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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00515
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1912
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00515
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA






FOURTH ANNUAL



ANNOUNCEMENT


OF THE



COLLEGE OF LAW


1912-1913






GAINESVILLE, FLA.:
PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE UNIVERSITY
MAY, 1912
z



















UNIVERSITY CALENDAR

1912-1913

1912-September 17, Tuesday............Summer Recess ends.
Examinations for Admission.
Registration of Students.
September 18, Wednesday ......... First Semester begins.
October 5, Saturday ............... Re-examinations.
October 5, Saturday, 2:30 p. m.....Meeting of General Faculty.
November 18, Monday ............ Farmers' Short Course begins.
November 27, Wednesday, 5:30 p. mThanksgiving Holiday begins.
December 1, Sunday, 7:00oo p. m .... Thanksgiving Holiday ends.
December 14, Saturday............Farmers' Short Course ends.
December 21, Saturday, zi:3o a. m. .Christmas Recess begins.

1913-January 4, Saturday, 9:00 a. m..... Christmas Recess ends.
January 29, Wednesday ........... First Semester ends.
January 30, Thursday............. Second Semester begins.
February 8, Saturday, 2:30 p. mn.... Meeting of General Faculty.
February 17, Monday............. Spring Term for Teachers begins.
February 22, Saturday ............Field Day.
March 1, Saturday ................ Re-examinations.
May 31, Saturday, 2:30 p. m.......Meeting of General Faculty.
June 1 to 3 ......................Commencement.
June 1, Sunday................... Baccalaureate Sermon.
June 2, Monday ..................Oratorical Contests.
June 3, Tuesday.................. Graduating Day.
June 4, Wednesday ................Summer Recess begins.
June 0, Friday ................... Examinations for Admission.



















1912 CALENDAR 1913


January
S M T W T F
-_ 1 2 3 4 5 6
.123456
7 8 9 1011 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 2C
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 .. ..

February
S M T W T F S
S- 1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 .. ..

March
S M I W T F S
1 2
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3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 .. ..- .- ..- ..

April
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7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
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28 29 30 .


May
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12 13 14 15 16 17 18
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26 27 28 29 30 31 --

June
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2 3 4 5 6 7 8
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16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30. .. .. ..


July


January


July


S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
. 1 2 3 4 5 6 -- 1 2 3 4_ 1 2 3 4 5
7 8 9 1011 1213 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 6 7 8 9101112
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
28 29 30 31 .. -- -- 26 27 28 29 30 31 ._ 27 28 29 30 31 -. -


August February August
S M T W T FS S MN T W T F S S M T W T F S
1 2 3 ... --. 1--- -- ----- 1 2
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
.... ..- -- -- -- -- --.... ..31 -- --

September March September
S M T W T FS S M T W T FS S M T W F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 .. .- .. .. .. I 1 2 3 4 5 6
8 91011121314 2 3 4 5 6 7 87 8 91011 1213
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
29 30 -- .. .. 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28 29 30 -- .. ..
- -- -- -- -. 30 31 .. .. -- .. .. -- -- -- -- --
October April October


S MT W T F S
-- -- 1 2 3 4 5
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13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 .. .

November
S M T W T F S
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24 25 26 27 28 29 30

December
S M T W T F S
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8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
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29 30 31 .- _--


S M T W T F S
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6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 -- -- --


May
S M T W T F S
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4 5 6 7 8 910
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
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June
SM TW T F S
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8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
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29 30 -- -- .


S M T W T F S
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5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 234 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 --

November
S M T W T F S
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2 3 4 5 6 7 8

23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 -- -- -- -

December
S M T W T F S
S1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31


-- --
























BOARD OF CONTROL
P. K. YONGE, Chairman ...................................... Pensacola
T. B. KING .................................................. Arcadia
E. L. W ARTMANN ................................................ Citra
F. P. FLEMING, JR ......................................... Jacksonville
W. D. FINLAYSON........... ................................ Old Town
J. G. KELLUM, Secretary to the Board ..........Tallahassee





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
ALBERT -V. GILCHRIST, President.............. ................. Governor
H. CLAY CRAWFORD .................................... Secretary of State
J. C. LUNING ............................................ State Treasurer
PARK TRAMMELL ...................................... Attorney-General
W. M. HOLLOWAY, Secretary........ State Superintendent of Public Instruction



















FACULTY



ALBERT A. MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D.,
President of the University.

THOMAS W. HUGHES, LL.B., LL.M.,
Dean and Professor of Law.

HARRY R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B.,
Professor of Law.

EDMUND C. DICKINSON, A.B., J.D.,
Professor of Law.



SPECIAL LECTURERS
1911-1912

CHIEF JUSTICE JAMES B. WHITFIELD,
JUSTICE R. F. TAYLOR,
JUSTICE W. A. HOCKER,
JUSTICE R. S. COCKRELL,
JUSTICE THOSE. M. SHACKLEFORD, LL.D.,
All of the Supreme Court of Florida.


















THE COLLEGE OF LAW


SPECIAL LECTURERS

In addition to the regular work of the College of Law, as
hereafter outlined, special lectures are given from time to time
by leading members of the bench and bar of the State. During
the year just closed the Law School was peculiarly fortunate in
having such lecturers as Chief Justice Whitfield and Justices
Cockrell, Shackelford and Taylor, all of the Supreme Court of
Florida. Chief Justice Whitfield delivered two lectures, the
first on Public Service Corporations and the second on Appel-
late Procedure and Practice in Florida. Justice Cockrell also
lectured on Florida Appellate Procedure and Practice. Justice
Shackelford gave four lectures on General Practice and Justice
Taylor lectured on Legal Ethics.
The faculty and students of the College of Law feel grateful
to the members of our Supreme Court for the helpful and in-
structive lectures delivered by them, and also for the uplift and
inspiration caused by their interest in the work of the College
of Law manifested by their visits to the University. A similar
course of lectures is being arranged for the coming year.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


LOCATION OF THE UNIVERSITY

The University of Florida is located at Gainesville, a city of
8,000 inhabitants, the judicial seat of Alachua County, in a region
noted for its beauty and healthfulness. The city is the head-
quarters of the phosphate industry and is surrounded by a
productive agricultural district. Besides being the seat of the
University of Florida, Gainesville has a well organized public
school of twelve grades, a public library and beautiful churches
of the leading religious denominations.
Gainesville enjoys excellent railroad facilities, affording her
ready communication with every part of the State by means of
the A. C. L., the T. and J. and the S. A. L. Railroads. It is
seventy miles from Jacksonville, forty miles from Ocala, and
one hundred and seventy-seven miles from Tampa.


GENERAL STATEMENT
In 1891, the American Bar Association declared that in its
opinion it was a part of the highest duty and interest of every
civilized State to make provision, when necessary, for main-
taining schools of law and the thorough legal education of all who
are licensed to practice law. Feeling with its full force the
soundness of this doctrine and being moved by a desire to dis-
charge this duty on the part of the State, the State Board of
Education and the Board of Control provided for the opening
of the College of Law in the Univeristy of Florida in September,
1909. The advantages to accrue to the State from having a
thorough and systematic course of instruction in the common law,
with special consideration of the peculiarities and exceptions ap-
plicable in Florida, as a part of its educational system, are many
and evident.
It was the purpose of the Board of Control to establish in
the University of Florida a law school which, by the quality
of its work and the character of its equipment, would merit
and command the confidence and support of the bench and
bar of the State and would draw within its walls the young
men who will constitute the future bar of Florida. That the
hopes of accomplishing these results were well founded and







COLLEGE OF LAW


that gratifying progress towards these ends has been made,
are shown by the number and character of those who have availed
themselves of the advantages offered by the College of Law.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
Graduates and matriculates of colleges and universities and
applicants who have completed a high school course of four years
will, upon presentation of proper credentials to that effect, be
admitted to the College of Law without examination as to pre-
liminary education, as candidates for a degree. Other ap-
plicants, if candidates for a degree, must show by written exami-
nation, or by certificate of the superintendent or principal of the
institution where they took the work, that they have satisfacto-
rily completed two years of high school work, one-fourth of which
must be work in English.
Notice is hereby given that with the opening of the session of
1913, the minimum requirements for admission to the College of
Law will be increased to three years of high school work and in
the fall of 1914 a high school course of four years will be required.

SPECIAL STUDENTS
Persons who are at least twenty-one years of age and are un-
able to comply with the above entrance requirements in their
entirety, are allowed to become special students and pursue a
selected course of study under the guidance of the Dean of the
College of Law, but without the privilege of being enrolled as
candidates for a degree. If the entrance conditions are removed
not later than the opening of the first semester of the senior year,
such students may, by special vote of the Faculty, become regu-
lar students and candidates for a degree.

ADVANCED STANDING
Attorneys at law who have been admitted to practice in the
courts of this State and who comply with the above entrance re-
quirements will be admitted to the senior class without examina-
tion.
No work in law done in other institutions will be accepted
towards a degree, unless the applicant passes satisfactorily the







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


examinations held in the subjects in the junior year of this de-
partment, or unless, by special vote of the Law Faculty, credit
is given towards senior standing without examination for such
work. In no case will credit be given in this way for work not
done in residence at an approved law school.

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION
The course of instruction in the College of Law extends
through two years of thirty-five weeks each, exclusive of vaca-
tions. The academic year is divided into two semesters, the
first having eighteen weeks and the second seventeen.
The purpose of the College of Law is to educate its students
by the study of jurisprudence and to acquaint them with the
foundation principles of the common law at the same time.
"The ability to think clearly, to reason closely, to appreciate
distinctions quickly, to investigate thoroughly, to generalize ac-
curately and to state his conclusions tersely, are prime requisites
of the safe counselor." To secure for the student this power
should be the constant effort of both student and faculty.
The method of instruction in the College of Law has been
planned with these ends in view. This is largely by the use of
text-books and selected cases. Each case is carefully studied
by the student and in the class room he is required to analyze
it, giving in his own language a clear and concise statement of the
essential facts, the issues involved in the case, the law governing
it and the reasoning of the court for the conclusion reached.
This practice tends "to greater thoroughness in reading, greater
care in reasoning and greater accuracy on the part of the student
in the art of expression."
In connection with this case work, the student studies a well-
written text-book on the subject under consideration which gives
him a systematic summary of the same, more detailed informa-
tion concerning the application of the law in particular instances
and an outline of the exceptions to and limitations upon the
general principles considered in the cases.
Particular stress is placed on the statutory modifications of
the common law in Florida. This is true in every subject in the
curriculum, but it is especially emphasized in Pleading, Practice
and Evidence, as the course of study is designed to thoroughly







COLLEGE OF LAW


instruct the student in the peculiarities of substantive law and
procedure in Florida so he will be able to enter upon the practice
understandingly at once.
With these ends in view, the following course of study has
been prepared:

FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER

CONTRACTS.-The nature of contract; offer and acceptance;
form and consideration; capacity of parties; reality of consent;
legality of object; operation of contract. Text-books: Clark on
contracts and Huffcut and Woorduff's Cases on Contracts.
(S hours a week. Dean Hughes.)
ELEMENTARY LAW AND ELEMENTARY REAL PROPERTY.-
Study of the elementary principles of the law as given in Books I,
II and III of first edition of Robinson's Elementary Law and the
first six chapters of Hopkins on Real Property. (4 hours a week.
Professor Dickinson.)
CRIMINAL LAw.-Nature of crime; common law and statu-
tory offenses; mental element in crime; insanity, intoxication
infancy, coercion, ignorance and mistake as bearing on exemp-
tion from responsibility; necessity; justification; agency; con-
sent; condonation; contributory acts; principals; accessories;
classification apd study of particular crimes; former jeopardy;
State and Federal jurisdiction. Text-books: Clark on Criminal
Law and the Statutes of Florida. (2 hours a week. Professor
Trusler.)
DOMESTIC RELATIONS.-This course considers thoroughly
the law of husband and wife, parent and child, guardian and
ward, infants, persons non compos mentis and aliens. Text-
books: Long's Domestic Relations and the Statutes of Florida.
(2 hours a week. Professor Dickinson.)
TORTs.-History and definitions; elements of torts; con-
flicting rights; mental anguish; parties to tort actions; remedies;
damages; conflict of laws; method of discharge. Text-books:
Burdick on Torts and Burdick's Cases on Torts. (3 hours a week.
Professor Trusler.)







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


SECOND SEMESTER
CoNTRACTS.-Interpretation of contract; discharge of con-
tract; remedies for breach of contract. Text-books: Clark on
Contracts, Huffcut and Woodruff's Cases on Contracts and the
Statutes of Florida. (3 hours a week. Dean Hughes.)
SALES OF PERSONAL PROPERTY.-Sale and contract to sell;
statute of frauds; illegality; conditions and warranties; delivery;
acceptance and receipt; vendor's lien; stoppage in transit;
bills of lading; remedies of seller and buyer. Text-book: Tif-
fany on Sales. (I hour a week. Professor Trusler.)
ToRTs.-Exhaustive study of particular torts, including
among others, false imprisonment; malicious prosecution and
abuse of process; conspiracy; slander and libel; trespass; con-
version; deceit; nuisance; negligence. Text-books: Burdick
on Torts and Burdick's Cases on Torts. (2 hours a week. Pro-
fessor Trusler.)
AGENCY.-Definitions and divisions; purposes for which
the relation may be created and how; who may be principal or
agent and evidence of the existence of the relation; ratification;
delegation of authority by agent; termination, nature and ex-
tent, construction and execution of the authority; rights, duties
and liabilities of agent, principal and third persons, the one to the
other; particular classes of agents. Text-books: Mechem's
Outlines of Agency and Mechem's Cases on Agency. (2 hours a
week. Professor Dickinson.)
COMMON LAW PLEADING-Definition and classification of
actions; proceedings in an action; analysis of the declaration;
Stephen's Rules of Pleading. Text-books: Shipman's Common
Law Pleading, the Statutes of Florida and the Supreme and
Circuit Court Rules in Common Law Actions in Florida. (3
hours a week. Dean Hughes.)
EQUITY JURISPRUDENCE I.-History and definition; juris-
diction; general maxims; equitable estates, interests and primary
rights, including a study of trusts, the powers, duties and liabili-
ties of trustees; mortgages; equitable liens; assignments. Text-
books: Eaton on Equity and Selected Cases. (2 hours a week.
Professor Trusler.)







COLLEGE OF LAW


BAILMENTS AND CARRIERS.-Nature and classification of
bailments; rights and liabilities of the parties; innkeepers.
Carriers of goods as to liability, discrimination, compensation,
lien. Carriers of passengers as to duty to accept, accommoda-
tions, ticket, ejection, personal injuries. Action against carriers.
Text-books: Goddard's Outlines of Bailments and Carriers and
Goddard's Cases on Bailments and Carriers. (2 hours a week.
Professor Dickinson.)
CRIMINAL PROCEDURE.-Jurisdiction and venue; arrests,
searches and seizures; extradition; preliminary examination,
bail and commitment; modes of accusation; the form of accusa-
tion; pleadings; proof; variance; verdict and judgment; pro-
ceedings after verdict; evidence; habeas corpus. Text-books:
Beale's Criminal Procedure and the Statutes of Florida. (I hour
a week. Professor Trusler.)
BRIEF MAKING AND THE USE OF LAW BooKs.-Where to find
the law; how to use statutes and decisions; how to find the law.
Text-book: Brief-Making and the Use of Law Books. (I hour a
week. Professor Dickinson.)

SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER
EQUITY PLEADING.-Nature and object of pleadings in equity;
parties to a suit in equity; proceedings in a suit in equity;
bills in equity; the disclaimer; demurrers and pleas in equity;
replication and answers in an equitable suit. Text-books:
Shipman's Equity Pleading, Rules of the Circuit Court in Chan-
cery in Florida and the Statutes of Florida. (2 hours a week.
Professor Trusler.)
EVIDENCE.-Rules as to admission and exclusion of evidence;
judicial notice; parole evidence rule; burden of proof and the
right to open and close; competency and examination of witness-
es; production of documents, persons and things; direct exami-
nation, cross examination and redirect examination. Text-
books: Reynolds on Evidence, Wilgus's Cases on Evidence and
the Statutes of Florida. (3 hours a week. Dean Hughes.)
REAL PROPERTY II.-Text-books: Hopkins on Real Property
Completed and the Statutes of Florida. (2 hours a week. Pro-
fessor Dickinson.)







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS.-Law Merchant; definitions and
general doctrines; contract of the maker, acceptor, certifier;
drawer; indorser, vendor, accommodate, assurer; proceedings
before and after dishonor of negotiable instruments; absolute
defenses; equities; payments; conflict of laws. Text-books:
Bigelow on Bills, Notes and Cheques, the Negotiable Instrument
Act of Florida, and selected cases. (2 hours a week. Professor
Dickinson.)
EQUITY JURISPRUDENCE II.-Accident, mistake and fraud;
penalties and forfeitures; priorities and notice; bona fide pur-
chasers; estoppel; election; satisfaction and performance; con-
version; specific performance; injunction; reformation; can-
cellation; cloud on title; ancillary remedies. Text-books:
Eaton on Equity and selected cases. (2 hours a week. Professor
Trusler.)
ORGANIZATION OF AND PROCEEDINGS IN THE COURTS OF
FLORIDA IN CIVIL ACTIONS.-
a. In General.-Disqualification, resignation, and removal
of judges; judge's power in vacation; judge ad litem; parties to
suits at law; locality and consolidation of actions; joinder of
causes of actions; rule days; commencement of suits at common
law; appearances, defaults and judgments upon default; plead-
ings at law; witnesses and evidence; jurors; judgments and exe-
cutions; motion for new trial and in arrest of judgment; lis
pendens; appellate proceedings at law and in probate matters;
limitation of actions.
b. Supreme Court.-Statutory powers; members of the
court; its terms, record, clerk, seal, decisions and reports.
c. Circuit Court.-Statutory powers and duties of judges;
terms; records and dockets to be kept by the clerk; seal and
records
d. Circuit Court in Chancery.-Its power in vacation; locali-
ty of action; process, its service and return; bill, demurrer, plea
and answer; practice and evidence; masters in chancery; de-
crees; rehearings and appeals; injunctions; ne exeat; divorce and
alimony; partition of property; quieting titles; disability of
minors and married women; liens.







COLLEGE OF LAW


e. Statutory Jurisdiction of Circuit Court.-Ejectment; re-
establishing lost papers; adoption of children; eminent domain;
court commissioners.
f. County Court.-Jurisdiction; terms; clerk; seal; records;
appeals; rules of practice.
g. County Judge's Court.-General powers; bonds; clerk;
seal; probate powers; as justice of the peace; forcible entry and
detainer.
h. Courts of Justices of the Peace.-General provisions; juris-
diction; proceedings before, at and after trial; proceedings on
appeal.
i. Special Statutory Proceedings at Law.-Attachment; gar-
nishment; forcible entry and detainer; replevin; statutory liens;
landlord and tenant.
j. Extraordinary Legal Remedies.-Habeas corpus; quo
warrant; prohibition.
Text-books: Shipman's Common Law and Equity Pleading,
General Statutes of Florida, decisions of Florida Supreme Court
and the Common Law and Equity Rules of Practice of the Cir-
cuit and Supreme Courts of Florida. (2 hours a week throughout
the year. Dean Hughes.)
THE UNIVERSITY PRACTICE COURTs.-One hour a week
throughout the year.
FLORIDA CONSTITUTIONAL LAw.-Declaration of rights; leg-
islative, executive, and judicial departments of government;
suffrage and eligibility; census and apportionment; counties
and cities; taxation and finance; homestead and exemptions;
married women's property; education; public institutions; mis-
cellaneous provisions. Text-books: The Constitution, Statutes
and Judicial Decisions of Florida. (I hour a week. Professor
Trusler.)
JURISDICTION OF THE UNITED STATES COURTS.-Under the
federal constitution; jurisdiction of different federal courts;
ancillary and appellate jurisdiction; bankruptcy; admiralty
suits; federal questions: removal from state to federal courts,
habeas corpus. Text-books: Thayer's Jurisdiction of the
Federal Courts and selected cases. (I hour a week. Professor
Trusler.)







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BRIEF MAKING AND THE USE OF LAW BooKs.-The trial
brief; the brief on appeal and its preparation. Text-book:
Brief Making and the Use of Law Books. (I hour a week. Pro-
fessor Dickinson.)
BROOM'S LEGAL MAXIMS.-A reading course running through-
out the year. (Dean Hughes.)


SECOND SEMESTER

UNITED STATES CONSTITUTIONAL LAw.-General principles;
distribution of governmental powers; congress; the chief execu-
tive; the judiciary; police powers; eminent domain; checks and
balances; guarantee of republican government, civil rights; polit-
ical privileges; guarantees in criminal cases; impairment of con-
tractual obligations; municipal corporations. Text-books:
Cooley's Principles of Constitution Law and Cooley's Constitu-
tional Limitations. (2 hours a week. Professor Trusler.)
WILLS.-Definition, nature and kinds of wills; a devisable
estate; who may make a will; error, fraud, undue influence and
mistake; who may take by will; formal requisites of wills; revo-
cation; re-publication; by what law wills are governed; con-
struction and effect of wills; lapse and substitution; rights and
liabilities of devisees and legatees; descent and distribution.
Text-books: Rood on Wills and the Statutes of Florida. (2
hours a week. Professor Dickinson.)
LEGAL ETHICS.-A consideration of the profession of the law
in its relation to society, embracing the duties the lawyer owes
to the commonwealth, to the court, to his professional brethren,
and to his clients. Text-books: Sharswood's Legal Ethics and
the Code of Ethics adopted by the American Bar Association.
(z hour a week. Dean Hughes.)
EXECUTORS AND ADMINISTRATORS.-When necessary; ap-
pointment and qualification; acceptance or renunciation; for-
eign and interstate adminsitration; powers, duties and liabilities
of executors and administrators; inventory; assets of estate;
insolvent estates; distribution; accounting and allowances.
Text-books: Croswell's Executors and Administrators and the
Statutes of Florida. (2 hours a week. Professor Trusler.)








COLLEGE OF LAW


DAMAGES.-General principles; nominal, compensatory, ex-
emplary, and liquidated damages; interest; value; pleading and
practice; breach of contracts for sale of goods; actions against
carriers; death by wrongful act; wrongs affecting real property;
damages in tort action; breach of marriage promise. Text-
book: Cases on Damages, selected from the Florida Reports. (I
hour a week. Professor Trusler.)
PARTNERSHIP.-Definitions and classifications; what con-
stitutes a partnership; contract of partnership; firm name and
good will; capital of firm; partnership property; rights and lia-
bilities of partners among themselves and as to third persons;
actions; dissolutions; limited partnerships. Text-book:
Mechem's Cases on Partnership. (I hour a week. Professor
Dickinson.)
PRIVATE CORPORATIONs-Nature of a corporation; creation
and citizenship of corporations; defectively organized corpora-
tions; corporation and its promoters; powers and liabilities of
corporations; corporation and the State; dissolution of corpora-
tions; membership in corporations; management of corpora-
tions; creditors, their rights and remedies; foreign corporations.
Text-books: Clark on Corporations and the Statutes of Florida.
(3 hours a week. Professor Dickinson.)
The text-books announced are subject to change.


EXAMINATIONS
The last week of each semester is devoted to examinations
covering the work of the semester. These examinations are in
writing and are rigid and searching, but ARE NOT NECESSARILY
FINAL. To be considered, prima facie, to have satisfactorily
completed a subject, the student must obtain an average grade
of at least 75 per cent, and an examination grade of at least 75
per cent During the last week of the second year, any candi-
date for a degree may be required to pass an examination in any
or all subjects given in the course and attain a minimum average
grade of 75 per cent in all subjects in order to be recommended
for a degree.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


THE UNIVERSITY PRACTICE COURTS
Thoroughly organized practice courts are regular features
of the course of instruction in the second year Weekly sessions
of the courts are held over which the Judge of the Practice Court
presides The object of the course in the Practice Courts is to
give the student practical instruction in pleading and practice
at law and in equity and experience in the preparation and trial
of cases The work is arranged as follows:
First-Cases arising upon prepared statements of fact are
assigned to the second year students upon which they are to de-
termine what proceedings to bring and how to bring them, issue,
serve and return process, prepare the pleadings and bring the
case to an issue on a question of law Each student must take
part in one case at law and one in equity. The case is first heard
on the sufficiency of the form and the structure of the pleadings
and, when these are approved, the issue of law is argued and
decided, the students acting as attorneys on each side drawing
the order, judgment or decree they deem themselves entitled to.
Second.-In the second class of cases in the Practice Court,
actual controversies are arranged and assigned for trial in the
Circuit Court as issues of fact. After determining what action
to bring, the students assigned to the case are required to issue
the proper process and prepare and file the necessary pleadings,
subpoena the witnesses, select the jury, examine and cross-ex-
amine the witnesses and argue the case to the jury. Each stu-
dent is required to participate in the trial of one civil and one
criminal case and must take part in carrying one chancery, one
civil and one criminal case to the Supreme Court for review.

THE LAW LIBRARY
Law books are the working tools of the practicing lawyer.
To teach the student how to use these tools, how to use the digest,
encyclopedias and reports, is as much the work of the law school
as to teach him the general principles of the law.
The College of Law was fortunate in being able to open its
doors with a good working library and now has on its shelves the
following books: Three sets of the Florida Supreme Court Re-
ports, with digest; The Session Laws of Florida from 1822 to
1911, except from 1828 to 1834; McClellan's Digest and Duval's







COLLEGE OF LAW


Compilation of the Laws of Florida; Revised Statutes of 1892
and the General Statutes of 1906; The Northwestern, South-
western, Northeastern, Southeastern, Atlantic, Pacific and South-
ern Reporters; The American Decisions, American Reports and
American State Reports, with digests; The Lawyers Reports
Annotated, with digests; The United States Supreme Court
Reports, with digests; The New York Common Law and Chan-
cery Reports, with digest; The New York Court of Appeals
Reports, the Reports of the Supreme Courts of Michigan and
Massachusetts and the New Jersey Equity Reports to the Re-
porters; The Reprint of the English Reports, the Encyclopedia
of Law and Procedure and more than two hundred of the leading
text-books and books of reference. The Legislature of 1911 has
also appropriated one thousand dollars for the purchase of new
books.
THE MARSHALL DEBATING SOCIETY
It is important that those who study law and intend to engage
in its practice should give attention to the subject of public
speaking. To suppose that excellence in public speaking and
debating is a gift of nature only and not the result of patient and
persistent effort, is a mistake. Believing in the truth of these
statements, the students in the College of Law met early the first
year and organized a society that would secure to its members
practice in debating and public speaking and experience in argu-
ing legal questions, as well as drill in parliamentary law. The
society was fittingly named "The Marshall Debating So-
ciety," in honor of the memory of that distinguished Southern
jurist, John Marshall. The membership and work in the society
are limited to students in the College of Law, but the Faculty
give all assistance and encouragement to the work that is possible.

UNIVERSITY PRIVILEGES
The advantages of the other departments of the University
are open to such students in the College of Law as desire and are
able to accept them. Courses in Constitutional and Political
History, International Law, Political Economy, Logic, Rhetoric
and English Composition are particularly recommended to law
students. No extra charge will be made for such courses, but







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


students in the College of Law will be permitted to take them
only with the consent of the Law Faculty and the professors
whose courses they wish to take.

DEGREE
The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) is conferred upon
those students who satisfactorily complete the course of study
as previously described. Students admitted to advanced stand-
ing may, if they do satisfactorily the work as prescribed by the
rules of the department, receive the degree after one year's resi-
dence, but in no case will the degree be granted unless the candi-
date is in actual residence during all of the second year.

ADMISSION TO THE BAR
The graduates of the College of Law are licensed by the Su-
preme Court, without examination, to practice in all the Courts
of Florida upon presenting their diplomas, duly issued by the
proper authorities and upon furnishing satisfactory evidence that
they are twenty-one years of age and of good moral character.

EXPENSES
TUITION.-A tuition fee of twenty dollars a semester, pay-
able in advance, will be charged all students.
REGISTRATION FEE.-An annual registration fee of five dol-
lars will be charged all students.
DAMAGE DEPOSIT.-In order to secure the University prop-
erty against damage, the sum of five dollars ($5.00) must be
deposited at registration. Damage known to have been done
by any student will be charged to his individual account; all
other damages will be prorated among the students.
At the end of the scholastic year, this deposit, less the amount
deducted, will be returned to the student.
INFIRMARY FEE.-An infirmary fee of three dollars ($3.00)
will be charged each student residing on the campus, the pro-
ceeds of which will go towards defraying the salary of a resident
nurse. This will secure the student, in case of illness, the priv-
ilege of a bed in the infirmary, which occupies Section A of






COLLEGE OF LAW


Thomas Hall; the services of the nurse, and attention from the
University physician, E. R. Flint, M.D. (Harvard). The pay-
ment of this fee does not increase the University charges made
in former years, as a like amount is deducted from the cost of
board and lodging for the first semester.
BOARD AND LODGING.-Board and lodging will be furnished
by the University at a cost of sixty dollars ($60.00) for the first
semester, not including the Christmas vacation, and sixty-four
dollars and fifty cents ($64.50) for the second semester. These
sums must be paid at the beginning of each semester. Board
and lodging will be furnished only by the semester and not by
the month. In very exceptional cases, arrangements may be
made to pay in three installments, payable in advance. This
includes meals in the dining-hall and room (with heat, light
and access to a bath room), furnished as stated below. The
dining-hall will be closed during the Christmas holidays.
RooM WITHOUT BOARD.-Students occupying a room in the
Dormitories, but not taking meals in the dining-hall, will be
charged $20.00 per semester for lodging.
FURNITURE.-All rooms are partially furnished. The furni-
ture consists of two iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier,
or bureau, table, washstand and chairs. The students are re-
quired to provide all other articles, including pillows, bedding,
wash bowl, pitcher, mirror, half curtains, mosquito-bar, etc.
BooKs.-The text-books used in the College of Law will, in
most cases, be found in the law library, but it will be necessary
for students to provide themselves with books for their daily
use. The cost of books is about forty-five dollars a year for
each year of the course. Nearly all the books are standard
texts and will form a nucleus of the student's future library.
DIPLOMA FEE.-No diploma fee is charged on graduation.
SUMMARY OF EXPENSES.-It will thus be seen that the total
minimum cost to the student of a year's work in the College of
Law, exclusive of books and laundry, is one hundred and sixty-
five ($165) dollars.
MILITARY DRILL AND DISCIPLINE.-Law students are ex-
cused from military drill and are not subject to military dis-
cipline.







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


REGISTER 1911-1912

SENIOR CLASS
Name. Postoffice. State or County.
Bowers, R. D .......... Gainesville ................ Alachua.
Buic, D. M ............ Bell....................... LaFayette.
Cason, F. W (B.S.) ..... Tampa.................... Hillsboro.
(Southern College.)
Donnell, E. B. (A.B.) ... Baton Rouge ............. .Louisiana.
(Peabody College.)
Fields, W P........... Hosford ................... Liberty.
Ferrell, H. A........... Apalachicola............... Franklin.
Godwin, J. L.......... Lyons..................... Georgia.
Harrison, W T........ Parrish.................... Manatee.
Keen, S. S.............Lake City ................Columbia.
King, R.............. Jacksonville ............... Duval.
Mershon, M L......... Gainesville ................ Alachua.
Moon, C. M ........... Kissimmee ................ Osceola.
McMullen, M A.......Largo.................... Pinellas.
O'Berry, M. L......... Kissimmee ................ Osceola.
Philips, A. E. (A.B.).... Fernandina ................Nassau.
(University of Tennessee.)
Price, W C............ M arianna ................. Jackson.
Randell, R. W ......... Madison .................. Madison.
Tranthanm, T. S........Camden ..................South Carolina.
W alker, W S.......... Jacksonville............... Duval.

JUNIOR CLASS
Bennett, A. C......... .Gainesville................ Alachua.
Black, L. W.......... .Grandin................... Putnam.
Brooks, A. C............Lake Butler ............... Bradford.
Bullock, J. R .......... Ocala ..................... M arion.
Christie, W. McL..... Jacksonville............... Duval.
Clayton, O. J ......... Aucilla................... Jefferson.
Coleman, H. K......... Tampa....................Hillsboro.
Cox, B. A............. Vernon................... .W ashington.
Crum L. D ............ Trilby .................... Pasco.
Diamond, C. P .........Cora..................... Santa Rosa.
Florence, J. W ......... Pensacola ................. Escambia.
Futch, Eli............. Gainesville ................ Alachua.
Garrett, G. P .......... Kissimmee ................ Osceola.
Gibson, J. B., Jr ...... River View ................ Hillsboro.
Hocker. F. R .......... Ocala ..................... M arion.
Househo der, E. F......Plant City................. Hillsboro.
Kennedy, W. M ........ Umatilla ...... ............ Lake.
Langston, B. G. (A.B.). .Chipley ................... Washington.
(University of Florida.)
Lawlcr, S. W., Jr.......Bartow ................... Polk,
Lischkoff, L. N ......... Pensacola ................. Escambia.
McCaskill, J. M ....... Sanford ................... Orange.
M iller, O. S............ Folkston .................. Georgia.
Mobley, Paul..........Punta Gorda ..............DeSoto.
Phipps, C. M. (A.B.)...Terra Ceia ................ Manatee.
(University of Mississippi.)
Riherd, F ............ Glasgow Junction.......... Kentucky.
W elch, C. L...........Tampa....................Hillsboro.
Wood, H. W .......... Arcadia .................. DeSoto.







COLLEGE OF LAW 23

SPECIAL STUDENTS
Name. Postofice. State or County.
Alderman, T. J....... Starke .................... Bradford.
Blackwelder, J. J...... Lake Butler .............. Bradford.
DeVane, E. C..........Plant City.......... ....... Hillsboro.
Graham, K. H......... Gainesville ................ Alachua.
Magaha, E. M .........Jay.................... .. Santa Rosa.
Mathis, B. V..........Ponce de Leon............. Holmes.
Shoemaker, J......... Gainesville ................ Alachua.


ALUMNI OF THE COLLEGE OF LAW
CLASS OF 1910
Name Occupation Address
E. C. Calhoun ............... Attorney ................ Perry, Fla.
L. P. Hardee ................ Attorney ................ Gainesville, Fla.
C. C. Small ................. Attorney ................ Lake City, Fla.


CLASS OF 1911
Syd. L. Carter, Jr............ Attorney ................ Gainesville, Fla.
Obie Crocker ................ County Judge............ Vernon, Fla.
Aaron S. Crews .............. Attorney ................ Starke, Fla.
C. Craig Epperson ........... Attorney ................ W illiston, Fla.
Floyd Green ................. Attorney ................ Bushnell, Fla.
Robert B. Huffaker............Attorney ............... Bartow, Fla.
Robert G. Johnston ..........Attorney ................ Kissimmee, Fla.
J. Lancelot Lester............ Attorney ................ Key W est, Fla.
Henry P. Osborne............ Attorney ................ Jacksonville, Fla.
Charles O. Rivers ............Attorney ................ Lake City, Fla.
Allen M Roland............. Teacher ................. W ildwood, Fla.
Cyrus Q. Stewart ............ Attorney ...............Ft. Myers, Fla.
Winder H. Surrency .......... Attorney ................ Jacksonville, Fla.
Leonidas E. Wade, Jr........ Attorney ............... Jacksonville, Fla.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA,
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA

The University of Florida, supported by the State and Fed-
eral Governments, offers instruction in the following Colleges:
1. College of Arts and Sciences, leading to degrees of B.A.
and B.S.
2. College of Agriculture, leading to the degree of B.S. in
Agriculture.
3. College of Engineering, leading to the degrees of B.S.
in Mechanical Engineering, B.S. in Electrical Engineering and
B.S. in Civil Engineering.
4. College of Law, leading to the degree of LL.B.
5. Teachers' College and Normal School, offering courses
leading to suitable degrees and certificates.
6. The Graduate School offers courses leading to the de-
grees of M.A. and M.S.


Beautiful Buildings and Attractive Campus.
Three more new buildings completed last year. Two addi-
tional, handsome structures nearing completion now, will be
ready for occupancy September 17, 1912. Contracts for the
History and Language Hall, to cost $40,000.00, and the George
Peabody Hall, for which the Peabody Board gave the Univer-
sity $40,000.00, will be let July the 3, 1912. Increase of nearly
300 per cent in enrollment during the past three years shows
fine optimistic and progressive spirit at the State University.
Fine moral tone. Exceptional advantages at lowest cost.
For catalogue address the President of the University.




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