Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00492
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: August 1921
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00492
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Full Text







University


of


Florida


GAINESVILLE, ELORIDA


University


Summer


School


(Co-Educational)
Announcement


June


20- August


12,


1921










SUMMER


SCHOOL


SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD


STATE SUPERINTENDENT


N. SHEAT


A.M


LL.D.


PRESIDENT


A. A. MURPHREE, A.M.,


LL.D.


PRESIDENT


EDWARD


CONRADI,


A.M


PH.D.


FACULTY


AND


OFFICERS


A. A.


MURPHREE


A.M.


LL.D


President


Director of Summer School


NORMAN, PH.D.,


Education


ANDERSON


BRISTOL


PH.D.


PH.D.


Socio
MISS


logy


Economics


GEORGIA


BORGER


Science


BUCHHOLZ, A.


Latin


MISS MARGARET C.
Primary Metho


CAWTHON
Mathematics


BURNS


ds


A.M.


J. M.


CHAPMAN, D.O.


Public Speaking


M. D.


CODY, M.A.


Biology
MISS ROSE COX
Art


MISS


ETHEL CRAWFORD, A.B.


History


C. L. C0
Spanish


ROW
and


Civics
PH.D.
French


Dean


Colle


Latin and French








SUMMER


SCHOOL


T. C.


FRYE,
History


JOSEPH R.


A.M.


FULK


PH.D.


Education


MISS


CORA


GRIFFIN


Primary Education


HATHAWAY


A.M.


Rhetoric


P. H.


English


R. H.


HENSLEY,
d American


HIXSON


A.M.


Literature


A.B.


Educational Hygiene


LEIGH


PH.D.


Chemistry


ALBERT


JOHNSTAD


Commercial Education


LEAKE


PH.D.


College


History


Economics


G. MANCHESTER, A.B.,
Physical Education


D.O.


MISS


CHRISTIAN


McDONALD


Rural Education


McMULLEN


History and Civics
MARSHBURN. A.B


A.B.


A.M.


h Language and Literature


METCALFE


Mathematics


Educational Psychology
JOSEPH ROEMER, PH.D.


secondary


Education


MISS


MADE


SAUNDERS


Geography
'" -


TTY war tt A TTTTTTT W


Eng


CC'


1 -L







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


SIMIPS


College
E. TURI


* I


PH.D.


Mathematics
INGTON. PH.D.


Agriculture


GEO.


WHITE


A.B.


General


secretary


Director


Department Religious


Social Service


MISS


FELICIA


WILLIAM


A.M.


English Grammar and Composition


J. H.


WOODRUFF


Penmanship


GRAHAM


Auditor


MISS


ROSE


COX, Dean of


Women


MISS
MRS. S. J.


CORA MILTIMORE


SWAN


SON


Librarian


, In Charge of Dining Hall


MARGARET PEELER, Matron






SUMMER SCHOOL

GENERAL STATEMENT


PURPOSE.-It is the main


purpose


University


Summer School


furnish such


training as will be most


useful


students


in the


profession


teaching.


teacher should not only be


well


versed in subject-matter,


but also resourceful in managing a schoolroom or a system


kinc


schools.
is of i:


The


Summer


instruction.


More


School


attempts to give both


specifically,


endeavors


prepare its students


for positions as teachers,


principals,


supervisors, and county


or city superintendents of public


instruction.


ORGANIZATION.-To this end the
School is organized as follows:


work of the Summer


Normal courses leading to the Normal Diploma.
College courses leading to standard college degrees


of A.B. and B.S.


Graduate courses


leading to advanced


degrees.


Professional courses meeting the requirements for


the extension of teachers'


certificates with or without fur-


their examination..


High school


courses


for mature


students and


those
home.


who do


not have adequate


high school facilities at


Review courses in all subjects required for county,


state, and special certificates.


ADMISSION.


- Graduates


Standard


Junior


High


Schools,


those


who


have


finished


tenth


grade


Senior High School, and teachers who hold a First Grade


County


Four-Year


Certificate,


Normal


are admitted
Curriculum.


first year


Graduates


of the


Standard


Senior


High Schools are admitted to the


Freshman


Year


of the Collegiate Course.
Persons twenty-one or more years of age who cannot


J I 1 P Jl A


1 J 1 1






6 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

There are no requirements for admission for those who
register merely for review courses.
To facilitate proper classification, all students are urged
to bring with them their high school diplomas or a state-


ment from their


high school


principals of the


work they


have completed. Blank certificates, conveniently arranged
for the desired data, will be sent to all high school princi-
pals, and, upon application, to prospective students.
DEGREES.-Students are expected to select their courses
in such a way as to lead to a college degree, or the Normal


Diploma.


The latter, sometimes called the L. I. degree, is


the very least that any teacher should possess.


considerable agitation in the


There is


United States at the present


time to


make


normal


diploma,


or its


equivalent,


minimum professional training for any teacher.


This de-


gree


is granted


those


students


who


have


finished


second


(Sophomore) year'


work in Teachers College,


with


the exception that the


foreign


language work is elective,


and that in the sophomore year Education


required.


Va and VIb are


Courses are also offered leading to the degrees


of Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in


Education,


Master


Arts


Education,


and


Master


Science in Education.


For the degree of Bachelor of Arts


in Education,


the major elective


work must be chosen in


Groups II and III, or Group II or
Bachelor of Science, from Group IV
for the more advanced degrees, the
the General Catalog, May, 1921.


III; for the degree of
. For the requirements
i student is referred to


Authority


for the


above


provided


Section


Summer School Act as follows:
"All work conducted at the said Summer School shall
be of such character as to entitle the students doing the
same to collegiate, normal or professional credit therefore,
and may be applied towards making a degree."






SUMMER


SCHOOL


with
jects,


subjects


and


will


take


they


hope


teach,


advantage


closely


freedom


related


sub-


choice


become especially proficient in these.


Students who expect


their


supervised


teaching


Biology


should


have


completed as a minimum Biology I and II.


Similarly, those


expect


should
English
French,
course i


have


their


completed


and


one


French


supervised
Chemistry


other


and


high school


course


French


teaching in


and


college


I;-in


History


Chemistry,


English,


English;


History,


in Latin


usual


, Latin A,


and I; in Mathematics, Mathematics A,


Physics


or Physics


and III; in


B and I;
Spanish,


in Physics,
Spanish A


and
each


(Catalogue,


case


more


than


May,


1920.)


minimum


s desirable
completed.


that


The choice


electives


must


be approved


by the


Dean,


and


only


in exceptional


cases


will


permit


a student


his supervised teaching who has not completed the min-


Imum


requirements


outlined


above.


GROUP SUBJECTS
[I. III.


Military Science
I and II


French
Greek
Latin
Rhetoric and
English Lan-
guage
Spanish


Bible
Economics
Education
English Li
erature
History
Philosophy
Political
Science
Psychology
Sociology


Agriculture
Astronomy
Bacteriology
Biology
Botany
Chemistry
Drawing
Descriptive
Geometry
Geology
Mathematics
Mechanics
Physics
Zoology
Physiology


who







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

CURRICULUM


Leading to the


Degree


Bachelor of Arts or
in Education.


Bachelor


Science


Freshman


Year


NAME OF COURSE NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
Education SIa.............. ..........Introduction to Education............
Education SIb ................ .... Education in the United States.. 3
Education SXb ............--... ...... Educational Hygiene -......-....-...-.. ..
Education SXXI .........-............ .Primary MI.ethods ...-.....-......... ......
English I ......................... ..........Rhetoric and Composition.............. 3
Foreign Language ........... .. French, Latin, or Spanish ........... 3
Agronomy I ........................G......eneral Agriculture ......-----...........
Biology Ia and IIb .............. ... Biology and Botany .... ..........-......
Chemistry I ...-........- ..-.......... .General Chemistry ..-..-....-...... .. ....
Foreign Language ................. French, Latin, or Spanish .......... 6
History I ..... --...... ................. ... Modern European -.....-....................
M them atics ..................................................................................
Physics -........ .....-........-.G.... ... General Physics ................----..........
Physical Education --...... -. .......-..-. .................. ......... .. .... ....-...... 1
Total ............................. ..................... -............................. ... ............... 16
Sophomore Year
Education SIIa -.. ...-..-..-.... ......
and Reviews and Methods in Gram- 3
Education SIIb........................ mar School Subj ects..................
or
Education SVIa ----....................Child Study ..........-------.................
and 3
Education SIVb ........... .......... High School Curriculum.......... ...
Philosophy SI -............... ........... General Psychology ..........-...........- 3
French, Greek, Latin or Spanish .............--.......... ...........-.........-. 3
Group IV ----....--- -....................---...-....................---........... 3
Physical Education -..-.........-..-. .....-....-................. .......... .-... 1
Total .................................-................. ... ............... ...............-.....-........ ..... 16
Junior Year
Education IIIa ...................... Public School Administration
and Supervision .............. ...
Education IIIb ........................ Problems in Administration and 3
or Supervision .............................
Education XIVb .................... High School Administration......
Education VIIa--.....................Educational Problems ................... 1
Electives .................... ....................................... .... . ......................... 11
Total ..............-... .....-......-. .....-.. .................. ......................... .. -- M 15
Senior Year
Education Va -..........................-Technique of Teaching ...............
'Edinn.sinn Vh THiQ+AU annd Philkenn nhr of nd. f


C1









































BIRD'


S-EYE


VIEW OF THE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS AS IT IS TODAY







































































THE UNIVERSITY CAMPUS AS PLANNED


Ilul


-- - I
____






SUMMER SCHOOL


SUMMER


SCHOOL


CREDIT.-One


hour


Summer


School is equivalent to one fourth year hour as given in


the following courses of study.


The amount of


credit to


which the completion of each course will entitle, is given


in the
special


description
permission


such


of the


courses.


No student


faculty is permitted


courses that will aggregate more than four and


college credits.


without
pursue
one-half


Exceptionally able students are sometimes


permitted to take more than this amount of work, but only


with the sanction


of the Teachers College Faculty.


The following resolutions, which are primarily intended


for students of less than college rank,


were adopted by the


Teachers College Faculty in January, 1921:


Courses to


given in


the Summer School shall


be designated as


Review,


Normal, or


College.


Courses intended primarily to give a rapid sur-
vey of a subject and thus prepare for examina-
tion for a Teacher's Certificate.


Courses arranged


primarily for pupils


unable


to offer fourteen college entrance units.
Courses designed primarily for college students


(those


able


to offer


fourteen


or more


college


entrance units).


"II.


All courses (whether Review, Normal, or College-


may, if the other regulations be observed, be used towards


extension of Teachers'


Certificates, provided that at least


one course of higher scholastic grade than those necessary


for the certificate, be taken.


A four-hour college profes-


sional course shall be deemed to satisfy regulation No. 2
(amount of professional work).


"III.


credit


college


entrance


units


college hours shall be given for successful completion of a


"Review'


course.


coarse.






10 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

by 'Normal' students at one session of the Summer School.


For successful completion of one 'Normal'


course of study


with


five


recitations


week,


one-fourth


one


college


entrance unit shall be given.


One hour of recitation shall


be considered


equal to


two


hours of work in


laboratory,


music, physical education, etc.


The Teachers College


will accept entrance unit credits


only in case an entire course has been completed.


no circumstances will it accept less than


Under


one-half unit in


a subject, and one-half units only in subjects so marked in


current


catalog.


The


College


will,


however,


accept


one-quarter of a unit when an additional unit or permissible
one-half unit is also offered in the same subject, provided
the one-quarter unit does not represent duplication of work.


recommended


that the schedule


classes


arranged as to make it possible for a student in


'Normal'


courses to earn two one-quarter units in one subject during
one session of the Summer School.
(c) A student able to offer fourteen or more college


entrance


units


shall


not,


without


special


permission,


allowed to receive more than four and one-half credit hours
or one and one-half college entrance units.
Successful completion of a course of study requiring six


class
sion,
hours


hours


will


per


week


entitle


thruout


student to


Summer


one and


School


one-half


ses-


college


completion of a course requiring four or five hours


per week,


will entitle to one college hour, and


meeting two or three times per week,


to one-h:


of a class
alf college


hour; but no credit in hours will be given for a class meet-


only


once a


week.


To entitle a student to credit,


course


Summer


head


School


Department


must


approved


University


most


by the
nearly


concerned."


QTr rfl 1 (rPTT PTrAIV A (rc' ri lnoi-no n\-P +ltk


"Pan nhrnc,


flnh


I







SUMMER SCHOOL


course they have made a general average of eighty-five on
all subjects and have not fallen below sixty in any subject.
These State Certificates are converted into Life Certificates
in the usual way.


EXTENSION


OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES


Section


6 of a recent Act of the


Legislature


provides


that:
"All teachers attending any of the Summer Schools
herein created and whose work entitles them to credit
therefore, upon making proof of the same to the State
Superintendent of Public Instruction, are hereby en-


titled to one year's


extension on any Florida teacher's


certificate


they


may


hold


and


which


has


fully


expired,


and


such


certificate


may


extended


one


year for each succeeding session attended by the said
teacher."


Under this section


of the law, no certificate of


credit


making proof


work


done


will


granted


State Superintendent and


Presidents


Summer


Schools,


except


those


teachers


who


attended


full


term and whose


work shall be satisfactory to the faculty


concerned.
REGULATIONS
When credit for extension of certificates is desired the


following


regulations


established


Summer


School


Board must be followed:


teacher


shall


allowed


take


more


than


twenty hours per week of purely academic subjects.
2. No teacher shall take less than five hours per week


of professional work.


(Any four or five hour course in education,


pedagogy


and


psychology


that


has


been


taken


previously


will


satisfy the professional


requirement necessary for exten-


sion of certificate.)







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


teacher


shall


take


less than


fifteen


hours


per


week without special permission.


5. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any
change of registration after the first week.
It is hoped that all teachers will recognize the wisdom


of the


above


regulations.


Every teacher


should


seek to


raise


grade


certificate.


The Summer School


faculty will


not recommend students


for an


extension


certificate for repeating courses which they have taken in


previous summer sessions,


or those who are not working


with the view


of raising the


grade of


certificate already


held.


fulfill


highest


mission,


Summer


School


should be used to advance and broaden


one


scholarship,


not merely to extend


one's certificate, or for the purpose


of "cramming" for examinations.


ADVANTAGES OF THE UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SCHOOL
The advantages that Gainesville presents as the seat of


the Summer School are numerous.


and easy of access.


It is centrally located


It has well-paved, lighted and shaded


streets,


an exceptionally


pure


water


supply,


and


a good


sewerage system.
and hospitable.
leading religious


The citizens are energetic,


progressive


The moral atmosphere is wholesome.


denominations


have attractive


The


places


worship.
The entire equipment of the University is at the hands


of the faculty and students.


Ample provision is made for


intellectual recreation and physical exercise.


The Peabody


Literary


'Society


meets


weekly;


lectures


concerts


given frequently; the gymnasium, swimming pool, baseball


grounds,
students
activities.


and
and


tennis


courts are


instructor


The


Y. M.


at the disposition


hand


A. has


fine


direct


of the
athletic


moving-picture


. I 1 n 1 I S 1 I I I


m


~






SUMMER SCHOOL


and stone structure. It is modern in every respect as to
equipment and arrangements. It contains all the lecture
rooms, laboratories and libraries that a modern college of
this kind needs.


LIBRARY.-The


general


library


of the


University


con-


tains about 18,000 volumes of well selected books to which


the Summer School students have free access.


The Peda-


gogical library will be of especial interest to them, for it


contains many


special


methods,


books on


history


educational


theory,


education,


general


psychology


and
and


philosophy.


In the reading room are more than a hundred


of the


best general


and


technical


periodicals.


Here also


are


received the leading newspapers of the state.


EDUCATIONAL


RESEARCH


ROOM.


- Room


Peabody


Hall, is set apart for special and graduate students in Edu-


cation.


This room contains exhibits of many lines of school


work; reports and publications of the U. S. Bureau of Edu-


cation; samples of school texts; Courses of Study


Superintendents;


catalogues


colleges


and


;Reports
universi-


ties;
laws.


samples


The


room


records and


especially


reports,


rich


and


state


material,


school
method


and


practical


operations


mental


and


educational


measurements.


Graduate students working on theses will


find


this


equipment


room
is at


especially


their


helpful


service,


and


and


convenient.


individual


tables


The
and


chairs will be provided.


TEACHERS'


EMPLOYMENT


BUREAU.-Teachers


College


and Normal School desires to serve the whole state in every


possible way.


For this purpose a


Teachers'


Employment


Bureau


From
From


was


school


instituted
officials


teachers it receives


vacancies.


and


open


receives


thruout


requests


year.


teachers.


requests for information as to


It files such information and tries,


when called


upon, to meet the needs of both teachers and school offi-


m l a a *1 -t . a-


1






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Bureau


aid.


charges


made


services.


For information, address


Joseph Roemer,


University


of Florida, Gainesville,' Florida.
EXPENSES


Registration


S2.00


Boarding and lodging in Dormitory per week,


in advance


5.25
40.00


In advance for the term.


Board without lodging, per week.....


4.25


Board


without


lodging


term,


advance


32.00


Board for children under eight, per week........


2.00


Board


children


between


eight


and


ten,


per week


Board for children above ten, per week..........


2.50
4.25


Infirmary fee


(including services of


consult-


ing physician and nurse, if needed).........


Students taking Manual Training will have to pay for


the material they use.


This will not amount to more than


75 cents.


There is no charge


for tuition.


Children


under eight


years of age will not be admitted to the dormitories, but
may dine with their parents in the Commons at $2.00 per


week.


All accounts are payable in advance.


RooMS.-Dormitory rooms are supplied with two good
iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, a table,


washstand and


chairs.


All students are required to


pro-


vide
other


for themselves a


things


they


pillow,


may


bed linen,


want


towels, and such


their


own


special


convenience.


Two


additional


dormitories


have


been


built,


which


makes it possible to accommodate some of the men on the
campus if they so desire.
Good rooms can be obtained adjacent to the campus at






SUMMER SCHOOL


INFIRMARY.


- The


University


will


maintain


well


equipped infirmary and a professional nurse for those who
may be ill during the Summer School.
THE ASSEMBLY.-The assembly will be held on Tuesdays


and


Friday at


10 o'clock.


COURSES OF INSTRUCTION


The


following


abbreviations


used


connection


with


the courses, indicate the buildings in which the courses are
held, and the numbers, rooms in which they are held:


A--Agricultural


Building;


S-Science;


P-Peabody;


E-Engineering


L-Language; G-Gymnasium.


AGRICULTURE


ELEMENTARY


AGRICULTURE.-A general course in agri-


culture.


This will introduce


the student to


the study


soil, plants, common diseases of plants, insects, farm crops,


domestic animals and the like.


Methods of teaching agri-


culture in the rural schools will be stressed.


Review and


extension


credit


only.


11:00


Mr.


Turlington.
ELEMENTARY CROPS.-The origin, classification, and use


crop


plants ;


and


growth and reproduction
lege credit. T. Th. S. 11


fundamental


(3 lectures,
:00 Lab. M.


processes


1 laboratory).
::00-4:00. A. 13.


plant
1 col-
Mr.


Turlington.


FERTILIZERS.-The nature,


composition and sources of


fertilizers and their reaction on soils and crops.


formulas and home-mixing.


The


making and


Fertilizer
economical


use of farm manures.


Fertilizer requirements for various


crops,


etc.


college


credits.


Daily


8:00


Mr.


Turlington.
ANTIAT. Finrn--nmnncnrm nFf rnllsnnnna aAl n1 nd QniniT l






16 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COMMERCIAL COURSES
The growing demand in Florida for teachers of commer-
cial subjects as well as for bookkeepers and stenographers
prompts us to strengthen these courses with a view to offer-
ing such instruction as will best meet these demands. Two
eight-weeks' courses have been planned, the completion of
which should prepare one for either teaching these subjects
in the high schools of the State or doing bookkeeping or
clerical work.
Both elementary and advanced courses will be offered
in Bookkeeping, Shorthand, Typewriting, Commercial Law
and Penmanship.
Tuition fees will be charged for commercial subjects as
follows:
Bookkeeping, $7.50 per term.
Shorthand, $7.50 per term.
Typewriting, $10.00 per term, machine furnished.
Commercial Law, $3.00 per term.
Penmanship, $2.00 per term.
All courses, to one person, $25.00 per term.
Schedule of commercial classes:
Bookkeeping, beginning, 8:00 a. m.
Bookkeeping, advanced, 9:00 a. m.
Penmanship, special, 10:00 a. m.
Shorthand, beginning, 11:00 a. m.
Penmanship, general, 2:00 p. m.
Shorthand, advanced, 3:00 p. m.
Typewriting, any convenient period.
All classes in Peabody Hall, Room 18.
DRAWING AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS
PUBLIC SCHOOL ART AND METHODS, GRADES I-IV
COURSE I.-This course includes: Elementary water
color, crayon and pencil from plants, flowers, vegetables






SUMMER SCHOOL


Model lessons given.


cussed.


Cost and selection of materials dis-


/2 college credit.


Section 1-M.
Section 2-M.


Th. S. 10:00 E. 12.


Th. 2:00


E. 13.


Miss Cox.
Miss Cox.


PUBLIC SCHOOL ARTS AND METHODS, GRADES V-VIII
COURSE II.-This course includes: Water color, pastello,
tempera and pencil from plants, flowers and still life ob-


jects,


studied


with


reference


light


and


shade;


color


theory; simple working


drawings; lettering; poster mak-


ing; suitability of


of people;


dress for different occasions and


applications of the


principles


of Art to


types
home


decoration; bookmaking; appreciation of direction, balance,
rhythm, proportion and values; study of design and its ap-


plication


to some practical


problem; paper


cutting; work


outlined for the school year; cost and selection of materials


discussed; perspective.


1/2 college credit.


Section 1 -W


. 4:00-6:00


Section 2-M. T. Th.


E. 12.


9:00 E.


Miss Cox.
Miss Cox.


NOTE


Other courses in Drawing and Industrial Art may be given


if the demand


sufficient.


EDUCATION
Any 4 or 6 hour course will meet professional require-
ments for the extension of certificates.


PEDAGOGY.-School


management,


general


and


special


methods of teaching, elementary principles of child nature,
school hygiene and sanitation, personality of teacher, rela-


tion


school


and


community,


and


other practical


peda-


gogical


questions.


Review.


Normal


credit.


Section 1-M. T.
Section 2-T. W.


F. 9:00 P


Th. F


11:00 P


Miss Griffin.
Miss Griffin.


PSYCHOLOGY.-A beginner's


course in psychology with


applications to teaching.


1 Normal credit.


. Th. S.


10:00 P


Mr. Sealey.


- ......... TT _r i /" m i . 1 I Ir'i -- -----_ .






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


EDUCATION


IIIa.-Administration


and


Supervision


Village and Consolidated Schools-A course stressing in a
practical way problems peculiar to these schools in Florida;


their relation to


federal, state and local government; the


supervising


principal,


qualifications, relation


supern-


tendent, boards, teachers, pupils, patrons and community;


adapting the school to the child'
riculum, attendance, promotions,


needs, organization, cur-
tests, health work; busi-


ness


practices,


school


housekeeping, records


finance,


and


material


reports.


equipment,


college


school
credits.


Daily 9:00 P. 23.


Mr. Fulk.


EDUCATION IVb.-High School Curriculum-This course
is designed to consider the problems of the curriculum of


high


school


organization.


Among the topics


treated are


Standards for the selection of the curriculum;


factors


considered-age


pupils,


social


standing,


probable school life, probable vocation; its traditional sub-
jects and their possible variations; new subjects and their
values; systems of organization, election and prescription;


problems


articulation


with


elementary


school,


college, the vocational school, and the community.


11/ col-


lege credits.


Daily 11:00


P. 32.


Mr. Roemer.


EDUCATION Va.--The Technique of Teaching-The laws


learning,


problem-project


lesson-planning,


method,


thinking,
socialized


questioning,


recitation,


democ-


racy 3
life.


mn


the classroom as a


Textbook: Colvin's


preparation for democracy in


"An Introduction to High School


Teaching."
Norman.


college credits.


Daily 8:00 P.


Mr.


EDUCATION Via.-Child Study-The nature, growth and


development of the child


from


birth


adolescence


with


reference to education; the original nature of the child and
his education; the meaning of protracted infancy; training
in recognition of types and individual differences, of com-
_- -?J *3 1 - -- J-- 1 1 _-






SUMMER SCHOOL


EDUCATION


VIb.-Supervised Teaching-This course is


planned to give the student practice in conducting recita-


tions under close supervision.


A study will be made of the


development of courses, and the present status of the sub-


ject taught.


Lesson plans will be required for all recita-


tions, and the manner of teaching will be subject to criti-


cism.
week.
I.
T. F.


Teaching


4 hours


a week;


conferences


hours


11/2 college credits.
American History in Secondary Schools.


S. 11:00


Mr. Fulk.


English in Secondary Schools.


M. T.


Th. F


4:00 P
III.


Mr. Hathaway.


Mathematics in the Secondary Schools.


M. T.


S. 3:00 P


Mr. Cawthon.


Science in the Secondary Schools.


S. 3:00


. Th.


Miss Borger.


EDUCATION Xb.-Educational Hygiene-Conditions and
forces that affect the physical and mental vigor of children
and teachers, and relate the school to the health of the home


and community.


Location and sanitation of school build-


ings;


hygienic


furniture,


etc.;


diseases


and


physical


fects; medical inspection; hygiene of instruction; teacher'


health; play and recreation; teaching of hygiene.


11/2 col-


lege credits.


Daily 8:00 P


Mr. Fulk.


EDUCATION


XI.-Educational


Diagnosis--The


making


of school surveys; the use of scales for measuring educa-


tional
mine


products; educational stock-taking.


what kind


How to


school a community needs,


and


deter-
what


progress pupils are


making, etc.


(Elective for Graduate


Students.)


college


credits.


Daily


8:00


. 32.


Mr.


Roemer.


EDUCATION XIVa.-Junior


High


School--The purpose


of this course is to give principals and teachers a knowledge


of the junior high school and its organization.


Since the






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


studies,


in discipline, methods of teaching, etc.; develop-


ment of the Junior


High


School; special


function


of the


Junior High School; organization, curricula and courses of
study, methods of teaching, etc., of the Junior High School.


Daily 9:00 P. 32.


Mr. Roemer.


EDUCATION


XXIa.-Newer Type of Primary


School-


This course will discuss some recent departures from the


traditional and will consider causes for these changes.


The


course will include organization of the primary school cur-
riculum, and a discussion of the relationship between the


kindergarten and


primary


school.


It is planned


meet


the needs of teachers of the first four grades.


11/ college


credits.


Daily 8:00 E.


EDUCATION


Miss Burns.


XXIb.-Traditional Subjects


Pri-


mary


School-Aims


and methods; the


rapid


transforma-


tion in methods of teaching the traditional studies will be


considered.


Type lessons illustrating the drill lesson,


application of the drill lesson and the lesson for apprecia-


tion will be given.


11/2 college credits.


Daily 9:00 E.


Miss Burns.


EDUCATION


XXIc.-Elementary


Pedagogy


--- Organiza-


tion and management of primary grades; elementary prin-


ciples of
methods


child nature; plays and games; lesson planning;


teaching;


and


other


practical


problems


that


should be understood by the primary teacher.


credits.


Daily 3:00 E.


Miss Burns.


11/2 college
r/


EDUCATION XXIIa.-The Teaching of Primary Reading
-This course will discuss the basic importance of reading
in the primary school; reading as a tool study; the various


methods of teaching reading, etc.


Because of the close re-


lation of language as a tool study to reading in the primary
school that subject will also be considered in this course.


The


value of


phonics,


writing,


and


also


spelling will


considered.


1 college credit.


Th. S.


10:00


-- w -- --






SUMMER SCHOOL


standards


measurement.


The four fundamental


cesses and how to teach them; rapid calculation; etc.


pro-
This


course will lay out the course of study in arithmetic in the


first three grades.


1 college credit.


.Th.


Miss


Griffin.
EDUCATION XXIIc.-Story Telling, Plays and Games for


Primary


Grades-This


course


will


cover


such


topics


the place of story in child life; the selection of stories for


children


kinds of stories to choose; the telling of stories


(actual practice will be given here)


the poems for child


life;


value


play


in child


life;


games


suitable


primary school; the actual playing of games with idea of


giving them to children.


1 college credit.


. Th. F


4:00 E.


Miss Griffin.


PHILOSOPHY Ia.-General Psychology-Facts and theo-
ries current in general psychological discussion: the sensa-
tions, the sense organs, and the functions of the brain; the


higher
feeling,
credits.


mental


emotion,


functions-attention,


volition,


Daily 11:00 P


and


like


perception,


topics.


Mr.


1


memory,


college


ENGLISH


ENGLISH
Section -


COMPOSITION.-Three sections:


Review


and


extension


credit only.


. Th. 9:00 P


. 28.


Mr. Hathaway.


Section


Review


and


extension


credit only.


W. Th. 8:00 P.
Section 3.
W. Th. 8:00 E.


Miss Williams.


Review


and


extension


credit only.


Mr. Sealey.


ENGLISH GRAMMAR.-Three sections:


Section 1


Review and extension credit only.


10:00 L. 26.


Mr. Marshburn.


Section


Review and


extension


credit only.


Th. 11:00 P
Sections 3.


Miss Williams.


Review and


extension


credit only.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


will
and


be demanded.


extension


How


credit


best to


only.


teach spelling.


11:00


Review


Miss


Williams.
AMERICAN LITERATURE.-Study of American Literature


as outlined in Metcalf's


"American Literature."


1 Normal


credit.


Th. F


. 3:00 P. 23.


Miss Williams.


ENGLISH LITERATURE.-The


ture as outlined in Metcalf'


history


of English Litera-


"English Literature"


will be


given.


1 Normal credit.


Th. F. 2:00


L. 26.


Mr.


Hensley.
RHETORIC.-A general course in composition and rhet-


ornc.


Normal


credit.


4:00


Mr.


Hathaway.
ENGLISH Ia.-Advanced College Rhetoric-Designed to
train students in methods of clear and forceful expression.
Instruction is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric,


in rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing,


the constant


correlation of the three as methods of approach to the de-


sired goal being kept in view


In addition a reading course


is assigned each student.


11/2 college credits.


Daily 3:00


L. 26.


Mr. Hensley.


ENGLISH


Ib.-Advanced


College


Rhetoric-This is the


work covered during the second semester of Freshman Eng-


lish.


It is a continuation of English Ia.


The chapters on


Invention


in Genung's


"Working


Principles


of Rhetoric"


will


studied.


minimum


compositions


quired.


Daily 9:00 L. 26.


Mr. Hensley.


EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY POETRY.-A study of the
chief poems of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, and


Byron,


with some attention to their relation to the earlier


Romantic
stressed.


movement.
Advanced


Their


students.


individual


theories


credit.


will


. Th.


10:00 L. 26.


Mr. Marshburn.


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rli,' on






SUMMER SCHOOL

FRENCH


FRENCH Aa.- Elementary


Cour


se -


Pronunciation,


forms,


elementary


syntax,


dictation,


written


exercises,


memorizing
9:00 L. 9.


vocabularies.


college


credits.


Daily


Mr. Crow.


FRENCH


Ab.--Elementary


French,


second


course; continuation of French Aa; grammar,


semester's
prose com-


position, reader, oral practice. I
French Course; La Belle France.


Fraser & Squair'


Prerequiisite


Shorter
French


Aa or equivalent.
Mr. Anderson.


FRENCH


11/2 college credits.


SIa.-Second year


Daily


11:00 L. 12.


French, first part.


Gram-


mar,


prose composition,


reader.


Prerequisite


French A


or equivalent.


1 college credit.


Th. F


. L. 12.


Mr.


Anderson.
GEOGRAPHY
POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY.-Special attention will be given


Florida and its relation


review
world.


geography


other


states.


United


A thorough


States and


Instruction will be given in the use of text-books,


maps, globes, industrial products, etc.


sion credit only


Review and exten-


three sections:


Section 1.
Section 2.
Section 3.


Th. 10:00 S. 1.
F. 2:00 S. 1.


. 3:00 S.


Miss Saunders.
Miss Saunders.
Miss Saunders.


PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.-The main features of the ordi-
nary text-book in physical geography will be studied. Along
with this stress will be placed upon the effects the physical


features


have


man-his


commercial


This will be correlated with agriculture.


and social life.
I Normal credit.


Two sections:


Section 1.
Section 2.


M. T.


Th. F


4:00 S. 1.


. W. Th. S. 10:00 E.


Miss Saunders.
1. Miss Borger.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


entertainments, consisting of moving pictures, stereopticon
slides and addresses on "How to Teach Hygiene and Sanita-
tion in the Public Schools" will be given each evening dur-
ing the week in the gymnasium. No credit given.
LATIN


FIRST


credit.


YEAR LATIN.-Section 1.
I. W. Th. S. 10:00 P. 28.


Section 2.


M. T.


. Review.


W. Th. 4:00 P


Beginners.


1 Normal


Mr. Hathaway.


Review and extension credit only.


Mr. Buchholz.


CAESAR.-In this course three books will be thoroughly


studied.
3:00 P.


Composition.


Normal


credit.


Th.


Mr. Buchholz.


CICERO.-Three or four orations of Cicero


with prose


composition.


1 Normal credit.


Th. 9:00 P


Mr. Buchholz.
VIRGIL.-Three books of Virgil are read and, in addi-


tion,


prose


composition


will


given.


Normal


credit.


Th. F. 8:00 P


Mr. Buchholz.


LATIN SIa.-Selections from Ovid, with a review of the


forms
oral)


and


simpler


easy


prose


constructions
composition.


with


practice


class


(largely
prefers,


Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia will be read instead


of the Ovid.


Prerequisite:


Three


years of High School


Latin.


1 college credit.


.Th.


9:00


Mr.


Anderson.
MANUAL TRAINING
This work is planned to include shop work and mechani-


drawing


courses


suitable


first


year


High


School.


SHOP


WORK.-The


shop


course


will


consist


of bench


work, machine work and turning.


At the


bench various


joints will be laid out and constructed and small pieces of


furniture


maerl.


This


will


"1VP


nrnactirp


ha.rnd


- wE a. a a w a a aa-. p. a a a


11sm1


I
























U


PEABODY HALL,


Where Summer School is Conducted


~WiV~in~~"s~ ~
~r ~







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


BEGINNER'S


PLANE GEOMETRY I.-Books I and II.


Normal


credits.


.Th.


8:00


. 20.


Mr.


Cawthon.
PLANE GEOMETRY II.-Review Course-Review and ex-


tension credit only.


M.,T.


2:00 E.


Mr. Sawyer.


SOLID GEOMETRY.---/2 Normal credits.


F. S. 9:00 E.


. Th.


Mr. Sawyer.


PLANE TRIGONOMETRY.-1 college credit.


3:00 L.


Th. F


Mr. Simpson.


COLLEGE ALGEBRA.-Selected topics of algebra that lie


beyond the high school course.


11/2 college credits.


Daily


9:00 L.


Mr. Simpson.


PLANE ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY.-First semester's work.


11/2 college credits.


Daily


11:00 L. 23.


Mr. Simpson.


ELEMENTARY


CALCULUS.-11/2


college


credits.


Daily


(hours to be arranged)


Mr. Simpson.


NOTE:


Those interested


spond with the instructor.


in other advanced courses should


corre-


MUSIC


Music


METHODS I.-It is the


object of this course to


point out the true place and purpose of public school music,
and to consider the various methods of teaching music to


children in the primary grades.


/2 college credit.


Section 1.


M. T.


Section


V. Th. 2:00 G.
Th. 10:00 G.


Mr. Davis.
Mr. Davis.


MUsic METHODS II.-A continuation of course I.


Ma-


trial is examined


for the


Grammar


Grades


and


High


School.


21/ college credit.


Section 1.


Section


T.W


Th. F. 8:00 G.


Th. F


4 :00 G.


Mr. Davis.
Mr. Davis.


PUBLIC SPEAKING


account


limited


funds, a


nominal fee will be


nlnn,.nVnA nT. Itn #nllnrTn nr nnIh rcmnn


.*%
* :*
"I







SUMMER SCHOOL


voice, gesture, and facial expression.


these studies spe-


cial attention will be given to preparing teachers for carry


ing on thi
Professor
arranged.


work in the public schools.


.M.


Chapman.


Law


Those interested see


Building.


Hours


PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


NOTE:
and tennis she


All ladies will be required
)es. It is recommended tha


the bloomers black sateen.


to have


middies,


it the middies


bloomers


be white and


Manchester will have these suits on


hand if students will place their orders with him early, accompanied
by checks or money orders.


All men will be required to have baseball


trousers or white duck


pants, gy
shoes are


rm


shirt


tennis


shoes.


White


gym


shirts


tennis


preferable.


PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


I.-Elementary


Gymnastics--


college
Section


credit.


Section


Women-M.


Men-M.


. 4:00


.Th.


Gymnasium.


10:00.


Mr.


Manchester.
PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


II.-Physiology-This


will


elementary


and


subject,


giving


exercise to stimulate


action


them.


The


different


general


laws


organs
govern-


ing the


body


and


health.


college credit.


2:00


4:00.


Gymnasium.


Mr. Manchester.


PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


III.-Advanced


Gymnastics-


This
have


credit.


is for those


made


who


progress


Section


have


had


in the


work


work


Men-M.


either in


elsewhere.


. Th.


3:00.


Course


college


Section


Women-M.


5:00.


Gymnasium.


Mr.


Man-


chester.


PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


.-Anatomy-An


elementary


course


in bony


structure,


muscles


and


important nerves


their


relation


physical


education.


college


credit.


8:00.


PHYSICAL


Gymnasium.
EDUCATION


Mr.


Manchester.


--Major


Sports--Organized


sports,


football


basketball


track and


baseball.


of coaching, training, diet and handling athletes.


Principles
1 college






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


sports, rules and organization governing them.


credit.


PHYSICAL


Th. F. 2:00.
EDUCATION


Gymnasium.
VII.-General


Mr.


1

it

1/ college i


White.


playground


and


social hour, 7 P


M.-This will be given on the campus.


RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL SERVICE
GEORGE E. WHITE, General Secretary Y. M. C. A.
Director Department of Religious and Social Service


Under


this


department


general


program


Young Men
two years,


's Christian Association, as rendered in the last


will be continued.


This is not a new


depart-


ment, but it places the department under a more definite
plan in order that it may serve the student life in a better
way.


All the other social


organizations on


the campus, and


the County Clubs,


will be organized through this depart-


ment.


Every phase of social life will be encouraged.


The


following is the general program in the
RELIGIOUS DEPARTMENT
Sunday, 7 P. M.-Vesper Services.
Tuesday, 10 A. M.-Chapel.


Wednesday,


7 P. M.-Devotional Services.


Friday, 10 A. M.-Chapel.
SOCIAL DEPARTMENT


Cooperating with the Department of Physical Education.
Monday, 4:00-6:00 P. M.-Plays and games on campus.


Tuesday,


8 P.


M.-Moving pictures in Gymnasium.


Wednesday,


4:00-6:00


M.-Plays


and


games


campus.


Thursday, 8 P


M.-Peabody Club.


Friday,


8:00-11:00


. M.-Socials


Social


Hall and


Gymnasium.


SCIENCE


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SUMMER SCHOOL


BOTANY.


-In


classroom


and


laboratory


structure,


morphology, reproduction and classification will be studied.
After students have been prepared for them, field trips will


be taken,


when representative types of important families


will be collected and identified.


11/2 normal credits.


Th. F


. S. 3:00 P. 1.


Miss Borger.


PHYSICS.-A general course, such as is usually given in


standard
stations,


secondary
and a lin


schools-lectures,


united amount


recitations,


individual


demon-


laboratory


work.
oratory


11/2 Normal credits.


4:00-6:00


M. T. Th. S. 10:00 P. 1.


P. 1.


Lab-


Mr. Fillers.


GENERAL SCIENCE.-A


course of methods


General


Science designed especially to meet the needs of high school


teachers.
Saunders.


1 Normal credit.


ZOOLOGY.- In


connection


M.T.W


with


8:00 P


text-book


Miss


study,


typical specimens illustrating the different groups will be
dissected and studied in the laboratory, to obtain as com-


prehensive an


idea


their


structure


and


physiology


possible.


1 Normal credit.


M. T. Th. F. 2:00 P


Miss


Borger.
BIOLOGY Ia.-General Biology-The fundamental prop-


erties of living organisms,
opment and life histories.


their structure, activities, devel-
Prerequisite to all other courses


biology.


(2 class and 2 laboratory periods


per week.)


college credit.


3:00,


Lab.


. 4:00-6:00.


Botany room.


Mr. Cody.


BIOLOGY XIa.-General Bacteriology-The morphology,


physiology
organisms.


and


cultivation


of bacteria and related micro-


(2 class and 2 laboratory periods per week.)


1 college credit.


3:00,


Lab.


4:00-6:00.


Botany room.


Mr. Cody.


BIOLOGY


XIIb.-Agricultural


Bacteriology-Soil


bacte-


and


their


influence


soil


fertility,


and


bacteria


relation to milk and its products.


(2 class periods and 2


I









ant crop plants,


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

with laboratory study of important types.


(2 class periods and 2 laboratory periods


per week.)


college credit.


M.W


. 2:00, Lab. W. F


4:00-6:00 S. Botany


room.


Mr. Cody.


CHEMISTRY


GENERAL CHEMISTRY.-A


who


wish


prepare


course


science


designed


those
high


teaching


school.


This course can be taken by those who have never


taken chemistry before or by those who have had a course


before and wish to review it.


There will be two courses in


General


embracing


Chemistry,


metals.


one
The


embracing


former


non-metals


and


one


prerequisite


latter.


21/ college credits.


Section


Equivalent to


first semester


Chemistry


Daily


9:00,


Lab.


. Th.


2:00-4:00


Mr.


Leigh.


Section


Equivalent to second semester of Chemistry


Daily


11:00, Lab. M.


. Th. 2:00-4:00. S. 8.


Mr.


Fillers.


QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS.-A laboratory


course


this


subject offered to those who have had general


chemistry.


11/2 college credits.


2:00, Lab., M.


4:00-


6:00. S.


Mr. Leigh.


GRAVIMETRIC


ANALYSIS.-A


laboratory


course


offered


to those who


have had


Qualitative Analysis.


1/ college


credits.


Laboratory


afternoons


2:00-5:00,


days


arranged. S.


12 hours per week.


Mr. Leigh.


VOLUMETRIC ANALYSIS.-A laboratory course offered to


those


who


credits.


have


had


Laboratory


Gravimetric
afternoons


Analysis.
2:00-5:00,


1


college


days


arranged.


12 hours per week.


Mr. Leigh.


ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.-This course is designed to pre-


sent the fundamentals of


chemistry


of the compounds of


carbon.


The work in the classroom is presented by means


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SUMMER SCHOOL


commercial laboratory work, or who wish to fit themselves
for the technical examination of materials in a chosen field.


See instructor.


A half course may be taken in Qualitative


Analysis if desired.


11/ college credits.


Mr. Leigh.


SOCIAL SCIENCES


Civics.-Special attention will be given to local,


city, and county governments.


town,


Information that every in-


telligent citizen should have is stressed.


An attempt will


be made to teach the subject as it should be taught.


sections.


Four


Review and extension credit only.


Section 1.


Section
Section


Section 4.


. Th. 10:00 P
. F. 11:00 E.


Th. F.
Th. F.


2:00 P.


3:00 P. 17.


Mr. Frye.


Miss Crawford.
Miss Crawford.
Mr. McMullen.


FLORIDA HISTORY.-State-adopted text-book will be cov-


ered.


Review and extension credit only.


W. 10:00 P


Miss Crawford.


UNITED STATES HISTORY.-Four sections, each covering


thorough review of State-adopted textbook.


Review and


tension credit only.


Section 1.


Section


Section 3.
Section 4.


Th. F


M. T. Th. F


T. Th. F


M. T.Th. F


8:00 L. 25.


. 9:00 L. 25.


2:00 L.


3:00 L. 25.


Frye.


Mr. McMullen.
Mr. McMullen.
Miss Crawford.


HISTORY.


-Ancient-ll/ Normal credits.


M. T.


. Th.


8:00. P


Mr. McMullen.


HISTORY.-Medieval and Modern-11/2 Normal and


tension


credits.


9:00


Miss


Crawford.


HISTORY.-English--1


Normal


and


extension


credit.


. Th.


2:00 L. 10.


Mr. Frye.


HISTORY.-American--1


Normal and


extension


credit.


M.T.


Th.

MODERN


.23.


'HISTORY.-History


Mr. Fulk and Mr. Frye.


World


War-This






32 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

from the point of view of the social, political, and economic
problems presented to the various states by the struggle.


Some


time


will, be


given


the aims and


objects of the


various belligerents and to the complex and intricate prob-
lems of the Congress of Versailles and the attempts there


made at reaching a satisfactory solution of them.


11/2 col-


lege credits.


Daily 8:00 L. 10.


Mr. Leake.


AMERICAN HIs
tion-This course


STORY.-The


will


Civil


include a


War


and


thorough


Reconstruc-


study


causes and background of the war between the states; the


various military, social, economic, and


political


phases of


the struggle, and the problems connected


with the recon-


struction
southern


period and the restoration


states.


college


credits.


of home rule in


Daily


9:00


Mr. Leake.


AMERICAN


GOVERNMENT


AND


POLITICS. -A


thorough


analysis
United


of the
States,


institutions


and


together with a


political


brief


practices


examination


of the
of the


fundamental features of


our state and local governments,


will constitute the work of this course.


Emphasis will be


laid on constitutional questions and on present-day political


problems.


This course will be of help to teachers of Civics.


11/ college credits.


Daily


10:00 L. 10.


Mr. Leake.


SOCIOLOGY AND ECONOMICS
The summer work in this department has been planned
with the two-fold purpose of meeting the needs of college
students and giving special assistance to those teaching or
planning to teach one or more of the social sciences-His-


tory


(with


current


events),


Sociology,


Economics,


Com-


munity Civics.
SOCIOLOGY I.-An elementary course touching a variety
of social problems with some reference to the principles of


social evolution, social


organization


and


social


progress.


w







SUMMER SCHOOL


with some application to current economic problems.


college credits.


Daily 11:00 L. 11.


Mr. Bristol.


SPANISH


SPANISH


Aa.- Elementary


Course Pronunciation,


forms,


elementary


syntax,


dictation,


written


exercises,


memorizing
11:00 L. 9.


vocabularies.


college


credits.


Daily


Mr. Crow.


SPANISH


Ab.- Elementary


Course Continuation


Spanish Aa, but mainly a reading course.


1 college credit.


M.T.W


Th. 3:00 L. 9.


Mr. Crow.


SPANISH


Ia.-Intermediate


Course-Work


Elemen-


tary Course continued, advanced grammar, including syn-


tax,
L. 9.


prose


composition.


college


credits.


Daily


8:00


Mr. Crow.


Only two of the classes outlined will be given, the choice
depending upon the demand.
ROOMS


who


expect to


occupy


dormitory rooms,


which in


every case are comfortable and commodious, should make
reservations as soon as possible.


For room reservations and general


information


as to


the Summer School, address


NORMAN,


Dean of Teachers College,
Gainesville, Fla.









Uniniversity


of


Florida


Gainesville, Florida


Normal


School


and


Teachers


College


REVIEW COURSES
ONE-YEAR COURSE


TWO-YEAR ELEMENTARY


PROFESSIONAL COURSE


REGULAR FOUR-YEAR NORMAL COURSE
COURSE LEADING TO AN A.B. DEGREE IN EDUCATION
COURSE LEADING TO A B.S. DEGREE IN EDUCATION

COURSES LEADING TO GRADUATE DEGREES
THE SUMMER SCHOOL



For information write,
A. A. MURPHREE, President


I -- --- ..




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