Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00522
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: September 1913
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00522
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

VID00522 ( PDF )


Full Text
0er


Voat


noa


university


GAINESVILLE


Normal


School


and


Teachers'


College


SPRING REVIEW COURSE
A ONE-YEAR COURSE
A TWO-YEAR ELEMENTARY PROFESSIONAL COURSE
REGULAR FOUR-YEAR NORMAL COURSE
COURSE LEADING TO AN A.B. DEGREE IN EDUCATION
COURSE LEADING TO A B.S. DEGREE IN EDUCATION
THE SUMMER SCHOOL


lorida











NORMAL SCHOOL AND


TEACHERS'


COLLEGE


FACULTY


ALBERT


A. MURPHREE


A.M


President.


JOHN A.


THACKSTON, Pd.M., Ph.D.,


Dean,


Professor


Education,


High


School


Inspector


HARVEY


Professor of


COX,


Psychology


Ph.D.,


and Philosophy.


BUCHHOLZ, A.M.,


Professor of


Elementary


Education


Methods


and Supervision.


JAS.


M. FARR, A.M.,


Ph.D.,


Professor of


English Language and Literature.


EDWARD


R. FLINT, Ph.D., M.D.,


Professor of


Chemistry.


J. R. BENTON, A.B., Ph.D.,
Professor of Physics.


CROW,


Professor of


Ph.D.,


Modern Languages.


ANDERSON, M.A., Ph.D.,


Professor of


Ancient Languages.


H. S. DAVIS, Ph.D.,


Professor of


oology and Bacteriology.


VERNON, B.Agr., M.S.A.,


Professor of


Agriculture.


H. G. KEPPEL, A.B., Ph.D.,


Professor


Mathematics.


A.
Professor


. WIECHARDT
Mechanical En'


M.E


gineering


M.M.E


Drawing.


L. FLOYD, M.S.,


I


JAS. N.


., LL.D.,


A.M.,


M.A.,








NORMAL SCHOOL AND


TEACHERS'


COLLEGE


W. S. CAWTHON, A.B.,
Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Science.


B. HATHAWAY


A.B.


Instructor in Latin, History and English.
M. B. HADLEY, A.B.,
Librarian.


PERRY,


Instructor in


IRA


ODLE


Instructor in Botany and Bacteriology.


BLANTON


,A.B.,


Teaching


Fellow


Mathematics


History.


LOCATION


Gainesville
inhabitants, pc
ly located and


OF THE


the seat of the


UNIVERSITY


University, a town of 10,000


assesses numerous advantages.


easy


access,


It is central-


being reached by the leading


railroads of the State.


streets


It has well paved, lighted and shaded


, an exceptionally pure water supply and a good sew-


erage system.


The citizens are energetic,


progressive and


hospitable.
many years


The


moral


atmosphere


the sale of intoxicants


wholesome,


has


been


and


prohibited


law.


the leading


denominations have attractive places


worship.


The


Chautauqua


and


Bible


Conference


held


during the winter form valuable adjuncts to the University


GROUNDS


AND


BUILDINGS


The


eighty-nine
Gainesville.


University


acres,


Ninety


occupies
situated


acres


tract


five


western


of this


hundred


and


extremity


tract are devoted


anm n t. I


A ml 1l w


and othletin


fl nlAo


an n


hn mI- 1


nnI


*Z N E ** *SIP UU I* E5 I* I** l S '* *. lI *-| ** U r .* i.| * *


, B.D.,


Physics.


A.B.,


, B.S.,






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


"Buckman Hall"


and


"Thomas Hall;" the Mechanic Arts


Shop; Science Hall; the Agricultural Experiment Station
Building; Engineering Hall; the Gymnasium; the Agricul-
tural College Building; the dining hall or "University Com-
mons ;" Language Hall; and the "George Peabody Hall," the


home of the Teachers'


College and Normal School.


are lighted with electricity, supplied with city water, and
furnished with modern improvements and equipment.

STATEMENT OF EXPENSES FOR WHOLE YEAR


They


Tuition. -For residents of Florida
Registration Fee _- -----------.


____-----_ $


For Spring Review and One-Year Course Students


00.00
5.00
00.00


Damage


Deposit


5.00


If no damage is done to University property this fee
is returned to student at end of year.


Infirmary Fee


3.00


Board and Lodging,


per session


124.50


For fuller particulars of expenses, see pages 39-41
of general catalogue.

GENERAL STATEMENT
It is the purpose of the Teachers' College and Normal
School to prepare teachers for the public schools of Florida.
It aims to give that training that will properly fit men to


teach in and


become


principals


grammar


and


high


schools, to be supervisors, county and city superintendents;


to give that information, insight and appreciation of


our


educational


problems


and


principles that each


intelligent


citizen of every community should possess, and to prepare
teachers in the Review Courses for the County and State


certificates.


This college


professional


school


teachers in the University and aims to bend every
nnwrcrA aiiri nc +fic g+Q+A n a zinnlv nf trninPrt tPne'hor .


effort







NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE


halls,


reading


rooms,


laboratories


modern college of this kind needs.


and


libraries


that


With such facilities at


its command nothing can hinder the college from realizing
its aims.
LIBRARY.-The pedagogical library receives many of the
best educational journals and is supplied with the standard
books on educational theory, general and special methods,


the history of education, psychology and philosophy.
tions will be made to these during the coming fall.


Addi-


PSYCHOLOGICAL


LABORATORY.-The


new


Laboratory is placed in the Peabody Hall.


Psychological
This will give


teachers


wonderful


opportunity


investigate


first


hand the great laws of the mind.
experiment will give the teacher


To know these through
a far greater power to


direct properly their development in the child.


The labor-


atory will contain all of the appliances and apparatus neces-
sary for thorough and efficient work in experimental psy-
chology.
THE PEABODY CLUB.-This club is an organization of the


teachers of this college.


It meets once a week and discusses


educational


problems.


The


new


building


will


provide


special hall for it, and then the good work that has been
carried on by this club will be better even than formerly.
Every teacher in this college is expected to become a member
of it and lend his best efforts toward making it a greater


success.


No part of the college work is more important than


this.
TEACHERS' EMPLOYMENT BUREAU.-It is the purpose of


this Buteau to


keep records of all teachers who have at-


tended the University who are fitted by their training for
the profession of teaching and to recommend them to school
boards who are in need of efficient principals and teachers.


Already


demand


our


graduates


and


students






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


may be taken by teachers by correspondence.


These courses


will


outline


Special


work


Methods


School


Management,


of Teaching the different


General


elementary


and
and


grammar school subjects, Psychology, History of Education


and other similar subjects.


Besides these, it is


planned


offer correspondence courses in some of the regular academic


subjects.


Reading


courses


will


also


suggested,


for the


completion of which certificates will be given.


All of these


courses should appeal to teachers who are ambitious to ad-


vance their


knowledge along special lines and


who are not


able to quit their work to attend school or college.
For full particulars concerning this correspondence work


address Dean Jno.


Thackston.


These courses are open


to all


white teachers.


THE NORMAL SCHOOL


OUTLINE


COURSES


AND


REQUIREMENTS


FOR


ADMISSION


The Normal


School


offers four courses:


Course


i.-Spring


Review


Course.


This


course


covers


the
Bot]


subjects required for the County and State Certificates.


the contents


and


methods


teaching


these


subjects


will be given.


This course is for those who are engaged in


teaching from four to six months in the year, and who want


to renew, or advance the grade of their certificates.


No re-


quirements


admission


demanded.


Anyone


who


can


profit by such a course will be gladly welcomed.


h







NORMAL


HOOL AND TEACHERS'


CURRICULUM,


SPRING


COLLEGE


REVIEW


COUNTY


CERTIFICATES


NAMES
OF
COURSES


HOURS


NATURE OF WORK


WORK


DESCRIP-


TION, s:
PAGE


Agriculture ....
Algebra -.. ------.... --...- -- - -
Arithmetic ___ ...... ..


Government
C1


English (
English (
Hygiene
Pedagogy
Physical
Political


:ompositio
grammar


n --- -- ----- -- ------m m s
C I- ------ -- - - -I ----- --- -- -l~ -


- a - --.


Geography
Geography


- a al -l-- I ---- - - -n -- .


Orthography ------
Reading -----------
U. S. History and Fla.
History


STATE AND SPECIAL CERTIFICATES


The


work for


State


and


Special


Certificates


Spring
Normal


Review
Course.


will


For an


found


outline of this


pages


Four-Year


12-16.


DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF STUDY


AGRICULTURE,


general


course


in agriculture.


This will introduce the student to the study


common
animals.


diseases


and such like.


plants,


Thi


insects


farm


soil,


crops,


plants,


domestic


will be done by means of text-


books, laboratory and field work.


Methods of teaching agri-


culture in the rural schools will be stressed.


(2 hours.)


ALGEBRA, S. R.-Elementary course covering the funda-


mental
touring,


operations, simple and


fractions,


involution


and


imultaneot
i evolution


is equations
, quadratic


, fac-
equa-


tions,


progressions,


ratio


and


proportion.


This


be closely correlated with the work in arithmetic.


ARITHMETIC


R. -A


work


will


(4 hours.)


made,
ninrl o.1


that the student may view it from both the teacher's


hurl'a


nnnft nf viPW.


Common and


decimal fractions


Civil


Regular


thorough review of arithmetic is


,






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CIVIL


GOVERNMENT,


R.-Special


attention


will


given
That


local,


practical


town


and


information


city,


that


and


county


every


governments.


intelligent


citizen


should have is stressed.


The State and national govern-


ments.


General interest in government is aroused.


How to


teach subject. (2 hours.)
ENGLISH COMPOSITION, S. R.-In this, words, sentences,


paragraphs, and whole compositions are studied.


Narra-


tion, description, exposition and


argument.


Punctuation


and spelling receive attention.


Many written compositions


required.


Letter-writing.


(2 hours.)


ENGLISH GRAMMAR, S. R.-Sentences


and


parts


speech.
Syntax.


Inflection.


Familiarity with the forms demanded.


Structure and analysis of sentences.


Principles


and methods of teaching grammar.


(2 hours.)


HYGIENE, S. R.-A general survey of the body and its


organs.


The functions and use of the organs.


Special ef-


forts to impress the teacher with the importance of hygiene


and sanitation.


How to keep well and physically efficient


is the special aim of this course.


(2 hours.)


PEDAGOGY,


R.-School


management,


general


and


special methods of teaching, elementary principles of child
nature, school hygiene and sanitation, personality of teacher,
relation of school and community, and other practical peda-


gogical questions.


(2 hours.)


PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, S. R.-The main features of the
ordinary text-book in physical geography will be studied.
Along with this stress will be placed on the effects the physi-
cal features have on man and his life, his commercial and


social


life.


This


will


correlated


with


agriculture.


hours.)
POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY, S. R.-Special attention will be


given to Florida and its relations to other states.


A thor-


ough review of the geography of the United States and the







NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS'


COLLEGE


will


work


e stressed.
demanded.


Correct spelling


How


best to


forms


teach spelling.


written
hours.)


READING, S. R.-Practice in reading required each week.


Teachers are so drilled in reading that they will


be able to


read


well


to their classes.


