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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00500
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1919
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00500
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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university


June


F Florida
FLORIDA


Summer


School


1919


University


GAINESVILLE,


(Co-Educational)


announcement


16-August


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SUMMER SCHOOL

SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD
STATE SUPERINTENDENT W. N. SHEATS, A.M., LL.D.
PRESIDENT A. A. MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D.
PRESIDENT EDWARD CONRADI, A.M., PH.D.


FACULTY


AND OFFICERS


A. MURPHREE, LL.D., President
Director of Summer School.
HARVEY W. COX, PH.D., Dean,
Educational Psychology.
J. N. ANDERSON, PH.D.,
College Latin andJrench.
MISS MARIE ANDERSON,
Primary Methods.


English
F.


E. C. BECK, A.M.,
Language and Literature.


BUCHHOLZ, A.B.,
Latin.


L. W. BUCHHOLZ,
Theory and Practice of


A.M.,
Teaching.


MISS


MARGARET BURNEY,
Mathematics and Methods.
W. S. CAWTHON, A.M.,
Higher Mathematics.
J. M. CHAPMAN, D.O.,
Public Speaking.
C. L. CROW, PH.D.,
Spanish Language.
P. W. FATTIG, M.S.,
Agricultural Education.


w
Scie


FISHER, PH.D.,
Bird Study.
i. FLOYD, M.S.,
? and Agriculture.


A.M.,









SUMMER

B. HATHI


A


SCHOOL

.WAY, A.M.,


Rhetoric.


HENSLEY


, A.M.,


English and American Literature.


Civic


C. F.
Biolo9


HODGE
ry and


, PH.D.
Nature


Study.


M. KEMPER, A.M.,
General History.


MISS
Industrial


FRANCES


KITTRELL,


School


usic.


. G. SAWYER,
Manual Arts.
McGHEE, PH.D.,
Chemistry.


McMULLEN


, A.B.,


English Grammar and Composition.


. SAWYER, A.M.,
Mdathematics.


ST. AMAN


ge History and


Commercial


I. TYLE
Subjects


T, M.A.,
Economics.


R, B.C.S.,
and Penmanship.


GEO.


Secretary


WHITE
nd Phys'


, A.B.,
ical Director


W. C. A.


Secretary


and Physical Director for Women.


WOODWARD


History and


, A.B.,


Civics.


SPECIAL


LECTURERS


HON


SHEAT


LL.D.


HODGE


PH.D.


FISHER, PH.D.


BISHOP


D.D.


K. H.


GRAHAM


Auditor


BUCHHOLZ,


Officer in Charge.


Public


A.
Colle


Men.








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


LOCATION


OF THE UNIVERSITY


Gainesville, the seat of the University, a town of 10,000


inhabitants, possesses numerous advantages.


It is centrally


located and


easy


of access,


being reached


by the


leading


railroads


shaded


streets,


State.


has


exceptional


well


pure


paved,


water


lighted


supply


and


and


good


sewerage


system.


The


citizens


are


energetic,


pro-


gressive and hospitable.


The moral atmosphere is whole-


some, and for many years the sale of intoxicants has been


prohibited


law.


leading


denominations


have


attractive places of worship.
GROUNDS AND BUIJILDINGS


The


University


occupies


a tract


hundred


and


thirteen acres, situated in the western extermity of Gaines-


ville.


Ninety acres of this tract are devoted to the campus,


drill-ground and athletic fields; one hundred and seventeen
acres are utilized for the farm of the College of Agricul-
ture; the remainder is used by the Agricultural Experiment
Station.


Twelve buildings have already been erected.


in the order of construction:


These are,


Two dormitories, known as


"Buckman Hall"


and


"Thomas


Hall"; the


Mechanic Arts


Shop,


Science


Hall,


Agricultural


Experiment


Station


Building, Engineering Hall,


the Gymnasium,


the Agricul-


tural College Building, the dining hall or


"University Com-


mons"


, Language


Hall,


"George


Peabody


Hall",


home of the Teachers' College and Normal School, and the


College of Law.


They are lighted with electricity, supplied


with city water and furnished with modern improvements
and equipment.


EXPENSES


Registration Fee .-........
_ .1 1 ----------- --


1.00


l~, . -- 1


CI 1


~







SUMMER SCHOOL


Students taking manual training will have to


the material they use.


pay for


This will not amount to more than


75 cents.
RooMs.-Dormitory rooms are supplied with two good
iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, a table,


washstand and


chairs.


All students are


required to pro-


vide


for themselves a


pillow,


bed linen,


towels and


such


other things as they may want for their own special con-
venience.
Two additional dormitories have been built which makes
it possible to accommodate the men on the campus if they
so desire.
Good rooms can be obtained adjacent to the campus at
$1.25 to $1.50 per week. A number of rooms in the city
can be obtained at $1.00 per week. Men desiring to have
their rooms reserved in advance should write at once.
PEABODY HALL.-Peabody Hall, the home of the Teach-


ers'


College,


is a magnificent three-story


brick and stone


structure.


It is modern in every respect as to equipment


and arrangements.


It contains all the lecture rooms, society


halls, reading rooms, laboratories and libraries that a mod-


ern college of this kind needs.


With such facilities at its


command, nothing can hinder the college from realizing its
aims.


LIBRARY.-The


general


library


University


con-


tains about 18,000 volumes of well-selected books to which


the Summer School students have free access.


The Peda-


gogical library will


be of


special interest to


them,


for it


contains


many


books


educational


theory,


general


and


special methods, history of education, psychology and phil-


osophy.


reading room


more


than


a hundred


best


general


and


technical


periodicals.


Here


also


are received the leading newspapers of the State.


PSYCHOLOGICAL LABORATORY.


- The


new


Psychological







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


oratory


will


contain


appliances


and


apparatus


necessary for thorough


and


efficient work in


experimental


psychology.


EDUCATIONAL


RESEARCH


ROOM.


-- Room


Peabody


Hall, is set apart for special and graduate students in Edu-


cation.


This room contains exhibits of many lines of school


work; reports and


publication


of the


Department of


Education


samples


of school


texts;


Courses of Study; Re-


ports of Superintendents


Education


catalogues of


colleges


and university
school laws.


ies


samples of records and reports, and state


The room is especially rich in material, method


and practical operation


of mental and educational measure-


ments.
Graduate students working on theses will find this room


especially helpful and convenient.


The equipment is at their


service, and individual tables and chairs will be provided.


TEACHERS'


EMPLOYMENT


BUREAU.-It


purpose


this


bureau


keep


records


teachers


who


have


attended


for the


University


profession


who


teaching


fitted


and


their


recommend


training


them


school


boards


who


in need


efficient


principals


and


teachers.


dent
ents


Already the demand for


is greater than


and


school


our


we can supply.


boards


requested


graduates and stu-


County superintend-


correspond


with


us when in need of well-trained and efficient teachers.


Federal


time


will


used


as the


official


time


Summer School.


After


first


day


Summer


School,


chapel


will


held each


day


except Saturday


at twelve o'clock.


FOLLOWING


COURSES


FOR


COUNTY


CERTIFICATES


EXPLANATION


ABBREVIATIONS


., Agricultural


Hall


Science


Hall;


Engineering


Hall


Peabody


Hall


Language


TV 1-


-t J












4AIL
r t


I~I


-1


PEABODY HALL, Where Summer School is Conducted


-"lf~.






v


SUMMER NORMAL SCHOOL, 1918






SUMMER


SCHOOL


in the rural schools will be stressed.


10:05 A. H.


Professor Floyd.


BEGINNERS'


ALGEBRA.-Elementary


course covering the


fundamental operations, simple and simultaneous equations,


factoring


and


fractions.


Section 1.
Section 2.


M.T


Th. F


. 3:05 L. H. 23.


9:05


Miss Burney.


Professor


Mc-


Mullen.


ADVANCED


ALGEBRA.


- Involution,


evolution,


quadratic


equations,


progressions, ratio and proportion.


Section 1.
Section 2.


. 10:05 P


.4:05 L. H.


Prof. Sawyer.
Miss Burney.


ARITHMETIC.-A


thoro


review


arithmetic


is made,


that the


student may


view it


from


both


teacher's


and


child's


point


view.


Common and


decimal fractions,


nominate


numbers,


percentage,


and


other


subjects


ered


text-books


adopted


State.


Principles


and methods of teaching arithmetic are


thoroly


gone


over.


Three sections


Section


. 10:05


Miss


Burney


Section 2.


Th. 8


05 P


. H. 21.


Professor L.


Buchholz.


Section


.Th.


. 2:05


. H.


Professor


Sawyer.


CIVIL GOVERNMENT.-Special


attention


will


given


local,
tical


town and city,


information


and


county governments.


That


prac-


that every intelligent citizen should have


is stressed.


How to


teach


the subject.


3:05


Professor


Woodward.


ENGLISH
Section ]


COMPOSITION


Two sections


H. 28.


Professor


Hath-


away.


Section 2.


Th.


4:05


A. H. 13.


Professor


McMullen.


ENGLISH


GRAM MAR.--Two


sections:


'. W






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


the importance of hygiene and sanitation.


How to


keep


well and physically efficient is the special aim of this course.


M.W


.F. 9:05 L. H. 25.


Professor Woodward.


PEDAGOGY.-School


management,


general


and


special


methods of teaching, elementary principles of child nature,
school hygiene and sanitation, personality of teacher, rela-


tion


school and


community,


and


other practical


peda-


gogical questions.


F. 11:05 P. H. 25.


Professor


L.W


. Buchholz.


PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.-The main features of the ordi-
nary text-book in physical geography will be studied. Along
with this stress will be placed upon the effects the physical
features have on man-his commercial and social life. This


will


be correlated


with agriculture.


. 4:05


P. H. 31.


Professor Hatcher.


POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY.-Special attention will be given


to Florida and its relation to other states.


A thoro review


of the geography of the United States and the world.


structions


will


given


in the


use


text-books,


maps,


globes, industrial products, etc.


Th. 8:05 P. H. 31.


Professor Hatcher.
COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY.-This course will include all
the important features of political geography and in addi-
tion a careful study will be made of commerce and indus-


tries in their relation to geography.


M.W


.F. 9:05 P


. H. 20.


Professor Hatcher.
ORTHOGRAPHY.-The spelling of common words will be


stressed.
demanded.


Correct spelling in


forms


written


How best to teach spelling.


work


8:05 A. H.


Professor McMullen.


READING.


- Practice


reading


required


each


week.


Teachers are so drilled in reading that they will be able to


read well to their classes.
teaching reading are given.


The methods and principles of


T. Th. 3:05 L. H. 10.


Professor


T-T a aolr






SUMMER SCHOOL


Section


.Th. F


. 11:05


A. H.


Professor


McMullen.


FLORIDA HISTORY.-Adopted book will be covered.


F. 3:05 L. H.


Professor Woodward.


For the above courses the State-adopted text-books will
be used.
These and all other books for the Summer School may


be obtained at the


University


Book Store, Language Hall.


STATE AND SPECIAL CERTIFICATES


The


following courses of


study


lead


State and


special certificates, and to -high school, normal and profes-
sional credits, which may be applied toward a normal school
diploma.


BEGINNERS'


PLANE GEOMETRY.-M. T.


8:05 P. H.


Professor Sawyer.


PLANE GEOMETRY.-Review course.


L.H.


F. 8:05


Miss Burney.


SOLID GEOMETRY.-T. W


Th. F


. 11:05 P


. H. 21.


Profes-


sor F. W


. Buchholz.


PLANE


TRIGONOMETRY.-M.


3:05


Professor Sawyer.


GENERAL


SCIENCE.-A


course


methods


general


science designed especially to meet the needs of high school


teachers.


T. Th. 9:05 P. H.


Professor Grimm.


PHYSICS.-A general course such as is usually given in


standard
stations,


work.
P. H.


secondary


and a


schools-lectures,


limited


Th. 10:05.


amount


recitations, ,demon-


individual


Laboratory,


laboratory
. 4:05-6:00


Professor Grimm.


FIRST


YEAR LATIN.-Section


Beginners,


Th. 9:05 P. H.


view, M.


Professor Hathaway.


4:05 P. H. 21.


Section


Professor F


Re-


Buch-


hkni


7


. H.


. W







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


prose composition will be given.


Professor F.


W. Th. F. 8:05 P


Buchholz.


RHETORIC.-A general course in composition and rheto-


M. T. Th. F. 4:05 P


H. 28.


Professor Hathaway.


ENGLISH LITERATURE.-The history of English Litera-


ture as


outlined


Metcalf's


English


Literature


will


given.


Th. F


2:05 L. H. 10.


Professor Hensley.


AMERICAN LITERATURE.-Study of American Literature


as outlined in Metcalf's


"American Literature"


M.W


Th.


F. 4:05 L. H. 11.


Professor Kemper.


METHODS OF TEACHING THE ELEMENTARY BRANCHES.-


this


course


emphasis


will


placed


presentation of grammar school subjects.


upon


M. T.


proper
Th. F.


3:05 P


H. 25.


Professor L.


W. Buchholz.


GRAMMAR GRADE ENGLISH.-Methods of teaching Eng-


lish


in grammar


grades


will


stressed


this


course.


Some time will be given to a discussion of the best English


productions


for these


grades.


F. 3:05


Professor Kemper.


PSYCHOLOGY.-A beginners'


course in psychology with


applications to
Professor Cox.


teaching.


. Th.


9:05


ZOOLOGY.


-In


connection


with


text-book


typical specimens illustrating the different groups,


study,
will be


dissected and studied in the laboratory, to obtain as com-


prehensive


an idea


of their


structure


and


physiology


possible.
Grimm.


M. T. W. Th. 2:05 S. H. Botany Room.


Professor


BOTANY.-In


classroom


and


laboratory


structure,


morphology, reproduction and classification will be studied.
After students have been prepared for them, field trips will


be taken,


when representative types of important families


will be collected and identified.


Th. F. 3:05 S. H.






SUMMER SCHOOL


HISTORY.---Ancient: M. T. Th. F. 10:05 L. H. 11.


Pro-


fessor Kemper.


Medieval and Modern


M. T.


. 9:05


L. H. 11.


Professor Kemper.


CIVIC BIOLOGY


AND NATURE STUDY


Professor Hodge
Dr. Hodge has taken for his special problem instruction
in biological subjects in the public grade and high schools.


His courses deal


with selection


and


treatment of


subject


matter best suited to each grade of instruction.


The aim


thruout


develop


confidence


and


resourcefulness


teachers so that each shall be able to organize into a practi-
cal course the materials at hand in the environment of his


school.


Our taxes in "H. C. L.", damages and losses running


into billions of money and hundreds of thousands of lives
each year, due to ignorance in these matters, are a measure
of our need for such instruction.


COURSE


Nature


Study


Grammar


Grades.


Text: "Nature Study and Life"


(Ginn & Co.)


By Hodge.


Daily 8:05 P. H. 25.


COURSE


School Course.


Civic
Text


Biology


and


"Civic Biology"


(Ginn & Co)


Hodge and Dawson.


Daily


10:05 P


H. 25.


Classroom


instruction


in both


courses


will


be supple-


mented by such excursions, for bird, insect, plant and gar-
den studies, and by such special outdoor problem work as it
may be possible to arrange for.
These courses may count for college or normal credit.

BIRD STUDY
Dr. Fisher
BIRD STUDY.-A course in Bird Study, to be conducted
in cooperation with the National Association of Audubon


Societies.


Work to begin June 16th, 1919, and to continue


Problems


High







12 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

books on birds and practical suggestions for bird study in


schools.


Field trips, the object of which will be to learn to


identify by eye and ear the birds to be found in the vicinity


during


July.


Students


will


learn


use the


keys


in the


handbooks so that they may


continue this study indepen-


dently.
As a part of the field work, special attention will be paid
to the identification of trees and all kinds of plants which
are concerned with the life of birds.
Field or opera glasses will be very useful in this course.


M. T. Th. Sat. 4:05


Text-book


"The Bird Study


Book", by T. Gilbert Pearson, Doubleday, Page & Co.

PRIMARY WORK
Miss Marie Anderson
NEWER TYPE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL.-Course will discuss
some recent departures from the traditional and will con-


sider


causes


for these changes.


The


course


will


include


organization of the primary school curriculum, and a dis-


cussion


of the


relationship


between the kindergarten and


primary school.


It is planned to meet the needs of teachers


of the first four grades.


Daily


10:05 E. H. 10.


TRADITIONAL SUBJECTS OF THE PRIMARY SCHOOL.-Aims


and


Methods-the


rapid


transformation


methods


teaching the traditional studies will be considered.


Type


lessons


illustrating


drill


lesson,


application


the drill lesson and the lesson for appreciation will be given.


Daily 11:05 E.


H. 10.


SPECIAL SUBJECTS OF THE PRIMARY SCHOOL.-Course
will include a discussion of the special primary subjects in
the order of their importance; viz., Handwork, Games and


Plays, Nature Study, Literature and Music.


Their intrinsic


educational value, and their importance to the regular sub-


jects as vital sunDlementarv aids will be emphasized.


Em-







SUMMER SCHOOL


We consider ourselves fortunate in securing


derson for the primary work.


Miss An-


Hon. J. L. McBrien, Rural


School Extension Agent, of the Bureau of Education, Wash-


ington,


says


her:


you


want


all-round


teacher whose education, experience and training fit her to
teach rural teachers how to teach, as well as to teach town


and


city


grade


teachers


how to


teach,


there


is no better


person than Miss Marie Anderson, Supervisor Primary Ed-
ucation, Port Arthur, Texas, that I can name for this work


South.


She


had


experience


institute


teacher.


She was for six years in the Gary schools under


the supervision of Superintendent Wirt of Gary fame.


Miss


Anderson has been establishing this system at Port Arthur,


Texas, for the past three years.


She taught one session at


the University of Pennsylvania."

PHYSICAL EDUCATION


White


The courses in Physical Education are designed to meet
the needs of Primary, Grammar and High School teachers


and


physical


directors.


They


will


include


formal


gym-


nasties, athletics, gymnastic and singing games, track ath-
letics, military marching and setting up exercises, artistic
drills, folk, esthetic and classic dancing.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION A.-Plays and games on the lawn


three evenings a week at 7 p. m.


Open to all students.


registration is necessary for this course.


play hour is


conducted on the lawn every evening for recreation of the


students and the instruction in


plays and games suitable


for adult community life, as well as those of the children.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION


B.-Elementary


Physical Educa-


tion.


Open to all students.


Includes work for the grades.


Daily 4:05.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION C.-Advanced Physical Education.







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


Includes folk, national, esthetic and classic dancing.


Daily


5 :05.


PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


E.-Playground


Activities.


The


purposes of this course are to give teachers practical train-


ing in the supervision


of school play, and in the equipment


playgrounds;


participation,


and


teach


them


thru


observation


playground activities that may


used,


and
with


small
public


and


large


schools.


groups


The


children,


attendance


school


grades
children


from


Gainesville


and


vicinity


will


provide


adequate


opportunity


for playing games and to organize various playground activ-


ities under actual school conditions.


7 :00 p. m.


on campus.


MUSIC
Miss Kittrell


Music


course


METHODS,


point


COURSE


true


1.- It
place


object


and


purpose


this


public


school music, and
teaching music to


to consider the


children


various


Primary


good methods


2:05 Gymnasium.
MUSIC METHODS, COURSE 2.-A continuation of course 1.


Grades.


Daily


Material
School.


is examined


Grammar


(Hours to be arranged)


Grades


and


High


Gymnasium.


DRAWING AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS
Miss Kittrell


PUBLIC


SCHOOL


ART


AND


METHODS,


GRADES


COURSE


1.-This


course


includes


Elementary


water


color,


crayon


and


pencil


from


plants,


flowers,


vegetables


and
lem


fruit; simple design


elementary


and


color theory


application


paper cutting


to some


and


prob-


construc-


tion;


action


lines


pose


drawing


lettering;


arrangement


and


poster


Model
cussed.


lessons


Wed.


making.


given.


2ndn


Work


Cost


a.t


-aI ~1a r--


and


9:05-11


first


four


selection


VV


grades


outlined.


materials


dis-


YI aS ~a*


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SUMMER SCHOOL


ory; simple working drawings; lettering; poster making;


suitability


dress


different


occasions


and


types


people; application of the principles of Art to home decora-


tion


bookmaking;


appreciation


direction,


balance,


rhythm,


proportion


and


values;


study


design


and


application to some practical problem


paper cutting; work


outlined for the school year; cost and selection of materials


discussed.


Perspective.


Tu. and Fri. 10:05-12:00 E.


H. 12.


NOTE.-Other courses in Drawing and Industrial Art may be
given if the demand is sufficient.
MANUAL TRAINING
R. G. Sawyer


This


work is


planned


include


shop


work and


me-


chanical drawing courses suitable to the first year of High
School.


SHOP


WORK.-The


shop


course


will


consist


of bench


work, machine work and turning.


At the bench


various


joints


will


laid


out and


constructed


and


small


pieces


of furniture made.


This will give practice in using hand


tools, glueing, staining,


varnishing, etc.


As much practice


as possible will be given on the different machines, and all


work will be done from drawings.


Shops will be open to


accommodate classes.


MECHANICAL


DRAWING.


-- In


drawing,


sketching


and


lettering will be practiced all through the session, and, if


possible,


considerable


work


will


given


mechanical


drawing, consisting largely


of accurate working drawings


in both orthographs and isometric projection and practice


in tracing and printing.


Hours to be arranged.


E. H. 2.


FOLLOWING COURSES FOR COLLEGE AND
GRADUATE STUDENTS
The following courses will be offered for those who are


I 1 I B ---







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


only a limited number can be given.


of course will depend upon the demand.

AGRICULTURE
Professor Floyd


ELEMENTS OF


AGRONOMY.-The origin, formation, and


classification of soils; general methods of soil management,
and the adaptation of soils to the requirements of plants.


M. T.


PLANT


11:05 A. H. 12, Th. 4:05-6:00 Field.
PROPAGATION.-Study and practice in propaga-


tion


by means of


division


cutting,


layering,


budding and


grafting, seed selection, storing and testing, and the fun-


damental physiological processes. Exerci
fruits, flowers, and shrubs will be given.


H. 12, W


4:05-6:00 Field.


VEGETABLE GROWING.-Vegetables


seasons


fertilizing,


which


irrigating,


they


are


grown,


troublesome


adapted


cultural


insects


and


Florida,
methods,
diseases,


packing and marketing.


6:00 Field.


FRUIT


GROWING.


- Varieties


fruits


adapted


state, their planting, cultivation, pruning, spraying, trouble-


some insects and diseases.


M. Th. F


9:05 A. H. 12 T. 4:05-


6:00 Orchard.
CHEMISTRY
Professor McGhee
GENERAL CHEMISTRY.-A course designed for those who
wish to prepare for science teaching in the High Schools.


This course can be taken by those who


have never taken


chemistry before or by those who have had a course and


wish to review it.


M. T


Th. F


8:05 Laboratory, M. T.


. Th.


2 :05-4:00


QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. -A


laboratory


course


in this


The number and kind


ses with common


Th. F. 8:05


Th. F. 3:05 A. H. 12 M. 4:05-







SUMMER SCHOOL


either


course may


qualitative


taken,


quantitative


instead


a whole


analysis
course.


half


Credit


to be given when the course is completed.

EDUCATION
Professor Fulk


Professor L.


W. Buchholz


CHILD STUDY.-The nature, growth and development of
the child from birth to adolescence, with special reference to


the meaning of these processes to the teacher.


Emphasis


given to the effect of


child study on the practices of


mentary and secondary education.


M. T. Th. F


ele-


9:05 P


Professor Fulk.


EDUCATIONAL


HYGIENE.-A


study


conditions


and


forces that affect the physical and mental vigor of school


children and teachers.
and defects of children


School sanitation; common diseases
; the teacher as medical inspector;


the hygiene of instruction; the teacher


hygiene.


health; community


A demonstration clinic will be an important fea-


ture of this course.


Students not registered for the course


may


enter


for the


clinic.


See


instructor.


. F.


3:05 P


.H. 23.


Professor Fulk.


PLAY AND RECREATION.-A study of play and recreation


especially from


the standpoint of the


public school,


with


some attention to the leisure time problem and avocational


training.


This course supplements either Child Study


Educational Hygiene, but may be taken separately, and for


graduate cred
CURRENT


administration


4:05 P


EDUCATIONAL


and


H. 23.


Professor Fulk.


PROBLEMS.-Vital


supervision.


problems of


possible


needs of those who take the course will be met.


The re-


organization of the elementary and secondary school, edu-
cational surveys, educational measurements, extra-curricula
activities, the adaptation of the school to the community,







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


trials and methods of teaching.


The purpose of the course


is to help form a broad, sound philosophy upon which teach-


ers may base educational practice.


May be taken for gradu-


ate credit.


M. W. Th. F. 8:05 P


. H.23.


Professor Fulk.


HISTORY OF EDUCATION.-This course has two main pur-
poses: first, to lead the student to appreciate the present


educational situation in


light of the


past


second,


acquaint him


with


the educational influence of the


great


educational leaders since the time of Rousseau.


Daily 10:05


H. 21.


Professor L.


Buchholz.


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
Professor Fattig
METHODS IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.-A study of the
selection, organization and presentation of agricultural sub-


jects in secondary schools.


Time will be given to the prepa-


ration of an agricultural museum.


Daily 9:05 P. H. 31.


One


field trip each week.
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION.-History of the development of
vocational education in the leading countries of the world;
principles of vocational education; prevocational education


and vocational guidance.


M. T. Th. F. 10:05 P


. H. 31.


NOTE.-Special


courses will


Teachers coming in for four weeks' work.


be arranged for the Agricultural


ENGLISH
Professor Beck
Professor Hensley
ADVANCED COLLEGE RHETORIC.-Designed to train stu-


dents in methods of clear and forceful expression.


Instruc-


tion


is carried


simultaneously


formal


rhetoric,


rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing, the constant cor-
relation of the three methods of approach to the desired


goal being kept in view.


In addition a reading course is


assigned each student.


Daily


10:05. L. H. 10.


Professor


~t 1






SUMMER SCHOOL


be attempted.
8:05 L. H. 26.


Daily written exercises.


Professor


All students. Daily


Beck.


TEACHING OF ENGLISH.-A course for English teachers


in high schools.


Late methods, concrete laboratory mate-


riel, modern subject matter,
sion and high school classics.


plans,


dramatization,


Advanced students.


discus-


Daily


9:05 L. H. 26.


Professor Beck.


THE


NOVEL.-Primarily


reading


course.


Different


types of novels will be read and discussed.


Criticisms and


magazine reviews.


tion"


Study of Howell's


Some written exercises.


"Criticism and Fic-


The works studied may be


Austin's


"Pride


and


Prejudice",


Meredith's


"Ordeal


Richard Feverel", Hardy's


"Return


of the


Native",


Con-


rad's "Victory"


, Tolstoi's "Anna Karenina", Ibanze's "Four


Horsemen


five hours credit.
10:05 L. H. 26.


Apocalypse"
On request.


Three


hours


See instructor.


attendance,
Tu. Th. Sat.


Professor Beck.


BROWNING. -Luria and


"My Last Duchess",


The Laboratory.


shorter poems,


"Andrea del Sarto"


Written


exercises.


including


, "Rabbi Ben Ezra".
Advanced students.


W. F. 11:05 L. H. 26.


Professor Beck.


SHORT STORY.-A study of the technique and substance


of American, English, French, and Russian stories.


attention paid to the magazine story of today.


Some


Some prac-


tice.


Advanced students.


M.W


.F. 2:05 L. H. 26.


Profes-


sor Beck.


ADVANCED


SHORT


STORY.-A


course


those


having


completed last summer's course.
to the history of the short story.


Some time will be given
More attention will be


given to the modern magazines and to writing and market-


ing stories.


On request.


See instructor.


Th. 2:05 L.


H. 26.


Professor Beck.


READING.-Lecture once each week on grammar grade


1_. --1-


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_ _ 1






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

FRENCH
Professor Anderson


FRENCH


Aa.


- Elementary


French,


first


semester's


course; pronunciation, grammar, prose composition,


reader,


oral


practice.


Daily


10:05


Fraser


& Squair's


Shorter


French Course; La Belle France.


FRENCH


Ab.


- Elementary


French,


second


semester's


course; continuation of French Aa: grammar, prose com-


position,


reader,


oral


practice.


Daily


11:05.


Fraser & Squair's


Shorter French Course


La Belle France.


Prerequisite


French Aa or equivalent.


GEOGRAPHY
Professor Hatcher


ADVANCED GEOGRAPHY.-A study


the political


divi-


sions and physical features of the different continents with
respect to natural productions; industries and possible corn-


mercial relations.


Central and South American countries


will be given special attention.
of Florida will also be studied.


The geology and geography


Daily 2:05 P


H. 1.


HISTORY


AND


ECONOMICS


Professor St. Amant


AMERICAN


HISTORY


AND


GOVERNMENT.-An


advanced


course on the history of the United States and the develop-


ment of its institutions.


Daily 2:05 L. H. 11.


EUROPEAN


IHISTORY.-Eighteenth


Century


Europe,


eluding the French Revolution and the Napdleonic Period.


M. T. Th. F


10:05 L. H. 11.


METHODS OF TEACHING HISTORY.-A study in organiz-
ing and presenting historical material in secondary schools.
A wide course of reading will be expected to serve as illus-


trative


material.


Thu.


Sat.


11:05






SUMMER SCHOOL 21

LATIN
Professor Anderson


LATIN


Ib. -Cicero's


Senectute


and


Amicitia


Terence's Phormio.


Daily


(hours to be arranged)


L. H.


Prerequisite: three years of High School Latin.


THE


TEACHING


School Latin"


LATIN.-Game's


is used as a


basis


"Teaching


for informal


High


discussion.


Saturday 9:05 L. H. 12.

MATHEMATICS
Professor Cawthon


COLLEGE ALGEBRA.-Selected topics of algebra


that lie


beyond the high school course.


Daily 3:05 P


H. 17.


PLANE


ANALYTICAL


GEOMETRY.


Second


mester s


Work.--Daily


11:05


P. H.


ELEMENTARY CALCULUS.-Daily


(hours to be arranged)


P. H. 17.
NOTE.-Those interested in other advanced courses should cor-
respond with the instructor.
SPANISH
Professor Crow
SPANISH Aa.-Pronunciation, grammar, exercises, con-


versation, reading of an easy text.
SPANISH Ab.-Continuation o:


Daily 11:05 L. H. 9.


elementary


Spanish A.


Daily except Fri.


3:05 L. H. 9.


SPANISH


Ia.-Syntax,


exercises,


conversation,


reading


of intermediate texts.


Daily except Tues.


8:05 L. H. 9.


SPANISH


COMMERCIAL


to business Spanish.


CORRESPONDENCE.-Introduction


Hours (three) to be arranged.


L. H. 9.


SOUTH


AMERICAN


AFFAIRS. Introduction


South


American geography, history,


politics.


Lecture and read-


ing course, open subject to consent of instructor.


(two) to be arranged.


Hours


L. H. 9.


NOTE.-All classes scheduled will not be given; those selected
depending upon the demand.






UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


be offered, as


past.


All the above will


be presented


with special reference to preparation for teaching.


completing


eight


weeks'


course


these


Teach-
subjects


should


experience


little


difficulty


passing


examina-


tion for teacher's


certificate in same.


Those desiring to


pursue the Commercial subjects


with


a view to
secretarial


making preparation


work


will


find


bookkeeping,


courses


admirably


clerical


suited


their needs.


Five


Dollars


will


charged


each


commercial


subjects,


except


Typewriting.


For


this


sub-


ject a fee of Ten Dollars will be charged,


rental
ranged.


typewriter for


session.


which
Hours


will cover


PUBLIC SPEAKING


EXPRESSION


AND


Professor
PUBLIC


Chapman


SPEAKING.


-In


courses


offered


particular


attention


will


given


to establishing


correct method


of breathing,


correcting faulty


articula-


tion,


and


teaching


voice, gesture, and facial


e principles
expression.


interpretation


In these studies spe-


cial attention will be given to preparing teachers for carry-


ing on


this


work in


public schools.


account


lack


funds,


small


tuition


charged.


Those interested see Professor


Chapman.


HOME


class


given


vice
Red


Work
Cross


seems


SERVICE


will


WORK


organized


THE
Iand


competent men and


American


service


necessary


workers


that


such


Red


AMERICAN


a series


women
Cross.


1 so great
a course 1


RED


CROSS


lectures


Home


The


this


given,


will
Ser-


demand


time
and


that


hoped that many will


take advantage of this course.







IA'













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THE COMMONS
























































































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SUMMER


SCHOOL


conditions, especially in Florida, in their relationship to the


welfare


community


and


public


schools.


The


course is also planned to give teachers some training in the


Modern Health


produced


will
sion.


Crusade


in a good


introduced


The


idea


Work,


many


a great


Modern


which


has already


schools


many


more


Health


been


Florida,
coming


in-
and


ses-


Crusade


enforce


hygiene


as taught


public


schools


and


develop on the part of school children health habits in addi-


tion


a knowledge


of the


body


and


habits.


The


following topics


will


discussed


Lessons


from


War,


Community


Food Supply


and Health, Nature and


Scope of Modern Health


Health
nation.


Crusade


Crusade, and


Tuberculosis


and


Relation


Community


Modern
Organi-


The above


will


be a


four-weeks


course,


beginning


July


and


is provided


State


Anti-Tuberculosis


Asso-


ciation.


Hours


will


be arranged


meet the


needs


class.


SPECIAL


LECTURES


Lectures


will


given


from


time


time


different


members


faculty


on school


libraries


and


selec-


tion,
high


and


care


apparatus


for science


courses


schools.


A series of lectures will be given on mental and physical


hygiene,


and sanitation.


The


State


High


School


Inspector


tures on high school administration,


will


give


several


lec-


with special reference


Florida


high


schools.


The State Superintendent has promised to give a series


of lectures


on the


Florida school


situation.


George


Clyde


Fisher,


Associate


Curator,


American


'r - - - -


,. LT J _. .


TT* J


i.I u1 r. :u11rll n *tT n ui 1i i 41


-n- a a -- A -.f ,--_t --






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Dr. C.


F. Hodge, the noted Naturalist,


will be with us


for the entire session, and give several popular lectures.


The


University has ample equipment to provide games


and


recreational


activities


whole


student


body.


Among the various games will be found:


baseball; indoor


baseball


basket


ball;


volley


ball;


cage-ball;


tennis


courts) ; boxing and quoits.


In addition to this, the swim-


ming pool and new gymnasium will be available.
Miss Kittrell will be with us again to lead our Twilight
Sings, and we are planning to have a first class story teller
for the Story Hour.
The Y. M. C. A. has a fine moving picture machine, and
a large number of educational and travel films have been
secured, as well as some of the finest feature films in the
country.


REGULATIONS


When
following


credit


regulations


extension
Established


certificates


desired


Summer


School


Board


must


followed:


teacher


shall


allowed


take


more


than


twenty hours per week of purely academic subjects.
2. No teacher shall take less 'than five hours per week


of professional


work.


The


maximum


hours


week,


including


profes-


sional,


vocational and academic subjects, shall in no case


exceed twenty-seven hours per week.


Two laboratory hours


to be counted as one hour of academic work.


teacher


shall


take


less


than


fifteen


hours


per


week without special permission.


5. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any
change of registration after the first week.
It is hoped that all teachers will recognize the wisdom


of the above regulations.


To fulfill its highest mission the







SUMMER SCHOOL

EXTENSION OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES


Section


6 of


a recent Act of the


Legislature


provides


that:


"All


herein


teachers


created


attending


and


whose


any
work


Summer


entitles


them


Schools


credit


therefore, upon making proof of the same to the State Super-
intendent of Public Instruction, are hereby entitled to one


year


s extension


on any


Florida


teacher'


certificate


they


may hold and which has not fully expired, and such certifi-
cate may be extended one year for each succeeding session
attended by the said teacher."


Under this section


of the


law,


no certificate of


credit


making proof of the work done will be granted by the State
Superintendent and the Presidents of the Summer Schools,


except


those


teachers


who


attend


full


term


and


whose work shall be satisfactory'to the faculty concerned.

CREDIT TOWARDS NORMAL SCHOOL AND COLLEGE DEGREES
Section 5 of Summer School Act is as follows:
"All work conducted at the said Summer Schools shall


be of such


character as to entitle the students doing the


same to collegiate, normal or professional credit therefore,
and may be applied towards making a degree."


ROOMS


who expect to


occupy


dormitory


rooms,


which


every


case are comfortable and commodious, should make


reservations as soon as possible.


For


room reservations and


general


information


as to


the Summer School, address


Cox,


Dean of Teachers' College,


Gainesville,


Fla.










University


of


Florida


Gainesville,


Florida


Normal


School


and


Teachers'


College


REVIEW COURSES


ONE-YEAR


COURSE


A Two-YEAR ELEMENTARY PROFESSIONAL COURSE
REGULAR FOUR-YEAR NORMAL COURSE
COURSE LEADING TO AN A. B. DEGREE IN EDUCATION
COURSE LEADING TO A B.S. DEGREE IN EDUCATION
THE SUMMER SCHOOL


For information write,


A. A. MURPHREE, President
or


II I


--- .1















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