• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Foreword
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Index
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00541
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1982
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00541
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Foreword
        Foreword
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Main
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
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        Page 386
        Page 387
    Index
        Page 388
        Page 389
        Page 390
    Back Cover
        Page 391
        Page 392
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VOLUME LXXVII


SERIES 1


NUMBER R"


* MARCH 1982


THE UNIVERSITY RECORD


PUBLISHED QUARTERLY


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA. GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA ZIP CODE


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University Calendar ....
A Complete University
Board of Education .....
Administrative Council


General


of the University


........... x


Information ...


Admissions ....
Expenses ......


Student


Affairs


Housing ...........................


Student
Student


Life Services,
Academic Regul


Facilities, Activities ................
nations ........................................

O opportunities ..........................


Time Shortened Degree


College, Schools, ai
College of Libera


nd Curricula


Arts and Sciences .....................


School of Accounting ................. ..


College o


Agriculture.


College of Architecture


School of Buil


College o
College o


ding Construction


Business
Dentistry


Administration


College of Education ...
College of Engineering
College of Fine Arts .....


School of Forest Resources and Conservation


College of Hea


College of


........ 145


Ith Related Professions ...


journalism and Communications


Center of Latin-American Studies


College of Law ........... ..


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ege o


Medicine ...
Nursing ..


College of Pharmacy .................................... ........
College of Physical Education, Health, and
Recreatio n ..... ....... ........................................................


College of Veterinary Medicine.


..
.......... i"

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Military Department ..........
Instructional Departments .....


Table of Statewide Course Prefixes


Descrip


on o


Courses


Staff and Faculty
Index ...................


TABLE OF CONTENTS


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CALENDAR for 1983


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APPLICATION DEADLINES


The application deadlines indicated below apply to former University of Florda students. currently
students seeking admission to the University of Florida for the first time.


enrolled University of


Florida students, or new


The application deadlines refer to completion of all application procedures including receipt of all required credentials and the completion of de-
partmental requirements, if any. Applications for admission to limited access programs received after the deadline may be returned unprocessed
Applications for admission to other programs received after the deadline will be processed only on a space avadiable basis Applicaltions for admis-
sion to certain programs will be considered only for the terms) indicated below.


19C FALL


190 SPRING


193 SUMMER


TERM A


TERM 3


LOWER DIVISION
Beginning Freshmen.
Freshman & Sophomore
Transfers

UPPER DIVISION
Juniors. Seniors &
PoItbaccalaureate
Architecture
Building Construction
Clinical & Community
Dietetics
Interior Design
Graphic Design
. Landscape Architecture
-Medical Technology
Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Pharmacy
Physical Therapy
All Other Programs

GRADUATE SCHOOL
Clinical Psychology
Master of Law in Taxation
*All Other Graduate Programs.
if available


March 1

June 25


February 1
March 1

March 15
May 12
April 1
May 12
March 15
March 30
March 15
March 1
March 15
lune 25


November

November


March

March


November
October 1


November
NA
November
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
November


NA
NA
5 March 1


February 15
June 1


lune 25


November


March


"NOTE:
I


Some departments have found it
than the deadline established by
guarding application deadlines.


necessary to establish deadlines for receipt of a
the Graduate School. All graduate applicants are


applications and all
advised to check w


supporting records that are earlier
ith the appropriate department re-


PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS
Applicants for admission to the professional schools of Law, Dentistry, Medicine or Veterinary Medicine are advised to check directly with the
school regarding application deadlines



OTHER CRITICAL DATES


1 FALL


Registration
Classes Begin
Classes End
Final Examinations
Commencement
Grades Due (Graduating Seniors)
Grades Due (All)


August 16-19
August 23
December 10
December 11
December 18
December 16
December 20


133 SPRING

lanuary 3-4
january 6
April 22
April 23-30
April 30
April 28
Mav 2


19,3 SUMMER


TERM A
May 5
May 9
June 17
In Class


TERM B
lune 23
lune 27
August 5
In Class
August 6
August 4
August 8


March


CALENDAR 1982-83

FALL SEMESTER


1982


* a -- m


1, Monday. 4:00 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion ol all ap-
plication procedures, including receipt of official tran-
scripts for Beginning Freshmen Applications received aller
this date may be considered on a space available basis
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Building Con-
struction and Pharmacy.
a-~ ks---j-_. M f --


.! ':
: 11 .
....*


University Calendar


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA






University Calendar


Oclobe


April 1, Thursday 400 p m
Deadline tor receipt of application and completion of allff ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official Jranscripts for Graphic De-
sign

May 12, Wednesday 400 p m
Deadline for receip oat application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require.
ments and receipt of official transcripts for Interior Design
and Landscape Archi lecture


r 15-16, Friday-Saturday-Homecomiib'-AHl
nphndpd Friday


'. ""'.
: ii** *:..::^ *
classes rs-


4 4. .
November 11, Thursday-Veterans Day-Classes suspended .. .

November 24, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m
Last day for dropping a course by college petitim. No drop
permitted after this date without receiving WF galis.
Last day for withdrawing from University without receiving
falling grades in all courses A W symbol will be assigned
for courses from which the student withdrew.


Novem


Tuesday. 400 p m


Deadline lor receipt of application and completion ot all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require.
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Master of Law
: in Taxation program

June. Friday, 40 p m
Deadline tor receipt ot application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures. Including departmental require-
nments, and receipt of oihicial iranscnplt tor all under-
graduate and graduate programs except those listed wilh
an earlier deadline dare under the proceeding section 4P-
PLICATION DEADLINES
Last day for students who hare previously aliended the Uni-
verity of Florida to appi lor a regrstralion appointment for
the Fall term
Last day to apply to change classificalion for the Fall tlem ex-
cept for programs with an earlier deadline as listed under
Sthe prceedmng section APPLICAlON DE 4DANt-,,
August 16-19 Monday-Thursday
Orientation and registration according to appointments as.
S: signed No one permitted to start registratlop on Thursday.
August 19. after 300 pm


August



August


Augu

8"^^s"


August


20, Friday
Drop/Add beginsalate regitation begins.M students regis-
tenng late subject to S25 late fee
23 M onday-Classes begin


st 27, Friday. 4 0 pm
Last day for completing late registration lor Fall Semesler No
one permitted to star registration on Friday August 22 af-
ter 3.00 pm
Last day for Drop/Add and tor changing sections Students
liable farfees for all hourslr which iegisted. Any change
after this date will be according To individual college peti-
tion procedures until date Wr's are assigned A W symbol
: w"It w reassigned torcourses droppeji aflt this datq and
prior to the date WF's are assigned
Last dal student may withdraw from the Unuversit and re-
ai selvefiull rd iN ees lesss witthdwal foa mecadktE
military reasons Studenl who ilhdraw Irom the Univer-
sity after this date lor medical or military reasons mav apply
for a relund of fees less mandatory fees 5'udents who


withdraw from
1' may receive


the Un
a 25%


iveisily
refund


until Sept
mandatory


fees
Last day for filing 5-U option card in Regisirar s Otice

30. Monday
All undeferred lee payments are due in full All waiters must
be established Anyone who has not paid tees or arranged
lo pay fees with Sludent Financial Services by this date will
be subject to a $25 lale payment charge
Last day for filing address change in Registrars Office. if not
living in residence halls. in order to receive fee statement,
if apphcable, at new address


September 6, Monday-Labor Day-Classes suspended

September 10 F rday 400 pm


Last day lor
for a de',


killing degree application at I
ee to be conferred al the end


Regisrar's
the Fall Sem


nester


ber 25-26, Thursday-Frday--Thanksgiving-Classes
ended 10:00 p.m. November 24


November 29. Monday, OO a.m.-Classes resume.


December 3, Friday, 10:00 p.m.


No eIamlnatlons, class quizzes or progress tests may
after this dale and prior to the final examination


be giien
period.'


December 10, Friday-All classes end


December 11, Saturday


Final examinations begin


December 16, Thursday, 1000 am--Degree candidates' grades due.


December 17, Friday. 300 p.m


Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
thne Regtrnr



December 20. Monday. 9.0 am. --. ----
Last day for submilling grades for Fall Semester indudi,
those given extension y Department arman.




UNIVERSIY OFfROR--

I CALfENBARr -
SIRDJNG SEMESIERL


Octoer 1.


." '. *:...!; >!Th!a :- :;: *w *a.Sr* *Jla


f d mp m


plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments* n rcei ol offiaal transcripts for Buidin n


:axV., 4 < ,"x *
KKKKKK KK KK K KK KK K


November 5. Friday. 4.00 pm.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures including receipt of offaial transoipts
lor Beginning Freshmen. Applications received after this
date may be considered on a space available basis.
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures, including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for Architecture.
Interior Design, and Landscape Architecture
Deadline for receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures. including departmental require-
ments, and receipt of official transcripts for all under-
graduale and graduate programs except those listed with
an earlier deadline date under the proceeding section AP-
PLICATION DEADLINES
Last day for students who have previously attended the Um-
,ersilv of Florida to apply for a registration appointment for
the Spring term.
tasi day to apply to change classification for the Spring term,
except for programs with an earlier deadline as listed under
rhP nreceedine section APPLICATION DEADLINES.


June 1.


. 4


. i. :.1 ***
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....


Vl




,: I


University Calendar


January &S Wednesday
Drop/Add begins, Late registration begins All students regis.
Sting late subject to S25 late fee.


January 6, Thursday-Classes Begin.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

CALENDAR, 1982-83


SUMMER TERM A*


january 12, Wednesday, 4:00 p.m.
Last day for completing late registration for Spring Semester
No one permitted to start regislraltion on Wednesday, lanu-
aqy 12, after 3:00 p m
Last daylfor Drop/Add and for changing sections Students
liable for fees for all hours for which registered Any change
after this date will be according to indii dual college peli-
tion procedures until date WF's are assigned A \' symbol
will be assigned for courses dropped alter this date and
prior to the dale WF's are assigned
Last day student may withdraw from the Uniersity and re-
ceive full refund of tees unless withdrawal is for medical or
military reasons. Students who withdraw from the Univer.
sity after this date for medical or military reasons may apply
for a refund of fees less mandatory fees Sludents who
withdraw from the University after this dale and until Feb
2 may receive a 25% refund of course rees less mandatory
fees.
Last day for filing S-U option card in Registrar's Office

January 13, Thursday
All undeterred fee payments are due in lull All waivers must
be established Anyone who has not paid lees or arranged
to pay fees with Student Financial Services by this date vil
be subjed to a 525 late payment charge
Last day for filing address change in the Registrar's Office. it
not living in residence halls, in order to receive fee slate-
ment, if applicable, at new address.

January 21, Friday. 4:00 p m
Last day for filing degree application at the Registrars Office
for a degree to be conferred at the end of the Spring
Semester
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associale of Arts
ertificate to be awarded al ihe end of the spemePer


February 2, Wednesday, 4*'00 p.m


1983
March 1


Tuesday. 4 00 p m


Deadline for receipt of application and completion
plication procedures including receipt of official
tor Beginning Freshmen Applications received
dale may be considered on a space available hba
Deadline for receipl of application and completion
plication procedures including departmental
ments and receipt ot official transcripts jor Arc
Interior Design and Landscape Architecture
Deadline for receipt ot application and completion
plication procedures. including departmental


ments and receipt of official
graduate and graduate program
an earlier deadline date under
PLICATION DEADLINES
Last day tor students who haie pr
versity of Florida to apply for a re
the Summer A lerm
Last da\ Io apply to change classic
term except for programs with a
under the proceeding section A


May 5,


Transcripts for
Is except those
the preceding


a
Ii
se


of all ap-
require-
hitecture.

of all ap-
require-
ill under-
sled wilh
ctlion AP-


epiously attended the Unl-
eglitration appointment for

fication for the Summer A
in earlier deadline as listed
APPLICATION DEADLINES


Thursday


Registration
permitted
J300 pm


May 6, Friday
Drop, Add begins Late registration begins All students regis-
lering late subject to %25 late lee.

May 9, Monday-Classces begin


11 Wednesday 400 p m


Last day student
ceive 25% refu
withdrawal is


may withdraw from t
nd of course fees. less
for medical or military)


the Universily
mandatory fees
reasons


and re-
unless


Last day for complete
NO one permitted
11 after 300 pm


Lasr day


February 4,. Friday. 4:00 p m
Last day for changing any grade assigned in the preceding
term, except in a modular course If not made up. grades of
I or X become E

March 3-4. Thursday-Fnday-Spring break
All classes suspended Thursday and Friday

April 8, Friday. 4.'00 p m


Last day for dropping a course by a college petition
permitted after this date without receiving WF g
, Last day for withdrawing from University without
failing grades in all courses A W symbol will be
for courses from which the student withdrew


April 15, Frinda, 1000 p.m. -
No examinations, class quizzes or
after this date and prior to the

April 22. Friday-All classes end

April 23, Saturday
Final examinations begin


April 28. Thursday. 10.00 a.m -Degree candidates'


progress tests may
final examination


No drops
rades
receiving
assigned


for Drop,


liable for lees tor
after this date w
tlon procedures
will be assigned
prior to the dale
Last day student n
cemie full refund
military reasons


ing late
to start


registration
registration


Summer Term A
Wednesday May


,'Add and lor changing sections I
Small hours tor which registered An*
ill be according to individual colle
until date WF's are assigned A V
for courses dropped alter this c
WF's are assigned
aiy withdraw from the Uniersity
of lees unless tllhdrawal is lor m'
Students who withdraw after this


Students
y change
?ge peti-
Ssymbol
lale and

and re-
edical or
date for


medical or military reasons may apply for a refund of fees
less mandatory tees Students who withdraw from the Un'-
versity after, this date and until May 18 may receive a 25%
refund of course fees less mandatory fees
Lasi day tor filing 5-U option card in Registrar's Office
Last day lor iling degree application at the Registar's Office
tor a degree to be conferred al the end of Summer Term A,
lune 18 1983
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts
certiicare Io be awarded at the end oa Summer Term A.
lune 18 1983


be gien
period.


May 12. Thursday


grades


April 29. Friday 3:00 pm
Report to colleges on degree candidates due in the
the Registrar


All undeterred fee payments are due in full All walkers must
be established Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged
to pay lees nvilh Student Financial Services by this date vill
be subject to a $25 late payment charge
Last day for filing address change in the Registrar s Office if
not living in residence halls, in order to receive fee stale-
ment, if applicable, at ne\\ address


Office of


Mlay 18 Wednesday 400 pm


according to appointments assigned
to start registration on Thursday. May


_~~_~___


..... i I w


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University Calendar


lune 3. Frida., 4
Last day
term e
I or ,


00 pm
for changing any grade assigned in the
xcept in a modular course If not made up.
become E


preceding
grades of


june 10 Frida 400 p m


Last da\
permit
Last day
ing f.I
8,gned


for dropping a course


by college


alter ihis date without receive
withdrawing trom the Un.ver
grades in all courses 4 W i
courses Irom which the studio


petition No drops
ing WF grades.
ily tlIhout recei-"
smbol lII be ad.
enl uit hdrew


lune 16 Thursday. 1000 a m Degree candidate grades due


. fin a -- MI.
17, Fdl dal
I rem ar class


lunle '1 Frda.,


clauses end
periods


300 pm


Final euaminallons


iill be held in


Report or colleges on degree candidates due in the Otlhce ot
rhe Reg.,!rar

june 18, Saturdar-C.raduatIon-No commencement ceremony

lune 20U MondaY c 0 a m
Last day for ,ubmilnlmg grades for Summer Term 4



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

CALENDAR, 1982-83

SUMMER TERM B*


1983

AprIl 29


4.'.. .. ..
n.:* ; ..'.. i. ,.
.1 a .


.. 1. .*
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1 i.


June 29, Wednesday, 4-00 p.m. :. ; ..' .., :.
Last day for completing late registration om hSmmer-.I" .t
No one permitted to start registration onedned .
29, after 300 p.m .. '. .... *:
Last day for Drop/Add and for changing sectriaiss .. ..:
liable for fees for all hours for whuch .fistered. A lnti., ':
after this date will be according to individual coaij ...:-
lion procedures unlil date WF's are assigned. A W....:l ..
will be assigned for courses dropped ,after this date-a ..
prior to the dale WF's are assigned, I "
Last day student may withdraw from the Univenity and m'e-'.;,: :
ceive full refund of fees unless withdrawal is for medical or :, :
military reasons. Students who withdraw after this date fo': :* ::;"
medical or military reasons may apply for a refund of fees: :.:*
less mandatory fees. Students who withdraw from the Uni-o. .
versity after this date and until luly 6 may receive a 25% re-
fund of course fees less mandatory fees.
Last day for filing S-U aplion card in Registrar's Office. :.
Last day tor filing degree application at the Registrar's Office .
for a degree to be conferred at the end of Summer Term B '
August 6, 1983. .
Last day to apply with the Registrar for an Associate of Arts .
certlihcale to be awarded at the end of Summer Term B, Au- .
gusl 6, 1983. .

lune 30. Thursday
All undeferred lee payments are due in full. All waivers must
be established Anyone who has not paid or arranged to
pay fees with Student Financial Services by this date wHi be
subject to a $25 late payment charge.
Last day for filing address change in.Registrar's Office, Ifh not
living in residence halls, in order to receive tee statement.
if applicable, at new address \

july 4, Monday--Independence Day Holiday--Classes suspended.


luly 6. Wednesday. 4'00 p m.


F r.day


400 p m


Deadline for receipt of applicallon and completion oa all ap-
plicalion procedure% including receipt at of olcal transcripts
toa Beginning Freshmen Applications received alter this
date ma, be considered on a space a'.ailable basis
Deadline ior receipt of application and completion of all ap-
plication procedures including depar mental requ re-


ment., and receipt of
Interior Design and L
Deadline for receipt of a
plication procedures
menI!, and receipt c
graduate and graduate
an earlier deadline da
PLICATION DfADLIN
Last day bor students wh


,ersit>
the Su
Las; day
term
under


ollicial transcripts tor urc
landscape .Architeclure
application and completion
including departmental
if official transcripts for
e programs except those I
te under the preceding s


hnieciuire,

ot all ap-
require-
ill under-
Ited ,lilh
ecion AP-


10 have previously attended the Urn.


of Florida to apply dor a registration appoinimeni rUi
simmer B term.
to applh to change classification for the Summer B
except lor programs wilth an earlier deadlines listed
the proceeding section APPLICATION DEADLINES


Last day student m
ceive 25% round
withdrawal is for


ay withdraw from t
of course fees. less r
medical or military


S* *
.
A. -' .


he University and re-
nandatory fees, unless
reasons.


29 Friday, 4.00 p.m
Last day for dropping a course by college petition
permitted after this date without receiving WF
Last day for withdrawing from University wilhou
tailing grades in all courses A W symbol will b
for courses from which the student withdrew.


August

August


August



August

August


lune 23, Thursday


No drops
;rades.
receiving
I assigned


4. Thursday, 100 a.m.-Degree candidates' grades due.


5, Friday-All classes
regular class periods.


end Final examinations will be held in


5, Friday. 3.00 p.m.
Report of colleges on degree candidates due in the Office of
the Registrar

6. Saturday--Commencement


8, Monday, 900 am.


Registration
permitted
300 pm


according to appointments assigned
to start registration on Thursday lune


SA lew


lune 24 Friday
Dropr 4dd begins. Late reglstrallon begins AMH students regis.
tenrng late subject to 525 late lee


Last day for submitting grades for Summer


selected courses, such as
offered which require a
and B For these courses.
end on Augusl 5 Classes
20 24


Term B.


those requrnng laboratories, may be
attendance during Summer Term A
classes would begin on May 9 and
will not meel for these courses June


lune 2' Monday-Classes Begin


* *
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HI !T


UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA.


. *.. .E I .. *
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. 14 .

* ,*
' ^ -. .


Florida's first the University of Florid
Amenrica's truly distinctive unilersiies
State and the University of Minnesota, the
ida offers more academic programs on a s
any of the nation's other universities, priva
also among the nation's 25 largest ur


a- s
Along
Unive
ngle c
te and
i versit


also one of
with Ohio
rsitv of Flor-
ampus than
public It is
ies, vet its


division into 20 colleges and schools, with their 140 depart-
ments, gives students the opportunity to know and work
closely with most of their classmates and teachers Its loca-
tion in Florida's University City Gainesville, dedicated
from its founding to serve as a home away from home for
college students adds immeasurably to the educational
and social opportunities for students
In short, the University of Florida is a residential campus,
with rich resources available because of its size, that pro-
... in *rsnh:. ..an I:. *r.n nfl... in..l. rn.* *n r* kn aknn nn


" 1,400 faculty members and graduate students are awarded
research and training grants annually, ranking the University
of Florida among the nation's top 40 research universities.


UNDERGRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES
Because it is a complete university freshmen through
professional and postdoctoral the University of Florida of-
fers more for its. undergraduate students.
Undergraduates aspiring for graduate or professional de-
grees can study in libraries and laboratories equipped for


almost every advanced degree offered
world They study alongside advanced
fessional students. They can begin their
they desire. een as freshmen. They can
from a faculty that has been aepmbledi


anywhere in the
graduate and pro-
research as early as
receive 'counseling
frnm main univer-


A CFLOPLETE U ERSFIRS

A COMPLETE UNIVERSITY


.


ERS








signed for both undergraduates and graduates. It also means
a wider selection of course opportunities outside a student's
major field of study. Above all, it means an undergraduate
student pursues his studies in a complete academic atmos-
phere.


COSMOPOLITAN STUDENT BODY
Students attending the University of Florida come from
every county in the state, every state in the nation, and last
year from 99 foreign countries. Eighty-live per cent of its en-
tering freshmen earned admission test scores above the na-
tional average. Thirty-eight per cent of the undergraduates
are transfers from community and other colleges. They expe-
rience no difficulty competing academically with students
who begin their work at the University of Florida. The Uni-
versity of Florida ranks seventh among state universities and
18th among all universities in the nation in the number of
' National Merit and Merit Achievement Scholars who choose
to attend. But the University of Florida is not.an elitist uni-
versity. And it does not want to be. Ten per cent of its lim-
ited beginning freshmen spaces are held open for students
who do not qualify academically for admission to a Florida
state university. These students, and any others who desire,
are offered special instructional programs to help them
progress scholastically. These programs have the central goal
of equipping students with the ability to complete their de-
grees.


LEADERSHIP TRAINING
Perhaps above all else, the University of Florida offers its
students leadership training and experience. Its results are
proven. Half of Florida's Cabinet members, in addition to
the 'ovemor, are UF graduates, as are approximately one-
third of the state senators, members of the state House of
Representatives, Floridians in the U.S. Congress and state Su-
preme Court justices. Half of ten persons named in 1978 as
Florida's most influential governmental, professional and
business persons had attended the University of Florida.
Thousands of other Florida graduates occupy key positions
in every known professional endeavor throughout the state,
in the nation and in' many parts of the world.
There are reasons behind the University of Florida's lead-
ership training success. The contained campus in a larger
community whose principal focus is on the University -
provides thousands of leadership opportunities. Student
Government at the University of Flonda is one of the
nation's most independent and influential. Every college has
its own student council. Almost every committee for gov-
ernance of the University as a whole and there are dozens
of them have student members. The University turns
many of its activities over to students to implement. Stu-
dents serve on advisory boards and councils in city and
county government. Hundreds of students are employed in
career-developing positions and serve internships in


Gainesville area Institutions More than 200 student organi-
zations, plus fraternities and sororities, require full slates of
officers. Virtually every academic offering provides oppor-
tunity for membership in chapters of national student organ-
izations. Churches and civic groups in the community pro-
vide special programs and opportunities just for University
of Florida students More than 500 participate in a student
volunteer action organization, providing companionship
and assistance to children. the elderly, the handicapped, the
incarcerated, the underprivileged and the lonely in 14 sepa-
rate programs. It is the largest student volunteer action
group in the nation. A nationally-recognized Student Serv-
ices Office offers counseling programs for dozens of special
student problems both academic and personal as well
as leadership training programs



A FUN PLACE


And
should
enloy I
dent, '
or she
ond, st
idence


* yes. the University of Florida believes students
have fun while pursuing their degrees First, students
their studies Ask almost any University of Florida stu-
'What's with you?." and the greatest chance is that he
will respond with a comment about course work. Sec-
udents enlov one another The way they live in res-
'halls, apartment complexes and as a dominant popu-


lation group in the larger communist guara
Third, the University and the community prov
tional and social opportunities by the scores
16,000 people a day use the centrally-located stu.
on campus. Outdoor recreational courts, pools
abound, not only on campus but throughout
munity More than 1,000 persons are able to enga
neously in eight different athletic and recreation
in the new Stephen C. O'Connell Student Activil
Entertainment of every description is nightly
weekend fare, both on the campus and in the c


which gears itself
ponderance of stu
women's intercolli


ntees that.
ide recrea-
More than
dent union
and fields
the com-
ge simulta-
al activities
ties Center.
and every
community .


to student interests because of the pre-
idents in it. A full program of men's and
gatee athletics insures one or more major


spectator games per week. More than seventy-five per cent
of the Student Body participated last year on more than
1,400 intramural teams. Gainesville is in the heart of Florida's
rolling woods, lakes, springs and river country And it is
equidistant only a 90-minute drive from the fishing
and boating Gulf Coast and the swimming, surfing and
beaching Atlantic Coast. Big name music stars and their
bands are brought to campus for concerts almost weekly by
Student Government Productions. Students themselves
have numerous opportunities to perform in local music
groups and stage plays, to exhibit their arts and, crafts, to
write for several student-operated publications and to
pursue hobby interests of every description
This, in summary, is the University of Florida. Florida's first
and one of the nation's most distinctive universities. And
more than anything else, a University putting the interests of
the individual student ahead of anything else.


* V,





BOARD OF EDUCATION

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ii' .
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.:.


FLORIDA STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


BOB GRAHAM
Governor
State of Florida

WAYNE MIXSON
Lieutenant Governor
State of Florida

GEORGE FIRESTONE
Secretary of State
State of Florida

IAMES C. SMITH
Attorney General
State of Florida


GERALD A.


LEWIS


Comptroller
State of Florida

BILL GUNTER, |1
State Treasurer


State of Florida


";B~b"":E~l::. ..^


DOYLE CONNER


Commissioner of


Agriculture


State of Florida


RALPH D.


TURLINGTON


Commissioner of Education
State of Florida


*S;' -i" *<
; '' : '_ w:

BOARD OF REGENTS


... K KKI E," K


C. DUBOSE AUSLEY,
Chairman


Tallahassee


ROBIN GIBSON
Lake Wales, Florida


Florida


BETTY A. STATON,
Vice Chairman


Orlando,


RALEIGH GREENE
St. Petersburg, Florida


Florida


AMES BLOUNT
Student Regent


WILLIAM F. LEONARD
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida


Orlando,


Florida


WILLIAM L. MALOY


Ed.D.


HYATT BROWN


Pensacola, Florida


Daytona Beach,


Florida


CECILIA BRYANT
acksonville, Florida
4 4 4


L Inn An L L


RA


FRANK P. SCRUGGS, I1
Miami, Florida

. TERRELL SESSUMS, J.I


LPH D. TURLINGTON


. . .. :
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ADMINISTRATIVE COUNCIL
OF THE UNIVERSITY


ELECTED REPRESENTATIVES OF THE FACULTY


RICHARD H. HIERS. Ph.D.


Professor


ROBERT Q. MARSTON. M.D.
President


JOHN A. NATTRESS. Ph.D.
Executive Vice President
ROBERT ARMISTEAD BRYAN, Ph.D.
Vice President for Academic Affairs


WH.ILLIAM EARL ELMORE, B.S.,


C.PA.


Vice President for Administrative Affairs


Acting


DAVID R. CHALLONER, M.D.


MARY H.


Assistant


TERRY L. MCCOY, Ph D


of Religion


MCCAULEY, Ph.D.
;or of Clinical Psychology


Associate


Professor


can Studies
DANNY R. MINNICK. Ph.D.


Professor.


JI


BRYON D. SPANGLER.


Professor of Civ
CAROLYN M


Assistant


C. ARTHUR SANDEEN. Ph.D.
Vice President of Student Affairs
KENNETH RAY TEFERTILLER, Ph.D.
Vice President for Agricultural Affairs
J. ARDENE WIGGINS


Vice President for Alumni


& Development


KENNETH FRANKLIN FINGER. Ph.D.
Associate Vice President for Health Affairs


Associate


GENE WILLARD HEMP, Ph.D.


lI


Professor


FAS
M.S.


Engineering (All.)
TUCKER, Ph.D.


of Psychology (All


REPRESENTATIVES OF THE STUDENT BODY


President


MIKE BEDKE


of the Student Body


SKIP DVORNIK
President of Student Senate
DAVID BURNS


Vice President of the


Student Body


GERALD SCHAFFER, B.S.B.A.
Associate Vice President for Admrnstratirve Affairs


DON L. ALkEN.


, D.D.S.


Dean of the College of Dentistry
CLIFFORD ALLEN BOYD. Ed.D.


the College of Physical Education,
Health and Recreation


PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEES
IOHN BATTENFIELD, MA
Director. University Relations
THOMAS WINSTON. COLE. Ed.D
Dean, Academic Alffars


WAYNE H. CHEN. Ph.D.
Dean of the College of Engineering
WILLIAM B. DEAL, M.D.. Ph.D.
Dean of College of Medicine


KIRK N. GELATT.


V.M.D.


F WAYNE KING


Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicape
RICHARD R. GUTEKUNST. Ph.D.


Dean of the College of Health Related


Professions


MARK T IAROSZEWIEZ, M.Arch.
Dean of the College-of Architecture
IAMES W. KNIGHT, Ed.D.
Dean of Academic Affairs for Continuing Education
ROBEIT FRANKLIN LANZILLOTTI, Ph.D.


of the College of Business


RALPH L. LOWENSTEIN. Ph.D.


Dean


College of Journalism and


ARNET


Communications


C. MACE, D.F.


Director of the Schoolof Forest Resources and


Conservation


LOIS MALASANOS, Ph D.
Dean of the College of Nursing
FRANK T. READ.' ID.
Dean of the College of Law


JOSEPH j.


SABATELLA,


M.F.A.


Dean of the College of Fine Arts


MICHAEL


A. SCHWARTZ. Ph.D.


Director


of the Florida


WILLIAM


Director.
MICHAI
Director


WADE COOPER, Ed.D.
Coordinator, ROTC


HUGH W.


CUNNINGHAM. IR.,


CATHERINE


Special


to President


. Ph.D.
State Museum


C. CARR III. M Ed.


Intercollegiate Athletlcs
EL R. HARRIS. M.B.A.
, Budget and Analysis


JACQUELYN D. HA$T, E.D S.
Affirmative Action Coordinaior
GUSTAVE ADOLPHUS HARRER. Ph.D.
Director of Unrversity Libraries
R. WAYNE McDANIEL, B.A.
Director of Alumni Affairs


GARY E


KOEPKE, B.S


; Facilities Planning
A. LONGSTRETH, Ed.D.


Assistant to the President


JAMES E. SCOTT, Ph.D.


Student


Sen ices


L VERNON VOYLES, B.A


University


Registrar


Dean of Pharmacy


CHARLES F. SIDMAN,


Ph.D.


Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and


Sciences


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS


DAVID


C. SMITH. Ph.D


Dean of the College of Education


FRANCIS


STEHLU. Ph.D


Dean of Graduate Studies and


Research


IOHN THEODORE WOESTE, Ph.D.
a s- _


Director


JOHN E. IVES, M.S.
of Shands Teaching


RALEIGH W GREENE,


President of the U


university


Hospital
IR.


of Florida Alumni Association


j MALCOLM RANDALL. M H.A.
firrlinr nf iha AdmmnicfrJihnnJ Uncnmft


Profess


Vice President for Health Affairs


of Lalin Ameri-


Associate


Vice President for Academic Affairs


Dean of


Director, University Information &


Press Secretary


Dean


of the


Administration


Director


Dean for

























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S:1:,


General


S IfE U DIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (
S::.. 1,' We believe the University of Florida stan
;. primacy of .truth, and for the integrity of the
.. the state, and the nation.
2..We believe the University of Florida exists to si
.cial, cultural, industrial, and political instrtut
tate.
%. 3L We.believe the University of Florida exists to i
S:. :quality of life of the people of Florida.
:" 4A'We. believe the University ol Florida must cc
.:. .two-fqld'task of institutions of higher learning
=".' task of preserving existing knowledge through
.; .anti the task of developing new knowledge I
.:. search.
i... 5'" .We. believe that research must include pure
..~qdvahce, knowledge, and applied research to
. =' : tioris'for the problems of society.
. .6. We believe that the University must consist


.i unity. of scholars in which emp
t:' 't el, .oh. learning and discipline.
: cribwliedge.
. *..We .believe hat the Universit) of
.." *.. pwlrposes for existence because
S.Mtu.lually supportive, programs in tl
*. the sciences, and the professions.


hasis
and

Flor
of i
ie ar


* is pla
on th

ida ser
its inc
ts the


* "" .SWe believe the University of Florida, in order
functions, must have lalerited students, distin
.Ulty; a comprehensive library, adequate suppol
... fr its programs, and sufficient and well
..equipment and physical plant.
S9. We believe the Unnersity of Florida has an o
S. make its programs and services known to the
". to the government of the stale, in order best
.... purposes for which the University exists.
10. We believe that, by fulfilling its proper fui
':= University of Florida upholds and enhances It"


society and of the naltor
.. The University of Florida
sociation of Colleges and
leges.


REED
ds for the
individual.

erve the so-
ions of the

improve the

continue the
:to wit, the
h teaching,
through re-

research to
seek solu-

of a com-


iced on in-
e sharing of

res well its
lusie, and
humanities,

to fulfill its
gushed fac-
rt personnel
maintained


obligation
people a
to sere I


lions, the
Values of


1n.


is accredited by
Schools-Comr


the Soul
mission


Adventist,


Church


ot Christ


Scientist.


Christian and Missionary Alliance. Admen
Church of Latter Day Saints, Church ol
sembly of God. Aposlolic Church ot Chri
Disciples of Christ. Pentecostal Holiness
Christ, and Unitarian-UnirersaIists Sel'
nominations maintain chapels adjacent
These include St. Augustine Chapel (Call


terl, the Baptist Sti
odist Student Cent
Student Centeri C
lion (Jewish) the
Day Saints (Morm
ter and the Society
on extensive prog
dents


uden
ler)
hurcl
Lulh
on).


union.
pel ol
Chrisi
n Stud
cipleP -


friends
,0of sI


Church


e\ Foun
Incarnate
ai B rith
'ssociar
biterian


uaker)
interest


of Christ


ritlitan lewish.
Nazarene, as-
.hurch oi God
tled Church of
of these de-
the campus
: Student Cen-
idation 'Meih-
'ion (Episcopal
Hillel Founda-
ion the tatter
Student Cen.
e chapel; carr,
Jnier itv slu-


TRANSPORTATION


A schedule of
points of the Uni
Greyhound Lines
Transit system has
Eastern Airlines s
connections to all
ida serve all major


daily bus service, w
led States, is mainta
and Trailways Bus
nine busses serving I
eres Gaines. ile w
parts of the U S Ch
r areas of the state


ith connections to all
ined by Southeastern
System The Regional
the cit, of Gaineswille
ith daily flights with
carter A\ir and Air Flor-


GOVERNMENT OF THE
UNIVERSITY


Direct supervision over t
cies and affairs, is vested
composed of 11 citizens vh
for six-year terms and one


? Uni',ersily of Florida.
the Board of Regenlis
are appointed by the C
udent appointed lor c


and the State Commissioner of Educatio
are administered bi the president &with
distance of the Uniersity Senate and
elected by the senate and appointed by


n Union
the ad
variouss
the prl


ersit) aff
Since and
commit
esidenl.


HISTORY


ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS


. Florida's oldest, the


University


nings to the takeover of the
Ocala by the state-funded Ea'
Seminary was moved to Gain
It was consolidated with the
Cultural College, then in Lake
' qf Florida in Gamnesville in 19(
102. Until 1947. UF was the
.thred state colleges. Others
Women (now FSU) and Flori
student body numbered 8,17


of Florida


traces


its begin-


pri ate Kingsbury Academy in
st Florida Seminary in 1853. The
es\ill. following the Civil War.'
state's land-grant Florida Agri-
City, to become the University
D6, with an initial enrollment of
men's school and one of only


were
da A&
7 men


Florida
M. Since
and 60


. grown to more than 33.000, largest in
..years with the University of Tennessee
'; 18th largest in the nation.


the st
as the


late College
194'., when
women, UF


ate. alte
South s


mating
largest,


I ,

SETTING AND ENVIRONMENT


The Llniverslty of'Flonda is located in Gain
'.86929 situated in north central Florida midw
Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico The city
agricultural and small industrial center


esville, a city of
ay between the
is known as an


, .:'... In'addition to a moderate climate, Gainesville offers many
So"ther advantages to students of the University A golf course


THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS is
ihe chief business officer of the University He is responsible
for establishing policy relating to university business mal-
ters, coordinating the preparation of and control of the oper.
acting budget, collecting and disbursing funds in accordance
with statl statutes managing campus security, auxiliary ser,-
ices and the maintenance of the physical plant and grounds,
directing purchasing, the administrative computer, staff per-


sonnel
safety.


property


control,


ACADEMIC AFFAI RS
THE PVCE PRESIDENT FOR
chief academic officer for the L
supervFses the allocation of resc
Ihe improvement of instructor
tional activities the debelopme
search activities, the evalualior
tivilt, and the establishment ol
ployment, promotion, and lenu
the absence of the President anc


acts with the


authority and


and environmental


health and


ACADEMIC AFFAIRS is t
niversitI In this capacity
'urces in the academic are
t. he correlation of Instru
*nl and improvement of
of university academic a
policy vith respect to er
ire of the academic staff
I Executive \Pice President


responsibility


of the President


Information


.
.
.
*A


::





General


.4f.
I '
: ". "


GENERAL INFORMATION

creation. financial aid,
unnli ng. student organic
pr grais and leadership
SStUdeni .fiairs follows in
,'* ." I "," "


SEMESTER SYSTEM
The University of Florida operates on a semester system.
TIe academic year begins ih August and ends the following
Au ust. During this period there are two semesters averag-
ing15 weeks of instiction plus a week of final examinations
andtwosix'weeks summer terms Semesters begin in August
and January with the fist summer term beginning in May
and the second begibfning in June. In most colleges of the
University courses are scheduled in such a way that a stu-
dent may enter in any term and proceed normally through
anf appropriate sequence of courses. Consult the individual
college sections of the cat~jog to determine programs that
S1egip only in designated terms.


COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS
THE SCHOOL OF ACCOUN rING offers curricula leading
to-the degree of Bachelor of Science in Accounting. The
bachelor's degree may be completed within the five year
program leading to the degree Master of Accounting. See
School of Accpunting page 71.
.TE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, a unit of the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, offers curricula in all of
the major fields of agriculture and grants the degree of
SBachelor of Scienc in Agriculture. See Page 75.
iTHE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE offers curricula in ar-
chitecture, interior ideign; landscape architecture, urban
and regional planning and building construction It confers
the degrees of Bachelor of Design, Bachelor of Landscape
Architecture, and Bachelor of Building Construction; Master
of Arts in Architecture, Master of Arts in Urban and Regional
Planning, Master of Science in Building Construction, and
Master of Building Construction. See page 8".
THE SCHOOL OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION offers cur-
ricula leading to the degrees Bachelor of Building Construc-
tion, Master of Building Construction, and Master of Science
in Building Construction. Also, a Ph.D program is offered in
conjunction with the College of Education. See page 95.
THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION offers
curricular programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Business Admininstration (See Page 99) and a
Bachelor of Science in Accounting degree (see School of Ac-
counting, Page 71).
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY. an integral part of the I.
Hillis Miller Health Center, graduated its first students in
June. 1976. The College offers an innovative modular cur-
riculum leading to the degree of Doctor of Dental Medicine
and has initiated post-graduate programs in various dental
specialities See Page 104.
THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION has curricula in elemen-
tary and secondary school instruction leading to the degrees
of Bachelor of Science in Education or Bachelor of Arts in Ed-
ucation. It also provides an inservice program for the teach-
ers of the slate The P K Yonge Laboratory School, a unit of
the College of Education, enrolls pupils from the kin-
dergarten through the secondary school. Undergraduate
teacher preparation programs are NCATE approved and lead
to certification at pre-school, elementary, and secondary
levels in Florida and thirty other states where NCATE stan-
djrd4k nrnvidp thp haie for recmnrocal agreements See Page


housing. individual and group
nations. the Reitz Union. judicial
training. A complete section on
this catalog


gineering and Nuclear Engineering. The Bachelor of Science
degree is awarded with majors in Nuclear Engineering Sci:-
ences. and Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies. The college
also offers the Bachelor of Land Surveying degree. See page
117.
THE COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS offers curricula in the studio
arts, history of art, crafts, graphic design, art education, mu-
sic, music education, theatre, and dance and confers the de-
grees Bachelor of Design. Bachelor of Arts in Art, Bachelor of
Fine Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education .
and Master of Fine Arts. See Page 135.
THE SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVA-
TION is a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences. The School offers the Bachelor of Science in Forest
Resources and Conservation Degree with majors in Forestry,
Wildlife Ecology, and Resource Conservation. See page 145.
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL offers programs leading to the
degrees of Doctor of Philosophy in 59 fields; Doctor of Edu-
cation, Specialist in Education, Engineer, Master of Account-
ing, Master of Agriculture. Master of Agricultural Manage-
ment and Resource Development, Master of Arts, Master of
Arts in Architecture, Master of Arts in Education, Master of
Arts in Health Education, Master of Arts in ]ournalism and

ter of Arts in Teaching. Master of Arts in Urban ana Regional
Planning, Master of Building Construction, Master of Busi-
ness Administration, Master of Education, Master of Engi-
neering. Master of Fine Arts. Master of Forest Resources and
Conservation, Master of Health Education, Master of Health
Sciences, Master of Laws in Taxation, Master of Nursing,
Master of Physical Education, Master of Science, Master of
Science in Building Construction, Master of Science in Nurs-
ing, Master of Science in Pharmacy, Master of Science in Sta-
tistics. Master of Science in Teaching, and Master of
Statistics. All instruction is carried on by the faculties of the
colleges and schools listed here.
THE COLLEGE OF HEALTH RELATED PROFESSIONS, a
unit of the J Hillis Miller Health Center, offers curricula lead-
ing to a Bachelor of Health Science with a major in Allied
Health, Bachelor of Health Science in Clinical and Com-
munity Dietetics. Bachelor of Health Science in Medical
Technology, Bachelor of Health Science in Occupational
Therapy, and a Bachelor of Health Science in Physical Thera-
py. The College also offers a curriculum leading to the de-
gree of Master of Health Science with a major in Occupa-
tional Therapy, and a Master of Health Science with a major
in Rehabilitation Counseling, and a Ph.D., specializing in
Clinical Psychology. A graduate program in health and hos-
pital administration in cooperation with the College of Busi-
ness Administration and clinical and research opportunities
for advanced students in speech pathology and audiology in
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is offered through
the department of communicative disorders. See Page 151.
THE COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICA-
TIONS offers curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Journalism, Bachelor of Science in Advertising,
and Bachelor of Science in Broadcasting. It offers sequences
in magazines, public relations, technical communications
and criminal justice public relations.
There are areas of specialization in reporting, editing,
photojournalism. journalism education, broadcast news and
public affairs, broadcast production, and broadcast manage-
ment. See Page 161.
THE COLLEGE OF LAW offers a curriculum leading to the
degree of Juris Doctor and a graduate program in taxation
leading to the degree Master of Laws. See Page 169.
THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES offers
curricula leading to decrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor


. . . . J m R i


I




, .


GENERAL INFORMATION


.Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the pro-
fessional degree of Doctor of Medicine. Ph.D. degrees in
basic medical sciences are offered through the Graduate
School. A special medical scientist training program leading
to the combined, degree of Doctor of Medicine-Doctor of
Philosophy is available jointly through the College of Medi-
cine and the Graduate School. See Page 170.
THE COLLEGE OF NURSING, a unit of the I Hillis Miller
Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of
Science in Nursing degree. The College also offers a cur-
dculum leading to the Master of Nursing degree or a Master
of Science in Nursing degree. See Page 171.
T tHE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, a unit of the I. Hdllis Miller
Health Center, offers a curriculum leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy and the Doctor of Pharma-
cy Degree. In addition the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees are of-
fered in pharmaceutical sciences through the Graduate
School, See Page 175.
THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH,
AND RECREATION offers services and programs through the
departments of General Physical Education, Professional
Physical Education, Health Education and Safety, and Recre-
ation. The department of General Physical Education pro-
vides programs for university students other than majors
The departments of Professional Physical Education, Health
Education and Safety, and Recreation offer professional
preparation programs leading to undergraduate degrees in
physical education, health education, and recreation. Pro-
fessional areas of preparation include: teachers of physical
education or health education, health educators for public
or voluntary agencies, and recreation directors. See Page 179.
THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, a teaching
unit of the J. Hallis Miller Health Center, offers a curriculum
leading to the professional degree of Doctor of Veterinary
Medicine. See Page 187.


DIVISION OF
CONTINUING EDUCATION
During the last year more than 32,000 people took advan-
rage of the many University sponsored opportunities made
available through the Division of Continuing Education.
More than 25.000 people participated in non-credit con-
ferences, workshops, institutes and seminars More than
5,000 students enrolled in Independent Study by Correspon-
dence courses (both credit and non-credit) Over 1,700 stu-
dents studied in credit extension classes throughout the
State Additionally, ten international programs were offered
through this Division last year Backed by the resources of
the University, the Division of Continuing Education sees
the State as its campus and the people as its student body


Subject areas iound within the CI
ramming, systems analysis, soft
niques. information representation
guage translators, operating systems.
and applications.
This background prepares the stuck
careers in the business, industrial s
demic worlds wherein information
critical importance to decision maki


In addition to the degree


are available for those who need experience in computer ap-
plications for proper career preparation For further informa-
tion, contact the CIS department office in 512 Well Hall
THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES is the Uni-
versity unit responsible for directing or coordinating in-
lerdisciplinary instructional and research programs related
to the Latin American and Caribbean area It is a budgeted
unit within the University and is administered by a Director
immediately responsible to the Iice President for Academic
Affairs
The Center sponsors conferences, publishes the results of
scholarly research related lo Latin America. and cooperates
with other University units in overseas development and
training programs It administers a program with Univer-
sidad de los Andes. Bogota. Colombia and a program in Bra-
zil for the State University System and offers programs in
Latin American Studies leading to a B.A degree. and BS.,
M A and Ph D Certificates in Latin American Studies; and
an interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Latin American Studies
The DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE offers the four
year program and the Iwo year program ot Army ROTC.
Completion of either of these programs by a student leads to
being commissioned in one of the branches of the United
Slates Army Reserve or the Regular Army Freshman/Sopho-
more AROTC carries no service obligation One, two, three
and four year scholarships are available to interested stu-
dents who can qualify
THE DEPARTMENT OF NAVAL SCIENCE offers a two-year
and a four-year program of Nay -Marine ROTC Upon suc-


cessful completion of this officer training
uate receives a commission in the U S
Corps and is immediately assigned to
ships covering two, three, or four full yea
able to male and female students who
THE DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE .


and female students both two-year and four-year programs
in Air Force ROTC Completion of eilher of these officer ed-
ucation programs leads to a commission in the United States
Air Force. Two. Three and Four year scholarships are avail-
able on a competitive basis to students enrolled in the pro-
gram Qualified individuals may compete for Pilot Training
assignments and begin learning to fly during their Senior
Year.


IS curricula include pro-
tare de lopment tech-
mnd transformation, lan-
computer organization.


lent for a
scientific ,
flow and
ng


SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL
UNITS SERVING ALL
COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


THE INTERCOLLEGE DEPARTMENT OF
INFORMATION SCIENCES. During the
electronic information processing machlr
many orders of magnitude beyond their
come into being. Though still in their ir
ready extending man's capability to solve
field of human activity. Against this back
nation of a curriculum dedicated to a bro.


COMPUTER AND
last three decades
ies with capability
predecessors have
ilancy they are al-
problems in every
ground, the organ,-
ad sector of human


THE DEPARTMENT OF M
such musical organizations
chestras, Choruses. and Glee
following areas (1) Theory
History and Literature. (4) f
Music, (6) Music Education, (
sembles
THE DEPARTMENT OF GE
OFFERS a wide variety of ph'
dents enrolled at the Unive
on the premise that although
tvity., all do not need or c
quently, the department off
dent to enhance physical he1
to total health


USIC has the responsibility for
as the University Bands, Or-
Clubs, and offers courses in the
of Music (2) Composition, (3)
Alusic Performance (5) Church
:7) Opera Workshop and (8) En-

NERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION
ysical activity courses to all stu-
rsitl The Department operates
,h all people need physical ac-
are for the same kind Conse-
ers many avenues for the slu-
alth and understand its relation


wide range
calc and ac
analysis is


service courses


programs, several


program, the grad-
avy or U S. Marine
tive duty Scholar-
5 of study are avail-
an qualify
UDIES offers male




General


GENERAL INFORMATION


INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICE UNITS


THE OFFICE OF INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES en-
courages experimentation in teaching and individualized
A:se:i ces to students. Reporting drectly to the Office of Aca-
denic Affairsi it provides support for the innovation of alter-
riatie approaches to instruction in the colleges and depart-
menipnof the Unierscly. assists faculty members in the de-
velopment of instructional modules or systems ior specific
CQaL e; and furnishes technical assistance in the deelop-
atent and pse :f teaching materials and media, analysis and
improvement of teaching and the evaluation ol student per-
formance Three units include media production, testing
and evaluation services and an instructional improvement


rials dealing with the performing arts has beenigathered into
the Belknap Collection.
Reference service is provided in Library West and ifh the
various branch libraries and readiftg rooms. A majof cofec-
tion of bibliographies and reference books and the union
catalog are located on the first floor of L.ibrary West.
Photoduplicatioh services are available. The regular
schedule for the central libraries is Monday through Friday,
8:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M.: Saturday. 10'00 A.M. to 5.00 P.M.;
Sunday. 10.00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M. The libraries serving the var-
ious academic colleges and schools observe a similar sched-
ule with variations


section.
Other units etnphasizing individualized
dlude the Reading and writing Center, the
Center, Mathemalics Laboratory and the La
torn. Selected sell-paced non-credit courses
reading. writing studs habits, tutoring and
Research consultation, course enrichment
services are also offered to inleresled faculty


instruction in-
O.I.R. Teaching
nguage Labora-
are available in
language skills
and evaluation
Y


iHEUOFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR has charge of the admis-
Ssinf and registration ol students, the maintenance of aca-
mpic records. the scheduling of courses, and the issuance
o fr l nscrpt s or student records
TE eJAI)SJELOR TO FOREIGN AGRICULTURE STU-
DENMTS. rForeigp students in Agriculture are requested to
co. nthe Ofice of International Programs in McCarty
;Hll. This office aid fIoreign students to integrate their
wAhiepicanaducationmaore completely with actual conditions
in their homelands and also gines information to all students
interested in foreign agricultural problems and careers in the
tropics


.:,



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".


THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM


The Florida Slate Museum was created by an act of the
Legislature in 1917 as a department of the University of Flor-
ida. Through its affiliation with the University it carries the
dual responsibility as the State Museum of Florida and the
University Museum.
The Museum operates as a center of research in the natu-
ral sciences and anthropology. Its functions as an educa-
tional arm of the University are carried forward through in-
terpretive displays and scientific and popular publications.


Under the administrative
three departments of the I
cerned with the study and
lions as well as research i
and evolutionary biology.
Sciences is concerned Itlh
cultures, both historic and
cerhed with the interpr


control of the I
Museum: Natural
expansion of the


na
soc
the
pre
etat


museum education and exhibit
scientific and educational staff


Director
Sciences
research


are the
is con-
collec-


variety of areas in functional
iobiology and ecology: Social
study of human variation and
historic; Interpretation is con-
ion of knowledge through
i techniques Members of the
of the Museum hold dual ap-


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LIBRARY SERVICE
The Iibrar) consists of two central units. Library East and
Library West, and branch libraries in the areas of Architec-
ture and Fine Arts, Education. Engineering. Law. the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, the I Hdllis Miller Health
Center, Chemistry and the P.K 'onge Laboratory School In
addition, reading room facilities have been provided for
Business Administration. Journalism and Communications,


Music, Physical Education. Health and Recreation.
and the dtomitory areas.
The holdings of the libraries number oter 2
cataloged volumes and a large number of unc,
documents and newspapers Mans of the material
the form of microfilm and microcards.


Physics

300.000
taloged
, are in


4 number of rationally significant research collections are
maintained as part of the library system Since 197' the Li-
braries have opened the Isser and Rae Price Library of
ludaica, the largest collection of its kind in the southeast, the
Baldwin Library. among the world's greatest collections of
literature for children and housed in the Department of
Rare Books and Manuscripts the Parkman D Howe Collec-
tion ol American Literature, which contains important first
editions and manuscripts of eter, New England author writ-
ing before 1900 In the rare books and manuscript area the
researcher will also find the papers of many well known au-
thors, such as Marlorle Kinnan Rah lngs and John D Mac-
Donald. and Ihe Margaret Dreier Robins papers which are
vital to the history of the Women's Trade Union League in
America


pointments in appropriate teaching departments. Through
these appointments they participate in both the under-
graduate and graduate teaching programs and supervision of
graduate students
Scientific reports are published in the Bullerin of the Flor-
ida State Museum, Brologrcal Sciences, the Ripley P. Bullen
Monographs in Anlhropologi and Histor), and in the Con-
rinbulaons of the Florida Srate Museum, Anthropologv and
Hisrory.
The research collections are under the care of curators
who encourage the scientific study of the Museum's hold-
ings. Materials are constantly being added to the collections
both through gifts from friends and as the result of research
activities of the Museum staff The archaeological and
ethnological collections are noteworthy. There are extensive
study collections of birds, mammals, mollusks, reptiles. am-
phibians, fish: invertebrate and vertebrate fossils, as well as
archives of animal sounds associated with the bioacoustics
laboratory
The Allyn Museum of Entomology. Sarasota. Florida, is a
unit of the Department of Natural Sciences, Florida Stale
Museum The combined Sarasota and Gainesville holdings
in Lepidoptera rank the A411n Museum of Entomology as the
largest in Ihe western hemisphere and the premier Lepidop-
tera research center in the world The Alln Museum of En-
tomology publishes the Bullerin of the Allyn Museum of En-
tomology and sponsors the Karl Jordan Medal. The Allyn
Collection serves as a major source for taxonomic and
biogeographic research by a number of Florida State
Museum and Department of Zoology faculty and students.
as well as a great many visiting entomologists from around
the world


K.. .
. a 'l.:: *
*'".'.~i ''
?"