Story-telling is also


brought in


in connection with


this work.


The methods and


principles


of teaching reading are given.


(1 hour.)


S. AND


FLORIDA HISTORY,


S. R.-A


thorough review


of United States and Florida history.


Methods of teaching


them and


Special


their correlation


notice


will


with


given


geography
biography


and
and


literature.


topic


method of study.


(3 hours.)


The text books adopted by the State will be used as the


basis for the work of Courses


1 and 2.


Course


-A One-Year Course.


This course covers same


work as Course 1, but is gone over more slowly


It is planned


those


students


who


need


more


time


than


Course


requires.
Teachers
any time


It may


will


find


be entered


classes


at any time during the year.


suited


during the session.


their


special


requirements


needs


for admis-


sion


demanded.


Any


teachers


who


can


profit


such


course will be admitted.


See under Course
done in this course.


1 for a description


of the work to


Hours and classes will be arranged to


suit the needs of the students.


Course


Two-Year


Elementary


Professional


Course.


This course includes all of the subjects taught in the element-


ary


and


methods


wural


schools.


teaching,


also


school


gives


special


management,


rural


attention


problems,


and such professional subjects as will make rural and gram-


mar


school


teachers


more


efficient.


Applicants


who


hold


teachers'


certificates, or who have finished the eighth grade


our grammar schools,


will


be admitted


to the first year


aS 4-if 4* nn an.


. I'1


nnn%,,,'C1 4- an


n I-


4-bC1 t nnt rci a aF"in ra c?


3.--A







10 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


TWO-YEAR


ELEMENTARY


PROFESSIONAL


COURSE.
First Year.


NAME HOURS DESCRIP-
OF NATURE OF WORK PER TION, SEE
COURSE WEEK PAGE
Education ---........... Reviews and Methods of
Teaching Political Geo-
graphy, U. S. History
and Fla. History ..-..-- 4 10
English ------...... .-- -.. Grammar, Composition
and Classics -. ---- 4 11
History ---. ...-- .Ancient History .... 4 11
Mathematics -..... ------Algebra ------__ __---_ 4 11
Science -------...- -__ Physical Geography and
Physiology ..... 4 11
Second Year.
Education ---.~-------..... Reviews and Methods of
Teaching Arithmetic
and English Language_ 4 10
Education ---......... ... School Management and
Rural Problems --- 4 198*
English ---------------.... Composition and Classics- 4 11
Mathematics .. ..-....-.. Algebra .. -..... 4 11
Science --.... ... .... __Agronomy and Horticul-
ture --.---....------ 3 11-12


EDUCATION


and Florida H


I.-Reviews


tory


and Methods


of Teaching


.-Thor-


ough and complete reviews of these three subjects are made.


The


work


is broader


and


more


advanced


than


that


eighth grade, and is always looked at both from the teach-


ers'


and pupils' points of view.


tion in the fall,


while geography


History receives the atten-
is taken up in the spring.


After mastering the subject matter


ing it to a class are given.


the methods of present-


(4 hours.


EDUCATI
Arithmetic


N 2-
and


.YR. II.-Reviews and Methods of Teaching


English


Language


Thorough


and


cornm-


plete reviews of these subjects are made.


cult


parts


I n St fllt f-a


arithmetic
-YrnnI 4n A .fl


taker


T1% nfl .. n


!up


and


All of the diffi-
fully explained.


1O fltI


nl ^i' *j n /--


- -a


CURRICULUM,


and Political Geography







NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE


ENGLISH 2-YR.


I.-Grammar,


Composition and Classics.


--A


thorough


course


advanced


grammar


will


given


(twice


per


week)


Composition,


oral


and


written.


least


one


written


composition


every


week.


Special


atten-


tion


will be given to narration.


Classics,


College Entrance


Requirements and those best suited for the upper grades of


the grammar school


and


ninth grade of high school.


Spe-


cial attention given to spelling and letter-writing.


(4 hours.)


ENGLISH


2-YR.


II.-Composition and Classics.-A


text-


book in


composition


scription and


used as


narration


will


guide
receive


(twice per week)


De-


major part of the


time. Oral and written composition. One written composition


each


week.


Classics


(twice


per


week)


Those


suited


grade and high school work.


Spelling and letter-writing.


HISTORY


YR. I


.-Ancient History.-The major part of


the time will be given


and Rome.


to the study


of the history of Greece


Special note will be made of hero stories,


biog-


raphy


mythology,


and


that


which


appeals


child


the grades.


tion with the topic


Reference reading will be required in


of the text-books.


connec-


(4 hours.


MATHEMATICS


2-YR.


I.-Algebra.- This


is a beginners'


course and it will cover the work through elementary quad-


ratics.


hours.)


MATHEMATICS


review


algebra


II.-Alg


quadratics,


bra.
and


good,


then


thorough


quadratics


and


remaining


part


an ordinary


second-year


algebra.


(4 hours.)
SCIENCE


The


work


newer


2-YR.


I.-Physical


physical


secondary


geography


school


Geography


will


and


about as


geographies.


The


Physiology.


outlined
proper


correlation of physical


with


political and


commercial geog-


raphies


will


made.


This


especially


necessary


teachers.
'I_.- -< --1t


Laboratory and field work will be done and notes


-~~~~1 t -II -UU --- -A afl aa


nl.rnrf nl Sty 1W 11


I


2-YR.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


omy will be a study


of soils and soil fertility in their rela-


tions to plant growth and the underlying principles govern-


ing the production of field and forage crops.


(First semes-


ter).


