• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Main














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00505
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1918
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00505
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

VID00505 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Image 1
        Image 2
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Image 3
        Image 4
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text













University of Florida
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


University


Summer


School


(Co-Educational)
Announcement
June 17-August 9, 1918












SUMMER


SCHOOL


SUMMER


STATE


SCHOOL


SUPERINTENDENT


PRESIDENT
PRESIDENT


BOARD
SEATS


MURPHREE


EDW


CONRADI


A.M


LL.D.


LL.D.


PH.D.


FACULTY


AND


OFFICERS


MURPHREE


Director


LL.D


Summer


Preside


School


HARVEY W.
Psychology


PH.D


and Philosophy.


ANDERSON


College


Latin and


, PH.D.,
French.


BECK, A.M.,


English Language


and Literature.


MRS. M.


MAY


BECK,


Story


Telling


Child Literature.


grzcu


BOH
Itural


ANNAN, A
Education.


BUCHHOLZ


, A.M.,


and Practice of
W. BUCHHOLZ


Teaching.
, A.B.,


Latin.


MARGARET


Mathematics


CA'


Higher


CH


BURNEY


, A.M.,


and Methods.


WTHON, A.M.,
Mathematics.
APMAN, D.O.,


Public Speaking.


Manual A


MISS ALY


CORR, A.B.,


Printing.


CROW


, PH.D.,


- . .


Theory


C








SUMMER SCHOOL

W. B. HATHAWAY, A.B.,
English.
W. B. JONES, A.M.,
English.
MISS FRANCES KITTRELL,
Industrial Arts and Public School Music.
MISS KATHERINE McCORMICK, A.B.,


Physical Education and


Recreation.


J. L. McGHEE, PH.D.,
Chemistry.
MISS LAURA McKENZIE,
Primary Methods.
MISS ISABEL MAYS,


Mathematics and
MISS EMMA OD


Hygiene.
)Y POHL,


Physical Education.


THOSE.


Economic


STAPLES, A.M.,
cs and History.


EUGENE SWOPE, PH.D.,


Bird


Study.


HARRY R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B.,
School Law.


WM.


TYLER, B.C.S.,


Commercial


Courses


and Penmanship.


F. G.


WETZEL,


Biology and


Physics.


SPECIAL LECTURES


HON.


W. N. SHEATS


EDWARD J. BANKS, PH. D.
J. ADAMS PUFFER, PH.D.


A. E.
HON.


WINSHIP, PH. D.


McBRIEN.


K. H. GRAHAM. Auditnr_







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

GIFTS TO THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL


Instructor in Spanish and South


American


Affairs.-


The


University


of Florida and the Board of Control here


record their grateful appreciation of the gift of three hun-


dred


dollars


International


($300)
Peace.


from


Carnegie


compliance


with


Endowment


this


gift,


Board of Control has secured the services of a professor
of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and South Ameri-


can Affairs for the Summer School.


Because of this gift


the Summer School will again be able to offer attractive


courses :
students.


these


subjects


(See courses on


which


should


appeal


many


other pages.)


Instructor in


Bird


Study.-This opportunity


is taken


to thank the National Association of Audubon Societies for
making it possible for the Summer School to offer a course


in Bird-Study.


For this work the Society furnishes a spe-


cial instructor who


will


spend


one


month


here,


devoting


all his time to this splendid work.


(See other pages for


outline of course.)


LOCATION


OF THE UNIVERSITY


Gainesville, the seat of the University, a town of 10,000


inhabitants, possesses numerous advantages.


It is centrally


located and easy


of access,


being reached by the leading


railroads


shaded


State.


streets,


has


an exceptional


well


pure


paved,


water


lighted


supply


and


and


good


sewerage


system.


The


citizens


energetic,


pro-


gressive and hospitable.


The moral atmosphere is whole-


some, and for many years the sale of intoxicants has been


prohibited


law.


leading


denominations


have


attractive places of worship.


GROUNDS AND


BUILDINGS


The


University


occupies


tract


hundred


and


+h irtdon n oornQ ciifiQ'afolA h +ha raa4+dar avrl-rrxn;ir ri9P foi;e naa.






































































































*^




". .. '."





I't"m i
'C-.



-'C



~ %..


a -. .- * .

.% .- 3..
-I -


H tfllrl


m


--Q ~~II~CL I


-2l~l


I


-~r


I


rrg*lr~rrrrrr*





























































PEABODY HALL, Where Summer School is Conducted


------ 1_1_-_4~_1111


_IYPLIIY--_,


~I~PJ~C'w ANA



sMY wN











-,F-m












-ON, -


. ,







SUMMER SCHOOL


Twelve buildings have already been erected.


in the order of construction:


These are,


Two dormitories, known as


"Buckman Hall"


and


"Thomas


Hall"; the Mechanic


Arts


Shop,


Science


Hall,


Agricultural


Experiment


Station


Building, Engineering


Hall,


the Gymnasium,


the Agricul-


tural College Building, the dining hall or "University Com-


mons,


Language


Hall,


"George


Peabody


Hall,"


home of the Teachers' College and Normal School, and the


College of Law.


They are lighted with electricity, supplied


with city water and furnished with modem improvements
and equipment.


EXPENSES


Registration Fee ----.- -.--...-...........-..
Board and Lodging in Dormitory,


$1.00


per week,


in advance --------.-
In advance for term ... ---- -..... -
Board without Lodging --.--.. ..


--- ----------- ------


4.50
35.00
3.75


M eals in D ining H all ............................................


Laboratory


Fee


Chemistry ..-.................... ....


2.50


Students taking manual training will have to


the material they use.


pay for


This will not amount to more than


75 cents.
RooMs.-Dormitory rooms are supplied with two good
iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, a table,


washstand and chairs.


All students are required to


pro-


vide


for themselves a


pillow,


bed linen,


towels


and such


other things as they may want for their own special con-
venience.
Single men cannot be accommodated in the dormitories,
but good rooms can be obtained adjacent to the campus at
$1.25 to $1.50 per week. A number of rooms in the city
can be obtained at $1.00 per week. Men desiring to have
their rooms reserved in advance should write at once.








UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


command,


nothing


can


hinder


college


from


realizing


alms.


LIBRARY.


tains about


-The
18.000


Summer School


general


library


volumes of


students


University


well-selected


have


free


books to


access.


The


con-


which
Peda-


gogical
contains


Library
many


special methods,


osophy


will


books


history 4
reading


special


on educational


education,


room


interest


theory,


them,


general


psychology


more


than


and


and
phil-


a hundred


best


general


and


technical


periodicals.


Here


also


received


leading newspapers


State.


PSYCHOLOGICAL


LABORATORY.


- The


new


Psychological


Laboratory


teachers


hand


is placed


wonderful


the great


in the


Peabody


opportunity


laws of the


mind.


Hall.


This


investigate
know these


will


give
first


through


experiment


direct


will


properly


give
their


teachers


development


a far


greater


child.


power


The


lab-


oratory


will


contain


appliances


and


apparatus


necessary for thorough


and


efficient work


in experimental


psychology.


TEACHERS'


EMPLOYMENT


BUREAU.-It


purpose


bureau


keep


records


teachers


who


have


attended


University


who


are


fitted


their


training


profession


teaching


and


recommend


them


school


boards


teachers.


who


Already the


in need


demand for


efficient


our


principals


graduates and


and
stu-


dents i


greater than


we can supply


County


superintend-


ents


and


school


boards


requested


correspond


with


when


in need


well-trained


and


efficient


teachers.


CORRESPONDENCE


ers'


College


is now


COURSES


FOR


conducting


TEACHERS.-The


several


attractive


Teach-
courses


correspondence.


Write


special


bulletin.


SPECIAL


saving


NOTICE.--In


becomes


a law,


case tne
ill classes


government


will


begin


daylight


one


hour


i1 4,a








SUMMER SCHOOL


AGRICULTURE.-A general


course


in agriculture.


This


will


introduce


common
animals


student


diseases of plants,


and


such


like.


insects,


Methods


study
farm


soil,


crops,


teaching


plants,


domestic


agriculture


in the rural schools will be stressed.


T. 10:35 A. H.


Professor Floyd.


BEGINNERS'


ALGEBRA.-Elementary course covering the


fundamental operations, simple and simultaneous equations,


factoring and fractions.


M. T. Th. F


2:35 L. H.


Miss


Burney.


ADVANCED


ALGEBRA. Involution,


evolution,


quadratic


equations,


progressions,


ratio and


proportion.


Section


10:35 P. H. 17.


Miss Mays.


Section


3:30 L. H.


Miss Burney.


ARITHMETIC.-A


thoro


review


arithmetic


made,


that the student may view it from both the teacher's


and


child's


point of view.


Common and decimal fractions, de-


nominate numbers,


percentage, and all other subjects cov-


ered


by the


text-books adopted


by the


State.


Principles


and methods of teaching arithmetic are thoroly gone over.
Three sections:


Section


Section 2.
. Buchholz.
Section 3.


W. F.
W. Th


W. Th. F


7:05 L. H. 23.


t. 8:05 P


1:35 P


H. 21.


H. 32.


Miss Burney.
Professor L.


Miss Mays.


CIVIL GOVERNMENT.-Special attention will be given to


local, town and city, and county governments.


That prac-


tical information that every intelligent citizen should have


is stressed.


How to teach the subject.


M. T. 2:35 L. H. 11.


Professor Lane.


ENGLISH


COMPOSITION. Two sections.


Each section


covers all matter in Huntington's Elements of Composition.


Section 1. M.


W. F. 10:35 P. H. 28.


Professor Hath-








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


HYGIENE.-Special efforts to


impress the teacher with


importance of hygiene and sanitation.


How to


keep


well and physically efficient is the special aim of this course.


F. 9


P. H.


Miss Mays.


PEDAGOGY.


- School


management,


general


and


special


methods of teaching, elementary principles of child nature,
school hygiene and sanitation, personality of teacher, rela-


tion


school


and


community,


and


other practical


peda-


gogical questions.


P. H. 25.


Professor


Buchholz.


PHYSICAL


GEOGRAPHY.-The


main


features of the or-


dinary


text-book


physical


geography


will


studied.


Along with


this


stress


will


placed


on the effects


physical features have one man-his commercial and social


life.


This will be correlated with agriculture.


3:35


Miss Mays.


POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY.-Special attention will be given


to Florida and its relation to other states.


A thoro review


of the geography of the United States and the world.


struction


will


given


text-books,


maps,


globes, industrial products, stereoscope, post-cards and news-


papers.


T. Th.


8:05 L. H.


Professor Jones.


ORTHOGRAPHY.-The spelling of common words will be


stressed.
demanded.


Correct spelling in all


forms


How best to teach spelling.


written


work


W. 8:05 L. H.


Professor Jones.


READING.


-- Practice


reading


required


each


week.


Teachers are so drilled in reading that they will be able to


read well to their classes.
teaching reading are given.


The methods and principles of


Th. 10:35 L. H. 22.


Pro-


fessor


Jones.


U. S. HISTORY.-Two sections, each covering thoro re-
view of State-adopted book.








SUMMER SCHOOL


These and all other books for the Summer School may


be obtained at the


University


Book Store, Language Hall.


STATE AND SPECIAL CERTIFICATES


The


following courses of


study


lead


the State and


special


certificates,


and


high


school,


normal


and


pro-


fessional


credits,


which may


be applied


toward a normal


school diploma.


BEGINNERS' PLANE GEOMETRY.-M. T.
Miss Mays.
PLANE GEOMETRY.-Review course. ]


7:05 P


W. F


8:05


L. H.


Miss Burney.


SOLID GEOMETRY.-T.


Th. F. 11:35 P. H. 21.


Pro-


fessor F


Buchholz.


PLANE TRIGONOMETRY. M.


. Th. F.


7:05 P. H. 17.


Professor Cawthon.
GENERAL SCIENCE.-A course of methods in general sci-


ence designed especially to


meet the needs of high school


teachers.


T. Th. 9:35 P


.H. 1.


Professor Wetzel.


.PHYSICS.-A general course such as is usually given in
standard secondary schools-lectures, recitations, demon-


stations,


and


a limited


amount


individual


laboratory


work.


. Th. 10:35.


Laboratory


F. 3:35-5:30


P. H. 1.


Professor Wetzel.


FIRST


YEAR LATIN.-Section


Beginners,


Th. 9


P. H.


Professor Hathaway.


Section


Re-


view, M.


3:30 P. H. 21.


Professor F


W. Buchholz.


CAESAR.


studied.
fessor F


-In


this


course


three


Composition.


books
. 2:35


will


thoroly


P. H.


Pro-


Buchholz.


VIRGIL.-Three books of Virgil are read and, in addi-


tion, prose composition will be given.


-I -


. Th. F. 8:00


t I I U^ fW Tw rrr f~ U U 1


.W


- m


-- I *I a








10 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

METHODS OF TEACHING THE ELEMENTARY BRANCHES.-
In this course emphasis will be placed upon the proper pre-


sentation


grammar school subjects.


. Th.


3:35 P. H. 25.


Professor L.


PSYCHOLOGY.-A beginners'


applications


teaching.


Buchholz.
course in


psychology with


8:05


Professor Cox.
ZOOLOGY.-In connection with the text-book study, typ-
ical specimens illustrating the different groups will be dis-
sected and studied in the laboratory, to obtain as compre-
hensive an idea of their structure and physiology as pos-


sible.


Th. 1:35 P. H.


Professor Wetzel.


BOTANY.-In


classroom


and


laboratory


structure,


morphology, reproduction and classification will be studied.
After students have been prepared for them, field trips will


be taken,


when representative types of important families


will be collected and identified.


Th. F. 2:35 S.


H. 1.


Professor Wetzel.


CHEMISTRY.-Elementary principles of chemistry


text-


book and laboratory work.


Carefully


kept note-books re-


quired.


.Th. F


8:00


Professor


McGhee.


Laboratory, M.
HISTORY.-1.
Professor Lane.


L. H.


. or T. Th. 1:30-3:30.


Ancient,


. 10:35


Medieval and Modern, M. T. W. F. 9:35


Professor Lane.


BIRD STUDY.-A course in Bird Study, to be conducted


in cooperation


with the National Association


of Audubon


Societies.


Work will


continue first four weeks.


Courses


designed for those


who


wish


know the


birds and for


those


who


teach


nature study.


Fifteen


(or twenty)


lec-


tures, and daily field trips.


Some of the topics to be con-


sidered in


the lectures are as follows:


Ancestry


classi-


fiction of the birds of


eastern North America; anatomy,


* i I A I SI I I








SUMMER SCHOOL


erature.


The most important part of the work, however,


will be the field trips, the object of which will be to learn
to identify by eye and ear the birds found in the vicinity


during


July.


Students


will learn


the keys


in the


handbook, so that they may continue the study independ-
ently.


As a


part of the


field


work,


special attention


will


paid to the identification of trees and all kinds of plants
which are concerned with the life history of birds.
Field or opera glasses will be very useful in this course.


Th. 11:35


Hours for field work to be arranged.


Professor Swope.


PRIMARY


METHODS.


methods, as applied
the public schools.


- This
work in


course


includes


prmary


the first three grades of


Drawing and singing.


(Time devoted


to each s
structor.)


subject in
Daily,


this


group to


10:35-12:30


and


be arranged


by the


4:35


Miss


McKenzie.


STORY


TELLING. A


course


primary


teachers


story telling and


children'


literature.


A general survey


of stories for the elementary school and actual practice in


the telling


of them.


3:30


Mrs.


Beck.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Miss Pohl
Miss McCormick
The courses in Physical Education are designed to meet
the needs of Primary, Grammar and High School teachers


and


physical


directors.


They


will


include


formal


gym-


nasties, athletics, gymnastic and singing games, track ath-
letics, military marching and setting up exercises, artistic
drills, folk, esthetic and classic dancing.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


PHYSICAL EDUCATION


B.-Elementary


Physical Educa-


tion.


Open to all students.


Includes work for the grades.


Daily, 4:35.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION C.-Advanced Physical Education.


Open to all students.


Includes work for High School and


College.


Daily


(hours to be arranged).


PHYSICAL EDUCATION


D.-Folk and Esthetic Dancing.


Includes folk, national, esthetic and classic dancing.


Daily,


5:15.


MUSIC
Miss Kittrell


Music


METHODS,


COURSE


1. -It


object


this


course to


point out the true


place and


purpose of


pubLc


school music, and to consider the various good methods of


teaching music to children in the Primary Grades.


Daily


2:35 A. H.


MUsic METHODS, COURSE


,-A continuation of course 1.


Material is examined for the Grammar Grades and High


School.


(Hours to be arranged)


A. H.


DRAWING


AND


INDUSTRIAL


ARTS


Miss Kittrell
PUBLIC SCHOOL ART AND METHODS, GRADES I-IV


COURSE 1.


- This course includes:


Elementary water


color,


crayon


and


pencil


from


plants,


flowers,


vegetables


and fruit; simple design and its application to some prob-
lem; elementary color theory; paper cutting and construc-


tion;


action


lines;


pose


drawing;


lettering;


arrangement


and poster making.
Model lessons given.


cussed.


Work for first four grades outlined.
Cost and selection of materials dis-


Wed. and Sat. 9:35-11:35 S. H.


PUBLIC SCHOOL ART AND METHODS, GRADES V-VIII


COURSE 2.-This course includes


Water color, pastello,








SUMMER SCHOOL


rhythm,


proportion


and


values;


study


design


and


application to some practical problem; paper cutting; work
outlined for the school year; cost and selection of materials


discussed.


Perspective.


Tu. and Fri. 10:35-12:35 S. H.


NOTE.-Other courses in Drawing and Industrial Art may be
given if the demand is sufficient.
MANUAL TRAINING
*


This


work


planned


include


shop


work


and


me-


chanical drawing courses suitable to the first year of High
School.


SHOP


WORK.


- The shop course


will


consist of bench


work,
joints


machine work and


will


laid


out and


turning.


At the


constructed


and


bench


small


various


pieces


of furniture made.


This will give practice in using hand


tools, glueing, staining,


varnishing, etc.


As much practice


as possible will be given on the different machines, and all


work will be done from drawings.


Shops will be open to


accommodate classes.


MECHANICAL


DRAWING.


- In


drawing,


sketching


and


lettering will be practiced all through the session, and, if


possible,


considerable


work


will


given


mechanical


drawing, consisting largely of accurate working drawings
in both orthographs and isometric projection and practice


in tracing and blue printing.

FOLLOWING COURSES


Hours to be arranged.

FOR COLLEGE AND


GRADUATE STUDENTS
The following courses will be offered for those who are


prepared to take them.


Four and one-half year hours, or


eighteen hours


allowed to


per week,


college


will


students


without


maximum
special p(


work


3rmission.


e








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

AGRICULTURE
Professor Floyd


ELEMENTS OF


AGRONOMY.-The origin, formation, and


classification of soils; general methods of soil management,
and the adaptation of soils to the requirements of plants.


M. T.


PLANT


11:35 A. H. 5,


3:35-5:35 Field.


PROPAGATION.-Study and practice in


propaga-


tion


by means of


division


cutting,


layering,


budding


and


grafting, seed selection, storing and testing, and the fun-


damental physiological processes.


Exercises with common


fruits, flowers, and shrubs will be given.


Th. F


8:05


A. H. 5


:35-5 :35 Field.


VEGETABLE


seasons


fertilizing,


GROWING.-Vegetables adapted


in which
irrigating,


they


grown,


troublesome


cultural


insects


and


Florida,
methods,
diseases,


packing and marketing.


Th. F. 2:35 A. H. 5, M.


3:35-


5:35 Field.


FRUIT


GROWING.


- Varieties


fruits


adapted


state, their planting, cultivation, pruning, spraying, trouble-


some insects and diseases.


M. Th. F. 9:35 A. H. 5, T. 3


:35-


5:35 Orchard.
CHEMISTRY
Professor McGhee
GENERAL CHEMISTRY.-A course designed for those who
wish to prepare for science teaching in the High Schools.


This course can be taken by those who


have never taken


chemistry before or by those who have had a course and


wish to review it.


M.T.


Th. F.


8:00 Laboratory, M. T.


Th. 1:30-3:30


QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. -A laboratory


course in


this


subject offered to those who


Laboratory, M.


have had general chemistry.


Th. 1:30-4:30 S.


Cit.r TnrO J m.,rwn A .1- 1^ .^ 9mm A n Ia nnh 'y'c wa








SUMMER SCHOOL


EDUCATION
Professor Fulk
Professor Buchholz
Professor Bohannan
CHILD STUDY.-The nature, growth and development of


the child from birth to adolescence,


with special reference


the meaning of


these facts to


the teacher.


Emphasis


given to effect of child study on the practices of elementary


education.


Daily 7:05 P. H.


Professor Fulk.


EDUCATIONAL


HYGIENE.


- A


study


conditions


and


forces that affect physical and mental vigor of school chil-


dren and teachers.


School sanitation; diseases and defects


school


children; the


teacher as


medical inspector;


hygiene of instruction; the teacher's health; play and rec-
reation; the teaching of hygiene. By making this a six-


hour course (three hours'


a master's degree.


credit)


it may be counted toward


8:05 P


Professor


Fulk.
SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION.-A study of the organization
and administration of public education in the United States,


with


special


reference


city


and


village


schools.


The


course is planned especially for principals and teachers of


these schools.
confront the


towns.
credit)


Emphasis will be .placed on


supervising


By making this a
it may be counted


officers and


six-hour


as graduate


problems that


teachers


course


work.


(three


smaller
hours'


By special


arrangement, graduate students may make this a two-hour


course


(one hour credit)


. M.


. Th.


2:35


Professor Fulk.
SECONDARY SCHOOL PROBLEMS.-For high school teach-
ers, dealing with practical problems of the secondary school.
As far as possible the special needs of those who take the


course will be considered.


The reorganization of the sec-


- 1. .1. 1 1 .I .1 .0







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


educational situation in


light of the


past; second,


acquaint him


educational


with


leaders


the educational influence of


since


time


Rousseau.


great
Daily


10:35 P


H. 21


Professor L.


W. Buchholz.


RURAL


SOCIAL


PROBLEMS.-A


study


principles


underlying the general social organization of rural life, as
well as ways and means of community improvement, such


as will enable teachers to
respective communities.


render positive service to their
hmong the topics to be considered


will


Rural


vital statistics;


shifting of


rural


popula-


tion; community


hygiene and sanitation; good roads; the


rural


church; the


rural


school,


etc.


.F.


10:35


Professor Bohannan.


HISTORY


AGRICULTURAL


EDUCATION.


- A


study


agricultural educational systems both in Europe and Amer-


with a discussion of the vital questions on the agricul-


tural education of today.


Daily 7:05 P. H. 30.


Professor


Bohannan.


METHODS


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


- A study


selection,


organization


and


subjects in secondary schools.


presentation of
Daily 11:35 P


agricultural


H. 30.


Pro-


fessor Bohannan.


ENGLISH
Professor Beck


SHAKESPEARE.-Hamlet and Antony and Cleopatra. An
intensive study of the two plays and a comparative study


of some modern drama, if time permits.


Daily written les-


sons.


All students.


Daily 8:05 L. H. 26.


TEACHING OF ENGLISH.-A course for English teachers.


Late methods, concrete laboratory material,


tization, and High School classics.


plans, drama-


Th. 9:35 L. H. 26.


BROWNING.


- Luria


and


the shorter poems,


including


A- v A-.'1 Q- ti P 4-r- Th hl "Dl ,-- 1,-n l A-rT. T" .n o finh/-accw QCannaO


lca,








SUMMER SCHOOL


THE SHORT STORY.


--A


study of the technique and sub-


stance of American, English, French and Russian stories.


Some practice.


On request.


See instructor.


L. H. 26.


FRENCH
Professor Anderson


FRENCH


Aa.


- One


semester'


work


Elementary


French, including grammar, written and oral exercises, and


reading simple French.


Daily


10:35 L. H. 12.


MILITARY


FRENCH.


- An


elementary


course


designed


especially for those who are preparing for service in France.


Daily


11:35 L. H. 12.


HISTORY


AND


ECONOMICS


Professor Staples


AMERICAN


HISTORY


AND


GOVERNMENT.-An


advanced


course on the history of our country and the development


of its institutions.


Daily


1:35


L. H. 11.


EUROPEAN HISTORY.-History and development of Euro-


pean countries since 181


Daily


10:35 L. H. 11.


METHODS OF TEACHING HISTORY.-A study of the best


methods


in organizing and


presenting


historical


material


in secondary schools.


T. 9:35 L. H. 11.


PRINCIPLES OF


EcoNoMIcs.-A study


of money,


bank-


ing, industrial


organizations,


labor,


taxation,


tariffs,


gov-


ernmental regulation.


Daily


3:35 L. H. 11.


LATIN
Professor Anderson
LATIN la.-Selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses and


other works.


Daily at 8:05 L. H. 12.


LATIN lb.-Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia; Ter-


ence's Phormio.


Daily (hours to be arranged)


L. H.


TEACHING LATIN.


-A short course, treating some meth-


ods of teaching High School Latin.


Saturday 9:05 L. H. 12.








UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


PLANE


ANALYTICAL


GEOMETRY.


- Daily


(hours


arranged)


ELEMENTARY CALCULUS.-Daily


(hours to be arranged)


NOTE.-Those


interested


correspond with the Instructor.
SPANISH


two courses


named should


Professor


Crow


ELEMENTARY SPANISH.-Pronunciation, grammar, exer-


cises, conversation.


. 8:00


L. H.


ELEMENTARY READING COURSE.-Easy Texts.


9:35 L.


INTERMEDIATE


SPANISH.-Continuation


Elementary


Spanish.


. 3:35


INTERMEDIATE


READING


COURSE.-Intermediate


Texts.


(Three


hours.)


Hours to


be arranged.


SPANISH


COMMERCIAL


to business Spanish.


CORRESPONDENCE.-Introduction


(Three hours.)


Hours to be arranged.


SOUTH


American


AMERICAN
geography,


AFFAIRS.


history


- Introduction


, politics.


South


. 11:35


Courses in Portuguese


will be given if


demand is


suffic-


ient.


The


number


courses


given


will


depend


largely upon


demand.


SPECIAL
COMMERCIAL
Profess(


COURSES
iL COURSES
or Tyler


The Summer School is again able to announce Commer-


cial


Courses.


Fees


for these are as


follows:


Bookkeeping, Beginning or


Advanced, thru the term..


$5.00


CN1.L -i- -l -- ,-- - - -- A.


. F


.W


. W


A 1 .__ .. . _- -


A.1 _


L1__ J


YAA








SUMMER SCHOOL


Professor Win.


Tyler is head of commercial department


of Pensacola High School.

PRINTING
Miss Alys Corr


METHODS


TEACHING


PRINTING.


- The


course


will


cover the


place and


value of


printing in


the curriculum,


scope of course, methods of organizing and conducting the
work, and correlation with other subjects, such as English,


Mathematics, Science, Design, etc.


Alligator Printing Office.


(Hours to be arranged.)


L. H.


LABORATORY


course


Double


COURSE


PRINTING.-To


laboratory


period,


taken


consisting


with
type-


setting, imposition, presswork, proof-reading, copy-editing,


etc.


Hours to be arranged.


Alligator Printing Office.


L.H.


NOTE.-A fee of $1.00 per week will be charged for the above
courses.


PUBLIC SPEAKING
Professor Chapman


EXPRESSION


AND


PUBLIC


SPEAKING.


- In


courses


offered particular attention will be given to establishing a
correct method of breathing, to correcting faulty articula-


tion,


and


teaching the


principles


interpretation


voice, gesture, and facial expression.


In these studies spe-


cial attention will be given to preparing teachers for carry-
ing on this work in the public schools.


account


lack


funds,


small


tuition


charged.


Those interested see Professor


J. M.


Chapman.


SCHOOL FOR RADIO OPERATORS
University of Florida
A school for radio operators has been established at the


University of Florida,


which, however, is distinct from the







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


HOME SERVICE WORK IN THE AMERICAN RED CROSS


class


will


organized


and


a series


lectures


will


be given


competent men and


women in


Home


Serv-


Work


American


Red


Cross.


The


demand


Red


Cross


seems


service


necessary


workers


that


such


is so great


a course


this


given,


time
and


that


hoped


that


many will


take


advantage


this


course.


SCHOOL


LAW


Professor Trusler


ESSENTIALS OF SCHOOL LAW.*


-Authority and responsi-


abilities of teachers; rights and liabilities of pupils


ableness


and


extra-mural


operation


rules


and


reason-
regula-


tions; the


teacher's


contract; city


schools; legal and illegal


expenditures


school


money;


legal


and


illegal


uses


public


school


public


property;


schools


tort


contractual


responsibility


capacity


school


and 1
s and


ability
school


officials; exemption of school


property from


taxation; legal


aspects of diplomas and degrees.


Lectures, quizzes, assigned


cases


and


readings.


Five


hours


a week


(hours


ranged).


SPECIAL


LECTURES


Lectures


will


given


from


time


time


different


members


tion,
high


use and
schools.


faculty


care


on school


apparatus


libraries
r science


and


selec-


courses


A series of lectures will be given on mental and physical
hygiene and sanitation.


The


State


High


School


Inspector will


give


several


lec-


tures on high school administration,


Florida high


with special reference


schools.


The State Superintendent has promised to give a series


of lectures


on the


Florida


school


situation.







liege



S- - ..- : . ... .
|ji1??~a j ^~t3~fBr;-


Wig
***aaa
I,


-.n


'f" k..7
*~ . _.- . ,, ,.^ .7 *<,*.--'p^*-.*
- -'" "m .* ::' I
r~a;<*** <^


SUMMER NORMAL SCHOOL, 1915


*qwl~"
:--_ pi~cb'

U.".


. IIU


.t I1P

*1


W-. I


IF~.' ;i"'''fC~- ~t- -
Cr~l:~-~



I~L~CI~I ~~~


-"'


_______ t t



































4 CM









THE COMMONS








SUMMER SCHOOL


Edward J


Banks, Ph.D.,


Oriental scholar and


of the Babylonian Expedition of the


University


Director
Chicago,


will give a series of lectures on Palestine and the Orient.


Adams


Puffer,


Ph.D


., noted author and lecturer,


will


lecture on


problems


Winship,


Ph.D


youth
editor


and


vocational


Journal


guidance.


Educa-


tion


author


and


traveler,


lectures


vital


problems


education.


Hon.


McBrien,


Federal


specialist on


rural


educa-


tion,


will


present three or four days.


Arrangements are being made for other lectures by men


and


women


national


reputation.


these


lectures


are


free to members of the Summer School.


RECREATION


THE


SUMMER


SCHOOL


The
courts
dents.


swimming


will


These


pool,


gymnasium


service


places


recreation


constantly frequented by
School.


those


and


Summer


and
who


cement


Schoc


pleasure


attend


tennis
1 stu-


should


Summer


Miss


evening
evening


Kittrell


each
play


will


week.
hour,


have
Miss


and


charge


Pohl


Mrs.


twilight


will


Beck


have


will


singing


one


charge


direct


an evening


story


hour.


REGULATIONS


When
following


credit


regulations


extension
Establish


certificates


desired


Summer


the


School.


Board


must


followed


teacher


shall


allowed


take


more


than


twenty


hours


per


week


purely


academic


subjects.


No teacher shall take less than five


hours


per week


of professional


work.


. L.







UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


5. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any
changee of registration after the first week.
It is hoped that all teachers will recognize the wisdom


ff the above regulations.


To fulfil its highest mission the


Summer School should not be utilized merely for the pur-


pose of "cramming"


for examinations.


Attention


directed


following


section


Summer School Act:


EXTENSION OF TEACHERS'


CERTIFICATES


Section


6 of a


recent Act of the


Legislature


provides


that:


"All
herein


therefore,


teachers


created


upon


Superintendent


to one year'


attending


and


whose


making I
of Public


any
work


entitles


proof of the
Instruction,


extension on any


Summer


them


lereby


same
are


Florida teacher's


they may hold and which has not fully


certificate may


be extended one


Schools
credit


State


entitled


certificate


expired, and such


year for each


session attended by the said teacher.


succeeding


Under this section


of the


law,


no certificate of


credit


making proof of the work done will be granted by the State
Superintendent and the Presidents of the Summer Schools,


except


those


teachers


who


attend


full


term


and


whose work shall be satisfactory to the faculty concerned.

CREDIT TOWARDS NORMAL SCHOOL AND COLLEGE DEGREES
Section 5 of Summer School Act is as follows:
"All work conducted at the said Summer Schools shall


be of


such


character as to entitle the students doing the


same to collegiate, normal or professional credit therefore,
and may be applied towards making a degree."
ROOMS


who


expect to


occupy


dormitory


rooms,


which in


every case are comfortable and commodious, should make
reservations as soon as possible.










Uniniversity


Gainesville


of Florida
, Florida


normal School and Teachers' College

REVIEW COURSES
A ONE-YEAR COURSE
A TwO-YEAR ELEMENTARY PROFESSIONAL COURSE
REGULAR FOUR-YEAR NORMAL COURSE
COURSE LEADING TO AN A.B. DEGREE IN EDUCATION
COURSE LEADING TO A B.S. DEGREE IN EDUCATION


THE SUMMER SCHOOL


For information write,


a a a. rr -r ... .-.-*


C





































































































































































































































































































-"


































































i
'










University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs