Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00491
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1921
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00491
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Full Text

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


of Law


GAINESVILLE


*.- tm.- - -S .--


-i r


11









THE


UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA


GAINESVILLE


Supported by the State and Federal Government for the
Liberal and Professional Education of Young Men


A State University of High Standards, Ranking
and Best Universities of the North and East.
Stands for the Highest Moral, Intellectual, and
ment of the Nation's Future Citizens.


with


Physical


Largest

Develop-


ORGANIZATION


1. The College of Arts and
a liberal education and confers


2. The C
struction an
the degree ol
3. The (
training in cl
to appropria
4. The
titioners of ]
are admitted
5. The f
philosophy al
to enter any
are granted
further exai
$40,000 gift
college.
6. The
Master of Al
7. The L
8. The I


collegee
d train
f B.S.A
College


of Agricultu
ing in vario
.-manygsho,
of Engineel


chemical, civil,
te Bachelor's
College of La
Florida. Corn
to the bar v


Sciences offers excellent advantr
the degrees of B.A. and B.S.
ire provides superior advantages
us branches of agriculture, and
rt courses offered.
ring affords the very best techno


electrical, and mechanical
degrees in engineering.
,w-the best in the count
fers the degrees of LL.B.
without further examination


teachers' College confers ,the degrees (
nd education and provides normal trainir


department of the public school
to Normal School and Teachers'
nination. The leading teachers'
from the Peabody Board for the


Graduate School offers courses
rts and Master of Science.
Agricultural Experiment Station.
University Extension Division.


service
College
college
build

leading


iges for

for in-
confers


lological


engineering, leading

ry for future prac-
and J.D. Graduates
n.
of B.S. and B.A. in
ig for those desiring
e. State certificates
e graduates without
:e in this territory.
ng occupied by this


;o the


degrees


For catalog or further information address


v


t


v














UNIVERSITY
1921-


CALENDAR


1922


1921-June


August


September


, Monday...
12, Friday.


- ~. - -.. ... .


12, Monday.


Summer School begins.
Summer School ends.


..Summer


Recess ends.


Examination for Admission.


Registration


of Students.


September


, Tuesday..


First Semester begins.


September 26, Monday..


School for County


Demon-


station Agents begins.


October


1, Saturday,


2:00 p. m.


Re-examinations.


2:30 p.


October


Tuesday.........


Meeting of General Faculty.
Citrus Seminar begins.


October 6,


Thursday...............


Livestock Roundup


begins.


November 24, Thursday.........


Thanksgiving


Holiday.


December
December


1922-January 2,


, Friday, 12:00 noon......


1, Saturday .......
Monday, 8:00 a.


Christmas Recess begins.
Christmas Recess ends.


... -. Resumption of Classes.


Review Courses for Teachers
begin.
January 3, Tuesday............................. Ten-Day Courses for Farm-
ers begin.


January


January 30,
February 11


March 4, Saturday,


May


27, Saturday,


-. .. ... -..., -
* -.. .. .. -.


2:30 p.


2:00 p. m..


2:30 p.


May 28 to 30.................


May 28,


Sunday...


May 29, Monday...


First Semester ends.
Second Semester begins.


....Meeting of General Faculty.
....Re-examinations.
....Meeting of General Faculty.
.... Commencement Exercises.
....Baccalaureate Sermon.
.. Oratorical Contests.
Annual Alumni Meeting.
Class-Day Exercises.


May 30,


May 31,
June 12,


Tuesday....


Wednesday..
, Monday .........


. . . - .... .. ...
-- ........ ...- ----- --... --


Graduating Day.
Summer Recess begins.
Summer School begins.


The date for the Boys'


Club


Week will be announced later.


Saturday...
Monday .....
L, Saturday,














BOARD


CONTROL


HODGES,


Chairman...........


.......A


ttorney-at-Law, Lake City


L. WARTMANN ...........................--...------..Planter and Stock Raiser,


Citra


JOHN


SUTTON ..................................


................ ....Attorney-at-La w,


Tampa


H1. B. MINIUM.......................... President,


United Trust Co.


Jacksonville


P. K.


YONGE............


......President, Southern States Lumber Co., Pensacola


DIAMOND,


Secretary


Board ..........