GENERAL INFORMATION


botanical illustrations and the growing botanical library
complement the ever-expanding collections of plant spec-
imens.
Opportunities are provided for students, staff, and visiting
scientists to use the collections. Research and fieldwork are
presently sponsored in the anthropological. paleontological
and zoological fields. Students interested in these specialties
should make application to the appropriate teaching depart-
mentl
mani
Graduate assistantships are available in the Museum in
areas of specialization emphasized in its research programs.
Facilities are available for graduate students.
The Museum is located at the corner of Museum Road and
Newell Drive in a modern facility completed in 1970. The


public halls are open from nine until five
eluding Saturday, and from one to five
holidays (closed Christmas Day) There
charge. The Museum is frequently used
public school classes. Classes for children
programs are also offered for members
community and the general public


each weekday, in-
on Sunday. and
is no admission
by University and
and special public
of the University


units by coordinating copy content, design and preliminary
production for booklets, folders, brochures, and other
printed material, and assists in preparing bid specifications
for printing.
The OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT AND ALUMNI AFFAIRS is
the campus headquarters for the University of Florida Na-
tional Alumni Association. Inc. and the University of Florida
Foundation, Inc.
The University of Florida National Alumni Association,
Inc brings together the organized efforts of alumni and the
promotion of the interests and needs of the University and
strives to encourage continuous participation by alumni in
the life of the University


The University of Florida Foundation


support from
operating and
ganized to ho
vest them a
University's p
THE UNIVE
Arts college
Southwest 131


the pnvale sector
capital purposes. It
Id funds for the ben
nd to insure the
privatee support.
RSITY GALLERY is a
The Gallery is loca
ih Street (or U S 441


exists


to encourage


to the University for both
is a private corporation or-
efit of the University. to in-
maximum value of the


in integral part of the Fine
ted on the campus facing
). An atrium and a contem-


GENERAL STATE AND
UNIVERSITY AGENCIES
THE FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE.
The transfer and application of knowledge through non-
resident educational programs is the primary purpose of the
Florida Cooperative Extension Service, a component of the
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The educational
programs are tailored to fit the needs of many audiences in
areas of agricultural production including energy manage-
ment, marketing and utilization, home economics; com-
munity resource development; natural resource manage-
ment, 4-H youth development, energy and marine sciences
Audiences include adults and youth, rural and urban
citizens, minorities and people from all economic levels. The
Cooperative Extension Service is administered by the Uni-
versity of Florida under a memorandum of understanding
with USDA. There is also a cooperative program funded
through federal grants with Florida A&M University The
basic legislative authority makes provision for cooperation
with local government in Florida, county programs are car-
ried out jointly between the University and respective
county governments in the 67 counties. The Extension Serv-
ice along with Resident Instruction and Research in IFAS
form a functional model typifying the tripartite organiza-
tional structure envisioned in the Morrll Act for the Land
Grant College system.
The OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS is responsible
for the development of public relations, including visitor re-
ception, cooperating with all campus agencies and organiza-
tions in the planning and implementation of their public re-
lations activities and serving as the University representative
with civic organizations which work with the Uniersity and
are not professionally related to a particular school or col-
lege. University Relations coordinates with all campus agen-
cies dealing with off-campus publics in a continuing effort
to develop two-way communications with the public and to
encourage public support and understanding of the Univer-
sity, its programs and higher education.
The DIVISION OF INFORMATION AND PUBLICATIONS
SERVICES serves University central administration and Uni-
versity Educational and General budgeted academic units,
departments, service offices and other campus-related or-
ganizations by distributing information through mass media
outlets, and providing communication services for the cam-
nc mrnmm.ni.tu i mntenrl ho 1h Ilniuvr.irh'6 nrnorAmc nnli-


porary
Gallery


ulptural fountain are twro pleasing features of the
distmnctive architecture style. The Gallery, with 3000


square feet of display space, is completely modern, air-con-
ditioned arid maintains a varied exhibition schedule of the
visual arts during the year. The content ot exhibitions dis-
played in the University Gallery range from the creations by
traditional masters through to the latest and most ex-
perimental works by the modern avant garde The minor arts
of yesterday and today along with the creations of oriental
and primitive cultures form topics for exhibitions scheduled
Besides its regularly scheduled exhibitions, which show for
approximately four to six weeks, the Gallery originales sever-
al unique exhibitions from its own and other museums' col-
lections each year. The Gallery's hours are from 9 A.M to 5
P M daily except Sunday when they are 1 P M. to 5 P 4y The
Gallery is closed on Saturdays and holidays
ART DEPARTMENT GALLERY, the leaching gallery, is lo-
cated adjacent to the Department's office area on the third
floor of the Classroom Building in the Artchitecture and Fine
Arts complex As a direct and physical adlunct to the Art
Department's teaching program this Gallery displays smaller
traveling exhibitions of merit as well as one man shows by
the faculty artists and student exhibitions. The Gallery is
open Monday through Fnday from 8 A.M. to noon and from
1 P.M to 5 PM It is closed Saturdays. Sunday and holidays.
THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN AND TROPICAL
ARTS is an interdisciplinary Center that provides coordi-
nation, direction, and focus to strengthen existing programs
related to the Fine Arts within the College ol Fine Arts. The
Center's faculty is bound together by a desire to relate their
research and leaching activities to the broader concepts con-
cerned with the fine arts of various world cultures The Cen-
ter broadens and strengthens existing interdepartmental re-
lations and provides additional stimuli and mechanisms for
translating results of research into more viable forms that re-
late directly to societal needs It also establishes more effec-
tIve lines for the training of able students at the under-
graduate, graduate, and adult education levels in various


aspects


of the fine


THE UNIVERSITY
the College of jour
WUFT. Channel 5
(PBS). WUFT-FM,
MHz. WRUF-AM.
KHz. and WRUF-F
103.7 MHz.


arts
Y BROADCAST FACILITY is operated by
rnalism and Communications It includes
. a public broadcasting television station
a non-commercial radio station (NPR) 89 1
a commercial radio station (NBC) 850
M. a commercial FM station. (CBS) stereo.


Annrnmmluial. I,,im lnr.4anl Jrp amnIlnmid in I hpP. hrnad-





General

GENERAL INFORMATION


* ,,,
,


tion for the demonstrated effectiveness of this academic and
work experience training
WUFT-TV telecasts programs of PS. the Public Broad-
casting Service. FPB, Florida Public Broadcasting Network, as
well as local studio and remote originations. As a unit of the
Florida Public Television Network, it both originates and re-
ceives programs of particular interest to the people of Flor-
ida


WUF T-FM. wlth 100.000 watts of power, reaches 16 North
Central Flor actounties The only public radio station in that
area rU"FT-FM broadcasts a fine arts diversified and news
formit firO hours e\,ery day of the sear The station pro-
Sides a variety of on-air, production and reporting experi-
: ence for broadcast majors of the College of journalism and
C nowmictions. These students are under the direct gui-
dance of professional public radio broadcasters With a
strong, emphasis on local production and programming
WUFT-FM is a satellite member station of National Public
Radio and aims to serve and reflect the diverse needs of the
communities of North Central Florida.
WRUF-4M serves the contemporary music audience.
while the WRUF -FM music ranges from show tunes to classi-
cal music, with a touch of progressive rock for the late night
listener. Student communicators produce and broadcast reg-
uj[ar news program over both stations under faculty super-
v/ison.
1; The student's proxMadit to, and participation in. this di-
verse broadcast operation brings a greater understanding of
Ahe opportunities and obligations that exist in the field of
Sbroadcasting. ,, :
THE UNIVERSITY OF FLOR~iA PRESS
The Unervly of Florida is host to the state university
System's schcolarlly publishing facility. Universir, Presses of
; Floriida. The goals of the systemwide publishing program im-
S'nemPted by Universilt Presses of Florida are expressed in
S" ^ ntof Regents' pqliy y
., to pubilih books mrnographs, journals, and other
iypes fQ scolarly or lreatIv wrks. The Press shall give
Sspe '1 attention to works of distinguished scholarship in
acaemic areas of particular interest and usefulness to
.~e citizen f at foridaf The Press shall publish original
works by state uinivesitv faculty members, but it may
: .- :also putis meritonus works originating elsewherand
may republish out-of-prnn works."
Each university's faculty publishing committee is inde-
pendently responsible for selecting works for publication
Sthn:sugh he 4acdtatlees i. NUersit Presses of Florida. At the
University of Florida, the University Press Board of Managers
pesees ibie)aocl4,IM determmed publishing program
The pucse:uftAte University of Florida Press is to en-
courage. seek out. and publish original and scholarly man-
uscripts which will aid in developing the University as a rec-
? oghited enter of research and scholarship
In addition to its broad range of state, regional, and Latin
American titles, the Press publishes books of general interest
and five separate series in Florldiana, gerontology, human-
lties", atin America studies, and social sciences.
The Press Board of Managers, including the director and
fifteen faculty experts appointed by the President of the
University, determines policies of publication relating to the
acceptance or rejection of manuscripts and the issuance of
author contracts Each year the board examines numerous
manuscripts submitted not only by the University faculty
but by authors from all over the United States, Europe, and
Latin America.
University Presses of Florida is a member of the Associa-
-< --_ i i-. -. -. f -t- __i L. -- . /


f


Agronomy. Animal Science. Botany, Dairy Science, En-
tomologv and Nematology. Food and Resource Economics,
Food Science and Human Nutrition, 4-H and Other Youth
Programs. Lab aketf F urs
Fruit Crops, Home Economics. Microbiology and Cell Sci-
ence, Ornamental Horticulture, Plant Pathology. Poultry Sci-
ence, Soil Science. Statistics. Vegetable Crops, and Preven-
tive Medicine (College of Veterinary Medicine). In addition,
six units vital to its research programs, namely: Editorial, Li-
brary. Business Service, and Centers for Rural Development,
Environmental Programs, and Biomass are located on cam-
pus
In order to best serve the varied needs of Florida's diver-
silied agriculture. Agricultural Research and Education Cen-
ters are located at numerous locations having different
climatic conditions, soil types and crops. Intensive research
is conducted in all fields of agriculture such as citrus, vegeta-
ble. field crops, livestock, pastures, and many others. Agri-
culture Research and Education Centers are located in
Homestead, Belle Glade, Bradenton, Lake Alfred, Quincy,
Sanford, and Tallahassee (Florida A & M University). A Re-
search and Education Center is also located at Welaka, Flor-
ida and is concerned largely with biological research pro-
gams and youth programs. Agricultural Research Centers are
located in Monticello, Ft. Pierce. Immokalee, Dover, Ft.
Lauderdale, Hastings. Ona, Apopka, Mrananna,. Live Oak,
Leesburg. and lay. Cooperative research is conducted with
the Brooksville Beef Cattle Research Station. Brooksville, a
~wI &' | -, ., L t -=. I i


the State. The Division is a development arm of the Unaver-
sity. coordinating its efforts closely with the Office of Aca-
demic Affairs. The Division of Sponsored Research is
directed by the Dean for Graduate Studies and Research.
All proposals for sponsorship of research. grantusin-aid,
and training grants are approved by the director. Nego-
tiations on administrative matters with potential contracting
agencies or sponsors of research and training pcdjects are
carried out by the Division.
The activities of the Division of Sponsored Research are
intended to stimulate growth and to assist in expanding a
balanced research and training program throughout the Uni-
versity. These activities are intimately related to the support
of the graduate and professional program. The services pro-
vided are designed to relieve the principal investigators in
many departments of detailed administrative and reporting
duties connected with some sponsored programs. The
duties and responsibilities of the Division, of course, do not
supplant the prerogative of the principal investigator who
seeks sponsors for his own project nor the responsibilityy of
the investigator for the scientific integrity of the project, In
direct contacts between a principal investigator and a poten-
tial sponsor, however, coordination with the Division is nec-
essary to insure uniformity in contract requirements ahd to
avoid duplication of negotiations with the same sponsor.
The Division of Sponsored Research is administratively re-
sponsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Policies
and procedures for the Division are developed by a board of
directors working with the director within the general
framework of the administrative policies and procedures of
the University
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, the re-
search function unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (IFAS), has the responsibility of developing new
knowledge and technology toward solution of agricultural
problems in the State. Research is administered through the
office of the Dean for Research located on the University of
Florida campus. IFAS research is conducted throughout the
State Twenty-one departments are located on campus-Ag-
ricultural Engineering. Agricultural and Extension Education,


S..
* *





.I
. .1 "
.* .


Experiment Station cooperates closely with the Cooperative
Tension Service in providing research findings for prompt
dissemination. .
THE FLORIDA ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRIAL EXPERI-
;MENT STATION (EIES) developed from early research ac-
tivities of the' engineering faculty and was officially estab-
lished in 1941 by the Legislature as an integral part of the
.., College of Engineering. Its mandate is "to organize and pro-
mote .the prosecution of research projects of engineering
arid related sciences, with special reference to such of these
problems as are important to the industries of Florida."
The College and the Station form a close interlocking rela-
Stionship witlhthe EIES serving as the research arm of the Col-
lege. In this capacity the EIES fulfills its function of conduct-
ing research'on many of Florida's most significant problems
rargingg from energy to water resources, environmental is-
sues to health-related activities. Of course many of these
.problems transcend the State and are also of national con-
cearn. The Station has developed a national and international
reputation in many areas and the faculty are at the forefront
of their fields. This has a malor positive impact on the Col-
lege since it makes good teaching possible, exposes students
to many important engineering problems normally not en-
countered in a college program, and helps the faculty better
instill students with the qualifications necessary for the. suc-
cessful practice of their profession. Moreover, both under-
graduate and graduate students frequently find em-
ployment on research projects.


conducts research in
vertlsing. and public
THE DIVISION OF
the analysis and does
available resources w
the many and diverse


at minimi


um long


and related corn
budgeting, space
design and consi
THE FLORIDA
which is funded
tablished in 1964
the passage of P


the news media. in broadcasting, ad-
relations
PLANNING AND ANALYSIS performs
the planning required lo ensure that
ill be used to accomplish the goals of
programs of the Uniersity of Florida


-range cost Work is earned out by the staff
mitlees in the areas of campus planning.
assignment, coordination ot architectural
Iruction of facilities.
WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTER,
by the Department of the Interior. was es-
at the UniversiWt of Florida as the result of


L 88-379--The Water


Resources


Act of 1964-"to stimulate, sponsor, provide for.
ment present programs for conduct of research
tion experiments, and the training of scientists
of water and of resources which affect water "
Director operates under the general police gui


advisory comr
versilt Resea
pertaining to
resource man
being conduct


University


of


mitlee appointed


rch
the
age
ted
Flo


the Slate Gradu
projects or other


projects adm
achievement
ment, water qi
by professors
rida. and other
iate assistants
activities of t


Research
d supple-
nvestiga-
the fields
Center s
ice of an


by the President of the
inistered bi the Center
of adequate statewide '
quality and water quantity
in various departments .
r colleges and university
may be employed on
he Center


The Station receives a small but imp
operating funds from the State; this func
near 10 for 1 return from contracts and
'ment agencies, foundations and indu
The Station has excellent facilities and
verse fields; a few such examples
bioengineering, energy conservation


ortant portion of its
ling base results in a
grants with govern-
strnal organizations.
faculty in many dl-


are: solar
and co


energy,
inversion,


ceramics, new materials development, photovoltaics, robot-
ics, soil mechanics, transportation research, coastal and
oceanographic engineering, microelectronics, air and water
pollution control, nuclear pumped lasers, systems analysis,
fluid dynamics and hydrology, technology for enhanced oil
recovery, lightning research.


NERDC


In addition
puters located


houses


to numerous
on ihe cam


the central facilities


Center (NERDC) of the Slate I
Facilities available to students.
Amdahl 4"'0 V/6-11 computer a
computer (running under OS,
supported by 22 megabytes of
IBM 3350 disk drives. 22 IBM


drives.


one 7-track tape d


r


small digital
pus. the Un


of the Northeast


I hybrid com-
*ily of Florida
Regional Data


University Sstem
faculty, and statf i
nd an IBM 3033 M
,'MVS with IES2)
main memory, mo
3330 disk drives t


ive, a


nd two 1403


h


of Florida
include an
lodel N.12
These are
re than 42
en 9-track
ugh -speed


THE FLORIDA ARCHITECTURE & BUILi
CENTER is a unit of the College of Archite
to foster and encourage research related
represented in the college. These include ar
ing construction, landscape architecture, in
urban and regional planning. The Center
sistance to faculty and graduate students i


operative efforts with other units of the


DING RESEARCH
*cture established
to the disciplines
architecture, build-
tenor design, and
also provides as-
n establishing co-


University


THE BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH
is the research arm of the College of Business Adminis-
tration. Through its four programs-forecasting, population.
survey, and publications-the Bureau generates and dis-


seminates demographic, economic
tion about Florida. Major sources of
annual Florida Statistical Abstract
People in Florida published by the
reau research are published in
Leaflets and Florida Economic lndic
ida residents, and Florida Building


Business and Econoi
and The Florida Outl4
Population for state,
cial reports. The Bure
fessors to engage in
search training for ur
THE PUBLIC ADMI


:ator
Perr


I business
information
the bienni
eau Repor
monthly E
s, both free
iits, in the


mic Dimensions, Population
ook; in the annual Florida Esll
counties and municipalities;


informa-
n are the
al Older
ts of Bu-
conomic
? to Flor-
quarterly
Studies.
mates of
and spe-


au makes it possible for teaching p
organized research and provides
idergraduate and graduate students
NISTRATION CLEARING SERVICE i


research, publication, and service adjunct
....* -- n l*-**__l f . . L- *-- I-^ ^"_ l4^ ^ I


of the Depart-
_-L -__I A -*- .__-


printers


NERDC is a
University of
tons and age


used fo
ing The
the Uni
Process
Compu
search (
of Fooc
NERDC
available
Network
NERE


University System support facility for the
la and ior other slate educational institu-
in northern Florida NERDC's facilities are


r instructional, adminislralite and research comput-
organizations directly responsible for computing at
versiry of Florida are Shands Teaching Hospital Data
ing Di.ision. University of Florida Administrative
ting Services the Center for Instructional and Re-
Computing Actiwvties (CIRCA UF), and the Institute
d and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) Access through
to four other regional data centers in the State is
le through the State Universith System Computer


k
)C p


provides


facilities


for cards,


magnetic


paper


tape, disks graphics, and Compuler Output Microfiche
NERDC supports batch processing through more than 500
interactive terminals These terminals support interactive
4PL/SV. CICS/VS ATMS TSO. MUSIC, ASSEMBLER. 4PL,
BASIC. WATFIV. FORTRAN SCRIPT. PL/I, COGO. PAN-
NvALET, and a locally written editor and remote-lob entry
(RJIE facility Graphics output is available through a Gould


5100 Electrostatic Plotter operated at NERDC's central
the University of Florida.


Extensive software is provided for batch pro
porting the maior high-level languages including
ASSEMBLER. COBOL. PL/I. and ALGOL. the 5
i L ~ l-- - - --.-L. . . . .. -.- -. -


site Ior


icessing sup-
g FORTRAN.
YSTEM 2000.


--i. L a fd ii


GENERAL INFORMATION


s a







r m ic.- y
'7!l:::^ w!


General

GENERAL INFORMATION


and many others More information is available through the


NERDC User's Manual, the Gu
monthly newsletter. Update


CIRCA


7 The Center for Instr
"vitires (CIRCA) provi
of Florida faculty and
programinmng, equipn
shpp unit-record eq
remote-batch term in
" through the Gould 51
dot-matrix printers
. .eypurinch facilities
, thrcughoUt campus.
lse, ices are availab e
Son lcperatitori with
feks extensive Census


uctic
des i
stuE
ient
uipn
als.
100
High
are
Ope


jents
repa


by IFAS in cooperation with the


sever


al Boards of County


idebook for New Users. and a Commissioners in the stale and the U S. Department of Agri-
culture Extension offices in all 67 counties are responsible
for the transfer and application of knowledge through non-
resident educational programs. These programs are tailbred .
to fit the needs of the many audiences in agricultural pro-
duction, marketing and utilization: home economics; comr .,
and Research Comuin Ac- mu rs m
iputing services for Unhiersify Auenes incu au s an you. rur an uan


ir


CIRCA pro\
, data-entry


consulting.
ices, open-


nent, interactive terminals and
Plotting facilities are available
Electrostatic Plotter and PrnnroniK
1-speed batch input/output and
available at several locations
n-shop terminals and consulting


in W eil Hall


NERDC and CIRCI
data services


the UF Librara


INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES


THE INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCI-
ENCES is the University of Florida's statewide agricultural re-
search and educational organization IFAS programs extend
into every count and reach fiople i p virtuallyevey cpn-
Smurnity in Florida.
The priinary mission of IFAS is to help Florida realue its
maximum potential for agricultural development. and to
contribute to the solution ol mans social, economic envi-
ronmental and cliltural problems oi concern to the people
of the state. This vital developmental mission iN carried out
though the three futnctidns of resident grtctdon, research,"
and extension. These are careful) interrelated to provide a
highly coordinated effort foi the benefit of Florida it
citizens and its industry This effort is guided b, the Vice
President for Agricultural Affalrs


The offi
Resident
near the
offices of
are locate
Library is
fices and
The resi


ces of the
Instruction
center of c
the School
d in Newir
located in
classrooms


? President, as well as the Deans for
?search and Extension are located
)us in McCarty Hall Administrative
Forest Resources and Conservation
.legler Hall The Hume Agricultural
McCarr Hall complete near the ou-
most departments


ident instruction programs conducted through the


College of Agriculture and the School of Forest Resources
and Conseratiion, are concerned \, ih educating )oung men
andwomTenrtr the..nastons growingg and increasingly come
plex agricultural industry The curricula lor the different
fields of sludi are structured to provide the business tech-
nological and science education necessary tor graduates to
meet the ever changing needs of a diverse and highly spe-
cialized agriculture, as well as related business and industry.
All academic departments offer an undergraduate program
leading to a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture The School
of Forest Resources and Conservation offers an under-
graduate program which leads to the Bachelor ol Science in
Forest Resources and Conservation Graduate programs at


Ihe masters


level are offered b) all academic


lor of Philosophy degree i
The mission of the IFWAS
opment, as well as impro\


Florida's agricultural i
ticularly in reducing
fuels; to improve con


s ol


nduslry t
depend


unlts The Doc-


lered in 11 specialties
arch programs is one oevel-
existing technology to enable


o become
nce on cc


summer health and


more efficient, par-
)nsumption of fossil
nutrition and to im-


citizens,


minorities and people from all


economics


levels.


In 19"2, the Center for Community and Rural Develop-
ment was established to provide statewide coordination of
research and education programs in community develop-
ment for rural and non-rural metropolitan areas. This center.
is concerned with improving the economic conditions in
these areas so that people have better employment op-
......... ptuliues. LrougBahPPoalt.. o ua de rgr
ale education the Center is assisting in the training of young
people to provide leadership in planning and developing lo-
cal programs. Courses of study in the economics-of environ-
mental quality, natural resource planning and development,
rural income and employment, and regional economic plan-
ning help them make definite contributions toward improv-
ing the economic and social conditions of non-urban areas.
The Center for Enwtronmental and Natural Resources Pro-
grams was created in October. 1973, 10o provide statewide co-
ordination for the IFAS research and education programs
concerned with solving some of the serious environmental
and natural rescue
thraughvut F1oid~t& TeCnr W
ways to protect managed agriculture ecosystems from envi-
rotnmeenraKdaevra negata~rtnnanI
agricultural production technology and protecting and
enhancing the quality of all or Florida's environment.
In 1980 IF45 received approval for the establishment of

nales pTanning, ceveTopment ani impiementarion a re-
search relatedd attiv e .... B .....
biomass, methods ol converting biomass to practical forms
of fuel and systems for utilizing bio-fuels and their co- and
b~-prod ucts


The creation ot


an Otfice of "fternaonlr


1966, formalized the international commitment of IFAS. The
Office of International Programs is responsible for adminis-
tration, coordination and development of all activities which
build or strengthen the international dimension of IFAS. This
includes participation in the determination of contract and
grant policy. development of outside funding sources for in-
ternational research and training projects. and assistance in
the initiation of new education programs. Integration of in-
ternational programs into each department is a specific ob-
.ieci... 'vel This pavides a i-e ^a: u
maximum resources available on the project. Both faculty in
the stale and those overseas benefit by the interchange of
ideas Education and research is handled under the same of-
fice by the Center for Tropical Agriculture established in
1965.
I

THE HILLIS MILLER HEALTH
CENTER I
The J. H1llis Miller Health Center at the University of Flor-

dimensions ot activity: the provision of modern health care
for both people and animals. the education of future health
professionals, research to expand knowledge of disease and
to improve treatment, and a wide variety of outreach health







GENERAL INFORMATION


i gram. the Communicore Building, became operational in
1974 and houses leaching laboratories, animal quarters, lec-
ture halls, a library'and a learning resources and communica-
1ions center. New facilities for the College of Dentistry be-
came operational in 1975. As part of the Health Center com-
plex, new facilities for the College of Veterinary Medicine
were phased into operation in late 1977 and early 1978. The
facilities include the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital
and Clinics where the slate's practicing veterinarians may re-
fer animal patients with rare or complicated diseases
io


A Veterans Administration Medical Center acr
Health Center is engaged in programs of patient
ing and research which are affiliated with the I
the Health Center's colleges.
The Jacksonville Health Education Programs.
offers educational opportunity in clinical fields
of the Health Center's colleges is an official div
University of Florida.
The academic programs of the Health Center I
dents to understand that tomorrow's health care
on the community in order to achieve the con


)ss from the
care, teach-
programs In


which
udents
of the


prepare stu-
must focus
nprehensive


health care of man The
that health care involves
nurse, the dentist. Ihe pt
professions, the commu
the counselor: that b, tr
ing together these men
lively to a person s well
The health-oriented


within the


programs
the health
harmacist
nit the
gaining toa
and worn
being
profession


Health Center_
I.- .


sources oi te univi
health and illness.
Since the opening
cine and Nursing -
a leading center for
the Southeast


Located on
campus, the t
lale presided
termination
health comply


?rsity to


of its thirst un
in 1956 the
health care.


southern
th Center


he University,
formulate ihe
n integral part


help them to understand
h team the physician. the
persons in health related
researcher, the educator;
either, and later by work-
en contribute more effec-


exchange
aw upon th
man s undei


information


its the Colleges of Medi-
Health Center has become
education and research in


ot the Uni.ersit of Florida
amed for Dr J Hdills Miller,


wt hose
early
of the


Mission and
planning of
University


' "


IS




* 1 : ::"w ,
.:Cp :: .
.... :


ADMISSIONS


APPLICATION FOR ADMISSIONS
Application for admission o any undergraduate Collee
School or Division of the University must be made to the
Admissions Sectron of the Office of the Registrar on the
forms prescribed and by the dates indicated below. It is
quite proper to correspond with Deans. Directors or Depart-
ment Chanmen, butr such contact with University officers
os nt min any way. elknv.ato &t ecesslt 1 a
mfa lt application in the Office of the Registrar by the dares

How to Apply: An applicant should address a request to
the Admissions Section, Office of the Registrar, University of
Florida asking for application forms. Forms and directions for
completion of applications vary with the level of entry at the
University and the applicant should indicate that forms are
being requested for admission as a Freshman, Under-
graduate Transfer, Post baccalauerae, Graduate. Dental,-
Law, Medical, Veterinary Medicine, or Special student, as the
case might be.
IMPORTANT NOTE An application for admission must be
filed for the specific term that the studeht wishes to enter
the University and will be considered for entrance in that
lerm ONLY. Applicants wishing to change their planned en-
try date should contact the Admissions Office for applica-
tion instructions. An approval for admission is valid ONLY
for entrance in the term specified in the admission notice
and does not in any way imply that approval would also be
given for entrance in any other term



GENERAL STATEMENT
The University encourages applications from qualified ap-
plicants of both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious, and
ethnic groups. The University does not discriminate on the
basis of handicap in admission or access to its programs and
activities. Both the Educational Testing Service (SAT) and
The American College Testing Program (ACT) have
brochures describing special testing arrangements for handi-
capped applicants and there are altemate admissions pro-
cedures for handicapped applicants who are unable to take
the required tests.


A brief summary of the general requirements for admis-
sion or readmission to any college or division of the Univer-
sity is given below:
1. A satisfactory academic record. Each applicant must
furnish a complete chronological record of educational in-
stitutions previously attended. Official transcripts must be
submitted in accordance with instructions which accom-
pany the application form.
2. Satisfactory scores on achievement tests or aptitude
tests as noted in the application instructions
3. A satisfactory conduct record
NOTE: Board of Regents regulations provide that
furnishing false or fraudulent statements or information in
connection with an application for admission or residence
affidavit may result in disciplinary action, denial of admis-
sion, and invalidation of credits or degrees earned.
The specific requirements for readmission (at the same or
a different level) of a student previously enrolled at the Uni-
"L JzIr ---------------- L= rl inr.ilr nr~r.- .. aL r~nl ..ri


matically guarantee admission. Indaer Boad oi Reents pql-
icy up to ten per cent of the students admitted duringti,
academic year at any level may hledmited as excptins to
the minimum requirements. The Unhiersity Admhisih
Committee is the agency at the Univerity of Horid& athiS b
responsible for the admission of unfduate sltdents un-
der this exception policy. For additionalnfounatios icsad-


The admission requirements have been arrived at after a
very careful study of the experiences of thousands of stu-
dents over a long period of years. In every case minimum re-
quirements have evolved from studies of student per-


would indicate a reasonable chance for successful comple-
tion of University of Florida work.
The University Admissions Committee is responsible for-- --
administering all admissions to the University and its various
components including applicants approved as exceptions to ..
the minimum admission requirements set forth in this
catalog -

ioa itime Wilt ronsoeror admission as a-
lows:
1. Beginning Freshmen: students who have never at-
tended college. (See following section, ADMISSION AS A
FRESHMAN)
2. Undergraduate Transfers: students who have previously
attended any college or university, regardless of amount
of time spent in attendance or credit earned, but who
have not received a bachelor's degree (See following sec-
tion. ADMISSION AS A TRANSFER STUDENT TO UNDER-
GRADUATE SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES).
3. Postbaccalaureate Students: students who have re-
ceived a bachelor's degree but do not wish to be admitted
to graduate study. (See following section. ADMISSION AS
A POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENT.)
4.-CGaduale Studenw:and daaes4orMoste#ie
degrees. (See following section, ADMISSION TO GRADU-
ATE SCHOOL).


5. Dental Students: candidates for admission to the Col-
lege of Dentistry. (See following section, ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY).
6. Law Students: candidates for admission to the College
of Law. (See following section, ADMISSION TO THE COL-
LEGE OF LAW)
7. Medical Students. candidates for admission to the Col-
lege of Medicine. (See following section, ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE).
8. Vetennary Medicine Students: candidates for admission
to the College of Veterinary Medicine. (See following sec-
tion, ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF VETERINARY
MEDICINE).
9. Special Students: applicants who do notfall in one of
the above categones. (See following section, ADMISSION
AS A SPECIAL STUDENT).
10. Transient Students: applicants who wish to enroll for
one term only in order to complete work for transfer back
to parent institution. (See -following section, ADMISSION
AS A TRANSIENT STUDENT).


TRAVELING SCHOLAR PROGRAM
The Traveling Scholar Program affords graduate students




S .. . m .
1- .
S.-


ADMISSIONS


UNDERGRADUATE
INTERINSTITUTIONAL
REGISTRATION PROGRAM


5. A record of good conduct. Major or continuing dif-
ficulty with school or other authorities may make an appli-
cant ineligible regardless of academic qualifications.


Any Florida student who


meets


the above


minimum ad-


The Undergraduate Inlerinslitutional Registration Pro-
gram enables students at Slate University System institutions
to take advantage of special resources and programs avail-
able on another campus in the System but not available at
their home institution, e.g., special course of ferings, research
opportunities, unique laboratories, overseas study programs,
and library collections. Course work taken under the Under-
graduate Interinstitutional Registration Program will be ac-
Scepted for credit at the student's home institution. A student
must be recommended to participate in the Program by his
own academic dean, who will initiate a visiting arrangement
with the appropriate dean at the host institution



PERSONAL HEALTH
HISTORY REQUIREMENT
A personal health history completed by you and reported
on forms supplied by the University Physician are required
prior to initial enrollment at the University of Florida. If your
application for admission is approved, the health history
form will be forwarded to you for you to complete and re-
turn.to the University Physician. Your form should be re-
ceived by the University Physician at least two weeks prior to
your planned date of entrance.


ADMISSION AS A FRESHMAN
(APPLICANTS WHO HAVE NEVER ATTENDED COLLEGE)
When to Apply: No application will be considered for the


Freshman Class more than one
for which entrance is sought. T
early part of the Senior year in S
admission to the Fall class will
cants whose applications and
served in the Admissions Office
lions for the Fall class received


year in
he best


advance
time to


secondary
be given I
supporting
prior to N
after Marc


of the term
apply is the


School Priority in
to qualified appli-
g records are re-
larch 1st. Applica-
:h 1st will be con-


sidered on a "space available" basis only. The deadly
receipt of applications for other terms are listed in t
veisity Calendar.
Admission of students is on a selective basis. Th
ability of community junior colleges and other state


ines for
he Uni-


sities in Florida has caused the Board of Regents to assign to
the University of Florida a role in the total state system of
higher education which demands that the entering
Freshman Class be limited in number. Such limitation does
not prevent students from subsequently applying for admis-
sion to upper division and professional schools of the Uni-
versity since they may attend junior colleges or other univer-
sities and if qualified, then transfer to the University's upper


division colleges in
in this Calalog.


accordance


with rules printed


elsewhere


The requirements for admission set forth below are desig-
nated to give priority to those applicants whose potential on
the basis of their record indicates the greatest likelihood of
success and the obtaining of maximum benefits from the
Lower Division program at the University of Florida.


A. Requirements for admission Florida students
For consideration a student must meet the following mini-


mission requirements and is interested in attending the Uni-
versity of Florida is urged to submit an application The Uni-
versity will do everything possible to accept all qualified ap-
plicants who apply before the application deadline date. If
the number of qualified applicants exceeds the number that
the University is permitted to enroll, admission will be on a


selective basis. An applic
eluding grades, test score
tern of courses completed
dalion and personal record
lion process.
Composite pictures of t
results of recent Freshmen


a
s
I,


not's total high school record in-
. educational objective and pat-
rank in class, school recommen-
I will be considered in the selec-


he Scholastic
classes at the


Aplitude T
University I


indicate that more than 50 percent score 500 or above on the
Verbal section and more than 75 percent score 500 or above
on the Math section. In addition, more than 50 percent of
each entering class has earned a "B" or better average in
high school academic subjects While there is no minimum
grade average or test score which in itself assures a student
of admission or success in college, prospective applicants are
urged to discuss the meaning and implication ol these data


with their school
sity of Florida.


counselors when


considering


the Univer-


B. Requirements for admission Non-Florida Students.
Because of a limited entering Freshman class each Fall.
only a small number of highly qualifed students from states
other than Florida may be admitted. The minimum require-
ments for consideration are essentially the same as for Flor-
ida students except that prority in consideration for admis-
sion will be given to those applicants who present scores of
at least 600 on each section of the Scholastic Aptitude Test of
the College Entrance Examinaltion Board and an academic
average of "B" or better.

OTHER INFORMATION OF
INTEREST TO PROSPECTIVE
FRESHMAN APPLICANTS
Early Admission
Applications for Early Admission (i e admission following
completion of the junior year in high school) from supenor
students are encouraged and will be considered on an indi-


vidual basis by the University's Admissions Corn
phcations should be submitted in accordance
lines published in the University Catalog.


mittee Ap-
with dead-


In addition to the application, the following items are
needed for processing Early Admission applicants.
1. A written statement by the student setting forth reasons
for requesting early admission.
2. An official transcript of the applicant's secondary school
record covering the 9th, 10th and 11th years Generally, an
overall academic average of B+ is expected.
3. Results of either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or
the American College Testing Program (ACT). Generally, a
score of approximately 600 on each section of the SAT or
a composite score of 28 on the ACT is expected.
4. A letter of recommendation from the student's high
school principal or guidance counselor. The letter should
give specific reasons as to why the applicant would profit
more from Early Admission than by completion of the Sen-




4i.: .,."':


General

ADMISSIONS


. *


The UniversIly of Floi
portunities other than Early
may accelerate graduation
please refer to the section
Shortened Degree Opportu
Candidates' Reply Date.
sion to the Fall Freshman
rollment plans within 30 da
Advance Housing Payme
quired to make a housing de
lance if they desire to liie i
ing deposit. less a $1000 se
May 1st for applicants acci
Freshman Class


Admission with Advanced Standing. The University of
:F.rida js a participants in the Advanced Placement Program
(APl9 and i'her* College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
If theCtiellege Entrance Examination Board Under the Ad-
vanced Placement Program a student entering the University


offers a nationally graded examination as evidence of com-
,pleoin ol a college level course taken in high school De-
pending on the results of the examination, the sludent may
receive Universit+ credit for courses covering similar materl-
aiot exemption from such courses without credit. Under the
College Level Examination Program, the Universitt grants
credits for satisfactory scores in each of the five areas of the
C EP General ExamiinaiOis Fatk fiirtther ioiattonwpteo
reirto the section of the Catalog entitled Time Shortened
Degree Opprltunities.
Early Decision for Superior Students. Students with supe-
rior secondary school records (academic average at least 3.5)
and lunior year high school SAT test scores (approximately
600 each on the verbal and mathematics sections) may apply
for early decision The student must certify that this is his
only application and this statement must be supported by
Sthssajgniatures ofIs parents aid apipropitlate scth:untfid
The completed application must be received by November
1, and, if admitted, the student must make his commitment
to attend the Uni\ersity ot Florida. accompanied by his
housing payment, by December 1


ADMISSION AS A TRANSFER
STUDENT TO UNDERGRADUATE
SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES
(APPLICANTS WHO HAVE ATTENDED ANY COLLEGE OR
UNIVERSITY. REGARDLESS OF THE AMOUNT OF TIME
SPENT IN ATTENDANCE OR CREDIT EARNED. ARE CON-
SIDERED AS TRANSFER STUDENTS)


When to Apply Applications


than one year in
to apply at least


enter A
PLYING
catalog
training t
ply for s
(NOTE
quence


applicants
section o
as well a
o the ind
peclllic in


advance
six month
should r
f the Uni
s consul
imidual ct
formation


a number
professional


and a
hs pri
efer I
iersil


be submitted not


ppllca
ior to
o the
y Cale
portion
to wh
irding


ndergradu
ses begins


more


nts are strongly urged
the date they plan to
DEADLINES FOR AP-
ndar published in this


in of Ihis
iich the
applicati
ale prog
ONLN in


of the junior year ) An applicant who wails until
sible date to file an application may find that it


to furnish the
a decision for


necessary
the term


* catalog per-
intend to ap-
on deadlines
rams, the se-
Ihe Fall Term
il the last pos-
is impossible


supporting records in time to permit
that admission is desired.


In this section are listed the general requirements for ad-
mission of undergraduate transfer students It should be ob-


rida provides numerous op-
SAdmission by which a student
For additional information,
i of this catalog entitled Time
'nilles.
Applicants accepted for admis-
class must indicate their en-
ays alter acceptance.
ent. Entering freshmen are re-
.posit within 30days alter accep-
n University housing The hous-
rvice charge, is refundable until
onted lor admission to the Fall


universles should consult Section 8 whrch foll .
The University of Florida subscribes to the Articulation.
Agreement between the State Universities and Public Junior
Colleges of Florida. Under this agreement, any graduate of a
State approved Florida public junior college is eligible for
admission to non limited access programs at the University if
the student has completed the university parallel program
rnrn rorcml A l ,o I Acc.r .l t m r At rta. mA, rfnlflt.AJ ilk ,4,


1. At least 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours)
demic work exclusive of occupational courses;
2. An approved general education program of at
semester hours (54 quarter hours):
3. A grade point average of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 sy
all college level academic courses attempted.
By law, all applicants seeking admission to a pro


teacher education must submit scores
tilude Test (SAT) or the American Col
scores should be forwarded to the
soon as possible after an application fi
submitted. Some colleges with enroll
quire applicants to submit lest scores
tlion process. When test scores are r


aca-


least 36

'stem on

igram in


on the Scholastic Ap-
lege Test (ACT). These
Admissions Office as
or admission has been
Iment quotas may re-
as a part of their selec-
equired by an Upper


Division college, the applicant will be advised directly by
that college.
Within space and fiscal limitations, applicants who have
satisfied the above minimum requirements will be con-
sidered for admission at the Junior level to an Upper
Division college Such students may be required to take ad-
ditional preprofessional courses not completed at the junior
college. However, such courses will not reduce the number
of credits required in the Upper Division for a degree.

B. TRANSFER APPLICANTS OTHER THAN GRADUATES
FROM A FLORIDA PUBLIC JUNIOR COLLEGE
This section applies to students seeking to transfer from a
Florida public junior college without an Associate in Arts de-
gree in a university parallel program and to all under-
graduate transfer applicants from other colleges or unver-


A transfer applicant should refer to the General Informa-
tion and Colleges sections of this catalog for an eKplanation
of the academic organization ofthe University. -
If an applicant is accepted for admission, courses wh.ich.
reasonably parallel the curriculum of the University Of Flor- .
ida that were completed with grades of ".D" or higher at oth-
er accredited institutions are arceptablefor transfer credit. It
is the prerogative of the college (within the University) that
administers the work for the degree being sought to de-
termine how transfer credit may be used in satisfying that
degree's specific course requirements. Not more than 64
.-- semnese~-h urs o4q ua" n."
from or through a junior college may be applied toward the
total credit hours requirement for a University of Florida de-
gree. Courses completed at a junior college in excess of a to-
tal of 64 semester hours may serve to meet specific course re-
quirements for a University of Florida degree but the credit
hours represented by those courses will not reduce the .
number of credit hours to be completed at the University.


-kuLQIOhIU RU5LI*j*O rcir nfS
This section applies ONLY to students seeking to transfer.
directly from a Florida public junior college with the As-
sociate in Arts degree in a university parallel program. All
ntUalr jiJnflF sn h nlolnl fnaIr .t c nA ^ .* .n nrlrrrd. ..*a I..frAa ls"


1










ADMISSIONS


and eligible tI
tended. A stud
to return to ar
considered for
3. Satisfactory)
of "C" or high
ida) on all wo
attended. No
plete official
graduate work
fice. An official


o return to
ent who for
I institution
admission t


any institi
any reason
previously
to the Univ


ition previously
will not be allow
attended cannot
ersity of Florinda.


record: An applicant must have an average
er (as computed by the University of Flor-
rk attempted at each institution previously
application can be considered until corn-
transcripts of all the applicant's under-
are in the possession of the Admissions Of-
I transcript must be furnished from each in-


stitution attended regardless of length of attendance or
credit earned. Official supplementary transcripts are re-
quired, as soon as they are available, for any work com-
pleted after making application Since an average of "C"
or higher is required for graduation from the University of
Florida, one who has failed to maintain this average at an-
other institution is not eligible for admission Regardless
of the average earned, courses completed at other institu-
tions must reasonably parallel the curriculum at the Uni-


versity


of Florida.


4. Satisfactory


scores.


An applicant who will present


less than 60 semester hours (or 90 quarter hours) of accep-
table college courses (including not more than 4 semester
*hours in Military Science and/or basic required Physical
Education) as credit for advanced standing must present
satisfactory scores on an acceptable general ability test
Any of the following tests may satisfy this requirement If
taken prior to first enrollment in college the Florida


Twelfth Grade Placement
Test (SAT) of the College Er
the American College Teslii
the applicant should furnish
lege Ability Test. College Le
ceptable score on these te'
and quality of academic s
completed prior to transfer


5. Satisfactory
a satisfactory
ficalions"' an


conduct
conduct
applicant


Test, th
nt rance


Aptitu
Board.


ng Program (ACT) Otherwise.
scores on the School and Col-
rvel (SCAT). The minimum ac-
sis will vary with the amount
tudy the applicant vill have


record. An applicant must
record Regardless of olhe
who has experienced ser


p
r


continuing difficulty with school or other authority
cause of improper conduct may find his application
proved.


present
quall-
ous or
es be-
disap-


duce the number of credits required in the Upper Division
for a degree

ADMISSION AS A
POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENT


When to Apply: Applications
year in advance and applicants


be submitted
rged to apply


up to one
as early as


possible. Applications MUST BE SUBMITTED by the dead-
line established for the term Some departments have found
it necessary to establish deadlines for the receipt of applica-
tions and their supporting records that are earlier than the
deadlines established for the University and published in
the catalog All applicants are advised to refer to the DEAD-
LINES FOR APPLYING section of the University Calendar
published in this catalog and to check with the appropriate
department regarding departmental deadlines.


Postbaccalaureate students may wish to e
for any of the following reasons


1. To validate


or unevaluated


undergraduate records from


nroll in courses


non-ac


credited


institutions


2. To expand their academic background,
3. To earn a second bachelors degree, or
4 To complete prerequisite courses for admission to grad-
uate study at some future date


plication
be made


for admission as a
to the Admissions


istrar, on forms supplied bN
erred to the appropriate di
proval. No application will
official transcripts) of all
work are in the possession (
transcript will be consider
directly\ from the Registrai
work was performed Offi


are require
pleated alter
Students


soon as they
applIcation


who desire


lege of Education to
vide the college with
as a part of the requ
dents should contact
formation.


be co
the a
ol the
ed oft
of thI
icial si


postbaccalaureate


Section


>n
PI


s


i, Office of th
pplicatllons
r approval or


sidered
plicanl's


unless'
prior


Admissions Off
Icial unless it
e institution at
upplementary i


,ailable.
filed


postbaccalaureate


for any

status


student
e Reg-
are re-
disap-


s complete
collegiate
ice, and no
is received
which the
ranscript(s)
work com-


in the


obtain teacher certification must pro-
a clear statement of certification goals
irements for admission Interested stu-
the college of Education for further in-


II. Requirements for admission to an Upper Division
College.
With the exception of items 1 and 4, an applicant for ad-
mission to an Upper Division College must satisfy the re-
quirements listed above for admission to the Lower Division


By law. all applicants seeking
division for January, 1983 or later
College Level Academic Skills Pro
seeking admission to a program
submit scores on the Scholastic
American College Test (ACT).
forwarded to the Admissions Off
an application for admission has


leges with enrollment q
mit test scores as a part


mission


to the upper


will be required to take the
igram By law, all applicants
in teacher education must
Aptitude Test (SAT) or the
These scores should be
ice as soon as possible after


submitted.


uotas may require applica
of their selection process


Some col-
nts to sub-
When test


scores are required by an Upper Division college, the ap
cant will be advised directly by that college. In addition,
following requirements must also be satisfied.
1. Advanced Standing credit. An applicant must preser
minimum of 60 semester hours (or 90 quarter hours) of
ceptable college courses, not mole than four seme!
hours of which are in Military Science and/or basic
lured Physical Education as credit for advanced standi


I students
cation for
submit a<
Language
hired for ad


mum TOEFL


whose native tongue is not English
admission as a Posibaccalaureate
acceptablee scores on Test of English a
(TOEFL) 4 minimum TOEFL score
mission to the College of Agriculture.


score


of 550 is required


for admission


tc


making
Student
is a For-
of 500 is
A mini-
I all oth-


er colleges.



ADMISSION TO
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


When to Apply: Applications may


year in advance
possible. Applic
line established
it necessary to e
tons and their
deadlines estab
the catalog All


it a
ac-
ster
re-
ing


propnalte


be submitted


and applicants are urged to apt
actions MUST BE SUBMITTED
for the term. Some department
establishh deadlines for the recei
supporting records that are ea


lished
applic
Iment


for the Unnversity
ants are advised to c
regarding deparnme


k


to one


ply as early as
by the dead-
ts have found
pt of applica-
rlier than the
published in
: with the ap-
deadlines


I


rl




General

ADMISSIONS


lion, and np transcript will be accepted as official unless it is
tiMeled directly fiom the Registrar of the institution in
which the work was done Official supplementary tran-
scripts are required, as soon as they are available, lor any
work completed after making application.


In general, no student wh
credited institution ,ill be co
any unit of the Universit'
All foreign students whose


o is a graduate of a non-ac-
nsidered for graduate study in


native tongue


is not English


making application for admission to the Graduate School of
the Uhiversity of Florida must present their scores on TOEFL
(Testing of English asa Foreign Language). Each applicant is
asked to write TOEFL Educational Testing Ser ice. Prnceton.
New Jersey, US.A. requesting a Bulletin ot Information and
registration form. It is important to remember that final con-
sideration can not be granted a foreign student's application
for admission until his scoreson this test are received by. Ad-
mission Sectiori, Office of The Registrar, University of Flor-
-ida, Gainesville, Florida, U.SA.
Undergraduate Record: Unqualified admissionn to the
Grapdate School is dependent iponthe presentation of a
baccalaureate degree froe lan tcdieaeidto lege or univer-
sity with an average of B for the innlor ari Senior years. In
some "units of the Graduate cho ltI on the more ad-
vanced levels of graduate study an udekgraduate average
considerably above B maybe required In some units admis-
sion may be considered with .an undergraduate average
slightly below B College graduateiadmission selection com-
mittees take into account not onhl the general grade aver-
; age, but the distribution of the course work and the quality
and extent of preparation for the graduate program which
the student proposes to undertake.
While the general admissii requements described
above apply to both master's ar# doca candidates. it
: should be noted that doctoral andidatesnust" meet certain
additi~ nal requirements, which evary :ierding to the pro-
grams 'established ty the degartmtnts and colleges.
Furtherfrore it is desirable or students~ iarW ing to enter
c ertain colleges and departments to have a reading knowl-
edge of one foreign language
Graduate Record Examination 4 satisfactory a erage score
d on the raduae Record Xamination is required for admis-
Sslon. Ech applcantfor admission must submit scores on the
aptitude testoqf the GRE but either at the request of the de-
: partmeritcohet nedorbin his own volition, the applicant is
encouraged t submit n addition the score on one or more
: advanced suil~Jtemtattertests of the GRE. The scores on all
tests t;iair e: weighed in regard to admission
TheCGR Is giiesixltimes a ear in October, December.
Jrnxiipay, Febtiarv. April and June at a great many loca-
tions' in thb United States, including Gainesville, Florida. To
determine exact dates and the most convenient locations,
stcldents should write to the Educational Testing Service.
SPfinceton. New lersey Applications are required several
weeks prior to the examination, and scores are received
aboat a month lfter the examination Hence, it is necessary
toappi to take he GRE in early September for admission to
the Uri iversityin lanuary. in early lanuarn for admission in
May or lune, and in early March for admission in August.
Other GRE examinations are given for w which application
must be made in November, December or May, but the GRE


exammations minicatea aoove are te ones oest correlateo
with the University s admission deadlines
Graduate Study in Business Administration.-Students
applying for admission to the Graduate School for study in
the College of Business Administration may substitute satis-
factory scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test
(GMAT) ior the Graduate Record Examination. Students ap-


_ -J I J I I -


ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY
When to Apply: The Application Request Card for the
American Association of Dental Schools Application Service


(AADSAS) may be obtained after
Admissions, College of Dentistri
be sent directly to the AADSAS.
Iowa 52240. Upon receiving the
the AADSAS the completed fo
ments must be returned directly
October 15 of the year prior to
dental school. Failure to meet th
Dental Admissions Committee fr


May 15, from the Office of
y. The request card should
P. O. Box 1003. lowa'City,
application materials from
rms and supporting docu-
the AADSAS no later than
anticipated enrollment in
is deadline will prevent the
om evaluating your record.


The data compiled by the AADSAS will be carefully eval-
uated by the Dental Admissions Committee and promising
applicants will be sent Formal Application forms which re*
quest additional information. The submission of a pre-
professional committee evaluation or letters of recommen-
dalton from people in academics will not be necessary until
the Formal Application forms are filed. The Formal Applica-
tion forms and supporting materials should be submitted as
early as possible, but no later than November 15 of each ap-
plication 'ear
The College of Dentistry aspires to attract students of the
highest caliber into its various programs. High standards of
scholastic achievement, moral character, and motivation are
expected of the applicant. The student of dentistry must
possess a high basic aptitude supplemented by an academic
preparation of the highest order because of the vast area of
science which must be mastered by the dentist. The highly
personal relationship between patient and dentist places the
latter in a position of trust, which demands maturity, integ-
rity. intellectual honesty, and a sense of responsibility. A
broad representation of the ethnic mixture of the State is
sought in the student body through an active recruitment
program. The College strictly adheres to the principle of
ethnic, racial, religious and social equality among its student
body and faculty
Generally, students applying for admission should plan to
complete the requirements for a bachelor's degree. lHow-
ever. qualified students may be accepted without fulfilling
the degree requirements, provided they show evidence of
sufficient preparation for the study of dentistry. Applicants
with an overall "B" average as a minimum will receive
strongest consideration for admission to the College of Den-
listry.
Every applicant must take the Dental Admission Test,
preferably in the Spring preceding the submission of his In-
itial Application or, at the latest, the Fall testing period. The
test is given twice a year at many college and university test-
ing centers Following a review of all application materials
and Dental Admission Test scores by the Dental Admissions
Committee. inter lews with members of this Committee will
be arranged for competitive applicants.
(See also more detailed description in the College of Den-
tistry bulletin )


ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF LAW


When
in the C
Begin
College


to Apply: Applications can
collegee of Law Catalog.
rnng Students: All applicai
of Law must have receive<


be accepted as indicated

nts for admission to the
i a baccalaureate degree


I - I J


I






ADMISSIONS


ify for admission. All applicants (including present and
former University of Florida students) must register with the
Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS) In lieu of re-
questing transcripts from each institution of higher educa-
tion attended. For more detailed information on admission
to the College of Law, please see the College of Law Catalog.
Advanced Sltnding Students: For information on admis-
sion to the College of Law with advanced standing see the
College of Law Catalog.


ADMISSION TO
THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
When to Apply: Because the number of places in the first
year class of the College of Medicine is limited, it is impor-
tant that a candidate make application as early as possible
during the Summer or Fall of the year preceding his in-
tended date of entry.
Personal qualities of high order character, responsibility
and'maturity are the primary requirements for admission.
The student must have demonstrated superior intellectual
achievement. A bachelor's degree is strongly recommended.
The quality of the academic background as well as the per-
formance of the student in relation to the load attempted.
will be weighed. A genuine interest in human welfare is im-
portant. Efficient methods of study and effective powers of
reasoning are essential
The College admits both men and women. A limited
number of out-of-state students, in proportion to the
number in the University as a whole, may be admitted. Stu-
dents who have failed academically or are ineligible to con-
tinue in another medical school will not be admitted.
Applications from students who are presently enrolled in
another medical school will be considered provided (1) Ihe
student is eligible to continue in his present medical school,
(2) the school he is now attending is a member of the As-
sociation of American Medical Colleges, and (3) space is
available.
Prospective applicants must take the Medical College Ad-
missions Test, preferably, by the Spring preceding the sub-
mission of the application. A personal interview will be re-
quired for final acceptance.


Graduate students who are candidates for the Ph.I
agree in medical sciences should apply through the Gra
School.
(See also more detailed description in the College of
icine catalog)


D. de-
iduate

Med-


would be desirable for a person considering application as a
special student to initiate such an application at least three
months in advance of the term he wishes to enter, in order
to allow time for additional evidence to be presented if it
should be requested by the Admissions Committee.
Special students may be admitted to the various schools
and colleges of the Upper Division only by approval of the
University Admissions Committee Each case will be con-
sidered on an individual basis Applications for admission as


a special student must include: (1) records of prev
national experience (high school or college transcri
statement as to the type of studies to be pursued.
statement of the reason or reasons for selecting
program other than a regular one, (4) satisfactory
of ability to pursue these studies for example, a
enroll as a special student for some technical co


'ious edu-
pts). (2) a
(3) a brief
a special
evidence
student to
urses and


who feels qualified to do so by reason of employment or
other experience: (5) satisfactory scores on such ability or
achievement tests as may be prescribed n individual cases
by the University Admissions Committee.

ADMISSION AS
A TRANSIENT STUDENT
Subject to availability of faculty, space and facilities, a reg-
ular undergraduate student in good standing at another ac-
credited collegiate institution may be permitted to enroll at
the University of Florida as a transient student in order to
complete work to transfer back to the parent institution. No
evaluation will be made of work previously completed and
it is the student's responsibility to secure such approval as
the parent institution may require.


Transient students are registered as
dents and no application for admission
propriate forms for enrolling as a NO
should be requested from the Office of
registration is subject to the availability o
enroll as a non-degree student cannot b
first day of classes in the term for which
to enroll.
Credit earned in e NON-DEGREE 5
matically applicable to a University of Fli
the student later be admitted in a regulh
as a NON-DEGREE student in no way in
sion as a regular student to the Universi


NON-DEGREE
is required. Th
N-DEGREE sti
the Registrar
if space, appro'
e given prior t
the student w


slu-
e ap-
Jdent
Since
val to
o the
iishes


status is not auto-
onda degree should
ar status. Admission
iplies future admis-
ity of Florida.


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION,


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE
OF VETERINARY MEDICINE
When to Apply: Application forms are available between
September 1 and December 1 from the Office of the Dean
for Student Services. College of Veterinary Medicine. The
application package (residency status, application forms.
fees, letters of recommendation. GRE scores, etc) must be
received by the Admissions Office by 4-30 P.M.. December
15, for the applicant to be considered for admission.
Candidates seeking admission to programs leading to the
Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree with em-
phasis on animal disease problems should apply through the
Graduate School
(See also the section on the College of Veterinary Medi-
cine on page 187.)


AND SOCIAL SECURITY


The University of Florida is
and training of veterans under
i.e., Chapter 31, Title 38. US
Chapter 32. Title 38, U.S. Coc
distance Program), Chapter 34,
G.I Bill), and Chapter 35, TitI
Deceased or Disabled Veter,
eligible for educational benefit
istration program are urged to (
ministration representative as
versity. Students expecting to
these programs must file an
certification can be made un
Benefits are determined by the


approved for the education
alr publicws nowi f effect,
i Code (Disabled Veterans):
de (Veterans Educational As-
Title 38. U.S Code (Cold War
e 38, U.S. Code (Children of
ins). Students who may be
Is under any Veterans Admin-
contact the local Veterans Ad-
soon as accepted by the Uni-
receive benefits under one of
application for benefits. No
til the application is on file
Veterans Administration and


the University certifies according to their rules and
lalltions.


regu-


_ I I I





General

ADMISSIONS


ADMISSION INFORMATION FOR

FOREIGN STUDENTS


All foreign students whose native tongue is not English
making application for admission to the University of Florida
must present their scores on TOEFL (Test of English as a For-
eign Language) Each applicant is asked to write TOEFL. Edu-
cational Testing Service, Prnnceton, New jersey, U.S.A.. re-
questing a Bulletin of Information and registration form. It is
important to remember that final consideration cannot be
granted a foreign student's application for admission until


his scores on this test are received by: Admission Section,
Office of the Registrar. University "of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida, 32611, U.S.A.

Foreign students whose native tongue is English will be re-
quired to submit test results as indicated in the appropriate
sections of this catalog before an application for admission
will be considered. Undergraduate students should submit
scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American
College Test (ACT). Graduate applicants should submit
scores on the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) or the
Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) as appro-
priate.


.. . .;*
, :/ d,:|.i ,84:'.. ) .J": |^ ^K '



m:


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w /


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;.; bF,,r : ,jj-,IP"~;ii"i;":,H;"r~;;l ;;I ~l;i(FaSxe~tl:~~~~~"~

.




S. ,


General


EXPENSES


Expenses


Is the sa
151(e)(1)
of 1954.
Revenue
reference


me as a
(2)(3) an
A copy
Code of


dependent as defined in
d (4) ol the Internal Revenu
of these provisions in the
1954 is incorporated in this


sections
ie Code
Internal
rule by


APPLICATION FEE


* Each application (pr admission to the University must be
accompanied by an application fee of 115.00. Application
fees are nonrefundable. Further instructions will be found in
the Admissions section of this catalog.



GENERAL
STUDENTS SHOULD BRING SUFFICIENT FUNDS. OTHER
THAN PERSONAL CHECKS TO MEET THEIR IMMEDIATE


NEEDS. Pe
amount of


checks


will be accepted


for the


CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS-
FLORIDA OR NON-FLORIDA


(Section 6C-7.05? Florida Administrative Code)
(1) For the purpose of assessing registration
fees, a student shall be classified as a "Florid
Florida" student
(a) A "Florida student" is a person who has
and who shall have resided in the state of F


least twelve (12) consecultie months
ceding the first day of classes of the
which the student enrolls In deter
the university may require evidence si
tration, driver's license, automobile
lion of bank account, rent receipts or,
materials as evidence that the applica


continuous


residency


Continuous


and tuition
a" or "non-


domicile in
londa for at


immediately pre-
academic term in
mining residency,
uch as voter regis-
registration loca-
an\ other rele, anl
nt has maintained


residency


require the physical presence of a student
twelve month period. If such a student
shall mean that the parent or parents, or I
of the student shall have domicile mn and
in the state of Florida for the penod stated
ida student" classification shall also be co
elude students who hold an Immigration


does not


for the entire
is a minor, it
egal guardian
have resided
above. "Flor-
nstrued to in-
and Natural-


exact


6. 4 "non-Florida" student is a
the requirements of subsection
(2) In all applications for admission


institution on a space
or if a minor, the parent
plicant,. shall make and


available
t or legal
file with


basis,


I


statement, under oath, that the
citizen, resident, and domichlarl
entitled as such to classification a
der the terms and conditions prn
dents, and domiciliaries of -the si
to "Florida student" classiticatno
evidence as stated in 6C-705(1)


tearing


person not meeting
(a) above.
or registration at the


a Florida applicant.


guardian of the minor ap-
such application a written
applicant is a bonafide
y of the state of Florida.
is a "Florida student" un-
escrlbed for citizens, resi-
tate ol Florida All claims


must be s
requested


ported by
the regis-


authority.


(3) A "non-Florida student" or. if a minor,
guardian, after having been a resident and
Florida for twelve (12) consecutive months,
and be granted reclassification prior to ih
classes of any subsequent term: provided,


those students who are non-
the United Slates on a non-
entitled to reclassification
ification as a "Florida stude
visions of subsection (2) ab
been classified as a "non-FIc
einal enrollment shall furr


6C-7.05(1) to the
that the applicant
the stale for the t
dence for tuition


resident


imm
An
hnt"
iove
rnda
uish


satisfaction
has maintal


welve


months


purposes


aliens


migration


his parent or
domiciliary of
may apply for
e first day of
however, ltha
or who are in


visa will not


application
shall comply
An applica
' student at
evidence a
the registeril
I continuous


uired to i
absence


In the


for reclass-
y with pro-
nt who has
lime of on-
s stated in
ng authority
residency in
establish resi-


of such


evi-


dence. the applicant shall not be reclassified as a "Florida
student." If the request for reclassification and the neces-
sary documentation is not received by the registrar prior to
the last day of registration for the term in which the stu-
dent intends to be reclassified, the student will not be re-
classified for that term.


(4) Unless
presumed b
which a stu
(a) The
eligible f
wise ent
This pro'


ization Form 1-151. Resident Alien Registration Receipt
Card, or Cuban Nationals or Vietnamese Refugees who
are considered as Resident Aliens, provided such stu-
dents meet the residency requirement stated above
and comply with subsection (2" below. The burden of
establishing facts which justify classification of a stu-
dent as a resident and domiciliary entitled to "Florida
student" registration rates is on the applicant for such
classification.
(b) In applying this policy"
1. "Student" shall mean a person admitted to the in-
stitution or a person allowed to register at the institu-
tion on a space available basis.
2. "Minor" shall mean a person who has not attained
the age of 18 years, and whose disabilities of minority
have not been removed by reason of marriage or by a
court of competent jurisdiction.
3. "Domicile" for fee paying purposes shall denote a
person's true,- fixed, and permanent home and place
of habitation. It is the place where the applicant lives


who are
States on


evidence to the contrary
y the registering authority
dent is registering that:


spouse 4
or classic
titled to
vision w


n-reside
non-im


any person
action as a "
assilfcation
not apply
ent aliens or
migration vi


appears, it shall be
ol the institution at


who is classified or is
Florida student" is like-
as a "Florida student."
in the case of students
who are in the United
sa


(b) If an applicant's eligibility for classification as a
"Florida student" is based on the residency of the
spouse the spouse shall make and tile with the applica-
tion a written statement under oath, that said person is
the spouse of the applicant and a bonafide citizen, resi-
dent and domiciliary o1 the slate of Florida, entitled as
such to classification as a "Florida student."
(c) No person over the age of 18 years shall be deemed
to have gained residence while attending any educa-
tional nslitution in this state as a full-time student, as
such status is defined by the Board of Regents. in the
absence of a clear demonstration thai he has estab-
lished domicile and residency in the state, as provided
under subsection (3) above
(d) Any "Florida student" who remains in the stale, af-
ter his parent previously domiciled in Florida or sta-
tioned in Florida on military orders removes from this
state, shall be entitled to remain classified as a "Florida


I




4 ..*

General

EXPENSES


mal academic year in order to render his attendance
"continuous "
(5) Appeal from a determination denying Florida student
status to any applicant therefore may be initialed after ap-
propriate administrative remedies are exhausted by the fil-
ing of a pelitlon for review pursuant to Section 120.68 F.S.
in the Districl Court of Appeal in the appellate district in
which the institution maintains itS hea8altbuaftMe tiblr


a parry resides
(6) Any student granted
which status is based on a
shall, upon determination
such disciplinary sanctions
idet Of the urPsersity


status s a "Florida student,"'
sworn statement which is false
of such falsity, be sublecl to
as may be imposed by the pres-


(7) ~ iipecal tigries--The following categories shall be
treated as liorida residents for tumtonpurposes it ade-.
quiatedocumenlatlion is provided
Sa) :member of the Armed Services of the United
States ho is stationed in Florida on acute duty
pu p uantt -militaNv ordered ie" spou an dependent
students
(b) A veteran of the .rmed Forces of the United States
of America with twenty (20) or more years of active mul-
itary service, including the spouse and dependent slu-
dents of such veteran's immediate family, provided that
t he veteran is mnFfloida at time oa rebrement-orEmoves
to Florida within one year following retirement and
files a declaration of Florida domicile
(c) Full-lime elementary, secondary, and community
college faculty members under current teaching con-
tracts in the state of Florida and their spouses and de-
pendent students
(d) Tu l-ti-me facufly, administrative and professional
and career service employees of the University System
and their spouses and dependent students


(e) A student certified by his respective state for partici-
pation in the Academic Common Market Program of
the Southern Regional Education Board who is enrolled
in a program approved by the Florida Board of Regents
(f) Florida domiciliaries living in the Panama Canal
Zone who have not established domicile elsewhere, in-
cluding the spouse and dependent students
(g) Florida residents who had their residency in Florida
interrupted by service in the U S. armed forces, the
Peace Corps or other similar volunteer organizations
fostered by the United States government shall be de-
emed to have had residency in Florida during limes of
service in the aforementioned organizations
(8) Reciprocal Agreements. The Board of Regents may
enter into agreements with appropriate agencies and in-
stitutions of higher education in other states and foreign
countries providing for the reciprocal exchange of stu-
dents enrolled and prospective in Higher educational in-
stitutions to facilitate utilization of public higher educa-
tional institutions in this State and other states or coun-
tries Such agreements may include provisions for waiver
or reduction of non-resident tuition for designated cate-
gories of students and ma, include contractual payments
to such other state or country. subject to the availability of
appropriations. Such agreements shall have as their
purpose the mutual improvement of educational advan-
rages for residents of this Slate and such other states or
countries with whom agreements may be made

To establish Florida residence a student applying for ad-
mission should complete the residence affidavit on the ap-
nir.*l rnn fnrfm,


statement from the personnel office as to his or her .bn-.
ployment status.



ION OF I
Registration consists of three major components:
1. The registrant must supply information requested by
the university for the purpose of establishing and adminis-
tering academic, financial and community relationships
between the university and the student;
2. The registrant must supply course and schedule in- i
formation needed to establish and administer his

tons,
3. The registrant must pay all assessed registration and tui-
lion fees as well as satisfy all current 'or delinquent
amut paal ote nvriy


REGISTRATION AND


The University Calendar appearing at the front of I~is
Catalog sets forth the beginning and ending dales of each
semester.
Fees are payable on the dates lasted in the University of
Florida Calendar appearing at the front of the CataloB or the

vance Registration. Payment of fees is an integral part of the
registration process. Registration (including payment of
fees) must be completed on or before the proper due date.
Student Financial Serices. The Hub, must be provided a
properly executed authorization for payment in cases where
fees are to be paid by a previously approved loan, scholar-

FEE LIABILITY
LIABILITY IS INCURRED FOR ALL CREDIT HOURS REMAIN-
ING ON A STUDENT'S SCHEDULE AT THE CLOSE OF THE
DROP/ADD PERIOD EACH SEMESTER.
ASSESSMENT OF FEES
Students must assess and pay their own lees. UNIVERSITY
PERSONNEL WILL NOT BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE FOR
PROPER ASSESSMENT OR MATHEMATICAL ACCURACY OF
CALCULATIONS
FEE STRUCTURE WAS UNDER REVISION AT THE TIME OF
THIS PRINTING FEE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED
AFTER JULY 1. 1982 BY CONTACTING STUDENT FINAN-
CIAL SERVICE. ROOM 100 THE HUB. GAINESVILLE, FLOR-
IDA 32611. (This includes all fees and medical, denial or vet-
erenar programs and the student health fee.)
NOTE: A student who is registered for twelve (12) hours per
semester is considered as full-time for purposes of Student
Financial Aid


STATE EMPLOYEES
FREE COURSE ENROLLMENT
Detailed information on the waiver of registration fees for
permanent full-time employees of the state may be ob-
tained from the Office of the Registrar.
Those who have been employed on a permanent full-time
hat.l fnr .a Ip.lat uiir mnnthl may he npl-mitrod ton nrnll fnr




. , ,
,!
..


EXPENSES


WAIVER OF HEALTH AND STUDENT
ACTIVITY AND SERVICE FEES
The University Controller may waive the Student Health
Fee-aand the Service and Activity Fee for students partici-
pating in such off-campus credit programs as the Mexican
Law Summer Program and the Utrecht Program.
These fees may also be waived at the discretion of the
Controller for those whose-studies required them to be off-
cartpus for an.entire semester or for such a duration as to
- predude their use of university facilities funded from these
fees.


A request for approval of such a waiver should be on-
ginated-by the dean or department chairman in charge of
the program upon request from the student enrolled in the
program.
Approved waivers must be delivered to Student Financial


Services, the HUB, prior to the deadline for fee payments
shown in the front of this catalog for the semesters re-
quested. Waivers of this type will not be processed after this
date. nor shall refunds be issued.
CANCELLATION AND REINSTATEMENT.
1. The university will cancel the registration of a student
whose fee account for enrolled instructional courses is in
arrears beyond the close of business on the twenty-eighth
day after the opening day of classes. A student whose reg-
istration is cancelled is not entitled to a refund beyond the
circumstances covered under the refund policy.
2. Reinstatement will require approval of the university,
payment of all delinquent liabilities and may include
payment of a reinstatement fee of $25.00. At no time will
a student be assessed more than 525.00 per term in late
fees.
A student whose registration has been cancelled or
flagged must request a reinstatement letter or request his
records be cleared at Student Financial Services, the HUB.
To expedite reinstatement, the student should deliver the
letter to Registrar Records, Room 34. Tigert Hall.
DEADLINES
Students are reminded that deadlines are enforced strictly
The Unvnersity does not have the authority to waive ihe
late and/or reinstatement fees unless it has been de-
termined that the University is primarily responsible for
delinquency in a student account or that extraordinary cir-
cumstances warrant such waiver.
LOCAL ADDRESS
IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE STUDENT TO BE SURE
THAT A CORRECT CURRENT LOCAL ADDRESS IS ON
FILE WITH THE REGISTRAR AT ALL TIMES. Change of Ad-
dress forms may be obtained from the Registrar's Office.
PICTURE i.Da
A CURRENT VALID PHOTO I.D. MUST BE PRESENTED IN
ORDER TO'TRANSACT BUSINESS AT THE OFFICE OF
STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES AND TO CASH CHECKS
AT THE STUDENT UNION AND CAMPUS BOOKSTORE.


SPECIAL FEES AND CHARGES
AUDIT FEE. Fees fof audited courses are the same as
listed above for Florida students. The audit fee is the
for Florida and non-Florida students.


COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION
are administered on campus or
month. Applications should be
Instructional Resources, 1012
before the day a test is to be gi
nation as 522 00 Checks should
Examination Program


N PROGRAMS Examinations
n the third Saturday ol every
* completed in the Office of
GPA, fifteen working days
ven The fee for each exami-
be payable to College Level


GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION The Aptitude Test of
the Graduate Record Examination is required for admission
to the Graduate School A fee of $20.00 covers the cost of this
examination These fees are payable to the Educational Test-
ing Service, Pnnceton, New Jersey 08540.
GRADUATE SCHOOL FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEST. All stu-
dents wishing to be certified as proficient in a reading


knowledge of French, German,


or Spanish, must take the Ed-


ucational Testing Service (ETS) Graduate School Foreign
Language Tests A fee of $12 50 co ers the cost of each exam-
ination. This fee is payable at Student Financial Services. The
Hub Administrative arrangements to register for this exami-
nation will be made through the Graduate School Office.
LIBRARY BINDING CHARGE Candidates for a graduate de-
gree with a thesis or dissertation pay a $14.00 charge for the
permanent binding of the two copies deposited mn the Uni-
versity of Florida Library. This charge is payable at Student
Financial Services. The Hub. by the dale specified in the
Graduate Catalog A copy of the receipt must be presented
at the Graduate School office
The above charges may be subject to change without notice


REFUND OF FEES
1. Fees will be refunded in full for-
a Credit hours dropped during the drop/add period
b. Courses cancelled by the University
2 With the exception of amounts required for collection un-
der bond and Irust obligations, fees may be refunded in in-
stances of:
a Involuntary call to active duly
b Death of a student.
c Illness of the student ol such duration or severity, as
confirmed by a physician, that completion of the quarter
is precluded, or
d Exceptional circumstances, upon approval of the Unim-
versity President
Refunds may be requested at Student Financial Services,
Room 114. the HUB. Proper documentation must be pres-
ented when a refund is requested. A waiting period for pro-
cessing may be required REFUNDS ARE NOT APPLIED AU-
TOMATICALLY AGAINST CURRENT OR SUBSEQUENT FEE
LIABILITIES.


PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS
All students' accounts are due and payable at Student Fi-
nancial Services. The Hub, at the time such charges are in-
curred.
University regulations prohibit registration, graduation.
granting of credit or release of transcript for any student
whose account with the University is delinquent.




* .: i'. .
S : "V ,
\ - ^.:: -:.f -


Student Affairs
rhe following information describes the responsibilities of
the vanous offices charged with assistance to students at the
University of Florida. Additional information may be found
in THE FLORIDA STUDENT GUIDE and THE CAMPUS DI-
RECTORY



VICE PRESIDENT FOR
STUDENT AFFAIRS
The Office at the vice President for Student Affairs is a
focal point for student concerns and strives to make the ed-
ucational experience lor students at the Universily of Florida
as meaningful as possible The Vice President for Student Af-
fairs works to maintain and improve good communications
and working relationships among and between students.
faculty, and administration
The goals of Ihe Dvision of Student Affairs include: de-
veloping effective and efficient services and programs for
students through the various departments within StudenI
Affairs; integrating student affairs and academic affairs;
directly involving students in the affairs of the institution,
encouraging a sense of community among students, faculty.
and administration, and increasing accessibility to and at-
tractiveness of the University of Florida to a wide 'ariely of
persons
The Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is lo-
cated in 123 Tigert Hall and is open to assisi individual stu-
dents and groups in matters concerning them. All students
are encouraged to share in the responsibility for enabling
the various divisions of the University of Florida community
to meet the needs of students
The Office of the \ ice President for Student Affairs has ad-
ministrative responsibility for the following offices and pro-
grams at the Universlty of Florida Office for Student Sera-
ices, Student Housing Office. Office for Student Financial
Affairs, Career Resource Center. I Wa yne Reitz Union. and
University Counseling Center

OFFICE FOR
STUDENT SERVICES
The basic commitment of the Office of the Dean for Stu-
dent Services at the University, of Florida is to the total devel-
opment of each individual student so that he or she might
achieve full potential as a human 'being Staff members strive
to help students become self-directive in all their activities.
The purposes of the Office for Student Services are to con-
tribute to the attainment of Ihe educational goals of the Uni-
versity of Florida by: helping to structure appropriate experi-
ences for the intellectual, psychological, social and physical


develop
meet st
dents in
students
of the I
tions of
opment


iment of each
udents' need
the deselopm
s aware of and
university. inter
the institution
of a sense of


and staff; helping stud


student; providing opportunities to
for personal attention, assisting stu-
ent of their career objectives; making
encouraging the use of the resources
'preting the goals, objectives and ac-
to students; encouraging the devel-
community among students, faculty
ents to develop purpose in their lives


- a system of values of which they are aware and a sense of
personal integrity, and assisting in the development of uni-
versity policy and procedures
Functions emerge from purposes, and the Office for Stu-


The International Student Center and the Institute- of
Black Culture are also operational units of the Office for 5tu-
dent Services.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES
The International Student Services Center assists inlerna-
tional students in adjusting to the changing life style and
study habits in a new and sometimes perplexing environ-
ment. Special services are provided related to foreign educa-
tional and cultural backgrounds, language, legal, eMt-
ployment, academic, and personal matters; U.S. immigration,
and other government agency responsibilities as aliens; and
currency exchange. The focus is on helping international
students achieve their educational goals, while providing an
insight into the culture of the United States through a pro-
gram of social activities, orientation seminars, and com-
munity visits
INSTITUTE OF BLACK CULTURE
The Institute of Black Culture is an educational tool for
students at the University of Florida. It is a facility for en-
lightenment and black awareness where Afro-Americans can
focus on their history, literature, art, culture, and life style. It
is also a place where whites can develop a better under-
standing of blacks and an appreciation of black contribu-
tions to American society. The center sponsors programs, ex-
hibits, and related activities.
SERVICES FOR HANDICAPPED STUDENTS
The Office for Student Services provides assistance for dis-
abled students. Services are varied dependent on individual
needs, and include but are not limited to: special campus
orientation, registration assistance, securing auxiliary learn-
ing aids, and assistance in general University activities. Stu-
dents with disabilities are encouraged to contact this office
to obtain any needed assistance


STUDENT HOUSING
The University of Florida offers its resident students a
unique and exciting residence hall program. It is our belief
that living on campus is a profitable educational experience
that the students will long remember Our desire is to pro-
vide accommodations and programs to meet the needs of
our students while promoting the overall educational goals
and objectives of the University
The University of Florida has a large resident population
composed of both in-state and out-of-state students, as well
as students from 90 different foreign countries. Since our
students come from differing environmental backgrounds
and social experiences, they bring with them varying needs
and expectations. Because of this diversity in our student
bod'. we feel it would be a disservice to our students to take
a unilateral approach in developing our residence hall pro-
gram Therefore, we have developed a program based upon
alternatives and choices. Our students may select from vari-
ous housing accommodations and environments the style
that best fits their needs


GENERAL INFORMATION
All freshmen who apply for admission to the University


receive
mission.


a Housing Application Card upon approval of


The University
Entering students


of Florida has no residency requirement.
are free to choose either on-campus or


I.
S .

. .






STUDENT AFFAIRS


the Director of Housing for assignment to University Hous-
ing facilities, or (2) obtaining accommodations in private
housing (see Off Campus Housing).
All correspondence concerning application for University
housing should be addressed to the Director of Housing,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32611. An applica-
tion for residence hall space for students other than
freshmen may be filled at any time after an application for
admission to the University has been approved. Prospective
students are urged to apply as early as possible because of
the housing demand.
For all students other than beginning freshmen, applica-
tion requests are considered first-come, first-served, on a
space-available basis.
Roommate requests shall be considered if the individuals
wishing to room together submit their applications on the
same date, clearly indicate their desire to room together on
their respective applications, elect the same visitation choice
and assignment option, and are within similar academic
classification.
Accessible housing is available for handicapped students.
Students with special needs should indicate these needs on
application requests.
ROOM STYLES
There are several room styles to fit the individual student's
preference. The most prevalent is the double room, accom-
modating two students, with central floor bath facilities
Doubles are found in every area except Beaty Towers and
range from air-conditioned units with phones in Hume Hall.
to rooms with bay windows in Murphree
All rooms have individual closets, storage space, dresser.
bed and mattress, study desk and chairs.
Room rates vary. depending on such features as air condi-


tioning, phone service, and floor space.
for specific charges.


See rental rate chart


Beaty Towers provide apartment living on campus These
two-bedroom apartments are fully contained with their own
bathroom, study, kitchen, and two separate bedrooms for
four students. Each apartment is fully carpeted, air condi-
tioned, and has a telephone.
The Murphree Residential Area offers suites for two stu-
dents. These non-air-conditioned facilities offer the student
more individual living space. Each suite is made up of two
rooms one designed as a study and living area, the other
as a bedroom with a lavatory.
THE RESIDENCE HALL STAFF
AND STUDENT GOVERNMENT
A full complement of professional and para-professional
staff members is available to assist students in becoming a
part of campus life. The staff in residence act as referral
agents in acquainting students with the many resources of
the University. Our staff are also involved in a range of ac-
tivities, from initiating social and intramural athletic pro-
grams to supplementing the various academic and develop-
mental programs. In addition, staff members supervise and
enforce policies designed to create an atmosphere con-
ducive to learning and growth.
Each floor or section is supervised by an undergraduate
Resident Assistant, the RA. Working in close conjunction


with the RA is
ordinates Ihe
environment
for Residence
sponsible for
functions will


* a graduate student, the Hall Director, who co-
area activities and insures, through the RAs. an
for learning. The Assistant Director of Housing
Life is a professional staff member and is re-
the overall administrative and educational
hin the residence area. The entire housing staff


lional life


The Inter


lished to help stimulate thi
the collective interests of all
lion also serves as a channel
idence area government
munity. and other outside
program at both the hall an
opportunity to help establish
to assist in the planning of
for their fellow students


Residence Hall Association


was estab-


s participation. IRHA represents
resident students The organiza-
of communication between res-
councils. the University com-
interests This self-government
d area levels offers residents the
h guidelines for group living and
social and educational activities


GENERAL SERVICES
TELEPHONES. A telephone is conveniently located in each
student room except in Buckman Co-op Each room tele-
phone provides 24-hour service on campus and within the
Gainesville area. cost of local service is included in the rental
rate Charges for long-distance calls are billed monthly to
each room by Southern Bell. and each student is responsible
for paying directly to the telephone company.
FOOD SERVICE. The Division of Housing is not directly af-
filiated with the University Food Service, and meals are not


included
lion Matl
cafetena
Hume H
located i
located i
Medical


in the housing rent
hias, a private food se
s and snackbars on c
all and Broward Hall
n Tolbert Hall and G
in lohnson Hall, the
Center It is the polio


payment. However. Servoma-
rrvice operation, does maintain
:ampus and oilers meal plans.
have cafeterias Snackbars are
raham Hall Cafeterias are also
Reitz Student Union, and the
v of the University to provide


well-prepared food at the lowest possible price.
REFRIGERATOR RENTAL. Some residence areas have a re-
frigerator in every room, and cost is included in the room
rent. If students bring their own refrigerators, they must
make arrangements for installation and removal No refund
will be granted if a student brings his refrigerator to a hall al-


ready furnishing such units
CUSTODIAL SER% ICE. Eac
has a staff of experienced CL
cleaning of public areas, bal
Other specific tasks are dc
housekeeping throughout tI
is the responsibility of each
INTERNAL' SECURITY
monitored by the residence


curilty general
Department.
patrol the are


Iv is the respol
Trained Housi
as immediately


VENDING Various vendi
cated in all residence halls
students desiring such serve


h residence hall (except co-ops)
islodians assigned to do general
throoms, lounges, and hallways.
ne in order to maintain good
he halls Student room cleaning
resident
Residence hall security is
hall stallff, external building se-
nsibility of the University Police
ng Division Securitly Assistants
adjacent to the residence halls.


ng machines are conveniently lo-
for the comfort and pleasure of
'ices.


LAUNDRY FACILITIES. Coin-operated washers and dryers
are provided in each residence area Most students provide
their own irons; however, some area governments provide
irons on a check-out basis. Ironing boards are located on all
floors

SPECIAL HOUSING AREAS: CO-OP,
HONORS, SCHOLARSHIP, GRAD, FAMILY
Recognizing the diversity of students' needs, the Division
of Housing offers several different living environments.


New students a
rooms when first
campus they may
financial needs m
three cooperative
These co-ops offe
dent participation
lent of approxima


are assigned primarily to double


or triple


applying to the University, but once on
qualify for specialized areas Students with
ay interview for membership in one of the
li ing areas Reid. Buckman. or North Hall
'r reduced rental rates in exchange for stu-
in the daily operational tasks, an equiva-
ilely thirty hours per semester.




* .* !. > .1*


' .: X.
...............................................................................................


General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


and the Honors Hall. contact the Director of Honors Pro-
ram (tele hone (904) 392-1521)
UpperDivision and graduate students residing on campus
generally tive in apartments in Beaty Towers. Four students
share an apartment with two bedrooms, complete kitchen
and private bath. Apartments in Schucht Village are also
valuable to students, with priority being given to students in
medial or dental school


FAMILY STUDENT HOUSING
FamiyHousing apartments are reserved for married stu-
dents antheiF children (if any), and student parents with-
Sut spouses wia have dependent minor children under
Their le care or Tho qualify under the provisions of Feder-
SalRe gultiaon Title IX
: studentt must have applied for admission to the Univer-
sity of Florida prior to applying for on-campus family stu-
dlnt heouSing He/she must be registered as a full-time stu-
dent as defined by his/her college or school during the
semester in which housing is desired in order to qualify for
a family housing apartment assignment. In order to maintain
occupancy, the student must make normal progress toward
a degree as determined by his/her college or school. As ap-
plicable, proof of marriage will be required, or the necessary
documents to SOlpo;r t;at a minor children) is in the legal
mre of a student parent Without a spouse
Family housing facilities consist of one- and two-bedroom
Spa twents afei townhouses and efficiencies. These units
come furnished, unfurnished, air conditioned and non-air
conditioned. Most all Family Housing villages are located on
campus or within a mile and a half of the University's main
campus
Family income limits are set by the Department of Hous-
ing and Urban Development For Maguire Village only. There
are no income limits for Corry, Diamond. Tanglewood, or
University Village South.
For additional information, write or call Division of Hous-
ing. Farminr Housing Office. Unirersitv^ of Florida.
Gainesville, 32611, telephone (904) 392-2176

OFF CtA&"PUHOUSING
The Housing Office functions as a listing and referral
agency for privately owned rental housing of all types listed
with the University for referral to students, faculty, and staff.
SThis office maintains extensive listings of apartments.
houses, rooming units. Irailers, and trailer park lots offered
for rent to students, faculty, and staff Each spring, the office
compiles a comprehensive list of malor apartment and
rooming unit developments. This list is available to anyone
who requests it in person or by mail from the Off Campus
Housing clerk
It is recommended that a personal inspection of the rental
facility and a conference with the owner (or agent) be made
prior to making a deposit or signing a lease agreement. Per-
sons seeking off-campus housing should plan to arrive in
Gariesville well in advance ol the semester in which hous-
ing is needed. For example. Fall Semester arrangements are
possible as early as April, Spring Semester after mid-Novem-
ber, etc. For best results, visit during the week not week-
ends after preliminary information on available rentals


has been obtained.
Landlord/tenant problems
Government's attorney, Room
IdlfA 1I1' 1'1'


handled by Student
Reitz Union, telephone


STUDENT FINANCIAL AFFAIRS
The Office for Student Financial Affairs provides financial
assistance and counseling for students who need help in
paying college expenses. Financial aid is awarded according
to each individual's need in relation to. college costs. Awards
may include loans, grants, scholarships, or part-time em-,
ployment and may be offered to students singly or in various
combinations. Evidence of financial need is determined by
the College Scholarship Service on the basis of the financial
information provided in the Financial Aid Form.
The application period for financial aid is january 1
through March 1 for the academic year beginning the follow-
ing August. Applications submitted after March 1 are ac-
cepted on a funds available basis only. A new application for
financial aid must be submitted each year. Financial Aid Ap-
plications may be obtained by writing to the Office of STU-
DENT FINANCIAL AFFAIRS, Room 111, Anderson Hall.
Applicants for financial assistance must complete a Col-
lege Scholarship Service Financial Aid Form (FAF) and Af-
fidavit of Educational Purpose. Undergraduate students
must apply for the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant by
checking Box 1, Item 41 on the FAF. An official award cannot
be made until the student has been accepted for admission
to the University of Florida. However, he/she should not
wait for notice of acceptance but should apply as soon as
possible after January 1. Aid for graduate students through
the Office for Student Financial Affairs is limited to part-
time employment and certain loan programs. Applications
for other aid; e.g., fellowships, assistantships and loans,
should be made to the head of the department of the
student's major or the Dean of the Graduate School.


Loans
Loans are available in two forms. Long-term loans are low
interest loans with payment deferred until the student grad-
uates, withdraws, or changes his or her status as a full-time
student. A full-time student carries a minimum of 12 hours
far flnan:ciPat-aidu- rpu erShoratrritar l pt
loans available to meet temporary needs recipients must be
full-time students in good standing with the University of
Florida. The maximum amount that may be bowowed in any
semester is SOO, or the amount of in-state Fees. Short-term
loan repayment must be made by the first day of the last
month of the semester in which the loan is obtained.

Grants
Financial assistance in the form of grants from Federal and
State sources is available to undergraduate students. Such
grants require financial need and do not have to be repaid
by the student.

Scholarships
Approximately 400 scholarships are awarded through the
Office for Student Financial Affairs to the most outstanding
undergraduate students showing financial need as de-
termined by the College Scholarship Service. Funds for the
scholarship programs are, of course, limited and in most
cases amount to $750 per year. Additional scholarships are
available to incoming freshmen through the Office of Ad-
missions and to undergraduates in general through individ-
ual colleges Awards are also available from private donors
who select the recipient directly. Students should consult
the resources of their home community, civic clubs, service
organizations and county educators.


I I


I.






STUDENT AFFAIRS


CAREER RESOURCE CENTER
The Caredr Resource Center provides career development.
job placement, and cooperative education programs for all
University of Florida students and alumni.
The objective of the Center is to assist students in de-
veloping 1) viable career plans compatible with academic in-
tersts, and 2) strategies that insure marketability and em-
ployment opportunity upon graduation. Thus, the entire
program focuses, upon the student--during early under-
graduate years, approaching graduation, and after gradu-
ation as an alumnus. The program is designed to permit stu-
dents to enter at any point in their college careers Program
resources include:
Individual advisement for students seeking personal ca-
reer development and job search assistance
A career mini-school offering many different career in-
vestigations and job search preparation short courses weekly
(50-minutes each). Subjects include career planning, career
information for minorities, job market projections for vari-
ous career fields, job search planning, resume and letter writ-
ing, interview techniques, part-time and summer jobs, tips
on using the Center. and other specialized information for
business, industry, and education job seekers.
A cooperative education program by which students may
--through supervised practical work experiences-add re-
levance to their classroom education, gain professional ex-
perience in chosen fields, provide a source of funds to help
defray college expenses, and in many cases, become more
competitive when entering the job market upon graduation
An extensive placement service for students and alumni
comprising the largest on-campus job interviewing program
in the stale representing all career fields, and Gator Malch. a
computer program matching students and alumni with
potential employers. The Center also publishes current em-
ployer job listings representing hundreds of positions-full-
time, part-time and summer-for students, new graduates.
and experienced alumni.


career resources


library


containing


eral thousand employes and related occ
Contact lists; directories for business.
and government; lists of American firms
reference and informatllonal material on
cial studies programs including fell
sistantships; and many other materials
needed by students planning a career, er


ket, or contempli
the library facilities
data on job treni
market statistics,


ng graduate school
is the "Trends Desk"
, outlook and econc
manpower bulletins


II


informallon


on sev-


upations: employer
industry, education
operating overseas.
graduate and spe-
owships and as-
and resource data
aiering the lob mar-
A special feature of
containing research
mtc forecasts, labor
for various career


fields, special directories and publications giving reports and
ratings on most employers.
An audio visual department with study carrels and a li-
brary of over 150 slide,'tape, ,ideo. and audio programs cov-
ering career choices, employer information, selection of aca-
demic programs, and lob search and interview techniques
A qualification record repository and referral service is
available to students and alumni Copies of credentials are
sent upon request of the students and alumni to potential
employers. In addition, the.Center refers qualified persons
on file and seeking employment to interested employers re-
questing candidates to fill lob vacancies.


An "outreach program" in which
bers are available to hold seminars f(
for lecture presentations to classes
planning and job search preparation
reer Day" programs in conjunction
Fnr .dlrdilmnIal infnrmalinn tlilti


professional staff mem-
jr student organizations.
on all phases of career
in. and to develop "Ca-
with colleges.
nik. almni antd fariltu


program of activities available to all persons of the Univer-
sity "community" serves as the basic purpose of the Union
Policy for the Reitz Union is established by a Board of Man-
agers, consisting of eight students and sin faculty members.
During May. 1967. the I. Wayne Reilz Union building was
opened Among the lacilaties and services offered are music
listening rooms, art gallery areas, Arts and Crafts Center.
photographic darkrooms, browsing library, a games area for
bowling, billiards and table tennis, public telephones, in-
formation desk, passenger and ride wanted bulletin boards,
display cases, barber shop. Union Store A large ballroom an
auditorium, and conference and meeting rooms are avail-
able for all University organizations Guest rooms are avail-
able for official guests of the University, guests of students.
faculty, staff, and alumni
The Reitz Union offers a wide range of food service facil-
ities and dining opportunities. A cafeteria, snack bar. a res-
taurant dining area, the Orange and Brew, the Sugar Cone.
and complete catering services for small intimate groups or
for a banquet for 700 persons are included in the building.


Of particular significance to the educational program of
the University is the Student Activities Center located on the
third floor. A distinctive physical arrangement of offices and
work space for Student Government. the Student Honor
Court, and many other student groups enhances the effec-
tiveness of the lotal student activities program of Ihe Uni-
versity
The Reitz Union plans and promotes many social, cultural.
and recreational activities lor the campus community.
Among the regular activities are art exhibits. International
Dinners, leisure classes, current and cultural films, a per-
forming arts series, speaker's programs, out-door concerts.
poetry readings, book reviews, arts and crafts sales, and cam-
pus tournaments in billiards, bowling, bridge, football and
chess Special activities such as receptions, dances. intracam-
pus and inter-collegiate bridge, billiard and bowling tour-
naments. music appreciation listening hours, fashion shows.
international acti\lites, and special holiday parties are all a
part of the Reitz Union program.


A disti
Theatre,
videos exc
ing, and


nctive area
a 464-seat
ellence in
acoustics.


of the Reitz Union is the H P Constans
facility for the dramatic arts which pro-
design, equipment for staging and light-


UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER


The University Counseling
selling and student develop
their spouses The Center is


Center oilers a variety of coun-
ment ser ices to students and
staffed by psychologists whose


primary interests are to facilitate the growth and develop-
ment of each student and to assist students in getting the
most out of their college experience. Services offered at the
Center include the following.
Counseling Individual couples and group counseling is
available to help students with personal, career and aca-
demic concerns. Appointments to see a Counselor can be
made by calling the Center at 392-1575 or in person at 311
Little Hall. Students initially have an intake interview in
which the student and the counselor make decisions about
the type of help needed. Students requiring immediate help
are seen on a non-appointment emergency basis. Informa-
tion concerning counseling interviews is confidential.
Consulting Center psychologists are available for con-
sulting with students, staff, professionals and faculty These
consultations often focus on working with individual stu-
dents, special programs, organizational problems, ways of
improving student environments, or other issues that ma\




General

STUDENT AFFAIRS


** i--k--


Others such as the math confidi
workshops, and counseling group!
p ints deal with common piobler
A list of available groups and nor
beginning or each term
Teaching/Training The Cer
praclicum and internship training
Counseling Pschologv. Counsi
habililation Counseling Center p,
dergraduate and graduate course
ments
CounseLine 4 self-help tape
vide inlormalion on hot. to cope
giving issp6onsofd b\ the Center
and ask far any ,a the rhvrL, -lour
li tof :the tapes iof published p
nwvip aer and is also available a
: ~ neW.a*e ,'soa


ence groups.
s are formed
ms and learn
shops is pu


1


s
,j


daeril
to help
specific
blished


,eness
partrc-
: skills,.
at the


ler provides, a ~arielI of
experience for students in
loi Education and Re-
',chologlits also leach un-
Iin some o01 these depart-


program designed
\,ith the problems
Students ma', call 3
lape' thai are a'.a,
eriodicall,, in the
I the Center


to pro-
01 daiIb
q2- 1683
able \
student


GATOR DINING SERVICE


Galor
lions on
rooms


Dining
campu


Ser\ ice proc ide.
s con\enienI to


rmacists,
peisonne
surgery,
Ilh care


laboratory and x-ray technicians, and support-
1 Specially clinics are available for allergy, mi-
orthopedics, mental health, and women's


The health fee is part of the tuition fee paid by all .full-time
students, it is optional for part-time students Because not all
services are covered by the health fee, the supplemental stu-
dent government health insurance plan is highly recom-
mended.
A personal health history questionnaire completed by you
is required before registration at the University.


SPEECH AND HEARING CLINIC
The Program in Speech-Language Pathology and
Audiology. Department of Speech, offers senices without
charge to University students who have speech, hearing, or
language disorders
e operates n t
dents are encouraged to call the clinic (392-2041) or stop by
the Arts & Sciences Building. Room 442. for information re-
garding services


Students are offered high i
ii campus cafeterias and 'n
and Brewt Ralhskeller and
I' 'flt is the policK ol the LlUni
food at the lowest possible
i sgr ib participating in on
S:I as. The se\en-dav plan
.0ad Sndday ihree mea
. t.evt day plan, Ito media d
day through Friday) an, tv
formation contact Ihe Galor
son Hall


IIhv lood
bars as
Arredon


veCsill TO
cost Stud
e or the
19 meals ,
Is M.onda
a udr ur Ur
0o meals
Dninmm S


reasonable pnrce.
ell as the Orange
) Room


pro\ ide ef
lentl mak e
three .Colu
a \eek (ilt
v through
ie ll\e ad
a da\ For
er\ ice 01lic


ltl-prepared
litect a sa\-
inlari' meal
o on Salur-
Fridayl, the
plan (Mon-
furtjrher in-
e. 110 lohn-


READING AND WRITING CENTER
The University Reading and Writing Center is a free serv-
ice offered to students at all levels. The Center is located in
Room 210' GPA. For additional information or appoint-
ments. the office can be contacted between 8-5 Monday
through Friday
READING. The reading program offers individual and
group instruction designed to improve comprehension, rate,
vocabulary and study skills These courses are developed, on
the basis of an initial diagnosis, to meet the needs of each in-
di* dual Consultation and other services are also available


to laff


STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE


Student Hi
services whtc
lion, health
sultation and


The ser\
in-paltent


?alth Scer ice
h include pr
screening pri
counseling


onsists
staffed


provides a spectrum
mar', medical (are
ograms and menia


ni (chn
nurses


medical
educa-
Ih con-


a 9-bed
ologists,


members


WRITING. The writing program also offers individual and
group instruction. Students are assisted in writing thesis
statements organizing papers, and developing essays from
outlines Texts and audiovisual materials are used to aid in
spelling, paragraph development, grammar and sentence
skills
CREDIT. Both programs may be taken for credit or as indi-
vidual volunteer programs




I *, ** *
. .*


Student Life


STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND
ORGANIZATIONS
Student Government: Student Government at the Univer-
sity of Florida is a cooperative organization for advancing
student interests and is based on mutual confidence among
and between the student body, the faculty, and the adminis-
tration. Considerable authority has been granted the student
body for the regulation and conduct of student affairs. The
criterion in granting authority to the Student Government


has been the disposition of UF students to a
ability commensurate with the authority grain
dent Government has several resources at
fulfill its mission, including the allocation o
three million dollars per year in student acti
fees, substantial authority in the regulation
activities, and administration of the Student


versity of Florida faculty and staff feel that


stance of responsibility for
the University is a valuable
andlevelopment of the inr
Student Government is
franchise under grant from
to its continued approval.


tr


accept responsi-
nted them Stu-
its disposal to
f approximately
%ity and service
of co-curricular
Court. The Uni-
aining in accep-


the conduct of student affairs at
e part of the educational growth
divildual student
a body politic, occupying its
the Board of Regents and subject
Student Government is patterned


on the state and national form of government but adapted
Io the local needs of the Student Body Powers are dis-
tributed into the three branches (1) legislative, which is em-
bodied in the Student Senate. (2) judicial, which is em-


bodied in
executive,
the Stude
directly b
members.
positions


eluding


the Student Honor Court and the Traffic Court, (3)
,embodied in the President and the Treasurer of
nt Body. Members of all three branches are elected
y the Student Body. of which all UF students are
In addition to elected offices. many appointed
have been established in Student Government. In-


Cabinet and sub-Cabinet, Student


Traffic Court posts


Court, and the


Student Government, recognizing its limitations
"government," attempts to exercise influence on
ments at all levels through conferences. lobbying,
and the advancement of proposals for change.
Students may apply for various positions within


as a true
govern-
research


the stu-


dent government structure by contacting the Student Gov-
ernment offices on the third floor of the I. Wayne Reitz Un-
ion.
Student Senate: The Student Senate is composed of repre-
sentatives elected from the colleges and living areas on the
campus and in general acts as the Legislative Branch of Stu-
dent Government.
Religious Activities The University of Florida welcomes
the contributions of religious traditions to the campus com-
munity The churches, centers, and organizations associated
with the University offer a rich variety of programs and min-
istries There are also interdenominational and non-
denominational activities fostered by the Department of Re-
ligion and the Campus Ministries Cooperative.
Social Fraterniries- Twenty-nine national social fraternities
have established chapters at the University in addition to


one national colony. The general work of
supervised by the Interfraternity Council.
President of each fraternity. The national
University of Florida are Alpha Epsilon F
Rho, Alpha Phi Alpha. Alpha Tau Omega.


Phi, Delta Chi, Delta Tau Della.
Kappa Alpha Psi, Kappa Sigma.


Delta Upsi
Lambda CI


I fraternities is
posed of the
ermnities at the
dpha Gamma
I Theta Pi., Chi
Kappa Alpha,
Ipha. Phi Beta


sororities. Primary jurisdiction in sorority matters is vested in
the Panhellenic Council The chapters at Ihe University of
Florida are Alpha Chi Omega. Alpha Delta PI, Alpha XI Delta,
Alpha Epsilon Phi. Alpha Kappa Alpha, Alpha Omicron PI,
Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma. Delta Phi
Epsilon. Delta Sigma Theta, Kappa Alpha Theta. Kappa Del-
ta. Kappa Kappa Gamma, Phi Mu, Phi Sigma Sigma, Sigma
Delta Tau. Sigma Kappa, Zeta Phi Beta, and Zeta Tau Alpha.
Professional and Honoranr Fraternurues


AGRICULTURE
AGRONOMY


EDUCATION SOCIETY
SOILS


DELTA SIGMA. '
EPSILON DELTA
EPSILON RHO. I
KAPPA DELTA, .
KAPPA PSI Busi
PI MU, Industria


AMERICAN
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
PETROLEUM
AMERICAN
AMERIC4AN
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
AMERICAN
AMERIC AN
ARNOLD Al


INSTITUTE
INSTITUTE
INSTITUTE


JJ
I


S
S
S
R


ASSOCIATION
BETA ALPHA
BETA ETA SIC
BETA GAMM


Ad ertising
. Pre-Med
Broadcasting
Sociology
ness
il Engineering
3F ARCHITECTS
OF CHEMICAL ENGI
OF MINING, META


NEERS
LLURGICAL &


M ENGINEERS
INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERS
MARKETING ASSOCIATION
NUCLEAR SOCIETY
SOCIETY OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEER
SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS
iOCIETh OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
R SOCIETY. Military
N FOR COMPUTING MACHINERY
PSI Accounting
jMA, Honorary Scholastics
A SIGMA. Business


MITCHELL


IS


DRILL TEAM, Military


BLACK AMERICAN LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
BLOCK AND BRIDLE Agriculture
COUNSELOR EDUCATION STUDENT ASSOCIATION
DAIRY SCIENCE CLUB
DELTA PSI KPPA,. Physical Education. Health. Recreation
DELTA SIGMA PI Business
DELTA SIGMA RHO Speech


DEUTSCHER ,EREIN UND STAMMTISCH, Ge
guage & Culture
ENDOGENOUS RHYTHMS, Zoology
ENGLISH GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
ENVIRONMENTAL LAW SOCIETY
EPSILON LAMBDA CHI. Engineering Leadership
ETA KAPPA NU. Electrical Engineering
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION HOI
ETY
FLORIDA ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION
FLORIDA ENGINEERING SOCIETY
FLORIDA PLA ERS
FOOD 4ND RESOURCE ECONOMICS CLUB
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS GRADI
DENT ASSOCIATION
FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN NUTRITION CLI
FORESTRY CLUB
GATOR RAIDERS. Military
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY
GUILD STUDENT GROUP. AMERICAN GUILL
GANISTS
HONOR COUNCIL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FL(


INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRON
INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINE
IOHN MARSHALL BAR ASSOCIATION
JUSTICE CAMPBELL THORNAL MOOT COU
KAPP4 EPSILON. Pharmacy
KAPPA KAPPA PSI. Band
LAMBDA TALU. Medical Technoloev


'rman Lan-


NOR SOCI-


JATE STU-


JB


3 OF OR-


3RIDA


IC ENGINEERS
RS


RT BOARD


General

STUDENT LIFE


.





General


STUDENT LIFE


O OMICRON DELTA KAPPA. Leadership


ORDER OFa


OMEGC


ORNAMENTAL


and Scholastics


Fraternity. Sororih Leadership


HORTICULTURE CLUB


PHI ALPHA DELT A. La'\


mHI ALPHA THETA
PHI CHTHETA, Bus
PH!MDELTA PHI. Law
PHI ETA SIGMA. Fre


PHI LAMBDA


SIGMA.


History
iness

shmen


Scholastics


Pharmacy


PH( IU: ALPHA SINFONIA Music


PI MU EPSILON.


Pir TAU


SIGM A.


This statement


serves to


remind students of the obligation


they assume as students at the University of Florida. Matters


of violations of academic honesty
Student Honor Court.


are adjudicated by the


STUDENT CONDUCT CODE


I Introduction: Students enjoy the rights and prin ileges


accrue


Mathematics
Mechanical Engineeri.n


S.RE-LEGAL SOCIE T1
PRE-PROFESSION ak ASSOCIAl
P .SI CHI, Psychology
PUBLIC RELATIONS STUDENT
RHO CHI, Pharmacy
; iRHO EPSILON, Real Estate


RHO PI PHI, Pharmac
SAVAN-U F, Leadersh
SIGMA AtPHA IOTA,


SIGMA DEL
. SIGMA LAM
SIGMA TAU


SOCIETY OF
SOCIETY OF


SOCIETY OF


.A CHI, JI


ip and Ser
Music s
wuhalism


BDA CHI, Building Construction
SIGMRA, Honorary Tutoring
AMERICAN FORESTERS
ENGINEERING SCIENCES
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERS
PLASTICS ENGJIEER$S
WOMEN ENGINEERS


rTON. Pre


to membership in


are subject to the responsibility


membership In order to have


-Med


SOCIETY, OF


I and Pre-Dent

AMERICA


governance,


a university community and
cities which accompany that


a system of effective campus


it is incumbent upon all members of the cam-


pus community to notify appropriate officials of any vio-
lations of regulations and to assist in their enforcement. All


conduct regulations of the University


available


are printed and made


to all students and are applicable upon publication


in the Independent Florida All/gator. the University Catalog.
the UF Student Guide or other reasonable means of
notification.


ice, Honorar,
': *' *. ?; .'' ^


II. Authority: The


Honorary


President


charged with the remponsi-


ability for establishing and enforcing regulations governing


student life Regulations


are designed to enable the Univer-


sity to project against the conduct of those who, by their ac-
tions, impair or infringe on the nghts of others or inlrfere
with the orderly operations of the University. Discipline may
be imposed for offenses against the Code occurring at any of


the following locations


or activities


SPANISH AMERICAN
SPEC. EbDUClATION
DFENTS


L AW. STUDENTS


ASSOCI AT


STUDPN4 AMEI CAN PHARMA(
STUDENT CHAPTER AME RICAN
ARCH ITECTS
STUDENT CHAPTER-AMERICAN
ING AND MAPPING
STUDENT CHAPTER-AMERICAN
DESIGNERS


STUDENT CONTRACT
: TU DENT DIETETIC
STUDENT OCCPATTI
STUDENT PHYSICAL
STUDENT PLANNING


Planning
TAU BETA PI E
TAU BETA SIGA
UNIVERSITY OF


FORS


ASSOCIATION


ION OF GRADUATE STU-

:EUTICAL ASSOCIATION


SOCIETY

CONGRE'

SOCIETYl


AND BUILDERS


ASSOCIATION
ONAL THERAPY


THER4PN


OF LANDSCAPE

SS ON SURVEY-

OF INTERIOR


ASSOCI ACTION


ASSOCIATION


ASSOCIATION


ASSOCIATION


Urban


A. University campus,.
B University owned or


controlled property;


C. Property or housing units assigned for responsibility to
the University, including, but not limited to. fraternity


and sororit
D Activities


property.
sponsored b\ the University,


E Activities officially approved by the University which
are conducted by University chartered organizations; and


F Acti. ties


occurring


off campus


as provided


in para-


graph LI
III Rules of Procedure: The primary judicial bodies author-
ized b\ the President and charged with the administration


and enforcement of this


Code shall formulate and furnish to


students charged with an offense, rules of procedure which


and Regional


engineering


AtA.


shall insure
ited to


basic procedural fairness


including, but not him-


A The right to be notified in writing of the charges


Music


FLORIDA ANTHROPOLOGY


against him/her with
pare for the hearing,


STUDENT


sufficient


detail and time to pre-


SOCIATION
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CHEMISTRY


SOCIETY


B The right to a prompt hearing before an appropriate
official, committee, or court;


UNIVERSITh OF FLORIDA COLLEGE OF NURSING GRADU-


ATE STUDENT


COUNCIL


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA GEOLOGY CLUB


UNI% ERSITY
UNI ERSITF
TION
UNIVERSITh'


OF FLORIDA F
OF FLORIDA


OF FLORIDA


HONORSS ORGANIZATION


REHABILITATION


STUDENT


INSTITUTE OF CONSTRUCTORS


UNIlERSITY OF


* WILDLIFE


FLORIDA


CHAPTER


STUDENT CHAPTER


SOCIETY


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


XI SIGMA


\OCAL


ASSOCI A-

-AMERICAN


OF THE


IAZZ TROUPE


PI Forestry Honorary


C. The right to know the nature


source


of the evi-


dence which will be used against him/her,
D. The right to present evidence in his/her own'behalf;
E. The right to freedom against compulsory self-in-
crimination, and
F The right to appear with an adviser at the hearing.


It. Suspension of Pending Hearing:


Certain situations un-


der the Unilerstlly Polic on Possession and Use of Firearms
on Campus call lor immediate suspension in the event of vi-


olation If
a hearing.


a student is suspended under this policy without
he/she shall, upon request, be entitled to a pre-


imminar hearing at


the earliest practical lime. Such hearing


shall be


solely to determine if Ihe suspending official acted


within the scope of hisher authority and that there is proba-


The Un


ot Florida


all of their Unilersity


expects


class work


cause


students to be honest in


Therefore,


students


are re-


9- 1 *r a r- -* I -n.- -- - - -- I* --- -


to believe that the student has violated


a Univer-


sily policy. The hearing board shall be appointed by the'Pres-
ident and shall report its determinations to the President.


This presidential action shall t
Conduct Committee shall hear


)e intenm until the Student
the matter and make recom-


. 4.
* iT. .


ACADEMIC HONESTY


iversly


1


//




f*". ... .
S- 'i *---
C' '


STUDENT LIFE


3. Unauthorized use, taking or destruction of public
or private property on campus, or acts committed
with disregard of possible harm to such properly
4. Actions or statements which by design or conse-
quence amount to intimidation or hazing.
5. Participation in or continued attendance at. after
warning to disperse by a University official, a raid on
a University living unit.
6. Disorderly conduct
7. Disrupting the orderly operation of the University
as defined in Florida Statutes, Board oi Regents' Poli-
cies, and the Demonstration Policy of the Unsersity.
8. Failure to comply with a University rule or regu-
lation.
9. Violations of Housing, Inter-residence Hall As-
sociation, and Area Government regulations.
10. Violation of conduct probation.
71. Possession, use, or delivery of illegal drugs as de-
fined in Florida Statutes.
12. Possession of a firearm on the University campus
except as specifically authorized by University Policy
on the Possession and Use of Firearms.
13. Actions or conduct which hinders, obstructs, or
-otherwise interferes with the implementation or en-


forcement of the Student Conduct


Code.


14. Failure to appear before the Committee on Stu-
dent Conduct or the Director of Student judicial Af-
fairs and to testify as a witness when reasonably
notified to do so Nothing in this subsection shall be
construed to compel self-incrimination.
15. Violation of anw municipal ordinance, law of the
State of Florida, or law of the United States
16. Ticket scalping: Selling tickets to any University of
Florida function for more than the original price.
17. Possession or use of fireworks, explosives, danger-
ous chemicals, ammunition and weapons (including
bows and arrows or switch-blade knives).
18. Actions which are committed with disregard of the
possible harm to an individual or group, or which re-
sult in injury to an individual.
19. Violation of the University Academic Honesty
Guidelines.
B. The Student Honor Court may recommend ex-
pulsion or any lesser penalty for academic dishonesty as
defined by the Student Body Constitution. The Student
Honor Court may impose any penalty provided for in the
Student Body Constitution for other offenses against the
student body as provided for in the Student Code of
Conduct. Conflicts in jurisdiction will be resolved by the
Director of Student judicial Affairs.
C. Conduct Boards may recommend penalties as set
forth by the University Housing Committee for violation
of University Housing. Inter-Residence Hall Association,
and/or Area Government regulations
D. Student Traffic Court may impose authorized penal-
ties for violation of University traffic, parking, and vehi-
cle registration regulations.
E. Other judicial bodies may be established and vested
with jurisdiction by appropriate authority.
VI. Off-Campus Conduct: When a student violates Section
V-A-15 of this Student Conduct Code by an offense com-
mitted off the campus and which is not associated with a
University-connected activity, the disciplinary authority of
the University will not be used merely to duplicate the pen-
. .. .


ty. or welfare of the University Community or its property; or
the offense committed by the student is of such a serious na-
ture as to adversely affect the student's suitability as a mem-
ber of the university community
If the Director of Student Judicial Affairs determines the
offense affects the University as stated above, then the Com-
mittee on Student Conduct shall hold a prompt hearing to
consider whether the offense is of such nature as set out
above; whether or not the student committed the offense;
and recommend appropriate action. The action of the Com-
mittee on Student Conduct shall be made independent of
any off-campus authonty.
VII. Postponement of Hearing Due to Pending or Possible
Criminal or Civil Charges: It the student charged with a vio-
lation of the Student Conduct Code, regardless of which pri-
mary judicial body may hear the matter, wishes to have the
hearing postponed because there is pending or possible civil
or criminal litigation which he/she feels might be prejudiced
by the findings of the hearing, such postponement may be
granted provided the student agrees to accept conduct pro-
bation or suspension, depending upon the gravity of the of-
fense. Such probation or suspension will be determined and
activated by the Director of Student judicial Affairs and will
remain in force until such time as the student requests a
hearing before the appropriate primary judicial body and
the hearing is held. The student shall be informed whether


he/she would be placed on probation or suspended
making a decision to postpone the hearing.
VIII. Student Waiver of Right to Hearing: In the
student charged with an offense under paragra
wishes to waive in writing the right to a hearing by
propriate official or hearing body and the Director


prior to

event a
ph V-A
the ap-
of Stu-


dent judicial Affairs wishes to accept jurisdiction, the Direc-
tor of Student Judicial Affairs may make a determination of
fact and make a recommendation of appropriate action
IX. Summary Hearing: When a student is accused of a vio-
lation of paragraph V-A of this Code, which in the opinion of
the Director of Student judicial Affairs, if proven, would not
warrant a penalty in excess of two quarters probation, then
the Director of Student judicial Affairs may require such
hearing to be held before the Chairperson of the Committee
on Student Conduct or his/her designated representative.
The hearing shall be held in accordance with paragraph III of
this Code.
X. Conflict of jurisdiction: In the event that the offense is
within the jurisdiction of more than one primary judicial
body, the Director of Student Judicial Affairs shall determine
which judicial body shall hear the charge.
XI. Penalties: A student adjudged guilty of violations un-
der paragraph V or the Academic Honesty Guidelines shall
be subject to a penalty commensurate with the offense and
any aggravating and mitigating circumstances, which may
include one of more of the following penalties, unless other-
wise expressly provided:
A. Reprimand-The student is given formal written no-
tice and official recognition is laken of the offense com-
mitted
B. Conduct Probation-The student is deemed not in
good standing with the University for a specific period of
time Conditions of probation may be imposed in rela-
tion to the offense committed. If the student is found to
have violated the probation by subsequent violation of
the Code or any appropriate condition, he/she shall be
subject to expulsion or any lesser penalty The duration
of the probationary period and conditions shall be in
proportion to the seriousness of the offense
C. Suspension -The student is required to leave the
UlnivprsltV for a givPn or indPfinitP DPriod of time the


I


f





General

STUDENT LIFE


;1 .such payment shall be limited to the actual cost of repair
: 1or reptacement of such properly
for additional information regarding conduct procedures
contact the Office for Student Services or consult the Stu-
'dent Guide.


INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
Universityaof Florida athletic teams compete in 16 sports in
mehs and women programs which make a comprehensive.
high-calibre level of competition on a regional and national
basi,
, lMehn's teams compete in the Southeastern Conference
4nd the National Colegiate Athletic association in football,
basketball, baseball, cross country, swimming. track, golf
arid tennis. Womnn's teams compete in the Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics for Women in Region III. fielding
teams in gymnastics, swimming, golf, tennis. track. cross
country, basketball and softball.
Physical facilities include Florida Field stadium (capacity
72A000) a baseball diamond, women's softball diamond,
Varsity tennis:,tadium, golf course, urhning track, two foot-
ball practice; fie|s; ad an exciting new i filit,. Stephen C
O'Connell: Center. which houses a 12.000-seat basketball
arena,an indoor track, an indoor swimming pool and diving
taEk and varjous other student activity segments


IntramuraE-Recreational Sports
intramnuralRecreatonal Sport~ s 5; sfgn hicant part oi the
"total educational.commn nity at the Un ihem t florda All
td s ents,.faculty andstaf are-ercourag pa ticipate ol-
wutarily in the program which has become an important
: phafte of extra-curricular activities on the campus and oilers
opportunity for exercise, recreation, social contacts and
friendly compettiion.
Student administration isa radition in the intramural pro-
g.r:r at Al the iuni ity. Stderits officiate the games, manage
,; the leagues, act as Sludent Directors in the Inlramural Of-
i : f serve on the Protest Board and on the Intramural Polic,

For unstructured leisure time activities the university,
community may picnic, boat and swim at Lake Wauburg,


check-out equipment from the
pus. play on any of the 16 footba
volleyball courts. 30 tennis court
wall handball-racquetball court
or 5 outdoor basketball courts.
ercise in the weight-training
O'Connell Center is an exciting
Florida as a recreational sports i


equipment rooms on
ill tields. 14 softball field
tIs, 12 tour-wall or 16
s. 2 squash courts, 4 i
swim in Florida Pool
rooms The Stephi
addition to the Univer
facility The center has


cam-
Ids. 16
three-
ndoor
or ex-
en C
sit of
B vol-


leyball courts, 16 badminton courts as well as an indoor track
(6 lanes. 222 yards, 60 yard straight avayj) olhmpic size swim-


ming pool, fencing-karate room, Nautilus equipped weight
room, and many other indoor facilities that will enhanceithe
intramural program
For structured competitive play. the department organizes
tournaments in the following leagues: All-University Special
Events, Women's Independent. Co-Recreational. Engineer-
ing, Fraternity, Law,. Little Sisters, Men's Independent, Men's
and Women's Dormitory. Married Students. Sorority and
Student Wives. The intramural clubs program offers instruc-
tion, recreation and competition in approximately 43 clubs.
Areas of interest include clubs in- dance related clubs, indi-
vidual and team sports, field sports, waler related clubs, rec-
reational sports clubs and martial arts.
The current importance and growth of intramural-recrea-
tional sports on campus is unmatched in the history of the
university The staff invites everyone to use this resource at
the university to fulfill their leisure-time interest.


AUTOMOBILE AND TRAFFIC
REGULATIONS


Any student of the University of Florida is eligible to reg-
ister a motor vehicle for use as authorized and to operate
and park a registered vehicle on campus. The type of parking
deal sued s d iterminec y the stu i
and student classification Studentsare advised to plan heir
Iransportation arrangements with care before the start of
classes. Increased volume of traffic in campus parking areas
in recent years has caused some to have difficulties commut-
ing to campus from surrounding areas On-campus housing
is within walking distance of a considerable variety of shops
and restaurants. Since parking near dormitories can also be-
come congested, some dormitory students may find it pref-
Prable to do without an automobile while attending the
University Many living near campus have found a bicycle to
be a handy convenience.,even for those who own their own
cars
Students desiring to park on campus during restricted
hours must register their automobiles, motorcycles or

18BB lohnson Hall, during their rst registration perio
ure to do so will result in a parking citation. There is a system
for fines and drier suspension for on-campus vehicle vio-
lations Persons failing to respond to tickets will be subject
to an additional administrative lee of $5.00 and will not re-
ceive grades or an academic transcript until delinquent fines
and fees have been paid
A copy of the rules governing traffic, parking and regis-
Iration of vehicles on campus may be obtained from the
Traffic and Parking Department located in Johnson Hall.
Each student is urged to familiarize himself with these regu-
lations upon registering at the Universitl.


Th r~ 4;; ArIEi PiE:Il8;~iE,


. 4.* r .
.'f


. **T





General

STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


Student Academic

Regulations
Additional information relative to graduation,
tivities, failure m studies, conduct, etc.. may be fo
Student Guide and the sections of the catalog
regulations of the separate colleges and schools
dent should become familiar with rules and reg
the University.


social ac-
'und in the
containing
Each stu-
ulatrons of


READMISSIONS


APPLICATION FOR READMISSION


The information contained in this section applies only to
students who have previously been admitted at any level to
the University of Florida. Requirements for admission for a
student seeking to enroll in the Unlversity of Florida for the
first time will be found in the Admissions section of this
catalog. Please consult the INDEX for page numbers.
How to Apply for Readmission: An applicant should ad-
dress a request to the Office of the Registrar for application
forms. Forms and directions vary with the level ol readmis-
sion. The applicant should indicate in the request the col-
lege and the level of last enrollment at the University of Flor-
ida as well as the college and level for which h he or she
wishes to apply. Applications must be received in the Olfice
of the Registrar by the deadline date for the term. as pub-
lished in the University Calendar
READMISSION OF STUDENTS
1. Satisfactory academic record
a. An applicant must be eligible to return to the Uniter-
sity of Florida on the basis of one s previous academic
record at this institution. If the applicant has attended
any college or university subsequent to enrollment at
the University of Florida, he or she must also have an at -
erage of "C" or higher (as computed by the Unltersirt
of Florida) on all work attempted at each institution A
student must list and furnish transcripts of every institu-
lion attended when seeking readmission to the Unier-
sity of Florida The applicant must also be in good stand-
ing and eligible to return to each institution previously
attended.
b. An applicant for readmission must meel the admis-
sion requirements of the college or school he or she ex-
pects to enter. (Consult the appropriate college section
of the catalog for specific admission requirements )


2. Satisfactory conduct record


a. An applicant must present a satisfactory record
conduct. Regardless of other qualifications, an applic
who has experienced major or continuing difincul
with school or other authorities since the last
rollment at the University of Florida may find his or
application for readmission disapproved
3. Submission of Request


a. An applicant
name under which
enrolled and the


for readmission should indicate
h he or she was registered when
social security number


study as outlined in the college announcement or its equil -
alent as determined b, the tacult. ot the college offering
the course, have been completed
2 Recommendarion of the tacults of the college awarding
the degree


3 Resrdence


requirements


ta) The minimum residence


quiremeni for the baccalaureate degree is two semesters (b)
Student- are required 10 complete the last thirty credits ap-
piled toward the baccalaureate degree during regular resi-
dence in the ollee r rom which h the student is to be gradu-
ated Exceplton to this regulation ma, be made only upon
&wrilten petition approved b\ the faculty of the college con-
cerned (c) For residence requirements lor degrees in the
Colleges ol' La,^ Medicine Dentistr\ or \eterinar\ Medi-


ale School


ie catalog oi each college (d) For
ol the Larious graduate degrees, si
Catalog


4 Aerage Required
must ha~ e a C a.
toward that degree
5 T\\o Degrees o\\o
B S may be conlerri
that the second deg
additional ,orlk i
dence requirement,


In order
,erage or


to secure
better in


a degree.
all credits


nce re-
Gradu.


a student
required


Degree. ol the same rank, e g
ed upon the sae same ndidual
ree irpresents at least thirty
Ih the necessary quahlialtie


6 Conrrnuou. ntendance When a student's attendance is
coniinuou gradluallion according to the curriculum under
which he or she entered is permitted provided the courses
required are offered b, the University II some or all of the
required cou res are no longer olrered, the lacullt of the col-
lege concerned ill make such adjustments for the individ-
ual students as are appropriate for the curriculum involved
9.5 long as a luJdent attends the LUniversit, as much as one
semester during any calendar year his'or her residence is
conflifluou%
" Summer lerm Enrollment E flectlie September 1 19'6 all
students enlering a unl-eriPll in the State Uni\ersit, System
tith less than bi) hours crPdit shall be required to earn at
least 4 credil hours prior to graduation bv attendance at one
or more summer term' Uni'.ersiv Presidents ma' waive the
application of thri rule in cases of unusual hardship to the
indi\ dual


8 ipp
music hI
fice on
Calend
expect
pre ilou


licalon F
Ie an app
or be ore
ar Studer
io gradu
Us ,m .e-


or Degree Students expecting to graduate
ili(aIon lor the degree in the Registrars Of-
the dale indicted in the current Unilersity
ts, must appl\ in the semester in which they
ate regardless of previous applications in
fr'.


9 Trme lrinir To receive a degree a
completed lai all residence work reqi
least 24 hour!' prior to the scheduled n
Faculty, ,-oling on the candidates fo
tension ior, at leatl ti'.I vweeks, prior t
Ing o the Conllrge Facullt .otlng on
greens
10 Trime-Shoriened Deeree OnDortur


grams is oller.d b, ti
enable r.tudenri to 'ho
lor them IC complete I
portunities include se,
and other option'. For
lion listed .n Ihe table
Degree Opportuniiies
lions for additional in!


candidate must have
ulred lor graduation at
meeting ol the College
ir degrees (b) all ex-
o the scheduled meet-
the candidates for de-


ntie'


he University of Flo
rten the length o thi
their degree required
eral credit b\ examir
speclihc information.
or content entitled *
Also refer to the
formation


A variety of pro-
rida whichh may
e time necessary
nenis These op-
lalion programs.
refer to the sec-
Time Shortened
college descrip-


The word credit
*=


as used in this catalog refers to one


11 Eitension \i rk Permitted (Note Extension %,ork as used
below meters to both extension classes and correspondence
study )


Credits





General

SlUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


section of thus catalog or consult with the dean da the col-
lege concerned.
d Students mar not take. by extension work. more'than
twelve of the last thirtv-six credits necessary for a bacca-
laureate degree


e Simultaneous registration
work is permitted provided
tained from the dean of the
is registered.
12. Registration of Graduate 5
registered in the Universitv
candidate s final examination i
she receives a degree


in on-campus and extension
thai approval has been ob-
college in which the student


Student
for the
s grven


s A student must be
term in which the
and at the lime he or


13. Repear Course Work Credit will nol be allowed on re-
pealed course work if the course that is repealed contains
essenrialiv the same course content as it did when the stu-
dent initially enrolled for the course
14. Pending Charge of Academic Drshonesty or Code of Sfu-
denw Conduct LV'olatron. No degree will be conferred upon a
student against whom there rs pending an unresolved
charge of either Academic Dishonesty or Code of Studeni
Conduct violation where the penalty for such violation
would likely be'


a Suspension
b Expulsion
c Failing Grade
d Any combinmaon of
charge is resolved and


the above until such time as the
degree requirements are met


d. A student taking courses at the University of Florida will
be required to register and attend classes under dhe Uni-
versry of Florida calendar.
e. The student will y appropriate fees at the Ulwivay
of Florida based on the number of credit hours for which
he or she is registered at this instituion.

It is the student's responsibility to insure that an official
transcript of work completed under a dual registration is
forwarded to the parent institution. Certification to social se-
cunty and veterans administration programs is also the rp-
sponsibibty do tidheMiduiar student whcntn requsu ema--
ndidual instilution to turnish records as might be neces-
sawry



NON-DEGREE REGISTRATION
A student not previously registered al the University of
Fionda may. with college approval, register for one semester
only as a non-degree student. Members of the faculty and
staff and those with special permission from their college
may be permitted to register as non-degree students for
more than one semester. Registration will be on a space
available basis. Procedures for registering are available from
the Registrar's Office.


GRADES


MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
Some colleges have a maximum load which is stated in the
catalog In the absence of such a statement, the general Unim-
versity regulation applies. This regulation allows a maximum
load of 15 credits for a student who earned an average below
a "C" the preceding semester of attendance. The minimum
load for ai undergraduate students is 12 hours. The mini-
mum load for a six-week summer term is 6. and for the
twelve-week lerm 12.
Simultaneous enrollment in conespondence courses, ex-
tension work at another college or university ts counted in
computing the maximum. but not the minimum load.
At the time of regaisration. a student, upon the approval of
hrs or her dean. may register for less than the minimum or
more than the maximum load. After the lale registration pe-
riod has closed, no student attending under the above con-
ditions will be permitted to drop below the minimum load
unless the student successfully petitions the college in
which he or she is enrolled The minimum load for lullhme
benefits from the VA os Social Security is 12 hours per
semester for undergraduate students


DUAL ENROLLMENT
1. Definrton: Dual Enrollment. as used in this regulation, re-
fers to a student taking on-campus courses simultaneously
at BOTH the Unrmersity of Florida and another institution
2. Dual Enrollment will be permitted ONLY under the fol-
lowrng conditions
a. Approval in writing for the dual enrollment must have
been secured by the student from the appropriate official
at EACH insinlution A copy of such approval must be
furnished at the time of registration to the registrar at the
University of Florida
b. A student will not be permitted to register at the Uni-
S-* .- .


Results
Office as


of student's
follows:


work


recorded in the Registrars


1. Undergraduate Students: Passing grades are A. B+, B,
C+. C. D+, D. in order of excellence, and 5-Satisfactory.
Failing grades are E Failure, I Incomplete, U Un-
satisfactory. X Absent from examination. EW -
Dropped for nonattendance or unsatisfactory work, and
WF Withdrew talking. The grade of EW is not a valid
grade after 1979-80.
Grades of I and X are considered as failing grades. They
must be changed to passing grades in accordance with the
dates set in the University Calendar, or be converted to
grades of E.
In special situations where it is not possible to assign
regular grades at the end of the term, a deferred grade may
be assigned. The symbol for a deferred grade is a grade of
H. This grade may be assigned only in special cases, such
as modular courses, confined to infirmary, and similar cir-
cumstances. A grade of H will not be computed in a
student's grade point average.
A symbol of W will be assigned for any course dropped
triugh the callegeafer _henBd_-ealair icacdpadd__as
penod and prior to the date for assigning a WF grade. The
W symbol is an official notation of an action taken in a
course, and will appear on the students transcript.
The degree-granting college may require a minimum
grade ol C in a particular course or courses.
2. Graduate students Passing grades for graduate students
are A, B+, B. C+. C ard S. Grades of "C+," and "C" in
courses below 5000-level are acceptable for credit toward
graduate degrees only if the total program meets the B-av-
erage requirement C+ and C grades in 5000-level courses
and above count toward a graduate degree only if an
equal number of credit hours in courses numbered 5000 or
above have been earned with grades of B+ and A, respec-
tively.




" *,,, *.
*:, *" :,
,K- -
i.


STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


agencies or institutions might count the grade of U as a fail-
ing grade Fn their grade point average computation.
To be eligible to enroll under the S-U option, a student
must 1) be in good standing may not be on any type of
probation, or warning; 2) be classified as an undergraduate
student, and 3) have approval from proper university of-
ficials.
Only one course will ordinarily be approved in any one
term. Approvals for exception to this policy must be ob-
tained from the dean of the college in which the student is
registered.
The deadline for electing the S-U option is the last day for
dropping or adding a course as published in the calendar. In
addition, students who elect the S-U option may subse-
quently request that their instructors assign a standard
grade, but the converse is not permitted.


AVERAGES
1. Definitions: The term "average," as used in any univer-
sity regulations concerning probation or suspension,
always refers to the average on work attempted at the Uni-
versity of Florida. Grades received at other institutions are
not averaged with grades received at the University of
Florida for the purpose of meeting any University average
requirement. Most honorary societies take into considera-
tion the quality of the work done at other institutions in
meeting any average requirements they may have.
2. How computed: Averages are determined by computing
the ratio of grade points to semester hours recorded as at-


tempted. Grade points are
semester hour as follows: A
3.0. C+ with 2.5, C with 2.0.
E, WF. EW, I, and X with 0.0.
grade after 1979-80. In corn
peated is counted as many
corded. Hours for grades of
in the University of Flonda


established by equaling each
with 40, B+ with 3.5, 6 with
D+ with 1.5. D with 1 0. and
The grade of EW is not a valid
putmg averages, a course re-
times as grades for it are re-
5, U. and H are not computed
grade point average.


3. Grade Pornt Averages: Students' grade point averages
will be based on their overall work at the University of
Florida. That is, when students are admitted to the Univer-
sity of Florida their grade point averages begin and their
academic averages will be based upon work taken at the
University of Florida. While work transferred from other
institutions toward a degree program at the University of
Flonda will count in total hours earned, such hours will
not be a part of the University of Florida grade point aver-
age

PROBATION, SUSPENSION, AND
EXCLUSION FOR
ACADEMIC REASONS
The University of Florida is responsible for providing the
best possible education in an economical and efficient
manner. In order to discharge this responsibility, the Univer-
sity expects and requires reasonable academic progress from
its students. Continuation of students who have demon-
strated a lack of the necessary ability, preparation, industry,
or maturity to benefit reasonably from a program of univer-
sity study is inconsistent with the University's responsibility
as a tax supported institution.
The University of Florida Senate has enacted regulations
covering probation, suspension, and exclusion. These regu-
lations are directed toward enforcing the academic stan-


PROBATION BECAUSE OF
UNSATISFACTORY
ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
The purpose of academic probation is to recognize
formally the fact that a student may not be making satisfac-
tory progress.
The conditions of academic probation are intended to (1)
relate to quality of achievement below standards required
ultimately to graduate, (2) recognize unsatisfactory work at
an early date; (3) be sufficiently significant to make clear to
the student, and the administration, the short-comings of
the student's performance. (4) provide occasion for counsel-
ing. (5) give students whose ultimate success is doubtful
further opportunity to demonstrate adequate performance.
All undergraduate students
A student with less than a 2.0 grade point average overall
for University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship
warning if he or she has a grade point delfcit which is less
than ten.
A student with less than a 20 grade point average overall
for University of Florida work shall be placed on scholarship
probation if he or she has a grade point deficit of ten or
more. but less than twenty.
Any student who is eligible to return to the University af-
ter a suspension because of academic reasons will be placed
on final scholarship probation for his or her next term.
In addition to University probation, students may be
placed on probation by the colleges in which they are regis-
tered if they do not maintain normal academic progress in
the program of study in which they are engaged.


CONTINUATION OF PROBATION
All Undergraduate Students


A student'
long as he or
student's sch
as he or she
twenty. If the
er probation
provisions of


s scholarship warning shall
she has a grade point deficit
olarship probation shall be
has a grade point deficit of
grade point deficit places hi
category, the student shall
that category.


be continued as
of less than ten A
continued as long
ten but less than
m or her in anoth-
be subject to the


REMOVAL OF PROBATION


All Undergraduate Students:
Scholarship probation or scholarship warning will be re-
moved when a student's grade point deficit has been re-
duced to zero.
Removal of college probation
A student will be removed from college probation when it
is deemed by his or her college that the student is making
satisfactory academic progress in the program of study in
which he or she is engaged.


SUSPENSION
The purpose of suspension from the University for aca-
demic reasons is to remove from the University community
any student who would not ultimately meet requirements
for graduation if he or she continued at his or her current
level of progress.
The conditions of academic suspensions are intended to





General

STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


A student re-enrolling after a one semester suspension
will be on final scholarship probation. If the grade point def-
pcit i, twenty or more at the end of the term the student re-
erolis, he or she will be suspended without the possibility
;of Oe-rergistering except by committee action.


E RNING CREDIT

WHILE SUSPENDED
A student .under any kind of academic suspension at the
University of Florida may not earn credit toward a degree at
the University of Florida by taking work in residence at an-
other institution or through extension or correspondence
courses; .
However, a student who was suspended tor academic rea-
sons andwho has not yet earned the Associate of Arts Cer-
tificate who subsequently graduates from an accredited Flor-
idCommunity College may appeal to the Petitions Com-
mittee for reinstatement. The Petitions Committee may
then, upon the recommendationtof the college in which the
student wishesto enter, admit the student on academic pro-
ationr to that colegedv school Credits earned by such stu-
1 ^dents whilk under suspension tfro the Unniersity of Florida
Smay be transferred in accordance wit other rules and regu-
Sations of the University of Florida.


EXCLUSION.
;. freshman and Sophomore students
S;fA student lassified cF who has attempted 80 semester
hitouts this includes all work accepted b> transfer and all
.work attempted at the University of Florida) shall be in-
eligible for registration at the University unless he or
she applies fora change of classification and is formally ad-
: mitted to a degree program
Al undurraduate students:
A student r ay be excluded from a program of study by
tbe College responsible for the program if the student fails
or rouses to maintain normal academic progress. Such ex-
clusion does not prohibit the student from enrolling in other
programs or colleges if he or she meets the requirements,
r" graduatee students:
:A graduate student may be denied further registration in
the Uiiversity or in his or he gduate major wheitthe
student's progress toward completion of his or her planned
graduate program becomes unsatisfactory Unsatisfactory
pog ress has been defined by the Graduate Council to in-
c: de failure to maaintain an accumulate grade average o B
in all work attempted in the Graduate School


DROPPING COURSES
:0%o student will be allowed to drop a course during the
Last two weeks of regularly scheduled classes without recei~-
ing faniing grades. A proportionate date will be esslbishq.
for shortened terms. Any student seeking :n expcei ftiI
this policy must petition the University Petitions Committee.


WITHDRAWALS
All undergraduate students
u __ __.-- --* - r L -* *- - -- -- J -


A student on University Senate Committee probation
must meet the terms of probation specified by the Commit-
tee.


ABSENCES OR
UNSATISFACTORY WORK
Students are responsible for satisfying the entire range of
academic objectives as they are defined by the instructor in
any course. For students whose names appear on the initial
class roll, absences count from the first meeting of the class.


Any student v
two class meet
she is regislerel
which offers the
course may be
which offers the
necessary to pr
add the course.


tones


through


vho has not
igs of acou


attended at least one of the first
rse or laboratory.in which. he.. or.


d and has not contacted the department
e course to indicate intent to remain in the
dropped by the chairman of the department
e course if the chairman deems this action
ovide space for other students who wish to
Students dropped from courses or labora-
this procedure will be notified by notice


posted in the department office. Such st
instated in the course or laboratory on


udents may be re-
a space available


basis if documented evidence excusing the absences is pres-
ented to the department chairman.
NOTE: Students must not assume that they are auto-
maticallf dropped i the fail to attend the first few days of
dass since the in
courses and laboratories.
TWELVE-DAY RULE: No student shall absent himself or
herself from the University for more than 12 scholastic days
per semester in order to participate in athletic or in extracur-
ricular activities. (A scholastic day is any day on which regu-
lar class work is scheduled)
The 12-day rule applies to individual members of the
group rather than to the group as a whole. Consequently, a
schedule of more than 12 days for any group should be ro-
tatedso that, student t
than 12 scholastic days.
A student who has been warned for absences or un-
satisftory wdr im an lhp41utn s afOin
absences in that course, even though he or she has not been
absent from the University for 12 scholastic days. It is the re-
sponsibility of the student to see that his or her class work
and attendance are satisfactory.
Student Responsibility: Students, themselves remain full
re*idr ble or si itngii*t t8M
tives as they are defined by the instructor in any course.
Under University policy, students are not authorized to at-
tend class unless they are on the class roll or have been ap-
proved to audit and have paid the audit fees.


POST BACCALAUREATE STUDENTS


The probation, suspension, and exclusion regulations that .
apply to undergraduate students also apply to post-bacca-
laureate students.


CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS


Students will be classified by the Registrar each semester
as follows:
0. Special transient or other non-degree students who have
been permitted to register at the University of Florida will be
S -




I ,' ,,


STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


5. A student who is a candidate for a degree in a program
which normally, requires 10 semesters and has earned 120
semester hours or more will be classified as 5.
6. Post-Baccalaureate students. Degree-holding students
who have been admitted to post-baccalaureate status will
be classified as 6.
7. A graduate student who is seeking a Master's degree will
be classified as 7.
8. A graduate student who has earned a Master's degree, or
has earned 36 or more hours while seeking a degree beyond
the Master's degree (but has not been admitted to doctoral
candidacy), will be classified as 8.
9. A graduate student who has been admitted to doctoral
candidacy will be classified as 9.


PETITIONS AND APPEALS
In case the operation of a student academic regulation ap-
pears to result in an undue hardship on an individual stu-
dent, he or she may petition for waiver of the regulation
Petitions requesting permission to drop/add should be
presented to the School or College in which the student is
* enrolled until the date specified in the calendar After that
date all drop/add petitions must be presented to the Com-
mittee on Student Petitions- Exceptions to the minimum-
maximum load regulation are presented to the School or
College for a decision. Petitions approved by the School or
College must be reported to the Registrar's Office before the
action becomes official.
All other petitions should be presented to the Registrar
who will refer them to the University. Senate Committee on
Student Petitions. No petition for readmission may be filed
after regular'registration has started for the term.
The student seeking waiver of regulation through peltlion
must remember that no committee on peirstons can direct
an instructor to change a student's grade, nor can the Senate
Committee require an\ college or school to grant a degree
by waiving any of rhese regulations.


MAINTENANCE OF
STUDENT RECORDS
The Registrar's Office maintains students' academic re-
cords. A progress report is sent to each student at the end of
the term indicating his or her grades, cumulative hours and
grade points, probationary status, if any. and degrees
awarded, if any


CONFIDENTIALITY OF
STUDENT RECORDS
The University of Florida assures the confidentiality of stu-
dent educational records in accordance wilh State Unier-
sity System rules, state statutes, and the Family Educational
Rights and Privact Act of 19'4, known as the Buckley
Amendment.
In general, a present or former student has the right to
personally review his or her own educational records for in-
formation and to determine the accuracy of these records
Parents of dependent students, as defined by the Internal
Revenue Service, have these same rights. A photo I D or oth-
er equivalent documentation, or personal recognition by
custodian for record will be required before access is
granted


AUDITING COURSES
Audtming may be approved on a space-atailable basis The
approval of the instructor and Dean is required. In addition
to payment of course fees Florida residents who are sixty
years of age or older may apphl for a waiver of payment of
auditor's course fees Procedures for auditing courses are
available at the Registrar's Office


ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS
AUL actions taken under these regulations shall be reflected
by appropriate notations on the student's record




i ,, ,i
,, ,"


General


STUDENT ACADEMIC REGULATIONS


Shortened


Degree Opportunities
The Unilersity of Florida provides numerous op-
: f portunities b\ which students may accelerate their academic
careers and reduce the overall length of lime spent in com-
Spleting degree requirements These opportunities are ex-
Splained below:
S1. Early Admission: The Early Admission program allows
superior students to be admitted to the University follow-
l (gcprpetion of the junior year in high school Applica
.t-on iee ecouraged and will be considered on an indi-
tid. bIui by the Admissions Committee. For additional
Swformabie refer to the Admissions section of the
catalog.
2 Dou:lEfolinment: Dual Enrollment refers to a student
taking on-campus courses simullaneousl at both the Uni-
versitl of Florida and another institution For example, a
high school student could register at the Uniersilt as a
a pndedgr student. The credits earned prloor to high
school gra nation could then be accepted for advanced
standing placement and degree-credit when the student is
admitted to the University For more information, high
school students ma\ refer to the description of non-de-
; ree reglstr~atri within the Student Academic Regulations
section.
University of Florida students may also earn additional
credit through the dual enrollment program. For more in-
formation. refer to the discussion of dual enrollment
within the Student Academic Regulations section.
3 ftcreased Course Load. Capable students who register
for more than the normal 15 hours per semester may com-
plete the traditional four-year span within three years.


4. Year-Round Attendance: Students attending the Uni-
versity every semester, including Summer sessions, may
advance their graduation date b\ as much as two
semesters.
5. Credit b)y examination: A student ma, participate in a
variety of credit by examination programs in order to earn
credit toward a degree awarded by the University of Flor-
ida. Credit received from one examination program may
not be duplicated b\ another The various credit by exami-
nation programs are explained below


Advanced


Placement


P


opportunity is sponsored
tion Board Under this pr
versity offers a nationally
completion of a college I
the results of the examir
ments listed below the st
it for courses covering si


Advanced
Placement
Examination
American Hislor'

Art History

Art, Studio
Biology

Chemlslrs,

English Language-


Composiiionr
Sn..nli.L r nmh..l nE


programm Th
by the Co
ogram. a st
graded exa
evel course
nation meel
student ma,
milar mate


s credit b\


examination


liege Entrance Examina-
udent entering the Uni-
mination as evidence of
'taken in high school If
I the minimum require-
receie University cred-
rial


Score Required Course
for Credit Title

3, 4. or 5 US H'sior\ Colonial to
Present
3, 4, or 5 Introduction to
Western Art
3 4 or 5 Beginning Ar
3. 4 or 5 Introduction Io
Biology
3 4 or 5 Introduction to
Chemislr'


or 5 Introductory


Semester
Hours
Credit

6

6
6

b


English


Labtin (Catullus-
Horace)

Calculus AB*"

Calculus BC"
Music, Lislening &
Literature


Music Theory


Physics B"
Physics C
(Mechanics)-"


Physics C (Electricity
& Magnetism)"a 3

Spanish Language 3

Spanish Literature 3

*Credit allowed for only 1
'Credit allowed for only
*"Credil allowed lor Phy


3. 4. or 5 Latin (Catullus-
Horace)
3,4, or 5 Elementary Functions
& Calculus
3, 4, or 5 Calculus

3, 4. or 5 Music Listening &
Literature
3, 4, or 5 Introductory Music
Theory
3, 4, or 5 General Physics


Introductory Physics
w/Calculus


4, or 5 Introductory Physics
w/Calculus
, 4, or 5 Spanish Conmposition
& Conversation
. 4, or 5 Introduclion to
Spanish Literature
English exam
1 Caculus eram
sics B or Physics C exams onl,


College Level Examination Program (CLEP): The College
. Level Examination Program is another type of credit by ex-
amination opportunity sponsored by the College Entrance
Examination Board. By presenting appropriate scores, stu-
dents mas receive as many as 30 semester hours credit
toward completion of general education requirements. Their
scores on the CLEP general examinations must meet thb min-
imums established by the State University System. In addi-
tion. students who plan to apply for credit must do so before
enrolling or, at the latest, prior to the end of their first term
at the Unilersity. CLEP testing is periodically available on the
campus and is administered by the Office of Instructional
Resources
In accordance with the Articulation Agreement (agree-
ment between public community colleges and public state
universities on the acceptance of credit by transfer), the Uni-
versity of Florida awards credit for CLEP examinations based
on the following scaled scores:


CLEP
General
Examination
SEnglish
Social Sciences
Biology
Physical Sciences
Humanities
Mathematics


Minimum Scor
Required for
Credit
Scale Score 610
Scale Score 488
Sub Score 50
Sub Score 49
Scale Score 489
Scale Score 497


Maximum
Semester
Hours
Credit
6
6


Additional credit may be awarded for satisfactory scores
on certain CLEP subject area examinations The maximum
amount of credit that may be earned or transferred under
the CLEP program, both general and subject examinations
combined, is 45 semester hours or 67.5 quarter hours. If Eng-
lish Sublect Examinations are taken it is imperative that the
essay option be taken if credit is to be received for English
Composition
Departmenral Examinallons: A student may also receive
credit through the challenge of departmental course exami-
nations. For specific information, contact the departments or
colleges.
fStudents should seriously consider their decision about
taking the CLEP general examination in English Experience
has shown that those who score below the 75th percentile
are often handicapped because they have not had college


Time


i


_




S, *
*. ..


College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences


PART I: Freshmen and
Sophomores
(Students Classified UF)




*< "* <* f


i **CK 1 j:
* ''
. -fMr"


College of Liberal Arts

and Sciences


Entering freshmen are classified UF They retain this classi-
fication up to but not beyond 80 attempted credits Students
should apply for admission to the college of their major at
the appropriate point usually 64 credits but earlier in the
case of some colleges. All students who will have junior
standing (60 semester hours) by the end of the Fall 1982 term
will be required to take the College Level Academic Skills
Program. Each college specifies admission requirements in
its section of the catalog.
GENERAL REGULATIONS
Maximum. Minimum, and Normal Loads: The normal
course load in this college is 15 credit hours, and all students
are expected to carry a normal load. First semester freshmen
and transfer students may prefer to carry a lighter load dur-
ing their first lerm Loads lighter or heavier than normal must
be justified and approved by the student's academic adviser
Loads of fewer than 12 or more than 19 require approval of
the Dean as well as the student's adviser.


Adding/Dropping/Withdrawing:


Courses


may


be added


any time during the drop,'add period if this does not in-
crease one's registration to more than 19 hours Courses may
be dropped during the drop/add period without penalty as
long as this does not lower one's registration below 12 hours
(See Maximum, Minimum and Normal Loads above) After
the drop,'add period, a course may be dropped up to the
date established as the College deadline. All drops are sub-
ject to the following restrictions:


(1) No more than two (2)
University's drop/add period,
student's lower division career,
2UF A maximum of one drop \
semester Students on acaden
will not be allowed to drop
tremely well-documented supl
(2) After the deadline student


such drops, after
will be permitted in
when classified as 1U
SIII be allow ed during
nic warning or proba
courses, except when
port is furnished
;s may petition to drc


course provided they can document sufficient
drop usually hardship or medical.


(3) The course load will not be reduced
(A petition to the Liberal Arts and Scienc
mittee must accompany such a request
which does reduce the load below 12 h
(4) Final approval to drop a course after
drop/add period must be obtained fror
Advisemeni Office. 358 Little Hall Stude
all classes for which the\ are registered


below
es Petiti
to drop
ours.)
the Ur
n the
?nts mu
Failure


Ip a


reasons to


hours
1 Corn-
course


diversity s
Academic
ist attend
to attend


a class will not be accepted by the College as constituting
a drop, the only procedure for dropping a class is the
proper processing of a drop card which the student must
initiate.
(5) Students dropping their entire courseload must con-
* *r* *kn r"es:. n' *Ln_ D..:.... -_ *L -. _.



T h:l


ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT
Initial registration as a freshman for each Fall cldas is con-
ducted during the preceding summer months. Students and
their parents have an opportunity to attend one of several
two-day programs. Notices concerning this are mailed in the
late Spring to those students who have been admitted by the
University Admissions Office. At these Summer Registration
Programs, students and parents attend sessions relating to
career choice, student activities, helping services and course
selection. Each student meets with an academic adviser who
assists in selecting courses to take in the Fall.
Those Fall students who cannot attend a Summer Regis-
tration Program confer with academic advisers as a part of
the registration period held in the week prior to the begin-
ning of classes in the Fall. Students entering college in the
Spring or Summer semesters also have advisement conr
ferences as a part of the registration period prior to classes.
In the latter part of each semester.. students register for
their next semester .Again academic advisers are available to
discuss course selection. It is expected that students shall ac-
cept responsibility for fulfilling curricular requirements as
slated in the catalog, and students w ho are making suc-
cessful progress are not required to see an adviser when reg-
istering Students who are changing majors or who are not


maintaining a
about course


"L average
selection.


In the first few days of
calendar printed on early
should review their course
if needed to make a reason
of past grades and current


e are urged to talk to an adviser

each semester (see deadlines in
pages of this catalog) students
selection and add or drop courses
able load for the semester in view
goals. If, during the semester, stu-


dents feel they must drop a course because of illness or oth-
er emergency they will find academic advisers available for
discussion of the problem Advisers are also available to help
the student define any other academic problem and find
corrective measures through the College Academic Advise-
ment Office. 358 Little Hall.


COUNSELING AND
RELATED SERVICES
In addition to assistance from academic advisers, students
may find that one or more of the following offices can be of
assistance in solving personal problems, career selection
problems or problems relating to deficiencies in academic
skills. The Student Affairs section of this catalog describes
their specific services
1. Reading and Writing Center


2. Speech and Hearing Center
3. Student Health Service (Infirmary)
4 Career Resource Center
5 Psychological and Vocational Counseling


Center.


vides professional psychological services to students. These
include \ocational counseling, career information, as-
sistance with academic problems, specialized testing." mar-
riage counseling and personal counseling. Students and stu-
dents' spouses may apply in person for such services as they
deem necessary No charge is made. The Counseling Center
offers consultative services to University faculty and staff
who are engaged in counseling students. Close relationships
are maintained with deans, college advisers, housing per-
sonnel, the Student Health Service, and religious centers, for
the purpose of expediting both counseling and consultative
sern Ices.


Colleges


INFORMATION


FOR


FRESHMEN AND

SOPHOMORES


(STUDENTS

UF)


CLASSIFIED







COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


prior to the end of their first term at the University. Students
who obtain general education credit by examination may
take further work in the areas covered, using it for elective
credit. Some credit by examination may not serve to ac-
celerate students' programs because the specific course re-


quirements of their majors
ject matter credit.


are not satisfied by general sub-


A student who chooses to attend three academic
semesters each year may accomplish the work of four aca-
demic years in three calendar years. Students may take such
Summer work at their local community college prior to com-
pletion of 64 credits. After completion of 64 credits only
work taken at accredited colleges or universities (not junior
colleges) is accepted as transfer credit. Students are urged to
discuss any such plans with a College academic adviser prior
to enrolling in courses at another school
Unusually able students may choose to accelerate by car-
rying heavier than average course loads rather than applying
themselves more deeply to normal loads. In some majors
such students might trim one to two semesters off of the
time required for their degrees: however, they do so at con-
siderable risk to the depth and quality of their education


SPECIAL PROGRAMS FOR UF
STUDENTS


1. SPECIAL SERVICES/PACT
The Special Services Program and the Program for Aca-
demic Counseling and Tutonng are designed to give educa-
tionally disadvantaged students who qualify for admission
to the University of Florida assistance in developing those
academic skills needed for successful academic and social
progress at the University.
The supportive services offered or arranged for by these
programs include counseling, academic advisement, tutor-
ing, study skills, reading and writing labs and special classes.
Peer Counselors are assigned to students to assist them in
making the smooth transition to the university environment


While admission
Program is selective
can participate, the
incoming students
assistance provided


to the federally-funded Special Services
and only a limited number of students
I Slate-supported PACT serves all other
who would benefit from the academic
through these Programs.


Both of these programs work in close coordination with
other supportive services in the planning and implementa-
tion of various programs designed to increase retention and
graduation efforts at the University of Florida
2. ACADEMIC ENRICHMENT AND RECRUITMENT SERV-
ICES PROGRAM (AERS)
The Office of Academic Enrichment and Recruitment
Services (AERS) works closely with minority high school and
community college students to facilitate their matriculation
to the University of Florida. Once these students are en-
rolled, the AERS office continues helping them by providing
academic advisement, career guidance, and tutoring. Aca-
demic counselors are available to assist students in review-
ing career goals, course selection and curricular require-
ments. The AERS office also serves as a central source of inm-
formation pertaining to academic enrichment services of-
fered at the University of Florida, and is an adjutant to the
Academic Advisement Center in the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences
3. THE COLLEGE HONORS PROGRAM
This is an invitational program for students who have
shown potential for superior academic performance. Inveta-
. .- in -


maintain an overall grade point


students


must take


nar and a two-semester sophomore interd
as one of the required honors courses each
requirements are not in addition to gene


quirements but may
ments. The small siz
the students make
course materials and
enhance their critic
writing of research
Students who fulfill


with a 3.0 overall
quirements, and


the Associate
3.5 overall a'
Honors After
comes the res
dent pursues
honors coordi


av
ha


Art
noP


be used in satisfaction
es of the classes and th
possible more thorot
More independent wo
al faculties through ei


inator


should be


average


of 3.00 All honors


Semi-


:iphlnarv course
*mester Honors
I education re-
I those require-
high quality of
,h inquiry into
k Students ma\


xtensie


reading,


papers, and oral presentations in class.
the requirements of the honors program
erage, satisfy the General Education Re-
ve 64 semester hours of credit, will get
s Certificate with Honors Those with a
will receive the Certificate with High


contacted for adm


mission


into


t


In summary, the goal of general education at the
slty of Florida is to prepare students
1 To think clearly and independently in fields


a iwo-semester


Freshman Honors


the sophomore 'ear, the honors program be-
ponsibility of the department in which the stu-
the major course of studs The departmental


Unier-

oulside


!
J


V


the upper division honors program The upper division lhon-
ors programs in the College of Liberal 4rts and Sciences lead
to the baccalaureate degree with either honors or high hon-
ors. On the basis of performance in honors courses, if re-
quired, a minimum upper division grade point average of 3.5.
and a senior thesis or project, each department will decide
whether the student will graduate ,with honors or high hon-
ors.

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS CERTIFICATES
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences awards the As-
sociate of Arts Certificate of the University All graduates of
the University must complete the general education pro-
gram and be eligible to receive the Associate of Arts Certifl-
cate prior to receiving the baccalaureate degree Students
entering the University of Florida with fewer than 60 credits
must remain in a UF classification in the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences at least one semester, after which they may
transfer to the college of their major when that college ap-
proves. Students who maintain a 2.0 grade point average
may remain, barring suspension, in the UF classification
beyond 64 credits to complete requirements for admissions
to the college of their malor, except that no students may re-
main in this classification beyond 80 credits
The Associate of Arts Certificate will be awarded upon
completion of
1. 64 credits including authorized credits in general edu-
cation as indicated for the student's major.
2. An overall C average.
Application forms for the Associate of Arts Certificate are
available from the Office of the Registrar and should be re-
turned to the Office of the Registrar


GENERAL EDUCATION


General Statement
The purpose of general education at the University of Flor-
ida is to lay a foundation for lifelong enrichment of the hu-
man experience and for lifelong contribution to society The
objective is to encourage all-around development of stu-
dents as individuals and as members of society, so they may
bring balance and perception to-aery field of their activity.




Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


General Education Requirements


The general education requirement


parts: (a) Basic Cultural Stkills
Social and Behavioral Science


includes four equal


(English and Mathematics), (b)


(c) Natural


the lH'umanities, All students will take


Sciences,


and (d)


a minimum of 36


semester hours of credit from lists of courses especially con-
structed to provide Intellectual balance and breadth
In planning each semester's program, students should bal-
ance general and professional education, science and non-
science courses. Undecided students should be careful to
mfte progress inrtheir general education while trying out
courses in specific majrs.j Typfcaly students complete the
greater art of their general education in the first two years
while also tkling the preprofess~onal courses specified for
their majors;
nJ selecting courses, students sihduld slud, course descrlp
tions in the back of the catalog, since course titles alone give
insufficient information. Freshmen and sophomores are cau-
tioned not to take courses for which they may not be pre-
par. Where prerequisites ar stated, the, must be adhered
to. Students should consult college and departmental ad-
visers as to whether partular General Education courses
hereafter listed may be used to satistfyv alege distribution
act major r r prep~?fessional requirements
: :The Director of the Honors Program in the College of Lib-
'eral Arts and Sciences is authorized to approve for each stu-
dent up to twelve hours of freshman and sophomore Honors
Seminars IDS 2931 nrid IDS 3931 to meet general education
requirements in appropliate general education distribution
areas.


man beings and their societies, and (2) to become ac-
quainted with how a Social Science discipline is applied to
or is useful in understanding the social world. The cur-
riculum offered allows flexibility to sample the offerings of
more than one discipline and to choose courses around a
theme which may be of special interest to the student. Each
student must select two courses from Group I and one
course from Group II. No more than two of the three courses


chosen may be from the same department.
Credit
Social/Behavioral


Catalog Page


GROUP I. Foundations of the Social/Behavioral Sciences


Anthropology
ANT 2402

ANT 2410
MAF 2402

ECO 2000

ECO 2013
Geography
GEO 1010

GEO 2410
History
AMH 2010
AMH 2020
AMS 2030
xx x ..^ :. .


(3) Anthropology and Modern
Life ................................................ 204
(3) Cultural Anthropology ................. 204
(3) Human Sexuality and Society ..... 204

(3) Economic Concepts and Institu-
tions ................................................. 229


Basic Economics


I ........


(3) Geography for a Changing
W o rld ...........................................


(3) Social Geograpl


U.S. History to


(3) U S. History Since 1877 .................


Introduce
Stud le


ion to Ae'rican


iTHORIZED COURSES OR
GENERAL EDUCATION


* *. -^ '* 1<
: ** l^


The foiopwing courses have been approved by the Council
on General Education 'or use in satisfying general education,
uinreiments, I selecting from among these courses, stu-
dents should keep in ind that the general education part
f their university program should serve to increase their
fund okf owledge outide their major and should broaden
their intellectual horizons


MATHEMATICS (Minimum Credits Required)


CataloR paRe


Any Mathiematics course, (except MAT 1033 and those with
aprefix of MAE) OR
Any Statistis course
SuBggeedforstudents who need no additional mathematics
- tfoher- maje' field.
MFP111 3 (3) Fundamental Mathematics ......... 280
ENGLISH (Minimum Credits Required) ................................ 6


Required of all students:
ENC 1101. (3) Expo


ENC 1102


Catalog page
story and Argumentative


Writing ..
(3) Writing about


Literature ..... ..


Available to Honors Students as Substitutes for the Required
Courses:
ENC 2935 (3) College Honors English ........ 244
ENC 2937 (3) College Honors English ................ 244
Qualified students, with the approval of the English Depart-
rment,. may substitute a literature or composition course at a
higher level in the place of ENC 1102. (Students in need of
special preparation will be required to take ENC 1000 Devel-
oDmental Enalish. Students scormnn low on the Test of Stan-


Interdisciplinary
* I fi- t) (3)


Si5 2120 (3)
SSI 2124 (31


American Institutions


H-lonortsI


Political Science
INR 2002 (3
POS 2041 (3
POS 2112 12


Psychology
PCO 2714
PSY 2013
SOP 2513
Religion
REL 2322
Sociology
SOC 2000
SOC 2005


SOC 2020
SSpeech
SPC 23X00)


" ..... 9..


. ;... .. .. .l ......^


International Relations ..............
American Federal Government ..
American State and Local
G overnm ent ........... .................


(3) Personal Growth ............................
(3) General Psychology .................
(3) Human Conflict ...........................


(3) Patterns of American Religion ...

(3) Principles of Sociology ............


(3) Principles


of Sociologyv:


Honors ........ ..................... .......
Social Problems ............................


(4) Introduction to Speech
Communication ......................... 322


GROUP II. Uses of the Social/Behavioral Sciences


Anthropology
ANT 2141

ANT 2610
ANT 3241
ANT 3302


(3) Development of World
Civilization ................................


(3) Language and Cultu


(3) Anthropology of Religion ............
(3) Sex Roles: A Cross-Cultural


hy ... ......................

1877 ......................


re ,...........,...







COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


History
AMH 3460
AMH 3530
Interdisciplinar
BES 2121
WST 3010


Political Science


CPO 2002
INR 2054
INR 3102
POT 2001

PUP 3204
PSychology
DEP 3003
EXP 3604

PPE 3004
SOP 3004
Religion
REL 2021


(3) U.S. Urban History .... ...........
(3) Immigration and Ethnicity
y
(3) Creative and Critical Thinking
(3) Interdisciplinary Perspectives
on Women ....


(3) Comparative Politics ........
(3) Alternative World Futures
(31 U S. and World Affairs ....


(3) Power. Ethics,


LIT 3111

LIT 3374
SCA 2502


Great


Books of the


World I
The Bible


Norse


Western


as Literature


and Germanic


Mythology


Philosophy -Religion


CLT 2371

PHH 2100
REL 2202

REL 3500
REL 3600


and the Modern


(3) Politics, Ecology, and Energy

(3) Developmental Psychology ..
(3) Introduction to Cognition an
Perception ... .. ...... .
(3) Psychology of Personality .
(3) Social Psychology ...


13) Religions of the Graeco-
World .. .. ..
(3) Philosophical Origins, I


Survey


Roman


of Biblical History


Religion
(3) History of Christianity
(3) Introduction to Judaism-


Classical


Period


GROUP II. Renaissance to Modern Times
Credtl
History


EUH 2001

EUH 2002

HIS 2464


The Individual and Religious
Experience ..................


Western


Catalog


Cilvlization Middle


Ages to 18th Century


Western


.. .. 266


ization


Century\ to Present
(3) Introduction to the History of


Science
Present


Renaissance


Sociology
MAF 2200
SOC 3110
SOC 3300

SOC 3331
SOC 3745
Speech
SPC 3710


(3) Marriage and


the Family


Interdisciplinary
AFA 2000 (


(3) Deviance .. .... ... .. ..........
(3) Community Growth and
Change ......
(3) Latin American Societies ...


Minorities in American


Patterns of


HUM


Inlroduction to Afro-American
St ides .......... .
Western Humanities


Renaissance


to the


Present


Society


HUM


2239


Intercultural


Western Humanities
Renaissance to the Present,
Honors ... ..... ..


Communication


HUMANITIES (Minimum Credits Required)


Literature
AML 2012


........................ 9


The requirements in the Humantlies provide the student
broad opportunities to develop insights into humanistic


studies from both topical and chronological


Each student must take th


ree courses


in Hui


two of which must be chosen from Groups I


than two of the three courses


following


terdisciplinary, Literature,


subject


perspectives.


manuites, at least
and II No more


may be selected from any one


categories


Philosophy


History,


- Religion, Fine


and Humanities and the Professions.


GROUP


I. Ancient
Credit


History
ARH 2050

EUH 2000

HIS 2463


HIS 3470 (.
Interdisciplinary
ARC 1701 (

CLA 1100 (
CLA 1120 o


CLT 2370


HUM

HUM


Times


through


the Renaissance
Catalog Page


Introduction to the Principles
and History of Art I .....


Western


Civilization: From Early


'Times to Middle


Ages ...


(3) Introduction to the History of


Science:


Origins to The


Renaissance ....... ..
3) History of Technology I


AML 2021

AML 3271
ENL 2022

FOT 2120

FRT 2413

GET 2480
LIT 2120

LIT 3121

LIT 3353
RUT 2110
SPT 2231


SPT 2601


3) Survey


History


of Architectural


I .............. ..


3) The Glory That Was


Greece


The Grandeur That Was Rome


223
... 223


(3) Myths of the Greeks and
Rom ans .. ......... ..... ....... .
(3) Western Humanities- Ancient


to Ren


aissance


(3) Western Humanities: College
H honors .......................


269


Philosophy-Religion
PHH 2400 (3)
PHI 2630 (3)
REL 3420 (3)


REL 3494
REL 3601


(3) Survey


oI American Literature


From the Beginnings through
Crane .. . ......


(3) Survey


4)


of American Literature


From Crane to the Present ..


Afro-Amencan


Survey
1750


Literature ...


of English Lietrature:


to the Psenit t


(3) Masterpieces


of .CoEntinental


)tehe turenh Itirsr Neritswe Ih
(3) The Frenpch LiLrrary heritage Ik


Classical to Modern ...
(3) German Literary Heritage


(3) Surne\


of World Literature:


Cenlury to Modern ...
Great Books ot the Western
W world II . .. .
Ethnic Literature..


(3) Russian Masterpieces


S. ..- *255


l/in


24


. .. .. 2 :

. ... 234


(3) The Modern Spanish- merican
Novel in English
Translation .. .. .........
(3) Masterpieces of Spanish
Literature .. . ..


Philosophical Origins II ...
Contemporary Moral Issues
Contemporary Religious
Thought .................


Human


Image in the West


(3) Introduction to ludaism:
Modern Period ....


rFn^^i in iII. caaas.l Tn..t L


244


...


": '
. &.*


. **/
.*:I
.<< Jl'
**^ *


,i E..
'** '. .
^ *
*'/
!'*\..* /^ **


. .


* ^ * *
'* -/." .


=1 I iI


nh^I1ni II I 1 |i I Jn


jJ j





Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


:3) History of Technology II
() Introduction to Latin
American History ..


Interdisciplinary
HUM 202Q (3) Humanities Forum
HUM 2030 (3) The Culture of Western
SCivilization ....


-UJM 2410
HUM 2420
HUM 2424

NHUM 24W0
LIN 2000
HUM 2513
1DS 2190
IDS 3181
Fine Arts
HUM 2510
MUL22011

MUL 2112
THE 20W


hilosophy-Religion
PHI 2403 (3)
PHM 2204 (3)


REL 2001

R L 2002

RIL 3321


(4) Asianr Humanities ... .....
(3) African- Humanities ....
S(3) African Cultures and
Literature ... ...... ........ ..


(3) L:atinAmerican Huma
(3) Language and People
(3) Museum without Wa.
(3) The Ascent of Mankir
(3) Social Ethics


cities .....

IIs .. ........
id .


OCE 2005
PHY 2037
PH'~ 3400
PSC 2121
PSC 2707

PSC 2900

PSC 3402


269
269
275
269
269
274


(3) Introduction to the fine Arts
(3) Introwuction to Music
Listening .. ..... .. .
(3) Masterworks of M4usic ... ..
(3) Theater Appre action


Science, Myth, and


value


Social Issues and Social


Thought ..
(3) Religion in Muman Experience,
A (Wvestern) .............. "-....,,
(3) Religion in BHuman Experience,
B (Asia** *****
(3) Judaism and Christanihnl ..
Ch st'ani* *....


(3) Introductory Oceanography ........
(3) Physics for Skeptics .......................
(3) Light. Color and Holography ......
(3) Natural Regions ..........................


The Physical


Sciences:


College Honors ........ .................. 303
(3) Scientists and Scientific
() S oncenpts y :.....
(3) Space and Society ........................ 303


Option B. (Recommended for science majors, engineering
majors, and preprofessional students.) One of the following
sequences Prerequisites must be adhered to.


CHM 20-1
CHM 2042-3

CHM 2051-2


CHM 2053
GL' 2015
GLY 2100
GLY 2991C
PHY 2004-5
PHY 2048-9

PHY 2053-4
PHY 2066-7


(3:3) General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis, I. II ......... 219
(3,3) General Chemistry
Honors I, II .... ....... ................... 219
(3) General Chemistry Honors II ...... 219
(3) Physical Geology ........................ 261


Historical


Geology ........ ...............


(3) Physical Geology-Honors .............
(3;3) Applied Physics I, II ......................
(3;3) General Physics with
Calculus I. II...... ... ................


(3;3) General Physics


II ......


(3,3) General Physics Honors I, II


NOTE: The science requirements call for at least three credits
iithe Physic Siencs h thM gtge


additional six credits


from the other.


Humanities and the Professions
ON 34 (3) Humanities
C4410 (3) Humanities


HiS9 (3;


39 (3)


irS 4163

PHI 4633


BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (3-6 credit


and Engineering
and .Medicine


): Hist y of Western
'.1 M ed ciwn ................ .....
SSociI flistorv of American
M ed icine .... . .......... ..
) Humanities and Law ..
Humanities and Business


Ethical ministate in Medicine
Ethical Issues in Medicine


The requirements in


the Biological


Is See note below.)
Sciences are designed to


enable a student to understand the bases for s ie-nifc in.
quiry, and to use this knowledge to understand our b gi-

of study have been devised: (1) for natural science majors,
and (2) for non-science majors.


Credit


Catalog Page


PHYSICAL SCIENCES (3-6 credits
The requirements in the Physical


- See note below.)
Sciences enable the slu-


dent (1) to become acquainted with the basic concepts and


methods of scientific inquiry in the Physical


Sciences,


(2) to become acquainted with the application and/or im-


plicatio

* ."cilplmet


ifrom G
fromn C


ins of the Physical Sciences. The curriculum allows
ty to -samrplelithe offerings of more than ene dit
or to choose a thee to pursu Wihich may be of spe


rest
A. C
roup
round


-- _


to the student


)ne course from Group


) II. Some courses
i I.


, followed by one course


in Group II have


Credit


prerequisites

Catalog Page


GROUP Foundations of the Physical Sciences
AST 1002 (3) Discovering the Universe .......


CHM 1020
GEO 2200
GLY 1000

PHY 2001

PSC 2501


(3) Chemistry and


Society ..................


(3) Physical Geography


(3) Exploring


the Geological


Sciences ... ..... .............


Introduction


(3)


to Principles of


Physics ...... ... .. .. ..
Our Environment .............


GROUP II. Uses of the Physical Sciences


AST 70n7


I ifp in Ihp I Iniveprr


Recommended for Science Majors and Preprofessional


Students
veterinary).


(Premedical,


predental,


Prerequisites must be adhered to.


BSC 2010


SC 20 1


BSC 2040

BSC 2041


preoptometry,


Integrated Principles of
Biology I ................


Integrated Principles of


Biology


Honors Laboratory ..


Integrated Principles of
Biology II. Honors Laboratory..


Recommended for Non-Science Majors:
APB 2150 (3) Bilotokica Sciencess :
Organisms, and Ge


APB 2151

APB 2991

APB 2992


Biological Sciences II:
Ecology, and Behav
Honors Biological Scii
Cells, Organisms, ai
Honors Biological Sci
Evolution. Ecology.
Behavior ................


Substitutions for the Non-Science Sequel
(not acceptable in some colleges) For


.... ....... ... .. . .


netics ......... 212
Evolution,
ior .. ........... 212
ences I:
id Genetics 212
ences II:
and
.. ...... ....... .. 212
rce:
APB 2150:
.a -


l IS 3471
LAH 2020


H15





__


I I


, I.J







COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


PLANS OF STUDY BY
COLLEGE OF MAJOR
On the following pages, specific general education re-
quirements are listed for each college and/or major. Stu-
dents are expected to follow the program of general educa-
tion specified for their particular baccalaureate goal In other
words the particulars of students' general education depend
upon their choice of malor and choice of courses within the
limits set by the major Associate of Arts Certificates are
awarded on this basis. Preprofessional courses for students
first two years are also listed
Suggested course sequences are not at all rigid. Students
should adjust programs to fit their ability and background
Academic advisers will help do this


4. Complete one cour'
prior to graduation (nc
the upper division). S
ment while they are in
completing a Liberal A
which has a laboratory


se in science having a laboratory.
it necessarily prior to admission to
students may satif tIhis require-
the lower division by successlullv
rts and Sciences course in science
A grade of ar leasr C is required


Teacher Preparation in Liberal Arts and Sciences
Students may earn their degrees in the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences and complete requilemenis for certifica-
tion as secondary school teachers in one or more academic
subjects by following one ol the Arts and Sciences Educa-
lion Programs described in the College of Education section
in this catalog


Further information may be obtained in
Liberal Arts and Sciences Advisement Office.


the College of
358 Little Hall


Stai


LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers degrees
with majors in thirty-one different major fields, plus an in-
terdisciplinary major Students who expect to obtain a de-
gree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should
complete the General Education Courses listed below and
elective courses, with a C or.better average Students with a
grade of D in any of these courses must complete a course in


the same area with a grade of
Students must complete the
button Requirements listed bh
tributlion Requirement must a
Many courses will serve in
Some will not.


C or better before graduation
' General Education and Distri-
elow. Note that the Basic Dis-
Iso be met prior to graduation.
satisfying both requirements


ndards For Students Who (
(1) Students are stronglI u
language requirement prio
into the College Those slu
ing demonstrated the nece
petency will be required t
course and to make sarista
until they have completed
ment
(2) UF students should mal


button
mathem
ing a
sophom
College
be expe
toward


requireml
atics and
science
ore hears
ditrinbuti
cted to


Change To 3LS
rged to complex
r to application
idenis admitted


Classification.
tre the foreign
for admission
without hay-


essary foreign language com-
.o register for an appropriate
ctory progress e.erv semester
the foreign language require-


ke


ents threi
science, ar
laboratory
Students
on require
make read


its completion


r


as vH


addi
d one
in
who
nent
3nabl'
ilh Ih


It
c
t


effort
ional
coursee
heir


io finish distrl-
hours each in
in science hav-
freshman and


hate not satisfied the
prior to admission will
e progress each term
e foreign language re-


General Education and Distribution Requirements


English ........ ..... .. ..
Mathematics .. ... .....
(Botany, chemistry, computer si
matics, premedical. predental.
zoology majors should not take M'
culus sequence.)
Social and Behavioral Sciences ..
The Humanities .......
Physical Sciences .... ..... ........
(Botany, chemistry, macrobiol4
predental, and zoology majors sh(
istry.)
Students malonng in Compute
physics sequence for Physical Sci
Biological Sciences ......... .......
(Botany. premedical, predent
should take courses in zoology ar
All students must earn at least a g
a biological science department
ZOO.)


Credits
. .. ... 6
rm
me i e me n m in H 6


rcence. economics, mathe-
physics, statistics, and
tGF 1113. but follow a cal-


.. ... 9


ogy.
would


.. ......... .. .. .... 69
physics, premedical,
take courses in chem-


er Sciences should
ences


take a


S .... 6


;al, and zoology
id botany or Core B
irade of C in one co
t- APB, BSC. BOT,


majors
lology.
urse in
MCB,


quirement
(3) E\er\ student v ill be
progress each term toward
an approved malor wiihan
Sciences


ACCOUNTING

Students planning to
should lake, while classify
study Siudents with i
professional Requirement.
the School of Accounting


expected to make satislactorv
satist\ying the requirement of
the College of Liberal Arts and


School
* follow
concern
10 conte


Account
program
the PI
n ad\lser


General Education Requirements


Credits


ENC English, including
*M' C 3223 Survey of Ca
Beha oral Studies ....
Social Sciences
The Humanities
Physical Sciences.
Biological Sciences


ENC 1101
Iculus 1


A great amount of flexibility is available to the liberal arts
student. Certain general guidelines are:
1 Study the materials on admission, advisement. and re-
quirements for degrees, and consult with the proposed
major department as soon as you have chosen a maior
field
2 Take courses in your malor and take electives.


3 All candidates for degrees awarded
Liberal Arts and Sciences are required
minimum nrnfiiePnrv in nlmp frnrPin


the Col
have at
t1ua P_


Idll


*

* .


lege of
least a
"hp re-


Preprofessional Requirements

ACC 2001 Introduction to AccounhinE
ECO 3411 Economics and Business St
ECO 2013-2023 Basic Economics
M4C 3224 Suriey of Calculus 2
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics
Electites to make a total of 64 hours


Credit


atlStlCS


*MAC 3223 is also considered a preprofessional


course


I





Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


Physical Science .....
agieal Science .....
Behavioral Scierice .;.,. .


Ifcii': ';t'*
": *: ':

*! ''^ 1


**


3220 and 3312.
2002. PLP 3002,


-....*..-.- .. a., .. *. .


and other according to prerequisites completed.
Suggested Course Sequence -------

Credits


English ............. . .... .................................... ... . ... .................
Social Sciences ................. ............ ................................


1132 Algebra and Trigonometry .............. ......................... 4


Behavioral Studies ....... ...............
CHM 2040 General Chemistry ..
English .. ................... ....... ...
Social Sciences ............. .............


2042L


CHM 2041,


PHY 2004 & 2004L ..................
Electives ...... ...... ......


223 Calculus


I


MAC3224 Calculus 2 .:


- -* -


ACC 2001 intiroiuction tAct6inting. ................
ECO 2013 Basic Economics ...... .....
ECO 2023 Basic Economics ;....... ... ...
STA 3Q23 Introduction to Statistics. . ....... .
ECO 3411 EcOnomic and Business Statistics ...
' Physical or Biological Science ........ .
humanities ................ .............
UIectives -,,-----


........ 3
.... ... 3
.... ... 3

. ... .. 3
,,, 3
.,,,, 3


AGRICULTURE

Students planning to enter the Cillege of Agriculture
should takewhile in lower division, the following program
iofstudy. The sequencein which courses are to be taken will
depdent upon the department in which a student takes his
ipper divisionmajor and will be determined by counselors
- i the College of .Agriculture
S. Credits


En h glish ... .. ....
MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigo.ometry ...
Behavioral Studies .


Social


Sciences ... .. .. .. . .


...... .. .... 4

6


SOPHOMORE YE AR


H um anltl es .............. . ............. ..... B......
CHM 2043C Chemistry ............................ ....
BSC 2010C Integrated Principles of Biology


Communications
Electi es ... .......
Humanities .. .


AEB 3103 Food Resource
BSC 2011 Integrated Prin


I ...................


. .............. .................................... .............


Economics ...... ............ ........... ...
l oles of Biolo" II .....................


Hum anities ...... ...... ........ ............ .... ... ..........


Communications .............


STheliH umanities ...... ..... ......
CHM 2040 Introd uctory Gteral Chemistr .........
PHW 2004 & 20041( Applied Phsics .. ..... .. .....
4SC 2010C Integrated Principes oi Biolog I .... ..
Preprofessionaj Requiren*nts
CHM 24i, 2042L and 2043C General Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis
AEB 3i03 Principles of Food,& Resource Economics..
afCommunicatiions ..... . . .. . ............ .......


.Selected from ,SPC
N*R la''M' m ^ C


C


EI
.jEte~i^t


3352 arnd AG(


3601'
4603


.. 7-10


. . . . ...


A: Prospective marjor in Animal Science. Dairy Science.
Food Science, Poultrn Science. pre-Veterinary Medicine.
and Micrdbioogy and Cell Science should take courses
listed above plus BSC 2011C Microbiology majors should
SUbstitute OT 2011C for BSC 2011C
B. Prospective majors in Dairy and Poullry Management
may satisfy tfhe Chemistry requirements by completing
CHM 2040, CHM 2041L, and 2042L.


Ci Prospective majors
namental Ho-ticulIure.


in Agronomy, Fruit Crops. Or-


Plant Pathology, Soil


Vegetable Clops should lake the
plus BQT 2011C.


courses


Science, and
listed above


I Entomology majors should take BSC 2011C in addition
to the aboveto complete biology requirements.
Prospective majors in food and Resource Ecnermcs.i
should take the courses listed above but may substitute
MAC 3311 or MAC 3223 lor PHY 2004 and 2004L and may


fulfill Chemistry requirements by completing
2041. and 2042L or CHM 1020 and 1021


F Prospective majors


CHM 2040.


in agricultural Education, Mecha-


ARCHITECTURE

Students planning to enter


..... 4


College of Architecture


should lake. while classified UF. one of the following pro-
grams of study They should consult the departmental major
adviser for specific information regarding grade point aver-


ages, minimum grades required in


certain courses and other


Information relating to the Curriculum Advisers are listed in
the catalog under the section titled. "College of Architec-
ture."
To be eligible for admission to the College of Architecture,
the student is required to have at least a 2.0 (C) average in
the courses listed in ihe appropriate curriculum for the first
two years. In addition the student must earn a 2.0 (C) aver-
age in all preprofessional work included in the first two years
of the program Please refer to additional information in the
section of this catalog titled "College of Architecture," under


the heading


For Upper Division programs see the College of Architec-
ture and School of Building Construction sections of the
catalog.
A. FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF DESIGN (ARCHITEC-
TURE) f


General Education Requirements


English ...... ...........
Social Sciences ............


Credits
ii.................I.. ..... .. I 6
.. ..... .... .............. 6


The Humanities ..... .... .... ................................................-. 9
BES Behavioral Studies ............................ ..................... ........ ..... .. 3

PHY 2004 Applied Physics 1 .......... ................................... 3
Biological Sciences ............ .................................................... 3
MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 ............................................. 3


Preprofessional Requirements


E active ............................................................. .

SOPHOMORE YE AR


Suitable electives in Agriculture: AEB 3133 or 3300, MAG


SOS 3022, PLS 2031,


ASG 3003. ENY 3005. FOR 2003. FOS 2001 and


ORH 3513C, FRC 3212


MAC


ii.iii iii iii.i...i.. ........................ i


Chemistry ....


"Requirements for Admission"


ti es ......


Humani
English

Elective

MACJ32


j


L


I


I


c


IC







COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


ARC 2681 Environmental Technology 1 ... ....
CIS 4930 Introduction to Computers ..... ...... ..... .
*Satisfies 3 hrs. of General Education requirement for
cities.
Sulgested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR


.. .. .. 2
.... 1
uman-


Credits
ARC 1126 Architectural Commumnications 1 .... .. . 3
ARC 1211 Building Arts .. ...... ............................ .. .................. 2
Physical Sciences ............... ............................ 3
MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 ...... ...... .................. ....... 3
H u m an cities .................................................................................. .. 3
BES Behavioral Studies ....... ................. .... ................. 3

Total 17


ARC 1131 Architectural Communications 2 ...
ARC 1701 & 1701L Survey of Architectural
H history & Lab ..... ........ ...... ..........................
Social Sciences ....................................................
English ................ ...... ....... .............. ................. .....
PHY 2004 Applied Physics 1 ..... ...................


,,,... .. ............... 3




Total 16


SOPHOMORE YEAR


ARC 2201 Theory of Architectiure
ARC 2311 Architectural Design 1
ARC 2461 Materials & Methods ol
English .............. ..... ........... ...
Biological Science ...........


f Construction 1


, .... 2
........... 4
......... 3
. .. 3


Total 15


ARC 2313 Architectural Design 2 ..... .... ..... .. ...... .. .. 4
ARC 2580 Architectural Structures 1 .... .. .............. .......... 4
ARC 2681 Environmental Technology 1 ................... .......... 2
CIS 4930 Introduction to Computers (Special Topics) ....... 1
Social Sciences ... ... .. .. ... .. .. 3
H u an es .................. ....... ... .... ... .... ... .....Totl..... 3

Total 17


B. FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF DESIGN (INTERIOR
DESIGN)
General Education Requirements


English ..... . ....... .......... ......... .........
H um anities .. ... ... ... .. .... ....... .. . ... ..
BES Behavioral Studies ........ ..........................
Physical Sciences ............. ...................... .......
Mathematics ........ .. .. . .. ..
Social Sciences .. .. . .. ...................... ..
Biological Sciences ............ ...
Preprofessional Requirements
Physical Sciences (Applied Physics) ...............


Credits
....... 6
.,,... 9
.3


. .... 6
. .. 3


FRESHMAN YE 4R
Semester 1
ARC 1126 Architectural Communications 1
ARC 1211 Building Aris
Physical Sciences
MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1 ...
English .... .. . .... .
Social Science (Recommend Intro to Sociologs)


Semester 2
ARC 1131 Architectural Communic
ARC 1701 Survey of Arch History
ARC 1701L Survey of Arch Histor
PHY 2004 Applied Physics I
English . ......... .... ..
Social Science . ......... ...


atlions 2

Lab


Credits
3
3
3
a. 3
3







1
3
3
3


Total 16


SOPHOMORE YE 4R


Semester 1
ARC 2311 Architectural Design 1
ARC 2461 Materials & Methods o Construction I .. .
ARC 2201 Theory of Architecture .
IND 2100 History Interior Design I .
Humanities (Recommend Theater Apprecialion)
Biological Sciences ...


Semester 2
ARC 2313 Architectural Design 2
ARC 2580 Architectural Structures I
AR 2681 Intro to Environmenlal Technology
IND 2130 History Interior Design II .. .. ...
Hum anities ......... .. ..
C15I 4930 Introduction to Computers (Special Topics)


... 4

-1
3
2
i.
3
3



4



3
1

Total 16


66 hours is the minimum of general education and pre-
professional courses which must be completed prior to entry
to the preprofessional program.


C. FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHI-
TECTURE
General Education Requirements
English ......... .. ... ..... .. 6
Social Sciences SOC 2000. SSI 2120 .. ...... 6
Hum anities ........ .. ..... 9
BES Behavioral Studies ... .. .... 3
Physical Sciences PSC 2501. GLY 2015 ...... .6
Biological Sciences BOT 1010 or BOT 2710 ... 3
Mathematics MAC 3223 .............. .. 3
Preprofessional Requirements


Mathematics


(Survey of Calculus 1


or A


lgebra


History of Interior Design I & II ............ . .......
Com puters .. ..... .. ..... ... ...... .. .. .
ARC 1126 Architectural Communications 1 ......
ARC 1211 Building Arts ......... .. ...... ....
ARC 1131 Architectural Communications 2 ....
*ARC 1701 Survey of Arch. History ...................
ARC 1701L Survey of Arch. History Lab ............
ARC 2311 Architectural Design I ... ......
ARC 2461 Materials & Methods of Constructior
ARC 2201 Theory of Arch ................ ..........


L Trig) ..


... ...... .


SArchitectural Communication
Architectuial Communication
Building Arts .. .... .
Survey of Arch History .....
L Survey of Arch. History Lab
Theory of Architecture .. .
Architectural Design 1 ....
SArchitectural Design 2
Mat. & Meth of Constr. 1 .....
Architectural Structure 1 .


Landscape Architeclure 1


4


i '"


4


&


S.
.. .. .





Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


Preprofessional Program
FRESHMAN YEAR


Semester 1


English
Physical


Science


Introduction to Sociology


BOT 1010 Botany ...,..
ARC 1211 Building Arts ..


Credits
S.,,,,, ...... .......... 3
-. . ... ... .. 3

- ,,, ,:


........ .. ... ........... .. ............ ...... 2


ARC 1126 Architectural Communications


Total 17


*ARC 2580 Architectural Structures 1 ........ ................................ 4
COP 3210 Computer Programming Using Fortran ................. 2
Elective ....................... ...... .. ........................................................ 3
*Minimum C grades are required in BCN 1210. ENC 3352, ARC
2580 and in either PHY 2004 or PHY 2005, but not both.
"Students who do not have background for calculus should
take MAC 1132, or MAT 1033 and MAC 1132L before MAC
3223. Credits may be used for the elective.
'*GLY 2015 may be substituted for GLY 2026.


Suggested Course Sequence


Semester 2
English .............
,Geology .
M4\C 3223 Survey
ARC 1701 Survey


of Calculus


1 ...... *I.:.*:* 1 ***** ** *******


of Arch, History .,......


ARC 1701L Survey of Arch. History Lab
ARC 1131 Architectural Communications


Total 16


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Semester 1
Humanities


ARC 2201 Theory of Architecture


*....*...... 2


CIS 4930 Introduction to Computers (Special Topics) ......
ARC 2311 Architectural Design 1 ............... ..... ..............


LAA 2710 Landscape Archltecture


ARC 2461 Materials


1
. 4


... ........... 4


& Methods of Congsruction


To.....l ....l 3

Total 17


FRESHMAN YEAR
Semester 1
ENC 1101 Expository and Argumentative Writing


Credits
.................. 3


MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus I ......... ................. ........................ 3'
APB 2150 Biological Sciences I ....... ......... .................... .........
U1C'4 210 Con4trudorraTer ............... ................ ...

Semester 2
ENC 1102 Writing About Literature ....................................................... 3
PHY 2004 Physics I ...... ................... ... .. ...................................... 3
BCN 1251 Construction Drawing I .. ........................... 3
H uma niti es ................................................................................ 3




ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business Comm ................. 3
PHY 20015 PhysicsL fIor PH .. 4P..
PHY 2004L Laboratory for PHY 2004 and PHY 2005 ................ 1


Behavioral


Studies ................................................. ...................... 3


Semester 2.
H um an ties ........ . .. . .......... ... ..............
2313 Ar itect ra Desig 2 .................. .... ...........
lAl 2711 landscape Archileclture 2 .. .. .. ...
ARC 2580,Arcitectural Siruclures 1 .., ..... ..... .........
S~o ial .SnceiC .. : .. :.....e .........


Principles of Accounting ......... ....................... ..................... 3
Hum ani tes ....... ....... ...................................................................
Semester 2


GLY 2026 Geology for


ECO 2013


Total 18


Engineers .................................................


ArcbhigEct mal rtu. Les .. --
Basic Econom ics I ........................ ............... .......


COP 3210 Computer Programming using Fortran
H um anities .... ...... ...... .... .... .. .... ........ .......
Elective ... ....... .... ... ....... .. ..... ............... .. ....


BUILDING CONSTRUCTION


Students planning to enter Ihe School of Building Con-
stRfction should lake, while classified UF. the following pro-
granm of study. They should consult the School adviser for
specific.information regarding grade point averages, mini-


mnum grades required in certain courses
lion relating to tie curriculum.


and other informa-


To beelgible**adwnission to the School of Building Con-
struction, the student is required to have at least a 2.0 (C) av-


erage


for ihe first two


years.


In addition, the student must


eaen2a t2 (C) average in all preprofessional work included in
the firt two years of the program. Please refer to additional
information in the:ettion of this catalog titled "School of


Building Construction,"
for Admission '


under the heading "Requirements


For the Upper Division program see the School of Building
ConstructiOn section of the catalog.


General Education Requirements

English ENC 1101 Expos & Arg. Writing; ENC
Writing About Literature . ..


Social Sciences ...
Humanities ....... . .......
tPHY 2;,2005 Applied Physics.


Credit,


II


I & II, PHY 2004L


- - .


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The College of Business Administration offers degrees in
seven major fields which are listed in the Business Adminis-
tration section of the catalog Studefnts who expct to re-
ceive a degree in one of the business majors must complete:
(1) the General Education courses and the Preprolessional
requirements listed below and elective courses for a total of
at least 64 hours: and (2) satisfactorily complete the upper
division requirements
Students who plan to major in Accounting please see the
section headed School of Accounting.


General Education Requirements


(For all majors


in Business


Administration)


Credits
......... 6
.......... 3


English ... ...............................................
*MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus I...............


Behiav udl .... .... .................................


Social Sciences .... ................. ........................... ............................ 6
Hum anit ie ............ ........... .......................................................... 9
Physical Sciences .... ...... .. ............................................. 3-6
Biological Sciences ................................... .............................. 6-3


Es..al........al Co-.A.ms*,s I ADD 7100 a


.,.**..* ..-..* *..._... .. .* ..i....._B....B........... ......... .... .. 3


"


*


1


PDnm fancininl Rmnaiiagmmnt E


R I I


F







COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


b. For Computer Information Sciences majors

A C C 2001 ............................. ....... ... ... ...
ECO 2013, 2023 Basic Economics .... ......... ...........
COC 3110 Introduction to Computing .................


MAC 3224


Survey


of Calculus


STA 3023 Mathematical


Credrts

.......... 6
. .. ... 3
.. ... 3


3 Speech
Sophomore
auiremeni


requirements


may


or delayed until


is met by


or by successfully


ministered by the


the speech


screening


successful


be completed
the junior 'ear


in the


completion of SPC


passing the speech


Speech


Department.


lesl is available in r


screening


test ad-


Information about
room 134, Norman


Slatistics .... ... .. ...... ..


STA 4033 Mathematical Statistics with Computer
A applications .... .. ............. ...... ......


CDA 3101 Introduction to Computer


Suggested Course Sequence


Organization


FRESHMAN


Electives to make a total of 64 hours


*MAC
*'Stude
Choose
semes
areas


3223 is also considered a prep
nts are expected to complete


elective


courses


hours in the uni
mathematics, na


professional course


9 hours of the


Sciences


needed to complete the total 64
versivy transfer program from such
tural sciences, social science, for-


eign language, and humanities.


'Social


and Behavior Sciences


'"Physical Sc
'"English
Electives


YEAR


Credfls


.... 9
..... 3-6
.. ... .. 6
..12


fences


30-33


Suglpsted Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR

English ............... .... .............. .
Social Science .. .......... .................... ..


Physical


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Credits


..... 3


Credits


.''"The Humanities
'"Biological Sciences
Mathematics
Electives


. .... ... .. 3-6
. .. 3
...... .... 14


Science ............ ...... .................


MAC 3223 (or MAC


Behavioral


1132 if needed)


. ... 3


Studies .........


.... ... .. 3


English ........ ................. ...... .......
Social Science .... ....
Biological Science
MAC 3224 .............. ... .....
Hum anities .............. .... ........


29-32


'Six of the nine


ences


semester


must be from


hours


the areas of


of Social


and Behavior


History. Anthropology.


Political Science Economics and


"One


semester


of Biological Sc


may either be omitted
"*'See statement under


fences


Geography
or Physical


or taken as an elective


General


Sciences


Education Requirements for


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Hum anities .........................


2013 ................ ........ ....


Science


***ECO


Biological or Physical
Statistics 3023 ....


Electives .....................


Humanities .......... . .............
ECO 2023 .............................
ACC 2001 .... ............ .... ........ .... .
EC O 3411 ... ........ ......... ................
Electives ...... .......... .... .


**May not be used for General


acceptable


English


3 "*"aStudents ma not
3 ities requirements


courses
use history


courses


SECONDARY EDUCATION OR K-12


n.....n


.... .... 3


Education


Social


Science


Secondary
leaching in
the College
Sciences


Certain


Education
grades 7.12 r
of Education


other


programs


students


to meet the Human-


PROGRAMS


wishing


work toward


certification for


degrees


in either


or the College of Liberal Arts


prepare students for


careers


ol leaching from kindergarten through grade


These


credit.


Art throughl


special
h either


programs


the College


of Education


or the Col-


ot Fine Arts)


EDUCATION
ELEMENTARY AND EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION


Health


Education (through


tion, Health and


Music


(through


the college of Physical Educa-


Recreation)


the College


of Fine Arls)


General Education Requirements


Social and Behavior


Physical


Credits
9


Sciences


Sciences.


. .. ..
3


Physical Education (through the
cation)


College


of Physical Edu-


Special Education-Mental Retardation (through the


Speech Palholog\
lege of Education or


the College of


d Sciences)


Sciences ...
semester of


All secondary


Science or of Ph'
ken as an elective


use AGG 2501. ANT 3511.
JN 2201. SOS 3215 to meet


programs


are specified


section


Students


science


.%41 Lowe
Secondary


ir Division
Education


science


students


music


working


degrees


education will pursue


the fol-


ENG 2131.


4260. CRW
ENG 2935.


2100


CRW


Creditrs


Social and Behav
Physical Sciences


Sciences


credits


r admission io upper
tr cnn *t L rk. n a rt *n n rl


se I
iter
as


at all


. 6


I


mi.. man.ma


E


II


111


mm 5 huma K "wallmassma ma@ Leds.M=4Budant na


3 1 ladlWFDFY%21 L


> aartfWEFROF





Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
L^.EG'E t '. ' / .' ' '


3312 ENC, 4260, CRW 210,
33*11, EiNG 2131, ENG 2935, L.


CR\% 2300. CR\ 3110, CRW
IN 3370. LIN 1100 LIT 2931


Science education majors should take CHM instead of
PSC and ZOO and BOT instead of APB. They should also
take MAC courses instead of MCF.
Because of the nature of their program, music education
najbrs will take their general education requirements over a
four year period rather than only during the first two years
Preprofessional Requirements
A. Teaching field, requirements
These teaching fields are listed in the College of Education
section of the Catalog together with course requirements for
each field. Some of these courses can and should be taken
while in the lower division.
B. Other Requirements
1, At least 64 credits are required foJr admission to upper
Division. The College o f Education will accept those stu-
dents who present the best records and show the most


:'promise of s
the College


further
division.


success


in a teacher education program.


of Education section of the catalog for


information


Other considerations


1:. \Speech


requirement


to admission


may be completed


tq rpper.


in the


Sophomore year'or delayed until the Junior,year. This re-


quirement


is met by Successful completion of SPCi2300


or 3601 or by successfully passing the speech screening
test administered by the Speech Department. English ant


Language Arts majors may meet this requirement only by
successful completion of SPC 2300 or 3601. information
about the speech screening test is available inRoon 134,
Norman Hall.
<2. Psychological Foundations Course. (Students must
have completed 53 credits)
a. EDF 3135 ot EDF4210 for Secondary Education
b. EDF:3110 for .Special Teaching Fields (K-12 Pro
grams)
3 tStudents who choose to work toward a teacher ed uca -
tiori degree ina college other than the College of Educa-
tion should consult that college's portion of the catalog
" for admission and graduation requirements.
Suggestd Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
S.Credts


macs. and the competence to read rapidly and with com-


prehension


The College of Engineering considers that a


minimum adequate preparation follows-


In high
subjects


school. Ihe student should


include the following


Essentials
Elementary algebra .. .. ...
Intermediate and advanced algebra
Plane geometry ..
Trigonometr .... ..
C hem istry .. .. . . ........ ........
P h ysics .. .. .... ...... ............
Desirable
Additional Mathematics .... .


... 1


Deficiencies in the aboae subjects may be overcome by


raf;tei pri gof
with parIs of


the regular engineering program


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
A student may request transfer to the College of Engineer-
ing at any lime after completing 30 credits; however, most
departments will require completion of most of the Calculus
and Physics (with Calculus) before admission.
Because of the limitations on space, facilities and number
of lacully the College of Engineering has had to become a


selective admission college


The two major criteria for ad-


mission are grade point average and completion of prerequi-
site courses All applicants are referred to the departments
for selection, with g p.a. being most important. In future
terms the minimum g.p a will vary with.number of appli-
cants. availability of space and numbers ot faculty in a given
program
Specific requirements for admission to each department
are given in the College of Engineering section of the
catalog

FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE REQUIREMENTS
The program below is described for students whose high
school preparation meets the criteria shown above.
The minimum course load for full-time students is 12 cred-
if hours each semester, but mosi students take 14 to 16 credV t


hours Al this rate. it takes at least 4-2
sunimmer term, ta earn a,*BA^ i-llByp


and Behavior Sciences ......
al D l nce io..: ..c.. .. ... .-.:.... .- .:.. .,,,-, -.,,-., .


***English ....,...... ... 6
Electives .... .... .......... .. ............... 12

30-33


****The Huma
*Biolo gical
Mathenmat


inities


SOPHOMOREYEAR
.Credits
,^^^ ^,,^,^ ,^,,,,^^.,^^,jj,,4^^^, ^^^j^,^^.,,,,,^^ 1 9


Sciences
Ijcs .. ,..s.i.- ,.i* e-.*..-.i- ...".*^ ll -. .. ..


fElectives. -..> ..., ..


longer for students who need preparation courses before en-
tering the program below
In planning the physical iasdeBand Mtaikiiim uti
of the academic program a freshman should talk with a Col-
lege of Engineering faculty adviser
The requirements in Social Sciences, English, Humanities,
and (in most departments Biological Science cani be met
only by (a) appropriate College Level Examination Program


(CLEP)


credits or (b) courses selected from the listing in the


Authorized Courses for


General Education section of this


ctallagiui a few cases as nited below ~ wiM iup
neering requires specific courses in fulfilling the General Ed-
ucation requirements for these subieci areas


*Six of the nine semester hours of Social and Beha ioral
ehcesmustbefram theareasot History. Anthropolog~.


liogy, Political Science, Economic and Geogiaph
**One semester of Biological Sciences or Physical


may either be omitted or taken as an elecltie


statement under General Education Requ


ory courses


to meet


***See


acceptable English courses,
****Students may not use Hist


l Sciences


irements for

the Human-


Courses
Social Sciences .. .
English Composition ..... .....
English Electie ... .....
Biological Sciences (see note


Humanities (see note
CHM 2042, 2042L, 204
(see note 3) ........


MAC 3311. 3312


Credits
... .I . I..... .


1 below)


. ... 3


13C, ............... ........ .hemisry
13C, General Chemistry


3313, Analytic Geometry & Calculus


- - ..a, r* r- ,


*Social
*tPhysic


' years, including a


relating


/j




S. "

mm


ECH 3023, Intro. to Chemical Engineering (see
no te 7) .................................................................................... 3


ing "Requ


criteria.


irements


all students


for Adm


isslon.


are admitted


" In addition to other


on a space


available


basis.


Unspecified Electives


(see note 8)


For upper division


programs.


see the College of Fine


*Total hours required


varies


section


55-63"
depending on department.


Note 1: Environmental Engineering
2010 to meet this requirement.


Note 2:


Sciences


Part or all of the humanities requirement


erred to the


junior and


senior


years


Courses


requires


may be de-
relating hu-


manities to engineering and the sciences, as listed in


ry III of the humanities subsection of the


section


Catego-


General Education


of the catalog


A. FOR THE DEGREES IN ART (GRAPHIC DESIGN, ART ED-
UCATION, CRAFTS, STUDIO AREAS, HISTORY OF ART)


General Education Requirements

English
Fundamental Mathematics .. ....
Behavioral Studies .


Social


, are especially recommended.


Creditrs


... ...... ... 3
. 6


Sciences ...


The Humanities


are required to take the Chemistry


Placement Examination, given each term by the Chemistry
Department. prior to initial registration in CHM 2040 or


CHM 2042. Students who


achieve


an acceptably high


on the Examination may proceed with the chemistry


sequence above, or with the


2042L concurrently, and 2043C.


score


must take the latter cou


sequence


Physical


Sciences


Biological Sciences


.. ..... .. 6/3
. ... ......... ... 3 /6


score


course


CHM 2040, 2041 and


Students achieving


a lower


rse sequence.


Note 4: Aerospace Engineering and Engineering
students must take EGM 3311.


Sciences


Preprofessional Requirements


Credits


ART 1201C., 1203C Beginning


ART 1300C, 1301C
ARH 2050. 2051 Int
Electi~es


Beginning
ro. to Histc


Design 1 and 2
Drawing 1 and
ory of Art 1, 2 ..


............... 6
.. .... ... 8


Note 5: Not required for students in Computer and Informa-


lion Sciences.


Chemical Engineering


credit hours) instead of COP 3212
Engineering students also take COP
Note 6: Not required for students


rical. Environmental.


and Nuclear Eng


requires
Industrial


3212L


CAP 3210 (3
and Systems


if available.


entering Chemical, Elec-


sneering


programs


29

Total 65


NOTE. Students


urged to


become


intending to major
familiar viih the requ


in art education


irements as


listed un-


Note 7: ECH 3012 and ECH 3023


required only in


der the College of Education dealing


Chem


neenrng program.


advanced


Professional


Sequence


with admission to the


Note 8: Students should 4
apartment they intend to
tives.


consu
enter


It a faculty adviser in the de-


r


when selecting


Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR

English ................................ ...... ........ .. ...
Social Sciences ........................................
MAC 3311, 3312 ... ........ .........
Chem istry .................. .. . ...... .
SOPHOMORE YEAR
H um anities ............ ........ ... ... ........
MAC 3313, MAP 3302 (or EGM 3311)..


PHY 2048, 2048L, 2049.
Biological Science ....
* Other Courses (see eni


2049L ..... .... ...............

engineering adviser)


these


elec-


Suggested Course Sequence


FRESHMAN


English ..........


Social


Credit


. ... .. .. 8


.......


Sciences ........


Biology or Physical Science ..
ART 1201 Beginning Design 1
ART 1300 Beginning Drawing


English ... .. ..... ...
Social Sciences
Humanities ......
Biology or Physical


Science


ART 1203 Beginning Design 2 ....
ART 1301 Beginning Drawing 2


YEAR


Credits
. .. .........., .. ... 3


........ 3
.... 3
...... 3


.......... ...... 3
. .. ........ 3


Detailed information about departmental


irements


found in the section on Engineenring in this


catalog.


SOPHOMORE


YEAR


Humanities


Students planning to enter the
take one of the following progr


College of Fine


ams


consult the departmental major adviser


tion regarding grade point


quired in certain courses
the curriculum. Advisers


section


averages,


Arts should


Biology


or Physical


Science


Credits
,,.... ,.... ... 3

....... ............. 3

.. .. .. ... 4 3


mathematics ......... ......... ..........
ARH 2050 Intro,. to History of Art
Elective ... .... .. . .


of study. They should


for specific
minimum g


informa-
rades re-


and other information relating to


are listed in


titled "College of Fine


the catalog


U


Arts


To be eligible for admission to the College of Fine


nder the

Arts. the


Humanities .... .......


Behavioral
ARH 2051
Elective


.... .. 3


Studies
Intro. to History of Art


student


is required to have 'at least


a 2 0 (C)


average


in the


I'S


COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


Note 3: All students


FINE ARTS


~ ~





I





Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


: "- '"-.






. :
r*p ^ *< .












:^. r ii


Spring Semester (2)
' ~MUT 1122 Theor of Music (2)
MVK 1011 Preparatory Piano Ski
Applied Music Principal ....
Band. Orchestra or Chorus ......

Social Sciences......... . .
Hum anities .... ....... .......


Credits
I I. 2. .


3
l1s .. . .... ... ... .. . 2
.. .. . . . .. . ... . . . 3
.. ... ..... ...... ...... ............. ... 1

' . . .. . .. .. ... ........ 3
. . .... ...... . ... 3


17.1Q


General Education Requirements
Credits
eSocial Sciences .... ... ..... ... ........................................

B eha inra M athdies ma cs .. ... ..... .. ..... ..... .......... 3


Physical Scen ce s .. ... ....... ..... ...... ...... .. ...... .... 3/
Biological Sciences ...................... ................. .............. .... 6/3

36
-Msi major ar allo wed to complete the general education
requirements over four \ears
professional Requirements
FRESHMAN YEAR
Music Performance Area
Applied Music Principal

Ensemble: Band, Chorus or Orchestra ... ............. 2
iM U E 2431 Voice Skils .... ...... ... .. ....... .. .. .. ... ... 1
(Voice Malors and loice Principals take MUS 4201
Language and Diction)
.MVK 0i 11 Preparatory Piano Skills ............ .. ........................ 2
MusiC theory Sequence
112 1122 .......... ....................... -
tUSCtets who do not meel minimum proficiency in piano
sfifs will be required to take MVK 1011 Preparatory Piano

SOPHOMORE YEAR
Music Performance Area
Applied Music: Principal
Instrument or voice .. . . .. 6
Ensemble Band, Chorus, or Orchestra ... ................ 2
MVK 2111, 2111, (A), (B) Plano Skills ...... ............ 4
Music Theory Sequence
M UT 2116, 211. 2246. 2247 .. ... . .. ..... ... ...... ....... 8..
'MUC 2101. 2102 Composition Skills ..... ................. ..... 2
*Required for Theory/Composition Malors
NOTE: The Bachelor of Arts degree in music is offered
through the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with the co-
operation of the Depahtment of Musuc:s Seerthe College ofa
Liberal Arts and Sciences section of the catalog for that de-
gree
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester (1) Credits
MUT 1121 Theory of Music (1) .... .. ......... 4
M UL E 2431 Voice Skills .. ...... ....... .... ....... ........... 1
(Voice majors and 'oice principals take MUS 4201
Language and Diction for singers)
Applied Music Principal .... ..... 3
Band, Orchestra or Chorus .............. ...... ... ... 1
English .. ... .. .... . .. .. .... ... ... 3
Social Sciences ..... .. ...... .. .. ... ....... .. ... .. .. ... 3

15


*Required for Theory/Composition Majors


C. FOR THE DEGREE IN THEATRE
General Education Requirements
Credits
English ...... ....... ...... ..... ... ..... .... ... ... .............................. ... 6
Fundamental MalhemTlics . .... ;. ......:.... ...
Behavioral Studies .......... ..... ..... ................ ...... .......... ......... 3
Social Sciences ........ . ....................... .............. ........ .... 6

Physical Sciences ......... ......................... .................................. ....... 6/3
Biological Sciences ...... ..... ............. ............ ..................... 3/6

33
Preprofessional Requirements
Credits
*THE 2000 Theatre Appreciation ..... ........... .. ........... .......... 3
ORI 2001 Oral Interpretation 1 ......... .. .............................. 3
TPP 2700 Voice and Articulation .... .. ....... ..... .................. 3
TPP 3510 Musical Theatre & Movement I ................. ............ 3
TPP 3110 Acting 1 ............................... ............... .............................. 3



26

Total 59
"Satisfies Humanities requirement. Hours counted in General
Education above.
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
Fall Semester Credits
Social Sciences .......... ... .... ...... .... .............. ...... .... ........ 3
English .. .... .... ... .......................... .................. ................. 3
Physical or Biological Sciences .................................... .... 3
*THE 2000 Theatre Appreciation ............... .................................. 3
Electives ........... ................ ...... .... ...... ............................. ..... 3


Spring Semester
Social Sciences ............ ...................... .............. ........................ 3
English .... ..... ... ....... ... ......................... .. . ........ .. .... 3
Physical or Biological Sciences ... ..................................... 3

TPA 3250 Stage Makeup ................... .. .................................... 3

15


Applied Music Principal ........................................ ........................ 3
Band, Orchestra or Chorus .................. ................................................ 1
..H i! l suds .., ............................ ............................................. 3
Shavviral Studies ..........^.^x.M.. .......

16-17
Spring Semester 14) Credits
MUT 2117 Theory of Music (4) ............. .................................. 3
MUT 2247 Theory of Music Lab (4) .................. ...................... 1
MVK 2111 Piano Skills (B) ............... ......... .................................. 2
*MUC 2102 Composition Skills ........................ .......... ....... 1
Applied Music Principal .................. .................... ............. ................... 3
Band. Orchestra or Chorus ................... ....... ..... ..................... 1
H u m anities ...... ..... .... ... ....... ............................................. 3
Mathematics ....... .. .................. .......... ....................... 3

17







COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


Spring Semester
H um anities .... ......... ....................... ............
M them atics ................... ... ..... .. .
TPP 3110 Acting I .. ............ ..........
Electives ............ ........ ............... .. ..


... 3
..... 3
.. ..... 3
5


14

Total 59
iSatisfies Humanities Requirement.



FOREST RESOURCES AND

CONSERVATION

Students desiring to prepare for professional careers in
Forestry, Wildlife Ecology and Resource Conservation
should select the appropriate preprofessional program listed
below In addition, they should contact the School of Forest
Resources and Conservation if advisement is needed.
To be eligible for direct admission applicants must have
completed courses as shown below (61-66 semester credit
hours), have a minimum overall grade point average (GPA)
of 2.3. apd have a minimum GPA of 2 0 in all preprofessional
courses in biological and physical sciences, mathematics, ec-
onomics, and statistics
Fall semester entrance into the School of Forest Resources
and Conservation is strongly advised, as Spring or Summer
entrance may result in an additional semester in residence.
due, to the sequencing of courses.
PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN FOREST RESOURCES
AND CONSERVATION
General Education Requirements


sessions are urged to study the section ol the catalog dealing
with the College and its programs in Clinical and Com-
munity Dietetics. Medical Technology Occupational Thera-
py, and Physical Theraps Special attention should be given
those paragraphs on admission policies.
Limitations in available staff, faculty and facilities make it
necessary that the College reluctantly establish quotas for
the admission of students.
Each department has its own application procedures Pre-
professional students should contact the department of
their proposed malor (oblectile) as early as possible
(Clinical and Community Dietetics. Room N1-8 in the Medi-
cal Sciences Building. Medical Technology. Room 4111 in


jenni
Dent
,n th
fessic
seme


ngs Annex, Occupational Therapi R
al Science Building, and Physical TI
e Shands Teaching Hospital) The
,nal courses in all programs begin
ster of the junior year The deadline


pleted applications for August enrollment
February 15


loom DG-83 in the
'erap,. Room A-92
sequences of pro-
s only in the Fall
for receipt of com-


is the preceding


Students who plan to earn a baccalaureate degree in the
College of Health Related Programs elect one of the follow-
ing programs.


A. FOR THE DEGREE IN CLINICAL AND COMMUNITY
DIETETICS
General Education Requirements


English ... .. .
MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonometry ..
Social Sciences .... ...... ...
Humanities ..... .
CHM 2040 General Chemistry ......... .
ECO 2013 Basic Economics ....


Credits
. .. 6

.. 3

3
.1


English ............... .. ......... .. ... ....... . .. .. .
'MAC 3311-3312 Analytic Geometry and Calc
Social Sciences ......
Hum anl ties ............... ........... ..
Behavioral Studies .... ... ...... ... ...... .....
CHM 2040. 2041, 2042L General Chemistry ...
Biological Sciences Elect either
(a) BSC 2010C, BOT 2011C (Forestry)
or
(b) BSC 2010C, 2011C (Wildlife and Re


Conservation) ... ,. . ...


Credits
. .. 6
s 1,2 .....
.. 6
9
. .* 3
... ....


source
. . . 8


Preprofessional Requirements


Credits
BSC 2010 2011 Integrated Principles of Biology .......... 8
CHM 2041 2042L 2043C General Chemistry ..... 8
HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Nutrition .... 3
PSY 2013 General Psychology ..... .... . ...... 3
HSC 1001 Intro to Health Related Professions .......... 2
CHM 3200 Organic Chemistry .. 3
CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry Laboratory ....... ......... 1
STA 3023 Introduction Io Statistics .. ...... ....... . ... . 3
Elective . .. .. .. ..... ............ 5


Preprofessional Requirements

"CHM 2043C Chemistry and Qualitative /
ECO 2013 Basic Economics I .. ... ......
*ECO 2023 Basic Economics II (Forestly m
**PHY 2004, 2005 Applied Physics ..
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics ..


Suggested Course Sequence


analysis ...

alors onl\)
.. ,i
..,.,


Credits
. ... 4



3


Total


*MAC 3223-3224 Surve) of Calculus 1. 2 (6 credits) ma, be
substituted for MAC 3311-3312 Students should note MAC
3223-3324 is a terminal calculus sequence Students with in-
adequate backgrounds in mathematics will have to com-
plete MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonometry (4 credits) or
equivalent
"BCH 3023 Elementary Organic & Biological Chemistr, (4
credits) may be substituted for CHM 2043C Students should
note this is a terminal chemistry course
*'AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Econ (4 credits)
miu 6. c.Imhttl.aIl fnr lrnr nm'.


FRESHMAN


YEAR


CHM 2040 General Chemistry ....
Social Sciences .... ...
BSC 2010 Integrated Principles of Biology
MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonometry ...
Electi es .. ....


CHM 2041 General Chemistry ..... ... .
CHM 2042L General Chemistry ....
Social Sciences . .. .. . ...
BSC 2011 Integrated Principles of Biology ..
HUN 2201 Fundamentals.of Human Nutrition
Elecl ives ... ..... .. .. ............


Credits
.. 3





1
..... 4

.. .. 3
I ** II **** *I 4


SOPHOMORE YEAR


CHM 2043C General Chemistry ........
H um anities ..... .... .. ........ .. ... ... .....
English ........ . . .... . .. .. .


Credits
... 4

... 3


lI


.




*. "
' .
V --. ** C'


Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


B. FOR THE DEGREE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY
General Education Requirements
""Credi t

n ..e..A..iebra and Trigonometry ..... ... 4....
Bedoliaul Stidies. 3. .. .. .
Social Sciences ... ... .. ........... ....... 6
The Humanities .. ............... .... ..... ...... 9
t" CHM 2043 292042LGenera Chemistri ... ........... 4
STA 3~23tduct6n t Slatiscs...... ... 3
B5C 2Qld, Zli201 C Biological Science
I tegr Steduence ..............................8
PE 11O FjPhy sica.Ed ca io n ......... . ....... 2
es alequiements
S. i .:.::: Credits

CH. 2043C General Clemistry ................ 4
CH.M 32@0, 32L Orgpanic Chemistry ......... .. 4
n, CHM~;*1, 3120 O 3120L Analytical Chemistry .. 4
HSC J0oi Introduction to Health Related Professions ... 2
MLS 2030 Introduction to Medical Technolog ... .. .. 1
E ec ves ,. . .. .... ..... .. ... 6
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
S ;tif Sm/ete: Credits
?SaI Scxices n*..fl .,#,, 3
g.chlish . ...... ..... ......... ..... ..... .. ....... 3
*CHM 2042. 2042t Geneal Chemisry ......... ........ .4
"MAC 1132 Algebra and Trigonomelry .... ........... 4
HSC 1001 Introduction to the Health Related
Proilessions .. ................. .. ... .. .. .. ... 2
j|jI aoete, Credits


CHM 2043C General Chemistry .. 4
MtS2G3DInt ttito Medical Technology ........ 1
Electives ......... ..... ... . .. 4
"CHM 2040, 2041 and 2042L may be substituted
Students who quality should lake an ad anced mathematics
course instead of MAC 1132 Consult UF Ad isor
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Fall Semester Credits
CHM 3200 Organic Chemistry .. .. ....................... ..... ........ .... 3
CHM 3200L Organic Chemistry Laboratory .............. 1
The Hum ani es . ... . .. ... .. 3
BSC 2010C Biologlcal Sciences-lnlegraled Sequence .....

PEM 1100 Physical Education . .. ... .... ... 2
Spring Semester Credits
T he H umantdes ..... ......................................................................
BSC 2011C Biological Scienceslntegrated Sequence 4
STA 3023 Introduclion to Statistics . .... 3
CHM 3120 4nalylical Chemistry .......... ................................ 3
CHM 3120L A nalytical Chemistry Laboratory ....... .... .. 1


C. FOR THE DEGREE IN OCCUPATIONAl THERAPY
General Education Requirements
Credits
En glish . . .. ... ........... ........... .... ....... ....... ... . 6
Fundamental Mathematics ... ... . . .. 3
Behavioral Studies .. . ... .. .... ...... ........ 3
Social Sciences .. .. ..... .. . ... ..... .. ....... .... ........ 6
Hum anities . .. . ...... . .. .. 9
PEM 1100 Physical Education ........ ........... ... ... 2
Physical Sciences ......... ... ... .. 6
flT Li )IWvu r~. _~....J ..ta


*PPE 3004 Psychology of Personality .............. ....................... 4
"These courses will also meet general education require-
(nents.
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
Credits
APB 2150 Biological Sciences 1 .................... ............. ....... 3
APB 2151 Biological Sciences 2 ....... ..... ... .................. ............... 3
APB 2152L Laboratory in Biological Sciences .......................... 7
PSY 2013 General Psychology ..... ..................................... 3
M them atics .. .............. ........... ...... ........... ............. .................... ... 3
EnBglish ................................. ............................,. .............. 6
HSC 1001 Introduction to Health Related Professions :......... 2
PEM 1100 Physical Education ................. .................................... 2
Elect es . ............. ....................... ......................................... 9

32
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Credits
PPE 3004 Psychology of Personality ...................................... 4
OTH 2000 Foundations in Occupational Therapy .................. 2
H um anities .......... ... ............... ........................ .......... ............. .... 9
Social Science ................................... ................................. ..... .... 6
Physical Science ..... ......... .......... .. ........ ...... ............................ 6
Electives .... ... ...... .......... ... .... ............... ........ ..................... ........ 5

32
Summer Session
Students may complete prerequisites for admission to the
program and those accepted for the Occupational Therapy
Program may elect available courses in the Department of
Occupational Therapy.
D. FOR THE DEGREE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY
General Education Requirements
Credits
English ........................ ............. ............................... ........... .. 6
Behavioral Studies ......... ........................ ..... ........................ 3
Social Sciences ............. .. ............... .............. ...................................... .......... 6
H um anities .............. .... ........ ....................... ............ ....... ..... .... 9
Electives .... ......... .... ................. ........................... --................ 10
Preprofessional Requirements
Credits
'CHM 2040, 2041, 2042L. 2043C OR
*CHM 2042. 2042L, 2043. General
Chem istry .. ........................................................................... 8-11


*BSC 2010C Integrated Prinnciples of
Biology I .. .... .................................................... .................... 4
'.200 370K F urni3tEr cnnaJ Yerzahr AeA nunmy
OR
'BSC 2011C Integrated Principles of
Biology II .... ...... .................................. ., ............................. 4
*PHY 2004 Applied Physics 1 ................. .................................. .... 3
*PHY 2005 Applied Physics 2 ....................................................... 3
*PHY 2004L Laboratory for PHY 2005 ......................................... 1
"*CLP 4144 Abnormal Psychology OR
PPE 3004 Psychology of Personality .......................................... 3
'These courses will also meet general education require-
ments.
**CLP 4144 may be taken with permission of instructor only.
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR
Credits
E nalo hl . ... .. .............................. .




* *


COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


AMH 2010, 2020 .........
POS 2041, 2112 ....


6
S .... 6


CHM 2042L ............ ..................................................................... 1
PSY 2013 .................................... ................................................ 3
E le ctive s ..... .. ....... .iii...,.... .... ..... .............i .. ...... ..... .... 4

Total 17
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Credits
Hum ani tes .... .......... .................. ...................... .......................... 3
Behavioral Studies ...... ........................... ............... ............... ..... 3
CHM 2043C .................................... ......... ...... ... ........................ 4
BSC 2010C ...... : ......................................................................... 4
PHY 2M004 ............................................................ ......... .. 3

Total 17
Hum anities ............ .............................. ... ...... ............................ 6
ZO O 3703 or BSC 2011C ................................................ ...... ... 4
PHY 2005 ............ ......................... ........ .. ....... ...... ...................... 3
PHY 2004L .................................................................................. 1


SOnly grades of C or higher are acceptable Two English
position courses must be included


corn-


Preprofessional Requirements
These courses should be taken as soon as possible, prefer-
ably before admission to the College of journalism and
Communications. They are required for graduation.
1 MMC 2100. Writing for Mass Communication. Grade
of C or higher must be earned; prerequisite for course is
a typing proficiency of at least 20 words per minute; stu-


dent may be exempted from and earn credit for
by passing a proficiency exam in writing at UF


2. SPC 3601, Public Speaking Grade o
be earned; speaking performance co
substituted. ORI 2001. ORI 2002 TPP


course
.... 3


f C or higher must
urses that may be
2'0 .. .. ..... .. 4


3004 ................................................................ .l 3

Total 17


JOURNALISM AND

COMMUNICATIONS
Listed below are general requirements for all students
seeking a degree from the College of journalism and Com-
munications It is expected that students will complete, in
their first two years at the university, nearly all of the Gener-
al Education Requirements and a considerable part of the
Basic Distribution and Pre-Professional Requirements. The
remainder will be completed as early as possible upon ad-
mission to the College of journalism and Communications
A suggested course sequence is provided for the first two
years. This can be altered to fit the student's circumstance


but students are urged not to delay
quantitative option.


their foreign language or


A student must complete the General Education require-
ments and have a 2.5 average (C+) to be considered for ad-
mission to the College.
For course options other than those listed, consult "Au-
thorized Courses for General Education."
General Education Requirements
Minimum Credits
English ...... ..... ... ...... ...... . ........ .. .. .......... ........... ..... ......... 6
ENC 1419- Expository & Arg. Writing
ENC 1170 Writing About Literature
(See list of English options)
M them atics ... ... ... ............... ................ ............. ............... 3
(See list of Mathematics options)
Social Sciences ....... ........... .... ............................. ....... ............... 6
SSI 2110 -American Institutions I
5SI 2120- American Institutions II


Behavioral


Stud ies .................... ............ .... ... ........


(See list of BES options. Also PSY 2013, SOC 2000, or ANT).


Humani
(See list
**ePhysical
(See list


tie ..... ...... .......... ...................... ............. ........ ..............
of Humanities options)
Sciences ..................... ............................................
of Physical Science options)


3. One Foreign Language


or


Quantitative Option
Take any combination of the following courses; ACC
2001. 2301. 2401 STA 3013. 3023. STA 3024, 4222 COP 3110,
3111. 3120 .. . ... ......... ..... ... ...... ....... ..... .... 6-7

For students who elect the foreign language option, the
requirement may be met by satisfactory completion of a be-
ginning course sequence in one foreign language (10
semester hours.) Students who plan to continue the study of


a language which the
take a placement tesi
proficiency called for


.y began at another institution must
I before registering. If the minimum
above is demonstrated by examina-


lion, this will constitute satisfaction of the forei
requirement. Consult the appropriate language
tal office for specific examination schedules
dents having fewer than 10 semester hours of
language may complete the requirement begil
point determined by a proficiency test The st
vised to take the language proficiency examine
as possible after admission lest a basic course h
peated with the result that the student loses cr
coursework If the student wishes to pursue sti
ferent language than that for which credit wa
earned, the earlier credit will stand. Intensive si


in French and Spanish


is available for student


gn language
departmen-
Transfer stu-
one foreign
inning at the
udent is ad-


lion as
ave to I
edit for
udy of
as prevl
jmmer
ts who


early
be re-
prior
a dif-
iously
study
have


earned no previous foreign language credit in college.
4. Professional courses see appropriate sequence
Total Hours Required for Graduation


FRESHMAN YEAR


First Semester
English ... ...........
Social Science ...... ...
Physical Science ........
Mathematics ........ ... ......
Behavioral Studies .. .


Credits
.u.. ... .. .. . . . 3

........ .... .. .. .... 3
S........ ...i 3


Total 15


Second Semester
English ................
Social Science ......
Physical or Biological
Public Speaking .....
Humanities .........


S..en... ....

Science


*" Biological Sciences .. ... .. .. ..........


Total 16

Yearly Total 31


(See list-of Biological Sciences Options)
Physical Sciences and Biological Sciences options may be
b* t . tnf i- *


CLP 4144 or PPE


S..... .......... ........ 10




Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


SecondSeemestetr:
Humanities
SForeign Language or Quatitative Option
S $.S History' ii *...--...
'! American Government o Economics .. ..... ..... .
Journalism Elective ........,.., ............... i .


3
3-5
3
. ...... 3


Total 15-17

Yearly Total 30-34



The College of Law offers program leading to the degree
of Juris Doctor. Admission is limited to those with a
bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university
who have satisfactory undergraduate records and have at-
tained a satisfactory score on the Law School Admissions
S; Test. Also offered is a one-year program leading to the de-
gree of Master of kaws in Taxation. This program is open to
those students wh hold the D. degree and who show sig-
nificant potential for success in the LL.M. program For de-
tailed information on admission requirements, course and
programs, see the College of Law catalog
PRELAW PROGRAMS
Admissiqn to law schooJ is a highly selective process Ap-
proximately 50% of each entering class is chosen solely by
reference to a combinatiorit f the Law School Admission
; Test (LSAT) score and the cumslati e undergraduate grade
point average (UGPA leading ta the first bachelor's degree.
SIn the absence of disciplinary problems, appliaCnts with
quantitatively superior recordswill b lautoma~ically ad-
mitted, Approximately.% of each cla~s selected from the
' h*ld" category which is composed of appicaits with less
than superior quantitative credentials. In addition to the
Sqanttative credentials ,nmtioned .above, the Admissions
Committee takes into consideration tie following factors:
Ascending or descending frowl feffovt reflected in the un-
dergrtadate academic performance; the colleges where, and
the discipines in whih, the applicant's degree was earned,
academic accomplishment subsequent to the earning of the
first bachelor's degree, leadership and other relevant ac-
tivities;letters of evaluation from undergraduate professors
and/or employers, work and maturing experiences, and the
,applicant's racial. ethnic. cultural and economic back-
ground. and geographic origin (both inside and outside Flor-
Ida)


The class entering the Unive
'" egsfrther 1981. had a mean 1
Id846, respectively In the al
a candidate was ill, or that som
curred at one of the testing, n
aged. The LSAT should be take
Application to the Law Sch
(LSDAS) should be submit
bfFMr the anticipated matric
: IISDAS applications are aval
;profes ional Education (OPE).
preparation for and apphlcatio
.n the Prelaw.Guide aalilable


!rsity of Florida Law


School in


UGPA and L5AT score of 340
3sence of documentation that
ie other unusual condition oc-
nultiple LSAT scores are aver-
n at the end of the junior year.
iool Data Assembly Service
ed approximately one year
:ulation date for law school.
lable in the Office of Pre-
More information concerning
n to law schools is contained
in the OPE


W: while any undergraduate specialization will prepare a
student for law school, the beginning law student must
possess the fundamental skills necessary for effective oral
and written communication. The student who lacks writing
stills should study advanced English composition. Any
coat te ts one's ability to organize a body of data and
reason from it will be beneficial l\so suueested are courses


Freshmen and transfer students planning careers in law
should register with the Office of Preprofessional Education,
353 Little Hall during their first term on campus. In addition
to serving as a central source of information on all matters
relating to prelaw advisement, the Office of Preprofessional
Education acts as a clearing-house for information,
catalogues, and LSAT Bulletins relating to prelaw prepara-
tion and application procedures The Office refers students
to academic advisers, and serves as a central office for collec-
ting and forwarding letters of evaluation for those applicants
placed in the "hold" category. In addition the Office of Pre-
professional Education coordinates the activities of the prel-
aw advisers located in the various deparitmenits anid colleges
listed below, and provides them with current data and in-
formation needed for effective advisement.
Ad\isers for prelaw students are available in the College of
Business Administration, and in the Department of Econom-
ics, English, History. Philosophy. Political Science, and Soci-
ology within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

MEDICINE, DENTISTRY AND
OPTOMETRY
The University of Florida, rather than having a separate.
organized premedical, predental or preoptometry degree
program, allows a preprofessional student to major in a pro-
gram offered by any department or college within the Uni-
versity Dental, medical and optometry schools expect appli-
cants to have received a liberal education and to have per-
formed at a high level of academic accomplishment, includ-
ing work n the required sciencecore sues
Selection for admission to these professional schools is usu-
ally based primarily on overall grade point average, (GPA),
science GPA. admission test scores, letters of evaluation of
the applicant from faculty familiar with the applicant's quali-
fications in compassion with other preprofessional students.


and nternlews conducted by th


e professional schools' selec-


lion committees Students from the University of Florida ad-
mitted to dental schools in 1980 averaged 3.3 in overall and
science CPA. with scores of 5 or more in the academic and
perceptual parts of the Dental Admissions Test (DAT). Uni-
versity of Florida graduates who were admitted to medical
schools in 1980 averaged 3.55 in overall and science GPA,
with an average sore of 9.5 on each part of the New Medical
College Admission Test (MCAT). The average GPA for stu-
dents accepted into regional schools of optometry was 3.0 in
1980.
Freshman students planning careers in medicine, dentistry
and optometry should register with the Office of Pre-
professional Education, 353 Little Hall, during their first term


at the Un
to the Col
first term
but the s
sociated v
greatly de
and unive
the first t


iversity
lege of
of resic
student
lith the
playedd
.rsities
erm of


, and normally should apply for admission
Liberal Arts and Sciencis at the end of their
dence. Admission may occur at a later time,
may lose valuable curricula flexibility as-
e programs described below if the transfer is
Students transferring from other colleges
should also register with this office during
residence In order to inform themselves


fully of requirements, procedures and other factors relating
to preprofessional preparation, students shou d obtain a cur-
rent copy of the PREPROFESSIONAL GUIDE prepared by
and available through the Office of Preprofessional Educa-
tion.
A one-credit course HSC 1005, Introduction to Medicine
and Dentistry, is available under the S-U option.
In addition to serving as a central source of information on
all matters pertaining to the preprofessional curricula, the
flfirs n Dnonr.n-fnt ...Ei ca.. r ..n Iir e 3e r ln...rnkn. m .






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


The Office of Preprofessional Education coordinates the
activities of the preprofessional advisers located in various
departments and provides them with current data and pro-
cedures needed for effective advisement. Following initial
contact with this office, the student will be referred to an ad-
viser who will help plan a program and upper-division major
best suited to the student's aims and abilities. The adviser
should remain aware of the student's progress, and inform
the Office of Preprofessional Education of academic dif-
ficulties and particularly of academic excellence. In the latter
case, the adviser may recommend a student for the Junior
Honors Medical Program described below and/or for a de-
partmental honors program.


PREMEDICAL, PREDENTAL, PREOPTC
CURRICULAR OPTIONS
The preprofessional student must
core requirements (usually prior to
fessional schools):
Required Core Courses"
1) A complete general chemistry seque
CHM 2043C, CHM 2053C, or CHM 20


)METRY

satisfy the following
application to pro-


.nce
52C.


(terminating with


2) A complete organic chemistry sequence terminating with
CHM 3211L, and CHM 3211, or CHM 3216 and CHM 3216L.
3) At least 8 credits in biology (usually BSC 2010C and BSC
2011C) with laboratory.
4) A complete physics sequence (terminating with PHY 2054
and PHY 2054L or PHY 2049 and PHY 2049L or PHY 2067C).
5) Two semesters of mathematics including at least one term
of analytic geometry and calculus (MAC 3311 and MAC
3312.)
6) One year of college-level English
These courses will also meet the basic requirements for
schools of Chiropractic, Osteopathic, and Podiatric medi-
cine.
in Addition: Premedical students should a4so take the fol-
lowing courses which are required by either Ithe Universit y
of South Florida or the University of Miami College of Medl-
cine
Statistics: STA 3023
Genetics- PCB 3063. PCB 3653C. or AGR 3303
Advanced Chemistry. preferably BCH 4313 or BCH 4203,
or CHM 3120 and CHM 3120L. or CHM 3400
A list of suggested elective courses for preprofessional stu-
dents is available in the Office of Preprofessional Education.
The list includes courses in Biochemistry, Microbiology and
Zoology which should be laken in addition to the required
courses.
The usual timetable for application to professional school
Is:


1) Complete the preprofessional core requirements
the first three years of college, preferably by the sum
the year preceding the year of graduation.
2) Apply for and take the admission test (DAT, MC
OCAT). preferably in the spring of the year precedi
year of graduation. Delay in taking the test until the f*
reduce chances of admission.


within
mer of


:AT, or
ng the
ill may


3) Have letters of evaluation collected in a confidential file
by the Office of Preprolessional Education (see procedure
described in services to Preprofessional Students in the PRE-
PROFESSIONAL GUIDE available at the Office of Pre-
professional Education) during the third year of college.
4) Submit completed applications (including admission test
scores and letters of evaluation) to the professional schools
by the end of August or the first part of September (at the
latest) of the year preceding the year of graduation. Delay in
completion of applications beyond that date may reduce


Besides meeting the preprofessional course requirements.
students are strongly recommended to gain some experi-
ence in the health care delivery environment of their career
choice. Such experience may be obtained by participation in
the programs of the Preprofessional Honor Society Alpha
Epsilon Delta. The Minority Preprofessional Association -
MPA, and the Preprofessional Service Organization PSO
at the University of Florida. More details about these pro-
grams and applications are available at the Office of Pre-
professional Education.

STANDARD PROGRAM FOR YEAR 1
Many students reach a decision to prepare for a career in
medicine or dentistry during or after one year of college.
Such students will usually have to complete requirements at
a more accelerated rate if they wish to graduate on schedule
The degree of acceleration should be discussed with a pre-
professional adviser in their major department.
Any sequence of general chemistry is acceptable. The
basis for choice among CHM 2040, 2042C. 2051C (Honors) is
outlined in the catalog section preceding chemistry course
listings and in the Preprofessional Guide. MAC 3311. 3312,
and STA 3023 should be completed this year. Social Science
and English requirements should be completed by taking
the appropriate courses or via College Level Examination
Program (CLEP) credit. Liberal arts elective courses including
English courses, and a foreign language, are among options
for students who have completed Social Sciences and Eng-
lish by CLEP credit. Those having a background in foreign
language prior to entering the University may satisfy all or
part of the foreign language requirement by taking a place-
ment examination, which is offered several times during the
year by the foreign language departments
STANDARD PROGRAM FOR YEAR 2


If a student has not finished


general


chemistry, it should


be completed in this year Organic chemistry should be
begun and completed this year. CHM 3200 is not acceptable.
Qualified students are advised to consider application to the
honors organic chemistry sequence. CHM 3215 and 3216.
Two terms of biology, usually BSC 2010C-2011C should be
completed by the end of this year Students should also


complete the humanities req
less they have previous CLEP
time might consider beginning|
guage sequence during this y
ground in a foreign language F
of Florida should refer to the
eign Language Requirement."


uirements by coursework un-
credit Students with available
g either physics or foreign lan-
'ear. Those who have a back-
arlor to entering the University
previous section on "The For-


Second year premedical students who have
or higher and who have completed the above


ments may want to apply
Medical Program This pi
the University of Florida
nation in third-year media
dents should contact the
Education in the College
Building) Applications fo
the Spring Semester, and
Summer Semester of the


average
require-


for admission to the junior Honors
program allows early acceptance to
College of Medicine and partici-
cal school seminars Interested stu-
Assistant Dean for Preprofessional
of Medicine (118 Medical Sciences
r this program are accepted early in
final selection is made during the
sophomore year.


STANDARD PROGRAM FOR YEARS 3 AND 4


During their third
icts and any preprof
filled. During year 3
must be completed


*ar. students generally complete phys-
slonal core requirements as yel un-
r 4 the foreign language requirement
not completed prior to this time.


The remainder of years 3 and 4 is devoted to completion
of a departmental malor and elective courses in science and
other areas. Professional schools attach no bias toward any


' : ,







Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


CHM 3610 and the physical chemistry sequence CHM
4410-411L (MAP 3302 is a co-requisite). Students in-
terested in a research experience should consider taking
CHM 4905 in their last year. .
2) Microbiology and Cell Science Majors Students in-
terested in a microbiology maiori should schedule MCB
3020C after at least one term of organic chemistry, In ad-
dition to MCB 3020C, the following courses constitute
the remainder of the major program: PCB 3136, BC H
4313, and 14 credits selected from departmental courses
offered in the 4000 series. In some cases which 'are de-
termined by the microbiology undergraduate coordi-
nator, BCH 4203 may be substituted for MCB 4413. Stu-
dents, interested in undergraduate research projects as
well as departmental honors should discuss MCB 4905


with the undergraduate coordinator. In
analytical chemistry, CHM 3120-CHM 3120L, is


addition
aa re ui red


background course for this major *
3) Zoology Major: A preprofessional zoology major must
take PCB 3063 or PBC 3653C and at least one course from


College of Medicine and to Emory Medical and Dental
Schools should complete additional advanced courses as
listed above before graduating regardless of their major.
CLEP Credit It is generally agreed that receipt of CLEP credit
does not imply the equivalent of educational experience re-
ceived in any university-level course. You should plan on
taking courses in every area in which you have been granted
CLEP credit, especially in English. Unless you are advised
otherwise, you should begin with introductory level courses,
or courses at the 2000 level for which you are certain that
'ou possess the prerequisites
Posi-baccalaureate undergraduate work- Students who have
received a BS or BA degree and have not qualified for pro-


fessional


school because of a lack of quality and/or quantity


of preprofessional work may want to consider additional
work at the undergraduate level to make up these deficien-
cies Students interested in this possibility should consult


the Director of
Little Hall.


the Office of Preprofessional Education, 353


each of the following four sets:
a. ZOO 3303C or ZOO 3203C


b. ZOO 3703C


or ZOO 3605C


c. PCB 4044C or PCB 4675


d. ZOO


4755C or PCB 4745C


(Suggested course selections for pre professional students
are: a) ZOO 3303C, b) ZOO 3703C, c) PCB 4675, and d)
either PCB 4745C or ZOO 4755C.)
At this point, the student will have 28 majbr credits. The
student should also be aware pf the possibility of research
under ZOO 4905 i
4) Biochermistry Major: Although an undergraduate major
is not currently available, the undergraduate
biochemistry program offers a comprehensive series of
courses providing a concentration in biochemrrstry and
molecular biology. Courses in the sequence 4313, 4203,
4905 and PCB 4535. may supplement or substitute for
comparable: courses in related major programs. Students
desiring research eKperience in this area should consider
BCH 4905. At some professional schools students having


taken a biochemistry


courses as


undergraduates may ex-


empt themselves from the biochemistry taught .as part of
the basic, medical science sequence.
5) Interdisciplinary Major: This major, described
elsewhere in the undergraduate catalog is available for
above average freprofessional students
Transfer Students: Transfer students. who have received
credit for the firrt two, years of college at another institution
should have no difficulty in adapting themselves to the
above format with the help of an adviser Since relatively)
heavy weight is placed by professional schools upon tohper-
forman~ e of transfer students in their third sear. such stu-
dents should plan on taking at least 20 hours in science dur-
ing the first two or three terms at the Un,~ersith of Florida
Those transfer students who have completed all of the basic
preprofesional course requirements Slhould Consider taking
additional courses in either chemistry. zoology, micro-


biology, bocheqmistry physics, mathematics or statistics By
dOing well in courses which are taken by mans pre-
professional students at the University ot Florida. transfer


students can enhance their academic records a nd provide
admission committees With a basis of comparison of their
academic abilities with other applicants. "
Choice f Electives;Professional schools do not appear to
have any significant bias toward elective courses chosen by


students. These schools, in fact, look with fasor upon stu-
dents who have shown broad interests and educational de-
velopment during theii colleRe career. Common selected


NURSING


General Education Requirements

English ...........
Social Sciences


: ANT 2410 (Cultural


Credits
. .11 i .. . .. i..m .. ...... ....... 3
.... ... ... .. ..... .... 3


4nlhropology) or


SOC 2000 (Sociology) .....


Biological Sc


ience


2150. 2151.


3511 are recommended) .


Humanities .. .
Beha~loral Studies (BES


.. .... ............ ....................... 3


BSC 2010, or
... .... .......... ..-. -3-4


... ..1 I.. .. ...... . ...................... 9
2121 MAF 2200, PS\ 2013.


or PCO 3714 are recommended


Electites


. .. ................................. 3


-.. ... ...- .... ...... ...... ...... .. 1 1-12


Sub-total 36


"Preprofessional Requirements
Microbiology PB 2170- APB 2170OL ....................................... 4
-"Human Nutrition HUN 2201 ......... ................. ................
Expository and Argumentative Writing ............. ............. 3
StaCistcs ... ...... ..................................... .......................................... 3
C hemi str~ .... ..... ..... .... ......... 6
Human Anatomy and Physiology (Must include lab)
PET 3320 and PET 3350 ... ...... .......... ....... ......... ...................... 6
Developmental Psychology or Human Growth
i and Deelopme (Ee0r lF tu ta 28 t &.

Sub-total 28


* Preprofessional courses


may not be met by CLEP.


'*HUN 2201 may be taken by correspondence; final grade
must be received by the College of Nursing four weeks prior
to registration for the Nursing Curriculum
SuggCeste dourseqjbui*.
FRESHMAN YEAR
Credits


ENC 1101 Expository and Argumentative Wnriting
SSI 2110 or 2120 Social Science ... .......
CHM 1020 Chem istry ... ...... .... .. ..........-......
HUM 2210 Humanities ..... .. .... ...........
APB 2150 or 2151 Biological Science .. ....
General Education Statistics . .... ..


HUM 2230 Humanities ...... .
APB 2170 tMicrobiology and APB


.. . .... 3


2170L Laboratory


ENC 1102 English ....


' ^, '.~ '
*' .


I






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


3
. ... 3


Electives ... ...... .. . .
HUM Humanities ...... ....
PET 3350 Physiology . .
DEP 3003 or EDF 3110 Developmental Psych
Human Growth & Development.
Electives ........ .......... ... .. .
Electives .. ... .. . .. ..


PHARMACY

The educational program in pharmacy is divided into two
phases: (1) The preprofessional curriculum and (2) the pro-
fessional curriculum The requirements of the pre-
professional phase can be completed at any accredited four-
year institution or community college of the student s
choice prior to entering the College of Pharmacy Students


choosing to matriculate
sly of Florida should


college
ofession


al


pleated at any accredited four-year inst
college of the student s choice prior to
of Pharmacy. Students choosing to m1
other than Ihe University of Florida shi
lated professions. Medicine. Nursing
and the Shands Teaching Hospital anc
ronment the pharmacy student has an
to learn and work with other .health p
lege is accredited by the American
ceutical Education and is a member in


American


other th
phase
itution


in the Uniner-
can be com-
or communist


Entering It
atriculate at
would cstry. I
Veterinary
1Clinics In
1 1


excellent o
professional
Council or
good stand


he College
a college
-ealth Re.
Medicine
this envi-
pportunity
The Col-
n Pharma-
ling of the


MAC 1132 (Algebra and Trigonometr\) an
lowing MrC 3223 (Sur ey of Calculus I) I
culus for Economics and Business). or the
MAC series beginning Milh MA-C 3311 (An
and Calculus) Students planning to pursu'
macb career should take MAC 3311 The r
credits are to be chosen b\ the student


completed these cou
calion requirements
accepted into upper


I one ol the
r MAC 2233
irsi course in
Iytical Geom
a research p
mining eleI


New students are admitted to the College or
August each \ear when the tall semester begins
prepharmacy should plan their course schedu
term so thai the minimum 64 credits and specify
quirements are satisfied by August of the ,ear
enter the College or Pharmacy


Pharmacy
Students
les for ea
ic course I
expected


PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH
AND RECREATION


Students expecting to malor
ucation, Health and Recreation
lowing programs


A. FOR MEN AND WOMEN INTENDING TO MAJOR IN
PHYSICAL EDUCATION


*General Education Requirements


Social
POS


Association ol Colleges of Pharmacy


March 1 is the deadlne for submitting an application
the University Registrar in the year the student wishes
enter the College of Pharmacy


Prepharmacy Program


To be considered for admis
cy the applicant must hae (
hours of acceptable college cr
"C" or higher on all course w
all lower division courses r1
riculum as indicated below in
and Sophomore years, (3)
professional courses (general
biological sciences and mi
pharmacy curriculum with an
(4) submitted scores on the
Test (PCAT) to the College o I
macy for further information


iion to tl
1) earned
edit vitI
olik atte
eq u hired
the proI
passed i
and orga
athemati
average
Pharmal


College


O


Pharmacy.
on Requi


at least 6
in o'.erall
pled (21
)r the de
im lor the
the req
c chemist
1 within
t "C" or I
College
See Colle
rements


of Pharma-


4 semester
average oi
completed
desired cur-
SFreshman
uired pre-
r. physics.
the pre-
ulgher and
Admission
ge of Phar-
for Admi,-


sion and PCAT
The courses listed below are recommended for the
two years of prepharmacy For academic adussement
other information contact the Office for Student Affairs.
lege of Pharmacy (Room P-ll1), i. Hillis Miller Health
ter


PET 3320


Credits


Social Sciences ...... .. .
"English. ENC 1101 and 1102 ....... . .
Behavioral Studies or Equivalent
"CHM 2042. 2042L, 2043 Gen Chem & Qual
Hu manities ... .... ... .
Economics (ECO 2023 Recommended)
BSC 2010C. 2011C Integrated Biology Core
*'PHY 2053. 2054 General Physics ...
CHM 3210, 3211 Organic Chemistry ...
CHM 3211L Organic Chemistry Laboratory
"*S *Approved Electives ..... .... .


. 9
3
8
.. 8
.. 6
. 2
5


If the student has
meel general edu
mum hours to be


Sciences
2041 American


Credits


Federal


POS 2112 American State and Local Gov'I
SS American Institutions ..
Behavioral Studies
PSY 2013 General Psychology
Biological Science
APB 2150 The Biological Sciences-Cells
and Genetics
English Composition (ENC 1101 ENC 1102)
Humanities
HUM 2210 Western Humanities
HUM 2230 Western Humanities
HUM Humaniies ...


Organisms.


rses. the co
related to
division


"'Student should consul required courses under the Depart-
ment of Professional Physical Education listings
Suggesled Course Sequence


. .. .. 1
2
... 1
3
.. 2


S .. 4


FRESHMAN YEAR


Credits


olal 64


4American Federal (C.ni I or


in the College of Physical Ed-
should pursue one of the fol-


Mathematics
M4C 1132 Aigebra-Tg ....,,,.,........ .. .... 4
Physical Science
ISC Fundamteritals of Physical Sciene ..i... 3
15C Fundarmentals of Physical Scence ...;.....,3
'Students should.eonsult department alEademIc adwisoror
alternative courses that meet these requirements.


'"Preprofessional Requirements


Applied Human Nnatldrmy ..,,.......... ,...
L applied Anatom, Lab ......
Applied Human Physiology
L Applied Physiology Lab
Personal and Family Health .
First Aind and Personal Safet .
Public Speaking or
Introduction to Speech Communication


T


"i

r
,E
E
" r
1~



: ,, "i


.' **


POS 2041





Colleges


COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


HUM 2210W ~rn i humanities ....................... ..... 3
1BC 2401 Fundameitals of Physical Science ............ 3
14E5 2000 Personal and Famill Health .. ......... ........... .. 3


Efectives


... . .; ... ..... .... ,,. _y. ;5 -
SOPHOMORE YEAR
Credits


^ PSY 2013 General Psychology .. .... ................
APB 21?0The biological Sciences-Cell. Organisms,
aild Genetics .(i . . .. . .
*:HUM 2230l'ester Huianities .. . ... ..
PET 3320 App lie Human Anatomy .... .. .. .
PET 332QLApied Anatomy Lab .. .
PE 3590 Professional Seminar. . .
PEP 2131 Weight Training and Conditioning .......


*Choices may be made from a number of


courses See academic advisers for checklist of courses and
acceptable substitutes in the concentration areas.

RECREATION


General Education Requirements


"English Composition ..
Mathematics . ......


Credits


'*Behavioral Studies ... .. .. ... .. ...
***Social Science ....... .. .. .. ... .... .. "


Electives


**9I I I m I W..I I ..I i l ***


The Humanities .... ................ ............... ....... ........... ,......,,. 9
'"**Physical Sciences ........ ....... ....... ........................................ 6
*' Biological Sciences ... ......................... ... ............................... 6


SPC 3601 Ps'lin"Speaking or
SPC 2300 introduction toSpeech Communication .
U. N M Humanities ...;..,, . ... ..... ...
'/ PET 3350 Applied Human Ph) siologv ............ ... ..
1 PET 3S3501 ApIied Physiolog) Lab ...... ...........
Required courses under Department of
Professional Physical Education .. . .. .
E lectitv es ......... ....* ... 9. l..r M
OI. FOR MEN AND WOMEN STUDENTS INTENDING
TO MAJOR IN HEALTH EDUCATION
General Education Requirements


ENC.English Compbsition ,.,.......
MAC or MGF Mathematics ..*......,...,...
SISocial Soences .... ..... :.. . ...
.. lJiM lHunumarities.
PC Physical SciecS :.....e......,,


Credits


.. 6
9
3
. . . 9
. .. 3


CH C h : em istry ' *
ARB iolgicmalmu Sciences .1111. v .q,.....
SPC Oral Communicdtions %... ....?. .t""IIIfl .


r in 6 hours of English com-


*General Psychology is recommended for Public and Thera-
peutic Majors
***American; State and Local Government is recommended for
Public Recreation Majors
****Three credits of one of these may be omitted
Choices may be made from a number of disciplinary courses
listed under Authorized Courses for General Education in
the Liberal and Sciences section of this catalog. See Aca-
demic Advisor in the Recreation Department for acceptable
substitutions


Related Professional Requirements:


(For Public and Therapeutic Recreation Concentration)


Peprofessional Requirements

. HES 200 Personal and Farily eallh..
HES2OQ Community and Environmental Health
ES 3404 instrutors First Aid ...A....i
PSY 2013 General Pwvholdgy


Credits

. 3


.4

of in...,erdiscipin, ar
of intend pscpinar,


APe Microbiology, .. .
SOC 2) Princiles o01 Sociology .
*e1tivce for concentration areas)
*Chois may be made from a number


courses


acceptable substitutes in the concentration areas
Suggested Course Sequence
FRESHMAN YEAR


" .NCG
SSrS~


MAC or M GFM mathematics
A PB Biolbogcal Sciences .
;: iES 2000 Persqpal and family Health


3
3


'* Activity Requirements
One Racquet and one Team Sport ..........


.................. . 2


One Aquatics and one other Individual Sport .................. 2
"If a student has not completed this course at the lower
division level (community college, etc). a competency ex-
amination. administered by the University of Florida Recrea-
tion Department may be substituted for this requirement.
Check with rhe Recreation Academic Advisement Office for


catzon (Ben~a lora Stues) an or


related professional requirements
"'One hour is required from each area


(For Public Recreation Concentration)

SOC 2020 Social Problems or SOC 3310 .................... ....... 3


PEQ 3109 Aquatic Management .. ............ ......... 3
PAD 4003 Introduction to Public Administration............... 3


*POS 2112 American Slale &


'Will count as a Social Science


Local Gov't


. .. ... ... .. ......... 3


E. N Eng, l1' Plish

PSC Physical Sciences .. .
SPC Oral Communication ..


3

3


Total 31


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Credits
* u *


HUM The Humanities .
Li LAfI t -..-- ta....


PPE 3004 Psychology of Personality .... ......................... 3
EAB 4704 Introduction to Applied Behavioral Analysis .... 3
HES 3114 Health Education & Medical Terminology ............. 2
PET 3220 Applied Human Anatom\ ... ......... .................. 3
PET 3640 Physical Education for the Handicapped ................ 3

(for Public Recreation Concentration)
EOD(c.LA.I Ak i vc A U


interdisciplinary


*Must earn a grade of "C" or bette
position


ENC 3213 Technical Writing and Business Comm.


HES 240 First Aid ... .. .....
*SPC 3601 Public Speaking
EDF 3110 Human Growth and
"'PSY 2013 General Psychology


Credits
.............. 2


... .. ........ ....... ......... 4-- -

Deelopmenr or PCO 3714. 3
S3


See academic advisers for checklist of courses and


"Counts for General Edu


Cred:s,
;Engish ..*I .I 3
aca Sciences .. .. .. ..6


.1 ..1 .. ...







COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


M G F M them atics ............: ...................
LEI 2023 Foundations of Leisure Services
Electives .................. .... ... ..............O.. .
SOPHOMORE YEAR


Activity Requirement (one Aquatics
Individual Sport) .............................
PSC/APB Physical Science/Biologica
BES Behavioral Studies ............ ..............
SPC 3601 Public Speaking ..............
HUM Humanl ties ... . .. ..............
SSI Social Science (Social Problems)
PSY 2013 General Psychology ..........
ENC 3352 Technical Writing and Bu!
LEI 3140 Philosophy and History of


.. .... ..... . 3
. 2
..... .. .. .. 4


Credits
& one other
. .. ... .. ...i... .... ... 2
I Science ............. 3
.. .. .. . . .... ..... ... 3
....... ...... ... . ..... .. . . 4
.. ... ... ...... . .. . ,
.......................... ....... 3

siness Comm. ...... ..... 2
Leisure Services .. ...... 2


Electives .................. . . .. ..... ....................... .. ............
(For Therapeutic Recreation Concentration)
FRESHMAN YEAR


Activity Requirement (one

ENC English Composition


Racquet and
.ii ii iii ii ii IIIII


one Team


5



Credits
Sport)

.. . 6


HES 2400 First Aid .......... .... .
Social Science .... ........... ..... ..
PSC/APB Physical Science/Biological
HUM Humanities ... ..... ... .........
MGF Mathematics ... .. . .
Electives ... ....... ........ .... ........


Activity Requirement (one Aquatics & one ol
Individual Sport) .. ........
PSC/APB Physical Science/Biological Science
BES Behavioral Studies (General Psychology)
HUM Humanities ....... . .
PS\ 2013 General Psychology ................


SPC 3601 Public Speaking . . ...
HES 3114 Health Education and Medical
PET 3320 Applied Human Anatomy ...
ENC 3352 Technical Writing and Busines
LEI 2023 Foundations of Leisure Services
LEI 3140 Philosophy and History of Leisu
Electives .... ..... ......... .... ..... ...


.... . . i ..i .

Science .

i .. ...... . . .. . .


Iher


Terminology

s Comm. ..

re Services .
.I. IIII. . IIII. I


SOPHOMORE YEAR


Credits


. .. ..i ..
. . ... .. e
..i .i .~ me ..

m. e .b




-- : ... .-- "*- ; a' .. ;;--- r *i. .s -a~
~ I *4 ." b-*_.. z .-7-* ^^...** f: ..
S.i . *. . .




j ,:h. I i


COLLEGE OF LIBERAL


ARTS AND SCIENCES


L a
Ri


* *I


L m. -


.* ,


-V.-


It..


U *
I +aW ***





Colleges


ege of Liberal Arts and
nc es


General Statement
; he Cojtege of Liberak Arts adl Sctences is the: gateway
cctegeaor ent( ring freshmen and other students with fewer
tian Mcreddits,, p hiding for their academic advisement and
their general education. It also provides advanced education
leading toward degrees in a variety of disciplinary and cross-
disciplinary fields in arts and sciences.
Culturally and historically the programs of the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences represent the core pf all higher ed-
ucation. The humanities, the social sciences, the natural and
biological sciences all are studied in the College and all
contribute to the richness of its program
The major aim of the College is to impart the ideas, con-


cepts, motivations, and
dents to enable them to
ety. Intellectual inquiry,
and an appreciation of th
world are the tools the
dents. Upon these fund
build rewarding lives. M
knowledge necessary to


skills of a liberal education to stu-
assume leadership positions in soci-
the intelligent evaluation of ideas,
he dominant thought patterns of the
College seeks to impart to its stu-
lamentals, they will be enabled to
moreover, they will also acquire that
launch a successful career through


further studs in the graduate and professional colleges
The LS classification applies to students pursuing Liberal
Arts and Sciences degrees. Most such students are in their
junior or senior years but, as noted above, freshmen and
sophomores may be approved for the LS classification. Qual-
ified students who are admitted by transfer from other in-
stitutions with 64 or more credits are classified LS


INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS
SEEKING DEGREES IN LIBERAL
ARTS AND SCIENCES


I
!'^6 :'*: '--
:i .;


Standards For Students Classified As LS


(1) Those students admitted without having demonstrated
the necessary foreign language competency will be re-
quired to register for an appropriate course and to make
satisfactory progress every semester until they have com-
pleted the foreign language requirement.
(2) Students who have not satisfied the College distribution
requirement prior to admission will be expected to make
reasonable progress each term toward its completion, as
with the foreign language requirement.
(3) Every student will be expected to make satisfactory
progress each term toward satisfying the requirements of
an approved major within the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences.


SUBJECT-MATTER FIELDS


The subject-matter fields regularly offered to students in
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the extent of
these offerings are indicated in the table below.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO
THE LS CLASSIFICATION


Subject
American Studies
Anthropology
Art History
Asian Studies
Astronomy
Atmospheric Sciences
BIochemistr)
Biologo
"*Botany
Chemistry
Computer and In-
formation Sciences
Criminal Justice
"'Economics
English
Foreign Languanes


Major
X
X
\
X
X


Masters

X


Ph.D. Electives
- x
X x
X


The University of Florida and
and Sciences encourage applica
from all cultural, racial, religious!
, below are the specific requireme
lege It should be understood, I
quirements are given and that a'
selective process. The satisfaction
does not automatically guarantee'
tal record including education
courses previously completed, q
record, and test data will all be
application for admission. Prlorit


the College of Liberal Arts
itions of qualified students
s, and ethnic groups. Listed
nts for admission to this col-
however, that minimum re-
dmission to this college is a
n of minimum requirements
e admission. A student's to-
inal objective, pattern of
quality of previous academic
considered in evaluating an
y in admission will be given


to those applicants whose potential on the basis of their to-
X tal record indicates the greatest likelihood of success in the
X program requested.
-x Students classified UF: admission to the LS classification is
normally approved if the student has earned acceptable col-


' **


Geography X X X X
Geology X X X
History X X X X
Individual/Inter-
disciplinary Studies X -
Latin .4mencan Studies X X
Linguistics X X X
Mathematics X X X X
""Microbiology and
'Music X X
Philosophy X X X X
Physics X X X X
Political Science X X X X
Psychology X X X X
Religion X X
Sociology X X X X

Statistics X X X X X
*Theatre X X
Zoology X X X X

"Graduate work offered through College of Fine Arts. Except
for majors, a maximum of 6 hours of credit in studio art. mu-
sic performance, and theater courses may be included in the
minimum of 124 hours required for the degree.
'"Degrees also offered through College of Agriculture.
'"Graduate work offered through College of Business Admin-
istration






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


A. Students attending four year colleges, who wish to
transfer after two years, should follow a program of gener-
al education and preprofessional courses as outlined un-
der Requirements for Degree
B. Junior and Community College transfer students should:
1. Complete a university transfer program at the lower
division college.
2. Indicate an intended major field of concentration, using
the exact terminology as on the list of majors at the begin-
ning of the Liberal Arts and Sciences section of this
catalog.
3. If pre-medical, pre-optometry, pre-dental, pre-veter-
inary, or if planning to major in mathematics, biological or
physical sciences; be certain to substitute subject-matter
courses in mathematics, botany, zoology, chemistry or
physics for survey courses in those areas. See Medicine.
Dentistry and Optometry programs listed in earlier pages.
4. Attempt to satisfy the foreign language requirement of
the College prior to transfer. All candidates for degrees
awarded by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are re-
quired to have at least a minimum proficiency in some for-


eign language. The requirement may be met by th
factory completion of a beginning course sequence
foreign language (10 semester hours) Students wh
to continue the study of a language which they bi
another institution must take a placement test befo
istering. If the minimum proficiency called for a
demonstrated by examination, this will constitute s
tion of the foreign language requirement. Consult
propriate language departmental office for specific
nation schedules Transfer students having fewer
semester hours of one foreign lanuuaae may comnl


e satis-
. in one
io plan
egan at
)re reg-
bove is
atisfac-
the ap-
exami-
than 10
lete the


requirement beginning at the point determined by a pro-
ficiency test. The student is advised to take the language
proficiency examination as early as possible after admis-
sion lest a basic course has to be repeated with the result
that the student loses credit for prior coursework If the
student wishes to pursue sluds of a different language


than that for which credit was previously
earlier credit will stand. Intensive summer s
and Spanish is available for students who h
previous foreign language credit in college


y earned, the
tudy in French
iave earned no


5. Complete as many sequential courses as possible prior
to transfer, especially the foreign language sequence (see
item 4 above). Some courses are cumulative and represent
a direct continuation of work done in a previous course. It
is difficult to guarantee complete articulation of such
courses when they are offered in a different institution.
6. Choose general education courses to satisfy the basic
distribution requirement (See Section B, under Require-
ments for Degrees), and choose a variety of elective
courses as needed to complete 64 semester hours of cred-
it. (Vocational-technical courses will not count as transfer
credit.)
7. Earn a GPA of 2 0 or better in all courses attempted No
course in which a grade of less than 20 has been earned
may be used to satisfy any basic or major requirements in
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
8. Wail until after transfer to the University to take courses
in professional education if the student expects to work
toward certification 1o teach
Special posr-baccalaureate student (6LS) A student who
has received a baccalaureate degree but who is not seeking
admission to the Graduate School may. under certain condi-
linnc hE 2rlmIParl at a .tnoriil c.lnnl Il Ct Tha annilraint


Graduate student- The general section of this catalog deal-
ing with admission describes certain minimum requirements
for admission of graduate students to the University Addi-
tional details for admission are given in the Graduate School
catalog.


ADVISEMENT OF STUDENTS


CLASSIFIED LS


Upon admission to the LS
should contact a departmental
who have received the LS class
siderable freedom in planning
framework of College and depa
faculty member's role is primarily
assumes the malor responsibility
departmental degree requirerr


CONSTITUTE


RULE DOES NOT
THAT RULE.


classification, the student
academic adviser Students
sification are allowed con-
their programs, within the
irtmenlal requirements The
y to gile ad ice. The student
ty for fulfilling college and
ients IGNORANCE OF A


A BASIS


FOR WAIVING


Students are urged to review the information presented in
the Liberal Arts and Sciences section of the catalog each
term when planning their programs Failure to read, under-
stand, and follow the guidelines presented here could cause
significant hardship and delays in their academic progress
Clarification of college requirements is available in the Aca-
demic Advisement Office, 358 Little Hall
Pre-Professional Advisement is available in 353 Little Hall
for Pre-medical, Pre-dental. Pre-optometry and Pre-law stu-
dents


HONORS PROGRAMS FOR JUNIORS
AND SENIORS
Consistent with its alew that higher education should re-
sult in the development of each student as an intellectual in-
dindual, this college gives its students a wide selection of
degree programs with electives. In addition the College of-
fers a variety of opportunities for independent and seminar
honors work to those of its undergraduates who have dem-
onstrated appropriate qualifications.
Superior students should take initiative in planning un-
dergraduate and graduate programs The honors coordinator
in the department of the student's malor should be con-
suited about the department s procedures leading to the
baccalaureate degree with honors or high honors Minimum
requirements set b\ the College require a 3 5 overall upper
division average and a thesis or special project On the basis
of the quality of the thesis or proaeclt. the department will
recommend the student for honors or for high honors
DEAN'S LIST


At the end of
regularly recogni
clusion on the li
point average ot
minimum of 15
taken under the
or "H" has been


the Fall and Spring terms, the Dean's List
zes outstanding academic achievement In-
st is awarded to students who earn a grade
3 5 or higher on reasonable course loads, a
hours This award is not granted for hours
S-U option or for which a grade ot "1', "X".
I submitted


PHI BETA KAPPA
Phi Beta Kappa is an honorary scholastic society for stu-
dents of high intellectual ability with a broad liberal educa-
tion. The first chapter was founded in 1776 at ihe College of
William and Mary The UF chapter was established in 1938
C ia-i0 wn *t fin .l *n.ln 2nf l au nf i 2**alu'^





Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES

and the physical artd biologica sciences : and !
deifc pefermnanctin lower and upper division
well as in the majortfield.


superior aca-
generally as


SStudents in colleges other than Liberal Arts and Sciences
who meet these requirements may be recommended in wriI-
ing by the dean of their college. The socieh also considers a
i selected number of graduate students in Liberal Arts and
Sciences who have earned the Ph.D; during the previous
yea .
For further inforWmation contact Dr. William C Childers.
4221 CPA.


College If they have completed more than 15 hours beyond
the normal minimum requirement for their degrees without
receiving the degrees, students should obtain permission of
the Dean for further registration
Class Attendance" The University and this College recog-
nizes the right of.the individual professor to make atten-
dance mandatory and, where appropriate, and after due
warning, to suspend students from those courses with failing
grades for excessive absences.


REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES


GENERAL REGULATIONS
Maximum, Minimum and Normal loads: The normal
coarse load in this College ijs-5 credit ours, and all students
are expected tocarry a n6rmia load, Loads of fewer than 12
or more than 18 hours must be approved by the student's ac-
ademic adviser.


ddinig/Droppips/Wftbdrawln8 Courses ma1 be
San tie dudlr g thi drop/add period if this does not
oneri's registration to more that i 9 hours Courses
d:ipped, during the drop/add, period without per
Iar gAthis does not lower one's registration below 1
*(Se Makirimum, rini murit and Normal loads above
tile drop/add period, a ourse may be dropped up
date'established as the College deadline All drops a
.jt tb the following restrictions:


(1) No more than two (2) such
University's drop/add period will be
student's upper division career. A,maxr
willF be allowed during any semester
tremely well-documented support is IL
on academic warning or probation will
drop courses,


added
increase
nay be
ialt\ as
2 hours
) After
'to the
ire sub-


drops, after the
permitted in the
mum of one drop
except when ew.
jrnished Students
not be allowed to


(2) After the deadline, students ma' petition to drop a
Scotrse provided theycan docum'ent sufficient reasons to
drop, usually hardship or medical
(3 i he otl load will not be reduced below 12 hours
(A petition to he Liberal Arts and Sciences Petition Com-
Si mttee must accompany the request to drop a course
when the outcome reduces the load below 12 hours
(4) Fina approval to drop a course after the Unilersit\ s
drop/add period must be obtained from the Academic
Advisement Office, 358 Little Hall Students must attend
l c latLsses for which they are registered Failure to attend
Sactass Wil not beaccepted by the College as constituting
Sa drop the only procedure for dropping claw is the
i; proper processing of a drop card which the student must
initiate,
S5) Students dropping their entire course load must con-
tact the Otfifce of the Registrar as this consritutes
witdrawalIrnM the university and mu1t be handled b\
:ithdrayval procedures established br the Registrar and
subject tothe published catalog deadlines


The program which leads to the degrees Bachelor of Arts
or Bachelor of Science are alike in all basic requirements.
The degree Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those
who tulfill the requirements for degrees with majors in one
of the fields of American Studies, Anthro pologLArs"Atiaa s
Studies. Classics, Criminal Justice. Economics, English,
French. German. Histor\. Music. Philosophy, Political Sci-
ence Religion. Russian. Sociology Spanish. Speech, and
Theatre
The degree Bachelor of Stience will be conferred upon
those who fulfill the requirements for degrees with maors in
one of the fields of Astronomy Botany, Chemistry. Com-
puter and Information Science Microbiology, Physics, and
Zoology


The degree of I
ferred upon those
the degree with a
ics Psychology. St
Program Students
nalor in their mal
curriculum in the
option tor the mai
lto Bachelor or Ar
greens on the same


Bachelor


of Arts


or Science


will be con-


students who fulfill the requirements for
malor in Geography, Geology, Mathemat-
atistics, or an Individual Interdisciplinary
should consult the undergraduate coord,-
or department to discuss the appropriate
event they elect the Bachelor of Science
or. In no instance will the College confer
ts degrees or two Bachelor of Science de-
sludent The requirements for graduation


with either of these degrees are li
Student Responsrbilty Students
sibility for regrltering ior the prope
fulfilling all degree requirements.
lor completing all courses for wh
the end of the drop, add period
Seniors must file formal applicati
lice of the Registrar early in the se
pect to receive the degree The of
latest date on which Ihis can be d


Additionally.
their academic
and Sciences 0
uation In their
all I ,\ and
the end of the I
for seeing that
recorded b> thi
by the abo~e d


sled below


must assume full respon-
r courses and loads and or
Students are responsible
ich they are registered at

ion for a degree in the Of-
*mester in which they ex-
flicial calendar shows the
lone.


iors who plan to graduate should have
re,,iewed in the College of Liberal Arts
Sone to two semesters prior to their grad-
II semester seniors should have corrected
grades to letter grades by no later than
week Seniors are themselves responsible
rade changes are properly submitted and
Illege of Liberal Arts and Sciences Office
line


A. CREDIT REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS


PStudent Petition~ A student nho feels
:ieglaions work a particular hardship or in
0on for waiver of the regulation involved
protac eitn submitting such petitions is a\
adem cAdviseleni Office. Room 358 Litll
Registratfon il Graduate Courses Underg


that the College
justice ma> pell-
Inlormation on
allable in the Ac-
e Hall.
graduate students


may not register in graduate courses (5000 le\el and abovel
wlthputpeu issio on the Dean This Dermlssion is normallY


A minimum of 1
the lower division
average of "C or
pleted in the Colli
work aliempted at
credits may not be
requirements of th


through c
- -_ __ _ i


24 semester hours c
and 60 while classify
better in all work tr
ege and an overall


IS


:ourses in
L r --


redit (normally 64 in
ed LS) with an overall
ansferred to or corn-
average of "C" in all


the Unniersity of Florida. NOTE Some
applicable toward the minimum degree
College For example, no credit earned
the Career Development Program or
. -. r n .




x .
C..


COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


conviction of the faculty that the fields
those which are conducive to a liberal
a student may select for upper division
9 hours of work from other colleges wi
No credit will be given for coursewo
College beyond the 9 hours Ihmri exce
special cases.


listed are in general
education However,
elective credit up to
thin the University
rk taken outside the
pt for the following


Special Cases:


1. The minimum total of 124 hours required for
bachelor's degree miy include not more than 16 hours cr
in education provided the student follows an approved
gram and becomes NCATE Certified If a student is
certification program, the only hours outside the col
which could apply would be the 16 hours of education
' 2. An approved interdisciplinary malor ma) include n
than 9 hours of course work in another College.
3. A preprofessional degree in Speech Pathology
Audiology may include up to 18 hours outside the Coil
as determined by the student's departmental adviser


the
'edit
pro-
in a
lege

nore


I. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
Students are expected to complete general education re-
quirements; the courses authorized for general education
are listed on earlier pages. Advanced students may sub-
stitute other suitable courses, if approved by a College Ad-
viser. The College awards the Associate of Arts Certificate to
qualified applicants to certify completion of general educa-
tion. General education credit may also be used in satisfac-
tion of the following Basic Distribution requirements.
C. DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS
These requirements build upon the experiences, nmtellec-
tual development, and insights acquired through the Gener-
al Education program. They are designed to provide the lib-
erally educated person with an understanding and apprecia-
tion of the human condition, ihe evolution of cmsilization
and its institutions, and the principles of science and their


impact on man and society
General education course credits can be applied I
these requirements Students must earn a grade of C
ler in each of these courses. They may not be taken
the S-U option. One course cannot be used to comply
quirements in two different areas. No more than 6
can be taken in History toward completion of disin
requirements.
These requirements include.


6 hours credit
composition
complete th
9 hours credit
department
9 hours credit
more than 6
6 hours credit
Information


in English


one course


toward
or bet-
under
ele re-
credits
button


must be


course CLEP credit cannot be used to
e composition requirement)
in Humanities (no more than 6 credits in one
may be counted.)
in the Social and Behavioral Sciences (No
credits in one department may be counted.)
in Mathematics. Statistics. or Computer and
Sciences (At least one course must be in


Mathematics.)
12 hours credit in the Natural Sciences (At least 6 hours must
be in the Biological Sciences and at least 6 hours in the
Physical Sciences, including a minimum of one laboratory
course.) All students must earn a grade of C in one course
in a biological science department: APB. BSC. BOT. ACB.
OO.


TOTAL


42 credits


The following courses r
tribution requirements. TI
ucatlon requirements.
ii .


nay be taken to complete the dis-
is list does not replace general ed-
.. .- -


4000 le els
quirement p.
Philosophy.
Art History,
Literature.


ma, be used to fulfil
History. Humanities
Religion (except REL
Music Appreciation, a


I the Humanities re-
LIN 3010, LN 3340,
3158 and REL 3322).
nd Foreign Language


Social and Behavioral Sciences any course in American In-
slttutions, Anthropology (except ANT 3511). Behavioral
Studies. Criminal justice. Economics. Geography (ex-
cept GEO 3200). History, Political Science. Psychology
(except for courses listed below under Biological Sci-
ences and Laboratory Requirements), and Sociology.
Also acceptable' LIN 3221. LIN 3611, LIN 3700. REL 3158.
REL 3322, SPC 2300. SPC 3601. SPC 3710. Certain of these
departments offer courses with laboratories which may
also satisfy the laboratory requirement. Refer to the de-
tails given below.


Mathematics: any course in Math
1033 and any course with prefix c
Statistics, and in Computer and
(except COC 3400)
Natural Sciences
(Ph\sical Sciences) an, course
Geology. Atmospheric Sciences
Sciences. GEO 2200.
(Biological Sciences) any cours
any BSC course. ANT 3511, APB
CBH 3003, CBH 4023C, DEP 300
EXP 4104 EXP 4124C. EXP 4214


Laboratory Req
department


uirements
that has a


ematics (except MAT
)f MAE). any course in
Information Sciences


in Chemistry.
Astronomy,


e
2
3.


any course in
laboratory .


ANT 3511. GEO 2200L. APB 2152L, SOP 4214
EXP 4205L, EXP 4934, PPE 4324C, PSB 4104L.
DEP 4704. PSC 2191L. Corequisites must be
NOTE Some lab courses may not be taken
requisite courses
D. FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT
All candidate' for degrees awarded br the Co


eral Arts and Sciences are required toc
mum proficiency in some foreign la
ment may be met by the satisfactory, c
nng course sequence in one foreign
hours) Students who plan to continL
guage which they began at another iI
placement test before registering If
ciencv called for above is demonstrate
will constitute satisfaction of the fore
ment Consult the appropriate languaj
for specific examination schedules Tr,
fewer than 10 semester hours of one
complete the requirement beginner
termined by a proficiency test. The stu


the language profici
ter admission lest a
result that the stud
the student wishes
than that for which


credit will


Spanish is av
vious foreign
E. ELECTIVE


Of
bache
64 are


stand.


oology.
2151. a
3204. E


Phy sics,
Physical

Botany:
nd 2152.
XP 3604.


Natural Sciences
so accepted are:


C, EAB 4022.
CBH 4023C,
adhered to
Without co-


liege


of Lib-


have at least a mini-
inguage The require-
ompletion of a begin-
language (10 semester
ue the study of a lan-
nstilutlon must take a
the minimum proil-
d by examination, this
'ign language require-
ge departmental office


ansfer
forelg


1


ency examination a
basic course has to
ent loses credit for
to pursue study of
credit was preulou
intensive summer s


g at
ent is
s earl,
be re;
prior
a diff
ly ear
dtuds


students having
i language ma\
the point de-
advised to take
as possible at-
peated with the
coursework If
erent language
ned. the earlier
in French and


ailable for students who have earned
language credit in college
REQUIREMENT


the minimum of 124 semester hours
lor s degree in the College of Liberal Ar
normally earned before the student is


LS classification.


I


At least 30 of the


must be electives An "<
earned outside of the sl
ance, a foreign language
-,r ---


hours


elective"
udent's
is an ele


requlr
Is and
admit


remaining
is defined
malor dep
activee to a


no pre-


for a
ences,
to the


alter the
d as an\
lartment.
II LS stu-


f.




Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


Sbut in no case may the tota* credits earned by extension or
correspondence exceed twelve of the last thirty-six credits
applied toward the degree.
*, THE M AJO '
1. Departmental Majors: A departmental major consists of
a concentration of course work in a specific department.
On the application for admission the student must in-
dicate an intended major, using the exact terminology as
on the list of majors in the Liberal Arts and Sciences sec-
tion of this catalog. The number of credit hours required
for a major wil vary from department todepartment, but
in no case may the number of hours required be fewer
than 24 hours or more than 40 hours in the majdr depart-
ment. The student should check the major requirements
in the section of the catalog which lists the courses offered
by the major department. Some departments may require
subsidiary courses from subject-matter fields other than
the major. No courses in the major,in which the grade
earned is below "C" will be counted toward the fulfill-
ment of the Minimum major requirement nor may they be
taken under the S-U grading option. World in the major
taken in the freshman or sophoroqre years or transferred
lo the University .from another institution is included in
evaluating the student's record far this requirement How-
ever, all transfer, credit in the major must be approved by
the major department.

SInterdisciplinary Majors: As alternatives to the departmen-
tal maj or, the CoIlege offers two kinds oi interdisciplinary
"majrors;. ;
a. The interdisciplinary programs ini American Studies,
Asian Studies, And Criminal lJstice have been fully
Splayed by the cooperating departments and adopted
by the College Fr a description of each of these pro-
grams, see the appropriate heading under the
alphabeical "Course Qescriptions" section of this
catalog; ;
b. n lixii"idual inte disciplinary, program may be de-
Signed and initiated by a student whose academic
Sa-i/r professional goals are not met by a departmental
major At least two faculty members from different de-
up af r tents imiust ihe consulted in planning the program,
a id they must also agree to supervise ttle program to
completion. At least one of the departments must be in
the Cogeof Liberj4irts and Sciences Each individual
interdiscplpItary program must be approved by the Col-
Slege Ctmittee on Interdisciplinary Studies, and shall
include at least 24 credit hours of related course work
taken in two or more departments All other College de-
gree requirements (eg foreign language, general distri-
bution, electlves, etc ) must be met, except that course
work taken in another college may be permitted to ex-
ceed 9 credit hours ii such is required by an approved
program The student must also take at least 6 credit
hours of IDS-4906 (or equivalent courses) under the
direction ot one or both of the supervisory faculty mem-
bers. and produce a senior thesis
Baccalaureate honors or high honors are available to indi-
vidual Interd iscipinary majors Requirements are the same
as for departmental majors, with the additional provision
*that honors must be recommended by two members of the
Student's supervisory committee (including the principal su-
pervisor), who will affirm that the student conducted an in-
dividual project in IDS-4906 (or equivalent) of high quality
and reflecting the interdisciplinarn nature of the program.
Planning for an individual interdisciplinary program
should be initiated no laler than the beginning of the junior
Inr. I .li ril nnrtl a nicn r jiill ma. .I n *. .Anr. .,.nr k 4s A^....J


Sciences may be approved to develop an individualized in-
terdisciplinary major in Atmospheric Sciences (or Meteorol-
ogy) leading to the B.S. degree. The program is designed to
provide the student with a background in the atmospheric
sciences and their applications to such problems as air pollu-
tion, economic impact of weather on agriculture, influences
of anthropogenic chemical releases on weather, atmospheric
radiation, transmission of polar radiation through the atmo-
sphere, and soil-water-air interfaces. The curriculum in-
cludes courses from such departments as Geography, Physi-
cal Sciences, Physics and Astronomy. Environmental Engi-
neering Sciences, Fruit Crops, Mechanical Engineering, Agri-
cultural Engineering, and Chemical Engineering.
A Minor in Atmospheric Sciences suited to the science or
engineering major desiring a basic introduction to the study
of the atmosphere is available
A Non-Technical Minor in Atmospheric Science is also
available. The program is designed to meet the increasing
need for a fundamental understanding of environmental
phenomena in many non-technical professions.
For further information, consult Dr. Karl Taylor, 309 Space
SiencesrResearch4mid ag
Biochemical Sciences
Undergraduate students interested in advanced work in
biochemistry may apply for acceptance into thi e individual
interdisciplinary malor program of Biochemical Sciences in
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The program offers
considerable breadth by virtue of its flexibility and the broad
range of required and elective courses. Graduates of this
program would have excellent backgrounds for research in a
variety of the basic medical sciences, and would be well
qualified for a variety of graduate and medical school pro-
grams.
Program applicants are required to have a good back-
ground in basic chemistry and zoology coursesAdvdanced
level work includes 1) course work required by both the
Biochemistry Department, 2) research in biochemistry; 3)
other elective courses to be selected from offerings b) the
Departments of Biochemistry, Botany. Chemrstry, Micro-
brology, Neuroscience, Psychology, and Zoology
For further information about the biochemistry program
consult Dr. R. J. Mann, 343 MSp
Film Studies
While the University of Florida does not offer an under-
graduate degree in film or cinema arts, an individual in-
terdisciplinary major in Film Studies is offered through the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Department of
Broadcasting in the College of Journalism and Communica-
tions. This interdisciplinary major provides a background in
film history, aesthetics, theory, and criticism, and gives train-
ing and "hands on" experience in film production Students
usually begin this malor at the start of their junior year in the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Students interested in the program may obtain further in-
formation from a member of the Film Studies faculty. A list
of Film Studies faculty members and their office addresses is
available from the Department of English. 4008 General
Purpose Building A.
linguistics
4n individualized major in Linguistics may be approved
for undergraduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences This program is designed to provide the student
with a background in the study of language, dialects, com-
munication, and particular languages. It will prepare the stu-
dent for graduate work in linguistics or the study of lan-
-* ~ ~ ~ .. .






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
through the faculty of the Center for Neurobiological Sci-
ences. The program is intended to provide the student with
a fundamental and broad-based academic foundation for
graduate and professional programs and related areas
The curriculum includes core requirements covering hu-
manities; social sciences; and physical, natural, and biologi-
cal sciences. In addition to the core requirements, students
select courses in either a very broad or a more specialized
program in. for example, such areas as animal behavior. neu-
rochemistry, neurophysiology. sensory mechanisms, neu-
roendocrinology, brain and behavior, or neuroembryology.
In order to focus their academic work in the various areas, all
students in the program are required to participate in re-
search with a member of the faculty of the Center for Neu-
robiological Sciences, coupled with a research seminar
For further information about this program, consult the
Psychology Departmental Office, 1114 Psychology Bldg.
Urban Studies
Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences who
wish to pursue a malor concentration in urban studies may
apply to do so as an individual interdisciplinary major. Alter-
natively they may also pursue a minor area of interest in the
Urban Studies Certificate Program. The Urban Studies major
is designed to provide a sound and broadly based program
in the social sciences for students who plan to enter pro-
fessional planning schools, graduate urban studies pro-
grams, or expect to work upon receipt of the baccalaureate
degree.
The core of courses required of all students in the major
provides the broadest possible exposure to the several dis-
ciplines concerned with urban problems and also to the
broadest range of methodologies used in urban analysis If
possible, the research project in IDS 4905 course is carried
out in conjunction with an internship in a firm or agency
suitable to the student's interest.
A number of faculty members from departments in the so-
. cial sciences serve as a panel from which students choose a
committee of at least two members to supervise their
progress through the program and the IDS 4905 project
Questions about the Urban Studies program may be
directed to Dean F. Eugene Dunnam, 2121 GPA


SPECIAL PROGRAMS
ENGLISH LANGUAGE INSTITUTE
A full-time noncredit, nondegree program in English as a
second language is available to foreign students with some
knowledge of the language who wish to increase their com-
petency. The program, which may be taken any of the quar-
ters of the academic year. emphasizes the oral and written
skills needed by students from abroad who plan to attend a
university in the United States. Further information is avail-
able from Dr. Jayne C. Harder. Director, English Language In-
stitute, 162 Grinter Hall, University of Florida. Gainesville.
Florida 32611.
TEACHER PREPARATION IN ARTS AND SCIENCES
Students may earn their degrees in the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences and complete requirements for certifica-
tion as secondary school teachers in one or more academic
subjects by following one of the Liberal Arts and Sciences-
Education Programs described in the College of Education
section of this catalog
Further information may be obtained in the Academic Ad-
visement Office, Room 358. Little Hall


Building). Program requirements are described in the
Speech Department section of this catalog
To qualify for the Certificate of Clinical Competence in
Audiology or in Speech Pathology awarded by the American
Speech and Hearing Association or to obtain endorsement
by the College of Education and the Department of Speech
for State Department of Educaltion certification in Speech
Correction. it is necessary to complete a master's degree or
equivalent.
Interested students should contact Mrs Margarel P. Nat-
tress, Coordinator. Speech and Hearing Clinic. 442 ASB.
SPECIALIZATION IN THE FINE ARTS
Music Students interested in majoring in music should
consult the faculty adviser. Professor lames P Hale, Music
Building, as soon as possible in their college program.
The student who selects a major in Music must earn a total
of forty semester hours in the following courses-
Hours
Applied music in approved courses numbered
above 100 .. ... . . .. .. ... .... ...... .. ... ....... ....... ... . .. .. 6
Theory of Music MUT 1121, MUT 1122. MUT 2116,
MUT 2117. MUT 2246, MUT 2247 .......... .......... 16
Sunrey of Music History, MUH 3211, MUH 3212 ............... 6
Upon completion of the above courses, the student must
select an area of concentration, i.e., Applied Music, Theory
of Music or History and Literature, and earn twelve credits in
that concentration. (These required credits are in addition to
those listed above and must be specifically approved for
each student ) The student must also register for and partici-
pale each term in ensemble music groups.
A piano proficiency examination is required of all music
majors The student must take Piano Skills until he has mel
this requirement.
A Senior student concentrating in the area of Applied mu-
sic will present a Senior Recital. In the areas of Theor% and
History and Literature, the Senior will present a project
which demonstrates his competence in his area of special-
ization.
For graduation with departmental honors in music, the
student should apply to the chairman of the teaching faculty
in his intended area of concentration at the beginning of his
lunior year. In addition to the grade-point average require-
ment, the student concentrating in the area of Applied Mu-
sic will present a Senior Recital which is adjudged by the
music faculty as having reflected honors-level work in ap-
plied music in the upper division. The student in Theory, or
History and Literature must present an honors project in his
specialized area. This project will be prepared in connection
with twelve credit hours from Music Theory courses MUT
3611. 3612. 3321, 3322, MUC 3201 3202, MUT 4411, 4421, or
MUC 4301. MUL 3351, 3341. or from History and Literature
courses, MUL 3362. MUH 3541, MUR 3401. MUH 3211. MUL
4371, MUL 4811, MUH 4331, MUL 4361. MUR 4801. and with
the approval of the music faculty
ART. The student who elects a malor in Art must earn a to-
tal of not less than thirty-tlwo semester hours including the
following courses (1) ART 1201C-ART 1203C. ART 1300C-ART
1301C. ARH 2050-ARH 2051. a total of twenty hours; (2) a
minimum of eight additional semester hours in a single field
of specialization Fine Arts, History of Art, or Ceramics, and


C


I


3) ARH 4453, 4 hours


Students should consult Dr
a malor program.
THEA TRE: Students seeking
a minimum of 30 credit hours i
individual program should be


Robert H Westin in planning

Theater as a major must earn
n theatre courses The specific
worked out in advance with





Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


SAdditional requirements# 1) Student must complete at
east three of the two of three course sequences in Theatre
(exe!luing tb1e 3310, 3311 Direcing Sequence) 2) Student
nmust. smpete at least eight credits in courses numbered
4.00 or above
Curricljmr limitations: 1) Student may not earn more
tha eight credit in Acting. For B A. candidates; Acting 1 and
2 (TPP X31103!!) will constitute a course sequence 2) Stu-
dent may not earn more than eight credits in Movement. For
B.A. candidates, Movement 1 and 2 (TPP 3510, 3511) con-
stitute a course sequence.


CERTIFICATE AND MINOR PR
Other speciaihed programs
and Sciences are described in
certain of these priOgrams, a ce
dent upon (1) cbmpiletion of
and (2) recommendation of Uh
ty. Sitch 'certificate programs
"C" immediately fdlIdWirtg thi


OGRAMS


ir
t
rtl
a
e
w


i the College of Liberal Arts
he following paragraphs. In
ificate is awarded to the stu-
prescribed course of study
program director and facul-
are denoted by a boldface


e program title: [C1


AMERICAN AREA STUDIES PROGRAM [C]
In addition to the majq rn Amiercan Studies (see descrip-
tion under interdisciplinary studies in this section) the Col-
lege of Liberal Arts and Sientces offers a certificate program
for students majoring in a conventional discipline who wish
to focus their work~on America. The student fulfills the re-
quirements for a departmental major, elects 24 credits from
arong American related courses, including those in his ma-
jorteld,;and take AMS 203, ntoductiond toAmer an Stud-
ies; AMH 4041, Studies irn American Civilizatio and AMH
4935, Senior Seminar in .American Cjvilziation. Interested
students are referred to Professor Stephen S Conroy, 3350
GPA~ for information and advisement
ASIAN STUDIES PROGRAM (Cl
in addition ito its interdisciplinary degree-granting pro-
gram of 27 hours in 4sian Studies, the College ot Liberal Arts
Sand Sciences also offers a 14-16 hours certificate program for
those undergraduate students who are interested in major-
ing in a particularized discipline but who wish either to (1)
focus on Asia in their major or (2) develop another area of
knowledge which will enrich and enhance their expertise in
their chosen field. The course of study for the certificate may
or may not include an Asian language, depending on the
Individual's needs and goals.
SSpecial arrangements may be worked out between this
College and ethers so that a wide variety of students may
avail themselves of this opportunity
Students :desimng more specific information than that
furished iaboi and iri: the description of Asian Studies in
this catalogue (see 'Departments of Instruction ') should
: contacLt p .,4; gard Johnson, the Dirrector (404 Little Hall). or
ary member of the InstructionStafIl Major Committee
L ATIN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM [C1
For students interested in Latin American area studies, the
Cli~ge of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers two options
S1. A, spcal: curriculum, based on a single departmental
majoi (elected from the fields of Anthropology, Econom-
iCS, Geography. History. Political Science, Sociology and
l Spanish), leading to a B A. degree and a Certificate in Latin
; American Studies. (See Latin American Studies section of
0 this catalog),
: or
S 2. An individual interdisciplinary program developed and
coordinated through the Center for Latin American Stud-
jes and approved b, the Inlerdisciplinary Committee of
thO rnllao nf I imhril Artc aninrC Crnroc anrl Ior tno t*f


SOVIET AND EAST EUROPEAN AREA STUDIES ICq
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers to under-
graduate students an integrated.program in Soviet and East
European studies The program provides a broad foundation
for those preparing for graduate work in the field and for
those who plan a career in government service.
The program is based on a major in one of the following
departments. Economics, Geography. History, Phitosophy,
Political Science, Religion, Foreign Languages. The student
must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Russian or an East
European language, and his over-all program, must include
at least 24 hours of work from the courses listed below. A
maximum of 10 course hours within the major may be used
in fulfilling the 24 hour area requirement.
Courses in the program include: ECS 4013. 4003. ECO 4905.
513 ECO 6306: EUH 3571. 3572. 3573. ESC 4334, HIS 4930,
EUH 5934. 6339. 6320. POT 414, CPO 4633, 4614, POS 4932.
4905, CPO 5636, 5065. 6637. POL 1120. 1121. 1122. 136, 427.
POL 4905. 596: REL 3492: RUS 1120. 1121. 1122, 2200. 2110,
3240, 4300, 4840, 4", 414, RUW 4100, 4101 RUS 4905. 5301.
5845. 5450. RUW 5120, 5121. RUW 5906, PHP 3765, or any
other relevant courses dealing with the Soviet and East Eu-
ropean area not listed above Ten credits of German may
also be accepted for students who are specializing in the
German Democratic Republic or comparative communist
systems.
All students interested in this program, including lower
division students, should consult with Dr. Marvin Entner,
Room 105 Grmnter Hall or with Dr James F Morrison. Room
439 Grnter Hall
AFRICAN STUDIES PROGRAM [C]
The African St dies Program is administeredtby an can
Studies Center responsible for the direction and coordi-
nation of interdisciplinary instruction and research activities
related to Africa. It cooperates with University departments,
schools and colleges in administering and staffing a coordi-
nated certificate program. The Center does not offer an in-
terdisciplinary degree. With the cooperation of participating
departments. it offers a certificate in African Studies in con-
junction with the B.A., M.A and Ph.D. degrees. Require-
ments for Certificate are listed elsewhere in this catalog


Extracurricular Acti'ities The Center regularly
conferences on African topics, and a colloquium


sponsors
series-


BARAZA-with invited lecturers. The Center has a fairly
wide ranging set of outreach activities addressed to public
school teachers as well as community colleges and other
universities The Center is responsible for editing the African
Studies Retrew. which is the journal of the African Studies
Association Two additional malor functions are the publica-
tion of the Bulletin of the Southern Association of
Afnrcanists, and a traveling African art exhibit.


library
through
meet thi
students
number
audiovis
imately


y Resources: The Center su
various departments select
e instructional and research
s The Office of Instructi
of educational films on
hual library of the Departm
5,000 African art slides.


pports directly as well as
ive library acquisitions to
needs of the faculty and
onal Resources holds a
-African topics, and the
ent of Art holds approx-


African Art The University Gallery holds 121 pieces of
African sculpture. The Rosenbloom Collection, 37 pieces of
African sculpture, is housed at the Florida State Museum.
For Certificate requirements at the M.A. and Ph.D. levels
and information on Graduate Fellowships and As-
sistantships, see the Graduate School Catalog. For further in-
formation on the Center's Certificate requirements, in-
terdisciplinary majors based on African themes, and other re-






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


Courses in the program are offered by a number
ments including Anthropology, Economics, Engli
Music, Political Science, and Sociology. In or
awarded the certificate, the student must corn;
credits from the courses offered. constructing ir
tion with the program director a pattern of cla
best fits the studenYs needs. In addition, the stu
complete a departmental major and fulfill the re(
for graduation from the College of Liberal Arts an


of depart-
sh, History.
der to be
plete 15-18
\ consulta-
sses which
dent must
lulrements
d Sciences.


Requirements for the certificate include. (1) Ihe core
courses in Afro-American Studies, 9 credits: AFA 2000. In-
troduction Afro-American Studies, 3. AFA 4936, Afro-Ameri-
can Studies Senior Integrative Seminar I. 3, which serves to
identify and explore further issues in the Afro-American
field; and AFA 4937, Afro-American Studies Senior Inte-
grative Seminar. II. 3, which provides directed work on Afro-
American research problems, (2) one or two courses from
the curriculum in African Studies one of which may be AFH
3100, Africa to 1800. 3-6 credits, and electives from approved
Program courses. 3-6 credits.
Additional courses in the program include ANT 4451--Ra-
cial and Cultural Minorities; LIT 3353-Ethnic Literature:
AML 3271-Afro-American Literature: ECP 4143-Blacks in
the American Economy. AMH 41'O-Slavery and the Civil
War, AMH 4572-Reconstruction and Race Relations, AMH
4579-Colloquium. History of the Afro-American, MUH 4116
-History of lazz, MUH 4561-Music of Black Americans,
PUP 4003-Issues in American Politics. PUP 4313-Minor-
ities and Change in American Politics: SOC 2020---Social
Problems; SOC 3745- Minorities in American Societs; SOC
4720-Black America. Current Problems. AF 4905-Individ-
ual Study in Afro-American Studies


For advice
the program
Hall.


or information, students are invited
director. Professor R C Foreman, jr,


WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM i[C
The College of Liberal Arts and Sc


fences


ofters


cate Program in Women s Studies for intrer
graduate students Students maloring in Ira
ciplines are advised by a six-person Steering
which will plan and administer programs with a
roles and potential roles of women.
The Program cooperates with other colleges
ments on campus to coordinate each student'
her/his special interests, needs and projected I


To receive a Certificate in Women's Studies
quired to complete courses totaling 12-15
selection of Women's Studies courses offei
ments in Nursing, Economics. Psychology E
lish, Humanities. Anthropology, Political
Studies, Philosophy. Physical Education, etc
core course is WST 3010 (interdisciplinary F
Women 3 credits) which is offered annual


Interested
Thompson.
formation


students should
Program Director, in


contact
4358 CPA


to contact
456 Little



a Certifi-


?sted un(
dilional
; Commi
focus on


and depart-
s malor with
future


a student is re-
credit, from a
red by deparl-
ducalion, Eng-
Science Black
The required
'erspec tlves on
Illy


Professor
,. for fourth


WESTERN EUROPEAN STUDIES PROGRAM [q
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences of the Universilt
of Florida offers an undergraduate interdisciplinary program
leading to the Certificate in Western European Studies. The
program is designed for students interested in Western Eu-
ropean culture, language, history, society, and politics. It
should also be of value to students who wish to become Eu-
ropean regional specialists or who are contemplating careers
in such fields having to do with Western Europe as govern-
ment service, international law, business or trade
Each student works with an adviser in constructing a pro-


student i
24 credits


partmentl
European
lake a mi
sequence
consultalti
reading a
language


s requl
(up to


to complete
which may be


courses totalin
trom his maior


from among appropriate courses with Western
orientation in the participating departments. (2) to
nimum of two courses from the European history
or to ofier an equivalent substdulte selected in
on with program adviser. (3) to demonstrate a
nd speaking knowledge of a Western European
(this requirement mas be satisfied either through


course work or with a special
guage may not. however be of
the requirement of some other
participate in EUS 4935. the I
ropean Studies Seminar during
year


Students desiring
are urged to contact
Studies Committee


examination, the same lan-
fered simultaneously to meet
r area study program). (4) to
nterdisciplinar Western Eu-
Winier Quarter ol his Senior


further information


any mem
Dr Harry


about the program
Western European
3' Grinter


ENVIRONMENT L STUDIES MINOR PROGRAM


A program of a minor (with c
Studies is available tor anyone w
Liberal Arts and Sciences The p
interest to students concerned
Electives can be structured arour
giving experience in an area th
portunities and make education


certificate) in Environmental
ith a malor in the College of
program is designed to be of
with environmental issues
id an environmental theme,
iat may expand career op-
more meaningful


The course selection will serve to increase the student's
knowledge of the interaction of man and his environment A
number of environmentally related courses requiring no
prerequisites are included to help non-science majors be-
come environmentally aware. Science majors will be able to
relate their major discipline to current environmental prob-
lems through more advanced course work
The Environmental Studies minor requires a minimum of
12 credits of approved environmentally oriented courses
with at least one each from the Social Physical and Biologl-
clal Sciences to total 9 to 12 credit hours
Courses required for the student's malor cannot be
counted toward the minor requirement Courses both
within and outside the College which bear on various
aspects of environmental problems may be used for the mi-
nor and at the same time to fulfill the student's elective re-
quirements The Liberal 'rts and Sciences limitation oi 9
hours which may be taken for credit outside Ihe college is
waived for the Environmental Studies minor. An inventory
file of approved courses for the Environmental Studies mi-


nor is available in 210 Bartram


West


Students interested in the minor should consult with their
departmental adviser and the En ironmental Studies Adviser
in 210 Bartram Hall


II is also


possible


to develop


a major in


Environmental


Studies under the College s individual Interdisciplinai
|or program. where one is able to formulate a major fro
propriate course areas in two or more departments Sti
interested in an interdisciplinary maior in Environr
Studies are referred to the interdisciplinary malor d(
lion under the Liberal Arts and Sciences section c
catalog. Those interested in the major should contact


F Eugene


Dunnam.


r, ma-
im ap-
idents
mental
escrip-
)f this
Dean


2121 GPA


IEWISH STUDIES [C]


Admi
gram p
curncul
broad s
various
English
with an


nlstered by the Center
provides an interdiscipli
um which serves as a
weep of Jewish civilizat


departments, mcl
and Philosophy,.
d specialize in an


uding
student
eas wit


for lewish Studies, this pro-
nary and interdepartmental
basis for understanding the
ion Through course work in


Re
iIs
hi


ligion. Foreign Languages.
may acquaint themselves
n jewish studies including




Colleges

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


?grasl best suited l to their needs, programs that take full ac-
cn t lf previous preparation. Interested students should
: consuifwith Professors B. Mesch or S. Isenberg. Department
od Religion.
CENTER FOR APPLIED PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS IN THE
PROFESSIONS
An interdisciplinary Center for applied philosophy and
ethics in the professions is located in the College with an of-
fice in the Department of Philosophy, 240A ASB. The Center
Is engaged in the preparation of course\ork and research
bearing on the relationship of philosophy, principally ethics.
toC heprofessions The Alfred A Ring Professorship of Social
Ethics is epdowed by a professor emeritus of the university
The Center is developing a major interdisciplinary pro-
gram on the Humanities and Agriculture which consists of a
ntumber of undergraduate courses in various humanities dis-
ciplinest A special minor/certificate program is being
S pianned; Students interested in pursuing a course of studies
;t. .ethial and cultural issues in agriculture should contact
RkfdKaynes. Humanities and Agriculture Program Direc-

B SINESS AND CINOMIC HISTORY [C]
A inierdisciplinary program leading to a certificate in
business and Stral'Afrts and Sciences and the Department of History
ITh progr. i isd designed todprovide students with angn-
te0duction tlobusiness and economics and an historical un-
destanding and appreciation of these disciplines. Require-
Iments feo the cetificate include (1) AMH 4379 United
Sftles in a Wldd Econo (2)t twa toursei ftoriamong
ECO 2014 ECO 2023, CO 4303, ACC 2fO1 SAS32ad (4 A
w *coursoes.fronm amiiong CO26~0 AMH 371, AMH 3500,
HIS 4470. HIS 4471. EUH 4640, EUH 4641, for a total of 15
credits.
For additional information, students are encouraged to
contact Professor A.M. Burns. III, 4303C GPA.
CLASSICAL STUDIES [C]
The Certificate in Classical Studies offers students the op-
p" ; dnItO ogmnizze thei~i lectzies in a meaningful way.
K"sOite..f I tcr ancie~ Iworld complements studio in
many disciplines and gives a liberal education a firm founda-
tion.
To obtain a Certificate in Classical Studies. students must
take four courses or a minimum of 15 hours selected from
IcoudrssJealirng wfh iN. ancient worldt leastt ftwaourses
must be taken from those offered by the Classics Depart-
ment. Students seeking this certificate should maintain a 3 0
GPA in both the major and the program
To arrange to complete a certificate in Classical Studies.
students should contact Dr Hartigan in the Classics Depart-
ment, 3-C ASB, 392-20'5
STUDY ABROAD
Fifteen semester credit hours may be earned each semester
on any academic year program of study abroad. All UF sum-
mer programs satisfy UF summer residency requirement. Fi-
nancial aid may be used on all UF programs Students must
have at least Sophomore standing, and have a 2.5 GPA to
participate on overseas programs For detailed information
concerning study abroad, contact the Center for Interna-
tional Studies and Programs. 168 Grinter Hall, 392-4904
Study abroad programs now in effect at the University of
Florida are open to students of other universities also, and
include the following-
LONDON, ENGLAND


MONTPELLIER, FRANCE
The UF has affiliated with the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill's program at Montpellier. Students must have
completed 2 years of precollege French and 3 semesters of
college French wih a B average in order to participate. The
first 4 weeks of September are spent in an intensive French
language and orientation program, after which students
enter regular classes at the Universite Paul Valery.


PARIS, FRANCE
The UF has affiliated with the American Institute for For-
eign Study's program at the Sorbonne University which of-
fers a two-track system: the Honors Program is for Juniors
and Seniors with 2 years of college French. All classes in the
Honors Program are taught in French by faculty from the
Sorbonne. The European Studies Program is for Sophomores
and luniors who want to improve their French (2 semesters
of college French necessary for participation). Some classes
are offered in English on the European Studies Program, but
students must take a French language and a French civiliza-
tion course each semester The first 3 weeks of both ro-

tation in Antibes.
A 7 week summer program is offere3i at i eorur-
ing which only French language and culture may be studied.
The first week is spent in independent travel. Six semester
hours credits .. ..1
BONN, GERMANY
Students must be at least a Junior to participate, and have
completed 3 semesters aicd;etL
of September is spent n an intensive languagerogram after
which students are given a language proficiency exam
before being allowed to enter regular classes at Bonn'Uni-
versity.
HAIFA, IERUSALEM, TEL AVIV. ISRAEL
Students may study at either Halfa University. Tel Aviv
University, or Hebrew University. The program at all 3 uni-
versities is especially designed for American students, and
commences with a 10 week Ulpan during which the student
studies Hebrew Students may choose from a large selection
of courses after that for the academic year. Most courses are
taught in English though the student is urged to continue to
master the Hebrew language
NIfENRODE, THE NETHERLANDS

tratlion with a minimum of 3.0 GPA. It is an exchange pro-
gram with the Netherlands School of Business and is limited
to 5 students. Classes are taught in English bv Dutch faculty,
but students must study a foreign language also. During the
spring semester there is a 10 week field internship with a Eu-
ropean business.
A 5 week summer program l ltffered at the Netherlands
School of Business during which 2 courses may be taken in
International Management. International Finance, or In-
ternational Marketing, for a total of 4 semester hours credit.
UTRECHT. THE NETHERLANDS (EXCHANGE) The UF has


an exchange program with


which
course
study i
study i
langua
fall set
student
taught


S--. - A- -


is limited to 10 students. A
is taught at the UF dun
n Utrecht the following I
n Utrecht must take it. In
ge course is taken by all
mester at Utrecht. In the


ts take cl
in Dutch.


ie Rajksuniversiteit Utrecht
An intensive Dutch language
ng Spring semester prior to
all. All students planning to
addition, an intensive Dutch
the participants during the
spring semester at Utrecht


asses in many varied fields The classes are
but papers and examinations are usually ac-


I .-- :-- = -J r ^-'_ -... -- - L .






COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


An 8 week summer program
politics and socialist economics
credit hours.
It is possible for UF faculty tc
year in Poland under the auspice
either lecturing (in English) or d


of Polish language, history.
is offered for 10 semester


Spend from 1 month to a
:s of our exchange program,
going research, or both.


SALAMANCA. SPAIN
The UF has affiliated with the American Institute for For-
eign Study's program in Salamanca. Spain. The month of
September is spent in an intensive Spanish language and ori-
entation program, after which students take classes at the
University of Salamanca in Spanish language and civiliza-
tion. Two semesters of college level Spanish are necessary
for participation. Students who are fluent in Spanish may
take almost any class offered at the University of Salamanca.
A 7 week summer program is also offered at Salamanca.
The first week is for independent travel followed by 6 weeks
of Spanish language classes taught by faculty from the Uni-
versity of Salamanca at the beginning, intermediate, and ad-
vanced levels for 6 semester credit hours.
In addition to the summer abroad programs in England,
France. The Netherlands (Nijenrdde). Poland and Spain, the
UF offers summer programs as follows
INNSBRUCK, AUSTRIA
A 9 week program which allows the first 3 weeks for inde-
pendent travel or students may take an organized tour of Eu-
rope for an additional fee. Approximately 70 classes in Liber-
al Arts, Business, and Education are taught by faculty from
the University of New Orleans and UF as well as guest pro-
fessors from European universities Nine semester credit
hours. It is recommended students take a German language
course prior to participation.


SANTOS, BRAZIL


A 7 week program with the
neiro accompanied by a UF faci
touring places ot interest. Next
a port city near Sao Paulo, study
Brazilian culture at the Centrc
idos. Six semester credit hour
pleted 2 semesters of Portugue9
program.


first week spent in Rio de la-
ulty member sight-seeing and
6 weeks are spent in Santos,
,ing Partuguese language and
o Cultural Brazil-Estados Un-
s Students must have com-
se prior to participation in the


BOGOTA. COLOMBIA
Students spend 6 weeks at the Universidad de los Andes
in Bogota studying Spanish and Colombian culture Spanish
is taught at the intermediate and advanced levels, and all in-
struction is by Colombian facully. One semester of Spanish
is required prior to participating Six semester credit hours.
POROS, GREECE
This is a 6 week program offered in conjunction with the
Aegean Institute Classes are offered in Greek drama, liter-
ature. art, and language Instruction is in English b\ faculty
from American universities with on site lectures and related
field trips. Students must lake Modern Greek language and
at least one additional course during the program Six
semester credit hours


STUDENT COUNCIL


The College of Liberal Arts and
(CLASSC) is composed of student
of the College's departments as
atives with lower division classifica
ly concerned with enhancing th
within the College. This past yea
students to a vast array of spei


Sciences Student Council
representatives from each
yell as student represent-
tion CLASSC is specifical-
e academic environment
r, CLASSC helped expose
kers, films, and lectures.


Projects funded included: a History Forum Lecture, a Politl-
cal Science Film Festival, a trip by the Students in the African
Studies Association to a working stimulation of the Organi-
zation for African Unity. followed by a presentation to stu-
dents by the delegates. Also funded were the Debate Team.


speakers through
and much more
made possible by


the
All
CL


Academic scholarships lt
the Council to CLAS sti
graduate scholarships in
graduate study scholarship
The Council's services also
dents may use the available


SGeolol
in all n
ASSC f
otalling
udents
the hu
and a


g'y Club. the Pre-Legal So-
iore than 28 presentations
undoing.
52000.00 were offered by
These included under-
manlties and sciences, a
foreign studs scholarship


lude a typing lab
pewriters


where stu-


The Council places students. by application, on several
faculht/student committees, including the Advisory Com-
mittee on General Education, the Advisory Committee on
International Studies, the College Curriculum Committee.
and the Faculty-Student Advising Committee.





















































:* i
i


. s^.
. ". I


t :K ifl $r n t:ThnE ;


i ;i i;:;"; r" iiT;~;"li~~ a~~xC"


-- x x xxE x q


~ ; ^"q,:a: x1 "x^~i x^ ^~E i. x x x x




School of


Accounting


i :" ."




Colleges


The School of

Accounting


GENERAL STATEMENT
The School of Accounting of the University of Florida was
established iAly 1, 197" The objective of the School of Ac-
counting is to provide the technical and general education
for graduates : r;ssimilate the proficiency necessary to enter
the accounti8g profession and progress rapidly through
levels of increasing responsibility The field of accounting
offers otsnding opportunities in such areas as public ac-
counting, industrial accounting, nonprofit accounting, and
tax accounting.
The accountant deals with complex problems in the busi-
ness world. This requires a thorough knowledge of business
operations and the environment of business as well as ac-
counting knowledge. In addition to the demanding techni-
cals skills, an ability to communicate clearly in both verbal
and written form is essential. The accountant interacts with
people cohstantly and arst develop interpersonai t~
counting is more of an art than a science and professional
judgment is an important element in the practice of accoun-
tancy. Although accounting is unusually demanding and re-
quires a high achievement motivation in order to succeed,
the rewards are high


SCHOLARSHIPS AND
ASSISTANTSHIPS


Information about general


financial


aid can be obtained


from the Director of Student Financial Aid, University of
Florida. Gainesville, Florida Information concerning schol-
arships available specifically for fourth and fifth year ac-
counling students can be obtained by writing to the School
of Accounting, University of Florida, Gainesville. Florida


HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL
ORGANIZATIONS
Beta Alpha Psi


This honorary accounting fraternity
tionallv. Upsilon Chapter was the
founded (in 1938) and is recognized as
ters in the country An active protessi
ducted each year including guest spl
sons, field trips, and other actiities
professional awareness. Beta Alpha Psi


uate Accounting


Confe


rence


t hich


a


has 115 chapters na-
18th chapter to be
one of the best chap-
onal prograrr is con-
eakers, panel discus-
designed to promote
cosponsors the Grad-
nnuall, attracts more


than 100 accounting practitioners Membership require-
ments include high ethical standards and a minimum grade
point average. Additional information concerning these re-
quirements may be obtained from the School of Accounting
Beta Gamma Sigma


Election to this national busmn
on scholarship and character F(
ply to the Office of the Dean. <
trallon
Florida Accounting Association
The FAA is a professional,'soc


less honorary society
3r additional inform,
College of Business


is based
action ap-
Admins-


:ial organization that is open


newsletter, Business Day, Teacher of the Year Award, orien-
tation sessions) and provides student representation on fac-
ulty committees


ACCOUNTING RESEARCH CENTER
The Accounting Research Center was organized in 1976 to
sponsor and encourage both frontier-seeking research and
research that has immediate benefit to the profession. The
Center provides an opportunity for graduate students to be-
come involved in specific research projects on a regular
basis Occasionally research projects provide a similar op-
portunity for undergraduate students. The Center publishes
research results in a working paper series. For information
contact the Director of the Accounting Research Center,
School of Accounting, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.


PROGRAM OF STUDY


The recommended curriculum
l -


to prepare for


ing to rne Masrer or Accounting degree.
gram allows the student to concentrate
specialty in addition to providing know
basic accounting framework and the ui
and related disciplines Details concerning
gram including the specialization areas
ing, managerial/cost, systems and tax ar
Graduate School Catalog which can be o
the Director of Admissions, Unive
Gainesville. Florida. Additional information
lamed by contacting the School of AccouI
Florida. Gainesville, Florida.


a pro-


Ine live-year pro-
in an accounting
ledge of both the
underlying business
g the five year pro-
of financial/audit-
re included in the
obtained by writing
rsity of Florida,
on can also be ob-
nting., University of


Students who successfully complete the first four years of
the five-year program will receive the Bachelor of Science in
Accounting degree. Graduates will have the requisite ac-
counting, business, and general education to pursue a varie-
ty of career opportunities in accounting and business and to
apply to graduate and professional degree programs in ac-
counting. business or law. Students wishing to specialize in
professional accounting should plan to complete the final
year of the five-year program.
Prospective students are cautioned to become familiar
with the pending change to a five year requirement to sit for
the Certified Public Accountants Examination.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
The University of Florida and the School of Accounting
encourages applications from qualified students from all
cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below are
the specific minimum requirements for admission to this
School. II should be understood however that these are minm-
imum requirements and that admission to this School is sub-
lect to enrollment capacity and is a selective process. The
satisfaction of minimum requirements does not auto-
matically guarantee admission. A student's total record in-
cluding educational objective, pattern of courses previously
completed, quality of previous academic record, and test
data will all be considered in evaluating an application for
admission Priority in admission will be given to those appli-
cants whose potential on the basis of their total record in-
dicates the greatest likelihood of success in the program re-

QrlrlJnlJ /"lf.Ac fi, I 1C. Trn a linilml& F,"r rd crlnmmn- n thn


I







SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING


plicant should complete, as far as possible, the courses re-
quired for the desired curriculum as indicated in the pro-
gram for the Freshman and Sophomore years in the College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences section. A minimum of 12
semester credits of preprofessional courses must be com-
pleted prior to admission to the School of Accounting. Com-
pletion of these courses and receqlt of an AA degree does
not guarantee acceptance to the School of Accounting. Ac-
ceptance to the School of Accounting is based upon prereq-
uisite courses completed and the student's earned grade
point average and depends upon enrollment capacity.
A. Students attending four year colleges, who wish to
transfer after two years, should follow a program of gener-
al education and preprofessional courses similar to the


Basic Curriculum for the
for students desiring to
which is outlined in the
ences section of this cata
ness subjects during the
pleted as indicated in
should not be taken dur
offered only at the upper
Florida.


Freshman and Sophomore years
enter the School of Accounting
College of Liberal Arts and Sca-
log. Prerequisite courses in busi-
first two years should be corn-
paragraph B.3 below. Courses
ing the first two years which are
division level at the University of


B. Junior College and Community College students
should:
1. Complete the university transfer program at the jun-
ior college.
2. Complete the general education requirements estab-
lished for the junior college.
3. Complete, insofar as possible, all of the following
courses which are prerequisite to any advanced pro-
fessional work in the School an introductory course (or
courses) covering both financial and managerial ac-
counting. a one-year sequence in economics, a one-
year sequence in analytical geometry and calculus, and
an introductory course in statistics. Differences in the
order of presenting material in basic one year courses
make it highly undesirable to take parts of such courses
in different institutions.
4. Choose elective courses needed to complete the to-
tal 64 semester hours in the university transfer program
from such areas as mathematics, natural sciences, social
, science, foreign language, and humanities.
5. Avoid professional coursework that is available at the
University of Florida only as 3rd and 4th year courses.
TRANSFER STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO AVOID SUCH
COURSES AS BUSINESS LAW. PRINCIPLES OF MAR-
KETING. PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE, PRINCIPLES OF
MANAGEMENT, PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE, PRIN-
CIPLES OF REAL ESTATE, PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT,
AND COMPUTER MANAGEMENT COURSES. A max-
imum of four semester credits may be allowed for
courses taken during the first two years which are avail-


able only as third
in the College of
versity of Florida
be in the form of


reference to
SUCH COUI
where a studio
course and
waivers may
student will
area being w
Department


and fourth year professional courses
Business Administration at the Uni-
Any credit granted for such work will
undistributed elective credit without
ific courses taken. IN NO CASE MAY
BE IN ACCOUNTING. In the case
dishes to waive an upper division core


substitute a community college course.
be granted on an individual basis but the
be required to take another course in the
waived. The course will be specified by the
Chairman of the area.


GENERAL REGULATIONS


Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Of-
fice of the Registrar early in the semester in which they ex-
pect to receive the degree. The official calendar shows the
latest date on which this can be done
NORMAL LOADS. The normal course load in the School
of Accounting is 15 credit hours per semester. A student may
be permitted to register for additional hours if in the opinion
of the academic adviser, his or her academic record (ustifies
it. Students who wish to take a lower course load should be
aware that certain university privileges and benefits require


a minimum registration. It is the student's
verify the minimum registration necessary fo
RESIDENCE- The last 30 semester hours
toward the degree must be completed in r
School ol Accounting A student ma\ not tak
semester credit hours by extension or
among the 60 semester credits of upper-di
quired for the baccalaureate degree and s
have prior approval from the Assistant I
School. REQUIRED ACCOUNTING COURSE
TENSION, BY CORRESPONDENCE OR AT
VERSITY MAY NOT BE TRANSFERRED


responslbilit\ to
r these benefits.


to be


applied


evidence in the
;e more than six
correspondence
vision work re-
uch work must
Director of the
S TAKEN BY EX-
ANOTHER UNI-
AND APPLIED


TOWARD REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S DEGREE.
SATISFACTORY-UNSATISFACTORY GRADE OPTION: An
undergraduate student in the School of Accounting may
lake on the S-U basis only those courses which will be
counted as free electives in fulfilling degree requirements.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION- Students who do not
make satisfactory academic progress will be excluded from
further registration More than one grade below C in upper
division accounting course work is considered unsatisfactory
progress.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS. To receive the degree
Bachelor of Science in Accounting a student must satisfac-
torily complete the following
1 64 semester credit hours of lower division requirements.
2 An approved program in accounting.
3 Upper division core courses
4. Elective requirements


A minimum of 124 semester credit hours is
graduation. The waiving of any required course
duce the hours required for graduation A st
maintain an overall average of 20 and a 20 a,
courses which count toward his or her upper-
gree requirements A 20 average must also be
for all upper-division accounting courses


required for
does not re-
udent must
erage on all
division de-
maintained


DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS:


A student who carries
point average ot 3 5 will
semester


To graduate WVlfh
3 2 average on all c
credit and all cou
tempted while regis
With High Honors,
age on all work ac'
course work excepti
tered in the Upper
graduating With Ho
policies are followed


14 hours per
be placed on


1 Honors
course wo
rse work
tleed in it
a student
cepled as
t as noted
Division.
nors or WV
*d- the stu


the University of Florida at lea
Division credit toward a degree
its and S-UL arade credits wil


semester
the Dean


with a grade
s list for that


a student musl make at least a
rk accepted as Upper Division
(except as noted below) at-
ie Upper Division To graduate
must make at least a 36 aver-
Upper Division credit and all
below) attempted while regis-
In calculating requirements for
'irh High Honors, the following
ident must have completed at
Ist 40 semester hours for Upper
?e in Accounting, transfer cred-
I be excluded. and credirs for


I






Colleges


SCHOOL OF ACCOUNTING


nee rnde s and for admission to Graduate School, consult
; the Cda Scobf CataalEy.






The upper division currcucuIu in accounting requires 60
semester credits. ',




UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENT

Required Nonccounting courses


CredIls


QMB 37(t Operations Research and Management .........
MAN 3010 Principles of Managetnent. ...
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing ... ... ... ....
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance


Required Accounting Courses:
Credits
ACC 3123 Financial Accounting I ........... ........ .............-........... 4
ACC 3143 Financial Accounting II ....... ................................... 4
ACC 3401 Cost and Management Accounting ...................... 4
ACC 4501 Federal Income Tax Accounting I ........................ 4
ACC 4602 Auditing I ..... ....... .......... ......... .... ............ .. 4
ACC 4741 Information Systems for Management Planning
and Control ........................................................................... 4


Total 24

Electives: No accounting courses (except ACC 4940) may be
counted for elective credit. A maximum of 6 credits of
advanced military science may be counted for elective
credit. A minimum of 4 elective hours must be taken
outside the School of Accounting and College of Business


Administration.


. 4


COP 3120 Intitr tc n to Cobol Programming ....... 3
C0 31) Prices and Markets ..o..... .. ... .... ... ...... 3


DLI 41Z Business taw ..i.


x E..yt I f <


Total 26


Students


advised


include


Speech course among their electives



Total 60

4 A c


t;


4 xx
'ii /*


4,


Y ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ >s ~:~ji, %,"~, IiE


I:<. .': r'/. f'i^ i
*' '.^i^ * < s:"^ : \


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; :"
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:;' lirf. ^
. ^ ^j .
E .:'


0,, ,,
"i"*ir** .
.' : ':"'


:/ -"l: I
." \ *. *


0 0
0 r
0 "+t~t~%
N~
4:(N

> 0+


i": 0 >1tf:?~, E"ji~ ^~:~E; ~~ lg~~~i tti~~<


i'* *I '
" ;* / **


E" * .H ** t

0 '


;* "xc.^

: : *, '. :'. ^


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"428j,:*: ~ TH


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El~;0 Ej*!
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: :-" /: ~~%:~ l^:rl..: '** "l*^*' T .




College of Agriculture


AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION EDUCATION

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING


V~~~3"~a:""" ~r"IP


(See College of Engineerin
^^^^En '.neennI^"^


AIGRON OM

ANIMAL SCIENCE


BOTANY


DAIRY SCIENCE


ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY

FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS

FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN NUTRITION

SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND

CONSERVATION

FRUIT CROPS

MECHANIZED AGRICULTURE

MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL SCIENCE

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE

PLANT PATHOLOGY
ir A i T rulrIrrrr" PP.lurn*a As


rV K K- ^ .
P P ^***


~.


. "~re. .._ ..


ta;;

~1E"'"~S:::
,,B ~""


. ' "i v


*13/L8 E*3.SM ..


*w:"


F. j **E"


' ;.'s *K
!:E' / ^.*^ *




, -.


Colleges


College of Agriculture


The aim of the College of Agriculture is to provide stu-
dents with the best education possible for service in agricul-
uraI business, technology, and science.
The departments in the College are: Agricultural and Ex-
, tension Education. Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy,
Animal Science. Dairy Science, Entomology and Nematolo-
gy, Food and Resource Economics. Food Science and Human
Nutrition, Fruit Crops. Microbiology and Cell Science. Or-
namental orticulture, Plant Pathology, Poultry Science, Soil
Science, Vegetable Crops, and Veterinary Science. Degree
programs are available through the College of Agriculture in
Botany ard Statistics departments administered in the Col-
lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The School of Forest Re-
sources and Conservation is a specialized faculty within the
College of Agriculture.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSIONS
?The Universily of Florida and the College of Agriculture
encourage applications from qualified students from all cul-
l..ri racial, religious, and ethnic groups. Listed below are
the specific requirements for admission to this college.
Any student with a UF classification who has finalized his
' 1 decision td study Agriculture may apply for admission to the
College of Agriculture after completing one semester in the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
To be eligible for admission students must have a mini-


mum of a C averagE
onstrated by selectKi
to pursue a program
Transfer Students
lege of Agriculture,
:d m requiremetts
lege that are set fo
catalog. Additional
* Ingioecific required
AglIculture: (1) Cor
sired curriculum a


? on all work completed and have dem-
on of preprofessional courses their intent
n in agriculture.
* To be eligible for admission to the Col-
a transfer student must satisfy the mini-
for admission to an Upper Dvlision Col-
rth in the ADMISSIONS Section of this
\the applicant must satisfy the follow-
nents for consideration by the College of
nplete the courses required for the de-
is indicated in the program for the


Freshman and Sophomore years at the University of Florida
and. (2) pass alr required preprofessional courses with a min-
imum grade of C. The following conditions will serve as a
guide in expediting transfer to the College of Agriculture in
compliance with the above requirements. In the event en-
rollment quotas become necessary because of limited space
or teaching resources, selection of those admitted will be on
the basis of past academic performance
A Students attending four-year colleges, who wish to
transfer after two years. should follow a program of gener-
al education and preprofessional courses similar to the
Basic Curriculum for the Freshman and Sophomore years
for students planning to enter the College of Agriculture
as outlined in the Lower Division section of this catalog.
B. junior College students should-

1 Complete the two-year college parallel program at
the junior college

2. Satisfy the general education requirements estab-
lished tor the lunior college.

3. Complete a program of chemistry through qualitative
analysis and mathematics through college algebra and
trigonometry


Speech and journalism are considered preprofessional
requirements for students maloring in Agricultural and
Extension Education.

8. Avoid specialized professional courses. Professional
courses .an be laken to much better advantage after the
student has acquired the appropriate background in
general education and basic science courses.
Special post-baccalaureate student (6AG): A student who
has received a baccalaureate degree but who is not seeking
admission to Graduate School may be admitted under cer-
lain circumstances as a special student Examples of these
circumstances are:
a) to receive a second baccalaureate degree
b) satisfy requirements for a second major
c) take basic requirements for admission to Graduate School
and
d) to complete courses for information only.
Admission requirements are the same as for transfer stu-
dents In addition. post-baccalaureate students must comply
with College and University rules and regulations and meet
all deadlines as printed in the catalog for undergraduate stu-
dents.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
BASIC CURRICULUM
In addition to the 64 semester credits required for en-
trance to the College of Agriculture. 64 credits must be
earned in the College of Agriculture curriculum for a com-
bined total of 128 credits required for the Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Agriculture degree.
In addition, students must have a 20 grade point average
both in Upper Division and all credits attempted at the Uni-
versity of Florida The following curriculum to all areas of ag-
riculture designates specific requirements and electives for
the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. Some of these
courses may be taken as electives in the Lower Division It is
especially important thai students in junior colleges, plan-
ning to transfer to the College of Agriculture, select courses
from the core requirements as electives.
Currculum College of Agriculture 64
Requirements and electives in student's major
department .. . mm 13--max 27
Other requirements, free and approved electives ..... 37-51
PRACTICAL WORK EXPERIENCE
By prior arrangement with individual Department
Chairmen and approval of the Dean, students may. during
their upper dyiin course of sud, recee credit for rac-
tical work under competent supervision in any recognized
and approved agricultural or related pursuit relevant to their
college program. Credit is normally earned at the rate of one
credit per month of full-time work and may not exceed a to-
tal of four in any combination of experiences. A formal writ-
ten report must be submitted before a grade (S-U) will be is-
sued
Departments offering this option have listed the course
number 4941 in their catalog listing courses. Guidelines are
available from the College and individual departments, es-
tablishing minimum criteria for credit eligibility and per-
formance.
DEAN'S LIST AND GRADUATION
WITH HONORS OR HIGH HONORS
A student who carries 15 hours per semester with a grade
nnmntl t ,rzaa e(f1 n nr hoiltar anrd nfn orda lact han r- in 2nhu


:* *







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


University after the student has earned 64 credits, wherever
taken.)
To graduate with High Honors the same requirements ap-
ply as for Honors except that the grade point average must
be 3 75 or above.


GRADUATE TRAINING IN AGRICULTURE


International Economics, and Tropical Ecosystems and a
minimum of 10 credits from Tropical Agriculture courses
The courses required for this Certificate will be de-
termined by the student in consultation with a departmental
adviser and approved b, the Dean of the College of Agricul-
ture Students interested in this program should consult the
Dean of Agriculture.


The College of Agriculture
Master of Agriculture, Master
tural Management and Resou
of Philosophy


offers four advanced degrees
of Science. Master of Agrlcul-
rce Development, and Doctor


Students contemplating graduate study should consult
with their advisers as early as possible to insure proper pro-
gram planning.


SPECIAL PROGRAMS
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND BUSINESS
Students in agriculture may specialize in one of three
broad areas of knowledge-Agricultural Science, Agricultur-
al Technology, and Agricultural Business, all within the
framework of 128 credits for the degree Bachelor of Science
in Agriculture.
For a specialization in Agricultural Science at least 12 cred-
its of the 128 total are required in one or more of the areas
of the Physical (CHM. GPY, PHY) and Biological Sciences
(BSC. BOT. ENY. PLP. AGR) and Mathematics (MAC). in ad-
dition to those required in the Lower Division
For program in Agricultural Technology a choice of
courses in applied agriculture is planned by the separate de-
partments of the College of Agriculture in areas of the
student's special interest
For Agricultural Business Specialization at least 13 credits
of the 128 total required must be completed from the areas
of Food and Resource Economics (AEB) and Business Admin-
istration (ACC. ECO. FIN. MAN. MAR). in addition to those
required in Lower Division plus a departmental mapor
The academic adviser of the department in which the stu-
dent majors will assist the student in arranging his course of
study, and make necessary recommendations to the Dean
The student's courses for each semester are subject to the
approval of the Dean and the Department Chairman.
TROPICAL AGRICULTURE

A program for a specialization (with certificate) in Tropical
Agriculture for undergraduate and graduate students in the
College of Agriculture is available The program provides
course selection to broaden the normal degree requirements


for those interested in specializi
Students enrolled in any one of t
in the College of Agriculture may
The Certificate in Tropical Agl
include courses from four basic gi


ies, International
ical Agriculture. /
courses which rel
is required from
Tropical Ecosystei
ry. In addition, a
culture courses r
modities in tropi


Ec<
A t


)nomics.
total of at


ng in Tropical Agriculture.
he existing malor programs
pursue this specialization.


riculture
roups as


Tropical
least 13


specialization
follows: Area S


Ecosystem
semester


ate to non-U.S. tropical areas
Area Studies. International Ec
ms with at least 3 credits from
minimum of 13 credits from T
elated to production of agric
cal areas of the world is requi


is, and T
credits f
of the w
onomics
each cati
tropical A
cultural c
red


The courses required for this specializallonr will
termined by the student in consultation with a depart
adviser from an approved list of courses as indicated


Tropical Aenrcu


ilture SDecialization guidelines. In most


The departments or disciplines from
be selected are listed below The specific
all details of the program are gl\en in a
Specialization guideline statement to
partmental advisers.


Area Studies
Anthropology
Education
Geography
History
Journalism
Latin American
Law
Political Science
Sociology
Others as appro


which courses
c courses as we
Tropical Agncul
be used by


Studies


'pnate


International Economics
Economics
Food and Resource Economics
Marketing
Others as appropriate
Tropical Ecosystems
Agronomy
Biological Sciences
Botany
Forestry
Zoology
Others as appropriate


Tropical Agrrcullure
Agricultural Engineering
Agronomy
Animal Science
Enlomology
Food and Resource
Economics
Fruitl Crops
Ornamental Horticulture
Plant Patholog\
o0il Science
Vegetable Crops
Veierinarv Science
Others as appropriate
PEST MANAGEMENT AND PLANT PROTECTION


Student', in
Specialization
tomology Ner
An understand
ecosystem as
through the a
grated system
be provided


Management
e instruction
Plant Patholo
component


related to ma
application ot
s compatible


Students who select
section Specialization '
grams in the College c


and Nemalologv
Plant Pathology.
denis who comply
Science degree \%


5 r- \


r-..r.


Fruit
ant Sc
e the


nagement (
biological
with a qua


e Pest
malor
gricult


Crops
fences
require


Plant Protection
Sprinciples ot En-
id Weed Science
ot the crop-plant


II group
emical
en. iro


nagement
jne ol the
Agronom
ornamental
ir Vegetab
ent ftor It


lth this specialization h
-r. .n*t rhc. .n 'nr,6 .. na .


ps otr
, and
nment


and Plant
iollowi ng
iv. Entomo


Horticu
Crops
Bachel


lould
c onIj


find many
nmn....n a.


omnlmn minl




Colleges


. ^.i^
:." "


'/ r .


PMA 3010 Fundamentals ef Pest Management
PMA 3323C Pesticide Application .,.
PMA 3931. Seminar in Basic Pest Mariagment .
PMA 3941 Internship in Pest Management
PMA 4401C Understanding & impiemernerng Pest
Management Strategies in Agricultural Systems
PLS 2031 Fundamentals of Crip Production
ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ... . ..
ENY 3006L Principles of Entomolegy Laboratory
ENY 3701 Principles of Nematologv .......
PLS 4601 Weed Science ........,. .
PLP 3002 Fund4mentals of Plant Patholog
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology... .. ..
BOT 3503 introductoryy Plant Physiology
BOT 3503Jt Introductory Plant Physiology Laboratory
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic jnd Biological
Chemistry ...........
SOS 3022C General Soils ...........,...........
AGR 3303 Genetics ......... ...


Credrts
.. 2

1
1


3
2
1
3
3
.. 4
5
3


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


chairman of the interdisciplinar\ committee on Sstems of
Pest Management and Plant Protection The following re-
quired courses should be completed in addition to the malor
program requirements. The requirements of this special-
ization can usually be met through ihe course requirements
of the major program and a wiie chOice ol electives within
The i28 credits required for the Bachelor ot Science in Agi-
culture.


STrigonometry
are required 1
"'Six semester
ment for an


and
lor ad
credit
Associ


Algebra at the high
mission to courses i
is will be accepted
ale of Arts degree


Because of the rigid course reqi
quire somewhat more than two
riculum Also. since admission t
pethllie students usually need
than the minimum grade point


....... ........ 4


30.


Animal Science:
Introduction to Animal Science (ASG 3003)
ASG 3402C Pimnciples of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding ....... ... ... ... ...
Humanities (HUM 2210, HUM 2220. HUM 22
2410 or 2420 .. ................ ........
Social Science (SSI 2110. SS 2120) .......
English (ENC 11"0 and ENC 1419 .............
Elec lives .. .. ..... ... ...
(e g Agriculture. Computer Science,
Economics. Humanities. Journalism.
Polincal Science, Psychology Social
Sciences. Statstics. etc )


oral
college


. \ s


. .. .. ... .. 8
... 8- 1 2


school or c<
n Calculus
if taken as


a


require-

ents re-
his cur-
is com-
yIv more


Jirements, most stud
,ears to complete t
o Veterinary School
to make considerab
average of 2."'5.


Pre-eterinnary students should consult
lege of Agriculture before registering
curriculum


. 4
. .. 3


CERTIFICATE MINOR IN
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

A program for a rthinor (with certifica)n en"ironmenlal
studies has been developed. The progfN provides course
Sseection to obtain a broad-knowledge of the environment.
Especially the inter~lationships: eteween the actsities of
:- nand an.enk iron mental iqualtv Students enrolled in one of
man~~~~~ e o ut.r on
5the existmg malor programs in the College of Agriculture
andt.for this minor |llI learn to apply their malor discipline
St0 tae solution or environmental problems
T .e environmental studies minor will include en Iron-
Smenta courses in three basic groups as follows biological
Sciences, phslcal sciences, and social sciences 4t least one
..corse from each or these three groups is required A minit-
mum pfl2 semester hours credit is required for the minor
Couses required toro the malor cannot be counted toward
S.thfe migtpr requirement. A pinimum ol three hours outside
; .the College 0of Agriculture s required
The courses tequred for rhis minor w IIIl be determined by
the students in consultation with their departmental adviser
trom an approved list or courses prepared by the depart-
ment, the College or Agriculture and the Un, ersily In most


cooper-


ahively
neernlg
neerln
the spe
lural p
menrt a
sourceS
biology
training
Studen
isler in
ing for


b\ the College of Agrlculture and ihe College of Engi-
g Students in this major receive basic training in engi-
g and agriculture so thai they are prepared Io solve
cialized and unique engineering problems of agrcul-
roduction and processing systems and the manage-
ind conservation of agricultural land and water re-
Since engineering problems in agriculture relare to
cal production and processing of biological products,
g in agricultural and biological courses is obtained
Is desiring careers in Agricultural Engineering will reg-
the College ol Engineering. See College of Engineer-


riculum


cases these requirements may be met
oqf elCtLes.,Students interested in this
their departmental adviser
PRE-VETERINARY MEDICINE


The Agricultural and Extension Education


The College of
admits a hImted r
of a degree Doc
courses must be
minimum grade


leterinary


Medicine


currci


designed to prepare students for careers in agricultural edu-
cation and the cooperative extension service Students ma-
lonng in this department have a common core curriculum
which combines courses in' technical agriculture, pro-
fessional education, and/ or extension methodology The de-
partment chairperson or one o01 the. departmental advisers
will advise students majoring in this department in the selec-


number ot students each
Ior ot ,eterinary Medicir
completed with no grade
point average oa 2 "'5


he pursuit
following
in C and a

ter Credits

,.. .. . 8

.... 3-4
... 20-23


SSeme
BSC 2010C and BSC 2011C Integrated Principles
of Biology I and II ... . . ... .
Microbiology (MCB 3020CI ... ........
Genetics (,GR 3303 or PCB 3653C) ...
Chem istry . .......


S1


electives


students" ca-


reer goals
The agricultural education (teaching) program provides


T


the Dean of the Col-
tor the pre-veterinary


Students who will hae completed the pre-veterinary re-
quirements in June can be considered for admission in the
Fall of the same year The Office o0 Admissions at the Col-
lege of Veterinary Medicine should be contacted early in the
Fall term of the year preceding anliclpated admission.



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING (Agricullural
Engineering)


The Agricultural Engineering


curriculum


is offered


cur


through a wise choice
minor should consult


AGRICULTURAL AND EXTENSION


EDUCATION


ulum


University


of Florida.


lion of


and requirements


to meet the




.. I l *


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Extension Education Practicum" (teaching internship) must
meet the following criteria:
1. Advanced senior standing.
2 Completion of EDF 4210 or equivalent speech and 16
hours of professional education in agricultural education
3. A "C" average (2.0) or better
4. A "C" average (2.0) or better, in all professional educa-
tion courses required in the area of specialization
5. Grades of less than "C in Agricultural Education
courses will not be accepted
6. Score a total score ol at least 835 on the Scholastic Ap-
titude Test (SAT) or a composite score of 1' or above on
the American College Testing Program tACT)

Students wishing to enroll in AEE 4943 Agricultural Ex-
tension Practicum" (extension internship) must meet the tol-
lowing criteria:
1. Advanced senior standing.
2. "C" average (2.0) or better.
3. A "C" average (2.0) or better in all professional educa-
lion courses required in the area of specialization.
4 Completion of the following courses'
a. AEE 3313
b. AEE 4424
c. AEE 3200
(b and c may be modified with approval of departmen-
tal chairperson)


Assignment to an internship cenlen is an involved pi
and is not taken lightly. Every consideration is given I
dent requests. However. applicants are specifically
guaranteed assignment to their home county, to th
mediate and general vicinity of the campus or to a
center on request Assignments will be made only to
centers indicated at time of application. Submission
application by a candidate constitutes an agreement


cept assignment in the center where it is determ
objectives of the internship program can best I
Failure to accept an assignment negotiated by
personnel relieves the Department of any furlt
ability to provide internship experiences and co
candidate
The student completing this program will be
satisfy the College of Agriculture core curricul
ments.
All students will take a basic skills assessment
while enrolled "n AEE 3323. This examination i
tions on mathematics, reading and writing A s
have a successful score on all sections of the
assessment examination prior to admission to
internship experience


ined I
be ac
Dep.
ler re
urses


3003 Introduction to Animal Science
1 3210 Field Crop Science
or
S4231 Forage Science and Range Management
3022 General Soils
3005 Principles oi Entomolog,


ENY 3006 Princ
ORH 3008 Intri
"*Electi.es in Ag
*The student
schools will co
the above list
b\ an asterisk
interested in e
partmental coi
a"Substitutions r
cultural and E[
**'To be planned


iples or
oductior
riculture
planning
mplete a
or profess
('I are r
tension
unselor
nust be
Tension


ntomolog\,
to Resident

to qualify
minimum
,onal court
quired. Th
education


approved b\ the
Education


by department ad


Lab
tial Horliculture


teach in the public
I semester hours Irom
The courses indicated
rriculum ror students
be planned by a de-


chairperson


visers


AGRONOMY


Agronomy students receive scientific and technical i
struction in the various aspects of held and forage crop pr
ductlon and utilization as well as in genetics and pla
breeding A minimum ot 64 total credits is required A sp
clalizallon in Pest Management and Plant Protecilon is ava
able Students interested in an Agronom% maior should co
tact the Department of Agronomy for information earl'
their academic career


process
o slu-
NOT
e im-


3 Genetics ... .
3 Elementary, Organ'c
strv
3C Introductory Plant


to ac-


;hat the
hieed
Irtment
sponsi-
for the


: required to
lum require-

examination
includes sec-
itudeni must,
. basic skills
the teaching


Credirs
3


and Biological


Physiology


3503L Introductory Plant Physiology Laboialor\
3005 Principles ot Entomolog.\
3006L Principles ot Entomology Laboratory
3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology
3221 Plant Propagation ..
3221L Plant Propagation Laboratory
3022C Ceneral Soils .. .


PL5 4601


Weed


Science


Departmental Requiements---3


) Field Crop Science
I Agronomy Seminar
In Agronomy


Credits


Credit
.. .. 3


Departmental Requirements 28 credits

'AEE 3323 Development & Philosophy of Agricultural
Ed ucatio n .......... .... .. .......... .... ......... . .... ....
*AEE 3200 Instructional Techniques in Agricultural
Ed ucation ..-.. ...... ... . ........... .. . . ...
*AEE 4504 Organization of Agricultural Education
Program s ......... .. ... ....... ........ ... ..... ......


WAEE 4224
Agnrcul
'AEE 4227
"AEE 4424
*EDF 3135
*AEE 4942
AEE 4943
AEE 4624
Agncul
AEE 3313


Special Methods in Teaching Vocational
Itu re ..... .............. .. .. .... . .... .... .. ..
Laboratory Practices in Teaching Agricultural
Agricultural Youth Programs . ..
The Adolescent (or equivalent) ..............
Agricultural and Extension Practicum ........
Agricultural Extension Practicum ... .........
Career and Prevocational Education in
Dture ....and Role ....o. Extension Edu.
Development and Role of Extension Educatio


Approved elecrates-22 credits


Credits

.. . 3

.. 3

. .. 3


ANIMAL SCIENCE


The currinc
requirements
ence is design
sciences and
the beef cat


Early in ti
programs
man or h


ilum in Animal Science meets the e
for the Bachelor ol' Science degree
ned to gi8e students a foundation I
fundamental training in the variou
lie svwine horse, sheep and meat


ir college planning, students
nd heir implications with the
counseling representatives


Departmental Requirements ..
Other Requirements and Electives


should
Depart


r


educallonal
Animal Sci-
n the basic
s phases of
industries
discuss the
nenl Chair-


Credits
20
... ..... 44


Total


In,


Plant Science Core Requirements--29 Credits


_





Colleges


COLeEGE OF AGRICULTURE


ANS 3612C Evaluation and Utilization of Meat Animals


and Carcasses .................;... .. *
ANS 4234C Horse Enterprise Management
ANS 4242C Beef Cattle Science and Range
Management ............................. ..
ANS 4264C Swine Production .......
ANS 4274C Sheep Production ..... ....


Other Requirements and Elecli


AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ............... ..
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratry ........


AGR 3303
AGR 4231(


Genet icsci nel l.** a ndiririniinn R .n.e ...
: Forage Science and Range


Management MM M BCH 3023 Elemnentary Organic and Biological
Chemistry Bil....g..y. ..... .. .. .o....... M.ro.,oi m . .- ...
MCB 3020C Basic Biotogy of Microdrganims ..


SOS 3022C General


... 4


4


VES 3202C Anatomy and Physiology ,.. ; ... 4
Flee Electives ...... ....... .......... ..

Students are encouraged td elect additional courses in Sci-
ence, Technology, Economics, and Business relating to a ca-
reer interest.


CURRICULUM


. ... 3

* 4


This is designed


- DAIRY MANAGEMENT


primarily for students interested


managing dairies or dairy enterprises, or careers in allied
agribusiness.
Departmental Requirements--18 Credits
DAS 3211 Dairy Cattle Management .. .. .......... ....... 2


ASG 3402C Principles of Animal Nutrition
and Feeding ... ..... ......... ...
DAS 4411 Dairy Cattle Nutrition ..


..... ..... 4
... ...... ...... 3


DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation or ASG 4334 Reproduction


en Farm Anmals ... ....
Minimum of 6 additional DeF
selected from the follow


D4S 3214 Dairy


Cattle Evaluation


)artmental Credits
ting courses:
Credits
... ........ .......................... 1


DAS 4213 Dair\ Management Techniques ... ....... ......... 1-4


DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation ..
DAS 4614 Dair Technology ...
DAS 4905 Problems in Dar\ Science


.... .... .. ...... ... ... 3
..... . ............ ... 4


DAS 4941 Pracllical Work Experience in Dairy


Science .....
ASG 4334 Reproduction
ASG 4992 Dairy judging


in Farm Animals ...


BOTANY


cu
Cu
A"


4 major in botany is offered through the College of Agrl-
lture. Students should consult with the Undergraduate
coordinator for curriculum. (See Botany, College of, Liberal
*JJ' f --*JI L^ WJ MBJ^~ f- S^ I- j Ihl: J'fc'*.^ -1i f


Arts and Sciences or e urs


C It1 lg


Other Reqmrements, and leIeflt se6mtt


Credits


4CC 2001 Introduction to Accounting ....


;CC 2301


Elementary Managerial Accounting


AEB 3111 Computers & Linear Programming for


agriculture .. ... . ...
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .......


DAIRY SCIENCE


The two curricula give broad foundations iQ science and
technology of the dairy industry, Students would consult
withthe chairman or departmennal adviser for assistance in
choosing the cucriculitn and selecting eletaes.
%v***' *


CURRICULUM I


This is


- DAIRt SCIENCE


designed primarily for students interesfod in ddairy


production, pre-veterinary medicine or post-graduate study
Departmental Requirements-18 Credits
Credsis
DAS 3211 Dairy Cattle Management ... ............... 2.
ASG 3402C Principles of Animal Nutrition
and .Feeding' .................C..,,..+..n, ........... 4
DA4 4 411 Dairy Cattle Ititiiion ., ... .......... .... 3
DAS 4510 hysiology of Lactatiop or ASG 4334
Reproduction in Farm Animals .. .... ...... 3
Minimum of 6 additional Departmental Credits
selected from the following courses
Credr1s


AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory ......
AGR 4231 Forage Science and Range Management
46G 3003 Introduction to Animal Sciences .
BCH 3023 Elementar\ Organic & Biological
Chemistrv .... .


MhAC


2233 Cal


MAC 3311


. ... ........ 2


. .. ... 3
. . .. 1
. ....1 4


cului for Economics & Business or


Analitic Ceometr, & Calculus I ...


\ES 3202C Analomy & Physiology of Domestic
Anim als . . .
Electives . ... .. . .


. .. 4
... 4
4


ENTOMOLOGY & NEMATOLOGY
Entomolog\ and nematology are biological sciences deal-
ing with two principal groups of Invertebrate animals. The


curricula are designed to give be
and nematoloy gandi secrallwd
ot: tijee two citntes
oi lu *Y i~jc'iiicr :;v^ :?yi .jcixii-t-


sic Iraining in entomology
pr rmivaosra


CURRICULUM I-GENERAL ENTOMOLOGY


Departmental Requirements


- 20 Credits


Credits


valuation


DAS 4213 Dairy Management Techniques
DAS 4510 Physiology of Lactation ...
DAS 4614 Dairy Technology ....-..............
DAS 4905 Problems in Dairy Science
DAS 4941 Practical WarlExeperence in Dair\


Science


I.. -- *W * fr I-: *


4334 Reproduction in farm Animals
4992 Dairy judging .


. .. ..... 1-4

1-4
. ... . .... 3


Other Requirements and: Eecrtesi-46 Credrts


Credits


AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management
-- __._ __ ** --- B .. -I* ** *.*_ *


3


ENY 1005 Principles ot Entomology ..
EN\ 3006L Principles of Entomology Laboratory ....


EN\ 3004 General Enlomnqogly
ENY 3931 Undergraduate Seminar


ENY 4353
ENf 4201


Insect Phvysolog% and Morphology


Insect


EN\ 4161 Incect


Ecology


Behavior, and Systematics ..


Identiication .


.. 3


Uher ikequirementr and tlectves Creits
BCH 3023 Organic & Biochemistry or equivalent ... ........ 4
Electives in Agriculture and/or Biological


C. rknn -


'1


3tli rI -r IiL.. _


: $ ~ 4I^E


DAS 324 Dairs Cattle


I


Soils Io ....;.... ..... ,,,, ...


.


S "*- 1






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


control, and


weed


control with special


reference


tc


lems in and around residential and other buildings. T


prob-
rainees


will be prepared to take the state certification examinations


ECO 4205 Macroeconomic


Theory


STA 3023 Introduction to Stahstics


Free and Approved


Electives .


............ 3

. ...... .. ... 18


Since
control


these pest problems


companies,


ness management


are serviced


considerable emphasis


so that


trainees


by private pest
is given to busl-


are prepared for adminis-


CURRICULUM II
MANAGEMENT


-AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS


tralive duties


as well.


Department of Entomology
Requirements--16


& Nematologv
Credits


This curriculum is d
in administrative and
lated businesses


designed for those students


sernvce


aspects


interested


of agricultural


or re-


ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology


Credits
. . .. ...... ... . 2


ENY 3006L Principles of Entomology Laboratory .... .


ENY 4353


Insect


Physiology and Morphology


ENY 4660 Medical and Veterinary Entomology
ENY 4161 Insect Identificaton .. .. .. ....


ENY 3551 Household


Insects ..


ENY 3515 Ornamental and Turf Insects


PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest M
Business Requrre
ACC 2001 Elementary Financial Ace
BUL 4112 Business Law (Contracts)
BUL 4305 Business Law (Property)


management
ments
counting ..


... .... 2


S ... 5
. .. 4
. .... 3


MAN 3010 Principles of Management
or
MAR 3023 Principles of Marketing ........... ..
or
BCN 1210 Construction Materials .........


Departmental


ulrements-29


AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ....


AEB 3133L Farm Firm
AEB 3300 Agricultural


Management
Marketing


Credirs


Economics


Credits


..... 4


Laboratory


.. ... 1


AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture .... ..... ...... ....


AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis
Behavior ... . .......


and Consumer
I i.. .... .I I. 3


AEB 4511 Quantitat'ke Analysis in Food and


Economics .. ... ... .
AEB 4935 Food and Resource


Seminar ... ...
Electives in Food and


Resource


"AEB 3111 may not be counted


nomics


elective.


Economics


Economic
as a Food


Resource


Senior


i.1,. .i ...... 1
and Resou1ce
and Re5suwe Ecct


General


Agriculture


Requirements


AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management ...... .
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory
AEB 4421 Agricultural Labor Economics .....
PLP 3002C Fundamentals of Plant Pathology ..


PLP 4102 Principles of Plant


PLS 4601 Weed


ORH 3513
ORH 4221


Disease


Control


Science .. ............... .....


Ornamental Plant Identification


Turfgrass


Culture .


Other Requiremenrs
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic an


Approved


and Electiles
id Biochemist


electves ... ....... ......


FOOD AND RESOURCE


Other Requirements and Electives-35 Credits
ACC 2001 Introduction to Accounting ,,................ i-.. ,,.


MAC


,........ 1
... 2
. .. .. 4


... ... .. ... 3
.. 3
... ... ..... ... 3
.... . .. .. .... 4


... 4


... ... ...... ....... .. .... .... 6


3223 5


urney


ECO 3100 or ECO


of Calculus 1 . .,....ai... *.,...tgii*n 4101 Microeconrniti Theory ..,.,, ,x.;.. 3


ECO 3251 or ECO 4205 Macroeconomic Theory .............. 3
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistoics .........,,,, ...i..;.:....^,, 3
Free and Approed Electives .... .. ..................i 18

CURRICULUM III CO-MAJOR WITH OTHER
DEPARTMENTS

Students majoring in other departments or colleges who


feel the need for a


better understanding of the


economics of


agriculture and the relationship of agriculture to the general
economy can also take a Co-Malor in Food and Resource Ec-
onomlcs.


ECONOMICS


curricula


are offered by


D


Resource Economics. The Curriculum


will depend upon the nature


of his


department
selected b


of Food and
, the student


or her interest


in the


field Students should consult the chairman of the depart-


ment or the departmental adviser


their choice of

CURRICULUM


ECONOMICS
This curriculum


primarily in training


for guidance in making


a curriculum and for approval of electives.
I FOOD AND RESOURCE


is designed for those students interested


as professional agricultural


or in preparing for graduate study.


economists


Departmenral Requrrementsr-21


4EB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource


AEB 3133


Farm Firm


AEB 3300 Agricultu


Management ...........


ral Marketing


Credits
Credits
Economics .. 4


AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture
AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture ...............................


AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Ani
Behavior ..... .... ..... ...
AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis
Economics ..... ....


Other Requirements and


MAC 3223 Survey
Free and Approvel


of Calculus 1 .
d Electives .....


alysis


and Consumer


in Food


and Resource


Credits


Requi


AEB 3103 Principles of Food


rements-26


and Resource


Credits
.Credais
Economics .. 4


CURRICULUM IV


- HUMAN RESOURCE AND


COMMUNITY ECONOMICS


AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .
AEB 3133L Farm Firm Management Laboratory


1..


This curncu
on problems


ilum


is designed to train professionals to work


affecting people and their communities.


AEB 3300 Agricultural
AEB 3503 Computers


Marketing ....


and Data


Analysis


for Agriculture .


Departmental Require


menlts-24


Credits


Itural Price Analysis


and Consumer


AEB 3103 Principles of Foi
AEB 3503 Computers and
ACR AT)A D..Mi;r DPnir. in


od and Resource
Data Analysis fo


Ano., .e Is., ,a


culture 2
2


Departmental


Electives-43


%
I *!
, :


I .


L





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


E"O *4504 Public Firance
AEB 4421 Agfaiultral Labor Economics
SAEB 4444 Regional Economics and Policy Analysis
MAB 4726 Income and Employment of Rural People
Eltciives in Food and Resource Economics*......
.. EB 111 may not be counted as a food and Resourc
ripmics elective.

Other Requirements and Eletives-40Credils


ACC 2001 Introduction toAccounting ........
MAC 3223 Survey of Calculus 1,........
ECO 300.or CO 4101 Microecoromic Theory
ECO3251 or ECO 4205 Macroeconomic Theory
STA3023 Introduction toStaitics .


Electives .F... .

FOOD MARKETING AND


ee:-and Approved
CURRICULUMV-


Dietetics. Students in these curricula take a common core of
courses, required courses for their area of concentration. and
electives Students should consult the departmental advisers
for guidance and approval of eleclives.

The oa ic Fo :ey d
te principles o C emilry. 1io emlstry, maicro o op. en-


^EEco


gineering. other basic


............ .. 3


sciences,


and management in applica-


lions related to the manufacturing, processing, preserving.
distnbulion and packaging of food and food products for
immediate or future utilization General areas of study in-
clude: chemical, microbiological and nutritional properties
ot rayw and processed foods; role of processing and engineer-
ing in modifying food properties, food deterioration and
spoilage- role of additives and other ingredients, food safety;
food fermentation and new food product innovations. An


opportunity


is offered for students to intensity in


areas


DISTRIBUTION
This curriculum is designedfor students interested in em
ployment at the managerial evel in the Food Industry.


Departmental Reqliremernts 2t CI its


AiB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource


!:r& ,..v
. *x" .
.'^"I
': <&* .
\ &' ^.. ^

K S^K K^
--'It. '
EiT..^
rl-S: i"
: ~ '***.
I^^ >*"





i^/^.^ :"1..

'*^ *M' '^ '
/^^ .:.* :
l"13 '*'
^l^;'':-


Credrls
Economics ... 4


AEB 3300Agricultural Marketng .. ..
AEB 3503 Computets and iDati Analysts for Agriculture
MAEB 414 Terminal Markets ad Cornmmodity Exchanges
Ai 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
BehFavior .. ... . .. .. .


AEB 4342 Food Distribution Management


AEB 4511 Quantitatie An
Ec.onmics .I ....... .
AEB 4935 Food and Resou


irce


... .. .... 4


is in Food and Resource

Economics Senior


Seminar .....,

: either Requiremenls and ElecUres -
ACC <21 Introduction to Accounting ....
MAC 3223 SSuw e of Calculus 1 ...


!CO 4101 Microeconomic The


qrbr E 4205


Macroeconomics Th


STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics
Free and Approved Electnies ..

CURRICULUM VI NATURAL RE


-43 Credits


...... ..... ..... ... 5
.. .. .. ..... 3
?or .. .... 3
ieory .. ... ... 3


specialization such


cessinmg


as general food processing, citrus pro-


seafood processing, food chemistry, food engineer-


ing food microbiology, management, food marketing, nutri-
tion public health'and consumer protection. Cooperative
programs are available with the appropriate commodity de-
partments for students desiring to specialize in dairy, meat,
poultry or fruit and vegetable processing. An excellent foun-
dation for graduate study and research in Food Scienceor re-
lated "fields is fs provide ss
The Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum is designed to give
students a foundation in nutrition and, if desired, for a en-
eral dietetics internship program upon graduation. h
Nutrition and Dietetics curriculum provides an excellent un-
dergraduate education for students planning to enter a grad-
uate program in human or animal nutrition. Students prepar-
ing for the professions of medicine, dentistry, or veterinary
medicine normally complete the minimum program and ad-
ditional courses chosen with the help of their advisers.


Department


Core Requirements-30 Credits


HUN 2201 Fundamentals of Human Nutrition .
FOS 3042 Introductory Food Science .. .. ...
FOS 4311C Food Chemistry .. ........ .....


FOS 4222C


Food Microbiology


FOS 4321C Food Analysis .


SOURCE AND


V~IRONMrENTAL ECONOMICS
S*-'is criculum is designed for students interested in nat-
ural resources and environmental quality

Departmental Requwrements-25 Credits
Credits
AEB 3103 Principles of Food and Resource Economics .... 4


AEB 3413 Economics of Environmental Quality


AEB 3503 Computers and Data Analysis for Agriculture


AEB 4224 Public Policy in Agriculture


At least 3


credits from the following


AEB 4324 Production Decrsions of Agricultural Firms
AEB 4334 Agricultural Price Analysis and Consumer
Behavior
AEB 4434 Land and after r Economics


AEB 4511 Quantitative Analysis in Food and Resource
_ E onom ics .. .. ... .. .. ....... ... ... .
AEB>493Food and Resource Economics Senior
Sem aiin r. . .. .. ...
Electes n Food and Resource Economics" .. ..
t AEB l-?i may not be counted as a Food and Resource
nribics elective

Other Requirements and Elecotves 39 Creditss


ACC 2001


Introduction to Accounting


MAC 3223 Survey


ol Calculus 1


FOS 4931


Credits
.......... 3
........... 3
... . 4


Food Science and Human Nutrition Seminar


CHM 3200 Organic Chemistry . ......... .. . .. 4
MCB 3020C Basic Biology ot Microorganisms
h o ra ory ..... ....... ...... ...........................


STA 3023


Introduction to Statistics


CURRICULUM


...... ................ 3


- BASIC FOOD SCIENCE


Addritonal requirements and electives 34 Credirs
Credits
fOS 4427C Principles of Food Processing .. ................. 4


... 2
... 3


FOS 4722C


Statistical Quality Control and Sensory


Evaluation of Foods ... ... ........ ........
FOS 4731 Government Regulations and
the Food Industry ..


MAC 3311 Analytic


Geometry & Caltulus


MAG 4062C Principles of Food Engineering


3


.. .. .. ... ... 5
. ... ... ... .. 3


a -. rt r a r. Ji fl -, *


In addition, students will be required to complete any two
of the following:
FOS 4522C Seafood Technology. ........ ....... 3
FOS 4551C Fruit. Vegetable and Citrus Processing ............. 3
ANS 4635C Meat Processing ........................... ................ 3
DAS 4614 Dairy Technology ................. ......... 4


PSE 4611 Poultry Products Technology
lecURRICULUM II- NUTRITION AND ............................

CURRICULUM II NUTRITION AND


........ 12-13


DIETETICS


i": .*? *,
^ / ^..1-.


(;i" *


... .... ... 3


iiI


1


w


/






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


MAN 3151 Foundations of Organizational Behavioral ...... 3
SOC 2000 Princples of sociology ....... .................. ... .............. 3


FOREST RESOURCES
AND CONSERVATION
(For Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements. See Listings
under School of Forest Resources and Conservation.)


FRUIT CROPS
The Department of Fruit Crops at the University of Florida
in Gainesvile offers an outstanding undergraduate program
for students planning to enter the citrus and other fruit in-
dustries in the state lob opportunities in production man-
agement, agricultural sales and technical representation, ex-
tension and many other areas are available to our graduates
Students receive a broad foundation in the science and
technology of fruit production, handling and marketing
Core lecture and laboratory courses in Entomology
Biochemistry. Plan't Pathology. Sodls. Plant Physiology. Plant
Propagation and Genetics are taken
For graduation, the student completes certain core
courses, a group of required departmental courses, specified
curriculum electives (chosen to meet the requirements of a
specialization within Fruit Crops) and other electives chosen
in consultation with the departmental counselor. Programs
of study can be designed to allow specialization in one of 2
areas:
-1. Production Management/Science
2. Business
Core courses required of all Fruit Crops students in either
specialization include the following:
Credits


3 Genetics ... ... .. . .. .
I Elementary Organic and

I Introductory Plant Physi
IL Introductory Plant Phys
Principles of Entomology
L Principles of Entomolog


Biological


ologi .. ... ..
biology Laboratory

,y Laboratory .....


PLP 3002 Fundamentals of Plant Pathology .. 4
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation ............... ....... .... ..... ... 2
PLS 3221L Plant Propagation Laboratory ..... ........... .. 1
SOS 3Q22C General Soils .......... .. .... .. .. .... ... 4
Departmental Requwrements 75 Credits
FRC 3212 Introduction to Citrus Culture ..... .................... 3
FRC 4223 Citrus Production .... ........... .... ..... ........ 3
FRC 4224L Field Production Practices in Fruit Crops 2
FRC 4612C Citrus Maturity and Packinghouse
Proced ures ... ....... ..... ... .. ... .. ..... ... ... ....... . .. ............ 4
FRC 4931 Undergraduate Seminar in Fruit Crops ......... 1
FRC 4933 Citrus Production and Harvesting
M anagem ent .................... ......... .... ...... ...... ...... .. 2
PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT/SCIENCE CURRICULUM
Students specializing in Production Management take the
core courses, the required departmental courses and 10 cur-
riculum electives.
Curriculum Electrves
Two electives from each group below (Business, Agncul-
lure) must be taken to graduate in Fruit Crops with the Pro-
duction Management Specialization:


AEB 3123 Law Applied To Agriculture .................. 3
AEB 3006 Agricultural Commodity Marketing ...... 2
a ngcuture Credits
PLS 46Oi W eed Science ............:......................................... 3
iMAlC 2 Water Manigement .., ..................... ,...,. 3
si 411S FertiJizers & Soil Fertility ............................... 4
ENY4221 "Principles of Insect Control .... .... ......... 3
PLP 410 Plnciplis of Plant Disease Control ....:...,.......... 3
MAG 3503 Agricultural & Environmental Quality ...,......... 3
E5 4451 Fruit & Vegetable Processing ....................... 3
SMAG 32240 Agricultural Mechanics ...*.. ....... ...... ..,,.....,,..... 3
hMAG 3312 Farmn. Machinery ...... .,.. . .,...-., ........ ... .... 3
PMA 3010 Fundamentals of Pest Management ................. 2

BUSINESS CURRICULUM
The Business specialization affords interested students an
opportunity to pursue in-depth studies into the business
aspects of fruit production and marketing. This special-
ization consists of the core and departmental requirements
plus 4 curriculum business electives selected from the list of
9 courses suggested under the Production Management cur-
riculum. The requirement of 2 Agricultural electives is
waived for the 2 extra Business courses.
The curricula fo the various specializations leave some
room for others electives for students wittit dfciex] nies
Many fine elective courses are available in Fruit Crops as
well as in other departments; Faculty adviser will be able to
assist students with selection of the best electives to suit ca-
reer interests.


MECHANIZED AGRICUtTURE


The Mechanized Agriculture crriculumn is designed to
provide expertisedino the application of principles and mnan
agprment of physical systems for improving production agri-
cuture and the handling, processing, and storage of agricul-
tral/ rodsctsi Emphasis s also placed 6n efficient esurce
utilizati r aid environmental quality protection in agricul-
ire practice Thetechnology of. mechanized agriculture is
complemented with emphasis on agricultural sciences and
business management.
Students graduating wita degree in Mechanized Agricul-
ture are prepared for careers in one of four gereataeas (1)
operations manager in production agriculture; (2) sales and
service representative for agri-business firms. (3) agricultural
extension, and (41 specialists with governmental agencies,
agricultural organizations, insurance companies, banks, etc.
The curriculum is structured to entourage concentration in
one ol the career areas Concentration is achieved through
selection of electives in consultation with the faculty aca-
demic adviser


ENC 4260 Advanced Professional Writing
Mec h nrzed Agrrcullure Requiremenrts
*MAC 3223 Surrey of Calculus I .
"PHY 2005 Applied Physics
.ACC 2001 Elementary Financial Accounting
AEB 3133 Farm Firm Management .. .
SOS 3022C General Soils
ENv 3005 Principles of Enlomolog.
ENY 3006L Principles ot Enlomology Lab
Animal Science Requirement (ASG 3003m)
Plant Science Requiremenl (PLS 2031")
MAN 3010 Principles ol Management .. ..
MAR 3023 Principles ol Marketing
MAG 3'32 Water Manaement ,,


Credirs
d.. 3
- 61 Credits


4
3
... 3

. 4
2
.... 1
.4
. 3
3
3
.. 3


F


<^|V
' x /'
*
/ . /':..:
; "f


. ... I





Colleges

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


MICROBIOLOGY AND CELL SCIENCE
The curriculum is designed to develop fundamental
knowledge of bacteria plant and animal cells, and viruses. It
Provides a background for pursuing graduate work in micro-
biology, cell biology, or biochemist as-well as other areas


of agricultural sci
s ary for work in


ences.


It also provides a background neces-


research


or diagnostic a~oratories~ both


governmental and industrial. The curiculupn also provides a
background for entry into the professions of dentistry medi-
cine and veterinary medicine.


D

BCH 4313


epartmental Requirements 24 Credits o
Credits
General Biochemistry and Molecular Biology .. 3


MCB 30ZOC Basic Biology of Microorganismts with
LaboratorQy .. ......E ............;... ..... 4


PCB 3136 Eukaryotic Cell Structure and Fu nation ...3:"..l, 3
MCB, AP B; and PC B Electives .*...*...t... *,.. .. 4...i .... .. 14


(BCH 4203 may count toward the 14 c
(One laboratory course beyond MCB 3020C


Other Requirements


redits)
is required)


and Eletive 40 Credits
SCredits


C^AHMT 3120 Analytical ~hemistry 4*,. ;.f..., ..... .... .; 3..... 1


CHM 31201 Analytical Chemisl
CHM 3210 Oganic Chemistry
CHM 3211 O organic Chemistry
CHM 32111 Organic Chemistrj
PHY 2053 General Physics 1 ....
PHY 20531. Laboratory for PHY


PHY 2054 General
PHY 2054L Laborat


try Laboratory i*.l..l*..A.i ..M..4. I

* i 4 : Lr ...: 4. :. 3
r Laboratory *..r*.. 2


, . 4


4rq* *44t4 WW f4 i.i 4 *..*. *


P ysicsr IU t ..l T .ii .....J1'....**.. 2 r. nn- .. i.. |
OfjT u fbr rPHI 2054: .*. 44;f"l"b,444"ttt4.4.t. b 1


MAC 3311 AnaltcGmer dCau
l-4 eo er nd-ac


Electives


.44,, ,,. 4 t :t 44,, it


W 44 44 t* ii4** h* .B 444 4


l-s 1 *. |... i .14


depending on their area of specialization with the exception
of ORH 3008 (a non-major course).


SPECIALIZATIONS: Stude
cialization and complete


.nts should declare an area of spe-


13-14 hours


gested courses
A General Ornamental Horticultur


from the list of sug-

e. This option is de-


signed for those students who do not declare a specific
commodity interest area and wish to complete a more


generalized program in Ornamental Horticulture.


from ORH courses


except ORH 3008.


Select


B Ornamental Horatcultural Science. Students desiring to
complete advanced degrees (M.S., Ph.D.) should select


this sp
courses
school.


ecializalion.


Accordingly.


students


will select


to strengthen and prepare them for graduate
CreditC


BCH 4203 Introduction to Intermediary
M etabolism .... .. ... .... ......... .......


BCH 4313
Bialogl


General Biochemistry & Molecular


BOT 2710 Practical Plant Taxonom


BOT 3153C Local


y .. ....... ........ ........


Flo ra ... ... .. ....... ...... ....................


BOT 3303 Introductory Vascular Plant Morphology ...
BOT 4283 Plant Mucrotechnique .... ............
CHM 2043L General Chemistry and Qualitative
A analysis ................... . .......... ... ... ... ...... ...... .. ......


CHM 3120C Analytical


Chemistry


I ..... .... . . ....


CHMr 3210 Organif Cheas ry:mj rIi ;xlcan emMaM.il
STA 3023 Introduction to Statistics I .... ....................... 3
CHM 3211 Organic Chemistry ............. ............... ........ 3
CHM 3211L Organic Chemistry ........... ............ .................. 2


" MAC 3311
MAC 3312


Analytic Geometry and Calculus
Analytic Geometry and Calculus


MCB 3020C Basic Biology of Microorganisms
with Laboratory .................. ..............
PCB 3043 Introduction to Ecology ... ...........


........ 4


ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE
Stu&nbt mSbrinig in Ornamenta IHobrtcuture ay spe-
cialize in general ornamental hortitulture, ornamental horti-
cultlyia scienen, nursery and landscape horticulture.
ftiriculture arid foliage, or turfgrass production and main-
tenance, Accqriirig 'toiyout' .peciaiatii, you will be as-
signed an academic adviser to assist In develd~ng a program
of course work, Students mni~oring in ornamental horni-
culture should complete the following requirements:


Sciences


Requirements


AR *330 3 G enetics '..4.. l ..... *. .
BCH 3023 Elementary Organic and Biologi
C tmenistr y ...*..*...*. tt4l*ttl.. .4 . .
O T 3503. Introductory Plant Physiioogy ,
SBQ 35031 Introductry Plant Pysiology


- 26 Credits"


SOCeditts


'cal

I I I i ....... .


rabnraorny.rv ....,..... ..,...... ..
**:.#4*I*4 4S. 4*It,, t. s .,444


ENY 3005 Principles of Entomology ..
ENY 3 06L Principles of m Ehnomolog
Laboratory:. ..s..., 4s.,i44'4m...,,' 4'*.
PLP 3002 Fundamental& of Plant Path
PLS 3221 Plant Propagation ..,....


32211
3022C


aology


Rlant Prpapgatioan Laboraiorx
SGeneral Soils


Departmental Requirement s


22-26


. .. .. ... 4

. ..... 1


PHY 2005 Applied


SOS 4115 Fertilizers and Associated Soil Reactions


C Nursery and Landscape Horticulture.


Nursery Manage-


meant includes the production, storage, and marketing of
ornamental trees, shrubs, and vines Landscape horti-
culture deals with the location, care and maintenance of
ornamental trees, shrubs and vines for the improvement
and beautification of man's environment.
Credits


ORH 3731
ORH 3231


ORRH


U:b T ...... .. . ... ... i.K ..... ... .. .. .. .


ORH 3815
ORH 4276
Laborato


Biological illustrations ...... ........ ...... ..... 3


Grounds Maintenance


...... ...... ... ...... 3


3534 Relationships of Ornamental Plants to the


Introduction to Landscape Horticulture ....
Foliage and Nursery Production
r~. .... .. .i.I...... ...... . .i .i iiii...


ORH 4941 Full Time Practical Work Experience ..... 1-3
ORH 4905 Special Topics and Independent

D Florculture and Foliage The growing of cut flowers,


polled plants.


foliage plants and transplants in the green-


house or field, and the sale at these crops through whole-
sale commission florists, flower shops and other retail out-
lets.


ORH 3611


credits


ORH 3513 Fundamentals oi Ornamental Plant


Identification I ....
ORH 3514 Ornamental


Plant Identdlicarion II


Retail Florist Shop Management ....


ORH 3534 Relationship of Ornamental Plants
Urban Enu ronment ... .. ... .. ........... ....
ORH 4276 Foliage and Nursery Production
Laboratory .... .. ... ... ... ....


ORH 4941
ORH 4263L


ORH 4411 Phyhiloagical Aspects of Ornamental Plant
Production ..... . .. ......


ORH 4931 Ornamental Hnrt


=r.-. 1j.


C lsw ..


Full-Time Practical Work Experience


Floriculture Lab


Credits
....... 3


to the


...... 1-3


I ...... ............. ..... ... ..... 1


ORH 4905 Special Topics and independent
C. J -. lnli .Chi F I I T.-- -.-


Plant
.^.. P it


PtS


Ph vsics 2 .... .... ............... ....................


j jj j_ j


c. u are ummar .


j


iJ


_ j j I I




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