The


horticulture


is a study


varieties and


culture


requirements


our principal


fruits


and


vegetables;


loca-


tion
mate


orchards


and


harvesting


and


markets


and


gardens


protection


marketing


with
from


styles


reference


insects


soils,


and


decorative


diseases;
planting


adapted to home and school.


(3 hours.)


Course


4.--Regular


Four-Year


Normal


Course.


This


course will


offer work similar to that of the standard Nor-


mal Schools of this country


Applicants who have finished


the first two years of a high school


will


be admitted to the


first


year


this


course.


High


school


graduates


will


allowed


to enter the third year of this course.


Graduates


of the


Normal


School


will


be admitted


the Junior Class


of Teachers' College.


Under recent Act of the Legislature,


graduates of the Normal School will be given State Certifi-


cates without further


examination.


This


State


Certificate


will be convertible into a Life Certificate in the usual way.


CURRICULUM,


REGULAR


FOUR-YEAR


NORMAL


COURSE


First


Year


NAME
OF
CoUrSE


NATURE OF WORK


HoURS DESCRIP-


TION, a
PAGE


English
History


Mathematics tNI


_.._____..- .. ,,Rhetoric, Composition and
Classics -------. .----


___--- --.._Mediaeval and
History -___.
__..__Plane Geometry


Take from 6 to 8 hours of the following
Latin NI -----__ _..--_, --Beginners' Course
French NI Beg... inn_,,, Beginners' Course
Science NI --------_._._ ..Physics _.------..
Mehanic Arts I ... Woodwork --____


Agriculture NI _...__El.._Elements


-------.
. - ma -
-- -----


Agronomy


aW -l -aa


Modern


WEEK





I U m m m


1J








NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE


Second


Year


NAME HOURS DESCRIP-
OF NATURE OF WORK PER TION, SEE
COURSE WEEK PAGE
English NII __...5 _..._,,American and English Lit-
erature and Composi-
tion --i... .....-_-- 4 14
History NII -.--. .., ,,-, .American History and
Civics- .- --- _------- 4 15
Take from 11 to 12% hours of following:
Latin NII __H______,, Caesar (4 books) and
Composition 15 ...._ 4 15
Mathematics NII _____.___Plane Trigonometry and
Solid Geometry ....._ 4 16
French NII _._........- -Second Year Course __... 4 14
Agriculture NII -----_..-Elements of Animal Hus-
bandry and Agricultur-
al Engineering ---.--- 3 198*
Mechanic Arts IIIa and IVb Forge and Foundry Work 41 16

Required .....- -- ......... _--__ ...-.----- 19 to 201
Third Year
Education Ia ........--.. Psychology -_ .---. 3 189*
Education IIb __ ..Methods of Study -.... J
Education 2-yr. I -.-a ...neReviews and Methods of
Teaching U. S. and
Florida History and
Political Geography __ 4 10
English I _............Rhetoric and Composition 3 79*
Take 6 hours of following:
French I ........---.. ..- Elementary Course ---. 3 92*
German I ________._. .,, ,Elementary Course --.... 3 92*
Latin NIII _.__Cice..--,,, Cicero, Composition and
Grammar- ....-----.. 3 15
Mathematics -_---- ---. Plane Analytic Geometry
and College Algebra -_ 4 89*
Physics .---.. .-- -_- General Physics _--_ 3 96*
Agronomy I ..........General Agriculture 3 116*
Botany I __ __._____ General Botany 3 76*
Chemistry I _.____ ..... General Chemistry ._.. 3 77*
History I -.. e .. . Modern European --... 3 83*

Required .-.--- ..- -- ----- - ....... - ........16
Fourth Year
Education IIIa _.5....--...Reviews and Methods of 1
Teaching Arithmetic I 189*
and Grammar ----- 3
Education IVb6 -.----._...School Management and
C<-,--.s! *1 on*






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


ENGLISH
MR. HATHAWAY


ENGLISH


NI.-Rhetoric,


Composition


and


Classics.-


The formal rules of rhetoric will be studied in so far as they
are needed in composition work and the study of the classics.


Compositions


Classics
ments.


two


written


hours


per


every


week.


week.


College


Spelling and letter-writing.


Exposition


Entrance


stressed.
Require-


(Both semesters; third


year; 4 hours.)


ENGLISH


NII.-American


and


English


Literature


and


Composition.-Most of the time of this class will be devoted
to the study of literature and not to the history of literature.


Much reading will be required.


Compositions one per week.


Argumentation stressed.


Spelling and letter-writing.


(Both


semesters; fourth year; 4 hours.)

FRENCH


ASSISTANT


PROFESSOR


CAWTHON


FRENCH


NI-First


Year.-Pronunciation


and


reading


aloud, dictation and conversation,


verbs,


the auxiliary and regular


irregular verbs used daily, simple constructions and


grammar.


The reading of simple selections.


(Both semes-


ters; third year;


4 hours.)


FRENCH


NIL-Second


Year


Work


first


year


con-


tinued.


Translations from English to French, grammar and


elements


syntax,


short


written


compositions,


dictation,


conversation, reading of selections.


year; 4 hours.)


(Both semesters; fourth


KKKKK






NORMAL


'HOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE


present.


Medieval


history


will


touched


lightly,


while


stress will be placed


upon English


history


Text-book and


reference reading required.


(Both semesters


second


year


4 hours.)


HISTORY


NII.-American


History


and


Civics.-A


gen-


eral survey from


the early


discoveries


the present time.


Text-book


and


reference


reading


required.


The


work


Civics will be studied in connection with the history so far


as possible.


Stress will be laid upon


the study of local his-


tory and geography in Florida,


local industries, transporta-


tion


and


communication


, organized


community


life


and


public health, local, state and national governments.


Text-


book used.


(Both semesters


fourth year


4 hours.)


LATIN


LATIN


NI.-Beginner's


HATHAWAY
Latin.-A


good


first-year


book


will be studied and completed.


(Both semesters; first year;


4 hours.)
LATIN NII.-Caesar, Composition and Grammar.-Four


books of


Casar will


be carefully read.


Prose


Composition


and Grammar once per week.
4 hours.)


(Both semesters; second year;


LATIN


NIII.-Cicero,


Composition


and


Grammar.-Six


orations of Cicero will be read in class.


Prose composition


and grammar once per week.


(Both semesters


third year;


4 hours.)


LATINK NIV


Virgil,


Composition


and


Grammar.-Six


books of Virgil.


Prose composition and grammar once per


week.


(Both


semesters;


fourth year; 4 hours.)


MANUAL


TRAINING


PROFESSOR WIECHARDT
/ffCntr A aTTr Admoc T T.T/T7nd Tr7tnrl -Tir'. i.r o ivpn an ele-






16

and


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


use of


wood-working machinery,


cut-off saw, band-saw, and planer.


neerng
hours c


students


counting


MECHANIC


first


semester


as 3 nominal
ARTS IIb.---E


such


as


the
of
lear,


rip-saw,


Engi-


6 actual


hours.)


elementary


Wood


Carving


and


Furniture Construction.-Herein is applied the skill,
edge,- and experience obtained in the first semester':


S


knowl-
work,


and each student will be required to design and construct a


piece of furniture,


or other approved article involving carv


ing,


turning or joinery as a passing piece.


(Required of


Engineering


students;


second semester;


Freshman class;


actual hours weekly.)


MECHANIC


ARTS


lia.-Forge


Shop.-Practice


work


first given so as to develop proficiency in the use of the ham-


mer.
such


The


student


as foundry


then


tools


makes


, hammers,


articles


cold


intrinsic


chisels,


lathe


value,
tools,


turning chisels, drawknives, and screw-drivers.


He acquires


skill in forging,


welding, dressing,


tempering and annealing.


(Required of all Electrical and Mechanical Engineering stu-


dents; first


semester; Sophomore year; 6 actual hours week-


MECHANIC


ARTS


IVb.-Foundry


Practice.--Foundry


practice will be given in the second semester,


by text-book,


or lectures.


(Required of


all except Civil Engineering


stu-


dents;


second


semester;


Sophomore


year;


3 actual


hours


counting


as 11/2


nominal hours.)


MATHEMATICS
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR CAWTHON AND MR. BLANTON


MATHEMATICS


NI.-Plane


Geometry.-The


first


five


books i
hours.)


plane


geometry.


(Both semesters;


third


year;


MATHEMATICS


NII.


olid


Geometry


and Plane


Trigo-


nometry.-During the first half of the year solid geometry is


(Required
Freshman y


Trigo-































Peabody Hall































Peabody Club







4r


The Commons





































Group of Summer School Students 1913


i~c~l~rii-~ ,.~~,;~~*_~,~,_,,;,;~,~_. ..........,,..... ..... __~~




atII"f F N;igfpI :**iuu A. A


NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE


PHYSICS
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR CAWTHON


SCIENCE


NI.-Physics.-Elements


problems and laboratory work.


Carefully


physics,


kept


with


note-books


required.


(Both semesters; third year;


4 hours.


TEACHERS'


COLLEGE


The Teachers' College offers two courses


One of these courses leads to an A. B.


degree in Educa-


tion, and the other to the B.


S. degree in Education.


To be


admitted as a candidate for this degree, applicants must be


graduates of Senior


High Schools to meet the requirements


admission


Freshman


Class.


(See


46-56


general
sent on


catalogue


full


application.)


description.


Graduates of the


Catalogue


regular


will


Normal


School Course are admitted to the Junior Class of Teachers'


College, and may go on to these degrees in two years.


Grad-


uates


Teachers'


College


granted


State


Certificates


without further examination.


Such certificates are convert-


ible into Life Certificates in the usual way.


ELECTIVES.-That


graduates


may


well


prepared


teach


two


or three of the high school


subjects,


nine hours
junior and


senior years,


respectively.


choosing these electives


student is


required


elect those special


studies


which


prefers


teach


and


make


himself


especially


proficient


in them by pursuing them two consecutive years. All
tives must be chosen after consultation with the Dean.


I elee-


For


the A.B. degree the major elective work must be chosen in


Groups II and III, or Groups II or


For the


B.S.


degree


the major electives must be chosen from Group IV.
The foreign language chosen in the Freshman year must


electives are offered in both curricula in







UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


CURRICULUM


Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science
in Education.
Freshman


NAMES


COURSES


NATURE


OF WORK


DESCRIP-
HOURS TION, SEB
PER CATALOGUE


WEEK


Education Ia__
Education IIb&


English Il
French I-


_---_--_--_-:-_-


m- --- ....------- -
------- --- -- -


Psychology -.-... ____
Methods of
Study .-.-.---
Rhetoric and Composition.


Elementary


German I--- .............- -Elementary


Latin I .--------- ----


Mathematics


History


I_ __-----_


Course...--


Course.--..


.....Cicero, Comp. and Gram.
_---Solid Geom. and Tri.-_


I---, ---.. .......Modern European-


Botany I- ---------...- -....General
Chemistry I--._---___-..-. General


Botany ..
Chemistry


----
----
n


Agronomy IL,___----.-..,,,General Agriculture. ..
Physics I-....... -__----- .. General Physics .... _
Foreign Language ---------French, German or Latin


Sophomore


Education
Education


IIIa.
IVb6


------_--::---
------- -.. --


Special Methods .--- ]
School Management and
Supervision -.- J


Group II
Group III
Group IV


---- a ------ -- ---------- ---- -
- a a --- anaasaaa-aaaaa---aa--- a a a.


or 6
orB6
or 6


71-99
71-99
71-99


Junior


Education


Education
Philosophy
Electives .


history
tion -_


VIb ----
la and b.


Secondary
General P


of Educa-

Education... J


'sychology....-


Senior


Education


Education


-------- .------.Principles


VIIIa


--- - - -


Philosophy


of Education-........
-Child St dy ...... I


PAGE


1


I


Il


t







NORMAL


HOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE


ELECTIVES


REGULATION


S.--


Upon


registration


Junior


year,


each student shall
of the College.


ubmit his choice of electives to the Dean


student


shall


elect


more


than


required


number


of electives without the approval of the Dean of the College.

ELECTIVE GROUPS*


. Language Group.
English,
Latin,
Greek,
French,
German,
Spanish,
Italian.


Philosophy Group. IV


Psychology,
Ethics,
Logic,
Bible IV,
History,
Pedagogy,
Public Law,
Economics,
Sociology,
Political Science.


science Group.


Mathematics,
Agriculture,
Astronomy,
Chemistry,
Physics,
Geology,
Zoology,
Botany,
Physiology,
Bacteriology,
Surveying,
Mechanics,
Drawing,
Descriptive
try,


general catalogue, pp.


71-99.


Geome-


Manual Training,
(See Mechanic Arts)




I
.1


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DEPARTMENTS


OF INSTRUCTION


EDUCATION
PROFESSOR THACKSTON
PROFESSOR COX
PROFESSOR BUCHHOLZ


EDUCATION


Ia.-Psychology.--This


elementary


course designed to set forth the main phenomena of mental


life, and


which
course


furnish


will
will


student


constantly


aim


with


recur


especially


concepts


further


prepare


and


study.


terms


This


student


examination


on Psychology for the


State


Certificate.


The


text-book prescribed from


time to time by the State Super-


intendent


Education


will


used


connection


with


lectures and much reference work to the standard American


writers.


(Required of


Freshmen


first semester;


3 hours.)


EDUCATION


IIb.-General


Methods.-This


course


will


have


main


purpose


application


laws


psychology,


methods


as learned


study


and


Education
teaching.


general


The


student


will


shown


best


methods


study


that


psychological


laws


indicate and he will
study accordingly.


urged


The general


pattern his own habits of


principles


and methods of


teaching will


be stressed.


(Required of


Freshmen;


second


semester; 3 hours.)


EDUCATION


IIIa.-Special


Methods.-The


special


meth-


followed


grammar


school


teaching


subjects.


Stress


will


elementary


placed


upon


and
the


special methods for language, history, geography and arith-


metic. (Required
EDUCATION IVb


of


Sophomores;


first semester;


3 hours.)


school Management and Supervision--


This course is designed to give the practical and theoretical


*1 Cfl %nit a an


n an Art


. U'.


Vfcnw; Tnln o0


osn


flfmlhlflt7


oitT in'
a011Tllflf'..I


.--S







NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE


tion,
being


and


grading


and


promoting-special


discussed-programs,


progress


books,


plans


promotion


time tables, report cards,


departmental


teaching,


exercises


plan
and


intermissions, the recitation,
second semester; 3 hours.)


(Required of


Sophomores;


EDUCATION Va.-History of Education


This course has


two


main


purposes.


First,


endeavor


is made


lead


student to


see and appreciate the good


things in


the many


systems


present-day


education
work as


studied


and


apply


as possible.


them


own


the second


place,


fine


ideals


and


incentives


devotion


calling


furnished 1
educational


studying


leaders.


lives


(Required


and


works


Juniors;


elective;


great


first


semester; 3 hours.)


EDUCATION


VIb.-Secondary


Education.-This course is


designed especially to give insight into the problems of


secondary and high school.


Many problems relating to the


high


schools


this


and


other


Southern


States


thor-


oughly


gone


over


purpose


understanding


present situation and


planning for


better things.


The fol-


lowing


special


topics


may


mentioned


Psychology


and


Pedagogy of Adolescence, High-School Athletics, History of


Secondary


Education,


High-School


Courses,


comparative


study of secondary education in the different countries, etc.


Lectures


several


and


reference


work


texts on this subject.


supplement
(Required of


reading


Juniors ;


elect-


ive; second semester; 3 hours.)
EDUCATION VII.-The Principles and Philosophy of Edu-


cation.- This


course


attempts


select


from


modern


psy


chology'and sociology all of the facts that will aid the teach-


er in


obtaining


a clearer insight into


the actual


workings


of the child's mind in the process of learning.


ing are a few of the topics studied


The follow-


The brain and nervous


system,


place


of the body in


education,


attention,


-~~~( a) a -a* 3


__ I I


|


r 1 r






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


development and growth


tracted


infancy,


of the child,


origin


and


di


development of intellect, heredity,


the meaning


development of
individuality,


of pro-


instincts,
abnormal-


ities and the application of facts learned to school work, etc.


(Required of


Seniors; elective; first semester; 3 hours.)


EDUCATION IXb.-Practice Teaching.-Knowledge of the


principles,


theory


any teacher for his


riences and


results.


practice


and


history


work,
under


education


will


better


but these without concrete expe-


S


direction


will not


give the


best


Realizing this, the course is planned for the purpose


of giving this experience under the supervision and watch-
care of the professor in charge of the department in which


subject


taught.


This


practice


the same position in the teachers'


teaching


will


occupy


course as laboratory work


does in the science departments and will have the same pro-


portion of credit as laboratory work.
second semester; 3 hours.)


SPECIAL COURSES FOR HIGH SCHOOL


(Required of Seniors;


TEACHERS


The following courses are offered by the different depart-
ments of the University for the special preparation of high
school teachers. Each course will aim to give to the student
the teachers' point of view of the subject, and will go over


and


organize


in a general


way


material


that


special subject should cover in the high school course.


Spe-


cial attention will be given to the methods of presenting the


subjects to a class.


The best text-books and reference books


will be pointed out along with special books and magazines
that have recently appeared on the teaching of the subject.
In the sciences the student will have the privilege of handling
and setting up the apparatus used in making demonstrations


before a class.


Besides this he will be required to select lists


of the most suitable apparatus for high school laboratories.
Practice teaching in the Practice High School will be given


tn thnRn atntdantsi whn tnl.rw tIh anp fmurarnr


Tnn


wnrd. it in







NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE


Senior and Graduate classes.


Students are REQUIRED to take


the course or courses that deal with the subject which they


are preparing to teach in the high schools


but none of these


courses may be taken by a student until he has made a thor-


ough


study


same


subject or


subjects


college


classes.


EDUCATION


Xa.-Th


Teaching


English.--A


general


survey of high school English will be made and the methods


presenting


same


will


given.


Text-book,


reference


reading,
semester


observation


and practice teaching.


Professor Farr


EDUCATION


XIb.-Botany


High


School.-High


school botany will be viewed from the teacher's


standpoint.


Apparatus for laboratory will be selected, field trips planned


and made, and best text-books pointed out.


Text-books and


reference


reading


required.


hour


second


semester


Professor Floyd.)


EDUCATION


XIIa.-M


thods


aching


High


School


Mathematics.-


Text-book, lectures and practice teaching.


hour


first


semes


Profe


r Keppel.)


EDUCATION XIIIb.-High


hool History.-Methods and


materials


used in


presenting history to


high school


pupils.


Observation and practice teaching, text-books and reference


reading required.


hour


ond


semester


Professor


Bernard.)


EDUCATION


Methods


a.--


the selection


semester.


aching of High


school Phys


of proper apparatus,


Professor


Benton.)


EDUCATION


lectures,


XVb.-High


selection


school


Chemistry.-Methods,


proper apparatus,


etc.


hour;


second semester.


Prof


essor


Flint.)


EDUCATION XVIa.-Methods of Teaching German in the
High School.-Lectures and reference reading required. (1


hour;


first semester.


Professor


Crow.)


hour


first


first


ics.-
hour:






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


experimenting, methods
and required readings.


presenting


subject.


(1 hour; second semester.


Lectures
Profes-


sor Vernon.)


OTHER DEPARTMENTS


order to avoid repetition,


detailed


description


of the


other subjects that may be taken by students in the Teach-


ers'


College are not


Chemistry


Latin,


Econom


Mathematics


printed here.


The courses


in Bol


ics, English, French, German, His
, Philosophy, Physics, and Zoology,


Sany,
tory,
will


be found in the section


of the catalogue devoted to the Col-


lege of Arts and Sciences; the courses in Agriculture in that


devoted to the College of Agriculture.


This catalogue will


be sent on request.
STATE HIGH SCHOOL INSPECTION


This


division


college


was


made


possible


generous


York.


(See


page


General
general


Educational
catalogue.)


Board


New


The Dean


of the College will visit and inspect the high


schools in the State, give what aid he can in the establish-
ment of high schools where they do not exist and help to ad-


vance those already established.


Where his co-operation is


desired, the inspector will take great pleasure in conferring


with


county


superintendents,


school


boards,


principals,


teachers


and


citizens


on any


educational


matter that


may


tend to the welfare and advancement of the high schools in
the State.






NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE


THE


PRACTICE


HIGH


SCHOOL


OF


THE


TEACHERS'


COLLEGE


This


part


former Sub-Collegiate


nected


with


work


Division.


Teachers'


s University
Hereafter it


College and Normal


includes


will


School,


con-
and


will be used as a practice and model school for the students


of this college.


Here student-teachers will have opportunity


to observe skilled instructors teach the high school subjects,
and will also engage in their practice-teaching in those sub-
jects that they desire to teach in the high schools.
ADMISSION.-Only graduates of Junior High Schools, or


students who have finished work


equal to that of the tenth


grade,


will be


admitted


this


High


School.


The


number


of students admitted will be limited to from twenty to twen-


ty-five


each


year


or grade.


NO


STUDENT


WILL


ADMITTED


COURSE


WHO


OFFERED


HAS


NOT


THE


COMPLETED


HIGH


SCHOOL


THE
HIS


HOME.
This rule will not be waived for any student except upon


written


application


parent


or guardian,


accom-


panied by the endorsement of his high school principal.
The work offered will be that of the eleventh and twelfth


grades of the Standard High Schools of Florida.


Students


will be required to take English and mathematics the third


year and English and history the fourth year.


This requires


eight


definite


hours


in each


year.


The


remaining


twelve


hours


third


year


and


eleven


to thirteen


and


one-half hours in the fourth year may be chosen only after


consultation


with


the Dean


Teachers'


College.


Not


less than eighteen nor more than twenty-two hours may be


taken


any


student


any


one


year


except


special


permission.


If a modern foreign language is chosen, it must






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CURRICULUM

Third Year, or Eleventh Grade


NAMES
OF
COURSES


NATURE OF WORK


HOURS
PER
WEEK


DESCRIP-
TION, SEN
CATALOGUE
PAGE


*English ----....--------Rhetoric, Composition
and Classics --. --. .
*Mathematics ---- ---Plane Geometry .-.-..
Take from 10 to 12 hours of the following:
Latin -_---------- --- Cicero (6 orations) and
Composition .-----
German ------------Elementary Course -- _
French .... ........ Elementary Course
Science .-------... ..Physics -- .
Manual Training ----.- Wood-work ...........
Agriculture ...- ...... Elements of Agronomy
and Horticulture ...


Required ------ 18 to 20


Fourth


Year,


or Twelfth Grade


*English .... ----.--.----American and English
Literature and Com-
position ___ .-.- -
*History .... ----------_American History and
Civics ... ..a .
Take from 11 to 13% hours of the follow
Latin -_ .. .. m. -- -- Virgil (6 books) and
Composition O.-.---.
Mathematics -.. ...... -- Solid Geometry and
Plane Trigonometry..
German -------------ntermediate Course -
French _lm---,_,.------- Intermediate Course __
Agriculture .....-.- -_--Elements of Animal
Husbandry and Agri-
cultural Engineering
Manual Training __.._ ._..Forge and Foundry
Work - - --


4
wing:


Required _._________19 to 21%


* Starred subjects are required of all students.


IE

i


i;







NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE




UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL

(Co-EDUCATIONAL)

June 16--August 8, 1913.



SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD


STATE SUPT.


W. N. SEATS, A.M., LL.D.


PRES. A. A. MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D.
PRES. EDWARD CONRADI, A.M., Ph.D.



FACULTY (1913)
A. A. MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D.,
President.

JOHN A. THACKSTON, Ph. D.,
Professor of Education and Psychology.


J. H.


WORKMAN, A.B.,


Professor of English and Civics.
F. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.B.,


Professor


Foreign


Languages.


W. CORR, A.B.,


Professor of History and


Science.


CAWTHON, A.B.,


Professor of Mathematics.
MISS JESSIE MORRELL,
Professor of Primary Methods.


C. L.


WILLOUGHBY, B.


Agr.,


Professor of Science.






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


COURSES OF STUDY


The


following courses


study will


be offered:


GROUP I -Education and Ps


ychology.-Theory and Prac-


tice of Teaching, five hours per week


Psychology


five hours


per week


History


of Education, five hours per week.


GROUP


II-English.-Reading


and


Spelling,


two


hours


per week; Grammar and Composition, four hours per week;


Rhetoric


four


hours


per


week


English


Literature,


four


hours per week.


GROUP III-Foreign Languages.-Beginners' Latin,


four


hours per week
hours per week


Caesar, four hours per week;


French or German


Virgil, four


, four hours per week.


GROUP


States and


IV-History


of Florida


and


four


Civics.


hours


-History


per week;


Civil


United
Govern-


ment


, two hours per week


General History, four hours per


week.


GROUP


V-Mathematics.-Arithmetic


four


hours


per


week


Algebra, four hours per week; Geometry, four hours


per week; Trigonometry, four hours per week.


GROUP VI-Primary Methods.-Primary


Methods, Draw-


and


Singing.


(Time to


devoted


each


subject


this group to be arranged by the Instructor.)


GROUP
Physiology


VII-Science.-Geography,


,


two hours per week; Phy


two
dical


hours per week;
Geography, four


hours


per


week;


Botany,


four


hours


week;


Zoology,


four


hours per week;


Physics, four


hours


per week.


GROUP


VIII-Vocational.-Agriculture,


four


hours


per


week; Nature Study, two hours per week; Manual Training,


four


hours


per week;


Domestic


Economy,


four


hours


per


week.
Not more than one advanced college course can be offered
under each of the above groups.

REGULATIONS


I







NORMAL SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' COLLEGE 29

2. No teacher shall take less than five hours per week
of professional work.
3. The maximum hours per week, including profes-
sional, vocational and academic subjects, shall, in no case,
exceed twenty-seven hours per week. Two laboratory hours
to be counted as one hour of academic work.
It is hoped that all teachers will recognize the wisdom
of the above regulations. To fulfill its highest mission the
Summer School should not be utilized merely for the pur-
pose of "cramming" for examinations.
Attention is directed to the following section of the
Summer School Act:
EXTENSION OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
Section Six of a recent Act of the Legislature provides:
"All teachers attending any one of the summer schools
herein created and whose work entitles them to credit there-
from upon making proof of the same to any County Super-
intendent of Public Instruction in this State are hereby en-
titled to one year's extension on any teacher's certificate
they may hold and which has not fully expired."
Under this section of the law, no certificate of credit
making proof of the work done will be granted by the State
Superintendent and the Presidents of the Summer Schools,
except to those teachers who attend the full term and whose
work shall be satisfactory to the faculty concerned.

CREDIT TOWARDS NORMAL SCHOOL AND COLLEGE DEGREES
Section Five of Summer School Act is as follows:
"All work performed at the said Summer Schools shall
be of such character as to entitle the students doing the
same to collegiate, normal or professional credit therefore,
and may be applied toward making a degree."
In addition to the courses outlined above one advanced
course of college grade will be offered in the following sub-
--a. *Sa S






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The


entire


made available


this


Summer


stories and


facilities
Sfor the
School.


dining


halls


use of the


The
will


university
faculty


libraries,


of
and


Florida
students


laboratories,


open


and


are
at


dormi.


best


service is promised.


Board


and


lodging,


including


furnished


rooms


and


I




"i
LI


lights,


will be offered at $4.00 per week, payable in advance;


entire


or $30.00
advance.


term


eight


weeks,


payable


who


expect


occupy


dormitory


rooms,


which


every


case


comfortable


and


commodious,


will


pected to furnish


bed linen,


towels and


pillows.


For room reservations and information as to


mer School, address President A. A.


the Sum-


Murphree.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs