Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00506
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1917
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00506
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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University of Florida
GAINESVILLE. FLORIDA


Catalog 1916-17
Announcements 1917-18









r -




CONTENTS

PAGE
UNIVERSITY CALENDAR................................ .......... ................ 3
ADMINISTRATIVE AND EXECUTIVE BOARDS.................... 4
OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY .................... ................ 5


STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY...
MILITARY ORGANIZATION................... .....
GENERAL INFORMATION......--..........
RECENT GIFTS.................. ..-- ---
H ISTORY.... .........- ..... ...............
LOCATION ... ------- -. ... ......... .. ...
INCOME ........... --- ..--...................
EQUIPMENT ................ .. .... ..
GOVERNM ENT ........... ........ .... .. -- .. ..............
HONORS ......... ......... ... ... .. --....
EXPENSES ...... ............... ...... ....... ...............
FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUND.........
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION........................................
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS............
ADMISSION ..........................
ORGANIZATION ............ .......-
GRADUATE SCHOOL...............
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE....
COLLEGE ............................ ...
EXPERIMENT STATION...............
DIVISION OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING.....
COLLEGE OF LAW...........................
TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL C'HO-C'I
C OLLEGE ........................ .................
NORMAL SCHOOL. ............. .........
PRACTICE HIGH SCHOOL............
STATE HIGH-SCHOOL INSPECTION...
TEACHERS' EMPLOYMENT BUREAU.
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL................
UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL.........
REGISTER
DEGREES AND HONORS.......................
ROLL OF STUDENTS .. ..... ..
SUMMARY ... ...- .. .
INDEX ... .. ... .. ... ...


........................... 10
...... ............... 11
.......................... 1I
- .- .................... 1 1
--.. .............-.... 14
----.......-- ...-- ... 14
--.. ....-- ......- 1 .5
......---.---.. ..... 20
................ .......... 27
... .................... 28
-...-----.......-- ...... .. 31
......................... 32















UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1917-1918
1917-June 11, Monday ..... ............Summer School begins.
August 3, Friday ..... .. ...... Summer School ends.
September 17, Monday ....................Summer Recess ends.
Examinations for Admission.
Registration of Students.
September 18, Tuesday.......................First Semester begins.
September 24, Monday........................School for County Demon-
stration Agents begins.
October 2, Tuesday................................Citrus Seminar begins.
October 6, Saturday, 1:30 p. m...........Re-examinations.
2:30 p. m...........Meeting of General Faculty.
November 29, Thursday........................Thanksgiving Holiday.
December 4, Tuesday ..........................Boys' Club Week begins.
December 20, Thursday, 11:30 a. m...Christmas Recess begins.
1918-January 1, Tuesday ...........................Christmas Recess ends.
January 2, Wednesday ...........-..--..Resumption of Classes.
Review Courses for Teachers
begin.
January 8, Tuesday ........................Ten-Day Course for Farmers
begins.
January 16, Wednesday...................... Stockmen's Institute begins.
January 26, Saturday......................... First Semester ends.
i January 28, Monday................ ........Second Semester begins.
February 9, Saturday, 2:30 p. m.........Meeting of General Faculty.
March 2, Saturday, 1:30 p. m.............Re-examinations.
June 1, Saturday, 2:30 p. m............... Meeting of General Faculty.
June 2 to 4..................................... Commencement Exercises.
June 2, Sunday .................................Baccalaureate Sermon.
June 3, Monday............................. Oratorical Contests.
Annual Alumni Meeting.
Class-Day Exercises.
June 4, Tuesday............................Graduating Day.
June 5, Wednesday............................Summer Recess begins.
June 7, Friday................................. Examinations for Admission.
June 10, Monday .............................Summer School begins.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BOARD OF CONTROL

P. K YONGE, Chairm an-...................... ...........................
......-.....President, Southern States Land and Lumber Co., Pensacola
T. B. KING............... .............. President, First National Bank, Arcadia
E. L. WARTMANN............................................ Planter and Stock Raiser, Citra
W. D. FINLAYSON..........Planter and President, Old Town Bank, Old Town
F. E. JENNINGS............................................. ............... -Lawyer, Jacksonville
J. G. KELLUM, Secretary to the Board............... ...... ......- ...
........Clerk of the House and Business Manager, State College
for Women, Tallahassee.



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

SYDNEY J. CATTS, Chairman.................- ........ ....... ...................... Governor
H. CLAY CRAWFORD...--...--------.... ---....--.....---... ..-.......-......-Secretary of State
J. C. LUNING --.--------....-.. .----- -...- --- --. ........... State Treasurer
T. F. W EST........................ ................................ ............. A ttorney-General
W. N. SHEATS, Secretary..........State Superintendent of Public Instruction


UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

ALBERT A. MURPHREE, LL. D...............................President of the University
JAS. M. FARR, Ph. D...................................Vice-President of the University
JAS. N. ANDERSON, Ph. D.............Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
P. H. ROLFS, M. S.....................................Dean of the College of Agriculture
Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station
J. R. BENTON, Ph. D.............................Dean of the College of Engineering
HARRY R. TRUSLER, LL. B...................................Dean of the College of Law
HARVEY W. Cox, Ph. D .......................................Dean of the Teachers College



SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD

W. N. SHEATS, LL. D................State Superintendent of Public Instruction
A. A. MURPHREE, LL. D.................................President University of Florida
EDWARD CONRADI, LL. D.........................President State College for Women


1/ /







OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY



ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D.,
President.

JAMES MARION FARR, A.M., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of English Language and Literature.

EDWARD RAWSON FLINT, Ph.D. (G6ttingen), M.D. (Harvard),
Professor of Chemistry and Resident Physician.
JOHN ROBERT BENTON, B.A., Ph.D. (G6ttingen),
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, M.A., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of Ancient Languages.
CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, M.A., Ph.D. (G6ttingen),
Professor of Modern Languages and Secretary of the General Faculty.
PETER HENRY ROLFS, M.S.,
Director of the Experiment Station and of the
Division of University Extension.
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, B.S., M.S.,
Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture and
Professor of Botany and Horticulture.
JOHN MARCUS SCOTT, M.S.,
Vice-Director and Animal Industrialist to the Experiment Station.
HERBERT SPENCER DAVIS, Ph.D. (Harvard),
Professor of Zoology and Bacteriology.
MAJOR EDGAR SMITH WALKER, U.S.A. (Retired),
Commandant of Cadets and Professor of .Ili.'t.l.I Science and Tactics.
S BAYARD FRANKLIN FLOYD, A.M.,
Plant Physiologist to the Experiment Station.
HERBERT GOVERT KEPPEL, A.B., Ph.D. (Clark),
Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy.
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B.,
Professor of Law.
JOSEPH RALPH WATSON, A.M.,
Entomologist to the Experiment Station.
HARVEY WARREN COX, A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard),
Professor of Philosophy and Education.
HAROLD EDWIN STEVENS, M. S.,
Plant Pathologist to the Experiment Station.







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


STANLEY E. COLLISION, M.S.,
Chemist to the Experiment Station.
ROBERT WILLIAM THOROUGHGOOD, C.E. (Lehigh),
Professor of Civil Engineering.
CLAUDE LEAKE WILLOUGHBY, B.Agr.,
Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying.
CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B. (Michigan),
Professor of Law.
LUDWIG WILHELM BUCHHOLZ, A.M.,
Professor of Education and School Management.
CHARLES KENNEDY McQUARRIE,
State Agent in Charge of Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work
and Farmers' Institutes.

ARTHUR PERCEVAL SPENCER, M.S.,
Assistant Director of the Experiment Station.

WALTER LEE SUMMERS, A.B.,,LL.B., Jur.Dr. (Yale),
Professor of Law.
RICHARD E. CHANDLER, M.E., M.M.E. (Cornell),
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Drawing.
NEWELL LEROY SIMS, A.M:, Ph.D. (Cornell),
Professor of Sociology and Political Science.
JOHN EDWIN TURLINGTON, B.Agr., M.S., Ph.D.,
Profesor of Agronomy.
WILLIAM STANMORE CAWTHON, A.M.,
State High-School Inspector.
OTHO CLIFFORD AULT, A.B.,
Associate Professor of History and Economics.
OLEY W. WEAVER, B.S.,
Professor in Charge of 'Agricultural Journalism and Correspondence
Courses and Editor of Agricultural News Service.
CONSTANTINE DEMETRIUS SHERBAKOFF, M.S., Ph.D. (Cornell),
Assistant Plant Pathologist to the Experiment Station.
JAMES MADISON CHAPMAN, D.O.,
Assistant Professor of Oratory and Public Speaking.
SETH S. WALKER, M.S.,
Assistant Chemist to the Experiment Station.
FRANCIS MARION RAST, JR., B.S., M S.A..
Assistant Professor of Soils and Fertili:eis.
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, A.B., A.M. (Harvard),
Assistant Professor of Education.







OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


GARVIN LEON HERRINGTON, B. S.,
State Agent for Boys' Clubs.
HORACE SMITH McLENDON, B.S.,
District Agent for Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work in
Central and South Florida.
E. W. JENKINS,
District Agent for Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work in
North and West Florida.
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, A.B.,
Instructor in Physics and Electrical Engineering.
ALBERT J. STRONG,
Instructor in Mechanic Arts and Foreman of Shops.
WILLIAM BYRON HATHAWAY, A.B., B.D.,
Instructor in English, Latin, and Spanish.
C. J. McCOY, A.B.,
Instructor in Gymnastics and Physical Director.
JAY JOHN GRIMM, B.S.,
Instructor in Chemistry.
EARL RAIMON STIVERS, C.E. (Wisconsin),
Instructor in Civil Engineering.
CHARLES AXTELL HUNTER, B.S., M.S.,
Instructor in Botany and Bacteriology.
FRED F. HALMA, B.S.,
Assistant Horticulturalist to the Experiment Station.
JULIUS MATZ, B.S.,
Laboratory Assistant in Plant Pathology to the Experiment Station.
HERBERT LAWRENCE DOZIER, B.S.,
Laboratory Assistant in Entomology to the Experiment Station.
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, A.B.,
Fellow and Assistant in English.
CECIL HOUSTON LICHLITER, A.B.,
Fellow and Assistant in History.
JESSE CARLISLE NIXON, B.S.,
Fellow and Assistant in Mathematics.
THOMAS JEFFERSON OVERSTREET, A.B.,
Fellow and Assistant in Mathematics.
CHARLES MADISON MANN,
Student Assistant in Dairying.
GORDON HART,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry.
FORD LESLIE THOMPSON,
Student Assistant in Agricultural Correspondence Courses.







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


JOHN STOTHOFF WYCKOFF, JR.,
Student Assistant in Physics and Electrical Engineering.
SIDNEY DANIEL PADGETT,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Psychology.
LEWIS JOHN STADLER,
Laboratory Assistant in Dairying to the Experiment Station.
MISS MARY C. CONNER,
Instructor in Violin and Voice and Director of Glee Club.


JOHN A. THACKSTON, A.B., Pd.M., Ph.D. (New York University),*
Dean and Professor of Education and Psychology.
G. CLYDE FISHER, Ph.D.,*
Professor of Bird Study.
E. L. ROBINSON, A.M.,*
Professor of Latin.
I. I. HIMES, B.S.,*
Professor of English.
P. W. CORR, A.B., LL.D.,*
Professor of Mathematics and Science.
E. W. McMULLEN, A.B.,*
Professor of History and Civics.
MISS NELLIE STEVENS,*
Professor of Primary Methods.
W. E. KEEN,*
Instructor in Commercial Courses.
MISS EMMA CHANDLER,*
Instructor in Drawing.
MRS. LUCY M. BERRY,*
Instructor in Penmanship.

MISS AGNES ELLEN HARRIS, B.S.,
State Agent for Home Demonstration Work.
MISS SARAH WARING PARTRIDGE,
District Agent for Home Demonstration Work in Central and South Florida.
MISS HARRIET B. LAYTON,
District Agent for Home Demonstration Work in North and West Florida.
MISS MINNIE FLOYD,
Poultry Club Agent.
ALBERT H. LOGAN, D.V.S.,
U. S. Veterinary Field Agent, Bureau of An..,,al Ird-.rt,.
*Summer School, 1916.
Division of University Extension.







STANDING COMMITTEES


KLEIN H. GRAHAM,
Auditor and Purchasing Agent.
MILTON BRUCE HADLEY, A.B.,
Librarian.
T. VAN HYNING,
Curator of Museum and Librarian to the Experiment Station.
MISS WILLIE B. ELLIS, A.B.,
Registrar.
MRS. S. J. SWANSON,
Matron.
MISS MARY McROBBIE,
Graduate Nurse in Charge of the Infirmary.
MRS. MARGARET PEELER,
Assistant Matron.
MISS ALICE L. SALOMON,
Secretary to the President.
MISS ELEANOR G. SHAW,
Secretary to the Experiment Station.
MISS LENA R. HUNTER,
Assistant to the Auditor.
HERBERT M. WILLIAMS,
Bookkeeper and Cashier.


STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY
The President of the University is ex officio a member of all Standing
Committees.
ADMISSION.-Professors Keppel, Farr, Crandall, Davis, and Ault.
ATHLETICS.-Professors Summers, Cox, Walker, Ault, and Rast.
DISCIPLINE.-Professors Flint, Walker, Cox, Summers, and Cawthon.
GRADUATE WORK.-Professors Anderson, Farr, Rolfs, Benton, Trus-
Icr, and Cox.
LItRARY.-Professors Farr, Keppel, Sims, and Chandler, and Mr.
Hadley.
PUBLIC FUNCTIONS.-Professors Davis, Floyd, Crow, Stivers, and
Grimm.
PUBLICITY.-Professors Willoughby, Turlington, Hathaway, and
Grimm, and Mr. Weaver.
SCHEDULE.-Professors Thoroughgood, Flint, Cawthon, Perry, and
Hunter.
SELF-HELP.-Professors Floyd, Thoroughgood, Buchholz, Perry, and
Hunter.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS.-Professors Buchholz, Willoughby, Cran-
dall, Sims, and Chandler.
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS.-Professors Benton, Crow, Farr, and
Trusler.
UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS.-Professors Crow, Turlington, Hathaway,
and Strong, and Mr. Weaver.







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


MILITARY ORGANIZATION

MAJOR E. S. WALKER, U. S. Army, Retired,
Professor of Military Science and Tactics.
FIRST SERGEANT EMMETT H. JONES, U. S. Army, Retired,
Assistant to the Professor of Military Science and Tactics.

FIELD, STAFF, AND NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF
T. J. BARNS....................................................................M major
L. A. GRAY ............... ------ ...........First Lieutenant and Adjutant
J. S. WYCKOFF, JR.................................First Lieutenant and Quartermaster
F. G. M ERRIN............... .............................. ........................Sergeant M major
W E. CARUTHERS.............................. ............................... Color Sergeant


Company "A"

G. R. BAILEY


F. R. EDWARDS


J. T. CLARK


R. STOUTAMIRE


J. D. HOWZE
T. M. PALMER
P. BAKER
R. T. HARGRAVE
A. B. CROSBY
R. K. DAVIS


H. H. McCALLUM
J. K. FULLER
J. R. GUNN
H. C. YONGUE
L. H. WILSON
W. S. HONAKER


Company B"
CAPTAINS
J. K. SPARKMAN
FIRST LIEUTENANTS
F. M. DEVANE
SECOND LIEUTENANTS
J. N. WHITFIELD
FIRST SERGEANTS
H. G. FORD
SERGEANTS
W. H. CATES
W. P. JERNIGAN
H. G. POWELL
F. D. MORRISH
G. H. FRITZ
H. G. HAMILTON
CORPORALS
K. F. HUGHES
W. P. HAYMAN
W. H. FORD
G. H. DICKIE
M. W. BRANCH
E. B. CASLER


Company C"

J. A. MIXSON


H. C. GORDON


E. W. MATHEWS


J. W. DALTON


R. A. HARRIS, JR.
B. F. WHITNER
A. P. MARSHALL
Y. T. MUNROE
R. CROSBY
R. L. ROBINSON


J. R. COWSERT
W. E. STONE
M. E. ELLIS
A. P. BOSANQUET
R. S. ROOD
C E. Du NCA N


FIELD MUSIC
O. MANECKE D. B. CHAMPION --

BAND
L. Y. DYRENFORTH, Chief Musician, F.L.HOLLAND, Pr,,r,,uil M.I,,ii ir,,
H. G. REDSTONE, Sergeant and Drum Maljo.r.
SERGEANTS--F. L. THOMPSON, D. A. STORMS, P.E. WEIER. H. E. WooV:
CORPORALS-B. E. SHULL, E. R. MORROW, F. L. KNOwr'., S. SilLiL,
W. E. ROBINSON, R. M. SWANSON, H. C. CRAwror.r., .IF:.
DRUM CORPS
J. KNAUER, In Charge.
R. H. COBB, A. C. ROGERS, C. P. LOVELL, Jr H. W. SHAID






HISTORY


GENERAL INFORMATION


RECENT GIFTS
The facilities of many of the state educational institutions
of the South have in recent years been increased by substan-
tial gifts. With deep gratitude the University acknowledges
that it also has profited by this generosity. It feels confident
that other broad-minded persons will desire to help in its
upbuilding. All gifts, of whatever nature or value, will be
gladly received and acknowledged.
Chair of Secondary Education.-This opportunity is taken
of acknowledging the annual gift by the General Education
Board, of New York, of seventeen hundred and fifty dollars
($1,750) toward the establishment and maintenance of a
Professorship of Secondary Education.
Instructorship of Spanish, Portuguese, and South Ameri-
can Affairs.-The University gratefully acknowledges the
gift from the Carnegie Foundation for International Peace
of nine hundred dollars ($900), used in securing the services
of a teacher of Spanish and Portuguese and of South Amer-
ican Affairs" in the Summer School, sessions of 1915, 1916,
and of 1917.
Instructorship of Bird-Study.-This opportunity is taken
of thanking the National Association of Audubon Societies
for making it possible to offer a course in Bird-Study dur-
ing the 1915 and 1916 sessions of the Summer School.
Schola'rships.-No method of contributing to the spread
of higher education is wiser or more beneficent than to give
a worthy and ambitious young man the opportunity of avail-
ing himself of the advantages offered by his state university.
The establishment of several scholarships is gratefully
acknowledged. A list of these and the names of the donors
will be found on pages 31 and 32.

HISTORY
Beginning with its territorial days Florida has always
manifested interest in higher education, and with this in
mind has formulated many plans and established many insti-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


tutions. As early as 1824 the foundation of a university
was discussed by the Legislative Council. In 1836 trustees
for a proposed university were named, but these seem to
have accomplished nothing. (Memoirs of Florida, 1,168.)
Upon its admission to the Union in 1845, the State was
granted by the general government nearly a hundred thou-
sand acres of land, the proceeds from which were to be used
to establish two seminaries, one east and one west of the
Suwannee River. This led to the foundation at Ocala in 1852
of the East Florida Seminary and of the West Florida Semi-
nary at Tallahassee in 1856. The former of these institutions
was, however, removed to Gainesville in 1866. The State
Constitution of 1868 contained provisions for establishing
and maintaining a university (Art. VIII, Sec. 2), pursuant
to which the Legislature passed the next year "An Act to
Establish a Uniform System of Common Schools and a
University." The salient features of this Act show high
ideals and purposes and would be a credit to any state.
Other attempts to establish a university were made in 1883
by the State Board of Education and in 1885 by the Legis-
lature. Furthermore, the State Constitution, adopted later
in the year 1885, expressly permitted special legislation with
regard to a university.
Meanwhile, in 1870, the Legislature had, in accordance
with the terms of the Land-Grant College Act of Congress
of 1862, passed "An Act to Establish the Florida Agricul-
tural College." An Act supplementary to this was passed in
1872, and the State received from the general government
ninety thousand acres of land, the proceeds from which were
to be used in support of the proposed college. A site for
the college was selected in 1873 and again in 1875. No edu-
cational work having been accomplished in the "temporary
college edifice" at its second location, the trustees appointed
a committee in 1878 to decide upon a more suitable situation.
Not until 1883 was the third site selected-this time, Lake
City. Here building operations were pushed forward as
rapidly as possible and, upon the completion of the main
building in the autumn of 1884, the work of instruction was
finally begun. An attempt was made in 1886 by this insti-
tution to have its name changed to the University of Flor-
ida," a title it finally secured by the Legislative Act of 1903.
Before this, in 1887, the Florida Agricultural Experiment






HISTORY


Station had, in accordance with the terms of the Hatch Act,
been established as one of its departments and three years
later the provisions of the Morrill Act provided a substantial
increase in its annual income.
During these years, in addition to the three already men-
tioned, three other institutions of higher education, all de-
pending upon the State for support, had come one by one
into existence. These were the Normal School at DeFuniak
Springs, the South Florida College at Bartow, and the Agri-
cultural Institute in Osceola County. In 1905, however, in-
asmuch as these six institutions had failed to make satis-
factory differentiation among themselves and to separate their
work sufficiently from that of the high schools of the
State, and inasmuch as the cost of maintaining all seemed
disproportionate to the results obtained, the Legislature
passed the Buckman Act," the practical effect of which was
to merge the six into the Florida Female College," at Talla-
hassee, and the University of the State of Florida." Both
these institutions began their scholastic work in September,
1905. In 1909 an Act of the Legislature changed the name
of the one to the Florida State College for Women," of the
other to the University of Florida."
During the first session of the University a distinct Nor-
mal School, which included two years of Sub-Freshman grade,
was maintained. In addition to this, instruction was given
in agriculture and in engineering, as well as in the usual col-
legiate branches. Candidates for admission to the Freshman
class must have finished the eleventh grade of a high school.
The Agricultural Experiment Station was a separate division,
altho members of its Staff gave instruction to the students
and the President of the University acted as its Director. The
next year the Staff of the Agricultural Experiment Station
were required to devote their time exclusively to Station
activities, and Mr. P. H. Rolfs was elected Director. The
Normal School was abolished and instruction in pedagogy
was transferred to the University proper. Two years of
Sub-Freshman work were, however, still offered.
Upon the election in 1909 of Dr. A. A. Murphree to the
presidency, steps were taken to reorganize the University.
The present organization dates from 1910. The College of
Law was added in 1909 and the departments offering instruc-
tion mainly to normal students were organized into a college






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


in 1912. In 1913 the present entrance requirements went
into effect. The same year a Summer School was established
at the University by Act of the Legislature and the Farmers'
Institute Work of the University and the Cooperative Demon-
stration Work for Florida of the United States Department
of Agriculture were combined. In 1915 the Florida Plant
Board was organized, with headquarters on the campus. On
July 1 of the same year, all the agricultural activities of the
University were placed under the direction of the Dean of
the College of Agriculture.
LOCATION
On the 6th day of July, 1905, acting under powers con-
fered by the Buckman Act, the State Board of Education and
the Board of Control, in joint session, selected Gainesville as
the location for the University. During the scholastic year
of 1905-06, that is, until suitable buildings could be erected
at Gainesville, it was found necessary to carry on the work
of the University at Lake City. Since the summer of 1906
the institution has occupied its pre-ent site.
The advantages that Gainesville presents as the seat of
the University are numerous. It is centrally located and easy
of access. It has well-paved, lighted, and shaded streets. an
exceptionally pure water supply, and a good sewerage sys-
tem. The citizens are energetic, progressive. and hospitable.
The moral atmosphere is wholesome and for years the sale
of intoxicants has been prohibited by law. The leading re-
ligious denominations have attractive places of worship.

INCOME
The annual income of the University. apart from Legisla-
tive appropriations, is derived principally from the following
Federal grants: (a) The "East Florida Seminary Fund."
amounting to about two thousand dolllar.; $(22..00) ; (bj the
"Agricultural College Fund" bonds, yielding about seventy-
seven hundred dollars ($7,700) ; (c) one-half of the Morrill
Fund," amounting to twelve thousand five hundred dollars
($12,500) ; (d) one-half of the "Nelson fund." yielding twelve
thousand five hundred dollars ($12,500). The total income
thus derived amounts to thirty-four thousand seven hundred
dollars ($34,700).
For the support of the Agricultural Experiment Station






EQUIPMENT


the Federal government makes two annual grants: (a) the
"Hatch Fund" and (b) the "Adams Fund." Each of these
amounts to fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).
See also Division of University Extension.

EQUIPMENT
GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS
The University occupies a tract of six hundred and four
acres, situated in the western extremity of Gainesville. Ninety
acres of this tract are devoted to the campus, drill-grounds, and
athletic fields; one hundred and thirty-five acres are utilized
for the farm of the College of Agriculture; the remainder is
used by the Agricultural Experiment Station.
The University is one of the few institutions in the United
States that made plans before laying the foundation of a single
building for all future development of the campus, as far as
this could be foreseen. Consequently the campus presents an
harmonious appearance. The liberality of the State has per-
mitted the erection of buildings as fast as they were needed.
Twelve have already been constructed, all of which are lighted
with electricity, supplied with city water, and furnished with
modern improvements. These buildings are:
The two Dormitories, Thomas Hall and Buckman Hall,
brick and concrete structures, three stories in height, sixty feet
in width and three hundred and two hundred and forty feet,
respectively, in length. They are built in fireproof sections,
each containing twelve suites of dormitory-rooms and on each
floor of each section a shower-bath, lavatory, and toilet.
The Mechanic Arts Shop, a one-story brick building, sixty
feet long and thirty feet wide, with a wing thirty feet long
and twenty feet wide. It provides for the shopwork in the
Engineering, Mechanic Arts, and Manual Training Courses.
Science Hall, a brick and concrete building of two stories
and a finished basement, one hundred and thirty-five feet long
and sixty-six feet wide. It contains the classrooms and labora-
tories of the Departments of Botany and Horticulture, Chem-
istry, Physics, and Biology and Geology.
The Agricultural Experiment Station Building, a brick and
concrete structure of three stories and a finished basement, one
hundred and twenty-five feet long and sixty feet wide. It con-
tains the offices and laboratories of the Station.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Engineering Hall, a brick and terra-cotta -tructure. three
stories high, one hundred and twenty-two feet long and sev-
enty-three feet wide, with a one-story wing for oilers and
steam-engine laboratory. It provides offices, classrooms. aIb-
oratories, and drafting-rooms for the Departments of Civil,
of Electrical, and of Mechanical Engineering, and of Mechanic
Arts.
The Gymnasium, a temporary one-story wooden sti ucture.
sixty feet long and forty feet wide. It is provided with
equipment for physical training, lockers, and -showers. Ad.ja-
cent is a swimming pool, thirty-six feet long, twenty-four feet
wide, and from four and a half to seven feet deep.
The Agricultural College Building, a brick a nd concrete
structure, three stories high, one hundred and fifteen feet tl:ng
and sixty-five feet wide. It provides for class ooms. labor ra-
tories, and offices for the Departments of Agr.'.nomy. Animal
Husbandry, and for Extension Work. One half i.,f the secundl
floor is used at present as a general assembly hall.
The University Commons, a brick building of one story and
basement, one hundred and fourteen feet long and forty-two
feet wide, with a wing forty-nine feet long and t\wenty-seven
feet wide. It provides a large dining-hall ar.'l kitchen.
Language Hall, a brick and stone structure of three stories.
one hundred and thirty-five feet long and sixty-six feet wide.
It is the home of the College of Arts and Sciernces and proivide-
classrooms and offices for the Departments of Languages. His-
tory, and Mathematics, together with the administrative offices
of the University and rooms for the use of the literary societies
and the Young Men's Christian Association. At present the
main offices of the State Plant Board are in this building In
the basement are the book stores and the offices and presses
of the Alligator.
George Peabody Hall, erected at a cost of forty thousand
dollars ($40,000), the gift of the Peab.-dy Poard if Trust.
and named in honor of the great benefactor of the South.
It is a brick building, three stories high .. .ne hundred and
thirty-five feet long and seventy-two feet wide. It provides
for the Departments of Education and Philoso,-phy and for
Teacher Training Work. The general library of the Univer-
sity is at present in this building.
The College of Law BR;ll;,11i,. a brick and stone structure
of two stories, one hundred and twenty feet long and seventy






EQUIPMENT


feet wide. It contains -n auditorium, model court-room, lec-
ture-rooms and offices. library, reading and consultation
rooms, cataloguing room, and quarters for the Marshall De-
bating Society.
VALUE.-The value of the property used for the work of
the University is about $660,000.

LIBRARY
The general Library contains about 20,000 volumes. Ad-
ditional books are purchased as fast as funds are available.
An effort is being made to place on the shelves all books ex-
tant relating to Florida history.
All the books in the Library are catalogued and shelved ac-
cording to the Dewey system, making them readily available
for reference. Students are encouraged to use the card cata-
logs, which are arranged alphabetically, both according to
authors and to subjects, and by free access to the stacks to
become familiar with the books themselves. The librarian or
a student assistant is always in attendance to explain the ar-
rangement of books and to give aid in reference work. A
taste for literature and information is being developed in many
students who, before entering the University, have not had ac-
cess to a good library.
As a designated depository of Federal documents, the
Library receives each year several hundred volumes of valu-
able government publications. Files are kept of all Florida
State publications and of the bulletins and reports of the
Agricultural Experiment Stations thruout the Union.
In the reading room are one hundred and thirty of the best
general and technical periodicals. The back numbers of these
are bond and kept on file and the early volumes purchased
whenever they can be obtained and funds permit. Here also
are received the leading newspapers of the State. County pa-
pers are added to the list at the request of students.
The technical departments possess special libraries, housed
in their respective buildings, but accessible to all members of
the University.
MUSEUM
The University Museum occupies rooms in Science Hall,
where it has recently been installed with new exhibition and
storage cases. Its functions are to embody the material of a






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


State museum; to collect and preserve a complete represen-
tation of the history of the State of Florida, both natural arind
civil: the natural history to be represented by complete col-
lections of the minerals, the flora, and the fauna; the civil
by material illustrating the advancement of civilization ini the
State, together with the economic natural resources.
The collections embrace over two hundred and lifty mounilt-
ed birds, six hundred bird skins, about one hundred bird nests.
and nearly eight hundred sets of bird eggs. Nearly fivye hu1n-
dred snakes and lizards, about seventeen thousand shells. ten
thousand prehistoric Indian relics, several tho:usandl fossils.
about one hundred casts of rare fossils, about one huindied
minerals, over two thousand insects, and a number of historic
relics.
The Museum is open to students and the public every week-
day afternoon from one-thirty to five, during which hours the
curator will be pleased to meet and assist visitors.

LABORATORIES
The following laboratories are maintained by the Univer-
sity:
The Agricultural Laboratories and the other agricultural
equipment will be found fully described under the Geneial
Statement of the College of Agriculture.
The Botanical Laboratory contains enough dissecting mi-
croscopes and instruments and Bausch and Lomb compound-
microscopes, magnifying from 80 to 465 diameter, for the
individual use of the students; a Zeiss binocular nmicro:scope: a
large compound microscope of very high power; two demon-
stration microscopes; and a McIntosh stereoption, with p:o-
jection microscope attachment. For work in hi'tology there
are hand microtomes, section knives, a s'lidllg microtome.
Miller's paraffin bath, and a supply of reagents, stains, and
mounts; for studies in physiology there are germination boxes.
nutrient jars, an osmometer. a clinostat. etc. An herbarium
has been started, to which l tutdents each year add specimens.
which they collect, identify, and mount. A case of reference
books and periodicals is in the laborato:ry v.ithin easy reach.
The Chemical Laboratory is eq'uiiperd with the apparatus
and material necessary for instruction in general inorganic
and organic, analytical and industrial chemistry, as well as
for advanced work. It contains two delicate balances, a latest






EQUIPMENT 19

m.,d el po -riscope, microscope and spectroscope, ample plat-
inum '.nre (crucible dishes, electrodes, wire, and foil) and
many special pieces of apparatus for illustrating, upon the lec-
ture table, chemical principles. The equipment is modern in
every respect and can be used to the best advantage. The
stock iof chemicals is abundant and complete.
The Dinamo Laboratory, providing for practical instruc-
tion ,:o electrical machinery, occupies a portion of Engineering
Hall. The principal machines are a 10-KW Type ACS General
Electric synchronous converter, a 25-KW General Electric
Type IB direct current generator, a 1-HP Westinghouse Type
R motor, a 1-KW synchronous motor, and two 2-KW Westing-
house Type S dynamos, designed to be used either as genera-
torns or a.- motors. The switchboard panel for each machine is
placed near it, but is connected to terminals on a main distri-
Iu)ltioni board for the whole laboratory. Power is supplied by
a 10-1IP single-phase Wagner induction motor, connected with
the city alternating current supply and driving the main shaft
of the laboratory. The various machines are driven from this
shaft, and can be thrown in or out by friction clutches.
The laboratory is also supplied with transformers, several
types of arc lamps, and numerous measuring instruments of
diffe-"ent ranges, chiefly of Weston make.
The G, "logical Laboratory contains the United States Geo-
logical Survey Educational Series of rocks. Students of his-
torical geology are provided with a collection of fossils illus-
trating the distribution and development of organisms. For
the .-tudy of mineralogy there is a blowpipe collection of one
hu nred selected mineral species, an accessory blowpipe collec-
tion of miscellaneous minerals, a collection of fifty natural
cryNtals. .and a reference collection of choice mineral speci-
mlenIs.
The Plhysical Laboratory is well equipped with apparatus
and mect- the needs of such undergraduate work in physics as
is usually carried on in the best American colleges. The west-
ern half of the ground floor of Science Hall is devoted to the
Department of Physics. Its quarters include a lecture-room,
25 feet by 23 feet, with amphitheatered seats, an office and
library room; a main laboratory room, 28 by 25 feet; an elec-
trical laboratory, 30 by 14 feet; a battery room; an optical
room. 23 by 10 feet, arranged so as to be effectively darkened;
a work-shop, a store-room; and a private laboratory room, for






20 UNIVERSITY OF FLOPRil I

research work. Water, gas, and electricity fr':i vnri':.: c: .-
cuits are led to all of the rooms. The l:lboji.t': ij provide
with several brick piers, on foundation- ih.iepieniiint of the
rest of the building, for the accommodation if instL ulmnt.-it re-
quiring special stability.
The Psychological Laboratory occupi>- -i:; i':ooi'e.-i on the
first floor of Peabody Hall and is well ea.iiplpe,' f:- c-la dem-
onstrations, and for carrying on experimental aiid rie-serii
work. As demand arises new equipment \vill 1- adil leil. In
addition to the apparatus for the regular c:p; rimenit:lil w'oiI:.
the laboratory is equipped for carrying oin mental iand plysic:l
tests in connection with the work in e'.lucatinal p.iy:holo::-i
offered by the Teachers College.
The Zoological and Bacteriological Lini it. ..'.: ,are w\ell
equipped for the work of instruction. In a.:dition ti:n the ne.:c-
sary glassware and reagents, there are a nloiill-l of higli-grade
microscopes; dissecting microscopes; two microto,:mes. ,ri ftir
celloidin, the other for paraffin sectioning: parafin blath ; ste'r-
ilizers, both wet and dry; warm and co,:l inllc~batr 's: ldak-
ground illuminator; balances; centrifuge: b.reedinlg cges.: an-
atomical preparations and models; a numnbe-r of the Luikart-
Chun zoological wall charts; one Leitz I1,lge coinp1runl1d micro-
scope with mechanical stage and a full set ,if apchr omiinatle o b-
jectives; and one Bausch and Lomb projecting lantern \with
accessories. The departmental library :conttainls a number of
the current periodicals, as well as the irsnre imiport.int text-
books and reference works.

ENGINEERING
The Mechanical Engineering Laborarn hal s a Inrge and a
small vertical steam engine, a pressure blower. fan blower,
a boiler feed pump, indicators, steam gauge tester'., and ther-
mometer testers. The large water tube I,,,iltir- in-talled for
the heating plant are also available for testing purposes.
The Testing Laboratory for testing the strvtngth of miate-
rials and other mechanical properties of materials. has -I 50.000
pound Riehle testing-machine for tests of til- tenslile, cimnpres-
sive, and transverse strength of materia'd. ani: ; cement tt-et-
ing-machine with the necessary accessories.. Tlhet. mc.clhinec
are useful among other things for testing m;ite.rials uscled inl
road construction.
The Computing-Room is furnished with all ncilect.lsary tablles






GOVERNMENT


aill.l a lil.iairy of about two hundred reference books for use in
c(.n'l.--tini with the work of the mechanical laboratories and
dr'I(ft iI g-r,.om.
Tli Di afting-Room is equipped with substantial oak desks
and ip:,-' -es the necessary minor equipment to accommodate
ci., .- .1' twenty-four students. It has been carefully de-
,ignldt f:ir its purposes and is a model of its kind.
.i',, .,.;:.ng Instruments.-These consist of three survey-
e *:- 'impjisses; three wye levels, two dumpy levels, and one
pti!.:-,io, lh-vel; two plain and four stadia transits, of which
three :.'e equipped with attachments for solar and star obser-
v~tionl -: one complete plane-table; and the necessary rods,
clhini. tiape:s, and minor apparatus.
.i,- i. .-The Wood Shop is provided with lockers, equipped
\ithl a full set of tools for bench work, such as chisels, squares,
:,; i Q. gaLges, etc. The wood-working machinery consists of
nine ..;.i"d-turning lathes, a planer, a rip-saw, band-saw, and

The- MiIchine Shop is equipped with an 18-inch Cady lathe,
:i 11-i-ilh Seneca Falls lathe, a drill press, a Gray planter, a
N.... 1 Pr..iwvn & Sharpe Universal milling machine, a Spring-
e.ll. lihaier, a small Barnes lathe, a 16-inch Reed lathe, three
emern -y v heels, grindstone, vises, and tools.
Tlih F.rge Shop is equipped with six power-blast forges,
itne ha:1i forge, six anvils, and a large supply of tools.

ATHLETIC
Th, in-titution has provided a hard-surfaced athletic field,
iniiluldig I!'ootball gridiron, baseball diamond, with grand-
stand :ianil enclosed field, and ample tennis-court facilities. A
la.'lk.t-I:,;li court and concrete swimming-pool are also located
'i thtie c.!i'ipus.
GOVERNMENT
ADMINISTRATION
Ei0ArcP OF CONTROL.-The general government of the Uni-
l: r-.itv i-z vested by law in a Board of Control consisting of
five 1e1 l.bers from various parts of the State, appointed, each
for:i a tel of four years, by the Governor of Florida.
TiTh- P,..rd of Control appoints the President and, upon his
irmin 'tiii, elects members of the Faculties, directs the gen-
era! i,.!ii.ies of the University, and supervises the expenditure






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


of its funds. The Board also prescribes the requirements for
admission, with the advice of the President and FaIculties., ind
upon their recommendation confers degrees.
PRESIDENT.-The direct administration of all affai s of the
University is in the hands of the President.
DEANS.-As executive head each college of the Univer-
sity (for Organization see page 42) has a Dean. pointedd
from the Faculty of that college. These officers ire t re-ponsi-
ble to the President.
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL.-The President and Vice-Presid'ient
of the University and the Deans of the several colleges firm
a council of administration, with the following functions:
To lay out new lines of work, inaugurate new enterprises in
general, and to prepare the annual budget; and to act a- the
judicial body of the General Faculty on cases of general dil;-
cipline not under the authority of the colleges, on new c:-ur ires
of study and changes in existing courses, bringing these mait-
ters before the Board of Control, and on question- of college
action referred to it by any member of the General Fa;:tlty.
FACULTIES.-The General Faculty of the University in-
cludes all persons engaged in the work of instruction in the
University, excepting laboratory assistants and iin.dergrad-
uate assistants to the professors. Under the lenderhip ,of
the President, it forms the governing body in all general
matters of instruction and discipline.
The Faculty of a college consists of those members of the
General Faculty who give instruction in it. Under the lead-
ership of its Dean, it forms the governing body in matters
of instruction and discipline in its college.

REGULATIONS
SUPERVISION.-An Officer in Charge, occupying quarters
in one of the dormitories, has immediate supervision of the
general life of the student-body.
OFFENSES AGAINST GOOD CONDUCT.-Any offense iagaindt
good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the word. renders
a student liable to discipline, whether or not a formal rule
against the offense has been published.
The following offenses will be treated with special -ever-
ity: Disrespect to an officer of the University; wanton de-
struction of property; gambling; drunkenness, or having iln-
toxicating liquors in possession on the University grounds.






GOVERNMENT


The use of intoxicating liquors at student functions of
any kind or by student groupJs or individual students, either
on or off the campus, is strictly forbidden.
HAZING.-No form of hazing will be tolerated in the Uni-
versity and no student will be assigned to a room in a dormi-
tory until he has matriculated and signed the following
pledge:
I hereby promise upon my word of honor, without any
mental reservation whatsoever, to refrain from all forms of
hazing while I am connected with the University of Florida."
ABSENCES.-No undergraduate student is permitted to be
absent from the University over night without permission
from the Officer in Charge.
A student who accumulates ten unexcused absences from
classes, or three unexecused absences from drill, will be given
a severe reprimand and parent or guardian will be notified.
Two additional unexcused absences will cause the student to
be dismissed from the University. Ten unexcused absences
from Chapel will subject all students, except Seniors and
those in the College of Law, to the same penalty.
ATTENDANCE UPON DUTIES.-A student who, without
good cause, persistently absents himself from his University
duties, is, after due warning, dishonorably dismissed for the
remainder of the academic year. A student who, by reason
of ill health or outside demands upon his time, finds it im-
possible to give regular attention to his University duties, is
requested to withdraw; but such request does not in any
way reflect upon his good standing.
Delinquencies in University duties are reported to the
Registrar, who brings them to the attention of the students
concerned and requires a prompt explanation to be made.
Careful records of all delinquencies are kept.

STUDIES
QUANTITY OF WORK.-A minimum and a maximum num-
ber of recitation hours (or equivalent time in laboratory
courses) per week are prescribed in each college and no
student may take fewer than the minimum or more than the
maximum, except by special permission of the Faculty of his
college. Not counting Military Science, these numbers are:
In the College of Arts and Sciences (except in the Pre-
Medical course), 15 and 18; in the College of Agriculture, 16






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


and 23; in the College of Engineering, 15 anld .'2; ii'n tL
College of Law, 15 and 18; and in the Teachti ''.:':l..ge. 1.
and 19.
In counting hours, two hours of laboratory wuri.r: re con-
sidered equivalent to one hour of recitation.
CONFLICTS.-Studies must be so chosen as ,not ti c-,nrlict,
as shown on the printed schedule for the year.
ASSIGNMENT TO CLASSES.-Every student ninLSt appl.n be-
fore the Dean of his college at the beginning .,f e.ch aca-
demic year for assignment to classes. No is.-t:t:ir has
authority to enroll a student in any course, ex:eplr :s autl:ir-
ized by the Dean of his college.
CHOICE OF STUDIES.-The choice as to whielh Ime .1' the
various curricula is to be pursued rests with tile ;ndiiduiiil
student, subject to considerations of proper prelp:lartil, : hut
the group of studies selected must be that belo:irin:- ti on-e ilf
the regular years in the chosen curriculum exactly: ar n-
nounced in the catalog, unless special reason ,xi-t f- :'-
viating from this arrangement. A student will. hl,\v.\'t. I,-.
held to the requirements of the catalog under whicli 11 -
tered.
CONDITIONS.-A student who is prepared to, take up ri..-t
of the studies of a certain year in the regular culrric:llumin, bIit
who is deficient in some studies, will be permitted to p,'-,l:ee:l
with the work of that year subject to the co'...'lthi;,- th:t heI
make up the studies in which the deficiency ocLuI-. Fo i-
sion for all of the lower studies must be made Ixbcfre >i-, ',.,f
the higher may be taken; in the event of conilict- inl tlit-
schedule or of excessive quantity of work, hig-hr st-.die;
must give way to lower.
EXTRA STUDIES.-By special permission from the D:);i .iof
his college, a student may take extra studies in alilitr;., t.,i
those prescribed, provided this can be done without c,'nllilt-
ing with a regular study or exceeding the max:inmm nllni:.er
of hours of study. Such permission is not, as :ii ,:. ~....ntl:
to any conditioned student; and it may be withd:l:i.v l f-OVn
any student in the event of his failure in any of the icl.ilar
studies.
SPECIAL STUDENTS.-Students who desire t, tal.:c ,pe:il
courses will be allowed to take those classes for wlhiih the:.'
may be prepared. Such students are subject to all the la\vs






GOVERNMENT


anid ri.-ulations of the University. These special courses do
not le:,l to any degree.
Thel- purpose of permitting students to take special courses
iN ni:e--ly to provide for the occasional exceptional require-
mients -f individual students. Any abuse of this privilege,
for t!:e sake of avoiding regular studies that may be distaste-
ftl. c'n not be tolerated. Accordingly, no minor student is
permitted to enter as a special student except upon written
rei-'i:'st of his parent or guardian. Minor special students
mn- t. -except as provided for in the College of Agriculture,
offe: fourteen units for admission.
AlU LT SPECIALS.-In order to provide for mature stu-
deint. \ho give evidence of serious purpose and of ability to
prI:l.t l:,y the courses they may take, persons 21 years of age
.-i Iover who cannot offer all the requirements may, under
-:.:,e.tional circumstances, b, adml ittid ',e.s "A,4u't $Specials."
\W'hn Special Studcnte'imal~ e 'up their dceficiencisc, they
iimay home regular student's and candidates for a degred'
CLASSIFICATION -' IRREGULAR' SvIDE'NT8-;-A student',is
diem dn l to belong to that class. invhi' 'tihE'majority of hi,
I11iri .4f work lies' But a special student is not considered
a Ibeliiging to any of the regular classes.
CHANGES IN STUDIES.-After a student is registered, he
iV no:t permitted to discontinue any class or to begin any
:ilhitiniial one, without written permisison from the Dean of
hik t-.ile-ge, which must be shown to the instructor involved.
If tihe student has been registered for two weeks, he will not
I. pI.: rinitted to make any such change, except at the be-
gin1iin:hi of the second semester, without the payment of a
fee ,f two dollars ($2.00).
;F..\DESPAND REPORTS.-Each instructor keeps a record of
the q'.j-ility of work done by each student in his classes and
-ig'ins grades, on the scale of 100. At the end of each
. month the average grades for the month of each student are
rep:roti-t.l to the Registrar for permanent record and for
entK:,. i .on a monthly report to parent or guardian.
If the monthly grades show that a student is not doing
atlist'. tory work, he may be required to drop some of his
stit.,lz and substitute studies in a lower class, or he may be
:L'-'if.'.l to withdraw from the University.
E'. AMINATIONS.-At the end of each semester examina-
ti-onw .re held on all of the work of that semester.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


FAILURE IN STUDIES.-A final grade for each semester's
work is assigned, based upon the examination and the
monthly grades. If this grade falls below 75, the student is
considered to have failed and may proceed only subject to a
condition in the study in which failure has occurred.
RE-EXAMINATIONS.-A student who has failed in the work
of a semester is allowed, in case his grade does not fall below%
60, to make up the condition by re-examination, on the lir-t
Saturday of March or the first Saturday of October. Only
one re-examination in any subject is allowed; in case cif
failure to pass this, the student must repeat the semester's
work in that subject.
DEGREES.-The special requirements for the various de-
grees offered by the University will be found under the Gen-
eral Statement; off';thh pha'dupte. School and of each of tile
five colleges. The ollovmng regtuletions apply to all colleges :
.Whi'e' pursuing studies leadin'g'tp.:'a degree a student mudt
be':registered.in ,the colleg.e.Qffeying thit"'degree.
''Two degrees -'f. the':ss' rank, as,':'g., B.S.C.E. and
B:S.E.E., will not be conferred upon the same individual, un-
less the second degree to be conferred represents at le:i;t
fifteen hours of additional work.

ATHLETIC TEAMS. MUSICAL AND OTHER CLUBS
ABSENCES ON ACCOUNT OF ATHLETICS, ETC.-The mem-
bers of regular athletic teams, of musical and of other stu-
dent organizations, together with necessary substitutes and
managers, are permitted to be absent from University duties
for such time, not to exceed nine days per semester, as may
be necessary to take part in games, concerts, etc., away from
Gainesville. All class-work missed on account of such trip;
must be made up, as promptly as possible, at such hours as
may be arranged by the various professors.
SCHEDULES.-Schedules of games, concerts, etc., must be
arranged so as to interfere as little as possible with Uni-
versity duties. Schedules of games must receive the approval
of the Committee on Athletics; schedules of conceits, of
dramatic entertainments, etc., the approval of the Committee
on Student Organizations.
All regular games will be played under the rules of the
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association.






HONORS


ELIGIBILITY TO ATHLETIC TEAMS, MUSICAL CLUBS, ETC.-
Any team or club representing the University must be com-
posed exclusively of genuine students in good standing, altho
the Committee on Student Organizations has the power to
waive this regulation in the case of dramatic and musical
organizations. Negligence of duties, or failure in studies,
excludes a student from the right to represent the University.
No student is permitted to play on any of the regular
athletic teams, who, in the opinion of the University phy-
sician, is not in proper physical condition. No minor student
is permitted to play, if his parent or guardian objects to his
doing so. A list of players and substitutes must be sub-
mitted to the Committee on Athletics before each game and
must receive its approval.
FINANCES.-Student organizations engaging in financial
operations must publish at least once a year in the Alligator
a statement of their receipts and expenditures.

HONORS
PHI KAPPA PHI.-A chapter of the Society of Phi Kappa
Phi was established at the University during the spring of
1912. This society has for its main aim the encouragement
of learning and of high ideals. To be eligible for member-
ship a student must have been in attendance at the Univer-
sity for at least three semesters, have been guilty of no seri-
ous breaches of discipline, have had at least three years of
collegiate training, and be within one year of finishing a
course leading to a degree. The number that can be elected
is limited to the first fourth of the Senior class of the Uni-
versity. The numerical grade which must be attained,is
based on all college work, whether done here or elsewhere,
for which the student receives credit towards a degree.
MEDALS.-Medals are offered (1) to the best declaimer in
the Freshman and Sophomore classes; (2) for the best orig-
inal oration by a member of the Junior class of any college;
(3) for the best original oration by a member of the Senior
class of any college. These contests are settled in public
competition at Commencement. The speakers are limited to
four from each class and are selected by the Faculty.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


EXPENSES
UNIVERSITY CHARGES.-Tuition.-A tuition f.:.: ot'f i'.- ty
dollars ($40.00) per year is charged every student rtgi;-
tered in the College of Law. In the other college- LtUldl:nt
whose legal residence is in Florida is subject to nr chi el;:-.
for tuition; a student who is not a legal resident .of the St ite
is required to pay a tuition fee of twenty dollar i 20.
per year.
Registration and Contingent Fee.-This fee of ten dil-
lars ($10.00) per year is charged all students, excerpt 'ile
scholarship student from each county in Florida and all
graduate students pursuing work leading to a higher di.ute-
than that of Bachelor. These two classes of stitdent- i are
charged five dollars ($5.00).
The scholarships referred to are to be obtained from
County Superintendents of Public Instruction and mult l.,e
filed with the auditor on the day of registration.
An additional fee of two dollars ($2.00) is 're.'ii'cd of
students who enter after the day scheduled for registratir'n.
Damage Deposit.-In order to secure the Uri]v'er-ity
against damage, the sum of five dollars ($5.00) mu-it be de-
posited at registration. Damage known to have I,.(nln dluie
by any student will be charged to his individual aci:-'unt:
other damages will be prorated among the student-.
At the end of the scholastic year this deposit. leI, thi:
amount deducted, will be returned to the student. Iri.r.i-vll:
that no book nor other part of the University equ;.rnmeit ,till
remains in his possession. Orders for the disbui.-ement '.it
sums remaining to the credit of individual student- mutt '5e
presented in person, and will not be recognized by the na:udi-
tor until after the close of the second semester.
*Infirmary Fee.-A student whose parent or .,tl,nlli.fn
does not reside in Gainesville, is charged an infirrn'a iiy f.ce .'
three dollars ($3.00), the proceeds of which go i:\\ai'al 'i e-
fraying the salary of a resident nurse and for medicine.
This secures for the student, in case of illness, tih- !'ri\il:..'e
of a bed in the infirmary (which occupies Sec:tion A if
Thomas Hall), the services of the nurse, and attention fi',im
the University physician.
Board and Lodging.-Board, lodging, and janit.:ire -ce will be furnished by the University at a cost of -i::tV-three






EXPENSES


dollars ($63.00) for the first semester, not including the
Christmas vacation, and sixty-nine dollars ($69.00) for the
-econd semester.* In order to get advantage of this rate,
payment must be made at the beginning of each semester.
In very exceptional cases arrangements may be made to pay
in three equal instalments. No refund will be made for less
than a month's absence. Board and lodging when not en-
:aged by the semester will be furnished at eighteen dollars
1$18.00) per month.
Under Board and Lodging are included meals in the din-
ing-hall and room (with heat, light, janitor service, and
access to a bathroom), furnished as stated below. The doors
of the rooms are provided with Yale locks. A deposit of 50
cents is required for each key, which will be returned when
the key is surrendered. Janitor service includes the care of
rooms by maids, under the supervision of a competent house-
keeper.
Lodging without Board.-Students occupying a room in
the dormitories, but not taking meals in the dining-hall, will
be charged $5.00 per month for lodging.
Board without Lodging.-Board without lodging will be
furnished at the rate of $13.50 per calendar month, payable
in advance. No part of this sum will be refunded.
Furniture.-All rooms are partly furnished and adjoin
bathrooms equipped with marble basin and shower with both
hot and cold water. The furniture consists of two iron bed-
steads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table, wash-
stand, and chairs. The students are required to provide
pillows, bedding, half-curtains, and mosquito-bar.
Unifprm.-Students in the military department are re-
quired .to provide themselves with the prescribed uniform,
which is furnished under contract. The suit is of Charlottes-
ville cadet grey, of good quality, and inexpensive. A cap of
dark-blue cloth and two pairs of white duck trousers are also
required. This uniform is neat and serviceable and may be
worth at all times. The total cost is about $17.00.
Books.-The cost of books depends largely upon the course
taken, but is, in no case, a large item of expense, tho in the
higher classes the student is encouraged to acquire a few
works of permanent value.
:The right is reserved to increase the cost of board and lodging, if the
high prices now prevailing warrant.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Summary.-The following statement summarizes the min-
imum expenses of a Florida student registered in any college
save in that of Law:
Tuition .............-------....................---------....................... $000.00
Registration and Contingent Fee.............................. 10.00
Damage Deposit ........................... ---------.......... ...... 5.00
Infirmary Fee ................-.........................--............... 3.00
Board and Lodging -..-------........................................ 132.00
Uniform (about) ..........................-..... ---.. ...... -----17.00
Books (about) .............................................................. 10.00
Incidentals (laundry, athletic, literary society,
etc., dues), about.................................................. 20.00
$197.00
Students who are exempt from buying uniforms will de-
duct $17.00 from the above table; students from other Stiltes
will add a tuition fee of $20.00.
The actual University charges to a law student (including
board and lodging, fees, and tuition, but not including books
or damage deposit) are $185.00.
REMITTANCES.-All remittances should be made toi the
Auditor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR EARNING EXPENSES.-It is often pos-
sible for a student to earn a part of his expenses by work-
ing during hours not required for his University duties.
A few students are employed as waiters in the diliing-
hall, as janitors, and in some other capacities. Such employ-
ment is not, as a rule, given to a student unless he is other-
wise financially unable to attend the University, nor is it
given to one who fails in any study.
While the employment of students is designed to assist
those in need of funds, the payment for their services is in
no sense a charity. The rate of remuneration is no higher
and the standard of service demanded is no lower than
would be the case if the work were done by others than
students. If a student employee fails to give satisfaction, he
is promptly discharged. Otherwise he is continued in his
position as long as he cares to hold it, provided it is not
found to interfere with reasonable success in his studies and
provided he does not commit any breach of good conduct.
Great credit is due those willing to make the necessary
sacrifices, nevertheless students are advised not to undertake
to earn money while pursuing their studies, unless such
action is unavoidable. Proper attention to studies makes
sufficient demand upon the time and energy of a student.






FELLOWSHIPS


without the burden of outside duties; and such time as the
studies leave free can be spent more profitably in healthful
recreation.

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUND
FELLOWSHIPS.-Three Teaching Fellowships, established
in order to encourage young teachers to prepare themselves
further for their work by taking graduate courses in Educa-
tion, are offered in the Teachers College. Each fellowship
pays $200.00 annually.
Application for a fellowship must be made in writing and
addressed to the Dean of the Teachers College or to the Pres-
ident of the University. It must show that the applicant is a
college graduate and that he has ability to profit by the work
offered, and must be accompanied by testimonials as to his
character.
The holder of a fellowship must devote himself to the
prosecution of studies leading to the Master's degree in Edu-
cation. He will be expected to teach four or five hours per
week in the Practice High School, under the direction and
supervision of the Teachers College. (This teaching will
count as two hours toward the degree.) He may be called
upon for other minor services, such as conducting examina-
tions and teaching review classes, but he shall not be called
upon to do anything that would interfere with his regular
graduate work.
SCHOLARSHIPS.-Thru the generosity of friends, the Uni-
versity is able to offer several scholarships, a list of which is
given below. Application for a scholarship should be made
to the President of the University and should be accompanied
by a record of the student's work, statement of his need, and
testimonials as to his character. To secure a scholarship:
(a) The student must actually need this financial help to
enable him to attend the University.
(b) He must be worthy to receive such help. To be
worthy he must be of good character and habits and suffi-
ciently far advanced to enter not lower than the Freshman
class.
One of $100.00 per year:
1. Kirby Smith Scholarship.-Established and main-
tained by the Kirby Smith Chapter of the Daughters of the
Confederacy. For the grandson of a Copfederate veteran.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Seven of $132.00 each per year:
2. Children of the Confederacy Scholarship.-E tlI.jilhe.1
and maintained by the Florida Branch of the Chiidie-o of
the Confederacy. For the lineal descendant of a Coinfenie-it.,
soldier.
3 and 4. United Daughters of the Confederac, .SilIn,-
ships.-Established and maintained by the United DnLughlteri
of the Confederacy of the State at large. For lineal .escc,:nd-
ants of Confederate veterans.
5. J. J Finley Scholarship.-Established and maintained
by the J. J. Finley Chapter of the Daughters of the C.infedl-
eracy. For the grandson of a Confederate veteran
6. Lykes Scholarship.-Established and maintained Iby
Mr. F. E. Lykes, of Havana, Cuba.
7. Alumni Scholarship.-Established and maintained Ily
the Alumni Association of the University.
8. Duval County Alumni Scholarship.-Established a I l
maintained by the Duval County Alumni Association.
One of $200.00 per year:
9. Knight and Wall Scholarship. -Established a nd
maintained by the Knight and Wall Company, Ihardware
dealers, of Tampa.
Further particulars relating to this scholarship may 1.-e
obtained from the Superintendent of Public Instruction,. Ilills-
boro County, Tampa, Fla.
LOAN FUND.-William Wilson Finley Foundati.',,,.-A- a
memorial to the late President Finley and in recognition of
his interest in agricultural education, the Southern Rail\\ay
Company has donated to the University the sum of ilne
thousand dollars ($1,000), to be used as a loan fund. Stu-
dents benefiting by this fund must enter the College of
Agriculture.
For further particulars address Dean P. H. Rolfs. College
of Agriculture, University of Florida, Gainesvilla, Florida.

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
At the close of the Commencement exercises in 19i06 the
graduates of the year organized an Alumni Association. All
graduates of the University and the graduates of th:i f.rin:,
institutions who have had their diplomas confirmed !',i tit
University are eligible for membership.






STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS


Further information concerning the Association may be
had by addressing any one of the officers: President, B. R.
Colson, Gainesville, Fla.; Vice-President, C. P. Lovell, Jack-
sonville, Fla.; Secretary and Treasurer, F. F. Halma, Gaines-
ville, Fla.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS
Y. M. C. A.-There is a branch of the Y. M. C. A. in the
University, the purpose of which is to create a Christian
atmosphere, to train men for aggressive Christian service,
and to cooperate in Christian work with all the churches of
Gainesville. The activities of the Association are directed
by a general secretary, Mr. H. Will Nelson, who devotes all
of his time to the work.
Two meetings of the Association are held each week: on
Wednesday night a prayer meeting conducted Dy students;
on Sunday afternoon a more general meeting at which some
member of the Faculty, minister of the city, or distinguished
Christian worker makes an address.
Classes for Bible and Mission study are conducted under
the auspices of the Association: in the former of these
courses were given on Student Standards of Action and the
Manhood of the Master; in the latter, South American Prob-
lems, Immigration, and other live topics of the day.
Students, on entering the University, should by all means
become identified with this organization and parents should
counsel and encourage them to do so. A note of introduction
to the president of the organization will cause special atten-
tion to be given a new student.
LITErIARY AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIES.-See General State-
ment of. each of the five colleges of the University.
ORCHESTRA.-The orchestra plays for Chapel exercises
and furnishes special programs on Fridays. It also accom-
panies the University Minstrels on its annual tour.
GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS.-The Glee Club develops
ability in part singing and gives much pleasure by adding
variety to the Friday morning programs. The Mandolin
Club, composed of mandolins, guitars, and similar instru-
ments, while complete in itself, joins the Glee Club in its
annual tour.
MILITARY BAND.-The Military Band, organized early in
the session of 1913-14 by C. D. Hamilton, has since then
u.f.-3





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


added much to the effectiveness of parades. The band makei-
several excursions during the year to neighl..uriir in toin\is.
and has an annual trip of nearly a week with the University
Minstrels.
PUBLICATIONS.-Beginning with the session of Il0I:'.-1I
each Senior class has published a profusely and handsomely
illustrated annual, known as the "Seminole."
The "Florida Alligator" is a weekly new'spalper o\i ned
and controlled by the student-body and printed on the cam-
pus. Its editorial articles discuss University problems from
the viewpoint of the undergraduates. It seeks the support
of all the alumni, who will find in it the best means of I:ee(p-
ing in close touch with the University.

ADMISSION
TERMS.-A candidate for admission must present. along
with his scholastic record, a certificate of good moral char-
acter, and, if he be from another college or university, the
certificate must show that he was honorably discharged.
No candidate under 16 (18 in the College of Laow) years
of age will be admitted.
METHODS.-There are two methods of gaining admission :
(1) By Certificate.-The University will accept certili-
cates from the approved Senior high schools of Florida: from
accredited academies and preparatory schools of the State:
and from any secondary school of another state which ik
accredited by its state university.
The certificate presented by the candidate for admissi.,n
must be officially signed by the principal of the shdiol attend-
ed. It must state in detail the work of preparation and, in
the case of Florida high schools, that the coiur-e fiter t..
twelfth grade has been satisfactorily completed.
Blank certificates, conveniently arranged for the desired
data, will be sent to all high-school principal and. Lupnl
application, to prospective students.
(2) By Examination.-Candidates not admitted by cer-
tificate will be required to stand written examinations upon
the entrance subjects. For dates of these examination-. Cz.:
University Calendar, page 3.
REQUIREMENTS.-" Entrance Units."-The re'.li irement,
for admission are measured in Entrance Units." bas-ed upon
the curriculum of the high schools of Florida. A unit repre-






ADMISSION


sents a course of study pursued thruout the school year with
live recitation periods of at least forty-five minutes each per
week, four courses being taken during each of the four years.
Thus the curriculum of the standard Senior high school of
Florida is equivalent to sixteen units. Two laboratory periods
should be'counted as one recitation period.
Number of Units.-Admission to the Freshman class of
the University will be granted to candidates who present
properly certified credentials, showing that they have been
graduated from a standard Senior high school with a full
four-year curriculum based upon an eight-year grammar-
-chool course, or who present satisfactory evidence of having
completed courses amounting to sixteen units of preparatory
work.
In no case will credit for more than sixteen units be given
for work done at a high school.
These requirements are equal to fifteen units as defined
by the Carnegie Foundation or the National Educational As-
sociation.
Distribution of Units.-Of the sixteen units required for
admission, ten (eight in the College of Law) are specified and
-ix (eight in the College of Law) are elective. Eight of the
specified units are required in common by all the colleges of
the University, while the remaining two vary.

UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENT
E english ............................. ...................................... .. units
Mathematics .....- ....--- ..------- .. -- ..- ..-...... ... 3 units
H history ...... ........ ........ .......-- ...- ..- ........ ...1 unit
S science ........................................... ................ 1 u nit
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
TEACHERS COLLEGE
A. B. Curriculum
L atin .............. ..-.... ... .............. ... ....- ...... .......-- 2 units
B. S. Curriculum
One Foreign Language
or
H history ...................... .................2 units
and
Science
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
One Foreign Language
or I
H history -..-.....- ---...........- ................ 2 units
and I
Science







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
M them atics .............................................................. 1 unit
History
or .......................... ...................... I unit
Science J
Elective Units.-These are to be chosen from the list of
elective subjects given below and from other subjects reg-
ularly taught in a standard high school. Not mote than
four of these units will be accepted in vocational subjects-
typewriting, stenography, mechanic arts, agriculture, etc.

LIST OF ELECTIVE SUBJECTS
Botany ...............--------..............-...-.........- .....% or 1 unit
Chem istry .................................................................. unit
*Engineering Practice ................................... ...............4 u it
E english ........................................................................ 1 nit
L atin ............................................................................ 4 unit
H history ........ ....................................... ......... ...... .. 2 unit
M them atics .............................................................. unit
Modern Languages-French, German, or
Spanish .............................................................. .. 2 unit
Physical Geography .................................................. 1 nit
P physics ..................................t-... .................. 1 I l1t
Zoology ....................................................... or 1 u it
Deficiencies.-A deficiency of two units will be allowed a
candidate, but such deficiency must be removed by the end of
the first year after admission.
Students who have registered for a University study will
not be allowed to make up an entrance condition by examina-
tion in this same subject, unless the examination be taken at
the time of re-examinations in October of the same school-
year. The University credit may, however, be used as a sub-
stitute for entrance credit.

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT COURSES
ENGLISH.-Four units.-The required work in English
(including Grammar, Composition and Rhetoric, and the
recommended Classics) is designed to cover three years. It
is urged that the exercises in Composition and the use of the
Classics be continued thruout this time. No candidate will be
accepted in English whose work is notably defective in spell-
ing, punctuation, idiom, or division into paragraphs.
(1) Grammar.-A thoro knowledge of English GrCam-
mar, both in its technical aspects and in its bearings upon
speech and writing.

*Only for admission to the College of Engineering.







ADMISSION


(2) Composition and Rhetoric.-A mastery of the fun-
damental principles of Rhetoric, such as is given in any
standard high-school text; and constant practice in Compo-
sition, oral and written, during the whole period of prepara-
tion.
(3) Classics.-The English Classics now generally adopt-
ed by schools and colleges. The work includes:
I. Study and Practice.-This part of the examination
presupposes the thoro study of each of the works selected.
The examination will be upon the subject-matter, form, and
structure. In addition the candidate may be required to
answer questions involving the essentials of English gram-
mar and the leading facts in the periods of English history
to which the prescribed texts belong.
II. Reading.-A certain number of books will be as-
signed for reading (see list subjoined). The form of exami-
nation will usually be the writing of a paragraph or two on
each of several topics to be chosen by the candidate from a
considerable number-perhaps ten or fifteen-set before him
in the examination paper. The treatment of these topics is
designed to test the candidate's power of clear and accurate
expression and will call for only a general knowledge of the
substance of the books. The candidate must also be pre-
pared to answer simple questions on the lives of the authors.
STUDY.-One book to be selected from each of the four
groups.
I. Shakespeare.-Julius Caesar. Macbeth. Hamlet.
II. Milton: L'Allegro, II Penseroso, and either Comus or Lycidas.
Tennyson: The Coming of Arthur, The Passing of Arthur, and The
Holy Grail. Selections from Wordsworth. Keats, and Shelley, in Book
IV of Palgrave's Golden Treasury (First Series).
III. Bbrke: Speech on Conciliation with the Colonies. Macaulay:
Speech on Copyright; and Lincoln: Cooper Union Address. Washington:
Farewell Address; and Webster: Bunker Hill Oration.
IV. Carlyle: Essay on Burns; and Selections from Burns' Poems.
Macaulay: Life of Johnson. Emerson: Essay on Manners.
READING.-At least two books are to be selected from each
of the five groups, except as otherwise provided under Group I.
I. The Old Testament (comprising at least the chief narrative epi-
sodes in Genesis, Exodus, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings, and Daniel, to-
gether with the books of Ruth and Esther). The Odyssey (with the
omission, if desired, of Books I, II, III. IV, V. XV. XVI. XVII). The
Iliad (with the omission, if desired; of Books XI, XIII, XIV, XV, XVII,
XXI). The Aeneid.
For any selection from Group I a selection from any other group may
be substituted. The Odyssey. Iliad, and Aeneid should be read in Eng-
lish translations of recognized literary merit.
II. Shakespeare.-A Midsummer Night's Dream. The Merchant of








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Venice. As You Like It. Twelfth Night. The Tempest. Romeo and
Juliet. King John. Richard the Second. Richard the Third. Henry tlic
Fifth. Coriolanus. *Julius Caesar. *Macbeth. *Hamlet.
(*If not chosen for study.)
III. Malory: Morte d'Arthur (about 100 pages). Bunyan: P.-
grim's Progress, Part I. Swift: Gulliver's Voyages to Lilliput and r.:.
Brobdingnag. Defoe: Robinson Crusoe, Part I. Goldsmith: Vicar .4
Wakefield. Scott: Any one novel. Jane Austen: Any one novel. Ma',.,
Edgeworth: Castle Rackrent, or The Absentee. Frances Zurney (Mada'ie-
d'Arblay): Evelina. Dickens: Any one novel. Thackeray: Any ohc.-
novel. George Eliot: Any one novel. Mrs. Gaskell: Cranford. Kingsle. -
Westward Ho! or Hereward the Wake. Reade: The Cloister and Tlie
Hearth. Blackmore: Lorna Doone. Hughes: Tom Brown's School Day3
Stevenson: Any one of the novels out of copyright. Cooper: Any ort
novel. Poe: Selected Tales. Hawthorne: Any one of the novels out 4:.i
copyright.
IV. Addison and Steele: The Sir Roger de Coverly Papers; or Se-
lecticns from The Tatler and The Spectator. Boswell: Selections fr:.m
the Life of Johnson (about 200 pages). Franklin: Autobiography. Ir -
ing: Selections from The Sketch Book (about 200 pages); or the Life .._1
Goldsmith. Southey: Life of Nelson. Lamb: Selections from :l.:.
Essays of Elia (about 100 pages). Lockhart: Selections from the Lfl'
of Scott (about 200 pages). Thackeray: Lectures on Swift, Addis:.r.
and Steele in The English Humorists. Macaulay: One of the follow i',
essays: Lord Clive, Warren Hastings, Milton, Addison, Goldsmith, Fr-..J-
eric the Great, Madame d'Arblay. Trevelyan: Selections from Life :.1
Macaulay (about 200 pages). Ruskin: Sesame and Lilies; or Selections
(about 150 pages). Dana: Two Years Before the Mast. Lincoln: ,'.-
lections. Parkman: The Oregon Trail. Thoreau: Walden. Lowell:
Selected Essays (about 150 pages). Holmes: The Autocrat of .he
Breakfast Table. Stevenson: Inland Voyage, and Travels with a Donk,..
Huxley: Autobiography and Selections from Lay Sermons (including ihe
addresses on Improving Natural Knowledge, A Liberal Education, and ;
Piece of Chalk).
V. Palgrave: Golden Treasury (First Series), Books II and II1.
with special attention to Dryden, Gray, Cowper, Burns, and Collins; Boul:
IV, with special attention to Wordsworth, Keats, and Shelley (if !i.:.t
chosen for study). Goldsmith: The Traveller, and The Deserted ViI-
lage. Pope: The Rape of the Lock. A Collection of English and Sc.. -
tish Ballads (as, for example, Robin Hood Ballads, The Battle of Otter-
burne, King Estmere, Young Beichan, Bewich and Grahame, Sir Patrl.:l;
Spcns, and a selection from later ballads. Coleridge: The Anci,.-n
Mariner, Christabel. and Kubla Khan. Byron: Childe Harold, Canto III
or IV; and The Prisoner of Chillon. Scott: The Lady of the Lake ,:.,
Marmion. Macaulay: The Lays of Ancient Rome; The Battle of Naseby.
The Armada; Ivry. Tennyson: The Princess; or Gareth and Lyneti'r.
Lancelot and Elaine, The Passing of Arthur. Browning: Cavalier Tune-.
The Lost Leader, How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Ar..
Home Thoughts from Abroad, Home Thoughts from the Sea, Incident .f
the French Camp, Herve Riel, Pheidippides, My Last Duchess, Up a- .,
Villa-Down in the City, The Italian in England, The Patriot, De Gus i-
bus ". The Pied Piper. Instans Tyrannus. Arnold: Sohrab and Rustuln..
and The Forsaken Merman. Selections from American Poetry, wioh
special attention to Poe, Lowell, Longfellow, and Whittier.
(4) History of American Literature; History of Engli.lh
Literature.-One unit, elective.-The fourth year of the high-
school course in English usually covers the above subjects.
MATHEMATICS.-FOUr units.-
(1) Algebra.-First Year.-One unit.-The elementary







ADMISSION


operations, factoring, highest common factor, least common
multiple, fractions, simple equations, inequalities, involution,
evolution, and numerical quadratics. This is supposed to rep-
resent the work of one year in the high school.
(2) Algebra. Second Year. One unit.* Quadratic
equations, ratio and proportion, the progressions, imaginary
quantities, the binomial theorem, logarithms, and graphic
algebra. This is supposed to represent the work of the
second year in algebra in the high school.
(3) Plane Geometry.-One unit.
(4) Solid Geometry.-One-half unit.
(5) Plane Trigonometry.-One-half unit.
HISTORY.-Four units.
(1) Ancient History, with particular reference
to Greece and Rom e..........................................1 unit
(2) European History since Charlemagne............1 unit
(3) English H history ..................................................1 unit
(4) American History ................................... .... .1 unit
A year's work based on a good textbook of at least 300 or
400 pages is required in the case of each of the above divi-
sions. The student should know something of the author of
the textbook used and give evidence of having consulted
some works of reference.
LATIN.-Four units.-At least four years' work in this
study is required to cover the four units. The minimum for
each year is as follows:
(1) First Year.-One unit.-A first year Latin book,
such as Collar & Daniell's First Year Latin or Potter's Ele-
mentary Latin Course.
(2) ,Second Year.-One unit.-Four books of Caesar's
Gallic War, with constant study of the grammar and constant
practice in prose composition.
(3) Third Year.-One unit.-Six of Cicero's Orations,
with grammar and prose composition thruout the year.
(4) Fourth Year.-One unit.-The first six books of the
Aeneid and as much prosody as relates to accent, versification
in general, and dactylic hexameter.
MODERN LANGUAGES.-Two units. If only one unit is
offered in a modern language, the student must pursue the
subject a second year in the University.
French.-First Year.-One unit.-(1) Drill in pronuncia-

*This represents only one-half unit on the Carnegie-unit scale.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


tion; (2) the rudiments of grammar, including the elemenlt-
ary rules of syntax; (3) abundant easy exercises; (4) the
reading of from 100 to 175 duodecimo pages of graduated
texts, with constant practice in translating into Frerch eti:y
variations of the sentences read (the teacher giving the Enm--
lish) and in reproducing from memory sentences previously
read; (5) writing French from dictation.
French.-Second Year.-One unit.-(1) The reading of
from 250 to 400 pages of easy modern prose; (2) practice in
translating into French variations upon the texts read; I )
frequent abstracts, sometimes oral and sometimes written,
of portions of the text already read; (4) writing French
from dictation; (5) drill upon the rudiments of grammar.
including forms and syntax, with constant application in the
construction of sentences; (6) memorizing of short poems.
German.-First Year.-One unit.-(1) Drill in pro:nunl-
ciation; (2) memorizing and frequent repetition of easy collo-
quial sentences; (3) drill upon the rudiments of gramrnar. in-
cluding the elementary rules of syntax and word-order.; ()
abundant easy exercises; (5) the reading of from 75 to 11I10
pages of graduated texts, with constant practice in trannlat-
ing into German variations upon sentences selected from the
reading-lesson (the teacher giving the English) and in Ir pro-
ducing from memory sentences previously read.
German.-Second Year.-One unit.-(1) The reading of
from 150 to 200 pages of easy stories and plays; (2) p.,iacti:ce
in the translation into German of variations upon the r-mat-
ter read and also in the off-hand reproduction, sometimes oral-
ly and sometimes in writing, of the substance of short and eay
selected passages; (3) drill upon the grammar; (4) memior'i-
ing of short poems.
Spanish.-Requirements similar to those for French.
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.-One unit.-Study of a modern
textbook, together with laboratory and field course, cvL-ring
the following subjects: (1) The earth as a globe: shape. how
proved; size, how measured; motions, how determined; map
making; modes of projection. (2) The ocean: form alid
divisions; depth, density, temperature; movements, wa- eS ai:nd
currents; character of floor; life; tides, character and c:i aMes:
shore lines. (3) The atmosphere: chemical composition and
pressure, how determined; circulation, character and catus~':
storms, classification and cause. (4) Land: amount alnd dik-






ADMISSION


tribution; topographic charts; plains and plateaus, kinds and
development; volcanos, distribution and character; rivers, life-
history; glaciers, kinds and characteristics.
BOTANY.-One-half or one unit.-Anatomy and morphol-
ogy; physiology; ecology; natural history and classification of
the plant groups. At least twice as much time should be given
to individual laboratory work by the student as to recitation.
ZoOLOGY.-One-half or one unit.-Study of a standard
high-school text and dissection of at least ten specimens. Note-
books with drawings, showing the character of the work com-
pleted, must be presented on entrance to the University.
PHYSIcs.-One unit.-Study of a standard high-school
text; experimental work consisting of lecture-table demonstra-
tions and individual laboratory work. The latter should com-
prise at least thirty exercises from a good laboratory manual.
CHEMISTRY.-One unit.-Individual laboratory work, com-
prising at least thirty exercises from a recognized manual; in-
struction by lecture-table demonstration; study of a standard
textbook.
ADVANCED STANDING
Advanced standing will be granted only upon recommen-
dation of the heads of the departments concerned. Fitness for
advanced work may be determined by examination or by trial.
Students from other colleges or universities of like standing
will ordinarily be classed according to the ground already
covered.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ORGANIZATION
I. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.
II. THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES.
(a) A Curriculum leading to the A. B. degree.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree.
(c) A Pre-Medical Course.
III. THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE.
Instructional Division.
(a) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Agriculti'ur
(b) A Curriculum leading to the title Graduate in FarllniLL
(c) A Two-Year Course.
(d) A One-Year Course.
(e) A Four-Months' Course.
Experiment Station Division.
Extension Division:
(a) Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work.
(b) Farmers' Institutes.
(c) Boys' and Girls' Clubs.
(d) Correspondence Courses.
(e) Publications.
IV. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING.
(a) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Civil ErLilr. e'-
ing.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Electri al Er-
gineering.
(c) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Mechani anl En-
gineering.
(d) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Chemi-:.l Lr.
gineering.
V. THE COLLEGE OF LAW.
A Curriculum leading to the LL. B. degree.
VI. THE TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL.
(a) A Curriculum leading to the A. B. degree in Educatr~ii.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Educatr.n.
(c) A Normal Course leading to a Diploma.
(d) Correspondence School.
(e) The University Summer School.







GRADUATE SCHOOL


GRADUATE SCHOOL
ORGANIZATION.-This School is under the direction of the
Committee on Graduate Studies, which consists of Professors
Anderson, Farr, Rolfs, Benton, Trusler, and Cox.
Graduate students should register with the Chairman of
this Committee.
DEGREES OFFERED.-The University is not in a position at
present to law any great stress upon graduate work. Its
courses are mainly of college grade and will doubtless remain
so for many years to come. For the benefit, however, of those
who wish to carry their studies further, courses are offered
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Arts in
Education, Master of Science, Master of Science in Agricul-
ture, and Master of Science in Education.
PREREQUISITE DEGREES.-Candidates for the Master's de-
gree must possess the Bachelor's degree of this institution or
of one of like standing.
APPLICATIONS.-Candidates for the Master's degree must
present to the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Studies
a written application for the degree not later than the first of
November of the scholastic year in which the degree is desired.
This application must name the major and minor subjects of-
fered for the degree and must contain the signed approval of
the heads of the departments concerned.
When a candidate offers as a part of his work any course
not sufficiently described in the catalog, he must include in his
application an outline or description of that course.
TIME REQUIRED.-The student must spend at least one en-
tire academic year in residence at the University as a graduate
student, devoting his full time to the pursuit of his studies.
WORK REQUIRED.-The work is twelve hours per week. Six
hours of this work must be in one subject (the major) and of a
higher grade than any course offered for undergraduate stu-
dents in that subject. The other six hours (the minor or mi-
nors) are to be determined and distributed by the professor
in charge of the department in which the major subject is se-
lected. No course designed primarily for students of a lower
grade than the Junior class will be acceptable as a minor.
While the major course is six hours, these hours are not the






44 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

same as in undergraduate work, for in general the major work
will require at least two-thirds of the student's time.
To obtain credit for a minor the student must attain a
grade of not less than eighty-five per cent.
DISSERTATION.-It is customary to require a dissertation
showing original research and independent thinking on some
subject accepted by the professor under whom the major work
is taken, but this requirement may be waived at the option of
the professor, subject to the approval of the Committee on
Graduate Studies. If the requirement be not waived, the dis-
sertation must be in the hands of the committee not later than
two weeks before Commencement Day.






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
JAS. N. ANDERSON, Dean

FACULTY.-Jas. N. Anderson, 0. C. Ault, J. R. Benton, L.
W. Buchholz, H. W. Cox, C. L. Crow, H. S. Davis, J. M. Farr,
E. R. Flint, W. L. Floyd, C. A. Hunter, H. G. Keppel, W. S.
Perry, N. L. Sims, E. S. Walker.
TEACHING FELLOW.-C. A. Robertson.

GENERAL STATEMENT
AIM AND SCOPE.-The tendency of universities at the pres-
ent time seems to be to reach out their arms farther and far-
ther into the domain of knowledge and to become more and
more places where the student may expect to be able to acquire
any form of useful knowledge in which he may be interested.
In the center, however, there is still found the College of Arts
and Sciences, the pulsating heart, as it were, sending its vivi-
fying streams to the outermost tips of the institution.
The aim of the college is to prepare for life, it is true, but
not so directly and immediately as do the professional schools.
It is a longer, but a better road, for those who are able to travel
it, to distinction and ultimate success in almost any calling.
Especially in the case of the learned professions, it is becom-
ing clearer that a man should first get a liberal education, if
possible, before entering upon his professional studies.
The purpose and aim of the College of Arts and Sciences is
to impart culture and refinement, to train the mind and
strengthen the intellect, to build up ideals and establish the
character, to enlarge the vision, to ennoble the thoughts, to in-
crease the appreciation of the beautiful and the true, to add
charm to life and piquancy to companionship, to make the man
a decent fellow, a useful citizen, an influential member of so-
ciety in whatever community he may be thrown, in whatever
field his life-course may be run.
But if the student wishes to examine the practical side ex-
clusively, he will find that there is also something practical in
all these courses. For instance, they are all valuable for him
who wishes to learn to teach those subjects. Moreover, the
use of electives gives the student an opportunity to specialize






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


in some branch according to his inclination and in furtherance
of his plans.
ADMISSION.-For full description of requirements for ad-
mission and of unit courses, see pages 34 to 41, inclusive.
LITERARY SOCIETIES.-The Literary Societies are valil.a.e
adjuncts to the educational work of the college. They are cln-
ducted entirely by the students and maintain a high level of
endeavor. The members obtain much practical experience in
the conduct of public assemblies. They assimilate knowledge
of parliamentary law, acquire ease and grace of delivery, lea rn
to argue with coolness of thought and courtesy of manner, and
are trained in thinking and in presenting their thoughts learl'y
and effectively while facing an audience. All student.; are
earnestly advised to connect themselves with one of these so-
cieties and to take a constant and active part in its work.
DEGREES.-The College of Arts and Sciences offers courses
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (A. B.) and Bach-
elor of Science (B. S.).
SUBJECTS OF STUDY.-The subjects of study lea.dingr
towards the degrees offered by the College of Arts anil S.i-
ences are divided into the following four groups:
I. II. III. IV.
Military Science, French, Bible, Agricultiiue.
I and II. German, Economics, Astronomy..
Greek, Education, Bacteriolor.,.
Latin, English Litera- Biology,
Rhetoric and Eng- ture, Botany,
lish Language, History, Chemistir..
Saanish. Philosophy, Drawing.
Political Science, Descripti -
Psychology, Geomet :,I.
Sociology. Geology,
Mathems t i: .
Mechanic -.
Military Scitnc,:
III and V.
Physics,
Physiolog;..
Surveying,
Zoology.
REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES.-For each of the degrees of-
fered, A. B. and B. S., a total of sixty-two hours must be taken,
of which two must be in Group I.
For the A. B. degree fifteen hours must be taken in Groups
II and III and twelve hours from Group IV; three hour: man.
be chosen from any group; the remaining fifteen hour- (in-
cluding the "major") must be chosen from Groups II, III and





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


(pure) Mathematics, altho twelve of these fifteen hours may
be taken from the first year of the course in the College of Law.
For the degree of B. S. twelve hours must be taken from
each of Groups II and III, twenty-four (including the "ma-
jor") from Group IV, leaving twelve hours to be chosen from
the subjects mentioned above, or from the first year of the
course in the College of Law.
The "major" must consist of nine hours in one department
(not counting the Freshman work) and must be approved by
the head of the department chosen. The choice of electives
must meet with the approval of the Dean.
The Bachelor's degree in Arts or Sciences will not be con-
ferred upon a candidate offering twelve hours in Law until he
has satisfactorily completed the second year of the course in
the College of Law.
PRE-MEDICAL COURSE.-Students intending to study medi-
cine are advised to take the regular B. S. course. Inasmuch,
however, as there is a demand for a pre-medical course on the
part of those who are unable to spend four years on a non-
professional course, the University offers two courses prepara-
tory to the study of medicine. The One-year Course is ar-
ranged for students intending to enter medical schools that
insist upon at least one year of collegiate work before the study
of medicine is begun; the Two-year Course, for students desir-
ing to enter institutions that require at least two years of pre-
liminary collegiate work. If a choice is to be made, the Two-
year Course is recommended even for those who expect to at-
tend a medical school that has the one-year requirement.







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CURRICULUM
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts
Freshman Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER \WVEEi
E english I......................... Rhetoric ..................................................-..... 3
Foreign Language I......French, German, Greek, Latin, or Spanish 3
History I.........................Modern European History............................
Mathematics I................Plane Analytic Geometry, College Algebra .
Military Science I..........Regulations ................................................... 1
E elective .......................... ......... ....... ...... .... .... ....... .......... ..
1'
Sophomore Year
G roup II .................................................................... ..... ................. .
G group III .................................................................................................... 3
G group IV .................................................................................................... 3
Group IV .....................-- ....---......-- ....----..-...---
M military Science II....................................................................................
Group II or III or in both........................................-............................

1C

CURRICULUM
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science
Freshman Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEKL
Botany I..........................General Botany .......................................... .. ..
English I........................- R rhetoric .......................................................... ?
Foreign Language I.....French, German, Greek, Latin, or Spanish .. 3
Mathematics I...............Plane Analytic Geometry, College Algebra
M military Science I......... Regulations .................................................... 1
E elective .................................................................................................... .


Sophomore Year
Group II ----------------------------------------------------------
G roup II ............................................................................................................
G roup III ............................................................................................. .......... 3
G group IV ........................................................................................................... 9
M military Science II .................................................................. ........................ 1
16

In the Junior and Senior years candidates for either of the
degrees offered must choose their studies so as to conform to
the general "Requirements for Degrees" of this College.







COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 49

CURRICULUM
ONE-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL COURSE

N.'I.ES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
Botany I..................................... General Botany............................................ 3
Ch. -mistry I...............................Inorganic Chem istry .................................. 3
(Clhemistry II..............................General Laboratory Chemistry................ 2
Fi ch I-.............-....... ..........-- Elem entry Course ..................................
.r [ 3
(,-rman I..................... ............ Elem entry Course..................................
F'h; ics I....................... .......------Mechanics, Heat, Acoustics, Optics........ 3
Ph: sics II...................-------- ...-- ..Laboratory Work to accompany Physics I 2
Zology I...................................General Zoology .......................................... 3

19

CURRICULUM
TWO-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL COURSE
First Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
CI nmistry I.--.....----..............Inorganic Chemistry .........-----......................... 3
Chemistry II............. ..-- -----General Laboratory Chemistry................ 2
Fi ench I...................................... Elem entry Course ..................................
,:r 3
F'. i nhan I-----------------Elementary Course---------------1-
(B,- man I...................................Elem entry Course..................................
lPly'ics I ...........----------- mechanics Heat, Acoustics, Optics........ 3
FPh: ics II---......................--------.......aboratory Work to accompany Physics I 2
Zo,. logy I............-..........--.... .... General Zoology ------------................................... 3

16
Second Year
lE-cteriology Ia.........................General Bacteriology.................................. 1
Botany I..........-........................- General Botany................................----------...... 3
(:Climistry V......----------.. ... Organic Chemistry ....--...... -----........................ 4
En,lish I...........................-- --........-- Advanced College Rhetoric........................ 3
Fiench II.........................--------...........ntermediate Course ..............................
Cor .
Sman .................................Interm ediate Course ..............................
Z...Ilogy IV --...V-----... --.--.Vartebrate Morphology.............................. 3

171


u. f.-4







50 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION
ANCIENT LANGUAGES
Professor Anderson
The study of the classics contributes largely to general cul-
ture. In addition to the recognized and peculiar disciplinary
value of such studies and their conspicuous service in cultivat-
ing the literary sense and developing literary taste, they have
a more immediate value and office as aids to the comprehension
and interpretation of modern languages and literature:. A
thoro study and a full understanding of the modern languages,
especially the Romance languages and our own tongue, de-
mand a considerable preliminary acquaintance with Latin and
Greek. Thus from two points of view, that of their own in-
trinsic beauty and value as culture studies and that of aids
to the study of other languages, Latin and Greek command
our attention and call for a large place in any curriculum
which proposes to issue in a liberal education.
The following courses are offered for the coming year:
LATIN
LATIN I.-Ovid, about 2,000 verses selected from his
various works, but mainly from the Metamorphoses; Versifica-
tion, with especially reference to the Dactylic Hexameter and
Pentameter; Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia. (3
hours.)
LATIN II.-Selections from the Roman Historians, especial-
ly Livy and Sallust, and from the Satires, Epistles, Odes, and
Epodes of Horace, with a study of the Horatian Metres. (3
hours.)
LATIN III.-Juvenal's Satires, with some omissions; Taci-
tus, parts of the Histories or Annals; selections from Catullus,
Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. (3 hours.)
LATIN IV.-Several plays of Plautus and Terence; Tacitus,
Germania and Agricola; selections from Seneca, Gellius, and
Quintilian. 3 hours.)
LATIN Vb.-History of Roman Literature, preceded by a
short study of Roman Life and Customs. (Second semester;
3 hours.)
LATIN VI.-Grammar and Prose Composition: an inter-






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


mediate course in Prose Composition adapted to the needs of
students taking Latin I or II and consisting of weekly written
exercises and some oral work; in connection with this there
will be a general review of Latin Grammar with some more
advanced work, both in forms and syntax. (2 hours.)
LATIN VII.-Advanced Prose Composition: a continuation
of Latin VI, open only to those students who have completed
Latin VI or equivalent. (2 hours.)
GREEK
GREEK I.-The forms and most important principles of the
syntax; numerous exercises, partly oral, partly written, and
some practice in conversation and sight reading. One book of
Xenephon's Anabasis, with exercises in Prose Composition and
study of the Grammar. (3 hours.)
GREEK II.-Xenephon's Anabasis, Books II, III and IV;
selections from Lucian and the easier dialogues of Plato; sight
translation; Prose Composition; Grammar. (3 hours.)
GREEK III.-Select orations of Lysias or other Attic ora-
tors, with informal talks on Athenian Laws and Customs;
parts of the Iliad and Odyssey of Homer; Prosody. (3 hours.)
GREEK IV.-Selections from the Greek historians, especial-
ly Herodotus and Thucydides; from the Greek dramatists,
especially Euripides and Sophocles; from the lyric fragments
of Alcaeus, Sappho, etc. (3 hours.)
GREEK Va.-History of Greek Literature, preceded by a
short study of Greek Life and Customs. A knowledge of the
Greek language is highly desirable, but is not required for
this course. (First semester; 3 hours.)
GREEK VI.-Grammar and Prose Composition: an inter-
mediate course in Prose Composition adapted to the needs of
students taking Greek III or IV and consisting of weekly
written exercises and some oral work; in connection with this
there will be a general review of Greek Grammar with some
more advanced work, both in forms and syntax. (2 hours.)
GREEK VII.-Selections from the Septuagint and from the
New Testament; class and parallel translations; vocabulary,
grammar, and stylistic features stressed. (3 hours.)
BIBLICAL INSTRUCTION
Professor Buchholz
The following courses are offered to Juniors and Seniors,
embracing such aspects of Biblical study as the University is






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


prepared to give, with a view to providing a major 'sullject in
the Bachelor of Arts curriculum that will permit student- to
begin preparation for such work as secretary or physical di-
rector of the Young Men's Christian Association, for welfare
work in mills or social settlements, or for the ministry. The
courses offered will be conducted by the instructors in the de-
partments under which the various aspects of the subject nat-
urally fall and will be given in a spirit free from any narrow
sectarianism.
BIBLE I.-Old Testament History.-The student will be
made familiar with the history of the Israeliti-h nation as nar-
rated in the books of the Old Testament; the connection- be-
tween sacred and profane history will be studied; and some
conception of the development of the cultural, ethical, and
spiritual life of the nation will be gained. The course will
also aim to give the student a keen appreciation of the Bible
as the best guide for human conduct. (3 :hours. Prof,_s.cr'r
Buchholz.)
BIBLE II.-New Testament History.-This course embraces
the period from Herod the Great to the death of Jolhn the
Evangelist. A thoro knowledge of the life of Christ and
the development of the early church will be the main end in
view. Lectures and Bible readings in connection with a regular
text suggest in a general way the nature of the course. (3
hours. Professor Buchholz.)
BIBLE III.-The English Bible as Literatu ,:r.-The various
literary types found in the Bible will be studied and the ex-
cellence of the work as compared with other great examilile-
of literature will be discussed. The diction of the 1611 version
will be compared with that of the earlier and more recent
translations and its effect upon English literature will be dem-
onstrated. (3 hours. Professor Farr.)
BIBLE IV.-Old and New Testament Greck.-See Greek
VII. (3 hours. Professor Anderson.)
BIBLE V.-The Bible as an Ethical and Rcligi,"urs Guidlc.-
(Consideration of the Bible as a guide for human conduct.)
Those parts of the Old and New Testament which libring out
most vividly and directly the moral and religious elements will
receive most attention. The course will aim to give each stu-
dent that appreciation of the Bible which all should ha\e.
Lectures, Bible readings, studies of great sermon s, and a text







COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


on Evidences of Christianity suggest in a general way the
nature of the course. (3 hours. Professor Cox.)

BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY
For a description of the laboratories and collections of this
department, see pages 19 and 20.
ZOOLOGY
Professor Davis
ZOOLOGY I.-General Zoology.-Typical examples illustrat-
in;, tlhe various groups of the animal kingdom are studied, the
ob.ie.t being to give the student a comprehensive idea of the
structure, physiology, and activities of animals. (3 hours.)
ZOOLOGY II.-Vertebrate Morphology.-Recitations and
lectures on the comparative anatomy of vertebrates, accompa-
nied by laboratory work on representatives of the principal
groups. (3 hours.)
ZOOLOGY IIIb.-Entomology.-Careful attention is given
to the structure of insects in general, after which the insect
orders are considered, the student being expected to recognize
the various orders and the more common families. Emphasis
is given to the economic side of entomology. (Second semes-
ter; 3 hours.)
ZOOLOGY IV.-Physiology and Hygiene.-Lectures and
recitations on general physiology, hygiene, and sanitation. (2
hlt'ls.)
ZOOLOGY V.-Histology and Cytology.-A study of the
minute anatomy of the cells and tissues that make up the va-
i ious organic of the vertebrate body. Special attention is given
to histological technic. (3 hours.)
ZOOLOGY VI.-Vertebrate Embryology.-Recitations and
lectures on the development of vertebrates, with special refer-
ence to the chick. Laboratory work on the development of the
chi :l:. (3 hours.)
ZOOLOGY VIIa.-General Biological Problems.-Lectures
and collateral reading on such general problems as variation,
adaptation, heredity, and organic evolution. Special attention
i' paid to the results of recent experimental work. (Elective,
.,liect to the permission of the instructor; first semester; 3
hou,'r.'.)





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BACTERIOLOGY
Professor Davis
Mr. Hunter
BACTERIOLOGY Ia.-General Bacteriology .-A general in-
troduction to bacteriology, designed to afford the student a
comprehensive knowledge of bacteria and their relation to
every-day life. (Prerequisite, Chemistry I (urnd citir" Bo tany
I or Zoology I; first semester; 3 hours.)
BACTERIOLOGY IIb.-Agricultural Bctf: riolog:j.-Special
attention is given to the bacteria of soil and dairy products,
with some consideration of the bacterial diseases of animals
and plants. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
BACTERIOLOGY IIIb.-Advanced Bact erioloigy.-Labo ratory
work with collateral reading along special lines adapted to the
needs of the individual student. (Second scnicster; 3 hours.)
GEOLOGY
Professor Davis
GEOLOGY Iab.-General Geology.-A general introductory
course. The first semester is devoted to the study of physical
geology, the second to historical geology. (3 hoais.)

BOTANY
Professor Floyd
Mr. Hunter
The department is well equipped for carrying on the work.
It has large, well-lighted laboratories, a description of which
will be found on page 18. Plants for study can be easily ob-
tained at all seasons of the year. The flora of the vicinity is
rich in the number of important species and additional ma-
terial may be secured from the horticultural grounds.
BOTANY I.-General Botany.-The study in the classroom
and laboratory of the structure, morphology, evolution, and
classification of plants. Work is done on special types, begin-
ning with the simplest and advancing to the more complex.
Field work is undertaken during the spring months. (3
hours.)
BOTANY IIa.-Plant Physiology.-The life processes of
plants, such as how water is taken up and disposed of, rela-
tion to the soil, nutrition, respiration, irritability, etc., are di-
rectly investigated. Much of the work is done in the labora-
tory and garden. (First semester; 3 hours.)


/1




COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


BorANY IIIb.-Histology and Plant Anatomy.-The struc-
ture and development of plant tissues in relation to their func-
tion. Practice in fixing, staining, and mounting microscopic
slides. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
BOT. NY IVa.-General Morphology of Thallophytes.-De-
signed for students desiring advanced work on the algae and
fungi with reference to classification, differentiation, and mor-
phology. Fresh-water algae will be studied from living speci-
mens in the laboratory, and students will make permanent mi-
croscopic slides of the species studied. Many of the marine
algae will be studied from preserved specimens. The study of
the fungi prepares for Plant Pathology. The field work will
consist of collecting and identifying the fungus flora of this
vicinity. (Prerequisite, Botany I; first semester; 3 hours.)
BOTANY Vb.-General Morphology of the Higher Plants.-
A study of the Bryophytes, Pteridophytes, and Spermatophy-
tes, with reference to classification, morphology, and differen-
tiation. In the field work and in the laboratory the student
will learn to recognize all the common liverworts, mosses,
ferns, fern allies and conifers, and the more important groups
of the Monocotyledons and Dicotyledons, especially those of
economic importance. (Prerequisite, Botany I; second semes-
ter: 3 lo'lrs.)
BOTANY VIa.-Plant Pathology.-The nature and causes
of plant diseases, especially those due to parasitic fungi. Lab-
oratory and field work on forms of greatest economic impor-
tance in the State. (First semester; 3 hours.)
BOTANY VIIb.-Plant Pathology (Advanced.) -Methods of
culture and investigation of organisms causing plant diseases.
This course is intended to prepare students for original inves-
tigation. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
CHEMISTRY
Professor Flint
The facilities for instruction in chemistry compare favor-
ably with those of the larger institutions of the South and are
being steadily improved. The department is equipped with
the necessary apparatus and material for instruction in gen-
eral inorganic and organic, analytical, and industrial chemis-
try. See page 18.
A course in general inorganic chemistry is given the first
year. The second year is devoted mainly to qualitative, the


L






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


third to quantitative analysis. Because of the electives offered,.
a student can get four years of chemistry and specialize in
analytical work in the fourth year. Abundant laboratory work
is offered in all courses.
CHEMISTRY I.-General Inorganic Chemist rir.-Du) ring the
first semester the non-metallic elements are studied by means
of textbook, lectures, and recitations. Special attention is
given to the principles underlying chemical union and to the
theories and laws which govern the science. In the -ecound -e-
mester the metals and their more important comi.ullmiids are
studied. (3 hours.)
CHEMISTRY II.-Laboratory Course in Gea cral Chlicnist rf .
-In order to impress upon their minds the principle.- of the
science, students are required to repeat in the laboratory ni.lny
of the experiments seen in the lecture-room, take notes o:f the
same, and, as far as possible, write the chemical reactions.
Each student is required to perform more than a hundred ex-
periments illustrating chemical principles and inc-luding the
preparation of many of the elements and their most impoi ta it
compounds. In the second semester the laboratory work is
designed to study the reactions of the metals with a view to
their classification, a portion of the time being devoted to dry
analysis. (2 exercises a week.)
CHEMISTRY III.-Laboratory Course in Qualitat i c .4 naly-
sis.-(3 exercises a week.)
CHEMISTRY IV.-Course III, with two additional exercises
a week. (5 exercises a week.)
CHEMISTRY V.-Organic Chemistry.-Lectur es. rec ita-
tions, and laboratory work. The laboratory work is designed
to illustrate principles studied in the text, as \well as to give
practice in making pure organic preparations. (5 thour'.)
CHEMISTRY VII.-Quantitative Analysie.-(St i.ior ckIc.-
tive; 3 hours.)
CHEMISTRY VIII.-Exercises in quantitative analysi il-
lustrating the operations involved in the gravimetric, vo:lu-
metric, and electrolytic methods in vogue. During the second
semester the exercises are so arranged as to aid the individual
student in preparing for his life-work-medicine, pharmacy.
analytical chemistry, etc. (7 hours.)
CHEMISTRY IXa or b.-Lectures on agricultural chemnist-ry
embracing the chemistry of soils, the atmosphere, plant and






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


animal growth and feeding, fertilizers, dairy products, insecti-
cides, etc. (Either semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
Professor Farr
Mr. Robertson
The work is designed to meet the requirements for a prac-
tical and liberal education, and is regarded both as a necessary
a i xiliary to the training in the technical courses and as an im-
portant factor among the liberalizing studies. The three sides
of the subject, Rhetoric, Linguistics, and Literature, are pre-
sented as fully as time will permit. Rhetoric and composition
ai e stressed in the lower classes, literary studies and linguistic
work in electives; nevertheless the attempt is made to keep the
three viewpoints before all classes as necessary to a mastery
of their native language.
ENGLISH I.-Advanced College Rhetoric.-Designed to
train the students in methods of clear and forceful expression.
Instruction is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in
rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing, the constant correla-
tion of the three as methods of approach to the desired goal
being kept in view. In addition a private reading course is
assigned to each student. (Required of all Freshmen; 3
It ours.)
ENGLISH IIa.-Development of English Prose.-This will
follow the method of Minto's Manual in tracing historically
the growth of English prose literature, supplemented by collat-
eral readings and by essays. (First semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH IIb.-Development of English Poetry.-A contin-
uation of English IIa, applying the method outlined to the
study of Ep'glish poetry. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH IIIa.-Milton and the Epic.-A study of Paradise
Lost, around which are grouped studies in the Age of Milton
and in the Epic as a type of Comparative Literature. The first
four books of the poem are read in class. Written reviews on
the remaining books alternate each week with essays from the
student and lectures by the instructor. A reading course in
the minor poets of the age and in the English translations of
the great epics is assigned to each student. (First semester;
3 hours.)
ENGLISH IIIb.-Shakespeare and the Drama.-This course
follows the above method. Three of the Shakespearian plays






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


are read in class. On eight others a written review is held
each fortnight and on the alternate week essays are written
by the students and lectures are given by the instructor.
Readings in the English drama from the Cycle plays to con-
temporary production are assigned. (Second se)kneter: 3
hours.)
ENGLISH IVa.-American Poetry.-A rapid survey of the
development of poetry in the United States, follov.ed by a
critical study of a few of the more important authors
(Bryant, Whittier, Longfellow, Emerson, Lowell. Poe).
(First semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH IVb.-Southern Literature.-A detailed study of
the literature of the South with extensive reading and essay
work and an examination of the claims of Florida authors.
(Second semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH V.-The English Novel.-A study of the chron-
ological development and technique of the novel; the student
reads a list of novels chosen to illustrate chronology and
variety of species, analyzes minutely one novel from the
technical side, masters the entire work and life of one nov-
elist, and compares closely a novel and a dramatized version
of it. It is hoped the student may be so grounded in the
classics and his taste and judgment so trained that his read-
ing of novels may not become mere intellectual dissipation.
(3 hours.)
ENGLISH VI.-The Romantic Revival.-A study in liter-
ary movement. The causes and forces which underlie the
movement, its phenomena and the authors and works which
exhibit them, and a comparison.with other movements in
literature will be considered. The work of Prof. Beers will
be used as a basis and the student will be led, by means of
extensive reading, by investigation and essays, and by lec-
tures on the wider ranges of the subject, to realize the truth
of his statements. (3 hours.)
ENGLISH VII.-Anglo-Saxon Grammar and Readring.-
Drill in the forms of the early language and an elementary
view of its relations to the other members of the Aryan fam-
ily and of its development into Modern English. The texts
in Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader are studied and Cook's edi-
tion of Judith is read. (3 hours.)
ENGLISH VIII.-Chaucer and Middle English Grammar.-
During the first semester, the works of Chaucer are read in






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


and out of class. The pronunciation, grammatical forms,
scansion, condition of text, analogues, and sources are closely
examined. During the second semester, Morris and Skeats'
Specimens, Part II, is studied in connection with informal
lectures on Middle English viewed as developing from Anglo-
Saxon into Modern English. (Prerequisite; English VII; 3
hours.)
ENGLISH IX.-Engineering Exposition.-This course will
attempt to give special training to the Engineering student
in the preparation of the various kinds of writing that he
will be called upon to do ,in the pursuit of his profession. It
will consist largely of the writing of papers (upon subjects
assigned by the departments in the College of Engineering),
which will be criticised and revised. (Engineering Seniors;
1 hour.)
EXPRESSION AND PUBLIC SPEAKING
Mr. Chapman
EXPRESSION AND PUBLIC SPEAKING.-Particular attention
is given to establishing a correct method of breathing, to cor-
recting faulty articulation, and to teaching the principles of
interpretation by voice, gesture, and facial expression.
A small tuition fee is charged.
HISTORY AND ECONOMICS
Professor Ault
The purpose of the courses offered in this department is
to train students to use historical and economic material with
discrimination; to develop a general knowledge of European,
English, and American History, so indispensable to a general
college-course and especially to a study of the Social Sciences;
to furnish students with a survey of economic life and
thought, such as every educated man is now supposed to
have; and to explain the economic principles lying back of
our present day wealth-getting and wealth-dispensing activ-
ities.
Students entering the University for the first time who
have not had satisfactory courses in European or American
History are advised to include these subjects in their courses
of study as a general cultural foundation for their other
work. With these should be included Economics I, which is
a prerequisite to the other courses offered in Economics.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


With the exceptions of History I and II and of Economics
I, all the courses listed below will not be offered each year.
HISTORY
HISTORY Ia and Ib.-European History.-A general sur-
vey of the growth of civilization in Europe from the earliest
times to the present. Emphasis given to the eighteenth.
nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. (3 hoi._.)
HISTORY IIa.-The American Colonies to ;'1: l..-Europani
background of colonial history; the discovery and settlement
of America; the development of the social, economic, and po-
litical life of the colonies; growth of American institutions.
(First semester; 3 hours.)
HISTORY IIb.-Early History of the Uiittd States. ; .,:-
1850.-The causes of the Revolution; the struggle for inde-
pendence; the formation of the government: its early opera-
tion; the origin and growth of political parties: development
of the nation. (Second semester; 3 hour..)
HISTORY IIIa.-Recent History of the United Storrti. 1550-
1915.-The slavery conflict; the Civil War: the period of re-
construction in the South; the industrial expansion; the rise
of political issues; United States as a world power. (First
semester; 3 hours.)
HISTORY IIIb.-European History, 115-!1i5.-Recon-
struction of Europe after the overthrow of Napoleon: indus-
trial revolution and social conditions; the revolutions of 1830
and 1848; the unification of Italy and of Germany; the com-
mercial and industrial growth of Germany and Great Brit-
ain; the awakening of Russia; the Near Eastern question:
European colonial possessions in Africa; intellectual and cul-
tural progress during the century. (S:,cond s,,,'i.itFr: 3
hours.)
HISTORY IV.-English History.-An elementary outline
course, emphasizing the struggle for constitutional govern-
ment; the international struggle for commercial and colonial
supremacy; the industrial revolution; social and political re-
forms. (3 hours.)
ECONOMICS
ECONOMICS I.-Principles of Econonic.'.--The leading
facts regarding business, money, banking, indlnustrial organi-
zation, labor, taxation, tariffs, and governmental regulation.
(3 hours.)






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


ECONOMICS IIa.-Money and Banking.-A brief historical
treatment of banks and banking together with the principles
which underlie the successful operation of these institutions.
(First semester; 3 hours.)
ECONOMICS IIb.-Corporation Finance.-The rise, growth,
and development of large business organizations; pools,
trusts, corporation, and holding companies; the rights of
"vested interests"; monopolistic tendencies; governmental
regulation, etc. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
ECONOMICS IIIa.-Public Finance and Taxation.-Rev-
enues and expenditures of public bodies, federal, state, and
local; the problems of budgetary reform and taxation; the
leading features of European systems of finance; proposals
for reform. (First semester; 3 hours.)
ECONOMICS IIIb.- Transportation.- The problems of
transportation; public and private interests involved; the
principles of regulation; and the judicial control of common
carriers. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
ECONOMICS IVa.-Economic History of the United States.
-A general but comprehensive study of the growth of
American industry and commerce with the social and eco-
nomic problems involved. (First semester; 3 hours.)
ECoNoMICS IVb.-Labor Problems.-A brief history of
industrial labor problems in Europe and America; trade
unions; employers' associations; and social reforms. (Second
semester; 3 hours.)

MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY
Professor Keppel
MATHEMATICS
The work in the Department of Mathematics is planned
with a threefold purpose in view:
1. For students who intend to specialize in Mathematics
it provides the preparation for more advanced work. Several
advanced courses are offered each year for this class of
students.
2. To those who need Mathematics as an instrument it
offers opportunities to become familiar with this instrument.
The application of Calculus not only to Physics, Chemistry,
and Engineering, but even to such seemingly remote realms
as Psychology and Political Economy, makes it advisable






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


that this class should continue the study of Mathematics at
least so far as to include Calculus.
3. To others it gives logical training in Analysis and
Proof, introduces them to that scientific method par excel-
lence of the Hypothesis, and develops the idea of a deductive
system in its classical form.
The following courses are offered each year:
MATHEMATICS A.-Solid Geometry. (2 hours.)
MATHEMATICS B.-Plane and Spherical Trigonometry.
(2 hours.)
MATHEMATICS I.-Plane Analytic Geometry and College
Algebra. (3 hours.)
MATHEMATICS II.-Spherical Trigonometry and Elemen-
tary Calculus. (1 hour.)
MATHEMATICS III.-Differential and Integral Calculus. (3
hours.)
MATHEMATICS IV.-Solid Analytic Geometry and Calculus.
(2 hours.)
MATHEMATICS V.-Advanced Calculus and Differential
Equations. (3 hours.)
The following advanced courses are offered for 1917-18:
MATHEMATICS VI.-Theory of Equations and Modern
Higher Algebra. (3 hours.)
MATHEMATICS VII.-Modern Projective Geometry. (3
hours.)
A course on the Teaching of Mathematics was given in
1916-17.
ASTRONOMY
In connection with the Department of Mathematics a
course in GENERAL ASTRONOMY is offered, consisting of lec-
tures and recitations, with practical exercises. No knowledge
of advanced mathematics is presupposed. (2 hours.)

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
Major Walker
Sergeant Jones
Military instruction is not optional, ,but is required by
law-by the law of the United States and by the law of the
State.
The instruction is both practical and theoretical. The
practical course consists of drills, target practice, and other






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


military exercises. The drills proper do not exceed three
hours per week.
The course in military science is necessary for graduation
and is, except as noted below, required of all students.
EXCUSED FROM MILITARY DUTY.-Law students, gradu-
ates, Seniors, Juniors in the Teachers College, mature stu-
dents taking special courses, those holding discharges from
the U. S. army, navy or marine corps after at least one term
of enlistment, and the physically disqualified.
The physically disqualified will be required to submit a
certificate to that effect from the resident physician and will
also, prior to graduation, be required to make up an equival-
ent amount of work in this or some other department.
Those who have served for three years in the national
guard may be excused from drills and, provided they pass an
examination under the Professor of Military Science and
Tactics, also from theoretical work.
Students will be given credit, year for year, for work done
at military schools having army officers as instructors.
Those taking the One-Year Course in Agriculture will be
excused from the theoretical, but not from the practical
course.
All applications to be excused from military duty for other
reasons must be submitted to the Professor of Military Sci-
ence and Tactics and all who are required to take military
work must report to him within five days after registering at
the University.
The General Faculty has adopted the following rules:
1. Two (2) credit hours shall be the equivalent of three
(3) drill hours.
2. Sttidents from other institutions entering the Junior
or Senior class without having had the requisite amount of
military instruction shall, unless physically disqualified, be
required to take military science and drill for two (2) years,
or one (1) year, respectively, excepting that in the Senior
year a study equivalent may be substituted for drill.
3. Pupils entering the eleventh or twelfth grades shall
be excused after drilling for three (3) years here.
The National Defense Act of June 3, 1916, provides for
the organization of an Officers' Reserve Corps. It is to be
composed of various elements, such as the Infantry Officers'
Reserve Corps, the Cavalry Officers' Reserve Corps, etc.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The members of this corps may be assigned to temporary
duty in time of peace or to duty in time of war-the assign-
ments being made by the President of the United States.
While so assigned they receive the pay and allowances of
their grade.
One method of securing members of this corps, is by util-
izing the voluntary services of graduates of universities and
colleges that maintain a course of military instruction.
The act of June 3, authorizes the President to establish
and maintain at such institutions a Reserve Officers' Training
Corps (R. O. T. C).
The R. O. T. C. is composed of two divisions: a senior
division and a junior division. The first or senior division
being maintained at those institutions having a four-year
course leading to a degree-the junior division, with some
exceptions, being maintained at other institutions.
Each division consists of units-such as infantry units.
artillery units, etc.
Under the provisions of the act of June 3, the Secretary
of War has prescribed a standard course of instruction cov-
ering four years. The first two years' course is compulsory
and its successful completion necessary for graduation. The
second two years' course is voluntary upon the part of the
student. However, having once entered upon the course, in
order to secure the benefits accruing, the student must carry
it to a completion, and time lost must be made up in order
to secure the credits necessary for graduation.
Membership in this corps is restricted to the physically
fit students who are over fourteen years of age and who are
citizens of the United States. No member of the U. S. Aimy.
Navy or Marine Corps, or of the National Guard or Naval
Militia is eligible for membership in the R. 0. T. C A mem-
ber of the National Guard may secure his discharge from the
same by signing a contract to enter the corps.
Sec. 50, Act of June 3, reads: When any member of the
Senior division of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps has
completed two academic years of service in that division, and
has been selected for further training by the president of the
institution, and by its professor of military science and tac-
tics, and has agreed in writing to continue in the Reserve
Officers' Training Corps for the remainder of his course in
the institution, devoting five hours per week to the military






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


training prescribed by the Secretary of War, and has agreed
in writing to pursue the courses in camp training prescribed
by the Secretary of War, he may be furnished, at the expense
of the United States, with commutation of subsistence at such
rate, not exceeding the cost of the garrison ration prescribed
for the Army, as may be fixed by the Secretary of War, dur-
ing the remainder of his service in the Reserve Officers'
Training Corps ".
The commutation of subsistence will probably be between
$7.00 and $8.00 per month The camp training at present
is limited to four weeks at the end of the Junior year and a
like period at the end of the Senior year. Commutation is
not paid, but subsistence in kind is furnished during the
encampment.
The President is authorized to appoint in the Officers'
Reserve Corps any graduate of the Senior division of the
R. O. T. C. who shall have satisfactorily completed the pre-
scribed courses of military training, including the practical
instruction subsequent to graduation, who shall have arrived
at twenty-one years of age and who shall agree, under oath
in writing, to serve the United States in the capacity of a
reserve officer of the Army during a period of at least ten
years from the date of such appointment, unless sooner dis-
charged by proper authority. Postgraduates are not eligible
for this appointment while pursuing the postgraduate course,
but they may receive an appointment later.
The President is authorized to appoint and commission as
a temporary second lieutenant of the regular army, in time
of peace and for the purposes of instruction, for a period not
exceeding six months, with the allowances now provided by
law for that grade, but with pay at the rate of $100.00 per
month, any reserve officer appointed as above described.
Upon the expiration of this service with the Regular Army
such officer shall revert to his status as a reserve officer..
Under the present regulations this appointment and as-
signment to duty with the army may immediately follow
graduation, in which case the four weeks' course at the train-
ing camp will be omitted.
Upon the application of the President of the University,
approved by the Board of Control, an Infantry Unit, senior
division, R. O. T C., has been established at the University
of Florida.


u.f.-5






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The War Department has ruled that the'course main-
tained at this University during the years 1914-15 and 1915-
16 was substantially equivalent to the first two years of the
standard course now prescribed. Hence tho-e \'ho completed
the courses during those years are eligible for the benefit.
offered under the third and fourth years of the standard
course.
After a unit, R. O. T. C., has been establi-hed, the War
Department is authorized to issue to the in-titution for e-ach
member of the unit, the following articles of uniform :
1 pair breeches, woolen, olive drab.
1 cap, olive drab.
1 coat, woolen, olive drab.
1 leggins, canvas, pair.
1 cap and collar ornament, set.
1 pair shoes, russet.
When the individual members of the unit have agreed in
wrtiing to participate in the prescribed coulse of in-ti tlc-
tion, the following additional uniform is authorized for i--ue
to the institution:
For each member who so agrees:
1 hat, service.
1 hat cord.
2 pairs breeches, cotton, olive drab.
2 shirts, flannel, olive drab.
Though issued for the use of individual nmemblers of the
unit, the uniform remains the propel ty of the United State-.
COURSE OF TRAINING FOR INFANTRY UNITS OF TIE SENIOR
DIVISION
MILITARY SCIENCE I.-1. Military Ait i3 lI,,,tor I"
week, counting 14 units): (a) Practical iDrill-). Weight
10. (b) Theoretical (Class Room). Weight 4. (1 S',.:. t t
hour.)
2. Military Art. (3 hours per we, k. counting 14 unit-) :
(a) Practical. Weight 10. (b) The.iletical. Weight 4. (1
Semester hour).
(1 and 2 required of Freshmen.)
MILITARY SCIENCE II.-3. Military Art. (3 Ithor,: /cr
week, counting 14 units): (a) Practical. \eight 10. (b)
Theoretical. Weight 4. (1 Semester Ilh''i.)
4. Military Art. (3 hours per w' k. counting 14 units) :






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


(a) Practical. Weight 10. (b) Theoretical. Weight 4. (1
Semester hour.)
(3 and 4 required of Sophomores.)
MILITARY SCIENCE III.-5. Military Art. (5 hours per
week, counting 24 units) : (a) Practical. Weight 13. (b)
Theoretical. Weight 11. (2 Semester hours.)
6. Military Art. (5 hours per week, counting 24 units) :
(a) Practical. Weight 13. (b) Theoretical. Weight 11. (2
Semester hours.)
(5 and 6 are for Juniors who sign the agreement to re-
main in the R. O. T. C. during the remainder of their courses
at the University.)
MILITARY SCIENCE IV.-7. Military Art. (5 hours per
week, counting 24 units) : (a) Practical. Weight 13. (b)
Theoretical. Weight 11. (2 Semester hours.)
8. Military Art. (5 hours per week, counting 24 units) :
(a) Practical. Weight 13. (b) Theoretical. Weight 11. (2
Semester hours.)
(7 and 8 are for Seniors who have signed the agreement
to remain in the R. 0 T. C. during the remainder of their
courses at the University.)
The units and weights noted above are for use in
military records only. University credits are shown in
semester hours.
MODERN LANGUAGES
Professor Crow
French, German, and Spanish are the subjects taught.
Extensive courses of reading, in and out of class, frequent
exercises, oral and written, and studies in literature and
language fdrm the chief feature of instruction.
Authors and textbooks vary from year to year. Tho the
classics are not neglected, special attention is paid to the
literatures of the Nineteenth Century.
All the courses offered will not be given in any one year.
FRENCH
FRENCH I.-Elementary Course.-Drill in pronunciation
and important grammatical forms, elementary syntax, dicta-
tion, daily written exercises, memorizing of vocabularies and
short poems, translation. (3 hours.)
FRENCH II.-Intermediate Course.-Work of elementary
course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


composition, translation of intermediate and advanced texts,
sight reading, parallel. (3 hours.)
FRENCH III.-Advanced Course.-Syntax, stylistic, comn-
position, history of French literature, selections foom the
dramatists or novelists as class may decide. (3 ht.'s.)
FRENCH IV.-Romance Philology.-(Prerequi. ites. French
III and Latin II; 3 hours.)
GERMAN
GERMAN I.-Elementary Course.-Drill in pronunciation
and important grammatical forms, elementary syntax, dic-
tation, daily written exercises, memorizing of vocabularies
and short poems, translation. (3 hours.)
GERMAN II.-Intermediate Course.-Work of elementary
course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax. prose
composition, translation of intermediate texts, sight reading,
parallel. (3 hours.)
GERMAN III.-Advanced Course.-Syntax, stylistic, com-
position, history of German literature, selections from the
dramatists or novelists. (Prerequisite, German II: 3 ho-rs.)
GERMAN IV.-Scientific Reading Course.-(Prirequ'islie,
German II; 3 hours.)
GERMAN V.-Middle and Old High German.-(Prcrequi-
site, German III; 3 hours.)
SPANISH
SPANISH I.-Elementary Course.-Drills in pronunciation
and important grammatical forms, elementary syntax, dicta-
tion, daily written exercises, memorizing of vocabularies and
short poems, translation. (3 hours.)
SPANISH II.-Intermediate Course.-Work of eleientairy
course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax. prose
composition, translation, parallel. (3 houre)
SPANISH III.-Commercial Correspondt enc.-< (l'tAi.ional,
subject to instructor's permission; hours to be arrarg.ed.)

MUSIC
Miss Mary C. Connor
This Department aims to foster a love for the better class
of music, and to encourage students to use their musical
abilities and training for the benefit of themselves and others.
Instruction is given in piano, violin, and voice. Students






COLLEGE OF "ARTS AND SCIENCES


are expected to take two half hours per week, private in-
struction.
(See the instructor for tuition fees.)
PHILOSOPHY
Professor Cox
The primary aim of this department is to give the student
a broad outlook upon life in general, as well as a better un-
derstanding of his own life from psychological, ethical, and
metaphysical viewpoints. Philosophy lies nearer today than
ever before to the various sciences on the one hand and to
the demands of practical life on the other.
Another very important aim is to aid in the professional
training of teachers. For description of the laboratory
equipment for carrying on mental and physical tests, see
page 20.
Students may begin with Course la, IIa, or IIIa. Juniors
and Seniors may begin also with Course VIIa.
PHILOSOPHY Ia.-General Psychology.-Facts and the-
ories current in general pyschological discussion: the sensa-
tions, the sense organs, and the functions of the brain; the
higher mental functions, such as attention, perception, mem-
ory, feeling, emotion, volition, the self, and like topics. (First
semester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY Ib.-Experimental Psychology.-Mainly lab-
oratory work with standard apparatus on the current prob-
lems in Experimental Psychology. Special attention given to
methods of psychological investigation and the collection and
treatment of data. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY IIa.-Ethics.-Principles of Ethics: study
of such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty, freedom,
civilization, and progress; history of the various Ethical
Systems. (First semester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY IIb.-Practical Ethics.-The moral problems
of the individual and of social life. (Second semester; 3
hours.)
PHILOSOPHY IIIa.-Logic, Inductive and Deductive.-
Practice in the use of syllogisms, inductive methods, logical
analysis, and criticisms of fallacies. (First semester; 3
hours.)
PHILOSOPHY IIIb.-The Philosophical Poets.-Philosophi-
cal problems and their solution as given by the world's great-







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


est poets. Such problems as Creati.m,. Nature. Life. Free-
dom, and Conduct will be given special attention. (S.'ond
semester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY IVa.-Social Psychoil-/,,.- .-I nt rie 1ne-s O:f tlhe
social environment upon the mental and moral .levelopmlent
of the individual. (First semester; 3 h,.or./..
PHILOSOPHY IVb.- Abnormal P.: :I.IholoUji.- A.Inorrril
phases of mental life: dreams, illusi'.i-. I!,alluciailitti.s, su-g-
gestions, hypnotism, hysteria, disease- .A' the memrn,.ry, dis-
eases of the will, etc. Special attention given to: mntital
hygiene. (Second semester; 3 hou ...
PHILOSOPHY Va.-Genetic Psychoil '!p.--The co:ur.-e of de-
velopment in the child from birth t,: ..idt.le-cence. rFir.:t
semester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY Vb.-Genetic Psych.:,l, '!,.-\AimaiLl inlitin1 -'ts
and intelligence. (Second semester; 3 hir.r..)
PHILOSOPHY VIa.-Philosophy of C'.,,i,,..-.-The pl:,llems
of conduct and of religion in the light of co:iitemp'.'rarI' dis-
cussion: the problems of philosophy from tle stanlp.iiit of
practical every-day life. (First sent.c-ti': 3 hour.)
PHILOSOPHY VIb.-Philosophy or .utric.-l\Iun' iela-
tion to and his place in Nature; the varion:us philliosplrical
doctrines: Animism, Pantheism, Materialism. Realismi. Ag-
nosticism, Humanism, Idealism, etc. .S..Curi st?:... te r: 3
hours.)
PHILOSOPHY VIIa.-History of Ar,-it,. Phiil,. .;:, /.-The
development of philosophic thought from its appeara.ice
among the Ionic Greeks to the time :.f Descartes. Special
attention will be given to the philosophy of PlaIt, -nid Arist,.tle.
(First semester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY VIIb.-History of Pl.l,,ilrn Phil ..l/b.-A
continuation of VIIa. Special emphasis. will be put tpo:'i the
study of the works of Descartes, Spino;:.., Leilbnitz. Kant.
Hume, etc. (Second semester; 3 hou- .)
PHILOSOPHY VIIIa.-Advanced P. t,r,/l.,,.-The the.oret-
ical problems in the field of modern IpsychIl,:,gy: the prjic-
tical aspects of psychology as applied to Busines.e. Law,
Medicine, Education, etc. (First sen,.t,.tr; 3 hn.:..)
PHILOSOPHY VIIIb.-Al.4o. titnc P.ichtll ,i.-Cn tinuation
of VIIIa. (Second semester; 3 hour. I






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


PHYSICAL CULTURE AND ATHLETICS
Mr. McCoy
GYMNASTICS.-Drills with dumb bells, Indian clubs,
wands, and free hand; heavy and light work on buck, Ger-
man horse, parallel bars, horizontal bar, etc.; tumbling and
mat; basket ball and other games. The more proficient
gymnasts compete for positions on the Varsity Gymnasium
Team," which gives several public performances during the
year and an exhibition during Commencement week. (Re-
quired of Freshman, optional for others; 3 hours.)
ATHLETICS.-Assisted by special coaches, when needed,
the Physical Director trains the various athletic teams.
PHYSICS
Professor Benton
Mr. Perry
The work of this department is intended to meet the
needs, on the one hand, of those who study physics as a part
of a liberal education and, on the other hand, of those who will
have to apply physics as one of the sciences fundamental to
engineering, or to medicine.
Instruction is given by (1) recitations based upon lessons
assigned in textbooks; (2) laboratory work, in which the
student uses his own direct observation to gain knowledge of
the subject; (3) lectures, in which experimental demonstra-
tions of the principles under discussion are given; and (4)
seminar work in the advanced courses, in which the various
members of the class take up different special problems re-
quiring extended study or investigation and report upon them
in turn.
The' physical laboratory (see page 19) is well equipped
for the experiments usually required in undergraduate labor-
atory work in the best colleges. The equipment has been
greatly increased in the last few years and additions are
made to it from year to year.
The following courses are offered:
PHYSICS I.-General physics, including mechanics, heat,
acoustics, and optics, but not electricity and magnetism. A
knowledge of plane trigonometry is presupposed. Textbook
to be used in 1917-1918: Spinney's Textbook of Physics. (1
lecture and 2 recitations per week.)
PHYSICS II.-General laboratory physics, to accompany






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Physics I. A knowledge of plane trigonometry is presup-
posed. (2 exercises of 2 hours each per w.'...k.)
PHYSICS III.-General electricity and magnetism. being a
continuation of Physics I. Textbook to be used in 1917-
1918: Spinney's Textbook of Physics. (2 r.,ita th.s iu:l
1 2-hour laboratory exercise per week.)
ADVANCED COURSES IN PHYSICS.-Preparation has been
made for offering advanced courses in physics. as electives
for Juniors, Seniors, and Graduate Students. Six such
courses have been planned: Advanced Experimental Phys-
ics, General Mathematical Physics, Mechaiics and Acoustics,
Heat, Optics, Theoretical Electricity. Each of these courses
is arranged to extend thru two semesters and to require
three hours per week of classroom work. or equivalent time
in the laboratory. Any one of these courses v.ill be given
when elected by three or more students.

SOCIOLOGY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
Professor Sims
SOCIOLOGY
SOCIOLOGY I.-Principles of Sociology.-A fundamental
course dealing with society as to its origin, its relation to the
environment, its composition, organization, control, mind,
types of association, institutions, evolution, and progress. (3
hours.)
SOCIOLOGY IIa.-Social Evolution.-The doctrine of evolu-
tion applied to society, human origin, forms of association,
and types of civilization. (Prerequisite, S',ci'olog? /; first
semester; 3 hours.)
SOCIOLOGY IIb.-Progress and Reform.-The rise of the
concept of progress; various theories of progress; factor of
progress; reform proposals-ethical, economic, and biologi-
cal. (Prerequisites, Sociology I and Ia; scund sem:.:stcr; 3
hours.)
SOCIOLOGY IIIa.-Rural Sociology aand Ec.intoi:c,.-The
rural problem-present status, population movements, types
of communities, the rural mind, economic conditions, farm
labor. (First semester; 3 hours.)
SOCIOLOGY IIIb.-Rural Sociology and EIon,....m ic.--RuLral
improvement--health, sanitation, morality; institutions-
school, church, farmers' organizations, home-life, fairs; gov-






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


ernment; cooperation; socialization; progress. (Second
semester; 3 hours.)
*SOCIOLOGY IVa.-Social Psychology.-The social mind-
general view; the mind of primitive and of modern man;
mental types; the role of instinct, feeling, and intellect in
society-mobs; folkways and mores; change and revolution.
(First semester; 3 hours.)
*SOCIOLOGY Vb.-Race Problems.-The negro problem in
its anthropological, social, political, and economic aspects,
etc. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
*SOCIOLOGY VIb.-Modern Social Theories.-Lectures and
readings on the social theories of Comte, Mill, Spencer, Gum-
plowicz, Tarde, Ward, Cooley, Ross, Giddings, and others.
(For graduates and advanced students; second semester; 3
hI: urs.)
*SOCIOLOGY VII.-Seminar.-Problems in statistical meth-
od, etc. (For graduate and advanced students; hours to be
arranged.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLITICAL SCIENCE I.-American Government.-Historical
review; federal, state, and local government; administrative,
legislative, and judicial aspects of government In operation;
political parties and problems. (3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE IIa or b.-Municipal Government.-
Municipal organization and administration in the United
States and Europe. (Either semester; 3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE IIIa.-Democracy.-Primitive, ancient,
modern, and ultimate democracy; democratic and anti-demo-
cratic forces. Special reference to American society. (Sec-
'ud semester; 3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE IIIb.-Principles of Political Science.
-Theory and practice of government in general. (First
sc mester; 3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE IVa or b.-International Law and Di-
plomacy.-Arbitration, courts, diplomacy, world organization.
(Either semester; 3 hours; by special arrangement.)

*Not given in 1917-1918.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
P. H. ROLFS, D,,i,
FACULTY.-P. H Rolfs, O. C. Ault. L. \\. Buchlholz. H. \\'.
Cox, H. S. Davis, J. M. Farr, E. R. Flint. \V. L. Floyd, G. L.
Herrington, C. A. Hunter, H. G. Keppel. I. B. lBadley, C. K.
McQuarrie, E. S. Pace, F. M. Ra.t. Jr., N. L. Sims. A. P.
Spencer, J. E. Turlington, E. S. Walker. O. \. \Veaer. C. L.
Willoughby.
Special Lecturers fo 1'.l7-19l._
Hon. W. A. McRae, Commission:, IrI .-lji*'lltir.
Prof. H. Harold Hume, Presidt n Stfrt. HI-rt;,* lt lrdl S'o-
ciety.
Willmon Newell, State Plant Co' ii, l_..itu A .
Dr. Chas. F. Dawson, Veterinai :n,. Stt. Bohilrd ,:f' Hnlth.
Dr. W. A. Munsell, Assistant l':t.', Snl ;,t. Slt. nr,,oli
of Health.
Dr. E. H. Sellards, State Geol,,,':-'t.
Capt. R. E. Rose, State Chemint.
F. M. O'Byrne, State Nursery li.~ Lct,'r.
Dr. A. H. Logan, Field Agent, U. S. D.-A.. Fler i ", f .Ai-
mal Industry.
Frank Stirling, General Inspect,,. Stote Pl,:t B''irl!.
Dr. E. W. Berger, Entomologist. S,iti. Plnt B.cirl.
Capt. W. D. Purvis, Superintewihlt, t St.t/F P i.i.a Fatri.

GENERAL STATEMENT
AIM AND SCOPE.-The work of the College o:f Agriculture
is carried on in three principal Divisions: Ill The In-
structional Division, which concernt- itself with giving in-
struction to men resident at the University. 12) The Ex-
periment Station Division, the imember- of which devote
their time and energies to ii\estigartion and to publiiatio:,n of
results upon agricultural problems of inteie-t to tih State.
(3) The Extension Division, which ilevotes its energies to
disseminating information obtained by the Experiment Sta-
tion and the U. S. Department of Agriculture-mainly lthi
the organization of the County Cooperative Demonstrattion






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Work, Farmers' Institutes, Boys' Clubs, Girls' Clubs, and
Correspondence Courses.
The College was established under the Acts of Congress
icrrating and endowing colleges for the liberal and practical
e,:iication of the industrial classes in the different states.
The recognition of agriculture as a branch of collegiate in-
struction is a distinctive feature of the institutions thus
f-iunded. The aim of the instructional division of the Col-
lege is to offer young men the best possible preparation for
agricultural pursuits. The courses afford opportunity for
gaining both technical knowledge and training in the art and
science of agriculture. About one-third of the student's time
is devoted to technical agricultural studies and the other two-
thirds to basic sciences and cultural studies. A broad foun-
dation is thus laid which will enable graduates to become
either leaders in educational work or effective producing
agi iculturists.
GROUPS.-The group courses offered during the Sopho-
more, Junior, and Senior years afford opportunity for select-
ing and preparing for the phase of agriculture best suited to
the qualifications and taste of the individual students. The
Agronomy or Animal Husbandry Group should be elected by
those wishing to pursue general farming; the Horticultural
Group, by those interested in fruit production or market
gardening; the Chemical Group, by those wishing to become
agrlicultural analysts; the General Group should appeal to
-tudents seeking a knowledge of the principal subjects em-
braced in all branches of agriculture, and will specially train
mena for service as County Agricultural Experts and Farm
Demonstration Agents, under the appropriations recently
made by Congress under the Smith-Lever Act. In order to
meet the constantly increasing demand for men competent to
giv e instruction in agriculture, a special group has been pre-
pared for teachers, in cooperation with the Teachers College.
SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS.-Available during 1916-1917
were:
William Wilson Finley Foundation, Loan Fund of $1,000.
Corn Club Scholarships-Bankers' Prize of $200; Federa-
tion of Women's Clubs, $50.
County Scholarships.-The Legislature of 1915 made pro-
vision for one scholarship from each county in the State by
the following Act:







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CHAPTER 6837 (No. 31)
Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Flor: l.i:
Section 1. That the Board of County Commissioners .if each c.-unty
in this State is hereby authorized to offer and create 'rnie chrla shi;r to
the Agricultural Department of the Universiy of FIlo ida at Gainesville.
Sec. 2. The said scholarship shall be awarded by competlti\e ex-
amination under the rules and authority prescribed by the said Boaid of
County Commissioners and shall entitle the holder theiPe:. to a full
course of instruction at the University of Florida and shall cubje.ct the
holder thereof to the same rules and regulations as other students at the
University of Florida.
Sec. 3. All applicants for the said scholarship shall be eligible for
admission to the University of Florida and anyone so appointed shall sign
a certificate agreeing, if capable and otherwise qualified, to erngage in
agricultural pursuits in this State. Nothing in this Act shall be con trued
to interfere with their receiving compensation for services rendered v.'hile
engaged in such pursuits.
Sec. 4. That for the purpose of maintaining Fsuch -chrnlars.hips the
Board of County Commissioners of each county in thi- State is heieLby
authorized to appropriate from any funds at their disposal a sunm suff.i
cient to pay the board of the person receiving the said -ihroarehip.
Sec. 5. The term board herein named shall be .cn'rstlued to mean
the regular dormitory rate and shall be paid monthly nhile the holder
of the said scholarship is in attendance at the Univer-ity of Florida.
Sec. 6. All laws and parts of laws in conflict with this Act are heie-
by repealed.
Sec. 7. This Act shall take effect upon its passage and approval.
Approved June 5, 1915.
THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB.-The purpose :,f the Agricul-
tural Club is to train the student in public speaking and in
preparing for leadership. It also gives an opportunity for
gaining a larger familiarity with the general agricultural
trend. Every student is urged to become a member.
EQUIPMENT.-Agricultural Hall.-Agricultural Hall pro-
vides space for department offices; for classrooms in Agron-
omy, Animal Husbandry, and Agricultural Engineering: for
laboratories in soils and fertilizers, crops and grain judging.
farm machinery, farm power, milk testing, dairy manufac-
tures, etc.
The classrooms and laboratories fully meet the present
needs of the College, and a large amount of apparatus has
been added recently that materially strengthens its work.
Donations and Loans.-The laboratories have been sup-
plied with much of their farm machinery for the purpose of
instruction thru the generosity of the following manufac-
turers:
The John Deere Plow Company, Atlanta. Ga.
International Harvester Company, Chicago. III., and Jack-
sonville, Fla.
Stover Manufacturing Company, Freeport, ll.






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Perkins Windmill Company, Mishawaka, Ind.
Wilder-Strong Implement Company, Monroe, Mich.
Bean Spray Pump Company, Lansing, Mich.
The Hardie Manufacturing Company, Hudson, Mich.
The Deming Co., Salem, Ohio.
E. C. Brown Co., Rochester, N. Y.
Library.-A large number of standard works on agricul-
ture and horticulture have recently been added to the general
library. A trained librarian is in charge to aid students in
getting quickly the references needed. Each department
has, furthermore, a small collection of well-selected volumes,
which are always accessible to the students. The Experiment
Station library contains one of the most complete sets of
bulletins from the experiment stations of the world and from
the United States Department of Agriculture. These bulle-
tins are fully indexed and are careful filed. The librarian
of the Experiment Station library is found on duty every
forenoon.
The College Farm.-The College farm, used for instruc-
tion purposes and for growing crops with which to feed the
instruction herds, consists of 225 acres; about 10 acres for
trucking, 100 acres for pasture and general field crops, 5
acres for orchard, 15 acres for soiling purposes and stock
lots, and 5 acres for buildings and grounds. The equipment
includes a hay and storage barn, a farm foreman's house, a
modern dairy barn, a machinery shed and corn crib, a potting
house, and several irrigation systems.
The Experiment Station farm and farm buildings are
easily accessible to students.
AGRONOMY DEPARTMENT
The Agronomy Department occupies four rooms-a large,
well-lighted, well-equipped soil laboratory, with adjoining
storage and work rooms, and a large crop-judging laboratory.
The soil laboratory equipment comprises microscopes,
-ampling augers, tubes, and carriers; balances, ovens, soil
thermometers, packers, cylinders, and tubes; moisture ab-
sorption box with trays; percolation, capillary, and evapora-
tion apparatus; sieves, shaker, etc. The equipment is of the
best type and fully adequate for giving thoro courses in soils.
There are three large stone-top desks with individual lockers






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


for seventy-two students. The storage room is provided with
soil bins, packer, cases and shelving in abundlance.
For Agricultural Engineering work there are two spe-
cially equipped laboratories-the one fo:r farn motors. and
iron work, the other for farm machinery and wood \work.
These laboratories are equipped with a Inage collection of
modern labor-saving machinery: gasoline engines, v.indmills.
feed grinders, stalk cutter, walking and riding pilomws. various
types of harrows, walking and riding cultivators,- seede'rs. ,ine
and two-horse corn planters, manure spreader, surveying im-
plements, etc. Special stress is placed upun instruction in
farm machinery, because labor-saving machinery Ia~ n lt yet
come into general use upon Florida farms.
HORTICULTURAL DEPARTRI NFT
In addition to the lecture room and laboratorie- for in-
door work ample provision is made fori practical \work out-
doors.
A propagating house and nursery on the farm are used
in carrying on stratification, layerage, cottage. budding.
grafting, and other methods of plant propagation.
Trees of different kinds are growing in the orchard.
which, though still small, is being gradually enlarged.
Hot beds and cold frames are provided for starting young
plants. An irrigation plant has been in,-talled \with Skinnei,
Campbell, Florida Favorite, and modified Skinner sprinkling
devices and a surface furrow system.
Large canvas-covered frames for growing crops to) ma-
turity have been constructed for use in \winter.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY DEPA I'I rENT
The Animal Husbandry Departme.,t i- provided with a
lecture and exhibit room containing tiered seats f, r -ixty
students and a paddock, 12x24 feet in size, with concrete
floor and iron railing, for exhibiting animal-. The equip-
ment includes a two-ton Fairbanks platform scale, tape lines,
measuring standards, and projectors. In the new dairy barnl
a stock-judging arena, 30x40 feet, ha- been provided for
practice in scoring animals.
The equipment in Veterinary Science consists of excellent
mounted skeletons of the horse and cow,. several wall chartt
on anatomy and physiology, a set of veterinary operating in-
struments, and sample jars of common dlirug and medicines.






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


For work in Dairying the College has a large, well-lighted
laboratory, equipped with several makes of hand-power
cream separators, churns and butter workers; milk cooler,
gravity creamer, vats for cream ripening and cheese making;
scales, wash sinks, sterilizer, and the cans, buckets, bottles
and brushes necessary for instruction.
The milk-testing laboratory contains working desks and
machinery for all the modern tests of dairy products. The
equipment includes Babcock testers of different sizes, cream
scales, lactometers, acidmeters, butter-moisture tests, and the
necessary glassware, reagents, etc.
The equipment for poultry instruction includes a Cyphers
incubator, brooders, and various poultry-yard appliances.
Poultry breeders of the vicinity aid in the work by lending
selected fowls for judging purposes.
The barns and livestock include a horse barn to accommo-
date the horses and mules used on the farm and campus; a
large new dairy barn of modern sanitary construction, pro-
vided with concrete floors and silos, steel stanchions and
fittings, for housing the herd of high-grade and registered
Jerseys belonging to the Experiment Station; a number of
pens and grazing-yards with modern shelters and equipment,
containing small breeding herds of Berkshire, Poland China,
Duroc Jersey, Tamworth, and Chester White hogs. Other
breeds and classes of animals are being added from year to
year. Several large herds of cattle and hog-breeding estab-
lishments in the vicinity are available for inspection and
judging purposes. A concrete dipping-vat, built in coopera-
tion with the Florida State Board of Health, is used for
demonstrations of cattle-tick eradication.

COURSES OFFERED
The following courses are offered:
1. A Four-Year Course.
2. A Middle Course of Two Years.
3. A One-Year Course.
4. Two Four-Month Courses.
5. A Ten-Day Short Course for Farmers.
6. Fourteen Correspondence Courses for Home Study.






UNIVERSITY OF FLO'II1DA


FOUR-YEAR COURSE
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS.-See pages 34 to 41.
DEGREES.-The Four-Year Course culminating in one of
the six groups--General Agriculture. Agrononmy. Horticul-
ture, Animal Husbandry, Agricultural-Chemical. or Agricul-
tural Education-leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Agriculture (B. S. A.). For the degree of Master of
Science in Agriculture (M. S. A.), see page 43.
CREDITS FOR PRACTICAL WORK.-Students -who. by previ-
ous agreement with the head of a department and the Dean.
do practical work, during their course of study, in any rec-
ognized agricultural pursuit, and who render competent and
faithful service, will, on their return to College and on the
presentation of a written report of their ob-ervations and
experience, be entitled to one semester-hour credit for each
month of such work. Such credit shall not total more than
six semester-hours in the Two-Year and Four-Year courses.
FARM EXPERIENCE REQUIRED.-Students must have at
least three months of practical work before graduation, but
credit will be given for such work only as stated above.
REMUNERATIVE AND INSTRUCTIVE LABOR.-Students are
offered opportunity to do considerable work in the fields and
truck gardens, about the barns, in the buildings, and at the
Agricultural Experiment Station. The compensation ranges
from ten to twenty cents per hour, according to: the experi-
ence of the student and the nature of the work. Those who,
during vacation periods, find employment in agricuLltur'al
pursuits will be markedly benefited and after graduation will
be able to command more desirable positions or will find
their efforts on the farm more effective. ISec also Oppor-
tunities for Earning Expenses, page :;.0.'i
LABORATORY WORK.-Two hours of laboratory work are
considered equivalent to one hour of recitation.
ELECTIVES.-The elective hours in each of the grou.:ps
printed below may be chosen from other groups or from
other colleges of the University; but the choice is. in every
case, subject to the approval of the Dean.






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


CURRICULUM
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
FOR ALL GROUPS
Freshman Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS PER WEEK
Agronomy I...............................Elements of Agronomy........................ 2 2
Horticulture I...........-- ...... ......Plant Propagation............................. 2 2
Animal Husbandry I......-........Types and Breeds of Animals............ 0 4
Agricultural Engineering I...Farm Machinery and Motors.............. 4 0
Botany I -........ --------.General Botany ...................................... 3 3
English I--...........................------.........Advanced College Rhetoric.................. 3 3
Mathematics B........................--Plane Trigonometry ............................------ 2 2
Agricultural Seminar -------- -----........................................................... 0 1
Library Work --.........................-- ....--- .... -----------..............---- 1 0
Military Science I....................Drill and Firing Regulations.............. 1 1

18 18

FOR ALL GROUPS EXCEPT ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
Sophomore Year
A gronom y II..............................Fertilizers .............................................. 0 3
Horticulture II .--------.Trucking ............................................... 2 2
Chemistry I-II..........................General Inorganic Chemistry.............. 5 5
Botany II...--.. ......-.....-- .....- Plant Physiology ........... ........... ...... 3 0
Zoology I...................................General Zoology...............................-------- .. 3 3
Military Science II.................----- Field Regulations and Guard Duty.... 1 1
E lective................................ .............. .................................................... 2 2

16 16
GENERAL GROUP
Junior Year
CI',iemistry III............................Qualitative Analysis............................ 3 0
Chemistry VII.. -------...................Quantitative Analysis.......................... 0 3
D.-. t-ny IV ------------..................................Plant Pathology ........................--....... 3 0
Pa..teriology I.........--...............-- General Bacteriology.. ------.......................... 3 0
E'r. teriology II.............-- .............Agricultural Bacteriology.. ----.................. 0 3
A'- ronomy V.......--------- .....Soil Technology.............----------- 3 3
Z.-,.-.logy III-..--..............---- Entomology .......................................... 0 3
E le .tive................................. ....................... ........................................... 4 4

16 16


Senior Year


Chemistry IX ---............................Chemistry of Soils, Fertilizers, etc. 3 0
S-.ciology III.............................Rural Sociology -- ---...... -- --........................
or 3 3
Economics I---...............................Principles of Economics..................
A-ricultural Education I.......Methods of Teaching Agriculture.... 1 0
Agricultural Education II.....Extension Teaching..-........-------.... 0 2
AL ronomy VI-VII....................-----Farm Management................................ 3 3
Ag ricultural Journalism-........-------............................... -- ....-- -- 0 3
E lective............................... .. ........................................................ .......... 6 5
16 16
*The first column gives the hours per week for the first semester, the
ei.:ond column the hours per week for the second semester.
n, ('.-6







82 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

AGRONOMY GROUP
Junior Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK 'HOURS PER WEEKl
A gronom y III............................Field Crops................................ ......... 0
Agronomy IV............................Forage Crops and Grasses... ... .0 3
Agronomy V..............................Soil Technology..................... ........ 3 3
Chemistry IIIa.....................Qualitative Analysis....... 3 0
Chemistry VIIb.........................Quantitative Analysis........ 3
Botany IV..................................Plant Pathology................ 3 0
Bacteriology I --------..........................General Bacteriology............... 0
Bacteriology II..........................Agricultural Bacteriology.. . 3
Zoology III................................Entomology ................. .. 1 3
Elective.......................... -----...... ................. ............---. ....--.. ... .. .. 1 1
16 16
Senior Year


Agronomy VI-VII----.....---.....---Farm Management........... ....... 3
Horticulture X ....................Landscape Gardening ...... ............ 0
Agricultural Engineering II....Buildings, Roads, Irrigation, and
D rainage.................... ................ 3
Chemistry IX............................Chemistry of Soils, Fertilizers, etc. 3
Economics I...............................Principles of Economics.................. I
or 3
Sociology III...... .. .............Rural Sociology.......................... ....
Agricultural Education II.......Extension Teaching............. ........... 0
Agricultural Journalism .................................................. ......... 0
Elective.......---...... -------------------.........................-- ... 4
103


3
2

0
0

3
0
3
3
16


HORTICULTURAL GROUP
Junior Year
Horticulture IV.........................Citrus Culture......................... .. ........... 3 0
Horticulture V---------.........................Citrus Harvesting, Marieting, and
Judging............................. ........ 2
Horticulture VII.......................Deciduous and Subtropical Fruits.... ? 0
Horticulture VIII.....................Plant Breeding............................... 3
Agronomy V............................Soil Technology....... .... ....... : 3
Botany VI........ ......-Plant Pathology.............................. .... 3
Bacteriology I........................General Bacteriology.......................... 3 0
Bacteriology II.......................... Agricultural Bacteriology.. .............. 0 3
Zoology III..........................Entomology ..---- . 0 3
E lective.................................................................................. .. 1 2

16 16
*The first column gives the hours per week for the fir t semester, the
second column the hours per week for the second semester.







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Senior Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS PER WEEK
Horticulture IX.....................Landscape Gardening.......................... 0 2
Horticulture VI......................Insects and Diseases of Citrusi
or Fruits ...................................... 3 0
Horticulture X..........................---- General Forestry.........................
Agronomy VI-VII ....................Farm Management................................ 3
Agricultural Engineering II...Buildings, Roads, Irrigation, and
Drainage........................................ 3 0
Agricultural Education II......Extension Teaching.............................. 0 2
Chemistry IX............................-------Chemistry of Soils, Fertilizers, etc. 3 0
Economics I..............................Principles of Economics.................
or 3 3
Sociology III...........................Rural Sociology ..................................
Elective----......... --...---------......................-------......................... 1

16 16
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY GROUP
Sophomore Year
Animal Husbandry II.............Animal Feeding..............................-- ... 2 0
Animal Husbandry III...........Animal Breeding................................ 0 2
Agronomy II.............................Fertilizers ............................................ 0 3
Dairying I..................................Dairy Products ...................................... 3 0
Chemistry I-II.......................... General Inorganic Chemistry............. 5 5
Zoology I................................General Zoology ................................ 3 3
Military Science II..................Field Regulations and Guard Duty.... 1 1
E lective.......................................................... .......................................... 2 2

16 16
Junior Year
Animal Husbandry IV............Beef Production.................................... 2 0
Animal Husbandry V.............Swine Production.................................. 0 2
Animal Husbandry VI............Poultry Culture.................................... 3 0
Dairying III.............................-Dairy Farming.............................. .. 0 3
Agronomy III........ ... ...Field Crops.......................... .... 3 0
Agronomy IV............................Forage Crops and Grasses................ 0 3
Bacteriology I...................General Bacteriology............................ 3 0
Bacteriology II..........................Agricultural Bacteriology.................... 0 3
E elective ........................................................ ................. . ..... 5 5

__16 16
Senior Year
Animal Husbandry VII..........Animal Diseases.....---................ 0 3
Animal Husbandry VIII.........Seminar ........................................ 2 0
Agronomy VI-VII............... Farm Management............................. 3 3
Agricultural Engineering II...Buildings, Roads, Irrigation, and
Drainage .......................................... 3 0
Agricultural Education II.....Extension Teaching......................... 0 2
Economics I............................... Principles of Economics............
or 3 3
Sociology III.............................Rural Sociology......---................. .....
Elective......................... ............................ .......... 5 5
16 16
*The first column gives the hours per week for the first semester, the
second column the hours per week for the second semester.







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


AGRICULTURAL-CHEMICAL GROUP
Junior Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS F['E \\ EE
Chemistry IV.............................Qualitative Analysis........-.............. 5 5
Chemistry V..............................Organic Chemistry.........................
Bacteriology I..........................General Bacteriology ....................... ,
Bacteriology II..........................Agricultural Bacteriology............. .0 3
E lective.........................- ....................-.........-...... ................................ 5 5

16 16

Senior Year
Chemistry VIII.........................Quantitative Analysis................... .. 7 7
Chemistry IX............................Chemistry of Soils, Fertilizers, ttcc. 3 I
Economics I...............................Principles of Economics..................
or : 3
Sociology III............-------. Rural Sociology...............................
Elective ................---- .......................-----.-----------...-- -- ..----- 6i
16 16

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION GROUP
Junior Year
Bacteriology I..........................General Bacteriology..................... .... 0
Bacteriology II..........................Agricultural Bacteriology ............. 3
Teachers College............................................... ... ........ .....
Elective -------................................ ............ -- ........-..- 7
16 16

Senior Year
Agricultural Education I.......-lethods of Teaching Agriculture 1 II
Agricultural Education II.....Extension Teaching.............. ...-- 1
Agronomy VI-VII-----.......-- Farm Management.....--------....... 3
Economics I...............................Principles of Economics-.............
or 3
Sociology III---------..............................Rural Sociology -----..............................
Teachers College .................................---------..------.....-..... 8 8
Elective .........................-- --....... .............................. --- -.............-- 0 1
I~; lli
*The first column gives the hours per week for the first semester. the
second column the hours per week for the second semester.







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AGRONOMY AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Professor Turlington
Assistant Professor Rast
AGRONOMY
The laboratory work and field observation aim to fix the
principles learned in the classroom and to give them prac-
tical application.
AGRONOMY Aa.-Elements of Agronomy.-The soil in re-
lation to plant growth and the underlying principles govern-
ing the production of field and forage crops. (Short courses
and Eleventh Grade, Practice High School, Teachers College;
3 hours.)
AGRONOMY I.-Elements of Agronomy.-The origin, form-
ation, and classification of soils; general methods of soil man-
agement and the adaptation of soils to the requirements of
plants; the origin, classification, and use of crop plants; and
the fundamental processes related to plant growth and repro-
duction. (Freshman year; 2 hours.)
AGRONOMY IIb.-Fertilizers.-The nature of plant food
and its relation to the composition of soils, sources and com-
position of commercial fertilizers and principles governing
their application, the making and economical use of farm ma-
nures, fertilizer requirements of various crops, and other re-
lated topics. (Sophomore year; 3 hours.)
AGRONOMY IIIa.-Field Crops.-The various grain, fiber,
and sugar crops will be discussed with respect to their habits
of growth, soil adaptations, fertilizer requirements, general
methods of tillage and harvesting, and the most profitable
forms in which to market them. Special attention will be
given to corn, cotton, and sugar cane. (Junior year; class 2
hours, laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 hours.)
AGRONOMY IVb.-Forage Crops: Legumes, Grasses, etc.-
Legumes, grasses, and miscellaneous forage plants, and their
adaptability to the various Florida soils, seeding and cultural
methods, harvesting and storing, composition and use, illus-
trated by specimens brought before the students and by field
observations. This course includes one hour of work in the






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


botany of grasses, given by the botanist. (Juniotr yi.ar; 3
hours.)
AGRONOMY V.-Soil Technology.-The physical and chemi-
cal properties of soil as related to soil fertility amn crup pro-
duction; soil management and drainage. (Jani'.'r ear: ted-
tations 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 in.,urs.)
AGRONOMY VIb.-Farm Management.-P principles of farm
management; specialized and general farming; farm accounts;
problems of labor, machinery, storing, marketing; laying out
farms, systems of rotation, etc. (Senior year: 3 io'iturs.)
AGRONOMY VIIa.-Advanced Course in Frrm ,Managc-
ment.-Special stress given to laying out and locating various
buildings, lots, fields, and crops; cropping systems; surveys
made in other states. (Senior year; 3 hours.)
AGRONOMY VIIb.-Weeds.-Origin and distribution; col-
lecting and identifying; injury to crops and methods of eradi-
cation. (Elective, Junior or Senior year; 2 ihoirs.)
AGRONOMY VIIIb.-Rural Law.-Classification of prop-
erty, boundaries, fences, stock laws, rents, contracts. deeds,
mortgages, taxes, laws governing shipping, etc. (Elect ice,
Junior or Senior year; 2 hours.)
AGRONOMY IXa or b.-Special Courses.-Special courses
will be offered at the option of the instructors, on approval
of the Dean.
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Ab.-Eleent-. of .4ricul-
tural Engineering.-Farm machinery and motors, irrigation,
drainage, buildings, sanitation, roads, fences, etc.. elements
essential to profitable plant and animal production and the
making and maintenance of comfortable, healthful homes.
(Twelfth grade, Practice High School, Teachl:,rs C'ol"lc:; ; 3
hours.)
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Ia.-Farrz Macli ryi and
Motors.-Elementary farm surveying and the details of con-
struction, functions, methods of operation, and care of the
various forms of tilling, seeding, spraying, and harvesting
machinery. Special attention is given to plo\vs, harrows, and
other farm implements.
Farm power, including windmills, gas engines, and tract-
ors. (Freshman year; 4 hours.)
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING IIa.-Buildings, Roads, Irri-






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


gation, and Drainage.-The construction of farm residences,
barns, and other farm buildings; the laying out of roads and
fields; drainage; and irrigation plants. Practice in drawing
plans and writing specifications. (Senior year; 3 hours.)

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
SProfessor Turlington
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION Ia.-Methods of Teaching Ag-
riculture.-Instruction and practice in methods of presenting
agricultural subjects. It will include materials and labora-
tory usage. (Senior year; 1 hour.)
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION IIb.-Extension Teaching.-A
course of lectures covering the history, methods, purposes, and
results of extension teaching. (Senior year; 2 hours.)
AGRICULTURAL SEMINAR.-Subjects will be arranged on
the approval of the Dean. (Freshman year; second semester;
1 hour.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING
Professor Willoughby
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
Live-stock raising commands a steady income and is a
valuable aid in maintaining soil fertility. The industry holds
an important place in Florida. The basic principles taught
are applicable to all parts of America, and special instruction
is given for southeastern conditions.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Aa.-Elements of Animal Husband-
ry.-Brief study of types and breeds of farm animals, with
some judging practice; principles of breeding, feeding, and
management; production of meat, milk, and poultry. (Short
Courses; Practice High School, Teachers College, Twelfth
Grade; 3 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Ib.-Types and Breeds of Animals.-
Types and classes of farm animals; the leading breeds of
horses, mules, cattle, sheep, and swine; practice in score-card
and comparative judging. Animals owned by the College will
be studied, and occasional trips made to nearby stock farms
and stables. (Freshman year; 4 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IIa.-Animal Feeding.-Composition
of plants and animals; digestion and assimilation; feeding
standards and balanced rations. Feeding practice with com-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


mon feeding stuffs applied to different classes of animals.
(Sophomore year; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IIIb.-Animal Breeding.-Principles
underlying the breeding of animals, including heredity. varia-
tion, selection, environment; the foundation and nmainaement
of a breeding herd; value of pedigrees and performaLnce re-
cords. (Sophomore year; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IVa.-Beef Production.- P practical
methods in beef production, including selection of feeders.
feeding and management of beef cattle, finishing and market-
ing, slaughter and packing-house methods. Brief considera-
tion of same subjects in mutton production. (Junior yc.r 2
hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Vb.-Swine Production.-Location
and equipment of a hog farm, breeds of swine suited to the
South; growing feeds for grazing and fattening, feeding and
managing the herd; marketing and slaughtering, curing meats
on the farm. (Junior year; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VIa.-Poultry Culture.-Location
and construction of houses and runs; the principal breeds of
poultry, with judging of best specimens obtainable; methods
of breeding, incubation, and brooding; egg production: feed-
ing and marketing poultry; management of flock and treat-
ment of diseases. (Junior year; 3 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VIIb.-Animal Diseases.-Elements
of anatomy and physiology; symptoms and treatment of com-
mon diseases of animals; methods of prevention, disinfection.
and sanitation. Simple surgical operations, with occasional
clinics. (Senior year; 3 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VJIIa.-Seminar.-Special topics in
animal industry, including essays and reports; preparation of
articles for agricultural papers and answers to local problems;
abstracting bulletins; monograph work. (Seni:,r ,iear; 2
hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IXa.-Breeding History.-Advanced
work in history of breeds; tabulation of pedigrees; principles
of thremmatology. (Elective for Seniors; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Xb.-Animal Nutrition.-Ad:van ced
work in,the principles of animal nutrition. (Elect';l fo'r S-
niors; 2 hours.)






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


DAIRYING
DAIRYING Ia.-Dairy Products.-Secretion, composition,
and properties of milk; testing milk and its products; methods
of creaming, operating cream separators; manufacturing but-
ter, cheese, and other dairy products. (Sophomore year; 3
hours.)
DAIRYING IIb.-Dairy Farming.-Locations suitable for
dairy farming; construction of sanitary barns, dairy houses,
silos; selection of breeds, feeding, and management of the
dairy herd, testing and herd records; pastures; soiling crops
and silage; marketing dairy products. (Junior year; 3 hours.)
DAIRYING IIIb.-Milk Inspection.-Methods of producing
sanitary milk, city milk inspection; Pasteurization and care of
milk in the home; score card for dairy barns and milk depots;
milk and cream contests. (Elective for Juniors or Seniors; 2
hours.)
DAIRYING IV.-Dairy Manufactures.-Advanced work in
making butter, cottage and Cheddar cheese, fermented milks,
ice cream, and various market products; creamery manage-
ment and accounting. (Elective for Seniors; 2 hours. Not
offered during 1917-18.)

AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM
Mr. Weaver
Agricultural Journalism.-Lectures on the fundamental
principles of journalism; laboratory work in news gathering,
news writing, and copy reading. Students will prepare copy
for State and agricultural press. (Senior year; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE
Professor Floyd
In a subtropical climate unusual opportunities for a prac-
tical and interesting study of horticulture are presented. The
wonderful variety of plants, the peculiar problems involved in
their growth and development, and the accomplishments of
those who have given time and labor to the solution of those
problems, offer inviting fields for study and experimentation.
Both the practical and the esthetic tendencies may be culti-
vated.
The department with its orchard, garden, laboratory, and
library, offers fine opportunity for instruction, experiment, and
research.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


HORTICULTURE Ab.-Elements of Horticultur(.-Varieties
and culture requirements of our principal fruits and vege-
tables; location of orchards and gardens with reference to
soils, climate, and markets; protection from insects and dis-
eases; harvesting and marketing; styles of decorative plant-
ing adapted to home and school. (Eleventh Grae. Practice
High School, Teachers College; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE I.-Plant Propagation.-Study and practice
in propagation by means of division, cutting, layering, bud-
ding, and grafting; seed selection, storing, and testing; and
the fundamental physiological processes. Exercises in propa-
gating common fruits, flowers, and shrubs will be given.
(Freshman year; 2 hours.)
HORTICULTURE II. Trucking. Vegetables adapted to
Florida, the seasons in which they are grown, cultural methods,
fertilizing, irrigating, packing, and marketing. (Sophomore
year; 2 hours.)
HORTICULTURE IIIb.-Floriculture.-The growing of flow-
ers upon the home grounds, pot plants, greenhouse crop and
their cultural requirements, including ventilation, watering.
and heating. (Sophomore year; 2 hours.)
HORTICULTURE IVa.-Citrus Culture.-Soils suitable for
citrus groves, their preparation, planting, cultivation, fertil-
ization, selection of varieties, and the use of cover crops. (Ju-
nior year; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE Vb.-Citrus Harvesting, Malrkting and
Judging.-Methods of picking, handling, washing, drying.
packing, and shipping citrus fruits. Attention will also be
given to identifying the leading commercial varieties and
judging by the use of the score card. (Junior year; 2 hours.)
HORTICULTURE VIa.-Insects and Diseases of Citrus Fruits.
-Injurious insects and important physiological and fungus
diseases and their treatment. (Prerequisite or required with
this course, Hort. IVa; Senior year; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE VIIa.-Deciduous and Subtropical Fruits.
-The growing of peaches, pears, persimmons, grapes, pecans,
guavas, avocados, mangoes, etc.; varieties adapted to the State,
their planting, cultivation, diseases, and insect enemies. (Ju-
nior year; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE VIIIb.-Plant Breeding.-Cross pollination
and hybridization of plants, improvement by selection, breed-
ing for special qualities, with field work and a study of the






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


methods of successful breeders. (Prerequisites, Ia and Bot-
Sany I; Junior year; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE IXb.-Landscape Gardening.-The princi-
ples underlying the various styles of landscape gardening,
plants suitable for planting, improvement of the home
grounds, making more attractive school and public grounds,
are some of the topics studied. (Senior year; 2 hours.)
HORTICULTURE Xa.-General Forestry.-The principles of
forestry, forest cropping, protecting the home wood lot, use
of Florida woods, varieties of timber trees, and the influences
of the forests on the other industries of the State. (Junior
or Senior year; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE XIb.-Forest Mensuration.-The determi-
nation of the age and volume of trees and stands. Estimating
standing timber by use of the hypsometer, dendrometer, and
other forest instruments. Principles of volume and yield;
tables and log rules. (Prerequisite, IXa; Junior or Senior
year; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE XIIa.-The Evolution of Cultivated Plants.
-Evolution as applied to the modification of our cultivated
plants, particularly the fruits. (Prerequisite, VIIIb; Senior
year; 2 hours.)
OTHER DEPARTMENTS
Descriptions of electives and other subjects that may be
taken by students in the College of Agriculture may be found
by reference to the Index.
MIDDLE COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
For the convenience and accommodation of those who can-
not meet 'the requirements for entrance to the Freshman
year, or vWho may not wish to pursue the Four-Year Course and
yet desire to obtain training in practical and scientific agri-
culture, a two-year course is offered. The course is not de-
signed to supplant or in any way to be a substitute for the
college course outlined above.
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS.-The requirements for admis-
sion to the Middle Course are:
E english .......................................... ............ ............ 2 units
M them atics ............................................................. 2 units
H history ........................................................................ 1 unit
E elective ...................................................................... 3 units
8 units







92 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

These requirements are equivalent to the work com pleted
in the tenth grade or Junior high schools. Students must ibe
at least sixteen years of age to be admitted.
TITLE.-The title of Graduate in Farming (G. F.) vill be
conferred upon students who satisfy the entrance reiquire-
ments and complete the Middle Course in Agriculture.
CERTIFICATE.-Those who cannot satisfy these enitr:aniic re-
quirements may be admitted to the Middle Course upo.:n shiow-
ing a knowledge of the common school branches, and v. ill be
awarded a certificate for the work done.

MIDDLE COURSE
Leading to the Title of Graduate in Farming
First Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOUpR Prr. Wrr 1[
Required Work: :
Agronomy I...............................Elements of Agronomy............. ...
Agricultural Engineering I....Farm Machinery.......................... ..... 0
Animal Husbandry I.............. Types and Breeds of Animals.. ... 0 4
Horticulture I............................Plant Propagation..................... ..... 2 2
Botany I.....................................General Botany ........................... ..... .
Library ....--........--..--......--..-.. -..........-- -........................................ ..... 1 0
Sem inar .............................................................................. .......... ..... .. 0 1
*M military D rill.......................................................................................... R R
Elective .-.........-............................-------------.................- .... -. 6 6
18 IS
Second Year
Required Work:
A gronomy II.............................. Fertilizers .................................... 3
Agronomy III............................Field Crops .................................. 3 0
Agronomy IV................ ......-- Forage Crops and Grasses........ 0 3
Animal Husbandry II.............Animal Feeding............................ 2 0
H orticulture III........................Trucking ..................................... .. 2
Zoology I....................................General Zoology ................ ..... 3 3
*M military D rill................................................................................... R R
E elective ........................................................................ ............... 7
IS IS
*Attendance upon Military Drill is required.







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
Elective Studies:
(First Semester)
Agronom y V ..............................Soil Technology ............................................ 3
Agronomy VI............................ Farm Management ...................................... 3
Horticulture IV----.........................-----Citrus Culture ................................----.....---------.. 3
lHorticulture VI.........................Insects and Diseases of Citrus Fruits.... 3
Horticulture VII.--......................Deciduous and Subtropical Fruits............ 3
Horticulture X .......................... Forestry ........................................................ 3
Animal Husbandry IV............ Beef Production-.....------................................ 2
Animal Husbandry VI ............Poultry Culture.............................................. 3
Dairying I..................................Dairy Products.............................................. 2
Agricultural Engineering II....Buildings, Roads, Irrigation,and Drainage 3
Chemistry I-II......................... General Inorganic Chemistry...................... 5
Bacteriology I.........-------... General Bacteriology .................................. 3
(Second Semester)
Agronomy V.............................----Soil Technology--- -----.................................. 3
Agronomy VI--......-------Farm Management .................................... 3
Horticulture III.......................Floriculture ........................ ........................ 2
Horticulture V..........................Citrus Harvesting and Marketing............ 2
Horticulture VIII-....--..........Plant Breeding ........................................... 2
Horticulture IX-------....................Landscape Gardening.................................. 2
Animal Husbandry III............ Animal Breeding.......................................... 2
Animal Husbandry V..............Swine Production ........................................ 2
Animal Husbandry VII...........Animal Diseases---.............. ..................... 3
Dairying II................................Dairy Farm ing.............................................. 3
Agricultural Education II......Extension Teaching...................................... 2
Chemistry I-II...........................General Inorganic Chemistry...................... 5
Bacteriology II.... ----......................Agricultural Bacteriology.......................... 3
A agricultural Journalism ........ ........................... ................................................. 3
Note.-This course may, with the approval of the Dean and the con-
-nt of the instructors, be altered to suit the needs of individual students.
Students shall choose from the elective studies, from other courses, or
from the Practice High School of the Teachers College, a sufficient
number to make a total of not less than eighteen nor more than twenty-
three hours per week, except on approval of the Dean. All choice of
electives must, furthermore, be submitted to the Dean.







94 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
This course will meet the needs of those who can spend
only one year at school. The only requirement for admission
is a knowledge of the common school branches. Certificates
will be granted to those who complete the course.

NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
(First Semester)
Agronomy I..........................Elements of Agronomy............ .
Agronomy III...........................Field Crops ................................ 3
Agronomy VI..................Farm Management ...................
Horticulture I....... ..............Plant Propagation.......................... ...
Horticulture II ...........Trucking......................Trucki.......... .... ......... 2
Horticulture IV......................Citrus Culture ..................... .... 3
Horticulture VI--......................Insects and Diseases of Citrus Ftults.
Horticulture VII....................Deciduous and Subtropical Fruits ....
Horticulture X.......................... Forestry .................................. .... 3
Animal Husbandry A..............Elements of Animal Husbandry.. 3
Animal Husbandry II.............Animal Feeding ................................ 2
Animal Husbandry IV............Beef Production................................ 2
Animal Husbandry VI............Dairy Products ............................ ....... 3
Dairying I............................... Poultry Culture................................... .... 3
Agricultural Engineering I......Farm Machinery and Motors...................... 4
Agricultural Engineering II...Buildings, Roads, Irrigation,and Drainag3: 3
Library ....-................... ....... .. ....--.... 1
*Military Drill ..................... ..- .............................. ..... R
(Second Semester)
Agronomy I..---............... ........Elements of Agronomy............. ...... 2
Agronomy II............................- Fertilizers ...... ................ .. . .......
Agronomy IV......................Forage Crops and Grasses....... ........ 3
Agronomy VI.......................Farm Management..................... ......... 3
Horticulture I-............-Plant Propagation.................... ... 2
Horticulture A.......................Elements of Horticulture....... ........ 3
Horticulture II.........................Trucking .................................... .. .........
Horticulture III............... .....Floriculture .......................................... 2
Horticulture V...................... Citrus Harvesting, Marketing, Juding 2
Horticulture IX.... ...............Landscape Gardening ..... ............ ... 2
Animal Husbandry I...............Types and Breeds of Animals.... ........ 4
Animal Husbandry III............Animal Breeding......................... ... 3
Animal Husbandry V............Swine Production................. .. . 2
Animal Husbandry VI............Animal Diseases....................... 3
Dairying II................................Dairy Farm ing.......................... ................. 3
Sem inar ....................................-...... ................... ... .... ...... 1
*M military D rill ........................................................... ............. R
Note.-Students shall select not less than eighteen nor more than
twenty-three hours per week, except on approval of the Dean. to whom
all choice of studies must be submitted.
*Attendance upon Military Drill is required.

FOUR-MONTH COURSES IN AGRICULTURE
The work of each semester of the One-Year Course out-
lined above has been so planned as to form of itself a well
rounded course of study which can be pursued to advantage
by those unable to spend more than four months at the Uni-






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


versity. Each of these Four-Month Short Courses, one of
which begins on September 18, 1917, and the other on January
28, 1918, should appeal to practical farmers who wish to in-
crease their productive power, to young men who expect to
become farmers, and to those who are turning from other lines
of work in order to obtain the advantages of country life.
Military Drill is not required of those who take only one of
these courses, but is required of those who take both during
the same scholastic year.

TEN-DAY COURSE FOR FARMERS
Beginning January 8, 1918, and ending January 17, 1918.
The Ten-Day Farmers' Short Course in Agriculture is
offered to meet the needs of those who for any reason cannot
pursue a longer course. It is especially suited to the following
classes: First, busy farmers of all ages who, recognizing their
needs for better preparation, desire more knowledge of scien-
tific agriculture in order to render effective the practical
knowledge they have already.gained; second, ambitious young
men who are compelled to drop out of school and yet desire
to devote a short time to special preparation for their life-work
upon the farm; third, city students who desire to fit themselves
for farm life; and, fourth, colonists who wish to secure special
information regarding Florida conditions and methods.
The laboratory equipment, the pure bred live stock, and the
farm used in the regular courses will be available for instruc-
tion in the Short Courses. The Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion will afford opportunity for observation and inquiry.
Special care has been taken to arrange the Farmers' Short
Course so as to meet the needs and suit the conditions of the
practical farmer.
There are no age limits and no educational requirements
for entrance to the Farmers' Short Course.
The course will consist of lectures, laboratory work, and
field observations and demonstrations in general field crops,
horticulture, animal husbandry, and dairying.
EXPENSES.-The necessary expenses for the Farmers'
Short Course for those who board at the University are:
Board, room, heat, and light for eleven days-.......--.--. ....------- $ 7.00
Laundry and Incidentals (estimated)..................................... 1.00
Tuition ............................................... ...................................... 0.00
Total.................................................. ....... ...................................... $ 8.00






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The rooms in the dormitories of the University are sul.,-
plied with the necessary furniture, but each student is req:li ired
to bring with him sufficient bedding for his own use.
The necessary expenses for the Farmers' Short Course for
those who board and room in Gainesville are:
Board, room etc..................................... .............. .......... .
Laundry and Incidentals (estimated) .....................----- ... 1-.
T tuition ........................................... ....................... .1
T otal ......................... .................................. 1 1 .
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES
Dean Rolfs
Mr. Weaver
The fundamental purpose of all public institutions is ser-
vice. The scope of the modern university is not limited to: the
students who come to study on the campus, but extends to
every community and neighborhood in the State. The number
who can attend an institution for resident study is necessarily
limited, but the university does not content itself will these.
It seeks to extend its benefits to the homes of the people.
With this purpose in view, the College of Agriculture en-
deavors, through the Extension Division and Correspondence
Courses, to carry its service to the rural districts. The Legis-
lature of 1909 authorized instruction in agriculture in the
public schools. There are many on the farm, however, who
feel the need of such training. It is for these, for teacheli, for
prospective farmers, and for new settlers unacquainted with
Florida conditions, that the Correspondence Courses are of-
fered.
It is not expected that these courses can be as effective as
resident study, wherein the student has the advantages of labo-
ratory equipment and has personal contact with competent in-
structors. But those who cannot attend the University will
find the courses profitable and instructive. Their effectiveness
is limited only by the initiative and diligence of the student.
The courses are organized according to the recognized
standards of practical and scientific methods. Fourteen alre
offered. Others will be added as rapidly as demands justify.
The fourteen courses are grouped into five divisions for the
convenience of persons who wish to specialize in some branch
of agriculture. Any one or all of the courses in any group or
the full fourteen courses may be taken. It is best, however, to
pursue them in some logical order.







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


(A) FOR FARMERS.-The following courses are offered:
Elementary Agriculture Breeds of Livestock, Feeds and
Soils Feeding
Tillage Dairy Production
Drainage and Irrigation Swine Production
Manures and Fertilizers Poultry Production
Fertilizers and Crops (advanced Citrus Fruits and Citrus Culture
course) Trucking
Field Crops Cooperation in Agriculture
These courses are grouped under the heads, Animal Hus-
bandry, Dairy Husbandry, Agronomy, Citrus Culture, and
Trucking. Elementary Agriculture stands first in each group
and will be found invaluable as a basis for practical farming
and further study.
The agronomy group is of special interest to those living in
the northern and western part of the State, the citrus and
trucking groups to those in the southern and central portions,
dairying and animal husbandry to those living anywhere in
Florida. Those wishing to specialize in some branch of agri-
culture will find the groups in trucking, citrus, poultry, and
dairying valuable. The general farmer will be interested in
animal husbandry, agronomy, and, perhaps, dairying.
(B) FOR TEACHERS.-Elementary Agriculture is offered,
especially to enable teachers to pass the examination required
for certificates. Altho only elementary agriculture is required,
no teacher can expect to render the best service without ad-
ditional knowledge of agriculture. All the courses offered to
farmers would be helpful.
To cover office expenses a registration fee of $1.00 is
charged for each course. Florida students pay no tuition fee;
others are charged a nominal sum, the amount of which de-
pends upon he course. Students must provide textbooks and
pay postage on manuscripts to and from the University. Regis-
tration may be made at any time during the year. Both men
and women are eligible. Negroes are referred to the Agricul-
tural and Mechanical College for Negroes, at Tallahassee. For
further information apply to the Dean of the College of Ag-
riculture.
AGRICULTURAL MEETINGS
A large number of people interested in agriculture meet
annually at the University. These find the living accommo-
dations excellent and the facilities for their purposes better
than anywhere else in the State. The laboratories, classrooms,
uf.-7







UNIVERSITY OF FLORID.


and exhibits, as well as the growing crops. barn-, and other
equipment, are placed freely at their service.
The following meetings were held during the past year:
County Demonstration Agents, October 2-7.
Home Demonstration Agents, October 2-7.
Citrus Seminar Class, October 10-16.
Seventh Annual Citrus Seminar, October 17-20.
Boys' Short Course in Agriculture, Decembler 4-9.
Fifth Annual Meeting of the Florida Live Sto:.k Associa-
tion, January 16-17.
Livestock Institute, January 18-19.
Florida State Veterinary Medical Association, J-anulary 18.


AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
P. H. ROLFS, Director
STAFF.-P. H. Rolfs, S. E. Collison, H. L. Dozier. B. F.
Floyd, F. F. Halma, J. Matz, J. M. Scott. C. D. Sherbakrff,
L. J. Stadler, H. E. Stevens, W. H. Turnley. T. Vanl Hyning,
J. R. Watson.
AIM AND SCOPE.-Agricultural experiment stati:,ons are
institutions, founded by Congressional act, the purpose of
which is to acquire and diffuse agriculture kn,ow\ledge. From
the enacting clause it is evident that Congress intended to
establish with every college and university receiving the
benefits of the original Land-Grant Act an institution for
purely investigational work. The Florida Agricutltulral Ex-
periment Station was founded in 1888 and has continued
without interruption. Inasmuch as its funi:l are received
from a Federal source, it must comply with the require-
ments of the Federal law. Its income mu-t be used for the
purpose of acquiring new and important kniov.ledge in rega d
to agricultural crops and soils and no part can be expetnrded.
directly or indirectly, for teaching purposes or for holding
Farmers' Institutes, and only five per cent for building ,o
making repairs. In order to receive the benefits of the
Adams' fund, the Station must submit plans for proposed
experiments to the United States Department of Agrilculture
for approval before any of the moneys are spent in investi-
gation.
ADVANTAGES OF LOCATION.-The advantages of having




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