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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00497
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: August 1920
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00497
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Full Text













University


of


Florida


GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


University


Summer


School


(Co-Educational)
Announcement


June


14-August 6,


1920









SUMMER


SCHOOL


SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD


STATE SUPERINTENDENT,


SEATS


A.M


LL.D.


PRESIDENT A.


A. MURPHREE


A.M


LL.D.


PRESIDENT EDWARD CONRADI


A.M


PH.D.


FACULTY


AND OFFICERS


MURPHREE


Director of
HARVEY W.


LL.D


Summer


President


School


PH.D


Educational Psychology


J. N:


ANDERSON


, PH.D.,


College Latin and F
E. C. BECK. A.I


rench


..


English L


language


and Literature


P. BLACK


, A.M.,


Chemistry
BUCHHOLZ, A.B.,
Latin


MISS


MARGARET C.


BURNS


J. M.


Methods


CHAPMAN


Public Spec
P. W. CORR


,D.O.,


Geography


C. L.


CROW


nish


Lang


PH.D.


uage


P. W


FATTIG, M.


Economic


W. L.
Science


Biology


FLOYD, M.S.,
and 'Agriculture


JOSEPH R. FULK


, PH.D.,


Education


HATHAWAY


Rhetoric


Dean


Prima


king
, A.B.,


I M


, A.M.,









SUMMER


C. E.


SCHOOL


JACKSON


Manual Training


J. M.


LEAKE


, PH.D.,


College


History and Economics


G. M. LYNCH


, A.B.,


Mathematics
G. METCALFE
Mathematics


J.W


NORMAN


, PH.D.,


Education


MRS.


J. W.


RUMLEY


C. A.


Secretary


and Physical Director for


Women


T. M.


SIMPSON


, PH.D.,


College Mathematics


SHELTON


SOUTER


History


G. C.


TILLMAN


TYLER


Commercial S


subjects


and Penmanship


GEO.


WETZEL,
Science
E. WHITE


Y. M.


Secretary


and Physical Director for Men


MISS SADIE LINDENMEYER
Music and Art


MISS


RUTH WHITE


English Grammar and Composition


WILLIAMS


Educational Methods


S. L.


WOODWARD


, A.B.,


History and Civics


, A.M.,


, M.D.,


, A.B.,


, A.B.,


A.M.,







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

LOCATION OF THE UNIVERSITY
Gainesville, the seat of the University, a town of 10,000


inhabitants, possesses numerous advantages.


It is centrally


located and easy


access,


being reached by the


leading


railroads of the State.


It has well paved, lighted and shaded


streets, an exceptional pure water supply and a good sewer-


age system
pitable.


m.


The citizens are energetic, progressive and hos-


The moral atmosphere is wholesome, and for many


years the sale of intoxicants has


been


prohibited by


law.


All the leading denominations have attractive places of wor-
ship.
GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS
The University occupies a tract of six hundred and thir-
teen acres, situated in the western extremity of Gainesville.
Ninety acres of this tract are devoted to the campus, drill-
ground and athletic fields; one hundred and seventeen acres
are utilized for the farm of the College of Agriculture; the
remainder is used by the Agricultural Experiment Station.


Twelve buildings have already been erected.


in the order of construction:


These are,


Two dormitories, known as


"Buckman Hall"


and


"Thomas


Hall"; the Mechanic Arts


Shop,


Science


Hall,


Building, Engineering


Agricultural


Hall,


Experiment


the Gymnasium,


Station
Agricul-


tural College Building, the dining hall or


"University Com-


mons,"


Language


Hall,


"George


Peabody


Hall,"


home of the Teachers' College and Normal School, and the


College of Law.


They are lighted with electricity, supplied


with city water and furnished with modern improvements
and equipment.


EXPENSES


Registration


F ee-_-.. ---.. _.... -- __ .--..-.........-------.. -..........--. -


$ 2.00


Boarding and Lodging in Dormitory, per week,


5.25


in advance -.- .. ....... -... -------- .---


__I__~_~_


____r_ ____ w _-








SUMMER SCHOOL


material they use.


This will not amount to more than 75


cents.
RooMS.-Dormitory rooms are supplied with two good
iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, a table,


washstand and chairs.


All students are required to provide


for themselves a


pillow,


bed linen,


towels and such other


things as they may want for their own special convenience.
Two additional dormitories have been built which makes
it possible to accommodate some of the men on the campus if
they so desire.
Good rooms can be obtained adjacent to the campus at


$1.25 to $1.50 per week. A nu
be obtained at $1.00 per week.


mber of rooms in the city can
Men desiring to have their


rooms reserved in advance should write at once.


INFIRMARY.-The


University


will


maintain


well


equipped infirmary and a professional nurse for those who
may be ill during the Summer School.
PEABODY HALL.-Peabody Hall, the home of the Teach-


ers'


College,


is a magnificent three-story


brick and stone


structure.


It is modern in every respect as to equipment


and arrangements.


It contains all the lecture rooms, society


halls, reading rooms, laboratories and libraries that a mod-


ern college of this kind needs.


With such facilities at its


command, nothing can hinder the college from realizing its
aims.


LIBRARY.-The


general


library


University


con-


tains about 18,000 volumes of well-selected books to which


the Summer School students have free access.


The Peda-


gogical library will


be of


special interest to


them,


for it


contains


many


books


educational


theory,


general


and


special methods, history of education, psychology and phi-


losophy.


In the reading room are more than a hundred of


the best general and technical


periodicals.


Here also are


received the leading newsnaners of the State.







UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


will contain all of the appliances and apparatus necessary
for thorough and efficient work in experimental psychology.


EDUCATIONAL


RESEARCH


ROOM.


- Room


Peabody


Hall, is set apart for special and graduate students in Edu-


cation.
work;


This room contains exhibits of many lines of school


reports


and


publications


Bureau


Education; samples of school texts; Courses of Study; Re-
ports of Superintendents; Education catalogues of colleges
and universities; samples of records and reports, and state


school laws.


The room is especially rich in material, method


and practical operations of mental and educational measure-


ments.


Graduate students working on theses will find this


room especially helpful and convenient.


The equipment is


at their service, and individual tables and chairs will be pro-
vided.
TEACHERS' EMPLOYMENT BUREAU.-It is the purpose of
this bureau to keep records of all teachers who have attended
the University who are fitted by their training for the pro-
fession of teaching and to recommend them to school boards
who are in need of efficient principals and teachers. Already
the demand for our graduates and students is greater than


we can supply.


County superintendents and school boards


are requested to correspond with us when in need of well-
trained and efficient teachers.
After the first day of Summer School, chapel will be held
Monday, Wednesday, Friday at twelve o'clock.

FOLLOWING COURSES FOR COUNTY, STATE AND
SPECIAL CERTIFICATES


The


subjects


Group


fulfill


requirements


county certificates.


The


Special


courses


Certificates


study


and


Group


may


lead


taken


State


high


and


school


rrrlitA nP fnr nnrvml l rprdit lnnrdin






SUMMER SCHOOL

AGRICULTURE
Group A


ELEMENTARY


culture.


AGRICULTURE.-A general course in agri-


This will introduce the student to the study of soil,


plants, common diseases of plants, insects, farm crops, do-


mestic animals and such like.


Methods of teaching agricul-


ture in the rural schools will be stressed.


M.T


10:05 A. H.


Professor Floyd.


ENGLISH
Group A
ENGLISH COMPOSITION.---Two sections:


Section 1.


10:05 P. H. 28.


Professor Hath-


away.


Section


T. Th.


3:05 P


. H. 17.


Miss White.


ENGLISH GRAMMAR.-Three sections:


Section 1.
Section 2.


M. W. F.


3:05 P. H. 17.


T. Th. 11:05 P. H.


Miss White.


Professor Hathaway.


Section


M.W.F


. 9:05 P


. H. 17.


Miss White.


ORTHOGRAPHY.-The spelling of common words will be


stressed.
demanded.


Correct spelling in all


forms


How best to teach spelling.


written


work


F. 8:05 P


Professor Hathaway.


READING.


- Practice


reading


required


each


week.


Teachers are so drilled in reading that they will be able to


read well to their classes.
teaching reading are given.


The methods and principles of


Th. 9:05 P


H. 17.


Miss


White.
ENGLISH
Group B
AMERICAN LITERATURE.-Study of American Literature


as outlined in Metcalf's "American Literature."


. 8:05 P. H. 17.


Th.


Miss White.







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


GEOGRAPHY
Group A
POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY.-Special attention will be given


to Florida and its relation to other states.


A thoro review


of the geography of the United States and the world.


structions


will


given in


text-books,


maps,


globes, industrial products, etc.


Section 1.


Section


M. W. F. 8:05 S. H. 1.
M. T. Th. 2:05 S. H. 1.


Professor Corr.
Professor Corr.


PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.-The main features of the ordi-
nary text-book in physical geography will be studied. Along
with this stress will be placed upon the effects the physical


features have on man-his commercial and social life.


This


will be correlated with agriculture.


M. W. Th. F


. 4:05 S. H.


Professor Corr.
HISTORY AND CIVIL GOVERNMENT
Group A
CIVIL GOVERNMENT.-Special attention will be given to


local, town and city, and county governments.


That prac-


tical information that every intelligent citizen should have


is stressed.


How to teach the subject.


Th. 3:05 L.


H. 25.


Professor Woodward.


FLORIDA HISTORY.-Adopted book will be covered.


F.3:05 L. H. 25.


Professor Woodward.


HISTORY.-Three sections, each covering thoro re-


view of State-adopted text-book.


Section 1.


M. T. Th. F. 4:05 L. H. 25.


Professor Wood-


ward.


Section
Section


Th. F. 11:05 L. H. 25.


M. W. Th. F. 8:05 L. H. 25.


Miss Souter.


Miss Souter.


Group B


HISTORY. -Ancient


Souter.


M. T. Th. F


Medieval and Modern


M. T.


. 10:05 L. H. 25.


Miss


9:05 L. H. 25.


Miss Souter.







Ob6


If ~



-Gl NIAR
ism
gig
AIi gap_____



-KM E DI mo-o~ j1 71


PEABODY HALL, Where Summer School is Conducted









































SUMMER NORMAL SCHOOL, 1918








SUMMER SCHOOL


CAESAR.-In


this


course


three


books


will


thoroly


studied.


Composition.


Th. 3:05 P


H. 21.


Pro-


fessor Buchholz.


CICERO.-Three or four orations of


Cicero


with


prose


composition.


T.W


Th. F. 9:05 P


H. 21.


Professor Buch-


holz.
VIRGIL.-Three books of Virgil are read and, in addition,


prose composition will be given.


M. W. Th. F


. 8:05 P. H. 21.


Professor Buchholz.


MATHEMATICS
Group A


BEGINNERS'


ALGEBRA.-Elementary course covering the


fundamental operations, simple and simultaneous equations,
factoring and fractions.


Section 1.
Section 2.


M.T. Th. F. 3:05 P


M. T.


W. F. 9:05 P


. H. 20.


H. 20.


Professor Lynch.
Professor Met-


calfe.


ADVANCED


ALGEBRA.


- Involution,


evolution,


quadratic


equations, progressions, ratio and proportion.


Section 1.


M. T. W.F. 10:05 P


H.20.


Professor Met-


calfe.


Section 2.


M. T. W. F. 4:05 P


. H. 20.


Professor Lynch.


ARITHMETIC.-A


thoro


review


arithmetic


made,


that the student may view it from both the teacher's and


child's point of view.


Common and decimal fractions, de.


nominate numbers,


percentage,


and all other subjects cov-


ered by the text-books adopted by the State.


Principles and


methods of teaching arithmetic are thoroly gone over.


Four


sections.


Section 1.
Section 2.


M.T.


F. 11:05 S.


H. 1.


M. T. W. Th. 8:05 L. H. 10.


Professor Corr.
Professor Wood-


ward.








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


MATHEMATICS
Group B


BEGINNERS' PLANE GEOMETRY.-M. T.


W. F


. 8:05 P. H.


Professor Lynch.


PLANE GEOMETRY.-Review course.


M. T.


F. 11:05


. H. 20.


Professor Lynch.


SOLID GEOMETRY.-T. W. Th. F


. 11:05 P


. H. 21.


Profes-


sor Metcalfe.


PLANE TRIGONOMETRY.-M.


3:05


Professor Simpson.

PROFESSIONAL SUBJECTS
Group A


PEDAGOGY.-School


management,


general


and


special


methods of teaching, elementary principles of child nature,
school hygiene and sanitation, personality of teacher, rela-
tion of school and community, and other practical pedagog-


ical questions.


M.T.


F. 11:05 P. H. 25.


Professor Wil-


liams.


Group B


PSYCHOLOGY.-A beginners'
applications of teaching. M. T.


course in


psychology with


W. Th. 9:05 P. H. 25.


Pro-


fessor Cox.


Either one of the above


professional subjects,


or any


four or five hour subject, under Education or in Primary
Methods, will satisfy the professional requirement necessary
for extension of certificate.

SCIENCE
Group A


HYGIENE.-Special efforts to


impress


the importance of hygiene and sanitation.


the teacher with
How to keep well


and physically efficient is the special aim of this course.


W. F. 9:05


H.1.


Professor Corr.








SUMMER SCHOOL


will be collected and identified.


Th. F


. 3:05 P


H. 1.


Professor Wetzel.


CHEMISTRY.-Elementary principles of chemistry


text-


book and laboratory work.


quired.


M. T. W. Th. F. 9:05


Carefully


kept note-books re-


Professor Black.


Labora-


tory M. W. or T. Th. 2:05-4:00.
PHYSICS.-A general course such as is usually given in


standard
stations,


work.


secondary


and


schools-lectures,


limited


amount


. Th. 10:05.


recitations,


individual


Laboratory W


demon-


laboratory
. 4:05-6:00


P. H. 1.


Professor Wetzel.


GENERAL


SCIENCE.-A


course


methods


general


science designed especially to meet the needs of high school


teachers.


T. Th. 9:05 P. H.1.


Professor Wetzel.


ZOOLOGY.


-In


connection


with


text-book


typical specimens illustrating the different groups,


study,
will be


dissected and studied in the laboratory, to obtain as com-
prehensive an idea of their structure and physiology as pos-


sible.


M. T. W. Th. 2:05 P. H. 1.


PRIMARY


AND


Professor Wetzel.


NORMAL COURSES


In addition to the normal courses offered as courses lead-
ing to state and special certificates, the following primary


and normal courses are offered.


The primary course aims to


prepare teachers for the professional branches in the state
primary certificate, and may be taken as requirement for
professional work in extension of certificates.
PRIMARY WORK
Miss Margaret Burns
NEWER TYPE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL.-Course will discuss
some recent departures from the traditional and will con-


sider causes


for these changes.


The


course


will include







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


teaching the traditional studies will
lessons illustrating the drill lesson,


be considered.


Type


the application of the


drill lesson and the lesson for appreciation will be given.
Daily 9:05 E. H. 10.


ELEMENTARY


PEDAGOGY. Organization


and


manage-


ment of primary grades


elementary principles of child na-


ture; plays and games; lesson planning; methods of teach-
ing, and other practical problems that should be understood


by the primary teacher.


Daily 3:05 E.


H. 10.


We are very glad to announce to the primary teachers of
the State that we have succeeded in securing Miss Margaret


Burns to take charge of the Primary Work.


Miss Burns


received her training in the State Normal School at Oswego,


New York, and Cornell University.


She was primary critic


teacher for three


years at California,


Pa., and for eight


years was critic and demonstration teacher in the State Nor-


mal School at Valley City, North Dakota.


She is now super-


visor of the primary work in the Jacksonville schools.
MUSIC
Miss Lindenmeyer


Music


METHODS,


COURSE


1.-It


object


this


course to


point out the true


place and purpose of public


school music, and to consider the various good methods of


teaching music to children in the Primary Grades.


Daily


2:05 Gymnasium.
MUSIC METHODS, COURSE 2.-A continuation of course 1.
Material is examined for the Grammar Grades and High


School.


(Hours to be arranged) Gymnasium.
DRAWING AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS
Miss Lindenmeyer
PUBLIC SCHOOL ART AND METHODS. GRADES I-IV


COURSE


1.-This


course


includes:


Elementary


water


color,


crayon and


pencil


from


plants,


flowers,


vegetables


and fruit: simple design and its application to some prob-








SUMMER SCHOOL


PUBLIC SCHOOL ART AND METHODS, GRADES V-VIII


COURSE 2.-This course includes:


tempera and pencil from


Water color, pastello,


plants, flowers and still life ob-


jects, studied with reference to light and shade; color the-
ory; simple working drawings; lettering; poster making;


suitability


dress


different


occasions


and


types


people; application of the principles of Art to home decora-


tion;


bookmaking;


appreciation


direction,


balance,


rhythm,


proportion


and


values;


study


design


and


application to some practical problem; paper cutting; work
outlined for the school year; cost and selection of materials


discussed.


Perspective.


T. Th. 10:05-12:00 E. H. 12.


NOTE.-Other courses in Drawing and Industrial Art may be
given if the demand is sufficient.


MANUAL


TRAINING


Professor Jackson
This work is planned to include shop work and mechan-


ical


drawing


courses


suitable


first


year


High


School.


SHOP


WORK .-The


shop


course


will


consist


bench


work, machine


work and turning.


At the


bench


various


joints will be laid out and constructed and small pieces of


furniture made.


This will give practice in using hand tools,


glueing, staining, varnishing, etc.


As much practice as pos-


sible will be given on the different machines, and all work


will be done from drawings.


Shops will be open to accom-


modate classes.
MECHANICAL


DRAWING.


- In


drawing,


sketching


and


lettering will be practiced all through the session, and, if


possible,


considerable


work


will


given


mechanical


drawing, consisting largely of accurate working drawings
in both orthographs and isometric projection and practice


in tracing and printing.


Hours to be arranged.


E. H. 2.


I____ _








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


sors are prepared to give, yet in the nature of the case only


a limited


number


can


given.


The


number


and


kind


course will depend upon the demand.
COURSE OF STUDY FOR NORMAL DIPLOMA


AND


COLLEGE


DEGREES


ADMISSION.


- Graduates


Standard


Junior


High


Schools, those who have finished the tenth grade of a Senior


High


School, and


teachers


who


hold


a First


Grade County


Certificate, are admitted


first year of the


Four-Year


Normal Course.


Graduates of Standard Senior High Schools


are admitted to the Freshman


Year of the Collegiate Course.


SUMMER


SCHOOL


CREDIT.-One


hour


Summer


School is equivalent to one fourth year hour as given in the
following course of study.


DEGREES.-Courses


are offered leading to


the degree of


Bachelor o
Education.


Arts


Education


and Bachelor


Science


ELECTIVES.-In


order that


graduates


may


well


pre-


pared to teach two or three high school subjects, much free-


dom in


the choice of


electives


is permitted.


is assumed


that the


teach


and


become


student


will


will


take


especially


elect


advantage


proficient


subjects


of his
these.


which


freedom


hopes
choice


Elective


Groups is given below


For the A.B.


degree the major elec-


tive work must be chosen in


Groups II and III, or Group


or III


for the B.S.


degree, from


Group


The choice of


electives must


be approved


by the Dean, and no


more than


the required number shall be chosen without his consent.


I.
Military Science
I and II.


Group
II.
French,
Greek,
Latin,
Rhetoric and
English Lan-
guage,
C -- ; T


Subjects


Bible,
Economics,
Education,
English Litera-
ture,
History,
LDq1 rt n nnn ftIf v


Agriculture,
Astronomy,
Bacteriology,
Biology,
Botany,


Chemistry,
Hnmv ofrlnL








SUMMER


CURRICULUM,
Leading


SCHOOL


FOUR-YEAR NORMAL COURSE
to Normal School Diploma
First Year


HOURS PER
NAME OF COURSE NATURE OF WORK WEEK

English NI............................ Rhetoric, Compositon and classics...... 5
History NI...........-------.............. Medieval and Modern History .....---.. 5
Mathematics NI....... ...............-Plane Geometry .-----................................ 5
Take 5 hours of the following:
Agriculture NI..............E....... Elements of Agronomy and Horticul-

Latin NI......... ................. Beginner's Course --....--....--............----........----- 5
Mechanic Arts NIa and NIIb ..Wood Work ......... ................................ .. 3
Science NI ......-- ................- ...-... Biology .. ....-...... ......-............ . ............... 5
Science NII----......... .......... .. Chemistry ............------------....... ...........-...-........ 5
Spanish NI..............................--. Beginner's Course .................. .------.......... 5

Required ......... -----------.................... ...- ....... ....-........... ... .. ............ 20
Second Year

HOURS PER
NAME OF COURSE NATURE OF WORK WEEK

English NII ...... ................... American and English Literature and
Composition ........-...-.............--......-. 5
History NII ....................... American History and Civics.....-----.... 5
Take 10 hours of the following:
Agriculture NII ...................... Elements of Animal Husbandry and
Agricultural Engineering ....-....... 3
Latin NII.......................---- .....Cesar (4 books) and Composition...... 5
Mathematics NII.. ............ .. Plane Trigonometry and Solid Geom-
etry ------.........-.. ........-..-- .... ........... 5
Science NIII ... ...................... -Physics --..............--.--............... ....... -... 5
Spanish NII.......................... Second Year Course ...............-.......-........ 5

Required ................ ...................... ... ................. ....... ..... ..... .. ....--......... -- 20
Third Year

HoURs PER
NAME OF COURSE NATURE OF WORK WEEK

)Education IaG ............................Psychology ............................... .. .........
Education Ib .....-....--..-.....-... --Methods .........................--.. -- 3
English I------ .................................Rhetoric and Composition --..-a...... .-... 3
Agronomy I ...........G.......,......... General Agriculture .........................
Biology ... ............... ..... .......... .....-..-.. .........-. ................. ..................... .......
C'hlm, i r7v Cnr rn l l1 fi hoi i atrv








UNIVERSITY

Fourth


FLORIDA


Year


HOURS PER
NAME OF COURSE NATURE OF WORK WEEK
Education IIA............... ..... .Primary Methods ............................
Education IIB ........................... Reviews and Methods in Grammar 3
School Subjects .........................
Education IIC.........,........... .Methods of Teaching High School
Subjects ..... --..........................
Education IIIA-A ............. .....P. P-lays and Ganes ................................. 3
Education IIIB ......................Hygiene and Recreation . .............
Education IIIC ................... .Public School Administration ........
Education VIa. ......... ............... Child Study . ......................................
Education VIb .................... Practice Teaching .............................. 3
*Group II or III...... ........ ..................................................................... 3
*Group IV..... ......................................... ...... ........... ............... ... ......... ........ 3
Physical Education II........... ....... ... ............ ......... ........ ........ .....-.-.. 1

16
CURRICULUM


Leading to


degree


Bachelor


Arts


or Bachelor


Science


in Education
The Freshman and Sophomore years are the same as the


Third and Fourth years of the course


leading to a Normal


Diploma, save that 6 hours of foreign language is required


and Education


VI may


be deferred to the Senior year.


Junior


Year


HOURS PER
NAME OF COURSE NATURE OF WORK WEEK

Education IVa ................... History of Education .....-.. . ...... ....
Education IV b.............. .........Secondary Education ..- .... .... ....-...-. 3
Philosophy I. ....... ......... ......... General Psychology............. ................... 3
E elective ............... ............ .....- .... ............... - ... .... .............. - ......- .. .
15
Senior Year
HOURS PER
NAME OF COURSE NATURE OF WORK WEEK
Education Va.....................Democracy and Education .............
Education Vb .....-..-.......-. ..... Democracy, The Curriculum and 3
I*-- r* 1Rf








SUMMER SCHOOL

AGRICULTURE
Professor Floyd


ELEMENTS OF


AGRONOMY.-The origin, formation, and


classification of soils; general methods of soil management,
and the adaptation of soils to the requirements of plants.


M.T.W


11:05 A. H. 12, Th. 4:05-6 :00 Field.


PLANT


PROPAGATION.-Study


and practice in


propaga-


tion


by means of


division


cutting,


layering,


budding and


grafting, seed selection, storing and testing, and the funda-


mental


physiological


processes.


Exercises


with


common


fruits, flowers, and shrubs will be given.


A. H. 12,


Th. F. 8:05


4:05-6:00 Field.


VEGETABLE


seasons


fertilizing,


GROWING.-Vegetables


which


irrigating,


they


grown,


troublesome


adapted


cultural


insects


and


Florida,
methods,
diseases,


packing and marketing.


W. Th. F


3:05 A. H. 12 M. 4:05-


6:00 Field.


CITRUS CULTURE.-History and botany


citrus; soils


suitable for groves, their preparation, planting, cultivation,


fertilization,


selection


varieties,


and


cover


crops.


. Th. 9:05 A. H. 12 T. 4:05-6:00 Orchard.


BIOLOGY
Dr. Hodge
Professor Fattig


NATURE STUDY IN THE GRAMMAR GRADES.-Text:


"Na-


ture Study and Life"


(Ginn & Co.)


By Hodge.


Daily 8:05


S. H. 3.


Professor Hodge.


CIVIC


BIOLOGY


AND


PROBLEMS


THE


HIGH


SCHOOL


COURSE.-Text: "Civic Biology"


(Ginn & Co.)


By Hodge


and Dawson.


Classroom


Daily 10:05 S.
instruction in


1. 3.
both


Professor Hodge.


courses


will


be supple-


mented by such excursions, for bird, insect, plant and gar-
*1 .. I^ S I Si** ^l







UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


mented by the standard text on personal hygiene.


11:05 S. H.


M.W


Professor Hodge.


ECONOMIC BIOLOGY.-This course will deal with plants,


insects, birds and animals of economic importance.


A study


will be made of the common


plant diseases,


their identifi-


cation and methods of control.
The major part of the course will deal with our injur-


10US


and


beneficial


insects.


Time


will


given


methods of preserving, mounting and rearing insects for


class room demonstrations.


4:00 to 5:00.


Labor-


atory and


Field


Work,


hours to


be arranged.


Professor Fattig.


CHEMISTRY


Professor


Black


GENERAL CHEMISTRY.-A course designed for those who
wish to prepare for science teaching in the High Schools.
This course can be taken by those who have never taken
chemistry before or by those who have had a course and


wish


review it.


Daily 9:05, Laboratory


. Th.


05-4:00 S. H. 2.


*QUALITATIVE


ANALYSIS.-A


laboratory


course


this


subject offered to those who have had general


Laboratory M. T.


chemistry.


Th. 2:05-4:00 S. H.


GRAVIMETRIC


ANALYSIS. -A


laboratory


course


offered


those


who


have


had


qualitative analysis.


Laboratory


afternoons,


2:05-5:00,


days to


be arranged.


Nine


hours per week.
VOLUMETRIC ANALYSIS.-A laboratory course offered to


those


who


have


had


gravimetric


analysis.


Laboratory


afternoons,


2:00-5:00,


days to


be arranged.


Nine


hours per week.


CHEMICAL


TECHNOLOGY.-A


laboratory


course offered


-~~~ ~ ~ S I U I........... A. -_


r I








SUMMER SCHOOL

EDUCATION
Professor Fulk
Professor Norman
Professor Williams


TEACHING


GEOMETRY.-A


study


that underlie the teaching of Geometry, and


teachers of this subject.


ie principles
designed for


Teachers are requested to bring


Wentworth & Smith's Geometry with them as the main part


of the work will be based upon this text.


. 9:05.


Professor Norman.


TEACHING


HISTORY.-This


course


planned


teachers of History in grades 7 and


and in high schools.


It attempts to give an insight into the meaning and uses of


history.


The development of courses, the present status of


history as a school subject,


the evaluation of texts, mate-


rials and methods of teaching, and the measurement of the


achievements of pupils, are topics of the course.
will be based chiefly on American History. T


The work
hose taking


the course should provide themselves with the state adopted


texts


in American


History.


May


taken for


graduate


credit.


M. T. Th. F


11:05 P


Professor Fulk.


TEACHING


GRAMMAR


GRADE


ENGLISH.-Methods


teaching


English


in grammar


grades


will


stressed


this course.


Some time will be given to a discussion of the


best English productions for these grades.


P. H. 21.


Th. F. 2:05


Professor Williams.


METHODS OF TEACHING THE ELEMENTARY BRANCHES.-


this


course


emphasis


will


placed


presentation of grammar school subjects.


upon
M. T.


proper
Th. F.


3:05 P


H. 25.


Professor Williams.


CHILD STUDY.-The aim of this course is to give the stu-


dent an insight into the nature, growth and


of the child from birth to adolescence,


development


with special refer-


ence to the mean.nm nof thps. nrne.~sPn t.n h pi t~.achr


Enm,







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


will


be stressed in


this course.


Daily


10:05.


P. H.


Professor Norman.
SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION.-A study of the organization


and the administration of public education in the


United


States


with


special


reference to city


and


village schools.


The course is planned primarily for principals and teachers


of these schools.


The work will be based chiefly on recent


educational


surveys.


May


taken


graduate


credit.


Daily 8:05, P. H. 23.


Professor Fulk.


EDUCATION AND DEMOCRACY.-A course intended to out-
line the principles that should be characteristic of an educa-


tional system in a democracy.


This course is equivalent to


the first half of the course in the Philosophy of Education


as described in the University Catalogue for 1919-20.


11:05, P. H. 23.


Daily


Professor Norman.


Any course or courses in education will satisfy the pro-
fessional requirement for extension, providing they amount
to four or more hours per week.
ENGLISH
Professor Beck
Professor Hensley
ENGLISH Ia.-Advanced College Rhetoric-Designed to
train students in methods of clear and forceful expression.
Instruction is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric,


in rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing,


the constant


correlation


desired
course


goal


being


is assigned


three
kept


methods


view.


each student.


approach


addition


reading


Daily 3:05.


Professor Hensley.


ENGLISH


Ib.-Advanced


College Rhetoric-This is the


work


covered


during


second


semester


Freshman


English.


It is a continuation of English la.


The chapters


on Invention in Genung's "Working Principles of Rhetoric"


A kmi-i^^rtm A -P 4-nnn ,nmn tvncdi -n 1i cI i'nii ^ m A


-BtTI I 1 T-l^ n4-1*T rf3f








SUMMER SCHOOL


ing the study of Austen's "Prj
"Ordeal of Richard Feverel,"


ide and Prejudice," Meridith's
and Hardy's "Return of the


Native."


Sinclair's


"The


Divine


Fire,"


Sedgwick's


Fountain Sealed," or Conrad's


"The Arrow of Gold" will be


used


supplement


standard


works.


Three


hours


attendance, three semester hours credit.


On request.


See


instructor before registering for the course.


L. H. 26.


F. 8:05.


Professor Beck.


BROWNING.-An intensive study of "Luria" will consti-


tute the major portion of the work.


"My


Last Duchess"


and


"Andrea


del Sarto" will serve as an introduction


Browning's dramatic monologues.


"A Blot on the 'Scutch-


eon" will be read.


Daily written exercises.


Advanced stu-


dents only.


Graduate credit.


Th. S. 8:05.


L. H. 26.


Professor Beck.
TEACHING OF ENGLISH.-A course for English teachers


in high schools.


Late methods, concrete laboratory mate-


rial,


modern


subject


matter,


plans,


dramatization,


high


school publications,


business English, high school classics,


and round table on any problems the teachers wish to dis-


cuss.


For the past three summers this course has been a


sort of


seminar


Advanced students.


for teachers


Daily 9:05.


English
L. H. 26.


in high schools.
Professor Beck.


THE SHORT-STORY.-A study of the technique and sub-


stance of


American,


French,


Russian,


Scandinavian,


and


English short stories. Son
magazine story of the day.


ie attention will be paid to the
This course is planned to be


extensive.
students.


There will be some practice, however.


F. 11:05.


L. H. 26.


Advanced


Professor Beck.


MODERN


POETRY.-A course in


present-day poems and


present-day


Noyes,
worthy,


poets.


Bridges,
Kilmer,


The


Cawein,


Letts,


late


poems


Hardy,


Foss,


Gallienne,


Kipling, Tagore,
Hagedorn, Gals-


Amy


Lowell,


Ella


___F *1 .r- .- .- -







UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


HIGH SCHOOL ENTERTAINMENTS.-This is a non-credit
course for high school teachers interested in entertainment


features.


There


will


be one


round


table


each


week


con-


ducted for and by the students, and practical application of


the material discussed in round table.


Farces, pantomimes,


stunts, burlesques,


adaptations.


ciding to take the course.


See instructor before de-


Hours to be arranged.


L. H. 26.


Professor Beck.


FRENCH
Professor Anderson
Professor Crow


FRENCH


Aa.


- Elementary


French,


first


semester's


course; pronunciation, grammar,


prose composition, reader,


oral


practice.


Daily


10:05


Fraser


Shorter French Course; Reader.


Squair's


FRENCH


Ab.-Elementary


French,


second


semester's


course; continuation of French Aa; grammar, prose compo-


sition, reader, oral practice.


Daily 11:05 L. H. 12.


Fraser


& Squair's Shorter French Course; La Belle France.


Pre-


requisite: French Aa or equivalent.


FRENCH


- Second


year


French,


first


semester'


course; grammar, prose composition, reader.


Daily


10:05


L. H. 12.


Prerequisite: French A or equivalent.


HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT
Professor Leake


MODERN


EUROPEAN


HISTORY.-This


course


covers


period from 1763, the close of the Seven Years' War, to the


outbreak of the late World War in 1914.


A thorough study


will be made of the Ancient Regime and of the causes of the


French Revolution.


Especial emphasis is laid on the French


Revolutionary and Napoleonic periods and the determina-
+innq n f thw flnnar.nrq nf Vinn pna AnmP in fnr a cnmnle.p atnal-








SUMMER SCHOOL


furnish the student with a fairly comprehensive knowledge


of present-day world politics.


Daily 9:05 L. H. 11.


AMERICAN


FORIEGN


RELATIONS.-This


course


vanced American History emphasizes the part of the United


States in international relations.


It will aim to set before


the student in a clear and comprehensive way the evolution
of our foreign policy and our attitude as a people toward


world affairs.


Our attitude toward the various European


wars, toward European and world questions, toward inter-
national movements, and toward African and Asiatic ques-


tions will be carefully traced.


This course will be especially


helpful to teachers of American History.


Daily


10:05 L.


H. 11.


AMERICAN


GOVERNMENT


AND


POLITICS.-A


thorough


analysis of


institutions and


political


practices


United States, together with a brief examination of the fun-


damental features of our state and local governments,


constitute the work of this course.


will


Emphasis will be laid on


constitutional questions and on present-day political


prob-


lems.


This course


will


be of help to


teachers


Civics.


Daily 11:05 L. H. 11.
FIRST AID AND EDUCATIONAL HYGIENE
Dr. Tillman
Professor Hixson


FIRST


AID.


- One


great


lesson


World


War


has


brought us is the value of First Aid in preventing infection,


blood


poison and other serious complications


which


often


result from minor accidents when left for some time without


medical attention.


It is the purpose of this course to give


the teachers instruction in all branches of First Aid work.


Tillman


saw


active service


in the


war as


a medical


officer and is


pre-eminently


qualified to


give


this


course.


T. Th. 12:05 P. H. 17.


Dr. Tillman.


EDUCATIONAL HYGIENE.-This course is intended fr .n a-







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


SOCIAL CASE WORK AS APPLIED TO THE SCHOOL.-This
course is intended to familiarize teachers with those meth-
ods of Social Case Work which have proven most successful
in family social welfare work and with their application to


individual pupils.


The delinquent child will receive especial


attention, but the importance of helping the average child to


a normal


development will


be stressed.


"Case Histories"


will form the basis of discussion throughout the course.


Th. F. 11:05 L. H. 10.


Professor Hixson.


LATIN
Professor Anderson


LATIN


Ia.-Selections from


Ovid.


Daily


(hours to be


arranged)


L. H. 12.


Prerequisite: Three years of High


School Latin.


LATIN IIb.-Selection from Horace.
LATIN Ib.-Selection from Horace.


Daily (hours to be


Daily


(hours to be


arranged)


L. H. 12.


Prerequisite: Latin I or equivalent.


THE TEACHING OF LATIN.-In addition to some study of
methods, there will be practical exercises in reading, trans-
lating, and discussing passages from Latin authors and in


turning English into Latin.


M. T. Th. F. 9:05 L. H. 12.


Of these three courses in Latin probably only one will be


given this summer.


An effort will be made to accommodate


as many as possible.
MATHEMATICS
Professor Simpson
COLLEGE ALGEBRA.-Selected topics of algebra that lie


beyond the high school course.


Daily 3:05 L. H.


PLANE


ANALYTICAL


GEOMETRY.


First


Semester's


Work.-Daily 11:05 L. H. 23.
ELEMENTARY CALCULUS.-Daily (hours to be arranged)


L.H.


NOTE.-Those interested in other advanced courses should cor-
respond with the instructor.














































S__ .-


-- -. -I--


IL1,




































BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF THE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS







SUMMER SCHOOL


teach Physical Training in the public schools.


tion costume will


The regula-


be bloomers, middies, and tennis shoes,


white preferable.
Theory
PHYSICAL EDUCATION.-Its relation to health and effii-
ciency; place in the curriculum, administration in schools,


physical diagnosis and examination.
nastic material, dances and games.


Management of gym-
Relation of Hygiene to


Physical Education.


Growth and


Development.


General


topics


hygiene


discussed


from


standpoint


teacher.


Education and Ethical Value of Play.


Organiza-


tion and Equipment of Playgrounds.


Choice and classifica-


tion of games and dances for playground use.


Coaching of


team and games and sport.
Practice


GYMNASTICS.-Free
tics, apparatus work.


standing


exercises,


marching. tac-


DANCING.-Simple


folk


and


aesthetic


dances,


suitable


for elementary or secondary school work.


GAMES


AND


PLAYS.


- Especially


designed


use in


schools, playgrounds and Recreation Centers.


ORGANIZED


SPORTS. Basket


Ball,


Volley


Ball,


Play-


ground Ball, Tennis, Swimming.


COURSE 1.-Elementary-Theory and Practice.


Section


I, M. W. F. 10:00 Gymnasium.


Mrs. Rumley.


Section II, T


Th. 9:00 L. H. 10.


Mr. White.


COURSE 2.-Advanced.


Both the theory and practice in


this course +will be along the same lines as Course 1, only
advanced work, and will be for those who have already had


Course 1, or made some progress in this work.


Section I,


W. F. 9:00 Gymnasium.


Mrs. Rumley.


Section II,


- t ..- r - S- W.r-- --


m mJ B


I- --- I






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


SPANISH
Professor Crow
SPANISH Aa.-Pronunciation, grammar, exercises, con-


versation, reading of an easy text.


Daily 11:05 L. H. 9.


SPANISH


Ab.-Continuation of elementary


Spanish A.


Daily


3:05 L. H. 9.


SPANISH


Ia.-Syntax,


exercises,


conversation,


reading


of intermediate texts.


Daily 8:05 L. H. 9.


SPANISH


COMMERCIAL


CORRESPONDENCE.-Introduction


to business Spanish.


Hours (three) to be arranged. L. H. 9.


NO TE.-All classes scheduled will not be
depending upon the demand.


given; those selected


SPECIAL COURSES
On account of limited funds, a nominal fee will have to
be charged for the following courses:
COMMERCIAL COURSES
The growing demand in Florida for teachers of commer-
cial subjects as well as for bookkeepers and stenographers
prompts us to strengthen these courses with a view to offer-


ing such instruction as will best meet these demands.


Two


eight-weeks'


courses have been planned,


the completion of


which should prepare one for either teaching these subjects
in the high schools of the State or doing bookkeeping or
clerical work.
Both elementary and advanced courses will be offered in


Bookkeeping,


Shorthand,


Typewriting,


Commercial


Law


and Penmanship.
Tuition fees will be charged for commercial subjects as
follows :
Bookkeeping, $7.50 per term.
Shorthand, $7.50 per term.
Typewriting, $10.00 per term, machine included.
Commercial Law, $3.00 per term.
Penmanship, $2.00 per term.







SUMMER SCHOOL

Shorthand, beginning, 11:00 a. m.


Penmanship, general,
Shorthand, advanced,


2:00 p. m.
3:00 p. m.


Typewriting, any convenient period.
All classes in Peabody Hall, Room 18.

PUBLIC SPEAKING
Professor Chapman


EXPRESSION


AND


PUBLIC


SPEAKING. In


courses


offered particular attention will be given to establishing a


correct method of breathing,


to correcting faulty articula-


tion,


and


teaching the


principles


interpretation


voice, gesture, and facial expression.


In these studies spe-


cial attention will be given to preparing teachers for carry-


ing on this work in the public schools.


Professor J. M.


Those interested see


Chapman.


SPECIAL FEATURES


Lectures will


be given from


time to time by different


members of the faculty on school libraries and the selection,
use and care of apparatus for science courses in the high
schools, and other subjects of interest.
A series of lectures will be given on mental and physical
hygiene, and sanitation.
The State High School Inspector will give several lec-


tures on high school administration,


with special reference


to Florida high schools.
The State Superintendent has promised to give a series
of lectures on the Florida school situation.


Dr. C. F. Hodge, the noted Naturalist,


will be with us


again for the entire session, and give several popular lec-
tures.
The University has ample equipment to provide games


and


recreational


activities


whole


student


body.


A vv^nn r 4-inn tin ir. T I r..nrna n,4ll lIan^ Snnn A


1t n ll,^ 11 W A A A "


I







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


secured, as well as some of the finest feature films in the
country.

REGULATIONS
When credit of extension certificates is desired the fol-
lowing regulations established by the Summer School Board
must be followed:
1. No teacher shall be allowed to take more than twenty
hours per week of purely academic subjects.
2. No teacher shall take less than five hours per week
of professional work.


3.
sional,


The


maximum


hours


per


week,


including


profes-


vocational and academic subjects, shall in no case


exceed twenty-seven hours per week. Two laboratory hours
to be counted as one hour of academic work.


teacher shall


take less than


fifteen


hours


week without special permission.


5. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any
change of registration after the first week.
It is hoped that all teachers will recognize the wisdom


of the above regulations.


To fulfill its highest mission the


Summer School should not be utilized merely for the pur-
pose of "cramming" for examinations.


Attention


directed


following


section


Summer School Act:

EXTENSION OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES


Section


6 of a recent Act of the Legislature provides


that:


"All
herein


teachers


created


attending


and


whose


any
work


entitles


Summer


therefore, upon making proof of the same to the State Super-
intendent of Public Instruction, are hereby entitled to one


Schools
credit


year's extension


on any


Florida


fl1WTT knid aA On h e n v+ nflny ^Ctlln -ytMrn.rl rt-- r3 nwn nrnu444:


certificate they


them


teacher's







SUMMER SCHOOL 29

except to those teachers who attend the full term and whose
work shall be satisfactory to the faculty concerned.
CREDIT TOWARDS NORMAL SCHOOL AND
COLLEGE DEGREES
Section 5 of Summer School Act is as follows:
"All work conducted at the said Summer Schools shall
be of such character as to entitle the students doing the
same to collegiate, normal or professional credit therefore,
and may be applied towards making a degree."
ROOMS
All who expect to occupy dormitory rooms, which in
every case are comfortable and commodious, should make
reservations as soon as possible.
For room reservations and general information as to the
Summer School, address
H. W. Cox,
Dean of Teachers' College,
Gainesville, Fla.










University


of


Florida


Gainesville, Florida


ormal


School


and


Teachers'


College


REVIEW COURSES


ONE-YEAR COURSE


A TWO-YEAR ELEMENTARY PROFESSIONAL COURSE
REGULAR FOUR-YEAR NORMAL COURSE


COURSE


LEADING


A.B.


DEGREE


EDUCATION


COURSE LEADING TO A B.S. DEGREE IN EDUCATION
THE SUMMER SCHOOL





For information write,
A. A. MURPHREE, President
or


L












































































































































*




t^















:









t'~-n/










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