.......-..... Tallaha


ssee


STATE


BOARD


EDUCATION


CARY


CLAY


HARDEE,


Chairman............


CRAWFORD ......... ............ ..-....-...-..-...............-..-.... Secre tary


vernor
State


J.C. L
RIVERS


UNING--......... ......------ .........---------


BUFORD ..--...----.....................


...State


treasurer


..A ttorney-General


HEATS,


Secre


tary........ State


Superintendent of


Public


Instruction


UNIVERSITY


COUNCIL


ALBERT A. MURPHREE, LL.D


JAS.


FARR,


..........President of the


Vice-President


University
University


ANDERSON


PH.D.


............Dean of the


College of


Scie


nces


WILMON


NEWELL, D.


J. R. BENTON, PH.D.......


.....Dean of


College


...Dean of the College of


Agriculture
Engineering


HARRY R.


TRUSLER, LL.B


....Dean of the


College of Law


JAS.


NORMAN, PH.D.....


..Acting Dean of the


Teachers


College


SUMMER


SCHOOL


BOARD


SHEATS, LL.D


...............State


Superintendent of Public Instruction


A. A.


MURPHREE, LL.D D..............


......-.. President


University of Florida


EDWARD CONRADI, PH.D...--.................... President State College


Women


PH.D..............















RESIDENT FACULTY


ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE


President of


, A.M., LL.D.,


University


HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, A.M.,


LL.B.


(Michigan)


Dean and


fessor


Law


CLIFFORD


WALDORF


CRANDALL,


LL.B.


(Michigan)


fessor


Law


ROBERT


SPRATT


COCKRELL


M.A


B.L.


(Virginia)


Professor of


Law


JOHN


HOWARD


MOORE


J.D.


(Chicago)


Professor of Law


WILLIAM


GORDON KLINE


LL.B.


(Nebraska)


Professor of


Law


JAMES
Pro


MADISON


fessor


CHAPMAN


Public


, D.O.,


Speaking


PRISCILLA McCALL KENNEDY


Librarian and


Secretary


Three classes of men should read law-the lawyer for his profession,


business


man


business


reasons,


every


man


increased


efficiency and his own protection.-Blaekstone.





UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


HISTORY


Largely


then


thru


a member


influence


Board


Hon.


Control,


Nathan


. Bryan,


College


Law


was established in 1909. From this time until 1917 the course
comprised the work of two years. With the session of 1917-18


present three-year


course


was


inaugurated.


At first the College was quartered in


Thomas Hall,


one of


dormitories.


opening


session


more spacious rooms were provided in Language Hall.


1913-14
During


following


erected


and


summer


and


Thanksgiving


fall


present


Day,


1914,


structure
College,


.was
with


fitting ceremonies,


took possession of its own home,


the finest


law school building in the South.

PURPOSE
It is the purpose of the College to impart a thoro, scientific,


and


practical


knowledge


law,


and


thus


equip


students


take


advantage of


splendid


opportunities


present readjustments in business and social life are creating.
It aims to develop keen, efficient lawyers, conversant with the


ideals and traditions of the profession.


Its policy is character-


ized


by the


emphasis


of practice


as well


as theory


pleading


as well as historical perspective


skill in brief making as well


as legal information.
EQUIPMENT
BUILDING.-This splendid structure is one hundred seventy


two feet long, seventy feet wide, and two and one-half


stories


high.


It contains a large,


well-lighted library, furnished with


bookstacks,


rooms


library
students


tables,


and


librarian's


faculty


office,


has


and


three


consultation
commodious


lecture-rooms,


together with the offices of administration, and


offices


several


resident


professors.


contains,


also,


a handsomely


paneled


courtroom


and


auditorium.


The


_I___





COLLEGE OF


LAW


heated,
superior
uses of 1


lighted b
grade of


r electricity,
furniture.


College of Law


and


and


equipped


devoted


thruout


with


exclusively to


furnishes accommodations


comfortable and as convenient as can be found in the country


LIBRARY.-The


Law


Library


contains


published


reports of the courts of last resort of every State in the
and of the Federal Courts, the full English Reprints, th


Union
e Eng-


lish


Law


Reports,


reports


Interstate


Commerce


Commission


and


Land


Decisions


Department


the Interior besides an excellent collection


digests,


encyclo-


pedias, series of selected
English and American.


cases,


The


treatises and


Library


text books,


also contains


both
Stat-


utes of several of the States besides those of the Federal Gov-


ernment,


and


is a subscriber to


leading


legal


periodicals.


A course of instruction is given in legal bibliography and the


use of law books.


Every facility


also


is offered law students


make


General


Library,


which


included


works


interest


and


information


lawyer.


Both


libraries are open


during the academic year on


every


secular


day between the hours of 8:00 A.


M. and 10:00


. M. and are


in charge of trained librarians,


who will render such aid as the


students may need in their use of the books.


GYMNASIUM.-A


brick and stone structure of


two stories


and


basement,


one


hundred and


six feet


long


and


fifty-three


wide.


It is steam-heated, supplied


with hot water, and


well-


lighted and


ventilated.


A gallery


around the main floor pro-


vides space for spectators at gymnastic exhibitions.


ment contains lockers


shower baths and toilets.


The base-
Adjacent is


a swimming-pool,


thirty-six


feet


long


and


twenty-four


feet


wide


and from four and one half to seven feet deep.


Organized


classes are conducted by the Professor of Physical Culture.


FLEMING


FIELD.-A


large


and


well-kept


athletic


field


equipped for the


various outdoor games and sports


which in


this
field


climate


was


carried


used


on the


New


year


York


round.


Giants


1919


their


this


spring


training


and


1921


by the


Philadelphia


Nationals.





UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


dormitories


inadequate,


students


wishing


stay in them are urged to reserve


their rooms at


the earliest


possible


Ellis,


date.


Registrar.


Application


deposit


should


$5.00,


made
which


Miss


will


. B.


credited


on fees, must accompany the application.

ADMISSION


REQUIREMENTS


FOR


ADMISSION.-Graduates


and


matricu-


lates


colleges


completed a


sentation


and


high-school


of proper


universities


course


credentials to


and


applicants


four years
that effect,


will,


who
upon


have
pre-


be admitted


the College as candidates for a degree.


Other applicants


admission


as regular


students


will


required


pass


entrance examination.
age will be admitted.


No applicant under eighteen years of


The


four-year


must consist of


high-school


sixteen


units


course
(fifteen


required
units as


admission


defined


by the


Carnegie


tion)


Foundation


or the


unit represents a


the school year with


five


National


course


recitation


Educational
study pursued


periods of


Associa-
thruout


at least forty-


five minutes each


per week, four


courses


being taken


during


each of the four years.


Eight units are


prescribed; viz.


English


Mathematics


3; History


Science 1


The remaining units may be chosen


from


following


electives


Botany


or 1;


Chemistry


English


Latin


History


Mathematics


Modern


Languages


raphy


(French,
Physics 1


German,
Zoology


or Spanish)


2; Physical


vocational


Geog-


subjects


(Typewriting,


Stenography,


Mechanic


Arts,


Agriculture,


etc.) 4.
Certificates of scholastic record signed by the principal


not


school
enter


attended


must


examination.


presented


Blank


those


forms,


who


conveniently


ranged for the desired data,


will be sent upon application.


SPECIAL


STUDENTS.-Persons


over


twenty-one


years


v u


I__





COLLEGE OF


LAW


encouraged,


and


their number is


restricted


more


than


twenty-five per cent of the law


enrolment.


ADVANCED


STANDING.-No


work


in law


done


other


stitutions will be accepted towards a degree,


unless the appli-


cant


passes


jects in


satisfactorily


question in


examinations


this College,


or unless


held


,by


sub-


special vote of


Faculty,


work


credit is given


meeting


without examination.


requirements


Credit


Association


American


Law


Schools,


which


this


College


is a member,


will


accepted.


school from


The


which credit will


admission


requirements


be received must be shown


any
defi-


nitely
units.


catalog


Where


a school


less


known


than
have


fifteen
made


high-school


relaxing


partures


from


published


entrance


requirements


or course


study,


acceptance


credit


from


such


institution


will


be considered.


no case


will


credit


given


work


not done in residence at an


approved law


school.


EXPENSES


The


yearly


expenses


a law


student,


exclusive


inci-


dentals, may be summarized as follows:


Tuition


Registration Fee
Student Activity


..$40.00
.. 10.00


Fee


Damage Fee


Infirmary F


15.00
5.00
3.00


Board
Books


and


ee ...........
Lodging..


(about)


..180.00
.. 50.00
$303.00


Tuition


payable


advance,


$20.00


each


semester.


Students taking


less


than


eleven


hours


work are charged


a proportionate part of the full tuition.


A diploma fee of ten dollars


($10.00), payable on or before


April


1st of the


year


graduation, is charged


candidates


- a a ,J'^ f U nn fi


-*- f-




UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


The charge for board, lodging and janitor service is payable
in advance, $90.00 per semester, exclusive of the Christmas


vacation.
absence.


refund will be made for


When not engaged


less


than a month's


semester,


board


and


lodging will be furnished at $24.00 per month.


Board


without lodging will


furnished at the


rate of


$20.00 per calendar month, payable in advance.


No part of


this sum will be refunded.


For more


detailed statements


reference


made


University catalog, pp. 35-38.

UNIVERSITY PRIVILEGES


ELECTIVES IN


OTHER COLLEGES.-The advantages of the


other colleges of the University are open to such students in


the College of Law


as desire and are able


to accept them.


Courses in History, Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Logic


and English are particularly recommended.


No extra charge


is made for such courses, but they can be taken only with the
consent of the Law Faculty and of the professors concerned.
MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS.-The University has an
Infantry Unit, Senior Division of the Reserve Officers' Train-
ing Corps, to membership in which law students are eligible.
They are not required, however, to join this organization or
to take any other military drill.

PUBLIC SPEAKING AND DEBATING
INSTRUCTION.-Regular classes in oratory and public speak-
ing are organized and conducted by the professor of public


speaking.


A small tuition is charged.


MARSHALL DEBATING SOCIETY.--Early in the first year of
the College the students organized a society that would secure
to its members practice in debating and public speaking and
experience in arguing legal questions, as well as drill in parlia-


mentary law.


The society was fittingly named "The Marshall


Debating Society", ii
jurist, John Marshall.


honor


distinguished


Southern


nflri n rt nn t





COLLEGE OF


LAW


after


one


granted


year


unless


s residence, b
the candidate


no case


actual


will


residence


degree
during


third year.


JURIES


DOCTOR.-Students


who


have complied


with all


requirements


degree


Bachelor


Laws


(LL.B.),


who have maintained an average standing in their law studies


10%


degree
College


above


te passing mark,
or an equivalent


University


or who


and


who


degree,


secure


such


have
from


obtained


an approved


degree


same


year they complete their law course,


of Juris Doctor


will be awarded the degree


(J.D.


COMBINED


approved


ACADEMIC


course of


AND


collegiate


LAW


COURSE.-By


and law


studies


pursuing


a student may


earn


both


academic


and


legal


degree


years.


Candidates


either the


A.B.


or the


B.S.


degree


may


elect


twelve
College


hours of work from the


Law


and


count


first year of the course of the


same


as credits


toward


aforesaid


degrees.


Such


degrees will not


be conferred,


how-


ever,
work.


until after the completion


MASTER


ARTS.-Candidates


of the second year of the


degree


law


Master


of Arts are permitted to take a portion of their work under the
Faculty of Law.


ADMISSION TO THE BAR


Upon presenting their diplomas,


duly issued by the proper


authorities,


and


upon


furnishing


satisfactory


evidence


that


they are twenty-one years of age and of good moral character,


graduates


College


licensed


Supreme


Court,


without examination, to practice in the Courts of Flor-


ida.


They


also


admitted


without


examination


United


States


District


Court


Northern


District


Florida.
EXAMINATIONS
The last"week of each semester is devoted to examinations


covering the


work


the semester.


These examinations


A.B.,




UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


present


themselves


regular


examination


subjects for which they are registered.
Students failing to secure passing semester


grades


in less


than fifty per cent of the number of hours of work


taken are


ineligible


to continue


College


unless


reinstated


Faculty for cause shown.

LECTURES


addition


courses


given


regular


Faculty,


lectures


given


each


year


eminent


specialists


profession,


both at the


bar


and


on the


bench.


The


Justices


of the Supreme Court of the State especially have been gener-


ous


giving


their time


and


services


this


way


Both


Faculty


and


students


feel


exceedingly


grateful


these


lee-


turers for the kindly interest they have manifested in the Col-
lege and for the resulting uplift and inspiration.


PLEADING


AND


PRACTICE


COURSES.--Differing


from


some


other


law


schools,


this


College is convinced


that an intensive


knowledge of


pleading


and


practice


should


secured


student,


since


legal


rights


cannot


well


understood


without


a mastery


rules of pleading whereby they


declared


"Good


pleading is


are enforced.


touchstone of the


Lord
true


Coke
sense


and


knowledge


common


law."


The


development


right has depended upon the development of actions


the rule


of law was the rule of writs and in large measure remains so


today.


Consequently the College offers thoro courses in Crimi-


Pleading


Pleading,


and


Code


Procedure,


Pleading,


Common


Florida


Practice, and Federal Procedure.


Law


Civil


Pleading,


Practice,


Equity
General


Thus the student on gradu-


action is enabled to enter understandingly upon the practice of
law; and to this fact the College attributes much of the rapid
advancement of its Alumni.
As young men from all parts of the country in increasing


numbers


attending


University,


combining





COLLEGE OF


LAW


offered Code Pleading and General Practice instead of Florida


Constitutional


Law


and


Florida


Civil


Practice


as shown


the course of


study


Such students also are


required


to sub-


mit


an acceptable


dissertation


showing


peculiarities


pleading


and


practice


State


which


they


expect


locate.


THE


PRACTICE


COURT.-Believing


students


obtain


Practice


Court


a better


practical


knowledge


pleading


and practice than can be acquired in any other way, aside from


the trial of actual cases


, the Faculty lay special emphasis upon


this


work.


Sessions


Practice


Court


held


thruout


the year in an admirably equipped courtroom.
sheriff are appointed from the Senior class, anc


of the court are kept.


A clerk and a
I regular records


Each student is required to participate


trial


criminal


at least one common law,


case, and is instructed in


appellate


one equity,


and


procedure.


one
The


Practice Court is conducted


Professors Cockrell


and


Cran-


dall.


CURRICULUM*
FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER


TORTS.-History


and


definitions;


elements


torts;


con-


flicting rights; mental anguish; parties to tort actions; reme-


dies;


damages


conflict


of laws;


methods


discharge;


corn-


prehensive study of particular torts


false imprisonment, ma-


licious prosecution,


libel,


trespass,


abuse of


conversion,


process,


deceit,


conspiracy,


nuisance,


slander


negligence,


and
and


others.
Torts.


Textbooks
3rd edition.


Burdick on Torts and Burdick's


hours.


Cases on


Professor Trusler


CONTRACTS


I.-Formation


contract;


offer


and


accept-


ance; form


and


consideration; reality


consent


legality


object; operation of contract; limits of the contract obligation


assignment


contract;


joint


obligations;


interpretation


contract.


textbooks


Anson's


Edition; Huffcut and Woodruff's


Law


Contract,


Cases on Contract.


Corbin's
(4 hours.





UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


elements


crime;


criminal


intent;


insanity;


intoxication;


duress; mistake of fact or law; justification; parties in crime;
offenses against the person, habitation, property, public health


and


morals,


law


public


nations.


justice


and


Textbook


authority,


Clark


government,


on Criminal


Law,


and
3rd


edition


selected


cases.


hours.


Professor Cockrell.)


CRIMINAL


PROCEDURE.-Jurisdiction;


arrest;


preliminary


examination


tion


and


and


their


bail;


grand


sufficiency


jury,
form


indictment


and


and


substance;


informa-
arraign-


ment, pleas, and motions; nolle prosequi and motions to quash;


jeopardy;


presence


defendant


trial


verdict;


new


trial; arrest of judgment; judgment, sentence, and


execution.


Textbook


cases.


Clark's
hours.


Criminal
Professor


Procedure,
Cockrell.)


2nd


edition;


selected


PROPERTY


I.-Personal


property;


possession


and


rights


based thereon; acquisition of title; liens and pledges; conver-


sion.


Textbook


: Warren's


Cases


Property


hours.


Professor Crandall.)


SECOND SEMESTER


EQUITY


JURISPRUDENCE.-History and


definition; jurisdic-


tion


maxims;


accident,


mistake,


fraud;


penalties


and


for-


features; priorities and notice; bona fide purchasers; estoppel;


election; satisfaction and


performance;


conversion;


equitable


estates


, interest,


primary


rights;


trusts;


powers,


duties,


and


liabilities of trustees


mortgages; equitable liens; assignments;


specific


performance;


injunction;


reformation;


cancellation;


cloud


on titles;


ancillary


remedies.


Textbook


Eaton


Equity; selected


CONTRACTS


cases.


AND


QUASI


Professor


Trusler


CONTRACTS.-Rules


relating


evidence and construction; discharge of contract.


Origin and


nature of


quasi contract;


benefits conferred in misreliance on


rights or duty, from mistake of law, and on invalid, unenforce-


able,


illegal,


or impossible


contract;


*benefits


conferred


thru


dutiful


intervention


in another's


affairs;


benefits


conferred


under constraint; action for restitution as alternative remedy


for breach of contract and for tort.


Textbooks


Anson's Law


hours.


.





COLLEGE OF


LAW


rights; custody and support of children; agreements of sepa-


ration.


Textbook:


Vernier's Cases on Marriage and Divorce.


hour.


Professor Cockrell.)


COMMON LAW PLEADING.-History and development of the


personal actions at common law; theory


of pleading and its


peculiar features as developed by the jury trial; demurrers,
general and special; pleas in discharge, in excuse, and by way


of traverse
assignment
pleadings.
Pleading.


replication de injuria; duplicity; departure; new


motions
Textbook


(3 hours.


based


Andrew,


pleadings;
s' Stephen's


generall


rules


Common


Law


Professor Crandall.)


SALES.-Sale and contract to sell; statute of frauds


gality;


conditions


and


warranties; delivery; acceptance


ille-
and


receipt; vendor's lien; stoppage in transit


bills of lading;


remedies of seller and buyer.


Textbook: Burdick on


Sales,


3rd edition


selected cases.


hour.


Professor


Moore.)


PROPERTY


II.-Introduction to the


law


conveyancing


rights incident to the ownership of land, and estates therein,


including


land


itself,


air,


water,


fixtures,


emblements,


waste; profits; easements; licenses; covenants running with


the land.


Textbook


Warren's Cases on Property.


(2 hours.


Professor Crandall.)


UNITED


ciples;


STATES


distribution


SECOND YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER
CONSTITUTIONAL


governmental


LAw.-General


powers;


prin-


congress;


chief executive; the judiciary; police powers; eminent domain;


checks


and


balances;


guarantee


republican


government


civil rights; political privileges; guarantee in criminal cases;


impairment


contractual


obligations.


Textbook:


Hall's


Cases on Constitutional Law, American Casebook Series.


hours.


Professor Kline.)


AGENCY.-Nature of the relation; purposes and manner
of creation; who may be principal or agent; ratification; dele-


gation


of authority; general and special agents; rights and


1 1m A I S S a S S S S





UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


EQUITY


PLEADING. -Nature


and


object


pleadings


equity; parties to a suit in equity; proceedings in a suit in


equity;


bills


equity;


disclaimer;


demurrers


and


pleas;


answer and replication; preparation of bills, demurrers, pleas,


answers.


Textbooks:


Fletcher's Equity


Pleading and Prac-


tice; Rules of the Circuit Court in Chancery in Florida; Rules


Federal


Court;


Statutes


Florida.


hours.


Professor Cockrell.)


BRIEF


MAKING AND THE


USE OF


LAW


BOOKS.-Where to


find the law


the lay
tion.
Books.


V


how to use statutes and decisions; how to find


the trial brief; the brief on appeal and its prepara-


Textbook: Cooley's Brief Making and the Use of Law


(1 hour.


Professor Crandall.)


PROPERTY III.-Titles and conveyancing, including acqui-
sition of titles by possession, modes of conveyance at common


law,


under the statute of uses, and by statutory grant; the


execution of deeds; estates created; covenants for titles; estop-


pel by deed


priorities among titles.


Textbook: Aigler's


Cases


on Property.


hours.


Professor Crandall.)


FLORIDA


CONSTITUTIONAL LAW.*


-Declaration


departments of government; suffrage and eligibility


rights;
census


and apportionment; counties and cities; taxation and finance;


homestead and exemption; married


cation;


public


institutions; miscellaneous


women's property


provisions.


edu-
Text-


books: Constitution, statutes, and judicial decisions of Florida.


(2 hours.


Professor Trusler.)


CODE PLEADING.**


-Changes


introduced


codes;


forms of action; necessary allegations; the complaint; prayer
for relief; answers, including general and special denials; new
matter; equitable defenses; counter claims; pleading several


defenses; replies and demurrers.


Textbook: Pomeroy's Code


Remedies.


(2 hours.


Professor


SECOND SEMESTER
EVIDENCE.-Judicial notice; kinds of evidence; burden of
proof; presumptions of law and fact; judge and jury; best





COLLEGE OF


LAW


court; examination, cross examination, privilege; public docu-


ments
book:
cases.


records and judicial writings; private writings.


Greenleaf
(4 hours.


on Evidence,


16th


edition,


vol.


Text-


selected


Professor Cockrell.)


PRIVATE CORPORATIONS.-Nature; creation and citizenship;
defective organization; promoters; powers and liabilities; cor-


portions and


the State; dissolution; membership; manage-


ment;


creditors;


foreign


corporations;


practice


forming


corporations, preparing by-laws, electing officers, and in con-


ducting corporate business.
portions, and Wormser's


Textbooks


Clark on Private Cor-


Cases on Corporations.


(4 hours.


Professor Moore.)
LEGAL ETHICS.-Admission of attorneys to practice; tax-


ation; privileges and exemptions; authority


liability to clients


and to third parties; compensation; liens; suspension and dis-
barment; duties to clients, courts, professional brethren, and to


society.


Textbooks: Attorneys at Law in Ruling Case Law


and the Code of Ethics adopted by the American Bar Associa-


tion.


(1 hour.


Professor Trusler.)


PROPERTY IV.-History of the law of wills and testaments;


testamentary


capacity


and


intent;


kind


of wills


and


testa-


ments; execution, revocation, republication, revival of wills;


descent; probate of wills and the administration of


Textbook:
Crandall.)


Costigan


Cases on


Wills.


hours.


estates.


Professor


FLORIDA


CIVIL


PRACTICE.*


- Organization


courts;


parties; joinder and consolidation of actions; issuance, service,


and return of process; appearance; trial


verdict; proceedings


after verdict; appellate proceedings; peculiar characteristics of
the common law actions; special proceedings including certio-


ran,


mandamus,


prohibition,


quo


warrant,


habeas


corpus,


attachment, garnishment, statutory liens, forcible entry and


detainer, landlord and tenant.


Textbook: Crandall's Florida


Civil Practice.


(3 hours.


Professor Cockrell.)


GENERAL CIVIL PROCEDURE.**


-The court; parties


forms


. a a,. a. 4. .. 1 .-


-1, -P- ? *_- 1 -- -- S





UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


THIRD YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER


INSURANCE.-Theory,


history,


significance;


insurable


terest; concealment, representations, warranties; subrogation;
waiver and estoppel; assignees, beneficiaries; creditors; fire,


life,


marine,


accident, guarantee,


liability insurance.


Text-


books:


Humble's Law


of Insurance and Humble's


Cases on


Insurance.


(1 hour.


Professor Trusler.)


PUBLIC SERVICE CORPORATIONS.-Nature of public utilities;
railroads and other common carriers of goods and passengers;
telegraphs and telephones; light and water companies; inns;
warehouses; elevators; stockyards; methods of incorporation;


public


control


rights


and


obligations


common


law


and


under federal and state statutes.


Textbook


Wyman's


Cases


on Public Service Companies, 3rd edition.


(2 hours.


Professor


Moore.)
FEDERAL PROCEDURE AND BANKRUPTCY.-System of courts
created under the authority of the United States, jurisdiction
of the several courts and procedure therein; Federal and state
bankruptcy legislation; who may become bankrupt; prerequi-


sites


adjudication;


receivers;


trustees;


provable


claims;


exemptions; composition


discharge.


Textbooks:


Hughes on


Federal Procedure, and Remington on Bankruptcy, Students'


Edition.


(3 hours.


Professor


PARTNERSHIP.-Creation, nature, characteristics of a part-


nership; nature of a partner'


interest; nature, extent, dura-


tion of the partnership liability; powers of partners; rights,


duties, remedies of partners inter se;
creditors; termination of partnership.


rights and remedies of
Textbook: Mechem on


Partnership, 2nd edition


selected cases.


(2 hours.


Professor


Moore.)
ADMIRALTY.-Jurisdiction; contracts, torts, crimes; mari-
time liens, ex contract, ex delicto, priorities, discharge; bot-
tomry and respondentia obligations; salvage; general average.


-~~~ a - -- r .. .-


I _





COLLEGE OF


LAW


legacies; cross limitations; gifts; failure of issue; determina-
tion of classes; powers; rule against perpetuities; restraints


on alienation.


Textbook:


Kales'


Cases on Future Interests.


(3 hours.


Professor Crandall.)


MORTGAGES.-Nature; elements; incidents of the relation;


discharge;


assignment;


redemption ;


foreclosure;


injunction


and account; extent of the lien; priority between mortgage


liens and competing claims; equity of redemption.


Textbook:


Durfee's Cases on Mortgages.


(2 hours.


Professor Cockrell.)


PRACTICE COURT.-(1 hour.)
SECOND SEMESTER


DAMAGES.-General


exemplary;


liquidated;


principles;
direct and


nominal;


consequential;


compensatory;


proximate


and remote;


general and


special; measure


in contract and


tort actions; entire damages in one action; mental suffering;


avoidable


consequences;


value;


interest;


lateral


support;


counsel fees and expenses of litigation; injuries to real proper-
ty and limited interests; death by wrongful act; breaches of


warranty.
(2 hours.


Textbook: Rogers' Law of Damages; selected cases.
Professor Trusler.)


MUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS.-Creation of cities and towns;
powers of a municipality, including public powers, power of
taxation, power over streets and alleys, etc.; obligations and
liabilities of municipal corporations; powers and liabilities of


officers.
edition.


Textbook:


(1 hour.


Elliott on Municipal


Corporations, 2nd


Professor Cockrell.)


SURETYSHIP.-Nature of the contract; statute of frauds;
surety's defenses against the creditor; surety's rights, subro-
gation, indemnity, contribution, exoneration; creditor's rights


to surety's securities.


hours.


Textbook: Spencer on Suretyship.


Professor Kline.)


NEGOTIABLE


INSTRUMENTS.-Law


merchant;


definitions


and general doctrines; contract of the maker, acceptor, certi-


fier,


drawer, indorser,


vendor, accommodate,


assurer; pro-


ceedings before and after dishonor of negotiable instruments;





UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


personal; remedies, rights of action, procedure; creation of
rights; property rights; personal rights; inheritance; obliga-


tions ex delicto and ex contract


recognition and enforcement


of rights; personal relations; property; inheritance; admin-


istration of estates; judgments and obligations.


Textbook:


Minor on the Conflict of Laws.


(2 hours.


Professor


INTERNATIONAL LAW.-Nature, subjects, and objects of in-
ternational law; intercourse of states; settlement of interna-


tional differences; law of war; law of neutrality.


Textbook:


Hershey's
readings.


Essentials


(1 hour.


International


Public


Law;


selected


Professor


TRUSTS.--The Anglo-American system of uses and trusts;


creation,


transfer, extinguishment of trust interests; priori-


ties between competing equities; construction of trust dispo-


sitions; charitable trusts.


Textbook:


Kenneson's Cases on


Trusts.


(2 hours.


Professor Kline.)


JUDGMENTS.-Nature and essentials; kinds; record


tion; amendment; modification


on Judgments


and


Rood's


satisfaction.


Cases


Textbooks


Judgments.


vaca-
: Rood
hours.


Professor Crandall.)
PRACTICE COURT.-(1 hour.)


Those who desire further information concerning the Col-
lege may address letters of inquiry to Harry R. Trusler, Dean
of the College of Law, Gainesville, Florida.




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