will consider recommending students for
graduatiPn wit HONORS or HIGH HONORS on the
ollowi criteria: grade point average, (b) distribution
and quality of subject matter studied, (c evaluation of the
students by the faculty, and (d) other .pertinent qallties of
the student and his work.
The student will be considered for HONORS or HIGH
HONORS uon his earning a minimum acade mic average
established his department or program. The average ill
be calculate on all work attemp while the student is
classified in the Upper pivislon. Transfer credits will be
excluded from the average; HONORS or HIGH HONORS
may be awarded upon a minimum of 72 quarter hour credit
taken at the University of Florida. Students should checkwith
their dearment or program director for minimum average
required.


I. CURRICULUM IN


SECOND YEAR
HUM Humanities......
English . . . . . ....
SSC Social Sciences ....
ARC 23'1C Architectural
Physical Education .....


1Cred
Credits


. . . . . . .* . . . . . . 4

. . . .... .. ................. 3
Design I ..................... 4
........m. lm.......l .. lm. l. 1I
:: .'** .' fl"""..i- ":.:*


CBS Biological Sciences ..........
HUM Huntaii tes; .. ; ..
SSC Social Stences .~ .., ,
ARC 2313C Architectura Desgn
Physical Education


CBS Biological Sciences


* . . .S

* ,xi"i^r ,
4 *< < fl
.. I..
....


. S i . . . . . . i .* *


THIRD wAR
ARC 3381C Archecura Deign f .......


I:


. ..

j.. kSlit


. . . . 3
Credits
... iam rS


careen in architecture the course of study leading to the
Bachelor of Design is a terminal program.
Students participate in a 2-yeat program of general
education in architecture. Also in consultation with
departmental counselors the student seects elective which
will strengthen and reinforce individual Interests and
objectives. Elective study permits the student to begin a
background for the 2-year professional graduate program.
In the graduate program optional courses of study are
architectural design, architectural structures, architectural
environmental technologies, architectural history and
architectural preservation. For details of the graduate
professional program see the Graduate catalog.
The undergraduate and graduate programs form a
curriculum of study accredited by the National Architectural
Accrediting Board.
The program of S;tdy ls inludoed efwv
sequence in which courses are taken. In the first and second
years, courses are offered frequently in quarters in addition

offered only in healor spring quarters, uen
courses offered in the appropriate quarters to maintain the
desired sequences. Admission into the third year is deter-
mined by the Department Selection Committee.
The Department reserves the right to retain student work
for the purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction.






I:

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


ARC 338C Architectural Design 5 ......... ....
ARC 3551C Architectural Structures 3 ...........
ARC 3463C Materials & Methods of Construction 2


* . . 6
. . . 4
* . 4

14


HUM Humanuties ........
BSC Biological Sciences ......
ARC 2313 Architectural Design
ELECT Elective ,4 #...4 ....


* .. .
. . .


FOURTH YEAR Creits
AR4:4 CS^ Arcfilte ratlen 6 f....icipft.... 6
ARC 4682C Environmental Technology 3 .. .., .. 4
ARC 4731 Survey of Archtectural Hstory 2 .........., 4


ARC 4385C Architectural Design 7 ............
ARC 4464C Materials & Methods of Contruncto
ARC 4561C Architectural Structures 4 .......,


14
,:: ::
* & a


14
ARC 4386C Architectural Design 8 ......... ..... .. 6
ARC 4274 Prof. Ad., Specs., & Estimating .......,..,.... 4
ARC 4741 Survey of Architectural History 3 .,.......... 4


Electives (Total for 3rd & 4th Years)

Total


IL CURRICULUM IN
INTERIOR DESIGN
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Design. MacFarlane, J.,
Program Difrector, Adviser.
This curriculum is for students who desire to become
professional interior designers in the domestic, commercial,
and institutional fields, or who desire to engage in the
design, and manufacture of furniture and accessories.
For Freshman and Sophomore programs of study consult
section of catalog entitled Lower Division.
The Department reserves the right to retain student work
for the purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction.
Students must begin the third year program duringthe Fall
Quarter only.
FIRST YEAR Credits
ARC 1211 The Building Arts ............. .... ....... 3
Sst Social Sciences ..... .............. ............... 3
PSC Physical scinces ...................4............4
ENG English .. ...... ... ......*.. *...... ..... .** 3
PSC Physical Education ...... ......... ............... 2


THIRD YEAR
IND 3215 nteror Design 1 .,.......,..
IND 3420 interior Furnshings 1 h..........
IND 3311 Interior Architectural Drawing ....
ARC 2641 Mat. & Methods of Construction 1


Ctedlits

4 4444 3
.:* 4 I 43
4 4 44 4
S* 4


IND 3216 Interior Design 2 .... ....,....
IND 3421 Interior Furnishings 2 ........,
IND 3100 History 1 ... ........ ..... .., ...
ARC 3463 Mat. & Methods of Construction 2


IND 3217 Interior Design 3 ........................ 5
IND 3430 Interior Furnishings 3 ................... .. 4
IND 3130 History 2 . ... ............ .......... .. 4
ND 3422 Textiles ...................................* 4

17

FOURTH YEAR Credits
IND 4222 Advanced Interior Design 1 ............... 8
IND 4406 Applied Design Connections ............... 4
ELECT Elective .. .... ....... *. .... .... ....., ... 4

16
IND 4223 Advanced Interior Design 2 ...,........,.. 8
IND 4500 Practice of Interior Design ......4........., 4
ELECT Elective ,..........-.........4...**.........** 4
16
IND 4226 Advanced Interior Design 3 ................ 8
BUL Business Law ....................................5
ELECT Elective .... ... ....... .....*..... ...... ... 3

16


III. CURRICULUM IN
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE


ARC 1115 Basic Drawing
S51 Social Sciences .....
PSC Physical Sciences ..
ENG English ..........
MAF Behavioral Studies


ARC 1126 Architectural Drawing
SSI SocialSciences...........
PSC Physical Sciences .........
ENG English .................
MAF Behavioral Studies .......


44 4* 44 # 4 5. 444 4 44 4 4* 44 4*4 -' 44 3 "-
.* 4 #445444 44.4 44 4 4... 4 4 4
4 * 4 r 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3
. ...**-*. .. . .* .- .. * . ... * 3 f
..II(......................... 3


454445M4*** hK1 I1* 4. 4 Sf *: *~ 31* J
#444.44444 4*4 d44*454 443
44*444.444 .44444*44.4.3
................... 13
*................... 3 -
ll .........l( (1lrll.1. 1 *


SECOND YEAR
HUjM Humanities .... ... ... .... .... .....*..
MAC Algebra and Trigonometry .................
ARC 1131 Architectural Communications .........


Credits

44 . 5
*4444 4


Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architec-
ture H. H. Smith, Program Director and Adviser
This four-year curriculum is designed for those students
who seek an undergraduate professional education in
Landscape Architecture. Leading to the degree, Bachelor of
Landscape Architecture, the program is accredited by the
American Society of Landscape Architects, and is an essential
first step toward legal identity in those states which regulate
the practice of landscape architects. Since Florida is one of
these states, entering students are embarked on a
professional career where discipline and ethical commit-
ment are construed as being in the best interests of public
health, safety and welfare.
The program is based on the core knowledge of landscape
architecture which is enhanced through subsequent
professional practice. Students become familiar with the art
of design, planning or management, and the arrangement of
natural and man-made elements on the land through
application of cultural and scientific knowledge. There is
r s.. .








comlrag Cu WOH--1 BWE


FIRST YEAR
ARC 1211 Building Arts .........................
ARC 1115C Bask Drawing .......................
MAC 2223 Argnismic Biolo .. ..............
MIAC 2223 Anal. Geom/Caic. .. ................


ARC 112C Architeaural Drawing
BOT 2710C Pract. Plant Taxonomy
ENG English .. .. ... .......... .
PSC 2501 Physical Sdences ......
PEM Physical Education .........


ARC 1131C Architectural Communication
ENG English . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .
"PSC Physical Sciences ..................
SOC 2000 Principles Sociology ..........
COP 3110 Intro. Computer Program ...


Credits
* . . 3
S. ... 4


. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. 4
*........ *.. ........ 3
. . . . . . . . . 3
. . . . . . . . . . 4
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 2


FOURTH YEAR Credks
LAA 4355L Advanced Landscape Architectural Desigh 1
LAA 4830 Recreation Planning 4
Elective 4


LAA 4356L Advanced Landscape Architectural Peign 2
LAA 4210 Professional Administration
Elective



LAA 4357L Advanced Landscape Architectural Design 3
LAA 4930 Senior Seminar
Elective


S. . ...... . 4
. . . . . .. 3
. .... ...... .... . 3
. . . . . . . 4
. .. .. . 2


t. t .
4-*^^^^


SECONd YEAR
i History of Iand pe Architecture
ARC 2311C Architectural Design 1 ........
Humanities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENPC Physical sciences ........ ..............
p Phyiul Scienc ........... iiiii


Credius
... . .. . 4
. . . . . 4


*A field trip is required of all Junior and/or Senior level
students. 24 credit hours of upper division electivehours are
required. Students may elect the Minor Certificate Program
in Environmental Studies. ........


. . . . .


L-AA il HitoQy of Landscape Architecture 2
ARC 2313C Architectural Design 2 .........

S nces ....... .* ...,, :..* *


ARC241 at/Method CoustruS O
ARC 2500 Architectural Structures 1 ..
Hu nile ....,.... ti
SS Slat iSalencs


*.. . . .
, * *4
I 4 * *. .


**.4 ,. ,

..... I. 1


15
.t.... .4
* .** .4*f
n'^^( It *r I T
( 111rt


(minimum) 96
neive Studies in Arde nay be substituted for
one HIM
**PHY 2004C may be substituted for PSC 2452 and 2401.l


I.AA 355L Landscape Architectural Design 1I
LAA 3421 Landscape Construicton I. .. .,.
AA. 333 Site A naelysIs....
ORH 3513C Fund, Om, Plant Class. ...


.Credts


p(**, 4
r*, *4


17
AA 331L Landscape Archtectural Design 2 ........... 5
I.A 3421 Landscape Cnstruction 2 ..,.. ..,...~ ...... 4
OH 3514C Ident. Basic Ornamental Plants .. ..., ... 4
9.e......e...ve.. .......:... ........ ... .... *
.^A- ..-^--


IV. CURRICULUM IN BUILDING
CONSTRUCTION

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Building Construc-
tion, Halperin, D.A., Chairman; Johnson, L.A., Tracey, V.G.
and Grim, D., Jr., Advisers.
This four-year program is for students who are interested
in preparing for professional careers in construction science,
management, techniques, operations, products research,
and related areas in the construction industry rather than in
architectural and engineering design. Graduate programs
leading to the degrees of Master of Science in Building
Construction and Master of Building Construction are
offered, see Graduate catalog.
The Freshman and Sophomore program of study (see
section of catalog entitled Lower Division) is designed
provide easy transfer junior and u
Associate of Arts graduates. Equivalent transfer courses in
these first two years are available at many MAnr an
community colleges. Thus, with proper course planning
many transfer students with A.A. degrees may complete the
four-year degree program in six or seven remaining quarters
at the University. Prospective junior and community college
transfer students should consult theadviseorPrithe
Department of Building Construction for a pre-building
construction program of local study.
The construction industry and its related fields are in dire
need of young men and women educated in the arts of
communications and interpersonal relations and in areas of
construction science, management, techniques, and
operations. This curriculum provides education in all these
areas.
Students are especially attracted to construction becaum
of the creative excitement, the challenging and rewarding
opportunities offered and the sense of tangible accomplish-
ments. Opportunities for advancement and increasing
rennnikhiliiae :r a .nlimhiAl in all =2ens nif ike inI nmn, a


458


~lllr"~""^ :::I:


KKK^K

E^ K! ,


* 1 *


X(, .. '
KE KK KKK KK
KK.^K K ^







COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


The department includes a chapter of Sigma Lambda Chi,
Ntilowiu Honorary Construction Fraternity, a student
er of the American institute of Constructors, and the
Student Contractors and Builders AocIation. This assoc-
tion is an affiliated student chapter of the National
Association of Home Builders and also of the Associated
General Contractors of America.
For the Fresh an and Sophomore program of study,
consult the section of the catalog entitled Lower Division.
JUNIOR YEAR


1st Quarter
BCN 3256 Construction
BCN 3401 Construction
BCN 3223 Construction
BCN 3281 Techniques L
2nd Quarter
BCN 3431 Structures 1
BCN 3224 Construction
BUL 4121 Business Law
3rd Quarter
COP 3110 Introduction
~DN 3461 Structurm 2


Drawing ..
Mechanics;
Techniques
laboratoryy


Techniques


Credits


*. .. .. f * * t i .
f * * * * ** * :**
1 4 44 t ft: 4 .44 4* 4
----* --** --*** **.*

ttt f t t*. .... * .BI ;*
2 ****** * -*


to Computer Programming .
4** 4* 4 4 44w 4 .* * : l * *. *44 *


BCN 323 ConstuctIon Technlque 3 ...+*. ,...+,S + 5
BCN 3611 Quantity Surveying I...+, 4.+......,...* 4


SENIOR YEAR


1st Quarter
BCN 4462 Structures3 ............
BCN 4612 Construction Estimating ......,
BCN 4500 Environmental Technology1 ...
BCN 4700 Construction Management 1 ....
2nd Quarter
BCN 401 History of Construction ........
BCN 4521 Environmental Technology 2 ....
BCN 4750 Construction Management 2 *...
BCN 4720 Construction Planning & Control


3rd Quarter
BCN 4751 Site Development ..............+
BCN 4510 Environmental Technology 3 .....
BCN 4710 Construction Management 3 ...+ .
Ele ve ....cti v.... ..e + ..+++++ +. ..cti..


Crt edi its
t,1E 4,,,411 4
< t* * 4) aii #* *44'
.... ...... "4
.... .... ..


4,
.l
.*
4,


.44,4,4,4,4
44)4 *~ 4 44* ** **::^
4444 *44. 44




.. *. .. ** ,:. :* 4*
.......,...
........,..4


. X -
' < i *



































'.
'r.
It


*1-*r


Fr -


-l .l m


'I


$ :::- ::::: .. **::.: ** ...
****.Hi.!:!: ill:i: *:
:.: *


.. .: ..* .x
*.1 H .
i.: x:. E--
,s a". "aeS
* ..C .


An d







The
KK KK *KKKKKK KK


College of Arts
and Sciences


ARTS Al


COMPUTER AND


GERMANIC


INDIVIDUAL INT


L


MICROBIO


.AMERICAN STUDIES
ANTHROPOLOGY
ART
ND SCIENCES GENERAL
ASIAN STUDIES
ASTRONOMY
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES
BIOCHEMISTRY
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
BOTANY
CHEMISTRY
CHINESE
CLASSICS
INFORMATION SCIENCES
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
ECONOMICS
ENGLISH
GEOGRAPHY
GEOLOGY
AND SLAVIC LANGUAGES
HEBREW
HISTORY
ERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES
JAPANESE
ATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
LINGUISTICS
MATHEMATICS
LOGY AND CELL SCIENCE
MUSIC
PHILOSOPHY
PHYSICS
POLITICAL SCIENCE
PSYCHOLOGY
RELIGION
ROMANCE LANGUAGES
SOCIOLOGY


I :::
,:ii"":"'
;i~"; ;;
Ir E """"
x^"


K> K
** /

81(E;~ """" "

"^
P.1r !M :~S
. /:-









The College of


and


Arts


Sciences


Mathematics
Mirobolopgy and
Cell Science


(Degrees also offered through College of Agriculture.)


GENERAL STATEMENT
Culturally and historically the programs of the College of
Arts and Sciences represent the core of all higher education.
The humanities, the social sciences, the natural and
biological sciences all are studied in the College and all
contribute to the richness of its program.
The major aim of the College is to impart the ideas,
concepts, motivations, and skills of a liberal education to its
students to enable them to assume leadership positions in
society. Intellectual inquiry, the intelligent evaluation of
ideas, an appreciation of the dominant thought patterns of
the world are the tools the College insists that its graduates
possess. Upon these fundamentals they can build personally
rewarding lives and careers. They will also be prepared to
pursue a field to its frontier through further study in the
graduate and professional colleges.
The College grants the traditional Bachelor of Arts and
Bachelor of Science degrees.

SUBJECT-MATTER FIELDS
The subject-matter fields regularly offered to students in
the College of Arts and Sciences and the extent of these
offerings are indicated in the table below:


Musir'
Philosophy
Physics
Polish
Political Science
Portuguese
Psychology
Religion
Russian
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
Statistics
Swahili
Theatre


(Graduate work offered through College of Fine Arts and
Department of Speech.)


Zoology


.Except for music majors, a maximum of 9
ensemble music may be included in the
hours required for the degree.
**Interdepartmental Major in Biology. Av
working toward the Teacher Certification
Certification program see College of Edu
the catalog.


hours of credit in
minimum of 186
'ailable for those
only. For Teacher
cation section of


Subject
American Studies
Anthropology
Art


Major
X
X
x
l


Masten Ph.D. &ective
X
x


(Graduate work offered through College of Fine Arts.J

X X X


xX"
KKK K
.:. .:_;__.


Botany


X
X


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE PROGRAM
University College students who plan to enter the College
of Arts and Sciences should consult the basic distribution
requirement section below (SectionA under Rlequirement
for Degrees.) After a student has completed 96 hours in
University College, only those courses and equivalents listed
are accepted as satisfying the. general education re-
quirements for graduation from the College of Arts and
Sciences. University College may have different or additional
requirements to obtain an Associate of Arts degree.


(Dpes aso offered through Cplge f Agreculture)


cheminry
Chinese
C
Computer and In-
ormadon science
Ciu f -**u* jw -* c**


(Gradtate work ofred through College of Business
Adn*WtshtraonJ)


EnFish
Frendh


Getian X X X
Greek X
Hebrew X
History X X X, X
individual/Intrer-
disciplinary Studies X -


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the College of Arts and
Sciences encourage applications of qualified students from
all cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below
are the specific requirements for admission to this college. It
should be understood however that minimum requirements
are given and that admission to this college is a selective
process. The satisfaction of minimum requirements does not
automatically guarantee admission. A student's total record
including educational objective, pattern of courses
previously completed, quality of previous academic record,
and test data will all be considered in evaluating an
application for admission. Priority In admission will begive
to those applicants whose potential on the basis of their total
record indicates the greatest likelihood of success in the
program requested.
University College Students: Admission to the College of
Arts and Sciences is normally approved if the student has
earned at least 96 quarter hours of acceptable college credit
with an overall average of 2.0 or higher on all college level


-f XT






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


program but who have an overall average B
kl r flro mo quarters In University College and
Stave clearly defined academic objective. Students
entering under early admission may satisfy the basic
dmtrbulion coursework by taking courses indicated below
Bin Seto Ai Bsic Distribution Requirements, under
"Rquilrements for Degree", or by taking courses In
Utlneritty College. In the latter case, the student must (a)
kesu cores before completing 96 hours and ib) consult
an advisor in the College of Arts and Scences office
Flofrda Stholars Program: Each year gifted and unusual
nt will be admitted after eleventh grade to a s al
Sprgram offered by University College and the College of
Ar and Sciences. See the ADMISSIONS section of this

ansfer Students: To be eligible for admission to the
College of Arts and Sciences, a transfer student must satisfy
the minimum requirements for admission to an Upper
Division College that are set forth in the ADMISSIONS
Sectin of this catalog.
A. Students attending four year colleges, who wish to
transr after two years, should follow a program of
general iucation and preprofessional coursesas outlin-
ed in the Basic Distribution Requirements (see below
Section A, under Requirements for Degree).
i. junior and Community College transfer students
shouidi
1. Complete a university transfer program at the lower
division College.
2. Indicate an intended major field of concentration,
using the exact terminology as on the list of majors at
the beginning of the Arts and Sciences section of this
catalog.
3. If pre-medical, pre-optometry, pre-dental, or pre-
veterinary, or students who plan to major in
mathematics, biological or physical sciences: be
certain to substitute subject-matter courses in
mathematics, botany, zoology, chemistry, or physics
for survey courses in those areas. See Medicine,
Dentistry and Optometry programs in the University
College section of this catalog.
4. Attempt to satisfythe foreign language requirement
of the College prior to transfer. Fifteen quarter hours
of a single foreign language with grades of "C" or
better, including course work at the intermediate
level, will meet this requirement if two (2) courses in
the same language are taken at the intermediate level.
For further advisement see below, Section B of
"Requirements for Degree".
5. Complete sequential courses prior to transfer,
especially the foreign language sequence (see item 4
above). Some courses are cumulative and represent a
direct continuation of work done in a previous course.
It is difficult to guarantee complete articulation of such
courses when they are offered in different institutions.
6. Choose general education courses to satisfy the
basic distribution requirement (See Section A, under
Requirements for Degrees), and choose a variety of
elective courses as needed to complete 96 quarter
hours of credit. (Vocational-technical courses will not
count as transfer credit.)
s.9-.An - ja, .d i a j".r knnLar ;n ocirh rntrc


Special po-baccaureae student (S): A student who
has received a baccalaureate degree but who is not seeking
admission to the Graduate School may, under certain
conditions, be admitted as a special student (AS). The
appliant mut meet deadlines printed in the University
Calendar. The College will seek the approval of the
appropriate academic officer: the chairperson of the
department specified by the student, the graduate coor-
dinator of the department, or the Director of Preprofiessonal
Education. Such approva must be granted for admission,
Students making application for admission under this
category are advised that they must declare a specific mor
fieldof study.
Graduate student: The general section of this catalog
dealing with admission describes certain minimum re-
quirements for admission of graduate students to the
University. Additional details for admission are given in the
Graduate School catalog.


ADVISEMENT
Upon admission to the College of Arts and Sciences, the
student should contact the office of Student Academic
Affairs of the College for referral to a departmental academic
adviser, The College policy is self advisement. The faculty
member's role is only to giveadvice. The student assumes the
responsibility for fulfilling college and departmental degree
requirements. A computer printout of the student's
academic record will be furnished for use during Advanced
Registration .each term. These printouts, available in the
departmental office of the student's designated major, assist
the student in following the College policy of self-
advisement. Printouts are reliable only if the student has
designated a major precisely according to the wording of the
list of major fields at the start of the Arts and Sciences section
of this catalog. (A computer program cannot be written for
Interdisciplinary majors, or for students in American Studies,
Asian Studies, Classics, or Criminal Justice. Such students
should regularly consult their departmental advisers.) The
student is responsible for informing the keypunch operator
in the Arts and Sciences office of corrections to the printout.
Students are urged to review the information presented in
the Arts and Sciences section of the catalog each quarter
when planning their programs. Failure to read, understand,
and follow the guidelines presented here could cause
significant hardship and delays in their academic progress.
Clarification of college requirements is available at the
College of Arts and Sciences office: students should ask to
see the Peer Advisors provided by the College of Arts and
Sciences Student Council and by the Dean's Office in 2008
General Purpose A Building.
Preprofessional Counseling: Preprofessional students
seeking advisement should contact the Office of Preprofes-
sional Education. For a detailed description of core require-
ments and career options, see PREMEDICAL, PREDENTAL,
PREOPTOMETRY, AND PRELAW PROGRAMS in the Univer-
sity College section of this catalog.


GENERAL REGULATIONS
Student Responsibility: Students must assume full respon-
sibility for registering for the proper courses and loads and
for fulfilling all degree requirements. Students are responsi-
ble for completing all courses for which they are registered at
the end of the drop/add period.










AdIn/Dropn/Whdrawing: Coures may be added
ny dme during the drop/add period if this does not increase
one's registration to more than 19 hours. Courses may be
dropped during the drop/add period without penalty as
long as this does not lower one's registration below 12 hours
(See Maximum, Minimum and Normal Loads above). After
the drop/add period, a course may be dropped up to the
dae established as the College deadline. All drops are
subject to the following restrictions:
(1) No more than three (3) such drops, after the
University's drop/add period, will be permitted in the
student's upper division career.
(2) After the deadline students may petition to drop a
course provided they can document sufficient reasons to
drop, usually hardship or medical.
(3) The course load will not be reduced below 12 hours.
IA petition to the Arts and Sciences Petition Committee
must accompany such a request to drop a course which
does reduce the load below 12 hours.)
(4) Final approval to drop a course after the University's
drop/add period must be obtained from the Dean's
Office. Students must attend all classes for which they are
registered. Failure to attend a class will not be accepted by
the College as constituting a drop; the only procedure for
dropping a class is the proper processing of a drop card
wh& te student iast Mtat The student 6 then
responsible for taking the approved drop card to the
Registrar for recording. It is the student's further
responsibility to. make certain that the drop is recorded
correctly. It is a recommended practice for students
periodically to confirm the proper registration of their
ewne at the legisth4 Office

con t Offit the kginr a i.sconstitutes
withdrawalfrom the Universlty, and must be handled by
ithdrawvrcedure estabilnhhel fistral.r and
su t tbipublrsed catalog de lies.
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the
Office of the Registrar early in the quarter in which they
ex pecto receivethe degree. The offi cial calendar shows the
latest date on which this can be done.
Additionally, Seniors who plan to graduate should have
their academic file reviewed in the College of Arts and
Sciences office one to two quarters prior their graduation.
In their final quarter seniors shouldhave coected all "i,
"X" and "H" grades to leer grades yn later thanthe ed
of the fifth week Seniors are temselvne responsible for
seeing that all grade changes are properly submitted and
recorded by the College f Arts and Sciences Office by the
above deadline,
Registration in Graduate ure l am rdance with the
rules of the Graduate School, undergraduate students may
not register in graduate course (500 level and above)
without permission of the College Dean. This permission is
normally given only to students in their Senior yearwho are
carrying not more than 17 hours and have an average of at
least 2.8 Students must present written approval from both
the instructor of the course and the graduatecoordinator of
the department offering the course.
Registration beyond normal period for completion of
degree: Any student who has completed all of the academic
requirements for the Baccalaureate degree but has not
obtained the degree will be denedfurther registration he


Individual professor to make attendance mandammry in
histher murune and, where approrlan, and after due
warning, to suspend students from thossecourses with failing
grades for receive absences.
Student Petitions: A student who feekls that the College
regulations work a particular hardship or Injustice may
petition for waiver of the regulation involved. Informalion
on procedure in submittin such petitions Is available in the
Office of the Dean.
Other Student Regulatons: The University issues a
bulletin entitled Student Guide which contains much
information of essential importance to any student. For
example, the general regulations governing military training
and student employment are covered. Each student In the
College of Arts and Sciences should be familiar with this
material. Copies of the bulletin may be obtained at the Office
of Student Services.
Credit for Coursework Outside the College
General:
At the beginning of this section is a list of subject matter
fields in which credit for a degree in Arts and Sciences is
granted. The primary objective of this College is to provide
its students with a Iiberat education anditisiheonvicrrof
eto da .
conducive to a liberal education. However, a student may
select for upper division elective credit up to 15 hours of
work fromothercolleges within he nversity
be given for coursework taken outside the College beyond
the 15 hour limit.


Special Cases:


1. The minimum total of 186 hours required for the
bachelor's degree may include not more than 24 hours credit
in education provided the student follows an approved
program and becomes NCATE Certified. If a student is in a
certification program, therefore, the only hours outside the
college which could apply would be the 24 hours of
education.
2. No more than 9 hours credit of ensemble music may be
included in the minimum total of 186 hours. (This does not
apply to Music majors).
3. In the first 96 hours of course work presented for
admission to Arts and Sciences a student may receive credit
for his degree for not more than 38 hours of work offered in
other upper division colleges.
4. An approved interdisciplinary major may include
more than 15 hours of course work in another College.
5. A preprofessional degree in Speech Pathology and
Audiology may include up to 28 hours outside the College, as
determined by the student's departmental advisor.


REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES
BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
The programs which lead to the degrees Bachelor of Arts
or Bachelor of Science are alike in all basic requirements.
The degree Bacheloof Atswll beonfeedpoahm
who fulfill the requirements for degrees with majors in one
of the fields of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, Asian


I~;"E~::^






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCE


The degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science will be conferred
upon those who fulfill the requirements for the degree with a
major in Computer and Information Science, Geography,
Mathematics, Psychology, Statistics, or an Individual Inter-
disciplinary program. A major in one of these subjects will
lead the Bachelor of Am degree if the majority of
Snd eective credits the studentire
undergraduate program are earned In the humanities
and/or social sciences, and will lead to the Bachelor of
Siene degree if such subsidiary and elective credits are
science credits. In no instance will the College confer two
Baciorof Ar degrees, or two Bacheorf dScencedegrees
on the same student. The requirements for graduation with
their dhsedegreesare as follows:
A minimum of 186 quarter hours credit (normally 96 in the
lower divsiand 90while registered in this College) with an
overall average of "C" or better in all work transferred to or
completed in the College and an overall average of "C" in all
work attempted at the University of Florida. NOTE: Some
itapproved by the Registrar as acceptable may not be
applicable toward the minimum degree requirementsof this
College. For example, no credit earned through courses in
the Career Development Program or through the College
Level Examination Program may be applied towards satisfac-
tion of degree requirements once a student has earned 96
quarter credits at any college.
Thedegree program must include (1) a basicdistribution,
S)a departmental or interdisciplinary major (3) a foreign
Language proficiency (4) elective requirement and (5)
residence requirement. Mere accumulation of credit hours
will not be sufficient for graduation from this College.

A. Basic Distribution Requirement
Normally this work will be completed while earning the
Associate of Arts certificate, before admission to the College
of Arts and Sciences. For all students actually registering in
the College,whose general education did not include at least
the basic distribution credits listed below, alternate courses
are specified which may be used by students classified 3AS or
4AS to make up deficiencies in the distribution requirement.
For early admission students (less than 96 hours) the basic
distribution coursework may also be satisfied by courses in
University College, provided (a) that the student take such
courses before completing 96 hours, and (b) that the student
consult an adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences office.
The student must earn a grade of "C" or better in each of the
courses taken to fulfill the distribution requirements, and
these courses may not be taken under the S-U option.
The requirement includes:
8 hours credit in social sciences
8 hours credit in English
8 hours credit in humanities
8 hours credit in physical sciences
8 hours credit in biological sciences
One course in mathematics -- No credit towards an Arts
and Sciences degree will be given for any course in
4 mathematics which is largely a repetition of high school
algebra.
A minimum of one laboratory course in either the
physical or biological sciences must be included in the above
distribution.
t.l nta...:...n .:p. -. na* a rnrnmmondafn tnv c.hslnft in


may differ. Students should be aware that the biology course
requirements in Arts and Sciences are not met by Agriculture
General, Chemical Engineering, EnvironmentalEngineering
Sciences Food Science, Forest Rourcesand Conservation,
Health ead Professions, or Soil Sciene urses.
After a student has completed the frst % hours In any
college, and has transfer to Arts and Sciencenlyhose
course lied below will be accepted toward meeting the
Arts and Sciences basic distribution requirement
Soal Siences: Any course In American Sudies, A
20, Anthropology, Criminal Justice Economic,
Geography, History, Political Science, Sociology. Ecept
GEO 32, DEP 3003, EAB 3002, EXP 3604, XP 304, PSB 34,
AB 4022, EXP 4934, PPE 4324, PS 4104L, DEP 5049, PS115,
ANT 3511.
English: Any course in English except LIS 2001, and EiSL
2422.
Humanities: Any course in Asian Studies, Englsh;Religon,
Philosophy; THE 2000, Classics,Art, Music, Foreign Language
literature, culture and civilization, HUM 2410, HCA 4410L,
HCA 4102, HUM 4563, HUM 4564, except ASN 01,, LI5001,
ENC 3351, ENC 436 and Music ensemble courses.
Physical Sciences: Any course in Chemistry, Physics,
Geology, Atmospheric Sciences, Astronomy, Comprehen-
sive Physical Sciences, and GPY 3000.
Biological Sciences: Any course in Zoology, Botany,
Microbiology and Cell Science; ANT 3511, AP8 2150, APB
2151, APB 2152. Acceptable if taken at the Univesity of
Florida: DEP 3003, EXP 3604, EXP 3204, PSB 3004, DEP 5049.
NOTE: To meet the requirement in Biological Science at least
3 hours must be in a Biological Science Department. The
other may be Anthropology 3511 or one of the approved
Psychology courses.
Mathematics: Any course in Mathematics, except MAT
1003, MTB 3364; Statistics; or Comprehensive Mathematics
courses if taken before 96 hours.
Laboratory requirement: Any course in a science depart-
ment that has a regularly scheduled laboratory. Also GEO
3200, also GEO 3200 plus GEO 3200L, APB 2150, SOP 4214C,
EAB 4022C, EXP 4934, PPE 4324C, PSB 41041, CBH 4023C, PSB
5115C.
B. Foreign Language Requirement
All candidates for degrees awarded by the College of Arts
and Sciences are required to have at least a minimum
proficency in some foreign language. The requirement may
be met by the satisfactory completion of a sequence of three
(3) five-hour courses including course work at the in-
termediate level (through 1112 or 1122). Students who plan
to continue the study of a language which they began at
another institution must take a placement test before
registering. If proficiency through the 1112 or 1122 level
is determined by examination, this will constitute comple-
tion of the foreign languagerequirement. Consult the ap-
propriate language departmental office for specific examina-
tion schedules. Transfer students having fewer than 15 hours
of one foreign language may complete the requirement
beginning at the point determined by a proficiency test. The
student is advised to take the language proficiency examina-
tion as early as possible after admission lest a basic course
have to be repeated with the result that the student loses
credit for prior coursework. If the student wishes to pursue
study of a different language than that for which credit was
previously earned, the earlier credit will stand. The language
courses may be taken by the satisfactory-unsatisfactory
eradine nation as lone as the are not nart of a maior.






C AIEC OF ARnS ANm SmaS


normally earned before the student i" admitted to this
College. A leasr 45 o/ the hours remaining after the first 96
must be earned outside of the student's major department.
Thirty (30) of these hours must be in Arts and Sciences
courses. Fifteen (15) may be taken in other colleges. Fifteen
may be in courses outside the college. However, no more
than 15 quarter hours outside the College of Arts and
Sciences will be counted toward the 186 minimum (except
in special cases. 1 and 4 under "Credit for Course Work
Outside the College" in General Regulations, above).
D. Redrdence Requirement
The last forty-five hours to be applied toward a degree
must be completed in residence in the College of Arts and
Sciences. In special cases this requirement may be waived,
but in no case may the amount of extension or cor-
respondence work permitted exceed eighteen of the last
fifty-four hours required for the degree.


E. The Malor


1. Departmental Majors: A departmental major consists
of a concentration of course work in a specific depart-
ment. On the application for admission the student must
indicate an intended major, using the exact terminology
as on the list of majors at the beginning of the Arts and
Sciences section of this catalog. Computer printouts for
self-advisement cannot be prepared for students who fail
to indicate a major precisely as listed. The number of
credit hours required for a major will vary from
department to department, but in no case may the
number of hours required be fewer than 36 hours or
more than 60 hours in the major department. The student
should check the major requirements in the section of
th, catalog wth lits the course offered by the major
department Some departmuets may rq4ulre subsidiary
courses from subJec-atter fields other than the major
No courses in the major in which the grade earned is
below "C" will be cou nted toward te fulfillment of the
minimum major requirement nor may they be taken
under the S-U grading option. Work in the major taken in
the University Col or transferred to the University
rom another institution is included in evauating the
r student record for this requlrement, However all
transfer credit in the major must be approved by the
major department and any such cred which is not
approved as a part of the major will not apply towards the
total credit requirement for the degree.
2, nterdiplinary .aors: s alternatives to the
departmental major, the Cofe offers two kinds of
nterisdpllnary, majors:
a.The following interdiscplinary programs which
have been planned by the cooperating departments
i and adpted by the College, and which ardescribed
under the appropriate headings in the "Course
Descriptions" section of this catalog


1: American Studies


2. Asian Studies
3. Classics
4. Criminal Justice
For a description of each of these programs see the
appropriate heading under the "Course Descriptions"
section of this catalog.
b. Individual interd plnary programs which are
Initiated and designed by the student in consultation
..t.i A #_ 3


of study not directly related to her or his concentration,
take 10 credit hours of ASC 496 or equivalent courses,
under either or both faculty members who agree to
supervise the student's program, and produce a Senior
thesis.
c. The following interdisciplinary programs have been
developed as a result of recent student interest in these
concentrations:
Atmospheric Sciences
Biochemical and Neural Sciences
Linguistics
Neurobiological Sciences
Urban Studies
Film Studies
Students interested in pursuing an Interdisciplinary major
should contact Associate Dean Ruth McQuown in the
College of Arts and Sciences Office.
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES (METEOROLOGY)
Undergraduate students in the College of Arts and
Sciences may be approved to develop an individualized
interdisciplinary major in Atmospheric Sciences (or
Meteorology) leading to the B.S. degree. The program is
designed to provide the student with a background in the
atmospheric sciences and their applications to such


problems as
agriculture, i
on weather,
radiation th
Interfaces. T
departments


air pollution, economic impact of weather on
influences of anthropogenic chemical releases
atmospheric radiation, transmission of solar
rough the atmosphere, and soil-water-air
he curriculum includes courses from such
as Physics and Astronomy, Environmental


Engineering Sciences, Fruit Crops, Mechanical Engineering,
Agricultural Engineering, and Chemical Engineering.
For further information, consult Dr. Alex E. Green, 221
Space Sciences Research Building.
BIOCHEMICAL AND NEURAL SCIENCES
Undergraduate students interested in advanced work in
biochemistry and neuroscience, as well as in the inter-
disciplinary area of neurochemistry, may apply for accep-
tance into the individual interdisciplinary major program of
Biochemical and Neural Sciences in the College of Arts and
Sciences. The program offers considerable breadth by virtue
of its flexibility and the broad range of required andelecin
courses. Graduates of this program would have excellent
backgrounds for research in a variety of the basic medical
sciences, and would be well qualified for a variety of
graduate and medical school programs.
Program applicants are required to have a god
background in basic chemistry and zoology courses.
Advanced-level work includes 1) course work required by
both the Biochemistry and Neuroscience Departments. 2)
research in neurochemistry, neuroscience, or iochemistry;
3) other elective coursesto selected from Serengs byte
Departments of Biochemistry, Botany, Chemistry,
Microbiology, Neuroscience, Psychology, and Zoology.
For further information about the program as well as other
programs which can be developed in other programs which
can be developed in other departments within the basic
medical sciences, concult Dr. James A. Deyrup, Assistant
Wk ~ ~ ~ .& aM N JR- _






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


isti o thetudy


Ssci ene The cuculm includes
course and omi course rorn a


Iterted adns may consult Dr. an Casagrnde, ~
Grinter Hall.
AUAJEONOLOGICAL SCIENCES
AR IrdMdqal interdisciplinary major in turbioloioal
$Sencesmay be developed by academically strong un-
dergduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences
through he faculty of the Center for Neuroblolical
ttenuCaThe program is intended to provide the student
i fundamentl and broad-based academic foundation
for graduate and professional programs and related areas.
The curriculum includes core requirements covering
humanities; social sciences; and physical, natural, and
biological sciences. in addition to the core requirements,
tudet select courses in either a very broad or a more
speiaized program in, for example, such areas as animal
behavior, neurochemistry, neurophysiology, sensory
methaneis, neuroendocrinnology, brain and behavior, or
neurombryology. In order to focus their academic work in
the various areas, all students in the program arerequired to
participate in research with a member of the faculty of the
Center for Neurobiological Sciences, coupled with a
research seminar.
For further information about this program, consult Dr.
Carol Van Hartesveldt, 359 Psychology Building.


Urban Studies
Students in the College of Arts and Sciences who wish to
pursue a major concentration in urban studies may apply to
do so as an individual Interdisciplinary major. The Urban-
Studies major is designed to provide a sound and broadly
ased program in the social sciences for students who plan to
enter professional planning schools, graduate urban studies
programs, or expect to work upon receipt of the bac-
calaureate degree.
The core of courses required of all students in the major
provides the broadest possible exposure to the several
disciplines concerned with urban problems and also to the
broadest range of methodologies used in urban analysis. The
major includes IDS 4905, a ten-credit course designed to
provide the student with an opportunity to integrate his or
her disciplinary knowledge. If possible, the research project
in that course is carried out in conjunction with an internship
in a firm or agency suitable to the student's interests.
A number of faculty members from departments in the
social sciences serve as a panel from which the student
chooses a committee of at least two members to supervise his
or her progress through the program and the IDS 4905
project
Questions about the program may be directed to Dr.
Virginia R. Hetrick, 3141 GPA.


FILM STUDIES
The College of Arts and Sciences in connection with other
colleges offers a variety of courses related to the study of film
as an art form. Students, working with the film studies
adviser, construct their own patterns of courses suited to
their personal interests. Courses offered in film work
include:


In lini


ARTS AND SCIENCES
HONORS PROGRAMS


Consistent with its view that higher education should
result in the development of each student as an intellectual
individual, this college gives its students individually tailored
degree programs of formal courses. In addition the College
offers a variety of opportunities for independent and
seminar honors work to those of its undergraduates who
have demonstrated appropriate qualifications.
Superior students should take initiative in planning
undergraduate and graduate programs. They should consult
advisers about Departmental and High Honors, Phi Beta
Kappa, and scholarships like Rhodes, Danforth, Marshall,
Fulbright-Hays, and the National Science Foundation. For
further information see Professor Sidney Homan in 4366
General Purpose A Building.
Dean's List
The Dean's List recognizes outstanding academicachieve-
ment at the completion of each quarter. Inclusion on the list
is awarded to all students who during that term have earned a
grade point average of 3.5 or higher on coursework of at least
15 hours. This award is not granted for courses taken under
the S-U option or for which a grade of "I", "X" or "H" has
been submitted.
Departmental Honors
A student may be recommended for this distinction by his
major department. Each department will set Its own
requirements for departmental honors work and will be
required to print them explicitly in the catalog.
Baccalaureate College Honors
College Honors will be awarded to all students who earn a
grade point average of 3.3 or higher in their upper division
work and either (1) successfully complete a departmental
honors program or (2) satisfactorily complete at least 12
credits of the College Interdisciplinary High Honors Seminar
. r .AflAf


ENG 3132 Movies as a Narrative Art 3)*
ENG3135 History of the Filml (4)*
ENG 3136 History of the Film 2 (4)*
ENC 3812 The Theory and Practice of Moder Criticism (3)
LIT 4930 Myth in Film and Literature (4)
ENC 4141 Film Studies (4)
ENG 6143 The Language of Film (4)'
PHI 3800 Philosophy of Art (5)
EIN 6144 Studies in MovI (4)*
THE 2000 Theatre Appreciation (4)
Students nteresed in the program are referred to
Professor William C. Childers, 4221 GPA, for information
and advisement.
*Courses have prerequisites.
College Honors or High Honors will be awarded to any
student who completes an individual interdisciplinary major
program; earns in upper division work a grade point average
of 33 or higher for Honors, or 3.5 or higher for High Honors;
earns in the majorwork a grade point average of 33 or higher
a for Honors, or 3.5 or higher for High Honors; and is
recommended by two members of his or her supervisory
committee (including the principal supervisor) as having
conducted an individual project in IDS 4905 which is of high
quality and reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the
student's program.
Detailed information is available from Dean Ruth Mc-
Quown, 2121 General Purpose A Building.






CmE OF ARTS -AM KIBiC


HIt Honon Sem h n: High Honors Seminars bring
together outstanding faculty and students from the four
major divisions in the College: Humanities, Social and
Behavioral, Biological, and Physical and Mathematical
Sciences. Some seminars explore the inter-relation of the
disciplines; one week a poet may be the guest,the next week
a nuclear physicist. Other seminars focus on a specific topic,
such as impeachment or the concept of rhythm in music and
the biological world. Students share the responsibilities of
working with the guests, devising new seminars, inviting
visiting campus speakers and dignitaries to the program.
There isa special room and library for the participants. as well
as an expense fund for books and travel. Work is done both
in the seminar room and in the field.
A candidate for High Honors normally registers for IDS
4938 for three quarters, preferably consecutive, and earns 12
hours creditable towards the elective requirement. The aim
is to have a place in a High Honors seminar for all qualified
and interested students. Membership is open to Juniors or
Seniors with at least one quarter of residence in the College;
students are chosen on the basis of academic average,service
to the university and the community, and an informal
interview with the High Honors Board of Directors. But the
main criterion is: what unique gift can the individual student
bring to the discussion?
Qualified students may get application forms in 2008
General Purpose A Building Applicants should consult the
High Honors Director, Professor Sidney Homan, in 4336
General Purpose A Building at least a quarter in advance of
that for which they seek admission.
The High Honors Seminars are designed to complement
University College and Departmental honors programs. For
students and faculty, participation is recognition of heir high
standing in the College and of their desire to be useful
members of society.
PHI BETA KAPPA
Phi Beta Kappa is an honorary scholastic society for
students of high intellectual ability with a broad liberal
education. The first chapter was founded in 1776 at the
college of William and Mary. The UF chapter was established
in 1938. Election is by invitation, not application.
Not over 10 percent are chosen from those ranking
academically in the upper 15 percentof the seniorclass in the
College of Am and Sciences who also meet the following
criteria: at least 68 quarter hours of coursin the College of
Arts and Sciences; completion of the foreign language
requirement; a broad distribution of letter-raded upper
division electives outside the mnjor subject (notably in the
humanities, social sciences, mathematics, and the physical
and biological sciences); and superior academic perfor-
mance in lower and upper division generally, as well as in the
major field,
Students in colleges other than Arts and Sciences who
meet these requirements may be recommended in writing
by the dean of their College. The society also considers a
selected number of graduate students in Arts and Sciences
who have earned the Ph.D, during the previous year.
For further information, communicate with the Chapter
Secretary, whose name and address can be obtained from
the Office of the Dean of the Colige of Arts and Scienes.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS


SPECIALIZATION IN AUDIOLOGY
AND S CHK PATHOLOGY
A preprofessional academic/clinical program precedes
the master's degree study which is accredited by the
American Board of Examiners in Speech Pathology and
Audiology. This program may be arranged through the
College of Arts and Sciences or the College of Education. For
admission to either program the student must consul a
faculty adviser assigned by the Department of Speech (442
Arts and Sciences Building). Program requirements are
described in the Speech Department section of this catalog.
To qualify for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in
Audiology or in Speech Pathology awarded by the American
Speech and Hearing Association or to obtain endorsement
by the College of Education and the Department of Speech
for State Department of Education certification in Speech
Correction, it is necessary to complete a master's degree or
equivalent.
SPECIALIZATION IN THE FINE ARTS
Musrc: Students interested in majoring in music should
consult the faculty adviser, Music Building, as soon as
possible in their college program.
The student who selects a major in Music must earn a total
of sixty quarter hours in the following courses:
Hours
Applied Music in approved courses numbered
above 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . 12
Theory of MUT-11 U 114, MUT 113--- .... 1.-----2-U......
MUT 1241, MUT 1242, MUT 1243, MUT 2116,
MUT 2117, MUT 2118, MUT 2246, MUT 2247.
M UT 2248 ......................... .......... .... 24
Survey of Music History, MUH 3211, MUH 3212,
M UH 3213 .. ..... .... .. ...... .. ............. 12
upon completion ; he dbo ei~flin
select an area of concentration, i.e., Applied Music, Theory
of Music or History and LqatuzuanA
that concentration. (These require twelve credits are an
addition to those listed above and mu st bespecifically .-....
approved for each student.) The studentmustalsoseagstr ......
for and participate each term in ensemble music groups.
A piano proficiency examination is required of all music
majors. The student must take Piano Skills until he has met
this requirement.
A Senior student concentrating in the area of Applied
Music will present a Senior Recital. In the areas of Theory and
History and Literature, the Senior will present a project
which demonstrates his competence in his area of specializa-
tion.
For graduation with departmental honors in music, the
student should apply to the chairman of the teaching faculty
in his intended area of concentration at the beginning of his
Junior year. In addition to the grade-point average require-
ment, the student concentrating in the area of Applied Music
will present a Senior Recital which is adjudged by the music
faculty as having reflected honors-level work in applied
music in the upper division. The student in Theory of History
and Lifrature must ~p nt an on r0i
specialized area. This project will be prepared in connection
with twelve credit hours from Music Theory courses MUT
3611, 3612. 3321, 3322, MUC 3201, 3202, MUT 4411, 4421, or
MUC 4301, MUL 3351, 3341, or from History and Literature
courses, MUL 3362, MUH 3541, MUR 3401, MUH 3211, MUL
4371, MUL 4811, MUH 4331, MUL 4361, MUR 4801; and with
the approval of the music faculty.
ART: The student who elects a major in Art must earn a
total of not less than forty-five quarter hours including the


E :~




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs