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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00511
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: June 1916
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00511
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Full Text








University


of


Florida


GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


University


Summer


School


(Co-Educational)

Announcement


June


12-August 4,


1916


)















SUMMER SCHOOL



SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD
STATE SUPT. W. N. SHEATS, A.M., LL.D.
PRESIDENT A. A. MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D.
PRESIDENT EDWARD CONRADI, A.M., Ph.D.


FACULTY AND OFFICERS
A. A. MURPHREE, LL.D., President,
Director of Summer School.
JNO. A. THACKSTON, Ph.D., Dean,
Professor of Pedagogy.
HARVEY W. COX, Ph.D.,
Professor of Psychology and Philosophy.
C. L. CROW, Ph.D.,
Professor of Spanish and Portuguese Languages,
and South American Affairs.
G. CLYDE FISHER, Ph.D.,
Professor of Illustrated Courses in Bird and Nature Study.
JAS. M. CHAPMAN, D.O.,
Professor of Public Speaking and Expression.
W. S. CAWTHON, A.M.,
Professor of Physics and Higher Mathematics.
W. L. FLOYD, A.M.,
Professor of Science.
W. B. HATHAWAY, A.B.,
Professor of English.
E. L. ROBINSON, A.M.,
'U^ JP 1. r J








SUMMER SCHOOL

E. W. MCMULLEN, A.B.,
Professor of History and Civics.
W. E. KEEN,
Professor of Commercial Courses.
MISS NELLIE STEVENS,
Professor of Primary Methods.
MISS MARY CONNOR,
Professor of Music.


Drawing will be taught for one month by a special teacher of the
Prang Company.
Penmanship will be taught for one month by a special teacher of the
D. B. Berry Company.


MRS.


K. H. GRAHAM, Auditor.
M. B. HADLEY, Librarian.
MRS. S. J. SWANSON, Matron.
MISS MARY McROBBIE,
Graduate Nurse in Charge of Infirmary.
W. S. CAWTHON, Officer-in-Charge.
V. S. CAWTHON, Assistant Officer-in-Charge.


GIFTS


TO


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SCHOOL


Instructor in Spanish and,
University of Florida and the
their grateful appreciation of
lars ($300) from the Carnegie


Peace.
has secu
tuguese


In compliance with
red the services of s


Languages


and


South American Affairs.--The
Board of Control here record
the gift of three hundred dol-
Endowment for International
this gift the Board of Control
professor of Spanish and Por-


South


American Affairs for the


Summer School. Because of this gift the Summer School
will again be able to offer attractive courses in these sub-
iects which should annual to many students. (See courses








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


time to this splendid work.


(See other page for outline of


course.)


LOCATION


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


Gainesville, the seat of the University, a town of 10,000


inhabitants, possesses numerous advantages.


located and easy of
railroads of the State.


It is centrally


access, being reached by the leading
It has well paved, lighted and shaded


streets, an exceptionally pure water supply and a good sew-


erage system
hospitable.


1.


The citizens are energetic, progressive and


The moral atmosphere is wholesome, and for


many years the sale of intoxicants has been prohibited by


law.


All the leading denominations have attractive places


of worship.


GROUNDS AND


BUILDINGS


The


University


occupies


tract


hundred


and


thirteen acres, situated in the western extremity of Gaines-


ville.


Ninety acres of this tract are devoted to the campus,


drill-ground, and athletic fields; one hundred and seventeen
acres are utilized for the farm of the College of Agriculture;


remainder


used


Agricultural


Experiment


Station.


Eleven buildings have already been erected.


These are,


the order of


construction:


Two dormitories, known as


"Buckman


Shop;


Hall"


Science Hall;


and "Thomas Hall;"


the Mechanic Arts


the Agricultural Experiment


Station


Building;


Engineering Hall; the Gymnasium; the Agricul-


tural College Building; the dining hall or "University Com-


mons;"


Language


Hall;


"George Peabody


Hall,"


home of the Teachers' College and Normal School, and the


College of Law.


They are lighted with electricity, supplied


with city water, and furnished with modem improvements








SUMMER SCHOOL


Dormitory rooms are supplied with two good iron bed-


steads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, a table,


stand and chairs.


wash-


All students are required to provide for


themselves a pillow, bed linen, towels, and such other things
as they may want for their own special convenience.


PEABODY


HALL. Peabody


Hall,


home


Teachers' College, is a magnificent, three-story brick and
stone structure. It is modern in every respect as to equipment


and arrangements.


It contains all the lecture rooms, society


halls, reading rooms, laboratories and libraries that a mod-


ern college of this kind needs.


With such facilities at its


command nothing can hinder the college from realizing its
aims.


LIBRARY.-The


general library of


University con-


tains about 16,000 volumes of well selected books to which


the Summer School students have free access.
gogical Library will be of special interest to


The Peda-
them, for it


contains many books on educational


theory, general


and


special methods, history of education, psychology and phil-


osophy.


In the reading room are more than a hundred of


best general and technical periodicals.


Here also are


received the leading newspapers of the State.
PSYCHOLOGICAL LABORATORY.-The new Psychological


Laboratory is placed in the Peabody


Hall.


This will give


teachers


wonderful


opportunity


investigate


first


hand the great laws of the mind.


To know these through


experiment


will


give the teachers a far greater power to


direct properly their development in the child.


The labor-


atory will contain all of the appliances and apparatus neces-
sary for thorough and efficient work in experimental psy-
chology.
TEACHERS' EMPLOYMENT BIUREAUI.-Tt is the nuroose of








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


boards are requested to correspond with us when in need of
well-trained and efficient teachers.


CORRESPONDENCE


COURSES


FOR


TEACHERS.


The


Teachers'


College


now


conducting


several


attractive


courses by correspondence.


Write for special bulletin.


FOLLOWING


COURSES


FOR


COUNTY


CERTIFICATES


EXPLANATION


A. H., Agricultural Hall;


, Language Hall.


ABBREVIATIONS


, Science Hall; P. H., Peabody Hall; L.


Figures denote rooms.


AGRICULTURE.-A general
will introduce the student to t


mon


diseases of


plants,


insects,


course


study
farm


in agriculture.


This


soil, plants, com-


crops,


domestic


ani-


mals, and such like.


rural


schools


will


Methods of teaching agriculture in the


stressed.


Th.


3:35


Prof.


Floyd.
BEGINNER'S ALGEBRA.--Elementary course covering the
fundamental operations, simple and simultaneous equations,


factoring,
Cawthon.


and


fractions.


Th. F


2:35


.H. 31


. Prof.


ADVANCED


ALGEBRA.-Involution, evolution,


equations, progressions,


ratio and


proportion.


quadratic
. T. W. F.


10:35 L. H. 23.


Prof. Corr.


ARITHMETIC.-A thorough review of arithmetic is made,


that


student may


view


it from


both


teacher's and


child's point of view.


nominate


Common


numbers, percentage,


Land
and


decimal fractions, de-
ll other subjects cov-


ered by the text-books adopted by the


State.


Principles and


methods of teaching


arithmetic


thoroly


gone


over.


Three Sections:








SUMMER SCHOOL


stressed.


How to


teach


subject.


2:35


Prof.


McMullen.


ENGLISH


COMPOSITION.-Two


covers all matter in Huntington'


Sections.


Elements of


Each


section


Composition.


10:35 L. H.


Sec. 1.
Sec. 2.


Th.


4:35 P


Prof. Himes.


. H. 28.


Prof. Hathaway


ENGLISH GRAMMAR.-


Two Sections.


Each section cov-


ers all matter in Hyde's Book II.


Sec. 1.
Sec. 2.


Th. F. 8:00 L. H.


Th.


9:35 P


Prof. Himes.


. H. 28.


Prof. Hathaway


HYGIENE.


-Special


importance of


efforts


hygiene


impress


and


sanitation.


teacher


How


with
keep


well and physically efficient is the special aim of this course.


Th.


9:35 L. H.


Prof. Corr.


PEDAGOGY.-School


management, general


methods of teaching, elementary principles of


and


child


special
nature,


school


hygiene


and


sanitation, personality


of teacher, rela-


tion of school and community, and other practical pedagog-


ical


questions.


. Th.


. 11:35


'. H.


Prof.


Thackston.


PHYSICAL


GEOGRAPHY.-The main features


of the ordi-


nary text-book in physical geography will be studied.


Along


with


this


stress


will


placed


on the effects


pt


features have on man-his commercial and social life.


will


be correlated


with


agriculture.


lysical
This


3:30


Prof. Floyd.
POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY.-Special attention will be given


Florida


and


relation


view of the geography of


Instruction


will


other


the United


given


states.
States


use of


thoro


and


text-books,


world.
maps,


globes, industrial products, stereoscope, post-cards and news-


papers.


Th.F


4:35 L. H. 23.


Prof. Corr.


.W,




I
!M


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


read well to their classes.
teaching reading are given.
Hathaway.


rThe methods and principles of
Th. F. 10:35 P. H. 28. Prof.


U.S.
view of
Sec.
Sec.


HISTORY.-Two Sections,
State-adopted book.
1. M. T.W. F. 8:00 L. H.
2. T.W. Th.F. 1:35 L. H


I
.


each covering thoro re-

1. Prof. McMullen.
11. Prof. McMullen.


FLORIDA HISTORY.-Adopted book
W. Th. 2:35 L. H. 22. Prof. McMullen.


will


covered.


For the above courses
used. These text-books x
questions in the Florida U
Certificates beginning Jur


-n


the
vill b
*nifor
ie 6th


following text-books will be
e used also as a basis for the
rm Examinations for County
i and Sept 5th, 1916.


These and all other books for the Summer School may
be obtained at the University Book Store, Language Hall.
Algebra-Milne's High School.
Theory and Practice-Lincoln's Everyday Pedagogy.
Arithmetic-Milne's Progressive, Book III.
Grammar-Hyde's Two Book Course in English, Book II.
Florida History-Bennett and Brevard's.
Civil Government-James and Sanford's Our Govern-


ment.
Geography-Frye's Higher Geography.
Agriculture-Duggar's Agriculture for Sot
Physiology-Rithcie's Human Physiology.
Composition-Huntington's Elements of C
Reading-Any text.
Physical Geography-Maury-Simond's.
Orthography-Aswell's New Century Spe
History--Our Republic.


ithern Schools.


composition .


ller.


The following courses of study lead to the State Certifi-
cate, and to normal and professional credits, which may be










ng"" zw-Q
IV'-i
WTb~
11 IrA5iL~


This is a bird's-eye view of the University campus as it is being developed. Already more than six hundred
thousand dollars have been invested on permanent improvements here, and other buildings are going up as fast
as needed and funds permit.














H---- ^BI-.~~rp~.-_~--`
THOMASHALL, OneofheDormtoriesompletd 1

THMA HL, neo-- t--D;ormitories *ompete 1
THOMAS HALL, One of the Dormitories, Completed 1906















al1.


1a


i~+


11uI(


PEABODY HALL, Where Summer School is Conducted, Completed 1914


* 1 i



































THE COMMONS


^
^








SUMMER SCHOOL


SOLID
Buchholz.


PLANE
Prof. Corr.


GEOMETRY.-T.


TRIGONOMETRY.-M.


Th. F. 2:35 P. H. 1.


Th. F. 1:35


Prof.


H. 23.


PHYSICS.-A gene
standard secondary
stations, and a limit
work. M. T. W. T


H. 1.


4


1 11


rai course sucn as is usually given in
schools-lectures, recitations, demon-
ited amount of individual laboratory
i. 10:35. Laboratory W. F. 3:35-5:30 P.


Prof. Cawthon.


BEGINNERS' LATIN.-M. T. W.
Robinson.


CAESAR.-In this c
studied. Composition.
Robinson.


Th. 1:35 P. H. 21.


:ourse three books will be
M. T. W. Th. 2:35 P. H. 21.


Prof.


thoroly
Prof.


VIRGIL.-Three books of Virgil are read and, in addition,
prose composition will be given. M. W. Th. F. 8:00 P. H.
21. Prof. Robinson.
RHETORIC.-A general course in composition and rhet-
oric. M. T. W. F. 3:35 P. H. 28. Prof. Hathaway.
ENGLISH LITERATURE.-The history of English Litera-
ture as outlined by Halleck's New English Literature will
be given. T. W. Th. F. 11:35 L. H. Prof. Himes.
METHODS IN ENGLISH.-This course will cover the best
modern methods of teaching English in primary and gram-
mar grades, with attention given to teaching of reading,
language and grammar. M. T. W. Th. 3:35 L. H. 23. Prof.
Himes.
PSYCHOLOGY.--A beginner's course in psychology with
applications to teaching. M. T. W. Th. 8:00 P. H. 17. Prof.
Cox.


ZOOLOGY.-In connection with th<
snreimrens illustration the differe


text-book study, typi-
nt (roun.s will ha cdis-


enl


L








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


be taken when repr
will be collected and
Prof. Floyd.
HORTICULTURE. -
demonstrations with
gating plants by me


esentative
identified.


types
M.


important families
W. Th. 4:35 S. H. 1.


- Plant Propagation. Lectures and
field practice will be given in propa-
ans of cuttings, buds, grafts, layers, etc.


Testing seeds, the influence
perature on germination and s
cal processes will be included.
lege credit. M. T. W.F. 9:35
GENERAL HISTORY.--This
survey of the world's history


of depth, moisture, and tem-
ome fundamental physiologi-
This may be taken for col-
A.H.1. Prof. Floyd.
course will make a general
with special stress upon the


most important events. M. T. Th. F. 10:35 L. H. 11. F
McMullen.
COLLEGE ALGEBRA.-Selected topics of algebra tha
beyond the high school course. M. T. W. Th. 11:35 P
31. Prof. Cawthon.
ELEMENTARY GERMAN.-A course in the grammar
composition of the language, suited to the requirement
beginners and of those wishing to review the subject.
T. W. Th. F. 10:35 P. H. 1. Prof. Buchholz.


'rof.


t lie
'. H.

and
s of
M.


BIRD-STUDY,
in cooperation
Societies. Work
tinue four week
know the birds


teen


(or twentyZ


course in


Bird-Study,


conducted


with the National Association of Audubon
Sto begin Monday, July 10, 1916, and to con-
:s. Courses designed for those who wish to
and for those who teach nature-study. Fif-
) lectures, and daily field trips. Some of the


topics to be considered in


lectures


as follows:


An-


cestry; classification of the birds of
anatomy with special reference to
are most used in classification; rel
and feeding habits; plumage and


eastern North America;
the external parts which
ation between structure
moults; songs; nesting


hahift- fnnrl with roforonrs tn prnnnmir vr alan.


th nrion


nnd








SUMMER SCHOOL


handbook, so that they may continue the stb
dently.
As a part of the field-work, special attention
to the identification of trees and all kinds of ]
are concerned with the life-history of birds.
Field or opera glasses will be very useful in
Conducted by George Clyde Fisher, Ph.l


Curator, American Museum of Na
PRIMARY METHODS.-This C
methods, as applied to work in
the public schools. Drawing and
to each subject in this group to be
tor.) Daily 10:35-12-30 and 4:35 A.
The examinations this year on


idy


indepen-


will be paid
plants which

this course.
D., Assistant


tural History.
ourse includes primary
the first three grades of
singing. (Time devoted
arranged by the instruc-
H. 10. Prof. Stevens.
Primary Methods will be


based on "Class Teaching and Management," by William E.
Chancellor.
"Augsburg's Drawing System," Book I.
Nature Study and Life, by Hodge.
Miss Arnold's Waymarks for Teachers.


COMMERCIAL COURSES


For the first tim
nounce Commercih
Bookkeeping thru 1
Shorthand thru the


ie the Summer School is now
dl Courses. Fees for these are


the term for _
term for ....


-


Commercial Arithmetic thru the t
Any two of the above combined :
All three of above combined for
Prof. W. E. Keen, head of the
Palm Beach High School, will be
jects in theSummer School. He


able to an-
as follows:
- .....$ 5.00
.-. -. 5.00
..... 5.00
--. 7.50
--_ 10.00


commercial department of
! the teacher of these sub-


is a man of


of successful experience in this line of work.
SPANISH.-Elementarv Course. -Drills in pronunciation


:erm for
for -...


a .- -- - -


thirteen years








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


dictation,


daily written exercises,


laries and short poems, translation.


memorizing of vocabu-
Daily 8:00 L. H. 9. Prof.


Crow.


SOUTH AMERICAN GEOGRAPHY


Course. -Correlation


physical


AND
with


HISTORY.-Lecture


political


and cornm-


mercial


geography;


history,


institutions


and customs;


ternational relations, especially those with the United States.


M. F. 11:35 L. H. 9.


Prof. Crow.


SPANISH.-Intermediate or Advanced Course.-The char-
acter of the course will depend largely upon the needs of


the students taking it.


Daily 3:35 L. H. 9.


Prof. Crow.


PHILOSOPHY Ib.-Experimental Psychology.--This course


will be mainly laboratory work.


The student learns to work


with the standard apparatus and becomes somewhat famil-
iar with the current problems in Experimental Psychology.
Special attention will be given to methods of psychological


investigations


and


collection


and


treatment


data.


Five hours to be arranged.


P. H. 17.


Prof. Cox.


PHILOSOPHY IIIb.- The Philosophical Poets.--A study of
philosophical problems and their solution as given by


world'


greatest


poets.


Such


problems


Creation,


Nature, Life, Freedom and Conduct will be given special at-


tention.


Daily 10:35 P. H. 19.


Prof. Cox.


PHILOSOPHY


IVb.-Abnormal Psychology.--A study


the abnormal phases of mental life.


Such topics as dreams,


illusions, hallucinations, suggestion, hypnotism, hysteria, dis-


eases of the memory, diseases of the will, etc.


tention will be given to mental hygiene.


Daily


Special at-
11:35 P. H.


Prof. Cox.
MUSIC AND ORATORY
Music.-The University Summer School is again offer-


nnViirocQ


in mli1i1i


Thaa


. .* rl i *lth..fl l .*lUUIl t.. *


courses should annual to a








SUMMER SCHOOL


school pupils.


In addition to this courses will be offered in


both class and private instruction in voice culture, piano,
violin, and history of music.


On


account of


charged for this work.


the lack of public funds, a fee will be


Those who are interested in


this


work


should


Miss


Mary


Connor


arriving at


University.


EXPRESSION


AND


PUBLIC SPEAKING.-In the courses of-


fered


particular attention


will be


given


establishing a


correct method of breathing, to correcting faulty articula-


tion,


and


teaching


principles


voice, gesture, and facial expression.


of interpretation by
In these studies spe-


cial attention will be given to preparing teachers for carry-
ing on this work in the public schools.


account


lack


funds


small tuition


charged.


Those interested see Prof. J. M. Chapman.


TEXT- BOOKS
The above courses that lead to the State Certificate Ex-


amination


will


based


upon


following


text-books.


These, as well as the texts for the other courses,


may be


secured at the University Book Store in Language Hall.
Plane and Solid Geometry-Milne's.
Trigonometry-Wentworth's Plane.


Physics-Carhart & Chute's.


Botany-Bergen'


The First Principles of.


Elements of (Southern States Edition).


Zoology-Colton's Descriptive and Practical.


Latin-Allen & Greenough'


New Grammar.


Caesar.
Virgil.


(Three books.)
(Three books.)


Any text will answer.
Any text will answer.


English.Literature-Halleck's New.
Halleck's Psychology and Psychic Culture.
General History-Myers' Revised Edition.








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


tures on Civic Biology will be of vital interest to


principals


and high school teachers.


Those on


Nature


Study


will


of special value to grade teachers.


Evenings he will deliver


lectures of more general interest. Dr. Hodge
most able men America has produced in the


is one


field


social


sciences;


and so much in demand that it was with much dif-


ficulty that the University secured his services for
short time.


even


this


The


SPORTS
swimming


THE


pool,


SUMMER


gymnasium


SCHOOL


and


cement


tennis


courts will be at the service of


all Summer School students.


These places of recreation and pleasure should be


constant-


ly frequented by all those
It is probable that there i


who attend


vill


Summer


in charge of


these


School.
amuse-


ment places a skilled and trained director who will give his
time toward teaching lessons in swimming and special phys-


ical culture work.


If it is possible to organize classes in this


kind of work it will be necessary


to charge


a small


carrying


However,


opportunities


will


great that all should be glad to take advantage of them.

REGULATIONS


When


credit


or extension


certificates


desired


following


regulations established


Summer


School


Board must be followed:


1. No teacher shall be allowed to take more than twenty
hours per week of purely academic subjects.


No teacher shall take less


than five


hours


per week


of professional work.


The


maximum


hours


week,


including


profes-


sional,
exceed


vocational


and


twenty-seven


academic subjects, shall, in no case,


hours


per


week.


Two


laboratory


han r-o Fta K-a nan I*nA n-o a*nni lit nin- n o ra rmn* nnrlffrlt








SUMMER SCHOOL


EXTENSION


OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES


Section Six of a recent Act of the Legislature provides:


"All teachers attending any


one of the


summer schools


herein created and whose work entitles them to credit there-


from upon making proof of the same to any
intendent of Public Instruction in this State


County


are


titled to one year's extension on any teacher's
they may hold and which has not fully expired."


Super-


hereby en-
Scertificate


Under


this


section


law,


no certificate


credit


making proof of the work done will be granted by the State


Superintendent and the Presidents of the


Summer


Schools,


except to those teachers who attend the full term and whose
work shall be satisfactory to the faculty concerned.


CREDIT


TOWARDS NORMAL SCHOOL


AND COLLEGE


DEGREES


Section Five of Summer School Act is as follows:


"All work performed at the
of such character as to en


said
Title


Summer


Schools shall


students doing


same to collegiate, normal or professional cr
and may be applied toward making a degree."


edit


therefore,


who


expect


to occupy


dormitory


rooms,


which in


every case are comfortable


and


commodious,


should


make


reservations as soon as possible.


For room reservations and general information as to
Summer School, address


JNO. A.


THACKSTON,


Dean of Teachers' College,
Gainesville, Fla.


be


I










Uniniversity


of


Florida


Gainesville,


Florida


Normal


School


and


Teachers'


College


REVIEW COURSES
A ONE-YEAR COURSE
A TWO-YEAR ELEMENTARY PROFESSIONAL COURSE
REGULAR FOUR-YEAR NORMAL COURSE
COURSE LEADING TO AN A.B. DEGREE IN EDUCATION
COURSE LEADING TO A B.S. DEGREE IN EDUCATION
THE SUMMER SCHOOL




For information write,
A ft Cf p- rTr *W4WTii rnr^ T 'T Sr- 4


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