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 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: November 1921
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00495
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Full Text



university


record


Vol.


XVI


NOVEMBER,


1921


Extra No. 2


Published Quarterly by the University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


University


of


Florida


rc


GAINESVILLE


Students


Operating


High-Power


Spraying


Machines


SHORT


COURSES


For
S.


Farmers


and


Farm


Women


It


I
I
I
I
I













UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


College


of


Agriculture


GAINESVILLE


BOARD OF


P K..
E.L.
J. B.


CONTROL


YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola.
WARTMANN, Citra.
SUTTON, Tampa.


L. WEAVER, Perry.


J. C.


COOPER, Jacksonville.


T. DIAMOND


, Secretary,


Tallahassee.


G. KELLUM


, Auditor, Tallahassee.


OFFICERS
A. A. MURPHREE, President.
WILMON NEWELL, Dean and Director.
W. L. FLOYD, Assistant Dean.


J. E.


TURLINGTON, Agronomist, in Charge Short Courses.









INSTRUCTIONAL


STAFF


A. A. MURPHREE, President.
WILMON NEWELL, Dean and Director.
W. L. FLOYD, Assistant Dean, Horticulture.
J. E. TURLINGTON, in charge of Short Courses, Agronomy.


C. H.


WILLOUGHBY


, Animal Husbandry and Dairying.


SANBORN, Poultry Husbandry.


L. SHEALY,


Veterinary Science.


F. ROGERS, Farm Machinery.


LORD, Plant Propagation and


Citrus.


HAMILTON, Farm Management.


BLAKE


, Poultry


Husbandry.


J.M.
J. R.


SCOTT, Animal Husbandry and Crops.
WATSON, Entomology.


R. W. RUPRECHT, Physiological Chemistry.
CHAS. E. BELL, Chemistry.


J. M. COLEMAN
O. F. BURGER, ]


A. P


, Chemistry.


Plant Pathology.


WELLS, Plant Pathology.
STOKES, Forage Crops.
SPENCER, Citrus and Vegetable Growing.


CLAYTON


, Citrus and Vegetable Growing.


JENKINS, Field Crops.
HIATT, Field Crops.


BROWN


, Dairying.


BLACKLOCK, Boys'


Clubs.


RALPH


TOUTAMIRE


, Agricultural Journalism.


SPECIAL LECTURERS


O'BYRNE, Citrus.


FRANK STIRLING,


J. R.


Citrus.


. YOTHERS, Citrus.
WINSTON, Citrus.


C. RILEY, General Extension.


BERGER, Entomology.


MONTGOMERY,


Plant


Quarantine.


Miss MINNIE FLOYD, Poultry Husbandry.


Miss ORA


ODOr,


Poultry


Husbandry.


GOODWIN, Bee Husbandry.








































--- *-:a.-- .-
2.:& .r. I





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]-- .-. -.
*. *;- .* *


Dairy


Barn of the Florida Experiment Station










THE SHORT COURSES


The purpose of the Short


Courses in Agriculture is to


enable men and women who do not find it possible to attend
the longer courses to acquire a knowledge of some of the
fundamental principles of agriculture as applied to Florida


conditions.


Agriculture


Florida


developing


rapidly,


and


our


rural


population


being


increased


annually


people


from other states


who are not


well informed


con-


cerning agricultural conditions here.


The College of Agri-


culture occupies


a very


important


position


in relation


these
state.


people


and


agricultural


development


It is pointing the way for the development of a per-


manent


agriculture,


and


helping


newcomer


adapt


himself to the new conditions in which he is placed.


The Short Courses are


planned also for the busy man


anal woman


Three


separate


who can spend


courses


have


only


been


a short


time


arranged


at college.
meet the


demands.
Poultry
Growing.


These are, Agriculture and Animal Husbandry,


Husbandry,


and


Citrus


Culture


and


Vegetable


An examination of the schedule of studies wi:


3how the


size and nature of


programs offered


this


year.


The


student


taught


lectures and


practical


exercises.


He is required to do things which will assist him in planning
his farm work and will make him more expert in his work
of general farming, stock raising, dairying, or fruit grow-


ing.


It is impossible for anyone to take advantage of all


the courses during one session.


The student is


urged to


pick and pursue the course that will be of most interest and
use to him.

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
4.. t IIft t 1






UNIVERSITY OF


Station.


ity.


I
i
1


FLORIDA


It is located in a progressive agricultural commun-


This, in connection with the large variety of products


grown upon its own farms, affords the student an excellent
opportunity for observation and study.

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT
The College of Agriculture and the Agricultural Experi-


ment Station occupy separate buildings on the


campus.


University


The College of Agriculture building was planned


particularly for instructional work.


There are large,


well-


lighted and well-equipt laboratories for the work in soils,
fertilizers, agronomy, horticulture, veterinary science, farm
machinery, stock judging and dairying. A new clinic for


veterinary science


work has been added recently.


The dairy


barn is large, new, and well provided


with


silos and modern equipment.


state.


It is one of the best in the


There are over 150 head of cattle in the dairy herd,


largely purebred Jerseys.


There are also a few Holsteins.


The beef herd includes animals of the Shorthorn and Aber-
deen-Angus breeds.


The


hog


herd includes


representatives of the


Chester


White, Duroc-Jersey, Poland-China,


Tamworth


and


Berk-


shire breeds.


A number of feeding experiments with swine


are now under way.
The collection of grasses and legumes in the plant intro-
duction garden on the horticultural grounds includes sev-


eral hundred


different


species.


These


afford


opportunity


for study to those interested.
Special equipment is available for the work in Poultry


Husbandry.


There will be representatives of all the chief


breeds, and a complete equipment of incubators, brooders


and other appliances.


There are good flocks in


the com-


munity that will be available for observation and study.
Thc prnmira' in oitrlln pnlltlr will rPenivP t.h ha3nefit of






SHORT COURSES FOR FARMERS AND FARM WOMEN


LIBRARY FACILITIES


The


library


Agricultural


Experiment


Station


contains mor
allied lines.


than 2,000 volumes along agricultural and


Complete sets of the publications of the dif-


ferent


state


agricultural


experiment


stations


and


United States Department of Agriculture are on file, as well
as many of the leading American and foreign periodicals.
The library is open to Short Course students.


addition,


than 20,000 volumes,


University


library,


containing


is available to the students.


more
While


there will be little free time on account of the full schedules,


some


will


doubtless


find


opportunity


look


special


information which they may desire.

NUMBER OF COURSES OFFERED
Three courses, each lasting ten days, are offered from


January 3 to 13,


1922.


These are, Agriculture and Animal


Husbandry,


Poultry


Husbandry,


and


Citrus


Culture


and


Vegetable


Growing.


The


courses


are


distinctly


different


and are planned to meet the needs of


people in the state.


different groups of


On this account, persons are urged to


register


one


course


only.


The


applications


those


desiring to take parts of two courses will be granted, pro-
vided it causes no conflicts.

ADMISSION


There


no entrance examinations


Farmers'


Short Courses, but applicants should be at least 18 years


of age.


The work has been planned primarily for men and


women of mature age and with some farm experience.

EXPENSES
Tuition and Fees.-No tuition or other fees are charged
those attending the Short Courses.


e






UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


students upon their arrival; or if preferred, assignments to
rooms will be made on request before arrival at Gainesville.


Hotel accommodations


can


had,


with


without


board, at reasonable rates.
Board in the University Dining Hall may be had for 85
cents a day, providing tickets are purchased for the entire


time.


Single


meals


will


furnished for


cents each.


There are several cafes and boarding houses in town, and


there are a number of


cafeterias, one of which is on


campus,


which serve


meals at reasonable prices.


Books and Stationery.-Such


books,


note


paper,


and


pencils as are needed can be secured at the University Book
Store.


INSTRUCTIONS


Those coming to the


University for the Short Courses


will report first to the office of the Dean in the College of


Agriculture


building.


They


will


registered


here,


and


meal tickets provided for those who care to eat in the Uni-
versity dining room.
Since it will be helpful to know approximately the ex-
pected attendance upon the courses before their beginning,
those proposing to attend are requested to notify the Dean,


College of Agriculture,


Gainesville, as soon as they decide


to come.


Registration should be made


once,


specifying


course desired.






SHORT COURSES FOR FARMERS AND FARM WOMEN


COURSE


AGRICULTURE AND


ANIMAL HUS-


BANDRY

JANUARY 3 TO 13, 1922
Florida is a pioneer state, and is just now on the verge


of a great development.


It is only recently that her general


agriculture


been


stable


basis.


The


razor-


back hog and the tick-infested range cow can still be seen,


but they are


fast


being replaced


better


breeds of


animals.


Fields


cotton


are


still


grown,


but they


are


becoming fewer.


In the new agriculture, field crops, live-


stock and dairying are being made the basis.


Fields of corn,


velvet beans,


cane, sorghum, sweet potatoes,


and


peanuts


are taking the place of cotton.


Better fences, better homes,


better credit is evident on every hand.


Every farmer must take a


part


this


great change


from the old to the new.


razorback hog and


There is no longer any place for


ticky


cow;


boll


weevil


making cotton growing difficult.
farmer must have knowledge.


To make the change, the
This he may obtain by ob-


serving


work


more


progressive


neighbor;


reading his agricultural papers and the bulletins of the ex-


periment


stations;


cooperating with


his county


agent


and by attending the courses at the agricultural college.


The


agricultural


college


forms


a part of


the advance


guard of the agricultural development in every state.


The


College


Agriculture


performing its


part in


University


the development of


Florida


agriculture


Florida.


The


Short


Course


Agriculture


and


Animal


Husbandry


planned


meet


present


needs


Florida farmer.


It is arranged to give the greatest amount


of useful information in the shortest amount of time.
Soils and Fertilizers.-A knowledge of these subjects is


important in the new agriculture.


The points of greatest


*A I I 1*1 a *






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


of building up the soil was given scant consideration.


With


new


agriculture,


farm


management


important.


The farm must be organized


the fields given proper size;


equipment selected; crops chosen; and work planned.


These


matters will


be discussed in


detail in


this course and ex-


amples shown.


One of the best Jerseys of the Florida Experiment Station dairy herd


Field and Forage Crops.-The selection of crops and the


methods used in growing them are important considera-
tions. The growing of sorghum, corn, Japanese cane, le-
gumes, sweet potatoes, peanuts, and other crops and their
place in Florida agriculture will be studied.
Animal Husbandry.-The work offered in animal hus-


m m


A1






SHORT COURSES FOR FARMERS AND FARM WOMEN


Dairying.-Dairy practices for use on the general farm


will be given special consideration.


fat in milk will be taught.


The Babcock test for


Farm separators,


the care of


milk and cream, and other topics of special interest will be
discussed.
Veterinary Science.-The work in this subject will in-
clude the care and treatment of sick animals, treatment of


common diseases, and minor operations.


Special attention


will be given to hog cholera, tuberculosis, and abortion dis-


ease in cattle.


Clinics will be held and practice work given,


including demonstrations in administering serum and virus
to hogs.


Farm


Machinery.-Special study


will


made


implements and machinery that may be used to advantage


on Florida farms.


A number of gas tractors will be avail-


able for study and practice work, as well as complete ma-
chinery outfits for use with teams and tractors.










*C







UNIVERSITY


SCHEDULE


COURSE


ii



OF FLORIDA

a


AGRICULTURE


AND


ANIMAL


HUSBANDRY


JANUARY 3 TO


1922


Tuesday, January 3


9-Opening Exercises.
10-Gas Engines, Principles and Types.
11--Poultry Keeping in Florida.
2-The Place of Animals in Agriculture.
3-Horses and Mules for the Farm.
4-Judging Horses and Mules.


Wednesday, January 4


8-Florida Soils. Their Nature and Uses.
9-Fruit on the Farm.
10-Breeds of Beef Cattle.
11-Feeding Tests with Beef Cattle.
2-Importance of Veterinary Science in Florida.
3 to 5--Judging Beef Cattle.


Thursday, January 5


8-Florida Soils, How to Handle Them.
9-Feeding and Management of Work Animals.
10-Principles of Animal Breeding.
11-The Silo in Florida.
2-Common Diseases of Work Animals and Their Treatment.
3 to 5-Examination Farm Animals for Soundness.


Friday, January 6
8-Forage Grasses for Florida.
9-Fertilizers, Their Nature and Uses.
10-Breeds of Dairy Cattle.
11-Common Diseases of Cattle.
2-Building up Herds and Flocks.
.3 to 5-Judging Dairy Cattle.


Saturday, January


8-Leguminous Forage Crops for Florida.
9-How to Buy Fertilizers.
10-Breeds of Swine and Sheep.
11-Hog Cholera and Diseases Resembling Same.
2-The Future of the Beef Industry.
3 to 5-Vaccination to Prevent Hog Cholera.
Monday, January 9
8-How to Have a Good Garden on Every Farm.
9-Benefits of General Extension to the Florida Farmer.
10-Principles of Animal Feeding.
11-Preventive Measures and Hygiene.
2-Producing Pork and Lard for the Home.
3 to 5-Judging Swine and Sheep.


Tuesday, January


8-The Purchase. Use and Care of Farm Machinery.
9-Profits to be Expected from Livestock and Crops.
10-Disinfection and Sanitation.
11-Feeding Tests with Hogs.
2-Dairying in Florida.
3 to 5-Feeding and Handling the Dairy Cow. The Babcock Test.
Wednesday, January 11







SHORT COURSES FOR FARMERS AND


FARM


WOMEN


Thursday


January


S-Grain Crops for Florida and Their Utility.
9-Most Important Factors in Profitable Farm Organizatlon.
10-Diseases and Treatment of Animals During Prgnan'."y aln] Partutrition.
11-Contagious Abortion.
2-Sugar Making on the Farm.
3 to 4-Study of Soft Pork Probhlms.


Friday, January


S-Boys' and Girls' Clubs in Florida, and What They Are,
9!-Honey Plants and Suggestions for Getting Most from
0-Para sitic Diseases.
1--The Plant Board and How It Helps to Control Disease.s
2-Bee Keeping in Florida.
3 to 5-Visit to Apiary and Plant Board.


Th. m.


.






UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


COURSE IN POULTRY HUSBANDRY


JANUARY

The course in Poultry


this time.


3 TO 13, 1922

Husbandry should be helpful at


No other state in the Union is like Florida in its


climate and its opportunities for profitable poultry keeping.
With good markets within its borders, green grass ranges


twelve months in


the year, no need for closed and costly


houses, and feeds to be had for the raising, it is easy to
understand the demand for this complete course in poultry
production.
The farmers are increasing the size of their flocks and


adopting better methods of


care and feeding.


The back-


yard campaigns have stimulated interest in town-lot poultry


keeping.


New settlers are asking for


help to meet their


needs as they start life anew in this great state.
Florida is as large as all the New England states, with a


wider range in its advantages for poultry raising.


A study


of these advantages will form a


only


will


the subjects


be covered


part of the course.


in formal lectures,


Not
but


also the round-table plan of discussion will be followed.
Florida needs more poultry and eggs to supply present


needs.


This course


part


of the


plan


stimulate


creased poultry production.


There should be good poultry


every farm,


every


grove


and


in the


backyards


every town.
4


I








SHORT COURSES FOR FARMERS AND


FARM


WOMEN


SCHEDULE


COURSE


POULTRY


HUSBANDRY


JANUARY 3 TO


Tuesday,


January


9-Opening Exercises.


10-Gas Engines,


Principles and


Types.


11-Poultry Keeping in Florida.
2-The Place of Animals in Agriculture.
3-Selecting Breeding Stock.


4-Eighteen Months'


Experience


With Trapnests.


Wednesday, January


8-Florida


Soils


Their Nature and Uses.


9-Fruit on the Farm.
10-Brooding and Brooders.
11-The Growing of Profitable Pullets.
2-Importance of Veterinary Science in Florida.
3-Florida Feeds and Pastures.
4-Internal Structure of the Hen in Relation to
Thursday, January 5
8-Florida Soils, How to Handle Them.
9-Feeding and Management of Work Animals.


10-The Farm Flock.
11-Breeds of Poultry (I).
2-Common Diseases of .Work


3-Forage Crops for Poultry.
4-Florida Bugs for Florida Hens.'-


Animals and


The


Production.





*ir Treatment.


Friday,


January 6


8-Forage


Grasses


9-Fertilizers,


for Florida.


Their Nature and Uses.


10-Houses, Equipment and Yards.
11-Beginners' Problems-Round Table.
2-Building up Herds and Flocks.
3-Breeds of Poultry (II).
4--Advertising the Farm and Farm Products.
Saturday, January 7


8-Leguminous Forage Crops for
9-How to Buy Fertilizers.
10-The Backyard Flock.
11-Poultry Feeds and Feeding.


Florida.


2-The Future of the Beef Industry.
3 to 5-Visit to Backyard Poultry Flocks.


January 9


8-How to Have a Good Garden on Every


Farm.


9-Benefits of General Extension to Florida Farmers.


10-Sanitation in


Yards and Houses.


11-Management of Laying and Breeding Stock.
2-Producing Pork and Lard for the Home.


3-Marketing Poultry


Products.


4-The Growing of Better


Pullets.


Tuesday,


January


8-The Purchase, Use and Care of Farm Machinery.
9-Profits to Be Expected from Livestock and Crops.


10-Poultry
11-Poultry


Parasites.
Ailments.


2-Dairying in Florida.
3-Natural and Artificial Incubation.


4-Home Demonstration
S


Work in Poultry


Production.


Wednesday, January


Monday,


--








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


Thursday, January 12
8-Grain Crops for Florida and Their Utility.
9-Most Important Factors in Profitable Farm Organization.
0-Demonstration in Judging and Candling Eggs.
1-Fitting, Showing and Judging Poultry.
2-Sugar Making on the Farm.
:3-Cooking and Canning Poultry.
4--The Farm Woman's Flock.


January


8-Boys' and Girls' Clubs in Florida, anY
9-Honey Plants and Suggestions for Ge
0-Meeting Florida Poultry Problems.
1-Killing and Dressing.
2-Bee Keeping in Florida.
3-Turkeys, Ducks and Guineas.
4-Cooperative Plan in Placing Standard


1 What They Are Doing.
tting Most from Them:


Bred


Poultry.


Chickens like these should have a place in nearly every farm home


Friday,






SHORT COURSES FOR FARMERS AND FARM WOMEN


COURSE


CITRUS CULTURE AND


VEGETABLE


GROWING
JANUARY 3 TO 13, 1922
The prospective citrus grower should know the charac-


teristics
adapted


good


grove


different


soil,


localities,


stock


and


and


varieties
fertilizer


that are
require-


ments of young trees.


The older growers may need infor-


mation on cultivation, fertilization, care of his trees, and
aid in identifying troublesome insects and diseases so that
he may apply the best methods of control at the proper time
and in the most effective way.
The man who grows and markets first class fruit, needs


have no


fear of


over-production.


There is no telling how


soon poor quality fruit may not pay the cost of producing it.
It is important to know what to do in order to produce good
fruit and then have the energy and determination to do it.
The Short Course will aid the grower in this way.


The


growing


vegetables


shipment


northern


markets is an important industry in Florida.


The time of


growing them and the methods that investigation and


perlence


have


shown


most


successful


may


studied with profit under teachers who have given thought
and attention to them.


The home garden should be an aid in reducing


expenses in every home.


living


The vegetables that may be grown


during the different seasons, even when many think there


is no use trying to grow them, will be studied.


The insects


and diseases of vegetable crops and remedies for them are
questions in which all are interested, and these will be dis-
cussed at the Short Course.


Altho


our


annual


rainfall


is great


it is


well


dis-


tribute thraout the year.


The conservation of moisture in








UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


SCHEDULE


COURSE


IN CITRUS


CULTURE


AND


VEGETABLE
JANUARY 3 T(


GROWING
13, 1922


Tuesday, January


9-Opening Exercises.
10-Gas Engines, Principles and Types.
11-Poultry Keeping in Florida.
2-The Place of Animals in Agriculture.
3 to 5-Characteristics of Different Species
Campus.


of Citrus


to Be Found


on the


Wednesday, January


--Florida Soils, Their Nature and Uses.
9-Fruit on the Farm.
0-Soils Adapted to Citrus; Preparation;
1-Citrus Varieties; Stock for Different
Planting; Pedigreed Trees.
2-Importance of Veterinary Science in
3 to 5-Judging Citrus Soils, Score Cai
ing Out.


*


Cultivation;
Soils; Age
Florida.
rd Method.


Cover Crops.
and Size of Trees


Orchard


Plans,


for

Lay-


Thursday, January 5


8-Florida Soils, How to Handle Them.
9-Feeding and Management of Work i
10-Citrus Whiteflies and Their Control.
11-Scale Insects and Their Control.
2-Common Diseases of Work Animals
3 to 5-Identification of Insects to be
Preserved Specimens.


Animals.


and Their Treatment.
Found on the Campus.


Study


Friday, January 6
8-Forage Grasses for Florida.
9-Fertilizers, Their Nature and Uses.
10-Rust Mites, Red Spiders and Other Insects.
11-Mealy Bugs, Mites and Minor Insects of Citrus.
2-Building up Herds and Flocks.
3 to 5-Spray Mixtures, and Spraying Machinery.
Saturday, January 7


8-Leguminous Forage Crops for Flc
9-How to Buy Fertilizers.
0-Diseases of Citrus: Wither Tip, C
1-Diseases of Citrus: Scaly Bark, 31
2-The Future of the Beef Industry.
; to 5-Identification of Diseases to 1
of Same.


rida.


rummosis, Foot-Rot.
lelanose, Stem-end Rot,


be Found on


Scab.


Campus and Field;


Study


Monday, January 9
8-How to Have a Good Garden on Every Farm.
9-Benefit of General Extension to Florida Farmers.
10-Decay of Citrus in Transit.
11-Decay of Vegetables in Transit.
2-Producing Pork and Lard for the Home.
3 to 5-Laboratory Study of Diseases.


Tuesday, January


8-The Purchase, Use and Care of Farm Machinery.
9-Profits to be Expected from Livestock and Crops.
10-The Home Vegetable Garden.
11-The Canker Fight and What Has Been Accomplished.
2-Dairying in Florida.
3 to 5-Demonstration of Implements Used in Seeding a


,nd


Cultivating.


I


-Ik


v









SHORT COURSES FOR FARMERS AND


FARM


WOMEN


Thursday, January 12

8--Grain Crops for Florida and Their Utility.
9-Most Important Factors in Profitable Farm Organization.
10-Troublesome Insects of Truck Crops and Their Control.
11-Troublesome Diseases of Truck Crops and Their Control.
2-Sugar Making on the Farm.
3 to 5-Identification of Insects and Diseases to be Found on the Farm.


Friday, January


8-Boys' and Girls'


9--Honey


Plants and


Clubs in Florida, and What They


Are Doing.


Suggestions for Getting Most from Them.


10-The Plant Board and How It Helps Control Diseases.
11-Styles of Packages and Methods of Shipping.


2--Bee


Keeping in Florida.


to 5-Visit to Apiary and Plant Board.


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Spraying watermelons to insure a good crop


If you know of anyone whi


her name and address.


Florida,


Write


o might be interested, send
to College of Agriculture,


Gainesville.


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