• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Main














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00474
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1922
Copyright Date: 1924
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00474
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

VID00486 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
Full Text

' -^


University of Florida

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA










2 -












Catalog 1921-22
Announcements 1922-23


I t f')










CONTENTS
PACE
U NIVERSITY CALENDAR............................................ ....................... 3
ADMINISTRATIVE AND EXECUTIVE BOARDS............................... 4
OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY.... ----------...................... -- --.. 5
STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY ................................ 14
GENERAL INFORMATION....................... .......... ....... ............ 15
R ECENT GIFTS........................................... .............. 15
H ISTORY ..................... ...................... ...................... ................... 16
LOCATION ..........................----------.. --. ----------- 1
IN COM E .......................................... ....... ... ............... 19
EQUIPMENT ............................................ ..- ..... 19
G OVERNM ENT .................................... ........ .. ............. ......... 28
H ONORS ----....... ..... .................................. .. 34
E XPENSES .................................................... ... .............................. 35
FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUND.................................... 38
A LUMNI A SSOCIATION.......................................... .. .......... ........ 40
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS------............................ 40
ADMISSION .......................---------- ---............ ......... 42
ORGA N IZATION .................................................... ...... 47
GRADUATE SCHOOL............................................... ................... 48
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES ........................ .............. 50
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE................-------............. 80
COLLEGE .............................. ... ..................... ...... .. ..... ....... 80
E XPERIMENT STATION............................................................. ................ 102
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION........................ -------.......... 104
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING ..........................---------... 112
COLLEGE O F LA W .................................................. ......... ... ............... 128
TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL.............................. 141
COLLEGE ............................................... ................... ... 143
N ORMAL SCHOOL............. ................................ ....... .. 155
UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL-----------.............................. -. 159
HIGH SCHOOL VISITATION................................................ 161
TEACHERS' EMPLOYMENT BUREAU..................... .. ..................... 161
DEPARTMENT OF HYGIENE................................................................ 163
DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS...-............... 165
DIVISION OF REHABILITATION........................ ............ ...... 169
EXTENSION SERVICE........... ----------------------...................... 172
GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION........................... ........... .............. 172
R E G IST E R ....................................... ................ ........... 176
DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES....................... .............. .......... 176
ROLL OF STUDENTS-... ----------.........................-------- ..--- 179
SUM M ARY ..................... .... .......................................... 211
IN D E X ....................................... ...... ................. ......... ............... 214
















UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1922-1923

1922-June 14, Wednesday.............................Summer School begins.
August 9, Wednesday..................Summer School ends.
August 10, Thursday..............................Farmers' Week begins.
September 4, Monday..........................School for County and Home
Demonstration Agents be-
gins.
September 11, Monday..........................Summer Recess ends.
Examinations for Admission.
Registration of Students.
September 12, Tuesday......................First Semester begins.
October 7, Saturday, 2:00 p. m...........Re-examinations.
2:30 p. in...........Meeting of General Faculty.
November 30, Thursday.................... Thanksgiving Holiday.
December 20, Wednesday, 12 noon....Christmas Recess begins.
1923-January 2, Tuesday............................Christmas Recess ends.
January 3, Wednesday, 8:00 a. m.......Resumption of Classes.
January 27, Saturday............................First Semester ends.
January 29, Monday..............................Second Semester begins.
February 10, Saturday, 2:30 p. m.....Meeting of General Faculty.
March 3, Saturday, 2:00 p. m.............Re-examinations.
May 26, Saturday, 2:30 p. in..............Meeting of General Faculty.
May 27 to 29........................................Commencement Exercises.
May 27, Sunday, 11:00 a. m........... Baccalaureate Sermon.
May 28, Monday.................................Annual Alumni Meeting.
Class-Day Exercises.
Oratorical Contests.
May 29, Tuesday, 10:00 a. m...........Graduating Day.
May 30, Wednesday..............................Summer Recess begins.
June 6, Wednesday................................Boys' Club Week begins.
June 13, Wednesday..............................Summer School begins.














BOARD OF CONTROL

P. K. YONGE, Chairman..Manager, Southern States Lumber Co., Pensacola
E. L. WARTMANN--...-----.....--...-...............--Planter and Stock Raiser, Citra
JOHN B. SUTTON ..-.................... --...... .......Attorney-at-Law, Tampa
J. C. COOPER, JR., ......................---.........-- Attorney-at-Law, Jacksonville
W. L. WEAVER-............State Senator, Cashier First National Bank, Perry


STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

CARY A. HARDEE, Chairman ............................. ..... --... ................ Governor
H. CLAY CRAWFORD----........--.... ----....................Secretary of State
J. C. LUNING...........-... ------- ...................---. State Treasurer
RIVERS H. BUFORD....------............................ ....--... Attorney-General
W. N. SHEATS, Secretary........State Superintendent of Public Instruction


UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

ALBERT A. MURPHREE, LL.D...............................President of the University
JAS. M. FARR, PH.D.................................---- Vice-President of the University
JAS. N. ANDERSON, PH.D............. Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc.........................Dean of the College of Agriculture
J. R. BENTON, PH.D...............................Dean of the College of Engineering
HARRY R. TRUSLER, LL.B....................................Dean of the College of Law
JAS. W. NORMAN, PH.D....................................Dean of the Teachers College


SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD

W. N. SHEATS, LL.D.................State Superintendent of Public Instruction
A. A. MURPHREE, LL.D................................President University of Florida
EDWARD CONRADI, PH.D.........................President State College for Women






OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D.,*
President.

JAMES MARION FARR, A.M., PH.D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of English Language and Literature.

JOHN ROBERT BENTON, B.A., PH.D. (G5ttingen),
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering.

JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D. (Johns Hopkins),*
Professor of Ancient Languages.

CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, M.A., PH.D. (GBttingen),*
Professor of Modern Languages and Secretary of the General Faculty.

WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, B.S., M.S.,
Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture and Professor of Botany
and Horticulture.

JOHN MARCUS SCOTT, B.S.,
Vice-Director and Animal Industrialist to the Experiment Station.

HE RBiF.T SPENOiER-DAVS,.-PH.D. (Harvard) t
Professor of Biology and Geology.

HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B. (Michigan),
Professor of Law.

JOSEPH RALPH WATSON, A. M.,
Entomologist to the Experiment Station.

CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, B.Agr.,
Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying.
CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B. (Michigan),
Professor of Law.
LUDWIG WILLIAM BUCHHOLZ, A.M.,
Professor of Education and School Management and Counsellor for the
School of Disabled Soldiers.
CHAR LES-KENN-EDY--McQUA-RRIE;* *
State Agent in Charge of Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work
and Home Economics.

*Also Summer School, 1921.
'tResigned Jan. 31, 1922.
**Deceased Nov. 15, 1921.
Note.-Officers of the University for regular session are arranged in
order of seniority.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ARTHUR PERCEVAL SPENCER, M.S.,
Vice-Director of the Agricultural Extension Division.
JOHN EDWIN TURLINGTON, B.Agr., M.S., PH.D. (Cornell),*
Professor of Agronomy.
JAMES MADISON CHAPMAN, D.O.,*
Professor of Expression and Public Speaking.
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, A.M., PH.D. (Columbia),*
Professor of Education.
JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, A.M., PH.D. (Nebraska),*
Professor of Education.
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, M.A., PH.D. (Wisconsin),*
Professor of Mathematics.
FRAZIER ROGERS, B.S.A.,
Professor of Soils and Fertilizers.
ROBERT SPRATT COCKRELL, M.A., LL.B. (Virginia),
Professor of Law.
JAMES MILLER LEAKE, A.B., PH.D. (Johns Hopkins),*
SProfessor of History and Political Science.
JOHN HOWARD MOORE, A.B., J.D. (Chicago),
\ Professor of Law.
ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY, B.S., D.V.M. (McKillips),
Professor of Veterinary Science.
ALBERT J. STRONG,
Acting Professor of Drawing and Mechanic Arts.
NATHAN W. SANBORN, M.D.,
Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Poultry Specialist for the
Agricultural Extension Division.
PERCY LAWRENCE REED, C.E., M.S.,
Professor of Civil Engineering.
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, A.M.,PH.D. (Chicago), F.S.Sc.
(London),*
Professor of Chemistry.
LUCIUS MOODY BRISTOL, PH.D. (Harvard),*
Professor of Sociology and Economics.
JOSEPH ROEMER, A.M.,PII.D. (Peabody),*
Professor of Secondary Education.
ALBERT WHITMAN SWEET, M.A., PH.D. (Brown),
Director of the Department of Health and Hygiene.
WILMON NEWELL, M.S., D.Sc. (Iowa),
Director of Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension Division.

*Also Summer School, 1921.






OFFICERS OF, THE UNIVERSITY


RUDOLPH W. RUPRECHT, PH.D. (Amherst),
Physiological Chemist to the Experiment Station.
OWEN FRANCIS BURGER, M.S.,Sc.D. (Harvard),
Plant Pathologist to the Experiment Station.

WILLIAM GORDON KLINE, A.B., LL.B. (Nebraska),
Professor of Law and Director of Major Sports.
RAYMOND GEORGE MANCHESTER, A.B.,D.O.,*
Professor of Physical Education.
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, S.T.B., PH.D. (Boston),*
Professor of Philosophy and Psychology.
JAMES W. DAY, B.S.A., M.A.,
Professor of Agricultural Education.
LEON SHERMAN GREEN, M.S.,
Professor of Industrial Arts.
MELVIN PRICE, E.E., M.S.,
Professor of Mechanical Engineering.
MAJOR JAMES A. VAN FLEET, Infantry, United States Army,
Commandant of Cadets and Professor of Military Science and Tactics.
J. SPEED ROGERS, A.B., M.A.,
Professor of Biology and Geology.
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, A.B., M.S.,
Assistant Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
EARL-CLIFTON BECK, A.M.,
Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature.
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, A.B.,*
Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering.
MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A.,*
Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology.
WILLIAM BYRON HATHAWAY, B.D., M.A.,*
Assistant Professor of Languages.
ALEXANDER BRESTH, B.S.,
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering.
EDWARD WALKER JENKINS, B.Ped.,
District Agent for Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work in
Central Florida.
RAYMOND W. BLACKLOCK, A.B.,
State Agent for Boys' Clubs.

*Also Summer School, 1921.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


HAROLD GRAY CLAYTON, M.S.A.,
District Agent for Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work in
North and West Florida.

STEPHEN W. HIATT,
District Agent for Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration Work in South
Florida.
WILLIAM EUGENE STOKES, B.S., M.S.,
Assistant Grass and Forage Crop Specialist for the Experiment Station.
WILLIAM B. TISDALE, B.S., PH.D. (Wisconsin),
Assistant Plant Pathologist for the Tobacco Experiment Station.

ADOLPH HARVEY BEYER, A.B., B.S., M.S.,
Assistant Entomogilist for the Experiment Station.

CAPTAIN JOHN H. ATKINSON, United States Army, Retired,
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics.

CHAS. E. BELL, B.S.,
Assistant Chemist to the Experiment Station.
CAPTAIN IRA E. RYDER, Infantry, United States Army,
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics.
CAPTAIN FLOYD H. BAIN, Infantry, United States Army,
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics.
EARLL LESLIE LORD, B.S.A.,
Assistant Professor of Botany and Horticulture.
JOHN M. COLEMAN, B.S.,
Assistant Chemist to the Experiment Station.
CAPTAIN LEWIS W. AMIS, Infantry, United States Army,
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics.
KARL T. STEIK, A.M., PH.D. (Chicago),
Assistant Professor of Chemistry.
RALPH STOUTAMIRE, B.S.A.,
Editor of Agricultural News Service and Instructor in Agricultural
Journalism.
HAMLIN L. BROWN, B.S., M.S.,
Dairyman for the Agricultural Extension Division.
WILLIAM GREEN WELLS, B.S.A.,
Assistant Plant Pathologist to the Experiment Station.
COLONEL EDGAR SMITH WALKER, U.S.A. (Retired),
Instructor in Descriptive Geometry.
R. DEWITT BROWN,
Director of Cadet Band and University Orchestra.
*Also Summer School, 1921.







OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


FIRST SERGEANT WILLIAM WEAVER, United States Army,
Retired,
Instructor, Military Science and Tactics.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN GAINES, B.S.,
Instructor in Mechanical Drawing.

WILLIAM RICHARD HALE, M.A.,
Instructor in Mathematics.

SERGEANT DALLAS B. HUNDLEY, Infantry, United States Army,
Instructor, Military Science and Tactics.

JOSEPH WEIL, B.S.E.E.,
Instructor in Physics.

JOHN P. LITTLE, B.S.E.E.,
Instructor in Electrical Engineering.

FREDERICK RENFROE-WEEDON, B. S.,
Instructor in English and French.
SERGEANT EARNEST A. KOPP, Infantry, United States Army,
Instructor, Military Science and Tactics.
H OMER-HOfWA.RD,
Fellow and Assistant in Mathematics.

GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS,
Fellow and Assistant in History.

RA-Y-L-HAMON,
Fellow and Assistant in Mathematics.

DEWITT EVERETT WILLIAMS,
Fellow and Assistant in Chemistry.

ROBERT--J.U.GE NE D U '. K WORTH,
Student Assistant in Modern Languages.
ANTEOKY,.REGRO,
Student Assistant in Band and Orchestra.
CHARLES JAMES REGERO,
Student Assistant in Band and Orchestra.

RUDOLP-H-GHARLES-LOHMEYER,
Student Assistant in Band and Orchestra.
JOHN FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, JR.,
Student Assistant in Physical Education.
THOMAS SHEROD FERGUSON,
Student Assistant in Physical Education.
CHARLES WILSON BOYD,
Student Assistant in Physical Education.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


HENRY GLENN HAMILTON,
Student Assistant in Agronomy.
KARL WILLIAM SCHWARTZ,
Student Assistant in Biology.

ARTHUR NEYLE SOLLEE,
Student Assistant in Civil Engineering.

JOHN SCOTT SHERMAN,
Student Assistant in Physical Education.

JACKSON HENSON McDONALD,
Student Assistant in Mechanic Arts.

ANSON BORDEN DEWOLF,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Electrical Engineering.
RUSSELL PAUL REDMAN,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Physics.
GEORGE ARTHUR CALHOUN,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Physics.
IRVIN GREY THOMAS,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Physics.
WILLIAM JACOB YARNOFF,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Physics.
LEE HAMPTON BALL,
Student Assistant in English.
ORVILLE MARION BERG,
Curator for the Department of Chemistry.
RICHARD TEMPLE BURR,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry.
ARTHUR CRAGO,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry.
HENRY FULLER,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry.
CHARLES EDGAR MORGAN,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry.
RALPH PARKER PERKINS,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry.
CHARLES EDWARD COOK,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Physics.

JOHN CAPRON BABSON,
Student Laboratory Assistant in Physics.






OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


NELSON DRENNEN COOPER,
Student Assistant Electrician.

GEORGIA BORDER,*
Science.

F. W. BUCHHOLZ, A. B.,*
Latin.

MARGARET C. BURNS,*
Primary Methods.

W. S. CAWTHON, A.M.,*
Mathematics.
ROSE COX,*
Art.
ETHEL CRAWFORD, A.B.,*
History and Civics.
U. P. DAVIS,*
Music.
S. A. DRAPER,*
English and Pedagogy.
T. C. FRYE, A.M.,*
History.
CORA GRIFFIN,*
Primary Methods.
P. H. HENSLEY, A. M.,*
English and American Literature.
R. H. HIXSON, A. B.,*
Educational Hygiene.
C. E. JACKSON,*
Manual Training.
ALBERT JOHNSTAD,*
Commercial Education.
CHRISTIAN McDONALD,*
Rural Education.
E. W. McMULLEN, A.B.,*
History and Civics.
J. H. MARSHBURN, A.B., A.M.,*
English Language and Literature.
H. G. METCALFE,*
Mathematics.

*Summer School, 1921.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


MADE SAUNDERS,*
Geography.
W. E. SAWYER, A.M.,*
Mathematics.
FELICIA WILLIAMS, A.M.,*
English Grammar and Composition.
J. H. WOODRUFF,*
Penmanship.
KLEIN H. GRAHAM,
Auditor and Purchasing Agent.
CORA MILTIMORE, B.S.,
Librarian.
GEORGE EDWARD WHITE, A.B.,
General Secretary, Y. M. C. A.
THOMPSON VAN HYNING,
Curator of Museum and Librarian to the Experiment Station.
PRISCILLA McCALL KENNEDY,
Librarian to the Law College.
MRS. WM. H. CATES, A.B.,
Registrar.
MARY EVELYN PARROTT,
Secretary to the President.
ELIZABETH ROUNTREE,
Secretary to Teachers College.
MRS. G. M. SESSIONS,
Secretary to College of Engineering.
MRS. E. J. MARTIN,
Secretary to College of Agriculture.
RUBY NEWHALL,
Secretary to the Experiment Station.
MRS. MARGARET PEELER,
Housekeeper.
MRS. ROXIE CONNELL,
Graduate Nurse in Charge of the Infirmary.
MRS. S. J. SWANSON,
Matron.
RACHEL THOMSON McQUARRIE,
Assistant to the Auditor.
EURY M. KNIGHT,
Bookkeeper and Cashier.

*Summer School, 1921.






OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION
FACULTY

BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.A., B.S.A.,
Director.
CLARA LOUISE FISHER, B.A.,
Specialist in Extension Teaching.
O. I. WOODLEY, PH.D. (Columbia),
Education.
CLIFTON F. HODGE, PH.D. (Johns Hopkins),
Civic Biology.
CHARLES F. DAVIS, M.A.,
American Government.
ELLA M. ALLISON, PH.B.,
Review Courses.
MARY ELLEN FOLEY, B.A., B.J.,
Journalism.
JULIA ANNETTE KEELER, B.S.,
Industrial Art.
ALICE L. ALLISON, A.B.,
Mathematics.
CEDORA FUTCH, A.M.,
Mathematics.
PANSY E. MANCHESTER, A.M.,
English.
J. REX FARRIOR, A.B.,
Latin.
MARION A. HALL, A.B.,
French and Spanish.
MADELAINE E. WILLIAMS, A.B.,
Civil Service.
ELDRIDGE HART, L.L.M.,*
Business Administration.
RALPH E. CALLAHAN,
Commercial Courses.
SPECIAL LECTURERS AND INSTRUCTORS
EDWIN EARLE SPARKS.
MEIGS B. RUSSELL.
MRS. FLORENCE T. COTNAM.
HOWARD STRONG.
MRS. EMILY NEWELL BLAIR.
LUCIUS E. WILSON.

*Summer Session.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY

The President of the University is ex-officio a member of all Standing
Committees

ADMISSION
Professors Simpson, Farr, Crandall, Leake, Fulk, Moore, Willoughby,
Roemer, Rogers.

ALUMNI
Professors Willoughby, Floyd, Anderson, Trusler, Perry, Buchholz.

ATHLETICS
Professors Beck, Kline, Leake, Atkinson, Van Fleet, White, Manchester.

DISCIPLINE
Professors Crandall, Fulk, Leigh, Van Fleet, Cody, Holmes.

GRADUATE WORK
Professors Anderson, Farr, Newell, Benton, Trusler, Norman.
LIBRARY
Professors Leake, Farr, Fulk, Miltimore, Shealy, Bristol.
MILITARY AFFAIRS
Professors Reed, Shealy, Roemer, Black.

PUBLIC DEBATING
Professors Bristol, Leake, Farr, Trusler, Roemer.

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
Professors Rogers, Strong, Rogers, Culin, Reed.
PUBLICITY
Professors Riley, Leigh, Hathaway, Willoughby, Beck.
SCHEDULE
Professors Perry, Strong, Simpson, Black, Rogers, Roemer.
SELF-HELP
Professors Turlington, Floyd, Buchholz, Cockrell, Day, White.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Professors Cockrell, White, Turlington, Walker, Simpson.

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
Professors Trusler, Benton, Crow, Farr.

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS
Professors Moore, Crow, Black, Roemer, Sweet.





RECENT GIFTS


GENERAL INFORMATION


RECENT GIFTS
Many of the state educational institutions of the South
-among them those of Florida-have in recent years received
substantial gifts. The University feels confident that its
friends will continue to help in its upbuilding. All gifts, of
whatever nature or value, will be gratefully acknowledged.
See also under Museum, Loan Funds, and College of
Agriculture.
CHAIR OF SECONDARY EDUCATION.-This opportunity is
taken of acknowledging the annual gift by the General Edu-
cation Board of New York of a sum sufficient to maintain a
Professorship of Secondary Education. Since June, 1920,
owing to increased appropriations by this Board, it has been
possible to extend greatly the work undertaken.
DEPARTMENT OF HYGIENE.-The University gratefully
makes mention of the benefits derived from an appropriation
by the U. S. Government of ten thousand dollars ($10,000)
-contingent upon a like appropriation by the State-and
used in fostering the physical welfare of the students and
in teaching hygiene.
SCHOLARSHIPS.-No method of contributing to the spread
of higher education is more beneficent than to make it possible
for a worthy but poor young man to attend his state univer-
sity. The establishment of several scholarships is gratefully
acknowledged-see pages 15, 38 and 39.
Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship.-The University
here renders reverent and grateful homage to the memory of
a former student, Captain Arthur Ellis Ham, who fell in battle
at St. Mihiel on Sept. 14, 1918.
His will provided that one half of his military insurance
should go to Smith College, of which his widow, Mrs. Eliza-
beth C. Ham, is a graduate, and the other half to the Univer-
sity, to be used in establishing at each of these institutions "a






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


scholarship for the annual benefit of some needy and deserving
student." Mrs. Ham at once generously sent checks for the
full amount, five thousand dollars ($5,000) each, to Smith and
to Florida. The Board of Control gratefully accepted the
bequest, and the Faculty, in its resolutions of sympathy and
thanks, added that the scholarship should be known as the
"Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship."

HISTORY

Florida has always manifested interest in higher education,
and with this in mind has formulated many plans and estab-
lished many institutions. As early as 1824 the foundation of
a university was discussed by the Legislative Council. In 1836
trustees for a proposed university were named, but apparently
accomplished nothing. (Memoirs of Florida, 1,168.)
Upon its admission to the Union in 1845, the State was
granted by the General Government nearly a hundred thou-
sand acres of land, the proceeds from which were to be used
to establish two seminaries, one east and one west of the
Suwanee River. This led to the foundation, at Ocala, in
1852, of the East Florida Seminary and of the West Florida
Seminary, at Tallahassee, in 1856. The former of these insti-
tutions was, however, removed in 1866 to Gainesville.
The State Constitution of 1868 contained provisions for
establishing and maintaining a university (Art. VIII, Sec. 2),
pursuant to which the Legislature passed the next year "An
Act to Establish a Uniform System of Common Schools and a
University". Other attempts to establish a university were
made in 1883 by the State Board of Education and in 1885
by the Legislature. Furthermore, the State Constitution of
1885 expressly permitted special legislation with regard to a
university.
Meanwhile, in 1870, the Legislature had passed "An Act to
Establish the Florida Agricultural College". This not fully
meeting the terms of the "Land-Grant College" Act of Con-
gress of 1862, the Legislature passed in 1872 a supplementary
Act and the State received from the General Government
ninety thousand acres of land in support of the proposed





HISTORY


college. A site for this was selected in 1873, in 1875, and
again in 1883-the third to be chosen being Lake City. Here
in the autumn of 1884 the work of instruction was begun. An
attempt was made in 1886 by this institution to have its name
changed to the "University of Florida", a title it finally secured
by the Legislative Act of 1903. Before this, in 1887, the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station had, in accordance
with the terms of the Hatch Act, been established as one of
its departments.
During these years, in addition to the three mentioned,
there had come into existence three other State institutions of
higher education: The Normal School, at DeFuniak Springs,
the South Florida College, at Bartow, and the Agricultural
Institute, in Osceola County. In 1905, however, inasmuch as
these six institutions had failed to make satisfactory differen-
tiation among themselves and to separate their work suf-
ficiently from that of the high schools of the State, and
inasmuch as the cost of maintaining all seemed disproportion-
ate to the results obtained, the Legislature passed the "Buck-
man Act", the effect of which was to merge the six into the
"Florida Female College" and the "University of the State of
Florida". In 1909 an Act of the Legislature changed the
name of the one to the "Florida State College for Women",
of the other to the "University of Florida".
During the first session of the University a distinct Nor-
mal School, which included two years of Sub-Freshman grade,
was maintained. In addition to this, instruction was given
in agriculture and engineering, as well as in the usual col-
legiate branches. Candidates for admission to the Freshman
class must have finished the eleventh grade of a high school.
The Agricultural Experiment Station was a separate division,
altho members of its Staff gave instruction to the students
and the President of the University acted as its Director. The
next year the Staff were required to devote their time ex-
clusively to Station activities, and a special Director was
elected. The Normal School was abolished and instruction in
pedagogy was transferred to the University proper. Two
years of Sub-Freshman work were, however, still offered.
Upon the election in 1909 of Dr. A. A. Murphree to the
presidency, steps were taken to reorganize the University.
The present organization dates from 1910. The College of





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Law was added in 1909 and the departments offering instruc-
tion mainly to normal students were organized into a college
in 1912. In 1913 the present entrance requirements went
into effect. The same year a Summer School was established
at the University by Act of the Legislature and the Farmers'
Institute Work of the University and the Cooperative Demon-
stration Work for Florida of the U. S. Department of Agri-
culture were combined. On July 1, 1915, all the agricultural
activities of the University were placed under the direction of
the Dean of the College of Agriculture.
Immediately after the United States entered the World
War the equipment of the University was placed at the disposal
of the Government. During the summer of 1918 the College
of Engineering was operated as the "University of Florida
Army School", for the vocational training of soldiers. At
the opening of the session of 1918-1919 all the regular
activities of the University were subordinated to the task of
training men for the armed forces of the United States. On
Dec. 14, 1918, upon the mustering out of the Student Army
Training Corps, the University again took up its regular work,
altho it made liberal allowance in credits to students for the
interruption of their studies caused by military service.
During the summer of 1919 the General Extension Division
was established. The University also entered into contract
with the United States Government to assist in the work of
rehabilitating men disabled while in the armed forces of the
country.
LOCATION
On the 6th day of July, 1905, acting under powers con-
ferred by the Buckman Act, the State Board of Education and
the Board of Control, in joint session, selected Gainesville as
the location of the University. During the scholastic year
of 1905-06, it was found necessary to carry on the work of
the University at Lake City. Since the summer of 1906 the
institution has occupied its present site.
The advantages that Gainesville presents as the seat of
the University are numerous. It is centrally located and easy
of access. It has well-paved, -lighted, and -shaded streets, an
exceptionally pure water supply, and a good sewerage system.
The citizens are energetic, progressive, and hospitable. The





EQUIPMENT


moral atmosphere is wholesome. The leading religious
denominations have attractive places of worship.

INCOME
The annual income of the University, apart from Legisla-
tive appropriations, is derived principally from the following
Federal grants: (a) The "East Florida Seminary Fund"-
about two thousand dollars ($2,000); (b) the "Agricultural
College Fund" bonds-about seventy-seven hundred dollars
($7,700); (c) one-half of the "Morrill Fund"-twelve thou-
sand five hundred dollars ($12,500); (d) one-half of the
"Nelson Fund"- twelve thousand five hundred dollars
($12,500). The total income thus derived amounts to thirty-
four thousand seven hundred dollars ($34,700).
For the support of the Agricultural Experiment Station
the Federal government makes two annual grants: (a) the
"Hatch Fund" and (b) the "Adams Fund", each amounting
to fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).
See also Recent Gifts, Fellowships, Scholarships, Loan
Funds, and Agricultural Extension Division.

EQUIPMENT
GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS
The University occupies a tract of six hundred and thirteen
acres, situated in the western extremity of Gainesville. Ninety
acres of this tract are devoted to campus, drillgrounds, and
athletic fields; the remainder is used by the College of Agri-
culture.
The University is one of the few institutions in the United
States that made plans before laying the foundation of a single
building for all future development of the campus, as far as
this could be foreseen. Consequently the campus presents an
harmonious appearance. The liberality of the State has per-
mitted the erection of substantial and attractive modern build-
ings as fast as they were needed. Early in 1922 the contract
was let for the construction of the first unit of the Adminis-
tration Building, which is to be the outstanding architectural
feature on the campus. The entire building will cost $750,000.
This unit, which is to cost $200,000, will include an auditorium
accommodating 2,200 people.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The present buildings are:
The two Dormitories, Thomas Hall and Buckman Hall,
brick and concrete structures, three stories in height, sixty
feet in width and three hundred and two hundred and forty
feet, respectively, in length. They are built in fireproof sec-
tions, each containing twelve suites of dormitory-rooms and on
each floor of each section a shower-bath, lavatory, and toilet.
The Mechanic Arts Shop, a one-story brick building, sixty
feet long and thirty feet wide, with a wing thirty feet long
and twenty feet wide. It is used, at present, as woodshop,
blacksmith-shop, and foundry.
Science Hall, a brick and concrete building of two stories
and a finished basement, one hundred and thirty-five feet long
and sixty-six feet wide. It contains the classrooms and lab-
oratories of the Departments of Chemistry and of Biology
and Geology, as well as the University Museum.
The Agricultural Experiment Station Building, a brick and
concrete structure of three stories and a finished basement,
one hundred and twenty-five feet long and sixty feet wide. It
contains the offices and laboratories of the Station.
Engineering Hall, a brick and terra-cotta structure, three
stories high, one hundred and twenty-two feet long and
seventy-three feet wide, with two one-story wings. One wing
is used for boilers and machine-shop, the other (one hundred
and eighty feet long by forty feet wide) is designed for wood-
shop, blacksmith-shop, and foundry. Engineering Hall pro-
vides offices, classrooms, laboratories, and drafting-rooms for
the Departments of Civil, of Electrical, and of Mechanical
Engineering, of Mechanic Arts, and of Physics.
The Agricultural College Building, a brick and concrete
structure, three stories high, one hundred and fifteen feet long
and sixty-five feet wide. It provides for classrooms, labora-
tories, and offices for the College, and for Extension Work.
The University Commons, a brick building of one story and
basement, one hundred and fourteen feet long and forty-two
feet wide, with a wing forty-nine feet long and twenty-seven
feet wide. It provides a large dining-hall and kitchen. A
wooden annex, one hundred and twenty feet long by sixty feet
wide, is now used as a Y. M. C. A. "Hut".





EQUIPMENT


Language Hall, a brick and stone structure of three stories,
one hundred and thirty-five feet long and sixty-six feet wide.
It is the home of the College of Arts and Sciences and provides
classrooms and offices for the Departments of Languages, His-
tory and Economics, Mathematics, and Sociology and Political
Science, together with the administrative offices of the Uni-
versity. In the basement are the bookstore and the offices
and presses of the Alligator.
George Peabody Hall, erected at a cost of forty thousand
dollars ($40,000), the gift of the Peabody Board of Trust.
It is a brick building, three stories high, one hundred and
thirty-five feet long and seventy-two feet wide. It provides
for the Departments of Education and Philosophy and for
Teacher-Training Work. The general library of the Univer-
sity is at present in this building.
The College of Law Building, a brick and stone structure
of two stories, one hundred and twenty feet long and seventy
feet wide. It contains an auditorium, model courtroom, lec-
ture-rooms and offices, library, reading and consultation
rooms, cataloguing room, and quarters for the Marshall Debat-
ing Society.
Auditorium and Gymnasium, a brick and stone structure
of two stories (one of which is mezzanine) and basement, one
hundred and six feet long and fifty-three feet wide. It is
heated by steam, is fully supplied with hot water, and is well
lighted and ventilated. The main floor is used as an audito-
rium and gymnasium. A gallery extending around the whole
room provides space for the spectators at gymnastic exhibi-
tions. The basement contains rooms for the director and for
University and visiting teams, and for lockers, shower-baths
and toilets. Adjacent is a swimming pool, thirty-six feet long,
twenty-four feet wide, and from four and a half to seven feet
deep.
WOODEN BUILDINGS.-During the existence of the S. A. T.
C., the Vocational Unit erected:
Two Barracks, each of two stories, sixty feet long and
forty feet wide, and each accommodating sixty-six men. One
of these buildings has been equipt as a hospital with accom-
modations for twenty-five men.
A Garage, one hundred and twenty feet long, and well ar-
ranged for repair work.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


VALUE.-The value of the property used for the work of
the University is about $1,000,000.
GENERAL LIBRARY
The general Library contains about 35,000 volumes. Ad-
ditional books are purchased as fast as funds are available.
A special effort is being made to place on the shelves all books
extant relating to Florida.
The books are classified and shelved according to the Dewey
Decimal system, and are indexed in a dictionary catalog.
Students are encouraged to use the catalog, and the indexes
to periodical literature, and by free access to the shelves to
become familiar with the books themselves. A taste for lit-
erature and information is being developed in many students
who before entering the University have not had access to
a good library.
As a designated depository of the United States govern-
ment the Library receives annually several hundred bound
volumes and many pamphlets. In addition much valuable
material is received from the various state universities, col-
leges and experiment stations.
The Library receives about two hundred and seventy-five
general and technical periodicals, the current numbers of which
are to be found on the reading tables. These periodicals are
bound as rapidly as the volumes are completed and are par-
ticularly valuable for use in reference work. The daily and
weekly papers are to be found in the newspaper room. Thru
the courtesy of the editors a large number of county and city
newspapers of Florida are sent to the Library for the use of
the students.
The University Library is glad to be of assistance to the
teachers and high-school students of the State. Under reas-
onable regulations books are lent upon request. When it is
impossible to send the material desired bibliographies with
suggested sources of information are gladly furnished.
The Library has been fortunate in the number of gifts
received during the past year. Dr. A. A. Murphree gave two
hundred and fifty volumes. Five hundred volumes were re-
ceived from the American Library Association. The family
of the late Rev. Rees W. Edwards, of Jacksonville, gave about
two hundred and fifty volumes on religion and philosophy.





EQUIPMENT


These books will be kept together and the collection will be
known as the "Rev. Rees W. Edwards Memorial." The Uni-
versity of Florida is one of seventy colleges and universities
in the United States to be presented with a copy of the cele-
brated Codice Trivulziano, which is the original manuscript
of Dante-Divine Comedy. Only three hundred and fifty
copies have been published and the volume is very valuable.
This was given to the University by the Italians of the United
States of America, on the initiative of Luigi Carnovale, Chi-
cago, Illinois, in commemoration of the six-hundredth anniver-
sary of the death of Dante, September 14, 1921.

DEPARTMENTAL LIBRARIES

The technical departments possess special libraries, housed
in their respective buildings, but accessible to all members of
the University.
MUSEUM
By Act of Legislature of 1916-17 the University was made
the home of the Florida State Museum. The Act further pro-
vides for a natural history and ethnological survey of the
State; for scientific investigations looking towards the further
development of its natural resources; for the collecting of
material of scientific, economic and civic value, whether per-
taining to the mineral, vegetable, and animal kingdoms or to
the aboriginal tribes and the early explorations and settle-
ments; for a library; and for traveling exhibits to be kept in
circulation among the schools of the State. Adequate funds
for carrying out all the provisions of this Act have not as yet
been provided; but, largely thru the generosity of some of our
citizens, enough specimens and data are already in hand to
permit the director to announce the opening of the State
Museum.
The Museum contains at the present time more than
two hundred and seventy thousand specimens, about one half
of which have been carefully catalogued. Among the eight
hundred and seventy-six recent accessions are perhaps most
worthy of mention an herbarium of four thousand and eight
hundred sheets presented by Dr. Samuel C. Hood, of Orlando;
the R. D. Hoyt collection of more than eight hundred birds and
four hundred sets of bird eggs; the John J. Ryman collection





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


of more than two hundred birds and eight hundred sets of
bird eggs; a complete collection of the mollusca of Alabama,
presented by the late Dr. Herbert H. Smith, curator of the
Alabama Geological Survey Museum; a large number of bird
plumes, presented thru Secretary Gilbert J. Pearson, of New
York, by the National Association of Audubon Societies;
and the "Loring Memorial Collection", presented by General
Loring's heirs, Mrs. William Loring Spencer and Mrs. M. C.
Royston, of St. Petersburg. This last collection is of great
historical and artistic value, besides being intrinsically worth
many thousands of dollars.
Other valuable donations can, it is believed, be announced
soon. Even now it is known that much material of historic
and artistic interest has been left to the Museum by will and
negotiations are under way for securing large exhibits. One
good-sized library and a collection weighing more than three
tons are already packed for shipment to the University.
In addition to these there are in the Museum a fair collec-
tion of the mollusca of Florida, containing more than eighteen
thousand specimens; about nine thousand Florida fossils;
more than five hundred Florida reptiles; more than ten thou-
sand specimens of stone implements and pottery of the
aborigines of Florida; besides thousands of specimens of
historic articles, minerals, insects, etc. The library of the
Museum numbers about five thousand volumes and pamphlets.
Unfortunately, owing to the lack of rooms and cases, only
a small part of this material is now on exhibition and of this
part few specimens are arranged to the best advantage. A
few rooms are, however, open every day but Sunday, from
one to five P. M., and in these rooms are many objects of
interest. Director Van Hyning is always pleased to be of
service to visitors.
LABORATORIES
For the Laboratories and other equipment of the College
of Agriculture, see pages 81-84.
The Botanical Laboratory contains enough dissecting mi-
croscopes and instruments and Bausch and Lomb compound
microscopes, magnifying from 80 to 465 diameters, for the
individual use of the students; a Zeiss binocular and a large
compound microscope of very high power; two demonstration
microscopes; and a McIntosh stereopticon, with projection





EQUIPMENT


microscope attachment. For work in histology there are hand
microtomes, a sliding microtome, section knives, Miller's
paraffin bath, and a supply of reagents, stains, and mounts;
for studies in physiology there are germination boxes, nutrient
jars, an osmometer, a clinostat, etc. An herbarium has been
started, to which students each year add specimens, which
they collect, identify, and mount. A case of reference books
and periodicals is in the laboratory within easy reach.
The Chemical Laboratory is equipt with the apparatus
and material necessary for instruction in general inorganic
and organic, analytical, and industrial chemistry, as well as
for more advanced work. It contains two delicate balances,
a latest model polariscope, microscope,. spectroscope, ample
platinum ware (crucibles, dishes, electrodes, wire, and foil),
and several pieces of apparatus for illustrating chemical
principles.
The Dynamo Laboratory occupies a portion of Engineering
Hall. For description of its equipment, see page 26.
The Geological Laboratory contains the U. S. Geological
Survey Educational Series of rocks. For the study of his-
torical geology there is a collection of fossils illustrating the
distribution and development of organisms; for the study of
mineralogy there is a blowpipe collection of one hundred
selected mineral species, an accessory blowpipe collection of
miscellaneous minerals, a collection of fifty natural crystals,
and a reference collection of choice mineral specimens.
The Hydraulic Laboratory, belonging to the College of En-
gineering, is described on page 27.
The Physical Laboratory is well equipt with apparatus and
meets the needs of such undergraduate work in physics as is
usually carried on in the best American colleges.
The entire third story of Engineering Hall is devoted to
the department of physics, as well as a lecture-room on the
second story, seating 147, and provided with projection lan-
tern. The quarters on the third story include a main labora-
tory, 53 by 27 feet; an electrical laboratory, 42 by 26 feet; an
optical room, 22 by 15 feet, arranged so as to be effectively
darkened; an office and private laboratory, 25 by 19 feet; a
workshop and apparatus room, 42 by 19 feet; a classroom,
24 by 22 feet; and a number of storerooms. Water, gas, and
several electrical circuits are led to all the rooms.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The Psychological Laboratory occupies six rooms on the
first floor of Peabody Hall and is well equipt for class dem-
onstrations, and for carrying on experimental and research
work. As the demand arises new equipment will be added.
In addition to the apparatus for the regular experimental
work, the laboratory is equipt for carrying on mental and
physical tests in connection with the work in educational
psychology offered by the Teachers College.
The Zoological and Bacteriological Laboratories are well
equipt for the work of instruction. In addition to the neces-
sary glassware and reagents, there are a number of high-grade
microscopes; dissecting microscopes; one Leitz large com-
pound microscope with mechanical stage and a full set of
apochromatic objectives; two microtomes, one for celloidin,
the other for paraffin sectioning; paraffin bath; sterilizers,
both wet and dry; warm and cool incubators; dark-ground
illuminator; balances; centrifuge; breeding cages; anatomical
preparations and models; a number of the Leukart-Chun
zoological wall charts; and one Bausch and Lomb projecting
lantern with accessories. The departmental library contains
a number of current periodicals, as well as the more important
textbooks and reference works.

ENGINEERING
The Dynamo Laboratory contains a 10-KW Type ACS Gen-
eral Electric synchronous converter, a 25-KW General Electric
Type IB direct current generator, a 1-HP Westinghouse Type
R motor, a 1-KW synchronous motor, and two 2-KW Westing-
house Type S dynamos, designed to be used either as genera-
tors or as motors. The switchboard panel for each machine is
placed near it, but is connected to terminals on a main distri-
bution board for the whole laboratory. Power is supplied by
a 10-HP single-phase Wagner induction motor, connected with
the city alternating current supply and driving the main shaft
of the laboratory. The various machines are driven from this
shaft, and can be thrown in or out by friction clutches.
The laboratory is also supplied with transformers, several
types of arc lamps, and numerous measuring instruments of
different ranges. The laboratory has enjoyed the generosity
of a number of manufacturers, who have lent machinery to it.





EQUIPMENT


It has also benefited by a large loan of machinery temporarily
out of use, from the American Agricultural Chemical Com-
pany, Pierce, Florida.
For experiments in power engineering there are indicators,
gauges, flue-gas analyzers, a draft-gauge, pyrometer, anemo-
meter and a psychrometer. The water-tube boilers installed
for the heating plant are available for testing purposes. There
are also two blowers and a boiler-feed pump.
The Testing Laboratory has a 50,000-pound Riehle machine
for testing the tensile, compressive, and transverse strength
of materials, and a cement-testing machine with the necessary
accessories. These machines are useful for testing materials
used in road construction.
Hydraulic Laboratory.-One Pelton Waterwheel; one box
weir fitted with a triangular notch, and with hook gauge
attacht; one Venturi meter; one Ford water meter testing
apparatus; one hydraulic ram; one gauge testing apparatus;
2 water piezometers; 2 mercury gauges; one Pito tube; one
water tank equipt with standard orifices; and various smaller
instruments for conducting hydraulic experiments.
The Computing Room is furnished with all necessary
tables and a library of about two hundred reference books for
use in connection with the work of the mechanical laboratories
and drafting-room.
The Drafting-Room is equipt with substantial oak desks
and possesses the necessary minor equipment to accommodate
classes of twenty-four students.
Surveying Instruments.-These consist of three surveyor's
compasses; three wye and two dummy levels, and one precision
level; two plain and five stadia transits, of which three are
equipt with attachments for solar and star observations; one
complete plane-table; one large telescope for astronomical
work; one sextant; one ameroid barometer; one army sketch-
ing case; and the necessary rods, chains, tapes and minor in-
struments. Blue-printing apparatus also is included.
Shops.-The Wood-Shop is provided with lockers, equipt
with full sets of tools for bench work: Chisels, saws, squares,
gauges, etc. The wood-working machinery consists of a
planer, a rip-saw, a band-saw, an iron combination saw table,
a jointer, and a grindstone.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The Machine-Shop is equipt with an 18-inch Cady, a
16-inch Reed, a 16-inch Bradford, an 11-inch Star, and a
Rivett lathe; a drill press; a Gray planer; a No. 1 Brown and
Sharp miller; a Springfield shaper; a No. 2 Marvel hack saw;
universal tool grinder; emery wheels; vises and tools.
The Forge-Shop is equipt with six power-blast forges, one
hand forge, six anvils, and tools.

ATHLETIC
The University has provided a hard-surfaced athletic field,
including football gridiron, baseball diamond, with grand-
stand and enclosed field, and tennis-court facilities. A basket-
ball court and concrete swimming-pool also are located on the
campus. Membership is maintained in the Southern Intercol-
legiate Athletic Association, the Southern Intercollegiate Con-
ference and the Amateur Athletic Union.

MILITARY
Military equipment of a value of more than $50,000 is
available for military instruction.

GOVERNMENT
ADMINISTRATION
BOARD OF CONTROL.-The general government of the Uni-
versity is vested by law in a Board of Control consisting of
five members from various parts of the State, appointed, each
for a term of four years, by the Governor of Florida.
The Board of Control appoints the President and, upon his
nomination, elects members of the Faculties, directs the gen-
eral policies of the University, and supervises the expenditure
of its funds. The Board also prescribes the requirements for
admission, with the advice of the President and Faculties, and
upon their recommendation confers degrees.
PRESIDENT.-The direct administration of all affairs of the
University is in the hands of the President.
DEANS.-As executive head each college of the University
has a Dean, appointed from the Faculty of that college. These
officers are responsible to the President.
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL.-The President and the Vice-Presi-
dent of the University and the Deans of the several colleges





GOVERNMENT


form a council of administration, with the following functions:
To lay out new lines of work, inaugurate new enterprises in
general, and to prepare the annual budget; and to act as the
judicial body of the General Faculty on cases of general dis-
cipline not under the authority of the colleges, on new courses
of study and changes in existing courses, bringing these mat-
ters before the Board of Control, and on questions of college
action referred to it by any member of the General Faculty.
FACULTIES.-The General Faculty includes all persons, ex-
cept laboratory and undergraduate assistants, engaged in the
work of instruction in the University. Under the leadership
of the President, it forms the governing body in all general
matters of instruction and discipline.
The Faculty of a college consists of those members of the
General Faculty who give instruction in it. Under the leader-
ship of its Dean, it forms the governing body in matters of
instruction and discipline in its college.
REGULATIONS
SUPERVISION.-An Officer in Charge, occupying quarters
in one of the dormitories, has immediate supervision of the
general life of the student-body.
OFFENSES AGAINST GOOD CONDUCT.-Any offense against
good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the word, renders
a student liable to discipline, whether or not a formal rule
against the offense has been published.
The following offenses will be treated with special sever-
ity: Disrespect to an officer of the University; wanton de-
struction of property; gambling; having revolvers in pos-
session on the University grounds.
.HAZING.-No student will be assigned to a room in a dormi-
tory until he has been matriculated and has signed the fol-
lowing pledge:
"I hereby promise upon my word of honor, without any
mental reservation whatsoever, to refrain from all forms of
hazing while I am connected with the University of Florida."
ATTENDANCE UPON UNIVERSITY DUTIES.-A student who
accumulates three unexcused absences from drill, or ten from
lecture or recitation, will be given a severe reprimand and
parent or guardian will be notified. Two additional unex-
cused absences will cause his dismissal from the University





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


for the remainder of the academic year. Ten unexcused ab-
sences from Chapel will involve, except in the case of a Senior
or of a student in the College of Law, the same penalty.
A student who, because of ill health or of outside demands
upon his time, finds it impossible to be regular in his atten-
dance upon University duties, is requested to withdraw; but
this does not in any way reflect upon his good standing.
Delinquencies in University duties are reported to the Reg-
istrar, who brings them to the attention of the students con-
cerned and requires a prompt explanation to be made. A
careful record of all delinquencies is kept.
INTELLIGENCE TEST.-All Freshmen are required to take
an intelligence test early in the first semester.
STUDIES
ASSIGNMENT TO CLASSES.-Every student must appear be-
fore the Dean of his college at the beginning of each academic
year for assignment to classes. No instructor has, except as
authorized by the Dean of his college, authority to enroll a
student in any course.
CHOICE OF STUDIES.-The choice, subject to considerations
of proper preparation, as to which one of the various curricula
is to be pursued rests with the individual student; but the
group of studies selected must be that belonging to one of
the regular years in the chosen curriculum exactly as an-
nounced in the catalog for the year in which the student
entered-unless special reasons exist for deviating from this
arrangement.
No applicant for a Bachelor's degree shall be allowed
to make a change in the curriculum selected, unless such
change be submitted to the faculty of his college at its
first meeting in the semester in which the change is de-
sired and be approved by a two-thirds vote of those present.
CONDITIONS.-A student prepared to take up most of the
studies of a certain year in a regular curriculum, but deficient
in some, will be permitted to proceed with the work of that
year subject to the condition that he make up the deficiency.
Provision for all of the lower studies must be made before
any of the higher may be taken. In the event of conflicts in
the schedule or of excessive quantity of work, higher studies
must give way to lower.





GOVERNMENT


QUANTITY OF WORK.-Minimum and maximum numbers of
recitation hours (or equivalent time in laboratory courses)
per week are prescribed in each college, according to the fol-
lowing table:
College Freshman-Sophomore Junior-Senior
Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum
Arts and Sciences................ 17 21 15 19
Agriculture .......................... 18 25 16 23
Engineering .......................... 18 23 16 21
Law ........................................ 15 18 15 18
Teachers ................................ 17 21 15 19
In all of the above colleges except Law the basic training
course of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps, amounting to
three credit hours in the Freshman and Sophomore years, is
included.
Two hours of laboratory work are considered equivalent
to one hour of recitation.
CHANGES IN STUDIES.-A student once registered is not
permitted to discontinue a class or to begin an additional one
without written permission from the Dean of his college,
which must be shown to the instructor involved; and if he is
undergoing military training he will not be permitted to dis-
continue that work on account of transferring, within a par-
ticular year, to a college in which military instruction is not
compulsory. A student who has been registered for two
weeks will not be permitted to make any change in studies,
except during the first two days of the second semester, with-
out the payment of a fee of two dollars ($2.00).
GRADES AND REPORTS.-Each instructor keeps a record of
the quality of work done in his classes and monthly assigns
each student a grade, on the scale of 100. This grade is
reported to the Registrar for permanent record and for entry
upon a monthly report to the student's parent or guardian.
If the monthly grades of a student are unsatisfactory, he
may be required to drop. some of his studies and substitute
those of a lower class, or he may be required to withdraw from
the University.
EXAMINATIONS.-Examinations on the ground covered are
held at the end of each semester.
FAILURE IN STUDIES.-A final grade, based upon the ex-
amination and the monthly grades, is assigned for each
semester's work. If this grade falls below 75, the student is





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


considered to have failed and may proceed only subject to a
condition in the study in which failure has occurred.
A student failing in more than fifty per cent of his class
hours for two consecutive months, will be dropped for the re-
mainder of the College year. Students so dropped will be en-
titled to honorable dismissal, unless their failure is clearly due
to negligence. Upon petition, such a student may, at the dis-
cretion of the President of the University and the Dean of
his College, be reinstated upon such terms as to them may
seem best..
RE-EXAMINATIONS.-A student who has made a semester
grade of 60 or more, but less than 75, in any subject shall be
entitled to a re-examination in that subject on the first Satur-
day of March or of October; altho a senior failing on an
examination at the end of the second semester shall be allowed
a re-examination during the week preceding commencement.
Only one re-examination in any subject is permitted; in case
of failure to pass this, with a grade of 85, the student must
repeat the semester's work in that subject.
DEGREES.-The special requirements for the various de-
grees offered by the University will be found under the Gen-
eral Statement of the Graduate School and of each of the five
colleges. The following regulations apply to all colleges:
While pursuing studies leading to a degree a student must
be registered in the college offering that degree.
Two degrees of the same rank, as, e.g., B.S.C.E. and
B.S.E.E., will not be conferred upon the same individual, un-
less the second degree represents at least fifteen "year" hours
of additional work.
SPECIAL STUDENTS.-Students desiring to take special
courses will be allowed to take those classes for which they
may be prepared. The number of such students in a college
is, however, restricted to not more than twenty-five per cent
of its enrolment. These students are subject to all the laws
and regulations of the University. Special courses do not lead
to a degree.
The University permits special courses to be taken solely
in order to provide for the occasional exceptional requirements
of individual students. Abuse of this privilege, for the sake of
avoiding studies that may be distasteful, cannot be tolerated.





GOVERNMENT


Accordingly, no minor is permitted to enter as a special stu-
dent except upon written request of his parent or guardian.
Minor special students must, except as provided for in the
College of Agriculture, offer fifteen entrance units.
ADULT SPECIALS.-Persons twenty-one or more years of
age who cannot satisfy the entrance requirements, but who
give evidence of ability to profit by the courses they may take,
may, under exceptional circumstances, be admitted as "Adult
Specials". Such students appear before the Committee on
Admission for enrolment and are not excused from military
duty; altho, if more than twenty-two years of age, they may,
under certain conditions, secure exemption. (See page 166.)
CLASSIFICATION OF IRREGULAR STUDENTS.-Until all en-
trance credits have been satisfied a student shall not rank
higher than a freshman; a student deficient in any freshman
work shall not rank higher than a sophomore; and one de-
ficient in sophomore work not higher than a junior. But a
special student is not considered as belonging to any of the
regular classes.
When special students make up their deficiencies they
may become regular students and candidates for a degree.
ATHLETIC TEAMS, MUSICAL AND OTHER CLUBS
ABSENCES ON ACCOUNT OF ATHLETICS, ETC.-The members
of regular athletic teams, of musical and of other student
organizations, together with necessary substitutes and man-
agers, are permitted to be absent from their University duties
for such time, not to exceed nine days per semester, as may
be necessary to take part in games, concerts, etc., away from
Gainesville. All classwork missed on account of such trips
must be made up, as promptly as possible, at such hours as
may be arranged by the professors concerned. All drills
missed, which so reduce the semester total that it averages
less than three hours per week, must be made up before
semester credits can be given.
SCHEDULES.-Schedules of games, concerts, etc., must be
arranged so as to interfere as little as possible with Uni-
versity duties. Schedules of games must receive the approval
of the Committee on Athletics; schedules of concerts, of dra-
matic entertainments, etc., the approval of the Committee on
Student Organizations.
2





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


All regular games will be played under the rules of the
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association.
ELIGIBILITY TO ATHLETIC TEAMS, MUSICAL CLUBS, ETC.-
Any team or club representing the University must be com-
posed exclusively of students in good standing. Negligence
of duties, or failure in studies, excludes a student from mem-
bership in all such organizations.
No minor student is permitted to play on any regular ath-
letic team, if his parent or guardian objects. A list of players
and substitutes must be submitted to the Committee on Ath-
letics before each game and must receive its approval.
FINANCES.-The general Faculty has made the following
rules:
All student organizations desiring to collect funds for any purpose
whatsoever on the campus must, unless such organizations be under
other Faculty control, first secure written permission from the Committee
on Student Organizations.
No profits are to be taken by the officers of any student organiza-
tion that makes its appeal for funds on the basis of its being a University
enterprise.
At least once a year student organizations engaging in financial
operations must have their accounts audited by the Committee on Student
Organizations and must publish in the Alligator a statement of their
receipts and expenditures.

HONORS
GAMMA SIGMA EPSILON.-The Beta Alpha Chapter of the
Gamma Sigma Epsilon Chemical fraternity, a national honor
society, was established at the University of Florida in the
fall of 1921. To be eligible for membership, a student must
have passed two courses in chemistry with an average grade
of not less than 85%. In addition to his class standing, he must
have proved himself a real man, dependable and ambitious;
and must have the respect and the friendship of his fellow
students.
PHI KAPPA PHI.-A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi
Kappa Phi was established at the University during the spring
of 1912. To be eligible for membership a student must have
been in attendance at the University for at least one year,
have been guilty of no serious breaches of discipline, have had
at least three years of collegiate training, be within one year
of finishing a course leading to a degree, and stand among the
first fourth of the Senior class of the University. The
numerical grade which must be attained is based on all college





EXPENSES


work, wherever done, for which the student receives credit
towards a degree.
MEDALS.-Medals are offered (1) to the best declaimer in
the Freshman and Sophomore classes and for the best orig-
inal orations delivered (2) by a member of the Junior, and (3)
by a member of the Senior class. The contests are settled in
public competition at Commencement. The speakers are
limited to four from each class and are selected by the Faculty.
EXPENSES
UNIVERSITY CHARGES.-Tuition.-A tuition fee of forty
dollars ($40.00) per year is charged every student registered
in the College of Law. In the other colleges a student whose
legal residence is in Florida is subject to no charge for tui-
tion; a student who is not a legal resident of the State is re-
quired to pay a tuition fee of forty dollars ($40.00) per year.
Registration Fee.-This fee of ten dollars ($10.00) per
year is charged all students, except one scholarship student
from each county in Florida and all graduate students pursu-
ing work leading to a degree higher than that of Bachelor.
These two classes of students are charged five dollars ($5.00).
The scholarships referred to are to be obtained from
County Superintendents of Public Instruction and must be
filed with the auditor on the day of registration.
An additional fee of two dollars ($2.00) is required of
students who enter after the day scheduled for registration.
Student Activity Fee.-This fee of fifteen dollars ($15.00),
payable on entrance, was voted by the students and ap-
proved by the Board of Control. The moneys so derived
are used to foster and maintain athletic sports, student pub-
lications, literary and debating societies, and other student
activities.
Breakage Fee.-In order to secure the University against
damage, and to pay for general breakage, etc., the sum of
$2.50 is charged. No part of this fee will be refunded. Dam-
age done by individuals and not reported usually consumes all
the moneys provided by this fee for covering general breakage.
Damage known to have been done by any student will be
charged to his individual account.
Laboratory Fees.-A small fee is required for each course
that includes laboratory work, to cover cost of consumable
materials, wear and tear of apparatus, and similar items. The





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


amount of the fee varies with the different courses, in no case
exceeding $6.00 per semester for any one course. In every
case payment in advance is required.
Infirmary Fee.-All students are charged an infirmary fee
of five dollars ($5.00)*. This secures for the student, in
case of illness, the privilege of a bed in the infirmary and the
services of a professional nurse and of the resident physician,
except in cases involving major operations. All students will
be given a careful physical examination at the beginning of
the session.
Diploma Fee.- A diploma fee of ten dollars ($10.00),
payable on or before April 1st of the year of graduation, is
charged all candidates for degrees.
Board and Lodging.-Board, lodging, and janitor service
will be furnished by the University at a cost of eighty-seven
dollars and fifty cents ($87.50) per semester (not including
the Christmas vacation). To get advantage of this rate,
payment must be made at the beginning of each semester.
No refund will be made for less than a month's absence.
When not engaged by the semester, board and lodging will
be furnished at twenty-two dollars and fifty cents ($22.50)
per month.
Under Board and Lodging are included meals in the com-
mons and room (with heat, light, janitor service, and access
to a bathroom), furnished as stated below. The doors of the
rooms are provided with Yale locks. A deposit of 50 cents is
required for each key, which will be returned when the key
is surrendered. Janitor service includes the care of rooms by
maids, under the supervision of a competent housekeeper.
Board and lodging in private homes may be secured at the
rate of thirty-five to forty dollars ($35.00-$40.00) per month.
Board without Lodging.-Board without lodging will be
furnished at the rate of $20.00 per calendar month, payable
in advance. No part of this sum will be refunded.
Lodging without Board.-Lodging without board is not
furnished.
Furniture.-All rooms are partly furnished and adjoin
bathrooms equipt with marble basin and shower with both

*The increase of $2.00 in this fee does not add to the total expenses of
the student, since the amount is offset by a decrease in the break-
age fee.






EXPENSES


hot and cold water. The furniture consists of two iron bed-
steads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table, washstand,
and chairs. The students are required to provide pillows, bed-
ding, towels and toilet articles for their own use.
Books.-The cost of books depends largely upon the course
taken, but is, in no case, a large item of expense, tho in the
higher classes the student is encouraged to acquire a few
works of permanent value. The average cost of books to
academic students is between $12.00 and $15.00 per annum;
to law students, $35.00 to $40.00.
Summary.-The following table summarizes the minimum
expenses of a Florida student registered in any college save
in that of Law:
Tuition ......................- -... ...... ...--------- ...... .....----- $000.00
Registration Fee........................................................ 10.00
Breakage Fee ..................-....... ---............ 2.50
Student Activity Fee ............................................... 15.00
Infirm ary Fee -------................................... ............ 5.00
Board and Lodging.......................................... ..... 175.00
Books (about)........---.......................--- --------...... 13.50
Laundry (about) .......................................... ....... 18.00
$239.00
Students from other states will add a tuition fee of $40.00;
those enrolled in the R. 0. T. C. will see also page 168. Can-
didates for degrees will add a diploma fee of $10.00.
REMITTANCES.-All remittances should be made to the
Auditor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR EARNING EXPENSES.-It is often pos-
sible for a student to earn a part of his expenses by working
during hours not required for his University duties.
A few students are employed as waiters, as janitors, and
in other capacities. Such employment is not, as a rule, given
to a student otherwise financially able to attend the Univer-
sity, nor is it given to one who fails in any study. Application
for employment should be made to Dr. J. E. Turlington, Chair-
man of the Self-Help Committee.
Altho the employment of students is designed to assist
those in need of funds, the payment for their services is in
no sense a charity. The rate of remuneration is no higher
and the standard of service demanded is no lower than would
be the case if the work were done by others than students. If
a student employee fails to give satisfaction, he is discharged.
Otherwise, provided it is not found to interfere with reason-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


able success in his studies and provided he does not commit
any breach of good conduct, he is continued in his position as
long as he cares to hold it.
Great credit is due those willing to make the necessary
sacrifices, nevertheless students are advised not to undertake
to earn money while pursuing their studies, unless such action
is unavoidable. Proper attention to studies makes sufficient
demand upon the time and energy of a student, without the
burden of outside duties; such time as the studies leave free
can be spent more profitably in recreation.
FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS
FELLOWSHIPS.-In order to encourage young teachers to
prepare themselves further for their work, three Teaching
Fellowships, each paying $200.00 annually, have been
established.
Application for a fellowship must be made in writing to
the Dean of the Teachers College or to the President of the
University. It must show that the applicant is a college
graduate and has ability to profit by the work offered, and
must be accompanied by testimonials as to his character.
A Fellow must devote himself to studies leading to the
Master's degree in Education. He will be expected to teach
four or five hours per week in the Practice High School, under
the direction and supervision of the Teachers College, for
which he will receive two hours' credit. He may be called
upon for minor services, such as conducting examinations, but
not for anything that would interfere with his graduate work.
SCHOLARSHIPS.-Thru the generosity of friends, the Uni-
versity is able to offer eight scholarships. (See also College
of Agriculture.) Application for a scholarship should be
made to the President of the University and should be ac-
companied by a record of the student's work, statement of
his need, and testimonials as to his character. To secure a
scholarship:
(a) The student must actually need this financial help to enable
him to attend the University.
(b) He must be of good character and habits and sufficiently far
advanced to enter not lower than the Freshman class.
1. United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarship.-
Established and maintained by the U. D. C. of the State at
large. For the grandson of a Confederate soldier. Value
$180.00.





ALUMNI ASSOCIATION


2. Kirby Smith Chapter, U. D. C., Scholarship.-Estab-
lished and maintained by the Kirby Smith Chapter, U. D. C.,
of Gainesville. For the lineal descendant of a Confederate
veteran. Value $90.00.
3. Jacksonville Chapter, U. D. C., Scholarship.-Estab-
lished and maintained by the Jacksonville Chapter, U. D. C.
For the lineal descendant of a Confederate veteran. Value
$180.00.
4. Tampa Chapter, U. D. C., Scholarship.-Established
and maintained by the Tampa Chapter, U. D. C. For the
lineal descendant of a Confederate veteran. Value $180.00.
5. Katherine Livingstone Chapter, D. A. R., Scholarship.
-Established and maintained by the Katherine Livingstone
Chapter, D. A. R., of Jacksonville. Value $250.00.
6. Knight and Wall Scholarship.*-Established and main-
tained by the Knight and Wall Company, hardware dealers,
of Tampa. Value $245.00.
7. Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship.-See page 15.
LOAN FUNDS.-The generosity of friends enables the Uni-
versity to lend a few needy students money with which to help
defray their expenses. A joint note is to be made by a
recipient of a loan and one responsible property holder own-
ing property to a value of not less than $1,000 over and above
the exemption privilege. Interest on such loans is at the rate
of 7% and is payable yearly, but does not begin until the first
of July after graduation, or until one month after a non-grad-
uating recipient has severed his connection with the Uni-
versity. The principal is to be repaid in annual instalments
of $100 each, due at the time of interest payments.
Willoughby Memorial Loan Fund.-Established by Pro-
fessor and Mrs. C. H. Willoughby in memory of their son
Paul Willoughby, who died at the University in 1918 while
enlisted in U. S. Army training; providing loans of $150 per
year each for two advanced students in science, under condi-
tions similar to those affecting loan funds offered by the
University.
William Wilson Finley Foundation.-See under College
of Agriculture.
State U. D. C. Foundation.-Loan to a lineal descendant

*For particulars, address the Superintendent of Public Instruction, Hills-
boro County, Tampa, Fla.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


of a Confederate soldier to an amount not exceeding $100 per
year.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
At the close of their Commencement exercises the class of
1906 organized an Alumni Association. All graduates of the
University and the graduates of the former institutions who
have had their diplomas confirmed by the University are
eligible for membership.
Further information concerning the Association may be
obtained from any one of the officers: President, Pat John-
ston, of Kissimmee; Vice-President, Harry W. Thompson, of
Pensacola; Secretary and Treasurer, B. R. Colson, of Gaines-
ville.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS
ORGANIZATIONs.-Practically every interest of the student-
body has a student-controlled organization, but with faculty
supervision, for its support. Some of these organizations are
mainly religious in character, some social, others purely liter-
ary or scientific, still others combine social with other features.
Hence there are athletic clubs, in addition to the general Ath-
letic Association of the University; associations of men who
have distinguished themselves or who are greatly interested
in some activity or study, as, e. g., a Military Club, a Mono-
gram Club, a Chemical Club, honor societies in Agriculture,
in Law, etc.; and a Rehabilitation Club. Among those worthy
of special mention are the following:
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION.-This association, composed of
the entire student body, has charge of all major and minor
sports, under faculty supervision and subject to the rules
and regulations of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic As-
sociation and of the Southern Intercollegiate Conference.
GOLF CLUB.-This promising organization has been formed
during the present year. It will foster golf playing among
the students as a recognized minor sport.
Y. M. C. A.-The Y. M. C. A., under the leadership of the
General Secretary, seeks to promote the ideal of the Univer-
sity, that every man should have a strong body, a trained
mind, and a Christian experience in order that he may go
forth prepared to meet the problems of life.
Clean, wholesome athletics is fostered, efficiency in the






STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS


classroom urged, and systematic Bible study promoted. The
best available ministers and laymen are brought before the
students to the end that the latter may become acquainted
with the problems of today.
The Y. M. C. A., in carrying forward this work, deserves
the support of every student, alumnus, and parent.
Honor Committee.-In order to carry out the spirit of the
"Honor System," which has been in operation at the Univer-
sity for years, each class elects one of its members to represent
it on the Student Honor Committee. This committee strives
in every way possible to promote among the students honesty
in all their work and conducts a fair trial in the rare cases of
breaches of the system. Its verdict is final, but is kept secret
from all save those concerned.
Literary and Scientific Societies.-See General Statement
of each of the five colleges of the University.
Debating Council.-The Debating Council, composed of
one representative from each of the Literary Societies, has
general charge both of intersociety and of intercollegiate de-
bates. Under its direction a debating contest is held annually
between members of each of the five colleges of the University.
The winning team gains possession of the Faculty Loving Cup
for the ensuing year; three successive victories entitle the
society furnishing the debaters to permanent ownership.
Teams representing the University debate annually against
teams from the University of South Carolina and the Uni-
versity of Tennessee. In 1921 and 1922 debates were held with
the Louisiana State University.
Cosmopolitan Club.-The students of foreign nationality,
together with a few Americans, organized in 1918 a club for
the purpose of promoting international understanding and
friendship. Under its auspices addresses are frequently made,
describing customs and institutions of foreign countries. The
membership consists at the present time of men from Brazil,
British Africa, Ecuador, Italy, Panama, the Philippines, Rus-
sia, Serbia, and the United States.
Orchestra.-The orchestra plays for Chapel exercises and
furnishes special music on Fridays.
Glee and Mandolin and Guitar Clubs.-The Glee Club de-
velops ability in part-singing and gives much pleasure by
adding variety to the Friday morning exercises. The Man-





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


dolin and Guitar Club, while complete in itself, joins the Glee
Club in its annual tour.
Military Band.-The Military Band adds much to the
effectiveness of parades. It makes several excursions during
the year to neighboring towns. The instruments, valued at
over $6,000, are furnished by the War Department.
The Masqueraders.-This dramatic association fosters in
its members an appreciation of the drama, and seeks to develop
personal power in expression. It stages annually at Gaines-
ville, and at other points in the state, an original play.
PUBLICATIONS. -Beginning with the session of 1909-10
each Junior (or Senior) class has published an illustrated an-
nual, known as the "Seminole".
The "Florida Alligator" is a weekly newspaper owned and
controlled by the student-body. Its editorial articles discuss
University problems from the viewpoint of the undergradu-
ates. It seeks the support of the alumni, who find in it the
best means of keeping in touch with the University.

ADMISSION
TERMS.-A candidate for admission must present, along
with his scholastic record, a certificate of good moral charac-
ter. If he be from another college or university, this certifi-
cate must show that he was honorably discharged.
No candidate of less than 16 (18 in the College of Law)
years of age will be admitted.
METHODS.-There are two methods of gaining admission:
(1) By Certificate.-The University will accept certifi-
cates from the approved Senior high schools and from accred-
ited academies and preparatory schools of Florida, and from
any secondary school elsewhere which is accredited by its
state university.
The certificate must be officially signed by the principal of
the school attended. It must state in detail the work of prep-
aration and, in the case of Florida high schools, that the course
thru the twelfth grade has been satisfactorily completed.
Blank certificates, conveniently arranged for the desired
data, will be sent to all high-school principals and, upon
application, to prospective students.
(2) By Examination.-Candidates not admitted by cer-
tificate will be required to stand written examinations upon





ADMISSION


the entrance subjects. For dates of these examinations, see
University Calendar, page 3.
REQUIREMENTS. "Entrance Units." The requirements
for admission are measured in "Entrance Units," based upon
the curriculum of the high schools of Florida. A unit repre-
sents a course of study pursued thruout the school year with
five recitation periods (two laboratory periods being counted
as one recitation period) of at least forty-five minutes each
per week, four courses being taken during each of the four
years. Thus the curriculum of the standard Senior high
school of Florida is equivalent to sixteen units.
Number of Units.-Admission to the Freshman class will
be granted to candidates who present evidence of having com-
pleted courses amounting to sixteen such units.
In no case will credit for more than sixteen units be given
for work done at a high school.
Deficiency.-A deficiency of one unit will be allowed, but
must be removed by the end of the first year after admission.
For admission to the College of Engineering such deficiency
must be in an elective, and not in a required subject.
Students who have registered for a University study will
not be allowed to make up an entrance condition by examina-
tion in this subject, unless the examination be taken on the
first Saturday in October of the same school year. The Uni-
versity credit may, however, be used as a substitute for en-
trance credit, a three-hour course continued thruout the year
counting as one unit.
Distribution of Units.-Seven and a half specified units are
required in common by all the colleges of the University; other
specified units are given below; the remaining units are
elective.
UNIVERSITY
English ....................................................... ...........3 units
H history ............................................... .............. .1 unit
Mathematics ....................................................... 2% units
*Science ...................................---- -........................... unit
*For the College of Engineering the Science must be Physics.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE*
TEACHERS COLLEGE
A. B. Curriculum
Latin .........--------.............. ............ .. ......-- 2 units
A. B. S. S. Curriculum
One Foreign Language............................................2 units
B. S. Curriculum
One Foreign Language
or
H history .....................................2 units
and
Science

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Mathematics ..........................--.........................1%-- units
ELECTIVE UNITS.-Elective units are to be chosen from
among the subjects regularly taught in a standard high school,
altho not more than four will be accepted in vocational sub-
jects-agriculture, mechanic arts, stenography, typewriting,
etc. Under exceptional circumstances practical experience in
engineering work may be accepted by the College of Engineer-
ing in lieu of not more than four elective units.
DESCRIPTION OF UNIT COURSES
The minimum requirements for the specified units, and
for the elective units most frequently offered, are as follows:
BOTANY.-One-half or one unit.-Anatomy and morphol-
ogy; physiology; ecology; natural history and classification of
the plant groups. At least twice as much time should be
given by the student to laboratory work as to recitation.
CHEMISTRY (PHYSICS).-One unit.-Study of a standard
high-school text; lecture-table demonstrations; individual lab-
oratory work, comprising at least thirty exercises from a rec-
ognized manual.
ENGINEERING PRACTICE.-Four units.-Regular commer-
cial work for pay in engineering, or in related subjects, may
be recognized for entrance credit at the discretion of the fac-
ulty of the College of Engineering. The candidate must sub-
mit a written statement from his employer, giving the nature
and quality of the work done and the date of beginning and

*A. B. Curriculum not offered in College of Agriculture.





ADMISSION


of ending. For each unit allowed twelve months of work
will be required.
ENGLISH.-Four units.-The exercises in Composition and
the use of the Classics should be continued thruout the whole
period of preparation. No candidate will be accepted whose
work is notably defective in spelling, punctuation, division
into paragraphs, or idiom.
(1) Grammar.-English Grammar, both in its technical
aspects and in its bearings upon speech and writing.
(2) Composition and Rhetoric.-The fundamental prin-
ciples of Rhetoric as given in any standard high-school text;
practice in Composition, oral and written.
(3) Classics.-The English Classics generally adopted by
schools and colleges.
(4) History of American Literature; History of English
Literature.-One unit.-Supposed to represent the work of
the fourth year in English in the high school.
HISTORY.-Four units.
(1) Ancient History, with particular reference
to Greece and to Rome........................... ....1.. unit
(2) European History since Charlemagne-..........1 unit
(3) English History -------......................................... .1 unit
(4) American History.......................-........-........- 1 unit
A year's work based on a textbook of at least 300 pages
is required for each unit. The student should know something
of the author of the textbook used and give evidence of having
consulted some works of reference.
LATIN.-Four units.-The minimum work required is:
(1) First Year.-One unit.-Completion of Collar &
Daniell's First Year Latin, Potter's Elementary Latin Course,
or other good first-year book.
(2) Second Year.-One unit.-Four books of Caesar's
Gallic War; grammar and prose composition thruout the year.
(3) Third Year.-One unit.-Six of Cicero's Orations;
grammar and prose composition thruout the year.
(4) Fourth year.-One unit.-The first six books of the
Aeneid and as much prosody as relates to accent, versification
in general, and to dactylic hexameter.
MATHEMATICS.-Four units.
(1) Algebra. First Year. One unit. Elementary
operations: factoring, highest common factor, least common





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


multiple, fractions, simple equations, inequalities, involution,
evolution, and numerical quadratics.
(2) Algebra. Second Year. One unit. Quadratic
equations, ratio and proportion, the progressions, imaginary
quantities, the binomial theorem, logarithms, and graphic
algebra.
(3) Plane Geometry.-One unit.
(4) Solid Geometry.-One-half unit.
(5) Plane Trigonometry.-One-half unit.
MODERN LANGUAGES.-Two units.-If the student offers
only one unit, he must study the language a second year in
the University.
French (Spanish).- First Year.- One unit.- Pronuncia-
tion; grammar; from 100 to 175 pages of graduated texts,
with practice in translating into the foreign language varia-
tions of sentences read; dictation; memorizing of short selec-
tions.
Second Year.-From 250 to 400 pages of easy prose; trans-
lation into the foreign language of variations upon the texts
read; abstracts; grammar; exercises; memorizing of short
poems.
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.-One unit.-Study of a standard
high-school text, together with laboratory and field course.
PHYsIcs.-Requirements similar to those for chemistry,
which see.
ZOOLOGY.- One-half or one unit.- Study of a standard
high-school text and dissection of at least ten specimens.
Notebooks with drawings, showing the character of the work
completed, must be presented on entrance to the University.
ADVANCED STANDING
Advanced standing will be granted only upon recommen-
dation of the heads of the departments concerned. Fitness for
advanced work may be determined by examination or by trial.
Students from other institutions of like standing will ordinar-
ily be classified according to the ground already covered.






ORGANIZATION


ORGANIZATION
I. THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.
II. THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the A. B. degree.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the degree of A.B. in the Social
Sciences.
(c) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree.
(d) A Pre-Medical Course.
III. THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE:
Instructional Division:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Agriculture.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the title Graduate in Farming.
(c) A Two-Year Course.
(d) A One-Year Course.
(e) A Four-Months' Course.
Experiment Station Division.
Extension Division.
IV. THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Civil Engineer-
ing.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Electrical
Engineering.
(c) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Mechanical
Engineering.
(d) A Curriculum leading to the B. S. degree in Chemical
Engineering.
V. THE COLLEGE OF LAW:
A Curriculum leading to the LL.B. or J. D. degree.
VI. THE TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the A. B. degree in Education.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B. S.'degree in Education.
(c) A Normal Course leading to a Diploma.
(d) The University Summer School.

VII. GENERAL (Connected with at least four Colleges):
Division of Military Instruction.
Division of Rehabilitation.
Division of Hygiene (In Cooperation with the Federal Inter-
Department Hygiene Board).


VIII. EXTENSION SERVICE.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GRADUATE SCHOOL
ORGANIZATION.-This School is under the direction of the
Committee on Graduate Studies, which consists of Professors
Anderson, Benton, Farr, Newell, Norman, and Trusler.
Graduate students should register with the Chairman of
this Committee.
DEGREES OFFERED.-Courses are offered leading to the de-
grees of Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Education, Master
of Science, Master of Science in Agriculture, and Master of
Science in Education.
PREREQUISITE DEGREE.-Candidates for the Master's degree
must possess the Bachelor's degree of this institution or of
one of like standing.
APPLICATIONS.-Candidates for the Master's degree must
present to the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Studies
a written application for the degree not later than the first of
November of the scholastic year in which the degree is desired.
This application must name the major and minor subjects
offered for the degree and must contain the signed approval of
the heads of the departments concerned.
When a candidate offers as a part of his work any course
not sufficiently described in the catalog, he must include in his
application an outline or description of that course.
TIME REQUIRED.-The student must spend at least one en-
tire academic year in residence at the University as a graduate
student, devoting his full time to the pursuit of his studies.
WORK REQUIRED.-The work is twelve hours per week. Six
hours of this work must be in one subject (the major) and of
a higher grade than any course offered for undergraduate stu-
dents in that subject. The other six hours (the minor or
minors) are to be determined and distributed by the professor
in charge of the department in which the major subject is
selected. No course designed primarily for students of a
lower grade than the Junior class will be acceptable as a
minor. While the major course is six hours, these hours are
not the same as undergraduate work, for in general the major
work will require at least two-thirds of the student's time.





GRADUATE SCHOOL 49

To obtain credit for a minor the student must attain a
grade of not less than eighty-five per cent.
DISSERTATION.-It is customary to require a dissertation
showing original research and independent thinking on some
subject accepted by the professor under whom the major work
is taken, but this requirement may be waived at the option of
the professor, subject to the approval of the Committee on
Graduate Studies. If the requirement be not waived, the
dissertation must be in the hands of the committee not later
than two weeks before Commencement Day.
SUMMER SCHOOL.-Four complete summer terms devoted
entirely to graduate work will satisfy the time requirement.
The application must be presented by the middle of the
first term.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
JAS. N. ANDERSON, Dean
FACULTY.-Jas. N. Anderson, E.-Cr-Beck, J. R. Benton, A.
P. Black, L. M. Bristol, L. W. Buchholz, M. D. Cody, C. L.
SCrow, HLJw.Davis*, H. O. Enwall; J. M. Farr, W. R. Hale, J. M.
Leake; T. R. Leigh, J. P. Little,' W. S. Perry, J. S. Rogers, T. M.
Simpson, K.T-Steik, J. Weil.
GENERAL STATEMENT
AIM AND ScOPE.-The tendency of universities at the pres-
ent time seems to be to reach out their arms farther and
farther into the domain of knowledge and to become more and
more places where the student may expect to be able to acquire
any form of useful knowledge in which he may be interested.
In the center, however, there is still found the College of Arts
and Sciences, the pulsating heart, as it were, sending its
vivifying streams to the outermost tips of the institution.
The aim of the college is to prepare for life, it is true, but
not so directly and immediately as do the professional schools.
It is a longer, but a better road, for those who are able to
travel it, to distinction and ultimate success in almost any
calling. Especially in the case of the learned professions, it is
becoming clearer that a man must first get a liberal education,
if possible, before entering upon his professional studies.
The purpose and aim of the College of Arts and Sciences
is to impart culture and refinement, to train the mind and
strengthen the intellect, to build up ideals and establish the
character, to enlarge the vision, to ennoble the thoughts, to
increase the appreciation of the beautiful and the true, to add
charm to life and piquancy to companionship, to make the man
a decent fellow, a useful citizen, an influential member of
society in whatever community he may be thrown, in whatever
field his life-course may be run.
But if the student wishes to examine the practical side
exclusively, he will find that there is also something practical
in all these courses. For instance, they are all valuable for
him who wishes to learn to teach those subjects. Moreover,
*Resigned.





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


the use of electives gives the student an opportunity to
specialize in some branch according to his inclination and in
furtherance of his plans.
ADMISSION.-For full description of requirements for ad-
mission and of unit courses, see pages 42 to 46, inclusive.
LITERARY SOCIETIES.-The Literary Societies are valuable
adjuncts to the educational work of the College. They are
conducted entirely by the students and maintain a high level
of endeavor. The members obtain much practical experience
in the conduct of public assemblies. They assimilate knowl-
edge of parliamentary law, acquire ease and grace of delivery,
learn to argue with coolness of thought and courtesy of manner,
and are trained in thinking and in presenting their thoughts
clearly and effectively while facing an audience. All students
are earnestly advised to connect themselves with one of these
societies and to take a constant and active part in its work.
CHEMICAL SOCIETY.-The Flint Chemical Society is organ-
ized by and for the students of the department of chemistry.
The purpose of the society is to stimulate the interest of the
beginning student of chemistry by giving him a correct idea
of the broadness of the field and its far-reaching importance
in the arts and industry. Those students who are so inclined
are thus encouraged to continue the study of chemistry. The
programs consist of lectures by various members of the fa-
culty, by advanced students of the department, and by outside
speakers when they can be secured. An open forum is held
at intervals when all members take part in the discussion.
Motion pictures are used to good advantage to illustrate the
application of chemical principles in various important indus-
tries. There are no restrictions as to membership, all chem-
istry students being urged to affiliate with it and attend its
programs. It meets on alternate Wednesday evenings during
the college year.
DEGREES.-The College of Arts and Sciences offers courses
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.), Bachelor
of Arts in the Social Sciences (A.B.S.S.), and Bachelor of
Science (B.S.).
SUBJECTS OF STUDY.-The subjects of study leading to-
wards the degrees offered by the College of Arts and Sciences
are divided into the following four groups:





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


I. II. III. IV.
Military Science French Bible Agriculture
Physical Education Greek Economics Astronomy
Latin Education Bacteriology
Spanish English Language Biology
and Literature Botany
History Chemistry
Philosophy Drawing
Political Science Descriptive
Psychology Geometry
Sociology Geology
Mathematics
Mechanics
Physics
Physiology
Surveying
Zoology
REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES.-For each of the degrees of-
fered, A.B., A.B.S.S., and B.S., there must be taken a total of
sixty-eight hours, of which at least the last fifteen hours must
be pursued in residence at this University.
For the A.B. degree eight hours must be taken in Group I,
twelve hours in each of groups II and IV, and eighteen hours
in group III; four hours may be taken in any group; the re-
maining fourteen hours (including' the "major") must be
chosen from groups II and III and (pure) mathematics. In
group II two courses of a grade as high as I must be taken.
For the A.B.S.S. degree the "major" must consist of nine
hours (not counting the Freshman work) either in the De-
partment of History and Political Science* or in the De-
partment of Sociology and Economics*; twenty-one hours (not
including the Freshman work) must be selected from Group
III; a part of the free electives may be taken from courses
offered in other colleges of the University with the consent of
the Deans involved and with the approval of the Head of the
Department in which the "major" falls.
The A.B.S.S. degree probably will not be conferred until
1924.
For the B.S. degree eight hours must be taken in group I,
nine hours in group II (three of which must be in a course as
high as I), fifteen hours in group III, and twenty-four hours
(including the "major") from group IV;the remaining twelve
may be chosen from any group or groups.
The "major" must consist of nine hours in one department

*It will be noted that students registered for the regular A.B. degree
may major in either of these departments.





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


(not counting the Freshman work) and must be approved by
the head of the department chosen. The choice of electives
must meet with the approval of the Dean.
COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAW COURSE.-For not more
than twelve of the free elective hours required for any of the
Bachelor's degrees conferred by the College of Arts and
Sciences there may be substituted an equal number of hours
from the first year of the College of Law.
The Bachelor's degree in Arts or Science will not be con-
ferred, however, upon a candidate offering twelve hours in
Law until he has satisfactorily completed the second year of
the course in the College of Law.
MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM HOURs.-The student must take
at least fourteen hours of work (not including Military Drill
and Physical Education) and in general will not be permitted
to take more than eighteen; but if in the preceding semester
he has attained an average of eighty-seven or more and has
not failed in any subject he may be permitted to take as many
as twenty-one hours, and if he has attained an average of
ninety with no failures he may be permitted to take as many as
twenty-three hours.
PRE-MEDICAL COURSE.-Students intending to study medi-
cine are advised to take the regular B.S. course. Inasmuch,
however, as many students are unable to spend four years on
a non-professional course, the University offers a Two-Year
Pre-Medical course.
CURRICULUM
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts
Freshman Year

NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
E english I ..................................R rhetoric .......................................................... 3
English II ................................History of English Literature.................... 2
Foreign Language I................French, Greek, Latin, or Spanish.............. 3
tH history I..................................M edieval H istory............................................ 3
Mathematics I..........................Trigonometry, College Algebra, Plane
Analytical Geometry................................ 3
*Military Science and Drill I..Regulations and Drill.................................. 3
Physical Education I .............................................. ... .... ...................... 1
18
*Students excused from Military Science and Drill must substitute for it
some three-hour course to be approved by the Dean.
tGreek may be substituted, in which case History I must be taken in the
Sophomore year.






54 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Sophomore Year

Biology Ia and IIIb..................---- 1
or
Chemistry I..............................

Physics I and II... ..............
or

Group II ..--..........- -----..---.. -.- --- ---- -.........- 3
Group III ........................................ 3
Group III ------------------------------------------------ 3
Group IIorII or---------------------------V----------------------------------------------- S
Group II or III or IV .................. ... ......................... ........ .................... 3
*Military Science and Drill II-....-- -.........---------------.. 3
Physical Education II-....................... .......... ........ ..... 1
17 or 18


CURRICULUM
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Social Sciences.
Freshman Year
NAMES OF COURSES HOURS PER WEEK
English I ..................-. ............-..--.............. 3
Sociology Aa........
and ........................ -----.... .-------.. 3
Economics Bb...... J
Foreign Language .......................... ....... .... ......... 3
History I................ 1
or -- ...-.........---- ----...-- ...--------- ...- ..--- 3
Political Science I J
M them atics I.................................................. ... .. ............... ......... 3
*Military Science and Drill I...................................---------- ..- 3
Physical Education I................................... ............ ...... 1
19

Sophomore Year
Chem istry I........................
or
Physics I and II or V ........................... ........................ 4 or 5
or
Biology Ia and IIIb ........
G group II ............................................................................ ............. 3
Group III ...................................--------------....----...---- 3
Group II, III or IV................ ........ --------...................... 3
*Military Science and Drill II...................................................- ------ 3
Physical Education II--..........................--............------.........----- 1
17 or 18

*Students excused from Military Science and Drill must substitute for
it some three-hour course to be approved by the Dean.






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 55

CURRICULUM
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science
Freshman Year

NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
Chemistry I.............................General Chemistry........................................ 5
E english I....................................Rhetoric ................................................--- 3
Foreign Language..................French, Greek, Latin, or Spanish.............. 3
Mathematics I..........................Trigonometry, College Algebra, Plane
Analytical Geometry ............................... 3
*Military Science and Drill I..Regulations and Drill---------.................................. 3
Physical E education I...................................................................................... 1

18

Sophomore Year
Biology Ia and IIIb.................-............---.--------------- 4
or
Physics I and I ................................. ...................................................... 5
or
P physics V ...................................................................... ............................. 5
*M military Science and Drill II.......................................................................... 3
Physical Education II.............................. ................ .. ....................... 1

17 or 18

In the Junior and Senior years candidates for either of the
degrees offered must choose their studies so as to conform to
the general "Requirements for Degrees" of this college. /

CURRICULUM
Two-Year Pre-Medical Course
First Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
Biology Ia and IIIb................General Course .............................................. 4
Chemistry I..............................General Chemistry -...............................---- 5
E english I.................................. Rhetoric ......................................................... 3
Foreign Language I................Elementary Course--.......................------...........--- 3
*Military Science and Drill I..Regulations and Drill................................... 3
Physical Education I.......................................--------------------- 1

19
Second Year
Advanced Biology ---------------................................................ 3
Chem istry III and V ........................................................................................ 8
Physics I and II........................
or ...................................... 5
Physics V................................
*M military Science and Drill II.................................. .......................... 3
Physical Education II................ ...................... ........................................... 1

20
*Students excused from Military Science and Drill must substitute for
it some three-hour course to be approved by the Dean.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

ANCIENT LANGUAGES
Professor Anderson
The study of the classics contributes largely to general
culture. In addition to the recognized and peculiar discip-
linary value of such studies and their conspicuous service in
cultivating the literary sense and developing literary taste,
they have a more immediate value and office as aids to the
comprehension and interpretation of modern languages and
literatures. A thoro study and a full understanding of the
modern languages, especially the Romance languages and our
own tongue, demand a considerable preliminary acquaintance
with Latin and Greek. Thus .from two points of view, that
of their own intrinsic beauty and value as culture studies and
that of aids to the study of other languages, Latin and Greek
command our attention and call for a large place in any cur-
riculum which proposes to issue in a liberal education.
Courses A, B, and C, if not used for entrance units, may
be taken for college credit.
LATIN
LATIN A.-First Year Latin, based on a book for begin-
ners. (3 hours.)
LATIN B.-Second Year Latin, based on Caesar, with
grammar and prose composition. (3 hours.)
LATIN C.-Third Year Latin, based on Cicero and Virgil,
with grammar and prose composition. (3 hours.)
LATIN I.-Ovid, about 2,000 verses selected from his vari-
ous works, but mainly from the Metamorphoses; Versification,
with especial reference to the Dactylic Hexameter and Pen-
tameter; Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia. A rapid
review of forms and the principal rules of Syntax; a short
weekly exercise in prose composition. (3 hours.)
LATIN II.-Selections from the Roman historians, espe-
cially Livy and Sallust, and from the Satires, Epistles, Odes,
and Epodes of Horace, with a study of the Horation Metres.
(3 hours.)
LATIN III.-Juvenal's Satires, with some omissions; Taci-
tus, parts of the Histories of Annals; selections from Catullus,
Tibullus, Properties, and Ovid. (3 hours.)





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


LATIN IV.-Several plays of Plautus and Terence; Tacitus,
Germania and Agricola; selections from Seneca, Gellius, and
Quintilian. (3 hours.)
LATIN Vb.-History of Roman Literature, preceded by a
short study of Roman Life and Customs. (Second semester;
3 hours.)
LATIN VI.-Grammar and Prose Composition: an inter-
mediate course in Prose Composition adapted to the needs of
students taking Latin I or II and consisting of weekly written
exercises and some oral work; in connection with this there
will be a general review of Latin Grammar with some more
advanced work, both in forms and syntax. (2 hours.)
LATIN VII.-Advanced Prose Composition: a continuation
of Latin VI, open only to those students who have completed
Latin VI or equivalent. (2 hours.)
GREEK
GREEK A.-The forms and most important principles of
the syntax; numerous exercises, partly oral, partly written,
and some practice in conversation and sight reading. One
book of Xenophon's Anabasis, with exercises in Prose Com-
position and study of the Grammar. (3 hours.)
GREEK I.-Xenophon's Anabasis, Books II, III, and IV,
selections from Lucian and the easier dialogues of Plato; sight
translation; Prose Composition; Grammar. (3 hours.)
GREEK II.-Select orations of Lysias or other Attic orators,
with informal talks on Athenian Laws and Customs; parts
of the Iliad and Odyssey of Homer; Prosody. (3 hours.)
GREEK III.-Selections from the Greek historians, espe-
cially Herodotus and Thucydides; from the Greek dramatists,
especially Euripides and Sophocles; from the lyric fragments
of Alcaeus, Sappho, etc. (3 hours.)
GREEK IVa.-History of Greek Literature, preceded by a
short study of Greek Life and Customs. A knowledge of the
Greek language is highly desirable, but is not required for
this course. (First semester; 3 hours.)
GREEK V.-Grammar and Prose Composition: an inter-
mediate course in Prose Composition adapted to the needs of
students taking Greek II or III and consisting of weekly
written exercises and some oral work; in connection with this





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


there will be a general review of Greek Grammar with some
more advanced work, both in forms and syntax. (2 hours.)
GREEK VI.-Selections from the Septuagint and from the
New Testament; class and parallel translations; vocabulary,
grammar, and stylistic features stressed. (3 hours.)

BIBLICAL INSTRUCTION
Professor Buchholz
The following courses are offered to Juniors and Seniors,
embracing such aspects of Biblical study as the University is
prepared to give, with a view to providing a major subject in
the Bachelor of Arts curriculum that will permit students to
begin preparation for work as secretary or physical director
of the Y. M. C. A., for welfare work in mills or social settle-
ments, or for the ministry. The courses offered will be con-
ducted by the instructors in the departments under which
the various aspects of the subject naturally fall and will be
given in a spirit free from sectarianism.
BIBLE I.-Old Testament History.-The history of the
Israelitish nation as narrated in the books of the Old Testa-
ment; the connections between sacred and profane history.
The aim is to give the student some conception of the develop-
ment of the cultural, ethical, and spiritual life of the nation.
(3 hours thruout the year. Professor Buchholz.)
BIBLE II.--New Testament History.-The period from
Herod the Great to the death of John the Evangelist, with
special attention to the life of Christ and the development of
the early church. Lectures, Bible readings, textbook. (3
hours. Professor Buchholz.)
BIBLE III.-The English Bible as Literature.- Literary
types found in the Bible and the excellence of the work as
compared with other great examples of literature. The dic-
tion of the 1611 version will be contrasted with that of other
translations and its effect upon English literature will be
demonstrated. (Professor Farr.)
BIBLE IV.- Old and New Testament Greek.- See Greek
VI. (3 hours. Professor Anderson.)
BIBLE V.-The Bible as an Ethical and Religious Guide.-
Those parts of the Old and New Testament which bring out
most vividly and directly the moral and religious elements will
receive most attention. The aim is to give the student a keen





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


appreciation of the Bible as the best guide for human conduct.
Lectures, Bible readings, studies of great sermons, textbooks
on Evidences of Christianity. (3 hours.)

BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY
Professor Rogers Assistant Professor Cody
BIOLOGY
For a description of the laboratories and general equipment
of the department, see pages 25 and 26.
Not all of the elective courses described below are given in
any one year, but any course, if elected by a sufficient number
of students, will be offered as often as each alternate year.
BIOLOGY Ia.-General Biology.-The fundamental princi-
ples of biology. This course is given in two sections, one deal-
ing primarily with animals, the other primarily with plants.
The same section must be elected for both lectures and labora-
tory work. This course is a prerequisite for all other courses
in biology. (2 lecture and 2 laboratory periods per week;
4 hours; laboratory fee $2.00.)
BIOLOGY IIb.-General Botany.-The vegetable functions,
structure and life-histories of plants. (2 class and 2 laboratory
periods per week; 4 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
BIOLOGY IIIb.-General Zoology.-A survey of the animal
kingdom. Classification, structure, life processes and ecolog-
ical relationships of animals. As far as possible the emphasis
will be placed upon the local fauna. (2 lecture and 2 laboratory
or field periods per week; 4 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
BIOLOGY IVa OR b.-Zoological Technique.-This course is
planned primarily for students who plan to teach biology in
secondary schools, but will be adapted to pre-medical stu-
dents and others who look forward to advanced laboratory
work. Training in microscopic and macroscopic preparations,
photography and chart making, and methods of collecting and
preserving specimens. (1 lecture and 6 actual hours of labora-
tory work per week; 3 hours; laboratory fee $3.50.)
BIOLOGY Va.-Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. (2
lectures and 2 laboratory periods per week; 4 hours; labora-
tory fee $3.00.)
BIOLOGY Vb.-Physiology.-The animal body considered
as a living mechanism, with special reference to the higher





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


vertebrates. The laboratory work will consist of demonstra-
tions and experiments on the special physiology of the frog and
of the cat. (2 lecture and 2 laboratory periods per week; 4
hours; laboratory fee $3.50.)
BIOLOGY VI.-Economic Zoology.-This course, designed
primarily for agricultural students, is devoted chiefly to the
study of insects and related forms, special attention being
given to those of economic importance. This is followed by a
brief consideration of the principal groups of vertebrates in
their relation to agriculture. (2 class periods and 1 laboratory
period per week; 3 hours; laboratory fee $1.50 per semester.)
BIOLOGY VIIb.-Vertebrate Embryology.-Lectures and
laboratory work on the development of animals with special
reference to the chick. (2 lecture and 2 laboratory periods
per week; 4 hours. Prerequisite: Biology IIlb; laboratory fee
$3.00.)
BIOLOGY VIIIa.-Genetics.-The phenomena of variation
and inheritance. The last quarter of this course will deal with
the questions and problems of human heredity. (2 lecture and
1 laboratory periods per week; 3 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
BIOLOGY VIIIb.-Animal Ecology.-The relationship of the
animal to its environment. The lectures will deal with the
general principles of ecology. The field and laboratory periods
will be devoted to the behaviour and habitats of local animals.
(2 lecture and 2 field or laboratory periods per week; 4 hours.
Prerequisite: Biology IlIb; laboratory fee $2.00.)
BIOLOGY IXa.-Plant Physiology.-The fundamental life-
processes, including digestion, assimilation, growth, respira-
tion, reproduction, etc. (1 class and 2 laboratory periods per
week; 3 hours. Prerequisites: Biology IIb and Chemistry I;
laboratory fee $2.00.)
BIOLOGY IXb.-Plant Histology and Anatomy.-The study
of plant tissues and the technic of fixing, sectioning, staining,
etc. (1 class and 2 laboratory periods per week; 3 hours.
Prerequisite: Biology IXa; laboratory fee $1.00.)
BIOLOGY Xa.-Plant Pathology.-The causal agents, symp-
toms, diagnosis, and treatment of truck and citrus diseases.
(1 class and 2 laboratory periods per week; 3 hours. Pre-
requisite: Biology IXa and XIa; laboratory fee $3.00.)
BIOLOGY XIa.- General Bacteriology.-The morphology,
physiology, and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


organisms. (2 class and 2 laboratory periods per week; 4
hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry I; laboratory fee $3.00.)
BIOLOGY XIIb.-Agricultural Bacteriology.-Soil bacteria
and their influence on soil fertility, and bacteria in relation to
milk and its products. (1 class and 2 laboratory periods per
week; 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology XIa; laboratory fe'e
$3.00.)
BIOLOGY XIIIb.- Sanitary Bacteriology.-The principles
of water supply, sewage disposal, disinfection, and the control
of contagious diseases. (1 class and 2 laboratory periods per
week; 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology XIa; laboratory fee
$3.00.)
BIOLOGY XIVab.-Ecological Botany.-A systematic study
of plants and their relations of structure and habit to the con-
ditions under which they live. (3 hours. Prerequisite:
Biology II.)
GEOLOGY
GEOLOGY Ia.-Physical Geology.-Designed as an introduc-
tion to dynamical and structural geology. (3 hours.)
GEOLOGY Ib.-Historical Geology.-A study of the geologi-
cal history of the earth and its inhabitants. (3 hours. Pre-
requisites: Geology la and Biology IIIb.)

CHEMISTRY
Professor Leigh Assistant Professor Black
Assistant Professor Steik
The aim of the Department of Chemistry is two-fold. It
offers to the general student the opportunity of becoming
acquainted with the principles of this science and gives him
practice in the fundamental methods used in a chemical
laboratory. To those students who wish to specialize in chem-
istry, the Department offers superior advantages for more
advanced work both practical and theoretical. The Depart-
ment also possesses a growing collection of reference books
which will meet the requirements of students especially inter-
ested in chemistry; and is supplied with equipment for instruc-
tion in general, organic, analytical, industrial and agricultural
chemistry.
The Flint Chemical Society, a voluntary association of stu-
dents in this department, is described on page 51.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CHEMISTRY I.-General Chemistry.-A course for fresh-
men. Lectures and recitations on the elements and their com-
pounds and on the fundamental laws and theories of chem-
istry, supplemented by laboratory work. Three lectures or
recitations and two laboratory exercises of two hours each a
week. Emphasis is placed upon the intelligent writing of
reactions, and the solving of problems. (5 hours; laboratory
fee $5.00 for each semester.)
CHEMISTRY III.-Qualitative Analysis.-This course in-
cludes the general reactions of the metals and acids with their
qualitative separation and identification. While chiefly labora-
tory work, it is amply supported by lectures. This course ex-
tends thruout the year; one class starts the first semester, the
other the second semester. (Prerequisite: Chemistry I; 3
hours; laboratory fee $5.00 for each semester.)
CHEMISTRY IVab.-Agricultural Chemistry.-For the first
semester this course is identical with Chemistry V below. For
the second semester it includes lectures, recitations and labora-
tory work arranged with special reference to the study of
soils, fertilizers and agricultural products. (Open only to
agricultural students. Prerequisite: Chemistry I; 5 hours;
laboratory fee $5.00 for each semester.)
CHEMISTRY V.-Organic Chemistry.-Lectures, recitations
and laboratory exercises in the aliphatic and aromatic series,
planned for students specializing in chemistry and pre-medical
and agricultural students. (Prerequisite: Chemistry I; 3 class
and 2 laboratory periods per week; 5 hours; laboratory fee
$5.00 for each semester.)
CHEMISTRY VI.-Industrial Chemistry.-See Chemical En-
gineering.
CHEMISTRY VIIa.-Quantitative Analysis.-Gravimetric
analysis of simple compounds, followed by the analysis of such
materials as phosphate rock, simple alloys, limestone and Port-
land cement. Weekly lecture-recitation for theory and prac-
tice of Stoichiometric calculations and the use of logarithmic
factors. (Laboratory fee $5.00.)
CHEMISTRY VIIb.-Quantitative Analysis.-Volumetric
methods in Acidimetry and Alkalimetry, Oxidation and Reduc-
tion, lodometry, and Precipitation. Weekly lecture-recitation
for theory and practice of stoichiometric calculations. (Labora-
tory fee $5.00.)





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


CHEMISTRY VIIIa.-Organic Preparations.-The prepara-
tion of a number of typical organic compounds. Discussions
of principles and theories. (Prerequisite: Chemistry V; first
semester; 3 hours; laboratory fee $5.00.)
CHEMISTRY VIIIb.-Inorganic Preparations.-The prepar-
ation of a number of typical inorganic compounds. Collateral
reading and quizzes. (Prerequisite: Chemistry Vila; second
semester; 3 hours; laboratory fee $5.00.)
CHEMISTRY IXb.-Advanced Agricultural Chemistry.-
Laboratory assigned readings, class reports and discussions,
adapted to the needs of students in agriculture and kindred
lines. (Prerequisites: Chemistry IVab and VIla; prerequisite
or corequisite Chemistry XIIb; second semester; 3 hours;
laboratory fee $5.00.)
CHEMISTRY Xa.-Water Analysis.-In this course waters
are examined to determine their potability and suitableness
for steam raising and other purposes. (Prerequisite: Chem-
istry Vila, and Chemistry VIIb; 3 hours; laboratory' fee
$2.50.)
CHEMISTRY Xb.-See Chemical Engineering.
CHEMISTRY XI.-Physical Chemistry.-Lecture and recita-
tions covering the gaseous, liquid and solid states of water;
equilibrium and velocities of reactions; electro-chemistry.
Laboratory studies in physico-chemical measurements. Deter-
mination of molecular weights; study of solutions thru conduc-
tivity and other methods; calorimetry; and the use of such
instruments as the refractometer, polariscope, and spectro-
scope. (Prerequisites: Chemistry III and Chemistry V; 3
hours; laboratory fee $5.00 for each semester.)
CHEMISTRY XIIa.-Advanced Organic Chemistry.-Special
lectures and collateral readings. Graduate course. (21/
hours.)
CHEMISTRY XIIb.-Chemical Research. (21/2 to 5 hours;
laboratory fee $5.00.)

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Professor Leigh Assistant Professor Black
Assistant Professor Steik
CHEMISTRY IIIe.-Qualitative Analysis.-Mainly labora-
tory work with class hour for theory, reports and tests by





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


arrangement. This course is given twice a year. Students
may begin the course the first or the second semester. (21/2
hours; laboratory fee $5.00 for each semester.)
CHEMISTRY VI.-Chemistry Technology.-Consideration of
chemical principles involved in manufacturing and refining
products of commercial importance: Fuels, sulphuric acid, the
soda and chlorine industries, fertilizers, cements, glass, pig-
ments, coal tar, mineral oils, soap, starch, sugar, fermentation,
industries, explosives, textiles, paper, leather, etc. Visits are
made to such factories and chemical plants as may be acces-
sible. (Required of chemical engineering students; Senior
year; 3 hours.)
CHEMISTRY Xb.-Engineering Chemistry.-Analysis of
materials connected with engineering: Fuels, boiler waters,
iron and steel, Portland cements, asphalt and coal tar products,
mineral oils, vegetable oils, fats and waxes, paints, fertilizers,
soaps, and food products. (Required of chemical engineering
students; Senior year; second semester; 10 actual hours;
laboratory fee $5.00.)
CHEMISTRY XI.-Physical Chemistry.-See Chemistry.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
Professor Farr Associate Professor Beck
Instructor Weedon Mr. Ball
ENGLISH I.--Advanced College Rhetoric.- Designed to
train students in methods of clear and forceful expression.
Instruction is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in
rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing, the constant corre-
lation of the three as methods of approach to the desired goal
being kept in view. In addition a reading course is assigned
each student. (Required of all Freshmen; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH II.-History of Literature.-An outline course in
the historical development of the English literature. Selec-
tions from important prose writers and poets; lectures on the
history of the language and literature; a manual for refer-
ence; frequent reports from the individual students; constant
use of the University library. (Required of Freshmen in A.B.
course; 2 hours.)
ENGLISH IIIa.-Description and Narration.-A course for
those who have completed English I and who desire to con-
tinue composition work. Practice in writing rather than





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


rhetorical analysis will be emphasized. Text-book work will
be supplemented by lectures and application of principles.
Pictorial writing and incidental description will be stressed.
Narrative practice will include the anecdote, tale, feature
story, short-story, and fanciful and real narratives. (First
semester; 3 hours. Prerequisite: English I.)
ENGLISH IIIb.- Exposition.- Study and composition of
the editorial paragraph, editorial article, definition, criticism,
formal essay, and informal essay. Some time is spent on
special feature articles. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH IVa.-Milton and the Epic.-A study of Para-
dise Lost, around which are grouped studies in the Age of
Milton and in the Epic as a type of Comparative Literature.
The first four books of the poem are read in class; written
reviews on the others alternate each week with essays from
the student and lectures by the instructor. Readings in the
minor poets of the age and in English translations of the
great epics are assigned. (First semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH IVb. Shakespeare and the Drama. Three
Shakespearian plays are read in class. On eight others a writ-
ten review each fortnight, and on the alternate week essays
from the students and lectures by the instructor. Readings
in the English drama from the Cycle plays to contemporary
production are assigned. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH Va.-The Short-Story.-An extensive study of
American, French, English, Russian, Scandinavian, Italian,
and German short-stories. Discussion and study of the
conte, or short-story. Constant use of various texts and the
library. The course is planned to furnish the student with
a wide knowledge of short-stories and short-story writers to
serve as a foundation for actual production. (First semester;
3 hours. Prerequisite: Eng. I.)
ENGLISH Vb. Writing the Short-Story. Primarily a
writing course. Discussion of various story types and story
ideas. Round tables on original plots. Current magazines
and their wants. Preparing and marketing manuscripts.
(Second semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH VIa.-American Poetry.-A rapid survey of the
development of poetry in the United States; critical study of
a few of the more important authors (Bryant, Whittier,
Longfellow, Emerson, Lowell, Poe). (First semester; 3 hours.)





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ENGLISH VIb.- Southern Literature.- A detailed study,
with extensive reading and essay work; examination of the
claims of Florida authors. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
ENGLISH VII.-The English Novel.-The student reads a
list of novels chosen to illustrate chronology and variety of
species, analyzes minutely one novel from the technical side,
masters the entire work and life of one novelist, and compares
closely a novel and a dramatized version of it. (3 hours.)
ENGLISH VIIIa.-Browning.-Lectures and written exer-
cises on Robert Browning's poems and dramas. Shorter
Poems: Rabbi Ben Ezra, Andrea del Sarto, Songs from Pippa
Passes, Childe Roland, Abt Vogler, My Last Duchess. Dramas:
Luria, The Return of the Druses, A Blot in the 'Scutcheon.
(First semester; 3 hours. Prerequisite: Eng. II.)
ENGLISH VIIIb.-Modern Poetry.-Present-day poems and
poets. American and English writers stressed. Discussion
of poetic values and modern poetic tendencies. (Second sem-
ester; 3 hours. Prerequisite: Eng. II.)
ENGLISH IX.-The Romantic Revival.-A study in literary
movement: the causes and forces which underlie the move-
ment, its phenomena and the authors and works which exhibit
them, and a comparison with other movements in literature.
The work of Prof. Beers will be used as a basis and the
student will be led, by means of extensive reading, by inves-
tigation and essays, and by lectures, to realize the truth of
his statements. (3 hours.)
ENGLISH X.-Anglo-Saxon Grammar and Reading.-Drill
in the forms of the early language and an elementary view of
its relation to the other members of the Aryan family and of
its development into Modern English. The texts in Bright's
Anglo-Saxon Reader are studied, and Cook's edition of Judith
is read. (3 hours.)
ENGLISH XI.-Chaucer and Middle English Grammar.-
During the first semester the works of Chaucer are read in
and out of class. Pronunciation, forms, scansion, condition of
text, analogs, and sources are examined. During the second
semester, Morris and Skeats' Specimens, Part II, is studied
in connection with informal lectures on Middle English
viewed as developing from Anglo-Saxon into Modern English.
(Prerequisite: English X; 3 hours.)





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


ENGLISH XII.-Engineering Exposition.-An attempt to
give special training to Engineering students in the prepara-
tion of the various kinds of writing they will be called upon
to do in the pursuit of their profession. It will consist largely
of the writing of papers (upon subjects assigned by the de-
partments in the College of Engineering), which will be criti-
cised and revised. (Engineering Seniors; 1 hour.)
ENGLISH XIII.-Newspaper Writing.-Designed to train
students to write clearly and concisely for newspapers. A
small, four-sheet paper, twice a month, will furnish the
laboratory work. Journalism. (1 hour.)

EXPRESSION AND PUBLIC SPEAKING
Mr. Chapman
EXPRESSION.-Particular attention is given to establishing
a correct method of breathing, to correcting faulty articula-
tion, and to teaching the principles of interpretation by voice,
gesture, and facial expression.
A small tuition fee is charged.
PUBLIC SPEAKING.-Students are instructed in the art of
preparing and of delivering debates, orations, and occasional
addresses.
The department always shows a willingness to co-operate
with the Committee on Public Debating and with the Debating
Council.
ALPHA PHI EPSILON.-A chapter of the Honorary Fratern-
ity of Alpha Phi Epsilon was established at the University
during the spring of 1921. The objectives of the fraternity
are to honor those who take active parts in debating; to unite
them in their efforts to spread abroad, and arouse where dor-
mant, the gospel of preparation for the times in life when
every ex-college student will be faced with the necessity for
speaking in some public place; to encourage all inter-class, in-
ter-organization, and inter-collegiate contests in public speak-
ing; to bring about a serious study of parliamentary law; and
in every way possible to raise the standards of public speak-
ing, both prepared and extempore.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
Professor Leake
The aims of this department are to give that knowledge of
the facts and philosophy of History which belongs to a liberal
education, to equip the student for more advanced work in the
historical and social sciences, and to prepare the student for
journalism or for the study of the law. With these ends in
view the courses are planned to cover a broad field of study in
a thoro manner. The department has the necessary library
authorities for adequate collateral reading. All students begin-
ning college work in History are advised when possible to take
History I before taking up any of the more advanced courses.
The courses in Political Science are planned so that
emphasis is laid upon the organization and functions of
national, state, and local governments in the United States,
with the dual purpose of preparing students for the privileges
and responsibilities of citizenship, and of familiarizing them
with a concrete example of government, as a foundation for
more advanced work in Political Science. Several advanced
courses are offered in Constitutional Law, International Law,
and Comparative Government.
All the advanced courses offered are not given in any one
year.
HISTORY
HISTORY Ia and Ib.-Europe During the Middle Ages.-A
general course in the history of Western Europe from the
Teutonic migrations to the close of the Seven Years' War.
(3 hours.)
HISTORY IIH and IIb.-American History, 1492 to 1830.-
The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the
history of America and of American institutions. Beginning
with the period of discovery and colonization a detailed study
is made of each colony. The Revolutionary movement, the
period of the Articles of Confederation, the adoption of the
Federal Constitution, and the social, political, and economic
development of the United States up to 1830 are subjected to
close analysis. (3 hours.)
HISTORY IIIa and IIIb.-American History, 1830 to the
Present.-The background and causes of the War between the
States, the rise and fall of the Confederacy, the Reconstruc-





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


tion Period, the industrial expansion of the United States, and
America as a world-power. Especial emphasis is laid on our
international relations. (3 hours.)
HISTORY IVa and IVb.-Modern European History.-The
characteristic features of the Old Regime, the French Revo-
lutionary and Napoleonic Periods, and the development of
Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the Congress of
Versailles. (3 hours.)
HISTORY Va and Vb.-English History.-A brief survey of
English History from the Anglo-Saxon invasions to the
Norman Conquest, and a more detailed study of the period
from 1066 to the present. (3 hours.)
HISTORY VIa and VIb*.-The Renaissance and the Refor-
mation.-A study of the causes, development and results of
these great intellectual and religious movements. (3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLITICAL SCIENCE Ia. American Government and
Politics.-A study of the structure and functions of our
national and state governments. Thruout the course present-
day political problems of national and local interest will be
made subjects of class discussion. (First semester; 3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE Ib.-Municipal Government-An out-
line of the growth of American municipalities and a study of
the organs and functional mechanism of modern cities of the
United States and Europe. Emphasis is laid upon the newer
tendencies in municipal government, the commission form of
government and the city-manager plan coming in for thoro
analysis. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE IIa.- Comparative Government.-A
study of the constitutional structure and organization of the
governments of the more important European countries. The
object of the course is to enable the student to compare these
governments, both in theory and in their practical workings,
with each other and with our own. (First semester; 3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE IIb.-Principles of Political Science.-
A study of the origin, nature, and functions of the state and
a critical examination of ancient, medieval, and modern politi-
cal theories. (Second semester; 2 hours.)

*Open only to advanced students.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


POLITICAL SCIENCE IIIa and IIIb.-Constitutional Law of
the United States.-Intended to familiarize the student with
the leading principles of the American constitutional system.
The course will deal principally with the Federal Constitution
and with the decisions of the Supreme Court of the United
States and will be found of special value to those students who
contemplate advanced work in political science or who intend
to enter upon the study of the law. (3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE IVa and IVb*.-International Law.-
The object of this course is to set forth the rules and principles
of International Law as a positive system with a historical
background of custom and convention. The attributes of
sovereign states, and their rights and duties as members of
the family of nations, in peace, in war, and in the relation
of neutrality will receive adequate treatment. (3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE Va and Vb*.-Political Theories.-A
comprehensive survey and discussion of the more important
political theories. (3 hours.)
MATHEMATICS
Professor Simpson Mr. Hale
The work in the Department of Mathematics is planned
with a threefold purpose in view:
1. For those who intend to specialize in Mathematics it
provides the preparation for more advanced work. Several
advanced courses are offered such students.
2. To those who need Mathematics as an instrument it
offers opportunities to become familiar with this instrument.
The application of Calculus not only to Physics, Chemistry,
and Engineering, but even to such seemingly remote realms
as Psychology and Political Economy, makes it advisable that
this class should continue the study of Mathematics at least
so far as to include Calculus.
3. To others it gives logical training in Analysis and
Proof, introduces them to that scientific method par excel-
lence of the Hypothesis, and develops the idea of a deductive
system in its classical form.
MATHEMATICS A.-Solid Geometry. (2 hours.)
MATHEMATICS B.-Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms.
(2 hours.)

*Open only to advanced students.





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


MATHEMATICS I.-Plane Analytic Geometry and College
Algebra. (3 hours.)
MATHEMATICS II.--Spherical Trigonometry and College
Algebra. (1 hour; not given in 1922-23.)
MATHEMATICS III.- Differential and Integral Calculus.
(3 hours.)
MATHEMATICS IV.-Solid Analytic Geometry and Calculus.
(2 hours.)
MATHEMATICS V.- Advanced Calculus and Differential
Equations. (2 hours.)
MATHEMATICS VI.-Theory of Equations, Complex Num-
bers, and Determinants. (3 hours.)
MATHEMATICS VII.- Modern Projective Geometry. (2
hours.)
MODERN LANGUAGES
Professor Crow
Instructor Weedon Mr. Duckworth
Extensive courses of reading, in and out of class, frequent
exercises, oral and written, and studies in literature and
language form the chief feature of instruction.
Authors and textbooks vary from year to year. Tho the
classics are not neglected, special attention is paid to the
literature of the Nineteenth Century.
All the courses offered will not be given in any one year.
FRENCH
FRENCH A.- Elementary Course.- Pronunciation, forms,
elementary syntax, dictation, written exercises, memorizing
of vocabularies and short poems, translation. (3 hours.)
FRENCH I.-Intermediate Course.-Work of elementary
course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose
composition, translation of intermediate and advanced texts,
sight reading, parallel. (3 hours.)
FRENCH II.-Advanced Courses.-Syntax, stylistic, com-
position, history of French literature, selections from the
dramatists or novelists, as class may decide. (3 hours.)
FRENCH III.-Romance Philology.-(Prerequisites: French
II and Latin II; 3 hours.)





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


SPANISH
SPANISH A.-Elementary Course.-Pronunciation, forms,
elementary syntax, dictation, written exercises, memorizing
of vocabularies and short poems, translation. (3 hours.)
SPANISH I.- Intermediate Course.-Work of elementary
course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose
composition, translation, parallel. (3 hours.)
SPANISH II. Commercial Correspondence. (Optional,
subject to instructor's permission; 3 hours.)

MUSIC
Mr. Brown
This department aims to foster a love for good music and
to encourage students to use their musical abilities and train-
ing for the benefit of themselves and others. It trains and
directs the student chorus, the chapel choir, the glee and man-
dolin and guitar clubs, the orchestra, and the University band,
and offers private instruction in voice and in violin and other
instruments. It seeks to cooperate with the musical organiza-
tions of Gainesville and in conjunction with them to give
several public entertainments during the year.
Owing to the lack of funds for the department, a small
tuition fee is charged for private instruction.
PHILOSOPHY
Professor Enwall
The primary aim of this department is to give the student
a broad outlook upon life in general, as well as a better under-
standing of his own life from psychological, ethical, and meta-
physical viewpoints. Philosophy lies nearer today than ever
before to the various sciences, on the one hand, and to the de-
mands of practical life on the other.
Another very important aim is to aid in the professional
training of teachers. For description of the equipment for
carrying on mental and physical tests, see page 26.
Students may begin with Course Ia, IIa, IIIa and IVa.
PHILOSOPHY Ia.-General Psychology.-Facts and theories
current in general psychological discussion: the sensations, the
sense organs, and the functions of the brain; the higher mental
functions-attention, perception, memory, feeling, emotion, vo-
lition, the self; and like topics. (First semester; 3 hours.)






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


PHILOSOPHY Ib. Experimental Psychology. Mainly
laboratory work with standard apparatus on the current prob-
lems in Experimental Psychology. Special attention given to
methods of psychological investigation and the collection and
treatment of data. (Second semester; 3 hours; laboratory fee
$2.00.)
PHILOSOPHY IIa.-Logic, Inductive and Deductive.-The
use of syllogisms, inductive methods, logical analysis, and criti-
cisms of fallacies. (First semester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY IIIa.-Ethics.-Principles of Ethics: study of
such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty, freedom, civi-
lization, and progress; history of the various Ethical Systems.
(First semester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY IIIb.-Social Psychology.-Influences of the
social environment upon the mental and moral development of
the individual. (Second semester; 3 hours. Prerequisite
Phil. Ia.)
PHILOSOPHY IVa.-History of Ancient Philosophy.-The
development of philosophic thought from its appearance among
the Ionic Greeks to the time of Descartes. Special attention will
be given to the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle. (First se-
mester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY IVb.-History of Modern Philosophy.-A con-
tinuation of IVa. Special attention will be given to the works
of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Kant, Hume, etc. (Second se-
mester; 3 hours.)
PHILOSOPHY Va.-Advanced Psychology.-The theoretical
problems in the field of modern psychology; the practical as-
pects of psychology as applied to Business, Law, Medicine,
Education, etc. (First semester; 3 hours.) Not offered 1922-
23.
PHILOSOPHY Vb.-Abnormal Psychology.-Abnormal
phases of mental life: dreams, illusions, hallucinations, sugges-
tions, hypnotism, hysteria, diseases of the memory, diseases of
the will, etc. Special attention given to mental hygiene. (Sec-
ond semester; 3 hours.) (Open to Seniors and advanced pre-
medical students only.)
PHILOSOPHY VI.-Advanced Logic.-Theories of thought
and knowledge. (Prerequisite: Philosophy Ha, and IVb,
Given with Philosophy VII in alternate years. Not offered
1922-23. 3 hours. Hours to be arranged. Seminar.)






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


PHILOSOPHY VII.-Philosophy of Nature.-Man's relation
to Nature; the various philosophical doctrines: Animism, Pan-
theism, Materialism, Realism, Agnosticism, Humanism, Ideal-
ism, etc. (Prerequisite: Philosophy Ia, IVa, and IVb. Given
with Philosophy VI in alternate years. Offered 1922-23. 3
hours. Hours to be arranged. Seminar.)
DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION*
Director Kline
Dierctor Manchester
This department has jurisdiction over all forms of athletics
and gymnasium exercises. It is striving to accomplish three
things.
One of these objectives is to advance inter-collegiate games
and sports, and establish football, basketball, baseball, track,
and tennis teams in a strong, friendly relationship with those
of other large universities and colleges of the country. Rapid
and sound development is noticeable in 1922, particularly, as
evidenced by the baseball and football schedules and the en-
trance of Florida into the Southern Inter-Collegiate Confer-
ence, composed of the large institutions of the South. Any stu-
dent carrying twelve hours' work satisfactorily, who has been
one year in attendance at the University, is eligible to take
part in these inter-collegiate contests. Adequate provision
will be made for inter-collegiate freshmen teams and competi-
tion on the same basis as "Varsity" requirements. A thoro
medical examination is required of every candidate for any
of these teams. Observance of reasonable training rules is
required under the Honor System. Good habits and a fine
spirit are desired above all else and are considered indispens-
able in securing successful teamwork. Special courses will be
given, if the demand warrants them, in, football, baseball,
basketball, and track with the object of fitting men for coach-
ing service.
Another objective is to foster and develop, extensively,
intra-mural games and sports and mass play. These activities
are open for every student who cares to take part, and all are
urged to participate. Inter-college and inter-class schedules
are arranged and played in all branches of sports. Boxing,
wrestling, swimming, hand ball, volley ball, soccer, indoor
baseball and mass play are offered under expert instruction.

*See also Department of Hygiene, pages 163-164.





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


The third objective of this department is physical develop-
ment solely. Gymnasium classes are called twice per week
and the work is compulsory for freshmen and sophomores.
College credit is given for this work. Inter-collegiate or intra-
mural participation during the season is accepted in place of
gymnasium work. This work consists of calisthenics and all
forms of exercises that may be had in any well equipped gym-
nasium. This includes punching bags, trapeze, pulleys, rings,
parallel bars, ropes, spring board and tumbling mats. Great
emphasis is placed upon outdoor work in Florida's wonderful
climate. No violent or dangerous exercises are permitted and
careful expert instruction is available.
The department seeks the all-around development of the
individual, physically, mentally and spiritually and bases its
team play upon clean sportsmanship.

PHYSICS
Professor Benton Assistant Professor Perry
Mr. Weil Mr. Little
The work of this department is intended to meet the needs,
on the one hand, of those who study physics as a part of a lib-
eral education and, on the other hand, of those who will have
to apply physics as one of the sciences fundamental to engi-
neering, or to medicine.
The courses offered in this department fall into three
groups; (1) Physics V is a brief course in general physics and
does not pre-suppose any previous knowledge of physics; (2)
Physics I, II and III form a longer and more advanced course
in general physics, pre-supposing a knowledge of the physics
taught in the High Schools and of Trigonometry; (3) the re-
maining courses deal more fully with special branches of
physics, pre-supposing a college course in general physics, and
some advanced mathematics.
Instruction is given by (1) recitations based upon lessons
assigned in textbooks; (2) laboratory work, in which the stu-
dent uses his own direct observation to gain knowledge of the
subject; (3) lectures, in which experimental demonstrations
of the principles under discussion are given; and (4) seminar
work in the advanced courses, in which the various members
of the class take up special problems requiring extended study
or investigation and report upon them.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The physical laboratory (see page 25) is well equipt for
the experiments usually required in undergraduate laboratory
work in the best colleges.
PHYSICS I.-General physics, including mechanics, heat,
acoustics, and optics, but not electricity and magnetism. (1
lecture and 2 recitations per week; Prerequisites: High School
Physics and Plane Trigonometry.)
PHYSICS II.-General laboratory physics, to accompany
Physics I. (2 exercises of 2 hours each per week; laboratory
fee $1.50 for each semester.)
PHYSICS III.-General electricity and magnetism, being a
continuation of Physics I. (2 recitations and one 2-hour labo-
ratory exercise per week; laboratory fee $1.50 for each semes-
ter.)
PHYSICS V.-General physics designed to meet the needs
of the general student, and of those taking the Pre-Medical
Course; divided as follows:
PHYSICS Va.-Mechanics and Heat. (First Semester; 3
recitations and two 2-hour periods per week; laboratory fee
$1.50.)
PHYSICS Vb.-Sound, Light, Electricity and Magnetism.
(Second Semester; 3 recitations and two 2-hour laboratory
periods per week; laboratory fee $1.50.)
METEOROLOGY.-A brief general course. (First Semester;
2 recitations and one 2-hour laboratory period per week; Pre-
requisites: Physics V or Physics I and II.)
ASTRONOMY.-A brief general course on descriptive astron-
omy. (Second Semester; 2 recitations and one 2-hour period
of observation per week; Prerequisites: Physics V or Physics
I and II.)
THEORETICAL MECHANICS.-A course in theoretical me-
chanics covering topics which do not enter the course in
mechanics offered in the Mechanical Engineering Department;
such as theory of attractions, potential, and vector analysis.
(First Semester; 3 recitations or lectures per week; Prerequi-
sites: Mathematics III, and Physics V or Physics I, II and III.)
MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS.-An introductory course to gen-
eral mathematical physics. (Second Semester; 3 recitations
or lectures per week; Prerequisites: Mathematics III, and
Physics V or Physics I, II and III.)






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS.-(1 class period and
4 hours of laboratory per week; Prerequisites: Mathematics I,
and Physics V or Physics I, II and III.) Omitted in 1922 to
1923.
THEORY OF HEAT.-(2 hours class and 2 hours laboratory
per week.) Omitted in 1922 to 1923.
THEORY OF OPTICS.-(2 hours class and 2 hours laboratory
per week.) Omitted in 1922 to 1923.
THEORY OF ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM.-Mathematical
theory, covering such topics as electric and magnetic fields,
electric oscillations and electron theory. (3 hours per week of
lectures or recitations.) Omitted in 1922-23.

SOCIOLOGY AND ECONOMICS
Professor Bristol
The aims of this department are to equip the student for
an intelligent appreciation of and participation in discussions
of social and economic problems; to make for more efficient
citizenship; to provide the sociological training so essential for
those preparing for law, teaching, the ministry, or profes-
sional social work, and to assist so far as possible in the special
training needed by those looking forward to a business career.

SOCIOLOGY
Sociology A forms a general introduction to all courses
given in the department.
SOCIOLOGY A.-Introduction to the Mental and Social
Sciences.-A course of lectures by Professors Benton, Leigh,
Rogers, Enwall and Bristol, with required readings and dis-
cussions. (First semester; 3 hours.)
SOCIOLOGY I.-Introduction to Sociology.-The principles
of social evolution, social organization and social control; the
factors that make for social efficiency and social progress; so-
cial pathology. Not open to Freshmen without special per-
mission. Sociology A should precede. (First and second
semesters; 3 hours.)
SOCIOLOGY IIIb.-Rural Sociology.-A broad survey of the
field of rural life in its social aspects; methods of improvement.
(Second semester; 3 hours.)





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


SOCIOLOGY IVa.-General Sociology.-A critical study of
social forces, processes and products; principles underlying
social organization and social progress. (Elective for Juniors
and Seniors. First semester; 3 hours.) Omitted in 1922-23.
SOCIOLOGY IVb.- Race Problems.- History, causes and
effects of immigration; methods of assimilation. The negro
problem. (Prerequisites: one course in Sociology. Second
semester; 3 hours.) Omitted in 1922-23.
SOCIOLOGY VII.-Seminar.-(Primarily for Seniors and
graduates; 2 hours.)
ECONOMICS
Economics B should precede all other courses except Eco-
nomics VIa.
Economics I or VIa should precede all other courses ex-
cept Economics B.
ECONOMICS B.-Our Economic Organization.-The devel-
opment and structure of our present industrial system; the
various factors in production; exchange; problems of business
organization and management; the conservation of natural
and human resources. (Second semester; 3 hours.)
ECONOMICS I.-Principles of Economics.-A general course
covering the fundamental principles of consumption, produc-
tion, exchange and distribution of wealth with practical ap-
plication to concrete problems. Not open to Freshmen and
should be preceded by Sociology A and Economics B. (First
and second semesters; 3 hours.)
ECONOMICS IIa.-Money and Banking.-The nature and
functions of money; functions and principles of banking as
revealed in the banking systems of leading countries. (First
semester; 3 hours.) Omitted in 1922-23.
ECONOMICS IIb.-Corporation Finance.-Rise, growth and
development of large business organizations; corporations,
trusts, pools, and holding companies; financial and social prob-
lems involved. (Second semester; 3 hours.) Omitted in
1922-23.
ECONOMICS IIIa.-Public Finance.-Principles governing
expenditures of modern governments; sources of revenue;
public credit; principles and methods of taxation and of finan-
cial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems of leading
countries. (Second semester; 3 hours.)





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


ECONOMICS IIIb.-Transportation.-Nature, history and
problems of railway transportation, especially in the United
States; rates, discrimination; government regulation, control
and ownership. (Second semester; 3 hours.) Omitted in
1922-23.
ECONOMICS IVa.-Labor Problems.-Origin and nature;
methods of amelioration and reform; woman and child labor,
sweating, unemployment, labor legislation; co-operation, profit
sharing, insurance, industrial education. (First semester; 3
hours.)
ECONOMICS IVb.-Economic History of the United States.
-A general but comprehensive history of the growth of
American industry and commerce with the social and economic
problems involved. (Second semester; 3 hours.) Omitted
in 1922-23.
ECONOMICS VIa.- Introduction to Economics.-A brief
study of the principles of economics and their application to
practical problems. (Primarily for agricultural and engineer-
ing Juniors; first semester; 3 hours.)
ECONOMICS VIb.--Business Organization and Manage-
ment.-Principles of business organization; types of organiza-
tion; manufacturing plants and equipment; cost accounting;
buying, selling, advertising; welfare work. (Second semester;
3 hours.)
BUSINESS LAW.-The following courses in the College of
Law are especially valuable for those planning to enter busi-
ness. They may be taken by students in the College of Liberal
Arts with the consent of the Dean, though preferably not be-
fore the Junior year. The figures in parenthesis indicate the
number of semester hours credit. First semester: Contracts
(4), Insurance (1), Public Service Corporations (2), Partner-
ship (2), Damages (2), Mortgages (2). Second semester:
Contracts (3), Sales (1), Private Corporations (4), Negotiable
Instruments (2), Suretyship (2).
HUMAN ENGINEERING.-This course, given in the College
of Engineering, is especially commended to students prepar-
ing for business. (First semester; 2 hours.)





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
WILMON NEWELL, Dean

GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Agriculture has three divisions:
1. Instructional Division (the College proper).
2. Research Division (Experiment Station).
3. Agricultural Extension Division.

THE COLLEGE
FACULTY.-Wilmbn Newell, L. W. Amis, J. H. Atkinson,
F. H. Bain, E. C. Beck, A. P. Black, R. W. Blacklock, L. M.
Bristol, H. G. Clayton, M. D. Cody, J. W. Day, J.'M. Farr,
W. L. Floyd, W. R. Hale, E. W. Jenkins, E. L. Lord,.T. R. Leigh,
J. M. Leake, J. S. Rogers, F. Rogers, E. Ryder, K. T. Steik,
N. W. Sanbornr, A. L. Healy, T. M. Simpson, A. P. Spencer,
Ralph Stoutamire, A. W. Sweet, J. E. Turlington, J. A. Van
Fleet, C. H. Willoughby.
Special Lecturers for 1921-1922.
Dr. E. W. Berger, Entomologist, State Plant Board.
R. C. Blake, Poultry Specialist.
Dr. J. V. Knapp, State Veterinarian.
Miss Minnie Floyd, Specialist in Home Poultry Work.
W. C. Funk, Office of Farm Management, U. S. Dept. Agri.
Prof. H. Harold Hume, President State Horticultural Society.
Harold Irving, Poultryman.
S. T. Fleming, Bureau of Crop Estimates, U. S. Dept. Agri.
Hon. W. A. McRae, Commissioner of Agriculture.
Dr. J. H. Montgomery, Quarantine Inspector, State Plant
Board.
F. M. O'Byrne, Nursery Inspector, State Plant Board.
Capt. R. E. Rose, State Chemist.
Frank Stirling, General Inspector, State Plant Board.
Willard F. Sanborn, Poultryman.
Special lectures are given also by members of the Experi-
ment Station and Agricultural Extension Staffs.





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


AIM AND SCOPE.-The College was established under the
Acts of Congress creating and endowing institutions for the
liberal and practical education of the industrial classes.
Recognition of agriculture as a branch of collegiate instruction
is a distinctive feature of schools thus founded.
The aim of the College is to afford young men the best
possible opportunity for gaining technical knowledge and
training in the art and science of agriculture. About one-third
of the student's time is devoted to technical studies, the other
two-thirds to cultural studies and basic sciences. A founda-
tion is thus laid which will enable graduates to become leaders
in educational work or effective producing agriculturists.
EQUIPMENT.-Agricultural Hall provides space for offices
and classrooms and laboratories for the departments of
agronomy, animal husbandry and dairying, agricultural engi-
neering, poultry, veterinary science, and horticulture.
Libraries.-Many works on agriculture and horticulture
have recently been added to the general library. A trained
librarian aids students in finding needed references. Each de-
partment has, furthermore, a small collection of well-selected
volumes, which are always accessible. The Experiment Station
library contains a very complete set of bulletins from the
experiment stations of the world and from the U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture, all fully indexed and carefully filed.
Farms.-The College farm, used for instruction and for
growing crops with which to feed the instruction herds, con-
sists of 225 acres: 10 acres for trucking, 100 acres for pasture
and field crops, 5 acres for orchard, 15 acres for soiling pur-
poses and stock lots, and 5 acres for buildings and grounds.
The equipment includes a hay and storage barn, a sweet-potato
storage house, a farm-foreman's house, a dairy barn, a
machinery shed and corn crib, a potting house, poultry houses
and yards, and several irrigation systems. The Experiment
Station farm and farm buildings are easily accessible.
AGRONOMY DEPARTMENT
The Agronomy Department occupies four rooms-a large,
well-lighted and equipt soil laboratory, with adjoining storage
and work room, an office, and a classroom.
The soil laboratory is equipt with microscopes, sampling
augurs, tubes, and carriers; balances, ovens, soil thermome-





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ters, packers, cylinders, and tubes; moisture absorption box
with trays; percolation, capillary, and evaporation apparatus;
sieves, shaker, etc. There are three large stone-top desks,
with individual lockers for seventy-two students. The storage
room is provided with soil bins, packer, cases, and shelving in
abundance.
For Agricultural Engineering work there are two labora-
tories-the one for farm motors and iron work, the other for
farm machinery. They are equipt with gasoline engines, feed
grinders, stalk cutter, walking and riding plows, various types
of harrows, walking and riding cultivators, seeders, surveying
implements, several of the best types of power sprayers and
farm tractors, a farm lighting-system, etc. Stress is laid upon
instruction in farm machinery, because labor-saving appli-
ances have not yet come into general use in Florida.
HORTICULTURAL DEPARTMENT
The Horticultural Department has a large, well-furnished
lecture-room, a laboratory equipt with microscopes, wall-cases
for preserved specimens, and a storeroom for material and
supplies. In addition to these, provision is made for prac-
tical work outdoors. A propagating house and a nursery on
the farm are used in carrying on stratification, layerage,
cuttage, budding, grafting, and other methods of plant propa-
gation; trees of different kinds are growing in the orchard;
hot beds and cold frames are provided for starting young
plants; an irrigation plant has been installed with Skinner,
Campbell, Skinner-Stephens, Florida Favorite, and modified
Skinner sprinkling devices and a surface furrow system; and
other facilities for growing fruits and vegetables.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY DEPARTMENT
The Animal Husbandry Department is provided with a
lecture-room containing seats for eighty students and concrete
floor upon which to exhibit animals. The equipment includes
scales, measuring apparatus and a large assortment of lantern
slides representing the various breeds. In the dairy barn a
stock-judging arena, 30x40 feet, has been provided for prac-
tice in scoring animals.
For work in Dairying the College has a large, well-lighted
laboratory, equipt with several makes of hand-power cream
separators, churns, and butter workers; milk coolers, gravity





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


creamer, vats for cream ripening and cheese making; scales,
wash sinks, sterilizer, and minor apparatus.
The milk-testing laboratory contains working desks and
machinery for all modern tests of dairy products. The equip-
ment includes Babcock testers of different sizes, cream scales,
lactometers, acidmeters, butter-moisture tests, and the neces-
sary glassware, reagents, etc.
The Barns and Livestock include: A barn for the horses
and mules used on the farm and campus; a large dairy barn
of modern sanitary construction, provided with concrete floors
and silos, steel stanchions and fittings, for the herd of high-
grade Holsteins and registered Jerseys belonging to the Ex-
periment Station; representative animals of the Shorthorn
and Aberdeen Angus breeds; pens and grazing-yards with
modern shelters and equipment, containing breeding herds of
Berkshire, Poland China, Duroc Jersey, Tamworth, and Ches-
ter White hogs. Other breeds and classes of animals are
being added from year to year. A concrete dipping-vat, built
in cooperation with the Florida State Board of Health, is used
for demonstrations of cattle-tick eradication.
The County and State Fairs of Florida provide excellent
practice each year in showing and judging animals. Stu-
dents are encouraged to take part in judging contests and to
aid in show-ring work. The Southeastern Fair, Atlanta, Ga.,
offers prizes and medals to competing teams from southern
agricultural colleges. The Alachua County Fair, at Gaines-
ville, Florida State Fair, at Jacksonville, and the South Flor-
ida State Fair at Tampa offer cash prizes and diplomas to
students making the best records in stock judging. Several
large herds of cattle and hogs within a few miles of the Uni-
versity, in Alachua and Marion counties, are available for
inspection and judging purposes. The meat-packing houses
and dairy plants of Jacksonville and vicinity are freely offered
for study, and trips for this purpose under the guidance of
instructors are arranged annually.
POULTRY DEPARTMENT
The poultry department is provided with an office, store-
room, laboratory, three laying houses, incubator house, brooder
house, central poultry house 16 x 24, with two wings 8 x 16.
The central house will be used for class purposes, practice





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


shows, demonstrations; the wings providing accommodations
for special matings and trapnesting high record poultry.
The plant is well provided with oil and electric heated incu-
bators of various makes; oil, coal and electric heated brooders;
poultry house equipment of various styles of trapnests, feed
and water appliances; small coops and houses.
The poultry plant has splendid flocks of four breeds-Leg-
horn, Wyandotte, Plymouth Rock, Rhode Island Red-owning
flocks that are well bred for egg production and from lines of
standardbred ancestry. These are represented by Single Comb
White Leghorns, Buff Wyandottes, Barred Plymouth Rocks,
Single Comb Rhode Island Reds. There are Leghorns with
trapnest records up to 250 eggs, Wyandottes up to 218 eggs,
and the Leghorn cock that heads one of the pens carries six
years of known line breeding along egg lines-214 to 279 eggs
-and is a direct descendant of blue ribbon winners at New
York and Boston.
This teaching poultry plant has grown from just a few in-
cubators and brooders, to its present modest size in thirty
months. It will be used for illustration, for practice work,
that the men who leave the College may be better fitted to
handle a large flock of hens on the average farm, or to take
up poultry husbandry as a business.
Local, county and state poultry shows are made use of in
the work, and the annual ten-day course in poultry provides
opportunity to hear men and women who are succeeding in
actual poultry farming. Poultry courses are given only dur-
ing the second semester.
VETERINARY DEPARTMENT
The Veterinary Department is provided with a lecture-
room, with seats for eighty students. An operating room has
recently been constructed and is equipt with an equine operat-
ing table, cabinets containing various medicines and surgical
instruments. The laboratory is supplied with microscopes for
the study of normal and diseased tissue specimens. The equip-
ment includes also mounted skeletons of the horse and ox,
an assortment of charts, models of the organs of the various
farm animals, preserved specimens of diseased organs and of
parasites, and a good library.
THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB.-This is a voluntary association
of students of the College. Its purpose is to give training





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


in public speaking and in preparation for leadership. The
programs consist mainly of speeches, essays, and of debates
on agricultural or civic topics.
SCHOLARSHIPS.-County Scholarships.-Provision has been
made by Legislative act for a scholarship, sufficient to pay the
board of a student in the College of Agriculture, from each
county, to be provided for at their discretion by the various
Boards of County Commissioners. The recipient is to be
selected by competitive examination from among the qualified
applicants.
Whether such a scholarship has been provided for may be
learned from the Clerk of the Board of Commissioners or the
Demonstration Agent of the county in question. Other infor-
mation regarding it may be obtained from the College of
Agriculture.
Boys' Clubs Scholarships.-The Florida Bankers' Associa-
tion offers club boys three prize scholarships, of $100 each, in
the College of Agriculture: one for the Western, one for the
Central, and one for the Southern district.
Williamson and Dennis, of Jacksonville, offer two first-
prize scholarships, of $250 each, in the College of Agricul-
ture: one to the State Pig Club Champion, the other to the
State Beef-Calf-Club Champion.
LOAN FUNDS.-William Wilson Finley Foundation.-As a
memorial to the late President Finley and in recognition of
his interest in agricultural education, the Southern Railway
Company has donated to the University the sum of one thou-
sand dollars ($1,000), to be used as a loan fund. No loan
from this fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per year.
Recipients are selected by the Dean of the College of Agricul-
ture, to whom all applications should be directed.
Loan funds available for students in any college of the
University, as well as the conditions under which loans are
made, will be found described on page 39.
REMUNERATIVE AND INSTRUCTIVE LABOR.- Opportunities
frequently occur for students to work in the fields and truck
gardens, about the barns, in the buildings, and at the Agricul-
tural Experiment Station. Those who, during vacation
periods, engage in agricultural pursuits will be markedly
benefited and after graduation will command more desirable





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


positions or find their efforts on the farm more effective.
(See also Opportunities for Earning Expenses, page 37.)
Donations and Loans.-The laboratories have been sup-
plied with much of their farm machinery for instructional
purposes thru the generosity of the following manufacturers
and distributors:
Stover Manufacturing Company, Freeport, Ill.
Florida Agricultural Supply Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Oliver Chilled Plow Company, South Bend, Ind.
Alamo Farm Lighting Plant, Holt Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Skinner Machinery Co., Dunedin, Fla.
Hardie Spraying Machine, Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa, Fla.
Hercules Engine Company.
Ford Motor Company, Jacksonville, Fla.
Owensboro Ditcher Co., Owensboro, Ky.
Niagara Sprayer Co., Middleport, N. Y.
COURSES.-The following courses are offered:
1. A Four-Year Course.
2. A One-Year Course.
3. Two Four-Month Courses.
FOUR-YEAR COURSE
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS.-See pages 42 to 46.
GROUPS.-The group courses offered afford the individual
student opportunity for preparing for that branch of agricul-
ture in which he is most interested. The Agronomy Group
should be selected by those wishing to pursue general farming;
the Animal Husbandry Group by those interested in fruit
growing or truck farming; and the Agricultural-Chemical
Group by those desiring to become analysts.
No student will be allowed to take more than twenty
hours of work, unless his general average during the previous
year was at least 87, with no failure in any study; or more
than twenty-two hours, unless the previous year's average
was at least 90, with no failure.
CREDITS FOR PRACTICAL WoRK.-Students who, by previous
arrangement with the head of a department and the Dean, do
practical work, during their course of study, in any recognized
agricultural pursuit, and who render competent and faithful
service, will, on returning to College and presenting a satis-
factory written report, be entitled to one semester-hour credit
for each month of such work. Such credit shall not total more
than six semester-hours in the Two-Year and Four-Year
courses.






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


FARM EXPERIENCE REQUIRED.-At least three months of
practical work is required before graduation, but credit for
this will be given only as stated above.
DEGREE.-The work outlined in the following tables, what-
ever the major subject, leads to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Agriculture (B.S.A.).

CURRICULUM
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
FOR ALL GROUPS
Freshman Year

NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS PER WEEK

Agricultural Engineering I....Farm Machinery and Motors............ 3 0
Agronomy Ib ..........................Farm Crops ........................................ 0 3
Animal Husbandry I................Types and Breeds of Animals.......... 0 3
Biology I....................................General Biology.................................. 4 0
Biology II ..................................General Botany .................................... 0 4
English I....................................Advanced College Rhetoric.............. 3 3
Horticulture Ia ......................Plant Propagation -............................. 3 0
Mathematics B..........................Plane Trigonometry............................ 2 2
M military Science I.............-- .... ---------............ .. ...---................ ...--.. 3 3
Physical Education............................................ ............................. 1 1
19 19
Sophomore Year
A gronom y IIa..........................Soils ....................-..................... 3 0
Agronomy IIIa........................Forage Crops ........................................ 3 0
Biology VI ................................Economic Zoology ................................ 3 3
Chemistry I..............................General Chemistry .............................. 5 5
Horticulture Ib-........................Pruning .................................---...... .. 0 3
H horticulture II..........................Trucking ............................................
or \ 2 2
Animal Husbandry II & III..Animal Feeding and Breeding......
M military Science II.. -----............................-.................... ........................ 3 3
Veterinary Science I................Veterinary Elements.....................
or
Poultry Husbandry I..............Farm Poultry................................... 0 3
or
E lective ................................. ............................................................
Physical E ducation.................................................................................... 1 1

20 20(
*The first column gives the hours per week for the first semester, the
second column the hours per week for the second semester.






88 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

AGRONOMY GROUP
Junior Year

NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS PER WEEK

Agronomy IV ...-.. --.............. Fertilizers ............................................. 0 3
Biology IX................................Plant Physiology ................................. 3 0
Biology XI ................................General Bacteriology ......................... 4 0
Biology XII...............................Agricultural Bacteriology .................. 0 3
Chemistry IVa..........................Organic Chemistry ............................ 5 0
Chemistry IVb....------..........Agricultural Chemistry..-.................. 0 5
Economics VIa..........................Introduction to Economics....-........... 3 0
Sociology IIIb............................Rural Sociology .................................. 0 3
E elective ........................................................... ... ........................ 2 3
17 17
Senior Year

Agricultural Engineering III..Irrigation and Drainage --..----........ 3 0
Agronomy V..............................Soil Technology ..................................- 3 0
Agronomy VI-VII..................Farm Management ............................. 3 3
Biology X... .......................Plant Pathology .................................. 0 3
Horticulture IX........................Landscape Gardening ........................ 0 2
Elective .........- ----............................ ... .. ...--.. ............---- 7 3

16 16

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY GROUP
Junior Year

NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS PER WEEK

Animal Husbandry IV............Beef Production ...........................-- ....... 2 0
Animal Husbandry V..............Swine Production ............................... 0 2
Biology XI.................................General Bacteriology .......................... 4 0
Biology XII-.....-.---...............Agricultural Bacteriology ................ 0 3
Dairying I..................................Dairy Products .................................... 3 0
Dairying II................................Dairy Farming .................................... 0 3
Poultry Husbandry II............Incubation and Brooding.................. 0 3
Veterinary Science II..............Veterinary Anatomy & Physiology.. 3 3
Elective ....---...........-- ...................----....-- ---....------....-.-.... 5 3

17 17
Senior Year

Agronomy VI-VII....................Farm Management .............................. 3 3
Agricultural Engineering III..Irrigation and Drainage .----........... 3 0
Economics VIa---..................----........Introduction to Economics.................. 3 0
Sociology IIIb............................ Rural Sociology.. -----......................- ... 0 3
Poultry Husbandry III............Poultry Management .......................... 0 2
Veterinary Science III............Diseases of Farm Animals................ 3 3
E elective ..................................................... ....... .... ...... ........... 4 5

16 16
*The first column gives the hours per week for the first semester, the
second column the hours per week for the second semester.





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


HORTICULTURAL GROUP
Junior Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS PER WEEK
A gronom y IV............................ Fertilizers ............................................. 0 3
Biology IX..................................Plant Physiology .................................. 3 0
Biology XI ..................................General Bacteriology .......................... 4 0
Biology XII................................Agricultural Bacteriology ................. 0 3
Horticulture IV........................Citrus Culture ..................................... 3 0
Horticulture V..........................Citrus Harvesting, Marketing and
Judging ......................................... 0 3
Horticulture VIIa....................Deciduous ............................................... 3 0
Horticulture VIIb ------....................Subtropical Fruits................................ 0 3
Economics VIa..........................Introduction to Economics................ 3 0
Sociology IIIb.......--------..... Rural Sociology ...........------.----. 3
E elective .......................................................... ............... .................... 1 2

17 17
Senior Year
Agronomy V..............................Soil Technology .................................. 3 0
Agronomy VI, VII..................Farm Management ......................-- -- ... 3 3
Biology X..................................Plant Pathology .................................. 0 3
Horticulture VIII....................Plant Breeding.. -................................ 0 3
Horticulture IX........................Landscape Gardening ..............------........ 0 2
Horticulture VI........................Insects and Diseases of Citrus
or Fruits ........................................ 3 0
Horticulture X..........................General Forestry ............................
E elective ........................................................................... ......................... 7 5

16 16

AGRICULTURAL-CHEMICAL GROUP
Junior Year

NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS PER WEEK
Agronomy IV..... ------.......................Fertilizers .......................................... 0 3
Biology XI...............................-General Bacteriology----.................... 4 0
Biology XII..............................Agricultural Bacteriology----............ 0 3
Chemistry III............................Qualitative Analysis.................-........- 3 3
Chemistry IVa.. -------.......................Organic Chemistry.............................. 5 0
Chemistry IVb..-.......................Agricultural Chemistry ---- --..................... 0 5
Elective .................... ----.......--.....-.... ...------------- 5 3

17 17
Senior Year
Chemistry VII..........................Quantitative Analysis ........................ 3 3
Chemistry IX............................Chemistry of Soils, Fertilizers, etc. 0 3
Chemistry XI--.................----...........Physical Chemistry............ --------. 3 3
Economics VIa..........................Introduction to Economics................ 3 0
Sociology IIIb............................Rural Sociology ..............------.---- 0 3
E elective ................................................................................................... 7 4

16 16
*The first column gives the hours per week for the first semester, the
second column the hours per week for the second semester.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Students desiring to secure the degree B.S.A. and at the
same time qualify to teach in the Smith-Hughes Schools may
do so by electing the following group after completing the
work of the Sophomore year:

Junior Year

NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
Agronomy IV ............................Fertilizers .......................................... 0 3
Biology XI...................... General Bacteriology ........................ 4 0
Biology XII..............................Agricultural Bacteriology ................ 0 3
Education IX..................... Vocational Education.......................... 3 0
Education IV............................Psychology of Education.................... 0 3
Education VIII................. Methods of Teaching Vocational
Agriculture --.................................... 3 3
Elective in Agriculture..................................................... 7 5
17 17
Senior Year

Agronomy V..............................Soil Technology.................................... 3 0
Agronomy VI & VII..............Farm Management.............................. 3 3
Education V........................ Principles of Education...................... 0 3
Education XVI........................Supervised Teaching of Vocational
A agriculture .................................... 3 3
Vocational Shop W ork............................ ..... ....................... 3 3
Elective in Agriculture................................ ................................. .. 4 4
16 16





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AGRONOMY AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Professor Turlington Assistant Professor Rogers
AGRONOMY
The laboratory work and field observation aim to fix the
principles learned in the classroom and to give them practical
application.
AGRONOMY A.-Elements of Agronomy.-The soil as re-
lated to plant growth and the principles governing the produc-
tion of the field and forage crops of Florida. (Short Courses,
Vocational and Practice High School; 3 hours; laboratory fee
$1.00 for each semester.)
AGRONOMY Bb.-Fertilizers.-An elementary study of fer-
tilizers, their nature and reaction on the soil and crop; fertil-
izer formulas and home mixing. A thoroly practical course,
dealing with Florida conditions. (Short Courses, Vocational
and Practice High School; 3 hours.)
AGRONOMY Cb.-Farm Management.-An elementary
course in organization for the farm business as a unit. The
laying out of fields, location of buildings, farm accounting and
important factors affecting profits will be considered. (Short
Courses, Vocational and Practice High School; 3 hours.)
AGRONOMY Ib.-Farm Crops.-The various grain, fiber,
and sugar crops with respect to their habits of growth, soil
adaptations, fertilizer requirements, general methods of tillage
and harvesting, and the most profitable forms in which to
market them. Special attention will be given to corn, cotton,
and sugar cane. (Freshman year; class 2 hours, laboratory
2 hours; credit 3 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
AGRONOMY IIa-Soils.-The origin, formation, and classi-
fication of soils; general methods of soil management and the
adaptation of soils to the requirements of plants. (Sophomore
year; class 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 hours; labo-
ratory fee $1.00.)
AGRONOMY IIIa.-Forage Crops; Legumes, Grasses, etc.-
Legumes, grasses, and miscellaneous forage plants, and their
adaptability to the various Florida soils, seeding and cultural
methods, harvesting and storing, composition and use, illus-





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


treated by specimens brought before the students and by field
observations. (Sophomore year; 3 hours; laboratory fee
$1.00.)
AGRONOMY IVb.-Fertilizers.-The nature, composition,
and sources of fertilizers and their reaction on soils and crops.
Fertilizer formulas and home-mixing. The making and eco-
nomical use of farm manures. Fertilizer requirements for
various crops, etc. (Junior year; 3 hours.)
AGRONOMY Vb.-Soil Technology.-The physical, chemical,
and biological properties of soil as related to soil fertility and
crop production; soil management and drainage. (Junior or
Senior year; recitations 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours; credit
3 hours; laboratory fee $2.50.)
AGRONOMY VIa.-Farm Management.-The factors of pro-
duction; systems of farming, their distribution and adapta-
tion; farm accounts; problems of labor, machinery, storing,
marketing, laying out farms, rotation systems. (Senior year;
3 hours.)
AGRONOMY VIIb. -Advanced Course in Farm Manage-
ment.-Special stress given to laying out and locating various
buildings, lots, fields, and crops; cropping systems; surveys
made in other states. (Senior year; 3 hours.)
AGRONOMY VIIIb.- Soil Management.- Factors in crop
production, loss of plant food, methods and results obtained by
investigators; laboratory and field experiments. (Elective for
Seniors; 3 hours.)
AGRONOMY IXb.-Rural Law.-Classification of property,
boundaries, fences, stock laws, rents, contracts, deeds, ab-
stracts, mortgages, taxes, laws governing shipping, etc.
(Elective, Junior or Senior year; 2 hours.)
AGRONOMY Xa or b.-Special Courses.-Special Courses
will be offered at the option of the instructors, on approval
of the Dean.
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Assistant Professor Rogers
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Ab.-Farm Machinery.-
Care, construction, operation and selection of farm machinery.
(Short Courses, Vocational Students, class 1 hour, laboratory
4 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Ia.-Farm Machinery.-The
construction, selection, and operation of seeding, tilling, and





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


harvesting machinery. (Freshman year; recitations 1 hour,
laboratory 4 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING IIb.- Farm Motors.- The
sources of power on the farm: windmill, gasoline and kerosene
engines; special attention given to farm tractors. (Junior or
Senior year; recitations 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours; labora-
tory fee $3.00.)
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING IIIa.-Drainage and Irriga-
tion.-Farm surveying, drainage and irrigation systems; prac-
tice in making surveys and in designing systems. (Senior
year; recitations 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours; laboratory fee
$2.00.)
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING IVa.-Farm Buildings.-
Ventilation, sanitation, construction, cost, management, labo-
ratory work in designing and drawing plans. (Junior or
Senior year; recitations 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours; labora-
tory fee $2.00.)

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
Professor Turlington Miss Miltimore
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION Ia.- Library Work.- Instruc-
tion in use of card catalog, readers' guides, agricultural in-
dexes, and reference books; practice in collecting and making
notes on assigned subjects. (1 hour.)
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION IIb.- Agricultural Organiza-
tions.-The organization and proceedings of agricultural so-
cieties. (Freshman year; 1 hour.)

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING
Professor Willoughby
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
The livestock industry holds an important place in Florida,
as it commands a steady income and is a valuable aid in
maintaining soil fertility. The basic principles taught in the
College are applicable to all parts of America, altho special
instruction is given for Florida conditions.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Aa.-Elements of Animal Husbandry.
-History, types and breeds of farm animals, with elementary
principles of breeding and selection. (Short Courses, Voca-
tional, and Practice High School; 3 hours.)





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Bb.-Live Stock Feeding and Man-
agement.-Relation of soils, plants and animals; methods of
feeding and handling different classes of farm animals. (Short
Courses, Vocational, and Practice High School; 3 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Ib.-Types and Breeds of Animals.-
Types and classes of farm animals; leading breeds of horses,
mules, cattle, sheep, and swine; practice in score-card and
comparative judging. Animals owned by the College will be
studied, and occasional trips made to nearby stock farms and
stables. (Freshman year; 3 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IIa.-Animal Feeding.-Composition
of plants and animals; digestion and assimilation; feeding
standards and balanced rations. Feeding methods for differ-
ent classes of animals. (Sophomore year; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IIIb.-Animal Breeding.-Principles
underlying the breeding of animals, including heredity, varia-
tion, selection, environment; foundation and management of
a breeding business. (Sophomore year; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IVa.- Beef Production.- Practical
methods in beef production: selection, feeding, and manage-
ment of beef cattle; finishing and marketing; slaughtering
and packing. Consideration of same subjects in mutton pro-
duction. (Sophomore or Junior year; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Vb.--Swine Production.- Location
and equipment of a hog farm, breeds of swine suited to the
South; growing feeds for grazing and fattening; feeding and
managing the herd; marketing and slaughtering, curing meats
on the farm. (Sophomore or Junior year; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VIa.- Animal Conformation.- De-
tailed study and measurement of market types and classes of
animals; advanced stock-judging and show-ring practice at
county and state fairs. (Elective; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VII.-Breeding History and Sem-
inar.-Advanced work in history of breeds, pedigrees and reg-
istration methods; historical review of the livestock industry
and its relation to agriculture. (Elective; 3 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VIIIb.-Animal Nutrition.- Review
of latest books on nutrition of animals, by Armsby, Henry,
Kellner, and others. (Elective; 2 hours.)





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


DAIRYING
DAIRYING Ia.-Dairy Products.- Secretion, composition,
properties of milk; testing milk and its products; methods
of creaming; use of cream separators; manufacturing butter,
cheese, etc. (Sophomore or Junior year; 3 hours; laboratory
fee $2.00.)
DAIRYING IIb.-Dairy Farming.- Locations suitable for
dairy farming; construction of sanitary barns, dairy houses,
silos; selection of breeds, feeding and management of herd,
testing and herd records; pastures, soiling crops, silage;
marketing products. (Sophomore or Junior year; 3 hours.)
DAIRYING IIIb.-Milk Inspection.-Methods of producing
sanitary milk, operation of county and city milk plants; state
and municipal dairy laws; work of city milk inspector, score-
card practice with dairy herds and milk depots. (Elective;
3 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
DAIRYING IV.-Dairy Manufactures.-Advanced work in
making butter, cottage and Cheddar cheese, fermented milks,
ice-cream and other market products; creamery management
and accounting. (Elective; 2 hours.) Omitted in 1922-1923.
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
Professor Sanborn
POULTRY HUSBANDRY Ab. Farm Poultry. Value of
poultry industry, the leading types and breeds of poultry,
location and construction of poultry houses, feeding and man-
agement for egg and meat production, rearing of chicks on
the farm. (Vocational and Short Courses; class 2 hours, labo-
ratory 2 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
POULTRY HUSBANDRY Ib. Farm Poultry. Value of
poultry industry, the leading types and breeds of poultry,
location and construction of poultry houses, feeding and man-
agement for egg and meat production, rearing of chicks on
the farm. (For groups other than Animal Husbandry; Sopho-
more year; class 2 hours; laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 hours;
laboratory fee $1.00.)
POULTRY HUSBANDRY IIb.- Incubation and Brooding.-
Natural and artificial incubation, development of chick in the
egg, artificial brooding and natural raising of chicks, feeding
and management to feathering stage; use of modern apparatus
and appliances of different sizes and types. (Sophomore or





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Junior year; class 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 hours;
laboratory fee $1.00.)
POULTRY HUSBANDRY IIIb.-Poultry Management.-Feed-
ing for growth, egg and meat production; management and
care of the flock, keeping records and accounts, marketing and
storing products, disinfection and treatment of diseases and
parasites. (Sophomore or Junior year; 2 hours; laboratory
fee $1.00.)
POULTRY HUSBANDRY IVb.-Poultry Breeding and Judging.
-Principles underlying the handling of breeding pens and
flocks, trap-nest records, selection and mating for color and
other purposes; methods of preparing birds for show, rules of
exhibitions, practice in judging, with standard of perfection.
(Junior or Senior year; 2 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)

VETERINARY SCIENCE
Professor Shealy
The aim of this department is to provide training which
will enable students to detect diseases more readily and to
understand their seriousness, and to become familiar with
simple methods of treatment and means of eradication and
prevention. All students interested in stockraising will find
this training helpful. The courses also form a good founda-
tion for students wishing to enter the profession of veterinary
medicine.
VETERINARY SCIENCE Ib.-Veterinary Elements.-Elemen-
tary anatomy and physiology of the domestic animals; causes
and symptoms of common diseases of animals; methods of
prevention, disinfection, and sanitation. Simple surgical
operations, occasional clinics. (For groups other than Animal
Husbandry; Sophomore year; 3 hours.)
VETERINARY SCIENCE II. Veterinary Anatomy and
Physiology.-Anatomy, including the skeleton, articulations,
muscles, large blood-vessels and nerves, and internal organs;
physiology, including circulation, respiration, digestion, and
absorption; also the skin, the body excretions, the nervous
system, and the special senses. (Junior year; class 2 hours;
laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 hours; laboratory fee $2.50 for
each semester.)
VETERINARY SCIENCE III.-Diseases of Farm Animals.-
Causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention of common





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


diseases of farm animals. Special attention given to conta-
gious diseases, such as tuberculosis, hog cholera, contagious
abortion, Texas fever, and rabies; sanitation following conta-
gious diseases; technic of holding and study of findings of
post-mortems. Clinic of at least 2 hours will be held one
afternoon of each week. The use of serum and virus in the
control of hog cholera will be demonstrated. (Prerequisite:
Veterinary Science I or II; Senior year; class 2 hours; clinic
2 hours; credit 3 hours; laboratory fee $1.00 for each sem-
ester.)
VETERINARY SCIENCE IVa.-Veterinary Hygiene and Farm
Sanitation.-Wholesome water, sources of water, impurities
found in water; wholesome food, diseases caused by unwhole-
some food; pure air, impurities of air and diseases produced
by them, ventilation, disposal of excreta; disposal of carcasses;
disinfection, agents employed; sanitation following infectious
diseases; hygiene of breeding animals. (Elective; 2 hours.)
VETERINARY SCIENCE Vb.--Parasitology.-Common para-
sitic diseases of animals; life-history of parasites producing
disease; symptoms of diseases, means of eradication and con-
trol of parasites. Lantern slides and natural specimens are
used. (Elective; 2 hours.)


AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM
Assistant Professor Stoutamire
AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM I.-Principles of agricultural
journalism; practical work in gathering and writing news,
reading copy, editing. Students prepare copy for agricultural
press. (Junior or Senior year; 3 hours.)

HORTICULTURE AND ECONOMIC BOTANY
Professor Floyd Assistant Professor Lord
In a subtropical climate unusual opportunities for the
study of horticulture are presented. The wonderful variety
of plants, the peculiar problems involved in their growth and
development, and the accomplishments of those who have
given time and labor to the solution of these problems, offer
inviting fields for study and experiment. Both the practical
and the esthetic tendencies may be cultivated.
4





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The department with its orchard, garden, laboratory, and
library, offers fine opportunity for instruction, experiment,
and research.
HORTICULTURE A.-Elements of Horticulture.-The funda-
mental principles of horticulture; practice in the culture, prop-
agation, pruning and training of the important fruit and orna-
mental plants of Florida. (Short Courses, Vocational, Prac-
tice High School; class 2 hours, field or laboratory 2 hours;
laboratory fee $1.00 for each semester.)
HORTICULTURE I.- Plant Propagation.- Propagation by
means of division, cutting, layering, budding, and grafting;
seed selection, storing, and testing; and the fundamental
physiological processes; practice in propagating common
fruits, flowers, and shrubs. (Freshman year; class 2 hours;
field or laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 hours; laboratory fee
$1.00.)
HORTICULTURE Ib.-Pruning.-Principles of pruning and
training; the physiological principles involved; practice in
pruning and training fruit and ornamental plants. (Sopho-
more year; class 2 hours, field or laboratory 2 hours; credit
3 hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
HORTICULTURE II. Trucking.- Vegetables adapted to
Florida, seasons in which they are grown, cultural methods,
fertilizing, irrigating, packing, and marketing. (Sophomore
year; class 1 hour, field or laboratory 2 hours, credit 2 hours;
laboratory fee $1.00 for each semester.)
HORTICULTURE IIIb.-Floriculture.-The growing of flow-
ers upon the home grounds, pot plants, greenhouse crops and
their cultural requirements, including ventilation, watering,
and heating. (Sophomore year; 2 hours.)
HORTICULTURE IVa.-Citrus Culture.-The citrus grove;
site and soil selection; preparation, planting and management;
selection of varieties and stocks, and the use of cover crops.
(Junior year; class 2 hours, field or laboratory 2 hours; credit
S hours.)
HORTICULTURE Vb.- Citrus Harvesting, Marketing and
Judging.-Methods of picking, handling, washing, drying,
packing, and shipping citrus fruits; identification of the lead-
ing commercial varieties and score-card judging. (Junior
year; class 2 hours, field or laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 hours;
laboratory fee $1.00.)





COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


HORTICULTURE VIa.-Insects and Diseases of Citrus Fruits.
-Injurious insects and important physiological and fungus
diseases and their treatment. (Prerequisite or corequisite,
IVa; Senior year; class 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours; credit 3
hours; laboratory fee $1.00.)
HORTICULTURE VIIa.-Subtropical Fruits. Avocados,
mangoes, pineapple and other tropical and subtropical fruits
particularly adapted to Florida; culture, varieties, insects, dis-
eases, etc. (Junior year; class 2 hours, field or laboratory 2
hours; credit 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE VIIb.-Deciduous Fruits.-Peaches, pears,
grapes, and other deciduous fruits with special reference to
Florida conditions, culture, varieties, insects, diseases, etc.
(Junior year; class 2 hours, field or laboratory 2 hours; credit
3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE VIIIb.-Plant Breeding.-Cross pollination
and hybridization of plants, improvement by selection, breed-
ing for special qualities, methods of successful breeders; field
work. (Prerequisites: la and Botany I; Senior year, class 2
hours, field or laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 hours; laboratory
fee $1.00.)
HORTICULTURE IXb.-Landscape Gardening.-The princi-
ples of landscape gardening, suitable plants, improvement of
home, school, and public grounds. (Senior year; 2 hours.)
HORTICULTURE Xa.-General Forestry.-The principles of
forestry, forest cropping, protecting the home wood lot, use
of Florida woods, varieties of timber trees, and the influences
of the forests on other industries of the State. (Junior or
Senior year; 3 hours.)
BOTANY A.-Agricultural Botany.-The relationship hab-
its, characteristics and environmental relations of the impor-
tant crop plants, with laboratory study of principal types.
(Short Courses, Vocational, Practice High School; class 2
hours, laboratory 2 hours; laboratory fee $2.00 for each
semester.)
OTHER DEPARTMENTS
Descriptions of other subjects that may be taken by
students in the College of Agriculture can be found by refer-
ence to the Index.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
This course will meet the needs of those who can spend
only one year at school. The only requirement for admission
is a knowledge of the common-school branches. Certificates
will be granted to those who complete the work.
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
(First Semester)
Agronomy Aa............................Elements of Agronomy............................---- 3
Botany A ..................................Agricultural Botany ..---....... .. -----................ 3
Horticulture A..........................Elements of Horticulture-......-.................... 3
Animal Husbandry A..............Elements of Animal Husbandry-----.............. 3
Electives, not less than-.......................................----.-------.----..... 6
18
(Second Semester)
Agronomy Ab............................Elements of Agronomy............................. 3
Agronomy C-----..............................Farm Management-----....................---....... 3
Animal Husbandry B..............Livestock Feeding and Management........ 3
Agricultural Engineering A.Farm Machinery..-----------........................ 3
Botany A...............------..----...................Agricultural Botany..........-----....................... 3
Electives, not less than.--...... ---------.......................-.--------- ....-- .. 3
18
A second year's work may be taken provided one subject is
selected in Agronomy, one in Animal Husbandry, one in Horti-
culture, Military Science I or II, and others to make up not
less than 18 hours in all, with advice and consent of the Dean.
Students with High School preparation may take subjects
from the Four-Year curriculum.
FOUR-MONTH COURSES IN AGRICULTURE
The work of each semester of the One-Year Course out-
lined above has been so planned as to form of itself a well
rounded course of study which can be pursued to advantage
by those unable to spend more than four months at the Uni-
versity. Each of these Four-Month Short Courses should ap-
peal to farmers who wish to increase their productive power,
to young men who expect to become farmers, and to those
who are turning from other lines of work in order to obtain
the advantages of country life.
Military Drill is not required of those who take one or
both of these courses, but it may be elected.
FARMERS' WEEK
Beginning August 10, 1922; ending August 17, 1922.
Farmers' Week is especially suited to the needs of the fol-




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs