Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00516
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: February 1916
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00516
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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This is a bird's-eye view of the University campus as it is being developed. Already more than six
hundred thousand dollars have been invested on permanent improvements here, and other buildings are going
up as fast as needed and funds permit.


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College


of


Engineering


University


Florida


ainesville


Descriptive Bulletin
OF THE


College


of


Engineering


,.
8























This Bulletin is intended to give in popular form a brief


description
maintained
University.


work


State of


More


College


Florida


Engineering


as a part of its State


complete information can be found in


the University Catalog, or obtained by writing to the


Uni-


versity


Florida.


Inquiries


will


welcomed and will


receive prompt attention.











THE


PURPOSE


OF THE


COLLEGE


ENGINEERING


The


College


Engineering


designed,


the one


hand, to help young men to prepare themselves for useful
occupation and, on the other hand, to help the industries of
the State by furnishing engineers and technical employees.
The State of Florida needs numerous public works, such


as drainage of


its swamps,


construction of highways, im-


provement


harbors


and


waterways,


added


public


utilities in towns--water works, electric power plants, gas
plants, sewerage systems, more railroads, further develop-
ment of its phosphate mines and other mineral resources,


and more manufacturing.


To meet these demands success-


fully
men


and economically requires engineers;


who


devote


themselves


that is to say,


planning


public


works,


the successful execution of plans, and economical


operation.


engineer has been defined as "a man


who


can do for a dollar what any fool can do for two dollars."


This


states


plainly the nature of engineering service.


lies, not so much in getting results some how or other, as
almost anyone can do, but in obtaining the results in the
most satisfactory and economical way, for which it is plain


that


careful


planning, scientific


knowledge, and practical


experience are necessary.


THE VALUE OF TECHNICAL


EDUCATION


It sometimes happens that a man can become a success-


ful engineer through practical experience, and


without any


systematic scientific education, but such cases are rare; and


engineers of


this kind are likely to be successful only in








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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


courses of study in engineering colleges, and it would be


very foolish for anyone to undertake


to succeed


in engi-


neering without securing the necessary technical education.


Such
cases


a man


may succeed to a certain


hopelessly


the higher ranks of


handicapped if
his profession.


point, but in most


attempts


This


very


reach
clearly


shown by a set of curves,


which are reproduced herewith,


taken from the report of the United States Commissioner of


Education (Vol. I, 1905, p. 16).


technical


They show the earnings of


graduates, graduates from manual training high


schools,


and


persons


with


less education who are en-


gaged in engineering work.


ENGINEERING


BUILDINGS


AND


EQUIPMENT


THE


UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


The headquarters and principal building of the College


Engineering


is Engineering


Hall.


three-story


brick building, 122 feet by 73 feet, with a one-story wing for


boilers


and


steam


engine


laboratory.


provides


class-


rooms and drafting rooms for all


engineering depart-


ments of instruction, and various special laboratories, such
as the hydraulic laboratory, dynamo laboratory, steam en-


gine laboratory, and laboratory for testing materials.


views of


Two


this building are shown herewith (page 2) as well


as the plan of the ground floor (page 8).
For the shop work, a separate building is used, located


about 400 feet west of Engineering


Hall.


It is a one-story


brick building,


60 feet long by


30 feet wide,


with a


wing


30 feet by 20.
A part of the work of the College of Engineering coin-


cides with that of the other colleges of the


University, and


such


work


classrooms


and


laboratories


other


University buildings are used.


n- 44


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FLOOR PLAN OF GROUND FLOOR, ENGINEERING HALL








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Ol-lk1.. OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EN(_;INEERIN(,


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F.x\CI.TY OF THE COLLEGE OF EN(;INEERIN(;
From left to right:-R. W. Thoroughgood (Ciil Engineeringi. J. MN. Iarr English). R. E. Chandler lMechanical Engineerintg. A.J. ',irong 'iliechinijal
Engineering). H. G. Keppel IMathematics). J. R. Benton Electrical Engineering. and Dean of the College of Engineeringl. W.. .Peti% IPhic-l.. A. Alur-
phree (President of the University), E. R. Flint (Chemistry). R. R. Sellers (Civil Engineering), C. L. Cro\w Spaniahp, Major E. S. Walker IMilitry Science).







COLLEGE OF


ENGINEERING


CHARACTER OF INSTRUCTION
AT THE


COLLEGE


OF ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


The courses in engineering at the


University of Florida


use the same textbooks and are planned in the same way as


those


engineering


colleges


good standing through-


out the United States.


In all such institutions it is under-


stood


that


school


training


alone


cannot


make


man


successful engineer, even though it is an indispensable ele-


ment in his ultimate success.


Practical experience, as well


as purely scientific knowledge, is necessary.


On the other


hand,


every


effort


is made to have


instruction


practical a nature as may be.


For this reason a great deal


of the work of the courses is not by recitations or lectures,
but is given in the laboratories, shops, drafting-rooms and
field, where students handle for themselves the things about


which they study.


Along with this practical work, recita-


tions and lectures are carried on, dealing with the theory of
the work and supplying general scientific knowledge, espe-


cially in mathematics, physics, and chemistry.


It has been


said that "the most practical of all things is a sound theory,"
so that, while the term "theoretical" is often popularly used
in a contemptuous way on account of the frequency of false


theories,


the other hand the study of fully established


and well verified scientific theory needs no apology, and, in
fact, makes a man much more practical than one who lacks
such study.

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING











































CIVIL ENGINEERING DRAFTING ROOM-CLAS' IN BRIDGE .AND ROOF DESIGN, OR STIRUCTLUR.L ENGINEERING









































A FEW


OF THE SURVEYING


INSTRUMENTS-CIVIL


ENGINEERING


DEPARTMENT


m










































HYDRAULIC


LABORATORY-MAKING


A TEST


OF A VENTURI


WATER METER


I


I






COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


pipes, canals,


pumps, turbines, and harbor works); in struc-


tural engineering, or the design of roofs and bridges and
framed structures in general; and in municipal engineering,
including the subjects of roads, pavements, water supply, and


the disposal of wastes.


The accompanying pictures show a


class in surveying at work, a class in the drafting-room for


roof


and


bridge


design, and a class making a test


in the


hydraulic laboratory (pages 12-14).
DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING


R. E.


Chandler, M.E.


(Stevens Institute), M.M.E.


(Cornell


University),


Professor


Major E.


S. Walker, U.


S. A. (Retired), Associate Professor of Engineering


and Professor of Military Science
A. J. Strong, Instructor
This department gives instruction in Mechanical Draw-


ing,


Machine


Design,


Mechanism, Strength


Mechanics, Steam Engines and Gas Engines.


of Materials,
This depart-


ment also has charge of the shops, in which practical in-


struction


given


Carpentry,


Carving, Cabinet Work, Blacksmith


Wood


Turning,


Work, Foundry


Wood
Work,


Pattern


Making and


Machine


Tools.


The shop


work is


designed, not so much to make skilled mechanics, as to give


students


direct personal


knowledge of


practical shop


processes.


The


accompanying


pictures


show


class in


mechanical drawing at work in the drafting-room, and some
views of the shop work (pages 16-19).
Instruction in the Testing of Materials is given jointly by
the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Civil En-


gmneermng.


The


accompanying


illustration


shows a class


making a test of the strength of a sample block of concrete
(page 14).
DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND PHYSICS


J. R. Bentoi
W. S.


i, B.


, Ph.D. (University of Goettingen), Professor


Perry, A.B. (Southern University), Instructor


This dnn rtment in its electric l enoinppnrino- wJnrk- aoivp





MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DRAFTING ROOM


1: l 'j;


LI


I-


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rA*


-CLASS IN MIECHANIC.-\L DRAWING AT WORK









































WOOD SHOP-CLASS RECEI\IN(; INSTRUCTION IN WOOD-TI RNING













































FORGE SHOP








































MACHINE SHOP
























































































































































































































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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING ;


given herewith showing two views of the dynamo labora-
tory (page 20).
In its work in Physics, the courses customary in Ameri-


can


colleges


given,


including


experimental


lectures,


recitations and laboratory work, in mechanics, heat, acous-


tics, optics, electricity, and magnetism.


The accompanying


pictures show a class at work in the physics laboratory and


the physics lecture-room ready for a lecture (page 22).


The


rooms used by the Physics Department are not in the Engi-
neering Building, but in Science Hall.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY
E. R. Flint, Ph.D. (University of Goettingen), M.D. (Harvard University),
Professor


In this department all engineering


students are required


to take work in general chemistry, both lectures and labor-


atory work.


Many special courses are also offered, which


frequently


engineering


taken


electives or


students, especially


extra


courses in


studies by
analytical


chemistry.

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
H. G. Keppel, A.B., Ph.D. (Clark University), Professor
In this department all engineering students are required
to take work in analytic geometry, college algebra, spheri-


trigonometry,


and


differential


and


integral


calculus.


Solid geometry and plane trigonometry is also required of
those who have not already had these subjects.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
Jas. M. Farr, A.M., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins University), Professor
C. A. Robertson, B.A. (University of Florida), Instructor
CL: a,,c AY a nfl aj 4.~. nuf 1 1* aj a ar an a n4. AA ai tn~l n tan































































PHYSICAL LABORATORY


FI







COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 23

DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES
C. L. Crow, M.A., Ph.D. (University of Goettingen), Professor
1 this department all engineering students are required


to take two years of Spanish.


view of the probable in-


crease in commerce, and other relations between Spanish
America and the United States, it is probable that a working
knowledge of Spanish will in the future be of great value
to American engineers.

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE


Major E.


Walker, U.


S. A. (Retired), Professor


In the freshman and sophomore years one hour per week
is devoted to lectures on military science, and in the fresh-
man, sophomore, and junior years, three hours per week are
devoted to military drill. It is thought that instruction in
these lines is of great value, whether or not a student per-
forms military duties in later life, since it familiarizes the


student


with


many of


the principles of


organization and


management, and since the physical exercise in performing
the drills is promotive of health and strength.

SPECIAL LECTURES
The College of Engineering has been fortunate in having


occasional


visits


from


distinguished practicing engineers,


who have been kind enough to give addresses on subjects


out of their practical experience.


These lectures are most


valuable to students of engineering.

ENGINEERING CLUB
The students of the College of Engineering maintain a





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BENTON ENUINEERINO SOCIEMY-COLLLUE 01- LENONEERING, UNIVERSITY 01. FLORIDA







COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


CURRICULA AND


DEGREES


Three curricula, each requiring four years, are offered:
one in Civil Engineering, one in Electrical Engineering, and


one in Mechanical Engineering.


Bachelor


Science


Bachelor of Science in


Civil


Electrical


They lead to the degrees


(B.S.C.E.),
(B.S.E.E.),


Engineering
Engineering


and


Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.


M.E.), respectively.


The


freshman


year


same


engineering


students;, the sophomore year is the same for electrical and


mechanical engineering students.


The work in Chemistry,


English, Spanish, Mathematics, and Physics is the same for
all engineering students throughout the curriculum, and in
part coincides with that provided for students in the College


of Arts and Sciences.


All engineering students take some


work in drafting and shop practice, but the time devoted to
these subjects varies in the different curricula.


student who has completed


regular curriculum


leading to


the bachelor'


degree in engineering, and who


has also had experience in responsible engineering practice,


may


obtain the degree of Civil Engineer (C.E.), Electrical


Engineer (E.E.), or


Mechanical Engineer (M.E.), under the


following regulations:


The


degree


C.E., E.E., or M.E. may be granted to a


graduate of the College of Engineering upon recommenda-
tion of the head of the department in which the degree is


sought,


and


College of


with


the concurrence


Engineering,


providing


he Faculty of the
candidate submits


evidence that he has had from two to five years of success-


and


responsible


engineering


practice,


subsequent


graduation.


The length of time demanded will depend on


character of


professional


experience, and on the


average grade which the candidate obtained while an under-
rorliito xxrhnih rntl h0 Q n-r mnra hn nrrdor tr nfhtan thp






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


intended


that the bachelor degree


(B.S.C.E., B.S.


E.E.,


and


B.S.M.E.)


shall


indicate merely the completion


of a course of studv in the theory of engineering, while the


later


degrees (C.E., E.E., or M.E.) shall indicate actual and


demonstrated


proficiency


to practice engineering in some


one of its branches.


Every student of engineering should


look forward to obtaining one of these degrees eventually.


En trance


Requirements.--In


order to be admitted as a


regular student in the College of Engineering, and to take
up the regular course of studies leading to a degree, a student


must


have


been graduated from a regular four-year high


school, or have had equivalent education.


In the case of


mature students


who


have


been


engaged in actual work


related


to engineering (surveying,


drafting,


machine-shop


work, or the like), work of


this sort will


be accepted for


entrance credit in place of not more than one year of high
school study.
Other Courses.-For the benefit of persons who have not
been through high school, who wish to take some engineer-
ing studies without being candidates for a degree, a short
course is offered, in which instruction is given in mechani-
cal drawing, machine drawing, elementary machine design,
wood working, forge and foundry practice, machine shop


practice,
chemistry.


and


elementary


mathematics,


physics,


and


OPPORTUNITIES FOR EMPLOYMENT IN


NEERING


ENGI-


AFTER GRADUATION


Since the foundation of the University of Florida in 1905
there have been forty-three (43) graduates from the College
of Engineering, of whom thirty-three (33) are employed as


engineers,


while the other ten


have found their way into


other lines of activity.


An earnest effort, which is usually


successful, is made by the College of Engineering to secure






COLLEGE OF


ENGINEERING


more as time goes on and they reach higher positions and


become more numerous.


The positions held by


University


of Florida graduates in engineering up to


1910 (of whom


there were seven) are as follows: Assistant Superintendent of
Phosphate Mining Company, at Nichols, Florida; Assistant


Physicist, Bureau of Standards,


Washington,


Tele-


phone


Engineer,


State


Railroad


Commission


Florida;


Electrical Contractor, Jacksonville; Civil Engineer, engaged


highway


and


bridge


construction,


Yellowstone


Park;


Civil Engineer for a Lumber Company in Florida.


One of


the seven is not engaged in engineering work.

EXPENSES
No charge is made to Florida students for tuition at the


University
each year:


of Florida, but the following fees are required


Registration fee-
Infirmary fee __
Contingent fee_-
Damage deposit.


_$ 5.00


Less damage deposit returned at end of year- .... ..


$18.00
5.00


$13.00
All students who are not residents of Florida are required


to pay a tuition fee of twenty


($20.00) dollars per year in


addition to the above.
Board and Lodging.-Rooms and board will be furnished
by the University at a cost of one hundred and twenty-eight


dollars


and


fifty


cents


($128.50)


collegiate


year.


Students


may


occupy


a room in


the dormitory,


without


taking meals at the


University


Dining Hall, at the rate of


five ($5.00)


dollars per


month


for lodging.


Board at the


Dining


Hall


without


lodging


dormitories will


furnished


rate


thirteen


dollars


and


fifty


cents


($13.50) per calendar month.
I T l T 'yntf'^/l rt LJ\n ^'^< n-- m^"^t rr^ r1 4'/^ r-i n--* In n /^ 4- y-1 jrh 4- r/^ j-j^ r-







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Books.--The


cost


of books


depends


largely upon the


course taken, but is in no case a large item of expense in
proportion to the value of the instruction obtained.


Summary.


- The


following


statement


summarizes the


probable


minimum


expenses of


a Florida student for the


collegiate year in the College of Engineering:


Fees, as above ....
Board and lodging
Uniform (about) -


. -
- - -


Books (about).-------..- ..-


Incidentals (laundry, athletic dues, etc.


(estimated)


18.00
128.50
15.00
20.00
30.00


Total_


$ 211.50


Less damage deposit returned at end of


year.. -..


$ 206.50


Students from


other states


will


pay in addition


to the


above a tuition fee of twenty dollars.

SCHOLARSHIPS

One scholarship securing exemption from the registra-
tion fee of five dollars is given to each county in Florida.


These scholarships


obtained


from


the County


Superintendents of Public Instruction.
Through the generosity of friends, the University is able


to offer several scholarships paying from


one


hundred to


two hundred dollars per year. Such scholarships are awarded
to indigent students of superior character and ability, and are
described fully in the general catalog of the University.


STUDENT LIFE AT THE


UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA
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INTERIOR


UNIVERSITY COMMONS


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A FEW OF THE STUDENT ACTIVITIES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Upper row: 1. Football team. 2. Y. M. C. A. cabinet. 3. Baseball team.
Lower row: University Band. 2. Glee Club. 3. Tennis Club,







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


length.


They are built in fireproof sections, each containing


twelve suites of dormitory rooms, and on each floor of each


section a shower bath, lavatory and toilet.


All rooms are


furnished with two iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier


or bureau, table,


washstand, and chairs.


The students are


expected to provide pillows, bedding, and such other articles


as they may wish.


In the last few years the enrollment has


been too great to provide for all of the students in the dormi-
tories, but rooms can be rented in private houses near the
University, many of which are the homes of the professors.
The number of rooms obtainable in this way, at moderate
prices, is ample.


It is


policy of the


University to foster all of those


wholesome student


activities


and amusements


that


make


American college life so attractive.


It is found that students


can


carry


on such


activities,


under


University


rules


which regulate them, without any detriment to their studies,
and with the advantage of gaining certain experiences likely


to help them in later life.


The athletic teams of the Univer-


sity, in football,


baseball


and


basketball,


play with other


colleges of the South,


under the rules of the Southern Inter-


collegiate Athletic Association,


of which the


University of


Florida is a member.


Students who do not belong to any of


the regular athletic teams receive regular instruction in the
gymnasium under a competent physical director.


Other successful student enterprises


The Y. M. C. A.;


musical


organizations,


the following:
including the


Glee


Club,


University


Orchestra,


and the


University


Band; the Florida


"Alligator"


, a weekly newspaper owned


and controlled by the student body, and printed from its own


presses
annual


University


published


each


year


campus;


senior


"Seminole"


class;


several


SlitPrirv QPiptip annd cripntific anQ






COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


WHY FLORIDA BOYS SHOULD


GO


TO COLLEGE


AT THE


UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


By attending college at the


young


man


who


expects


University


make


Florida any


his home


Florida


has an opportunity to form a wide acquaintanceship through-
out all parts of the state, which is likely to be of much value


to him in later life in


whatever profession he may enter.


He also has better opportunity to become familiar with


peculiar


local


conditions affecting


his own


line


work


than is possible


if he leaves the state for his college course.


Some years ago it was difficult to


find


good facilities in


Florida for pursuing college studies; this condition has now
been remedied and no longer furnishes a sound reason for
going outside of this state for college study.


At the University


of Florida one can


obtain


only


formal


instruction


special


courses,


also


broad


acquaintance with the general intellectual life of the state.


student


engineering


this


institution


comes fre-


quently


into


contact


with


those


who


studying


law,


agriculture, education, or chemistry, or are specializing in


purely


cultural


studies,


or are preparing to take


medical


courses.


Such


contact with minds of


varying interests is


broadening, and is


helpful in familiarizing the student with


the points of view in


various


lines of work.


A student at


this institution also comes in contact with the research work
being done by the Agricultural Experiment Station, which


gained


much


information


practical


value


Florida agriculture, and with the Extension


Division,


purpose of


which is to diffuse


th


knowledge throughout the whole


e benefits of
population


specialized
of the state;


with the work of High School Inspection,


which is carried


on from the University campus, and has helped so much in
the development of Florida high schools; with the work of
the Florida Plant Board, engaged in using scientific methods


* 4

































READING ROOM FOR PERIODICALS
UNIVERSITY fcBRARY

The University Library contains 17000 volumes, including


a large number on Engineering subjects.


In the periodical


room shown here, the current numbers of 112 periodicals


are kept on the tables for the use of students.


All of the


important


American


journals


on engineering and related


sciences, together with a number of foreign ones, are on file
here.


The


Library is


open


every


week-day


from


8 a.m.


10 p.m., under the direction of the University


Librarian, Mr.


Hadley, A.B.


(Yale),


who


devotes his full


time to


T





* A. &-
4 <



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*' .. .K^ **''*


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