Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00529
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: October 1909
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00529
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Full Text


University Record

Vol. IV OCTOBER, 1909 No. 4
Published Quarterly by the University, Gainesville, Florida
Entered, September 6, 1906, at the postoffice at Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, July 16, 1894.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ANNOUNCEMENT
FOR THE

STUDY OF AGRICULTURE

AT HOME

1909-1910
The University of Florida offers correspondence courses in agricul-
ture for all (white) citizens of the State. These courses are designed to
meet the needs of the following classes:
1. Teachers and prospective teachers.
2. Farmers and prospective farmers.
3. Farmers' wives, sons and daughters.
4. Others who may be interested.
WHY HOME STUDY COURSES ARE OFFERED
A careful study of rural economy will convince the fairminded inves-
tigator that agricultural education is quite as essential to successful agri-
culture as is education designed to equip for other lines of human effort.
Our school days are soon over, but education should continue to the
closing of a career. It is essential that educational advantages in agricult-
ure should be provided for every boy and girl in the rural communities.
Since that opportunity was not available when they were attending school,
all who are engaged in any of the various agricultural pursuits should now
be given the opportunity for increasing their technical knowledge and
practical efficiency. By offering agricultural information at the very doors
of all citizens who will avail themselves of the opportunity, it is hoped to
make the agricultural industry more remunerative, and, in time, greatly
improve rural life and rural welfare.





UNIVERSITY RECORD


A SINCERE DESIRE TO HELP ALL THE PEOPLE
The University is supported by the State and by the Federal Govern-
ment. The Government appropriation is a gift to all the State, and every
citizen has a just claim upon the institution. Recognizing this fact, the
authorities are striving in every way with the means at their disposal to
carry the benefits of the University to every citizen in the Commonwealth.
By means of these correspondence courses it is hoped to reach a large and
deserving body of citizens who, for various reasons, have heretofore been
unable to gain both scientific knowledge and practical training. They
have been compelled by force of circumstances to be content with prac-
tical information only. This practical information, in many cases, has
been ineffective on account of the meager opportunity for observations.

PLAN PROPOSED

The extension movement is a practical method of rendering more
universal educational advantages. In practically every state some form of
extension work or extension teaching is carried out. Offering correspond-
ence courses is one of the many effective ways employed in extension
teaching. The Pennsylvania Agricultural College has conducted corre-
spondence courses in agriculture for farmers for a number of years, and
thousands have pursued these courses. In Minnesota, the last legislature
appropriated the magnificent sum of $50,000.00, for the biennial period,
for extension work to be conducted by the Agricultural College. This
work includes correspondence courses in agriculture, domestic science and
rural affairs.
IS THIS PLAN PRACTICABLE?

Correspondence courses are not so effective as resident study, but
they are far better than no educational advantages along these special lines.
They lack the personal factor of the instructor, and lack most of the bene-
fits of laboratory work and illustrative equipment. On the other hand, with
ambitious and industrious persons, such courses develop in no small degree
independence of thought and effective individuality of 'action. In this
latter respect they are often superior to resident study.

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES IN AGRICULTURE DO NOT CONFLICT
WITH ESTABLISHED SCHOOLS
Correspondence courses in agriculture will not conflict with, but
rather supplement, established schools. They will arouse a more wide-
spread interest in education and tend toward the improvement of local
school conditions. Furthermore, they reach a large body of people who,
without them, would never receive educational advantages in the subjects
offered.





UNIVERSITY RECORD


EFFECT UPON OTHER INDUSTRIES
Rural conditions affect all other lines of business. Nothing so quickly
causes stagnation in the commercial world as widely distributed poor crops,
which necessarily result in curtailment of expenses and farm improvements.
Therefore, influences that affect beneficially the agricultural industry will
react beneficially upon all other industries.
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES ARE INTENDED FOR
1. Those who are busy.
2. Those who cannot leave home.
3. Those who have not the money for resident study.
4. Boys and girls, and young men and young women who, for
various reasons, can not continue in school.
STUDIES ARE ELECTIVE
Any course in the list may be selected. It is usually best to pursue
only one course at a time. Upon the completion of one course another
may be started. Furthermore, a logical order should be followed. Advice
on the subject will be freely given if requested.
METHOD OF INSTRUCTION
Upon request an application blank is forwarded to any address. The
name of the applicant is registered for a course upon receipt of the ap-
plication, and literature and necessary instructions for beginning the work
are mailed. When the textbook is received the first lesson is studied.
With the book closed answers to questions on lesson one are prepared and
mailed to the instructor. These answers are carefully read. All incorrect
answers are stamped with a hollow rectangle within which the page of the
textbook where the discussion of the subject may be found is inserted, and
the manuscript returned. After further study answers are prepared a sec-
ond time on the questions incorrectly answered, thus giving the pupil the
benefit of first endeavoring to correct the errors. The second answers are
read when received, and remaining errors are fully explained by the in-
structor and returned, thus completing the first lesson. This proceeding
is repeated for each succeeding lesson.
After the course is completed a final examination is given. Those
who secure a final grade of 70 per cent, with no lesson below 60 per cent,
are graduated and granted a printed certificate over the signatures of the
President of the University and the instructor. The lesson grades and the
grade on the final examination each count half on the final standing.
COURSES OFFERED
The following courses are offered, beginning November 1, 1909, and
endiL ; June 1, 1910:





UNIVERSITY RECORD


1. General course in elementary agriculture
2. Soils.
3. Tillage.
4. Drainage and Irrigation.
5. Manures ahd Fertilizers.
6. Field Crops.
7. Types and Breeds of Live Stock.
8. Dairy Husbandry.
9. Poultry Husbandry.
10. Animal Breeding.
11. Feeds and Feeding.
12. Citrus Fruits and Citrus Culture.
The general course in elementary agriculture is intended to prepare
teachers for examinations for certificates and to fit them to effectively give
instruction in nature study and agriculture in the public schools of
the State, but any one may take this course. In fact, many will find it
desirable to begin their study of agriculture with this general elementary
course.
There is no age limit and no examinations are required. Registration
may be made any time during the term and the work may be pursued rap-
idly or slowly as the time, ability or inclination of the individual may dic-
tate.
COST
The instruction in all courses will be free. All persons registering
for a course will be required to provide themselves with a textbook, and
pay the postage on all manuscripts to and from the University. The total
expense to each person will range from $1.50 to $3.00, depending upon
the cost of the textbook and length of the course selected.
MISCELLANEOUS QUESTIONS
Miscellaneous questions will be answered, but each student should
exhaust his own resources for the benefit to be derived therefrom.
Correspondence relative to educational matters and rural affairs is
solicited.
PASS THE GOOD WORD ALONG
Your neighbors may be interested in this new movement. You will
confer a favor, and, at the same time, possibly, render valuable service to
the agricultural industry and rural people in your neighborhood, by giving
this new movement wide publicity.
TO WHOM TO WRITE
Those who wish further information, or who desire to register for one
of the courses, should communicate with J. J. Vernon, Department, f Ag-
riculture, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs