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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00472
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1924
Copyright Date: 1924
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00472
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Table of Contents
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    Index
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Full Text
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University of Florida
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA









University Summer School


(Co-Educational)

Announcement

June 10 to August 2,


1924
























































Pcnoa


Plan of Campus










SUMMER SCHOOL


SUMMER SCHOOL BOARD

STATE SUPERINTENDENT, W. S. CAWTHON, A. M.
PRESIDENT A. A. MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D.
PRESIDENT EDWARD CONRADI, A.M., PH.D.



FACULTY AND OFFICERS


A. A. MURPHREE, A. M., LL.D., President
Director of Summer School

J. W. NORMAN, PH.D., Dean
Education

JOSEPH R. FULK, PH.D., Assistant Dean
Education

JOSEPH ROEMER, PH.D., Assistant Dean
Education

MISS GEORGIA BORGER, B.S., Dean of Women
Science

MRS. M. L. ALSTETTER
Demonstration School

J. N. ANDERSON, PH.D.
Latin

A. P. BLACK, A. B.
Science

L. M. BRISTOL, PH.D.
Sociology and Economics

F. W. BUCHHOLZ, A. B.
Geography and Mathematics

MISS CHRISTINE CARMACK, A. B.
History and Civics







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


MRS. A. B. CARRIER
Elementary Education

W. H. CASSELS, A. B.
Mathematics

J. M. CHAPMAN, D. O.
Public Speaking

J. W. DAY, M. S.
Agriculture

H. O. ENWALL, PH.D.
Philosophy and Psychology

G. E. EVERETT, M. A.
English

W. L. GOETTE, B. S.
Geography

JOHN GRAY, M. S.
Biology

MISS CORA GRIFFIN
Elementary Education

R. L. HAMON, B. S. E.
Mathematics

MISS REBA HARRIS
Health Education

W. B. HATHAWAY, M. A.
English and Spanish

GLADYS HENDERSON
Drawing and Industrial Art

C. I. HOLLINGSWORTH, A. B. E.
Mathematics

J. M. LEAKE, PH.D.
History

T. R. LEIGH, PH.D.
Chemistry

W. A. LITTLE, M.A.
Mathematics






SUMMER SCHOOL


B. F. LUKER, PH.D.
Modern Languages

MISS GERTRUDE McARTHUR, M. A.
Rural Education

E. W. McMULLEN, A. B.
History and Civics

MRS. L. H. MAHAN
Demonstration School

R. G. MANCHESTER, A. B., D. O.
Physical Education

H. G. METCALFE
Mathematics

W. S. PERRY, M. S.
Physics

MRS. J. REID RAMSAY, A. B.
English

C. A. ROBERTSON, M. A.
English

MRS. JOSEPH ROEMER, B. S.
Elementary Education


Rural Education

R. G. SAWYER
Industrial Education

MISS MARY SHEPPARD, M. A.
English

T. M. SIMPSON, PH.D.
Mathematics

G. B. SIMMONS, A. B. E.
History and Civics

A. W. SWEET, M. A., PH.D.
Director of the Department of Health and Hygiene






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


MRS. MABEL WALL
Music

GEO. E. WHITE, A. B.
Religious Education

J. H. WISE
Latin

O. I. WOODLEY, M. A.
Education

K. H. GRAHAM, Auditor
MISS GEORGIA BORGER, Dean of Women
MISS CORA MILTIMORE, Librarian
MISS AVA TAYLOR, Assistant Librarian
A. R. KNOTT, in Charge of Dining Hall
MRS. MARGARET PEELER, Matron
DR. D. T. SMITH, Consulting Clinician
DR. J. M. DELL, Consulting Clinician
DR. GEO. S. WALDO, Consulting Clinician
DR. G. C. TILLMAN, Resident Physician
MISS ROSA GRIMES, Nurse
MISS WINONA WADE JOHNSON, Y. W. C. A. Secretary



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY

On Advanced Standing: Fulk, Black, Simmons.
On Admission: Simpson, Roemer, Gray.
On Public Functions: White, Leigh, McArthur, Perry.
On Graduate Work: Anderson, Farr, Newell, Benton, Trusler, Norman.
On Student Publications: Leake, Robertson.
On Extension of Certificate: Metcalfe, McMullen, Cassels.
On Reports to State Department of Education: Buchholz, Day, Hollings-
worth.
On Student Council: Borger, Griffin, Mrs. Roemer, Mrs. Carrier, Little.
On Literary Societies: Woodley, Metcalfe, Sheppard, Hamon.
On Recreation: (a) For women: Johnson, Carmack, Mrs. Ramsay,
Borger, Miltimore, Mrs. Wall.
(b) For Men: White, Manchester, Goette, Everett.
On Buildings and Grounds: Day, Perry, Leigh, Hathaway.






SUMMER SCHOOL


GENERAL STATEMENT

The fifteenth annual session of the Summer School of
the University of Florida will open Tuesday, June 10, and close
Saturday, August 2, the session lasting eight weeks.
Summer study is growing in popularity all over the United
States. In 1923 fully one-fourth of all the teachers in the Unit-
ed States attended Summer School. The Summer School,
generally speaking, has come to be recognized as an annual
event of real and increasing importance to higher education.
Indeed, as the president of one of the larger mid-western uni-
versities is reported to have said:

"To a college president, the summer school is the most desirable
from many points of view. . . There is more of a collegiate atmosphere
about the campus. The pupils are there for business. Their presence is
not explained by the song, 'We're here because we're here because we're
here because we're here.' "
The University Summer School has, accordingly, become
an established feature of the work of the University.
ENROLLMENT PASSES ONE THOUSAND MARK.-The enroll-
ment in the Summer School of 1923 for the first time in the
history of the University passed the one thousand mark, reach-
ing 1,028. This does not include thirty-four children enrolled
in the Demonstration School. Beginning in 1910, with a group
of students seventy-four in actual numbers and with a
faculty of only some half dozen members, the Summer School
has grown to the above proportions with an instructional
staff in 1923 of forty-four. The cordial reception and gen-
erous commendations of the work of previous summer sessions
encourages us to put forth still greater efforts to make the
session of 1924 an improvement over all those that have pre-
ceded it.
PURPOSES OF THE SUMMER SESSION.-Work may be taken
in the Summer Session for either undergraduate or graduate
credit, and a special effort is being made to offer teachers
every opportunity for professional improvement as well as to
qualify for higher types of certificates and for the extension
of certificates. More specifically, the courses in the summer
session are designed to meet the needs of the following per-
sons:






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


1. Teachers who wish to increase their professional skill,
to revise and extend their knowledge of a chosen field, or to
qualify in new subjects, preparing to meet special demands in
the profession of teaching.
2. School superintendents, principals, supervisors, and
other officers. Teachers and supervisors of agricultural ed-
ucation, drawing and art, music, public speaking, physical ed-
ucation and coaching, as well as of the regular academic sub-
jects, will find work especially suited to their needs.
3. Teachers and prospective teachers who desire to secure
a high grade teacher's certificate. Extensive opportunities are
offered for the review of all subjects required in the state
teachers' examinations.
4. Graduate students, especially in the field of Education,
though graduate students may major in other departments of
the University.
5. Undergraduate students, and especially those register-
ed in the fall and spring semesters of the University. Such
students may use to advantage a portion of the vacation per-
iod to take up studies which they are unable to include in their
regular programs, or to make up deficiencies, or to shorten
their courses.
6. High school graduates who are about to enter upon
regular university courses and who desire to broaden their
preparation for university work.
7. High school students who are not graduates. Such stu-
dents are sometimes able to make up deficiencies in their
high school work. It should be made plain to them, however,
that they must make arrangements with their high school
principals for receiving credit for work covered. The Summer
School does not grant high school credit, and in no case should
high school principals grant more than a fourth of a year's
credit for work covered in one Summer School.

ORGANIZATION.-That these purposes may be realized. the
work of the Summer School is organized as follows:
1. Normal courses comprising the last two years of high
school work and the Freshman and Sophomore years in col-
lege, and leading to the Normal Diploma. (For requirements,
see page 22).






SUMMER SCHOOL


2. College courses comprising Freshman, Sophomore,
Junior and Senior years in college and leading to standard
college degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education and Bachelor
of Science in Education. (For requirements, see p. 20.)
3. Graduate courses leading to advanced degrees. (For
requirements, see p. 20.)
4. Professional courses meeting the requirements for the
extension of teachers' certificates without further examination.
5. Review courses in all subjects required for county,
state and special certificates.

MEANS FOR THE ACCOMPLISHMENT OF THE ABOVE PURPOSES
1. THE FACULTY.-For the accomplishment of the above
purposes, the instructional staff is, of course, by far the most
important factor. A complete list has already been given.
For the most part the faculty this summer will be the same
as last summer.
Dr. Enwall, who was given leave last summer to visit
Sweden and study the school systems of that and adjoining
countries, has returned and will be with us again this summer.
Dr. Bristol, who was called to the University of Minnesota
for the Summer School there last year, will again be in the
Summer School and is planning a unique series of courses in
his department.
Dr. and Mrs. Roemer have been on leave of absence during
the second semester of the academic year at Teachers College,
Columbia University, but will return in time for the Summer
School.
"Professor A. P. Black, who was studying at the University
of Chicago in the summer of 1923, will again be connected
with the science department.
Professor B. F. Luker, who came to the University in
September of 1923 and has been associated with the Depart-
ment of Modern Languages during the past year, will teach
French and Spanish during the coming Summer School. Pro-
fessor Luker is highly recommended both as a teacher of lan-
guages and as a teacher of teachers.
Professor John Gray will be in charge of the courses in
advanced Biology. Professor Gray has given considerable at-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


tention to the subject of teaching, and teachers of science will
find his courses very beneficial.
Professor C. A. Robertson, who has for two years been
associated with the Department of English, will offer college
courses in literature and advanced English composition. Pro-
fessor Robertson is one of our own graduates and has done
much advanced work at Harvard University. His courses
have been universally popular since coming to the University.
2. THE COURSES OF INSTRUCTION.-Second only in import-
ance to the faculty are the courses of instruction, a descrip-
tion of which is given in detail later.
Special attention is called to the courses that are offered
preparatory to the new teacher's certificates. There will be
several sections of the course in Biology and also in Element-
ary Psychology. An attempt has been made to offer work in
every subject required for teachers' certificates.
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS AND
TEACHERS.-For some time there has been a felt need for
courses dealing specifically with the field of vocational edu-
cation,-courses particularly designed for school superintend-
ents, principals and teachers, that they may become familiar
with the underlying principles of vocational education and
better fit themselves to discharge their school duties. In order
to decide whether the demands for informational courses in
this field are sufficient to warrant the engagement of a well
qualified instructor of vocational courses for the Summer Ses-
sion, it is desired that those interested in pursuing any of
these courses address Dean Norman, making a request for the
courses.
ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY.-The Department of Eco-
nomics and Sociology will begin with the Summer School of
3924 a course of training for social workers, and this will be
continued if the demand warrants. This new line of activity at
the University is under the patronage of the Executive Com-
mittee of the State Conference of Social Work and the South-
ern Division of the American Red Cross Society. It is hoped
that the interest will be such as to make possible a course
covering four summer sessions. The demand for trained so-
cial workers in Florida far exceeds the available supply and
the only training schools in the South are at Baltimore, Rich-






SUMMER SCHOOL


mond, and at the University of North Carolina. Such a course
should prove of special value to several groups: (1) to teach-
ers of the social sciences; (2) to teachers in all grades who
desire to increase their efficiency especially as community
leaders; (3) to teachers who would like to combine social
work with teaching, or supplement their teaching with some
form of professional social service during the summer vaca-
tion; and (4) to those who are looking forward to professional
work as a vocation. The courses offered in the Summer Session
of 1924, and described in full later in the bulletin, may well be
supplemented by work in the Department of Physical Edu-
cation, the course in Plays and Games being especially desir-
able.
3. THE UNIVERSITY CITY.-There are many features of
the Summer School other than classroom work that will prove
to be conducive to that larger life which should permeate all
citizens, especially that of teachers. The advantages that
Gainesville presents as the seat of the Summer School are nu-
merous. It is centrally located and easy of access. It has well-
paved, lighted and shaded streets, an exceptionally pure water
supply, and a good sewerage system. The citizens are ener-
getic, progressive, and hospitable.
4. RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE.-The moral and religious
atmosphere at the Summer School is wholesome: The leading
religious denominations have attractive places of worship in
the city and students are welcome at every service. Under the
direction of the Secretary of the Young Men's Christian Asso-
ciation, assisted by an able social worker, the religious and
social service on the campus is maintained at a high level.
Under this department will be found the programs that are
usually connected with the Young Men's and Young Women's
Christian Associations. The addition of a social worker to
this department in the Summer School of 1923 placed the de-
partment of Religious and Social Service on a more definite
footing so that it may now function in the student life in a
better way.
SAll the other social organizations on the campus, including
the county clubs, will be organized through this department.
Every phase of social life will be encouraged. The following
is the general program in the






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


RELIGIOUS DEPARTMENT
Tuesday, 10 A. M.-Devotional exercises at the General
Assembly.
Wednesday, 7 P. M.-Devotional services.
Friday, 10 A. M.-Devotional exercises at the General
Assembly.
SOCIAL DEPARTMENT
Cooperating with the Department of Physical Education.

Monday, 4:00-6:00 P. M.-Plays and games on the campus.
Wednesday, 4:00-6:00 P. M.-Plays and games on the
campus.
Thursday, 8 P. M.-Peabody Club.
Friday, 8:00-11:00 P. M.-Socials in Social Hall and Gym-
nasium. (As announced from time to time).
5. THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.-All students and faculty
members are expected to attend the General Assembly on
Tuesday and Fridays at 10:00 o'clock. The completion of
the new Auditorium makes it possible without crowding to
accommodate all those who may wish to attend. The Audito-
rium will seat about 1,900, and is near enough to the main
lecture halls to make it easily accessible to all students.
Many important announcements will be made at the Gen-
eral Assembly, for the observance of which students will be
held responsible, even though they may not be in attendance
at the time.
The following persons will address chapel on the given
dates:
Friday, June 13 --......Opening Exercises,
President Murphree
Tuesday, June 17-....... Mr. Leigh
Friday, June 20---...... Mr. Little
Tuesday, June 24-......Mr. Simpson
Friday, June 27--...........Musical program
Tuesday, July 1--...--....Mr. White
Friday, July 4.-......-...-.Patriotic Exercises
Dr. J. R. Cunningham
Tuesday, July 8--......-...Mr. Puffer
Friday, July 11 ..-..--... Mr. Puffer
Tuesday, July 15---........Mr. Leake






SUMMER SCHOOL


Friday, July 18--..-........Mr. Roemer
Tuesday, July 22 .........Musical Program
Friday, July 25 -...-......-Mr. Enwall
Tuesday, July 29-.....-...
Friday, August 1--....... 8:00 P. M. Graduating Exercises.
6. LECTURES AND ENTERTAINMENTS.-There will be a
greater number of public lectures and musical recitals than we
have had heretofore in the Summer School. In the week of
July 7 to 11 Dr. J. Adams Puffer, lecturer and author, Beacon
Boys' Bureau, Boston, will give a series of lectures on adoles-
cent life and activities. On July 16 Mr. Fred Patton; baritone,
of Astoria, N. Y., will give a recital. On July 18 and 19 the
Coffer Miller Players of Chicago will be here for two even-
ing performances. On July 28th and 29th Miss Mary Craig,
soprano, and Mrs. Granberry, pianist, of New York City will
give two joint vocal and piano recitals.
Efforts are being made to add others of equal importance
to this program.
7. COOPERATIVE GOVERNMENT.-During the summer of
1923, a system of cooperative government between faculty and
students was begun. The generous commendations that were
given to this venture leads us to hope that still further im-
provements may be made in the summer of 1924 to the end
that all may be benefited and all may be happy and contented.
8. THE PEABODY CLUB.-The Peabody Literary Society
meets weekly in the Auditorium. Delightful and instructive
programs are rendered at each meeting. All students of the
Summer School are eligible for membership.
9. THE ALLIGATOR.-The summer edition of the Alliga-
tor is published by the students in cooperation with the De-
partment of English and a committee from the faculty.
Through its columns the more important news of the campus
is disseminated. Every registered student is automatically a
subscriber and entitled to every issue from the date of regis-
tration.
10. ATHLETICS.-The gymnasium, the baseball grounds
and tennis courts are at the disposition of the students, and in-
structors are at hand to direct athletic activities. A well kept
golf course is near the University and for a nominal fee stu-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


dents of the Summer School are permitted to play on the
course.
11. STUDENT HEALTH AND MEDICAL ADVICE.-The Univer-
sity maintains a well equipped infirmary and has a profes-
sional nurse for those who may be ill during the Summer
School. Regular physical examination and medical advice are
offered to all students on any day at the regular hours of con-
sultation in the infirmary. Opportunity is offered for indi-
vidual and private conference with the University Physician,
Director of the Department or assistants.
The University Physician keeps hours daily at University
Infirmary for purposes of consultation. Infirmary care is
provided for those requiring it. Constant bedside care is given
by resident registered nurse. Students must furnish their own
transportation to the Infirmary.
12. THE LIBRARY.-The general library of the University
is temporarily located in Peabody Hall. It contains about
38,000 volumes of well selected books to which the Summer
School students have free access. The Pedagogical library
will be of especial interest to them, for it contains many books
on educational theory, general and special methods, history
of education, psychology and philosophy. In the reading room
are more than a hundred of the best general and technical
periodicals. Here also are received the leading newspapers
of the state and nation.
Attention is called to the course in Library Science (p. 47)
for the benefit of those teachers who wish better to equip
themselves for managing the libraries in their own schools.
The library will be open week days from 7:50 to 12:30,
from 1:50 to 5:30, and from 7:00 to 10:00, except that on
Saturday it will close for the day at 5:00.
13. BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT.-The entire equipment
of the University is at the service of faculty and students.
The buildings are for the most part magnificent three-story
brick and stone structures. They are modern in every respect
as to equipment and arrangements. They contain the kind of
lecture rooms, laboratories and libraries that a modern college
needs. Attention is called to the accommodations in the dormi-
-tories and commons below under "Rooming Facilities" and
"Expenses."






SUMMER SCHOOL


14. THE NEW AUDITORIUM.-Special attention is called to
the Auditorium, a magnificent new building, just completed.
It has been erected at a cost of $200,000 and is considered by
many to be the most commodious structure of its kind on any
campus in the South.
15. DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL.-For use in demonstrating
principles of teaching both in the early elementary school and
the later elementary school. It is the plan this year to have
a demonstration school with two grades; a first grade with
some beginners and other children who have had some first
grade work, and a sixth grade, or a fifth and sixth grade com-
bined. The tuition for these children will be five dollars
($5.00) for the entire term. The school will run for six weeks,
beginning on June 16th. Students who have children who
are in these grades are urged to enroll them with the Dean
of the Summer School at an early date, as only a limited num-
ber can be accommodated.
16. THE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU.-As the Teachers Col-
lege and the Summer School wishes to serve the whole state
in every possible way, a Teachers' Employment Bureau was
established several years ago. It is open throughout the year,
except during the first week of the Summer School (students
are particularly requested not to ask for conferences during
the first week of Summer School, as the Director will be very
busy with other duties during that week), and the vacation
period immediately following the Summer School. Its duties
are to assist students and graduates of the University to ob-
tain positions in the teaching profession. From school offi-
cials it receives requests for teachers. From teachers it re-
ceives requests for information as to vacancies. It keeps on
file both information as to vacancies and as to available teach-
ers. When called upon the Bureau tries to meet the needs of
both teachers and school officials.
The Director of the Bureau will be glad to be informed of
present or prospective vacancies in positions for which col-
lege-trained men or women are eligible. No charges are made
for services, though students are required to pay for all tele-
grams and telephone calls made in their behalf.
The aggregate yearly salaries of all teachers who secured
positions through the Bureau last summer was in excess of






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


$324,675.00. Had the same positions been obtained through
professional agencies, fees in excess of $16,233.75 would have
been collected from the teachers. As the Employment Bureau
made no charges whatever, it is readily seen that no small
amount was saved the teachers of the state.
-Communications in regard to teaching positions should
be addressed to Dr. Joseph Roemer, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida.
17. THE BULLETIN BOARDS.-Read the bulletin boards
daily.
18. DANCING.-The University of Florida does not feel
justified in placing its stamp of approval on the dance as at
present practiced. Dancing is therefore forbidden both on and
off the campus during the summer session.

EXPENSES
The cost 6f attending the Summer School is very moderate
when compared with that at many other institutions. There is
no charge for tuition and fees are very low. The combined
cost for a room on the campus and meals in the Commons is
only $40.00 for the session. The cost of meals alone is $32.00
for the session. For laundry, incidentals and books, expendi-
tures vary, but necessary expenditures are not very high. The
estimate of the cost to a student living on the campus follows:
High Low
Tuition -..................................--- ... $ 0.00 $ 0.00
Registration fee ............ ........----- 5.00 5.00
Boarding and lodging in Dormitory
per week in advance ........--------------... 5.25 5.25
In advance for the term..............._-------. 40.00 40.00
Board without lodging, per week--...--. 4.25 4.25
Board without lodging for the term,
in advance .....-----.------------.. 32.00 32.00
Board for children under eight, per
week ................. ......----.--------------- 2.00 2.00
Board for children above eight, per
week ........................--------- --.--------- 4.25 4.25
Chemistry Laboratory fee.....-----...-. -- 5.00 5.00


Physics Laboratory fee ..---....-___.....----------2.50


2.50






SUMMER SCHOOL


Biology Laboratory fee----....-..-..------. 5.00 5.00
Botany and Zoology Laboratory fee ... 2.00 2.00
Drawing fee (for materials used)...... 1.00 .75
Primary Handwork
(for materials used) ..-........ --------...... .75 .50
Laundry ----........................ -----......-- 12.00 4.00
Incidentals ---------.------------------.. 16.00 8.00
Books -----------------------------..... 8.00 3.00
For students living off the campus, the estimated expense
is the same except that rooms and board will be somewhat
higher. However, good rooms adjacent to the campus can be
obtained at from $6.00 to $12.00 a month per student, and
board off the campus will cost about $6.00 a week.
Only students will be admitted to the dormitories, but
children may take meals with their parents in the Commons
at the rates given in the above list. All accounts are payable
in advance.

ADMISSION

ADMISSION TO SUMMER SCHOOL.-Graduates of Junior
High Schools of ten grades, those who have finished the tenth
grade of a Senior High School, and teachers who hold a First
Grade County Certificate, are admitted to the first year of the
Four-Year Normal Curriculum, which comprises the equi-
valent of the last two years of high school and the Freshman
and Sophomore years in college. Graduates of Senior High
Schools who can offer sixteen entrance units, including three
(3) of English, two and one-half (21/.) of mathematics, one
(1) of history and one (1) of Science, are admitted to the
Freshman year of the Collegiate course.
Students are urged to pursue courses leading to a degree
and to have themselves classified when they register. To facili-
tate proper classification, all students are requested to bring
with them their high school diplomas or a statement from their
high school principals of the work they have completed. Blank
certificates, conveniently arranged for the desired data, will
be sent to all high school principals, and, upon application, to
prospective students.
No one under sixteen years of age will be admitted unless
he is a graduate of a Senior High School.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Persons twenty-one or more years of age who cannot sat-
isfy the entrance requirements, but who give evidence of abil-
ity to profit by the courses they may take, may, under excep-
tional circumstances, be admitted as "adult specials".
There are no requirements for admission for those who
register merely for review courses.
ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS.-For the large number of sum-
mer school students who have not finished high school and,
hence, do not have sufficient entrance units to enable them to
enter the Freshman class, but yet are mature enough to profit
by regular college work, entrance examinations will be ar-
ranged. All students should file with the Dean of the Summer
School not later than May 20th petitions for examinations in
each subject in which they wish to be examined.
SCHOLARSHIPS.-At the meeting of the Legislature in 1923,
a scholarship law was passed providing for two scholarships
from each county in the State, one to the Teachers College of
the University of Florida, and one to the School of Education
at the State College for Women. Each of these scholarships
may be held for four years by the successful applicant and
carries a stipend of $200.00 per year. A student to be con-
sidered as an applicant for a scholarship must present sixteen
college entrance units. These scholarships are awarded upon
competitive examinations to persons satisfying the entrance
requirements of the University of Florida and of the Florida
State College for Women. A student who desires to be con-
sidered as an applicant for a scholarship should make his
desire known to his county superintendent before the first
of May of each year. He should also write to the State Super-
intendent of Public Instruction telling him of his application
for the scholarship. The following counties have each had a
representative at the Teachers College during the academic
year 1923-24. All counties that are not listed have not had a
representative, and these scholarships will be open to appli-
cants beginning September, 1924.
Alachua Charlotte DeSoto
Bay Citrus Escambia
Bradford Clay Flagler
Brevard Columbia Gadsden
Calhoun Dade Hardee






SUMMER SCHOOL


Hendry Marion Santa Rosa
Hillsboro Monroe Sarasota
Holmes Nassau Seminole
Jackson Okaloosa Sumter
Jefferson Okeechobee Suwannee
Lake Osceola St. Lucie
LaFayette Palm Beach Taylor
Lee Pasco Union
Leon Pinellas Wakulla
Levy Polk Walton
Manatee Putnam
ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING.-Office hours will be
held daily by the Committee on Advanced Standing in Room
24, Peabody Hall, to evaluate the credits of those students
who have attended other colleges and universities and who
wish to receive advanced standing at the University of Flor-
ida. This office will, however, not be open after Saturday,
July 26, as this Committee will have other duties during the
last week of the Summer School. Students are, therefore,
cautioned not to delay attention to this important matter
later than this date.

DEGREES

DEGREES OFFERED.-Courses are offered leading to the de-
grees of Master of Arts and Master of Science in Education,
of Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Edu-
cation, and Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education. In
addition to these degrees, the Normal Diploma, sometimes
called the L.I. degree, is granted to those who have finished
the second year's work in Teachers College. (For require-
ments, see p. 22.) Every student should register, at the very
least, for the Normal Diploma, for two years of training be-
yond the high school, even for those who expect to teach in the
elementary school, is now recognized thruout the United States
as the very minimum that any teacher should possess. Students
who expect to teach in high school should in every case possess
a bachelor's degree.
Authority for the above is provided in Section 5 of Sum-
mer School Act as follows:
"All work conducted at the said Summer School shall be






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


of such character as to entitle the students doing the same to
collegiate, normal or professional credit therefore, and may be
applied towards making a degree."

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE.-
1. A candidate for the Master's Degree must be in resi-
dence for at least one scholastic year, or four summer terms,
devoting his entire time during this period to study and re-
search.
2. He must complete two majors and two minors. A major
is a three year-hour course of rank above the Senior Class. A
minor is a three year-hour course of rank above the Sopho-
more Class.
3. A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should
be closely allied to the major subjects. The title of the thesis
should be submitted by the end of the first summer and com-
pleted by the beginning of the fourth summer.
4. All students who hold the bachelor's degree are ex-
pected to attend a conference each Monday at 10 o'clock, Pea-
body attic.
5. All students who wish to pursue work leading to the
Master's degree must register with the Chairman of the Grad-
uate Committee as well as with the Dean of the Summer
School as soon as possible, so that plans for giving the work
which they desire may be perfected before the opening of the
Summer School. In the communication, state what subjects are
desired.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREES.-The follow-
ing curriculum has been designed to meet the requirements
for the degrees of A.B.E. and B.S.E. (For the requirements
for the B.S.A.E. degree, see General Catalog of the Univer-
sity.)







SUMMER SCHOOL


CURRICULUM
Leading to the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education or
Bachelor of Science in Education
CONsTANTS.-i. e., subjects required of all students en-
rolled in Teachers' College.


Physical Education I.... 1
Physical Education II.... 1
Military Science I....... 2
Military Science II........ 2
English I........................ 3
Psychology ...................... 1
Educational Psychology 1
Education I..................... 3
Education II................ 3
or
SEducation VIa............ 1
SEducation IVb............ 1
Education IVa ........... 1
Education Xb ................ 1
Education IIIa .............. 1
Education XIVb.............. 1
Education Va ................ 1
Education VIb ................ 1


%



1/2
/2
/2
/2
/2
/2
/2


hr.
hr. ;
hrs.;
hrs.;
hrs.;
hrs.;
hrs.;


required
required
required
required
required
required
required


Freshmen
Sophomores
Freshmen
Sophomores
Freshmen
Sophomores
Sophomores


hrs.; year course; required of Freshmen
hrs.; year course. 1 Sophomores must
Stake either Ed.
hrs.; first semester II or Ed. VIa
hrs.; second semester J and Ed. IVb.
hrs. first semester. Required of Juniors.
hrs.; second semester. Required of Juniors.
hrs.; first semester. Required of Seniors.
hrs.; second semester. Required of Seniors.
hrs.; first semester. Required of Seniors.
hrs.; required of Seniors.


Each student must select courses from three of the follow-


ing Groups.


(See Regulation 2 below.)


A-Ancient Languages B-Modern Languages


Required courses: Required course
Latin I French A
Latin VI 6 hours French I
or |or
Latin II J Spanish A
Recommended courses: Spanish Ij
Latin III or
Latin IV German A )
Greek A German I
Greek I Recommended
or French II
French A 1 Spanish II
French I German II
or Latin
Spanish A History I or
Spanish IJ English IV,
D-Mathematics I E-Natural


Required courses:
Mathematics I 6 hrs.
and III J
Recommended courses:
Mathematics IV
3 hours from a
Science
Surveying


ses:


6 hours



courses:


IV
V or VI
Science


Required courses:
Biology I
Biology II
Biology III 16 hours
Chemistry I
Physics V
Recommended courses:
Chemistry III
Advanced Physics
Chemistry V


C-English
Required courses:
English I (included
among constants)
English, 6 1
hrs.
6 hrs. from 12 hrs.
one for-
eign lan-
guage J
Recommended courses:
Other courses in lan-
guages, and His-
tory V.



F-Social Science
Required courses:
History I
History II
History III 15 hrs.
Sociology I
Economics I
Recommended courses:
Social Science
Biology
Psychology and
Philosophy






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


REGULATIONS:
1. All students must take all Constants.
2. Each student must select from three Groups of Studies
from A to F, and must continue in those selected until com-
pletion of the Sophomore year; at which time a student may
concentrate upon two of these Groups by permission of the
Dean.
3. Where the total number of hours of the three Groups
combined does not equal 24, additional hours must be taken
from the recommended courses in these Groups to make the
total 24 or more.
4. A total of 66 year-hours is required for graduation.
5. In case a student is exempt from Military Science I
:and II (see General Catalog) he must substitute an equal
number of hours from other departments.
6. For the Bachelor of Arts degree, the major elective
work must be chosen in Groups A, B, C and F; for the Bach-
elor of Science degree, from Groups D and E.

SUBSTITUTIONS PERMITTED:
(1) Summer School students may substitute another course
in Education for Education Ia with the consent of the Dean.
(2) Summer School students may substitute either Edu-
cation Xa or Education XIXa for Education Ib.
(3) Summer School students may substitute Education
XXIV or Education XXIII for Education IIa, except that
Education XXIII gives only one year hour of credit. The
additional half hour must be made up elsewhere.
(4) Summer School students may substitute Education
XXII for Education IIb.
(5) Choice is allowed Summer School students between
Education IIIa and Education XXVII.
(6) Summer School students may choose among Educa-
tion XIVa, Education XIVb, and Education XXI.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE NORMAL DIPLOMA.-The Normal
Diploma (the L.I. degree) is granted to those students who
have completed the Freshman and Sophomore years of the
above curriculum leading to the bachelor's degrees, with the





SUMMER SCHOOL


exception that in the Sophomore year Education VIb (Super-
vised Teaching) is required, and in the same year, students
may choose between the required Sophomore and Junior
courses in Education. (See the CURRICULUM under "con-
stants".) Since, however, so many students in previous sum-
mer schools seem to have misunderstood the requirements for
the Normal Diploma, a description in detail of these require-
ments is here given.
The student must first offer sixteen entrance units to the
Freshman Class in College. (See the requirements for ad-
mission to Freshman Class, p. 17.) In the next two years he
must complete at least one credit hour of Physical Education
and two credit hours of Military Science. In addition, the
student must complete thirty academic and professional year
hours, or sixty semester hours. Of these, the following are
required: English I, 3 hrs.; Psychology, 11 hrs.; Educational
Psychology, 11/2 hrs.; Education I, 3 hrs.; Education VIb, 11/
hrs.; and either Education VIa and Education IVb, or Educa-
tion IVa and Education Xb, 3 hrs. The student may then choose
three of the groups described under the requirements for the
Bachelor's degree, and so far as possible complete the "re-
quired" courses in these three groups. On account of the large
number of hours required in two of the groups, it may be im-
possible for students who elect these groups to complete all
of the "required" courses in three groups. In that case, they
should divide their time about equally among the groups
chosen.

CREDIT

SUMMER SCHOOL CREDIT.-Students will ordinarily be able
to complete about one-fourth as much work in a session of the
Summer School as they do in the regular annual session. By
reciting six times per week, however, it is possible for college
students to complete a full semester's work in three courses.
The amount of credit, stated in year-hours, to which the com-
pletion of each course will entitle one, is given below in the
description of the courses of instruction.
The following resolutions, which are primarily intended
for students of less than college rank, were adopted by the
Teachers College Faculty in January, 1921:






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


I. Courses to be given in the Summer School shall be designated
as (a) Review, (b) Normal, or (c) College.
(a) Courses intended primarily to give a rapid survey of a subject
and thus prepare for examination for a Teacher's Certificate.
(b) Courses arranged primarily for pupils unable to offer fourteen
college entrance units.
(c) Courses designed primarily for college students (those able to
offer fourteen or more college entrance units.)
II. All courses (whether Review, Normal, or College) may, if the
other regulations be observed, be used towards extension of Teachers'
Certificates, provided that at least one course of higher scholastic grade
other than those necessary for the certificate, be taken.
III. (a) No credit in college entrance units or in college hours shall
be given for successful completion of a "Review" course.
(b) Summer School students offering less than fourteen entrance
units shall not, without special permission, be allowed to take more than
twenty hours per week. Not more than one entrance unit will be given
for work done by "Normal" students at one session of the Summer School.
For successful completion of one "Normal" course of study with five
recitations per week, one-fourth of one college entrance unit shall be
given. One hour of recitation shall be considered equal to two hours of
work in laboratory, music, physical education, and drawing.
The Teachers College will accept entrance unit credits only in case
an entire course has been completed. Under no circumstances will it
accept less than one-half unit in a subject, and one-half units only in
subJects so marked in the current catalog. The College will, however,
accept one-quarter of a unit when an additional unit or permissible
one-half unit is also offered in the same subject, provided the one-quarter
unit does not represent duplication of work.
It is recommended that the schedule of classes be so arranged as-
to make it possible for a student in "Normal" courses to earn two one-
quarter units in one subject during one session of the Summer School.
(c) A student able to offer fourteen or more college entrance units
shall not, without special permission, be allowed to receive more than
four and one-half credit hours or one and one-half college entrance units.
Successful completion of a course of study requiring six class hours
per week thruout the Summer School session, will entitle the student to
one and one-half college hours; completion of a course requiring four
or five hours per week, will entitle to one college hour, and of a class
meeting two or three times per week, to one-half college hour; but
no credit in hours will be given for a class meeting only once a week.
To entitle a student to credit, a course in the Summer School must be
approved by the head of the Department in the University most nearly
concerned.

Maximum and Minimum Hours.-Without special permis-
sion from the Teachers College faculty, all students must take
as many as fifteen hours a week and may not take more than
twenty. College students may not register for courses that
aggregate more than four and one-half college credits. In
special cases students may petition the faculty for permission
to register for fewer than fifteen hours and exceptionally able
students are sometimes permitted to take more than the usual
amount of work, but only under the following regulations
which have the sanction of the Teachers College Faculty:





SUMMER SCHOOL


1. Students must first petition the Teachers College Fac-
ulty for permission to register for more than the usual amount
of work, presenting this petition to the Dean of the Summer
School.
2. Before being allowed to register for more than 41/2
year hours credit, or more than 20 recitations per week in
pre-college work, the student must show that he has attained
an average of 87 in the term or Summer School immediately
preceding, in which case he may be permitted to take 51/2
credits. In like manner, the student must show an average
of 90 before he will be permitted to take as much as 6 credit
hours. The faculty reserves the right to reduce the amount
of credit received to 41/2 credits even if all subjects should be
passed, unless the same high averages, respectively, are main-
tained.
3. Students will not be permitted to register for more
than 41/2 hours until their petitions have been granted.
AMOUNT OF CORRESPONDENCE WORK PERMITTED.-Students
are not permitted to complete more than 50% of the work to-
ward a degree by correspondence. Those who take their de-
grees by attendance at the Summer School are encouraged to
take all of the last 15 year hours immediately prior to the
reception of their degrees in residence. In some cases, however,
a student may take by correspondence 6 year hours during
the 10 months just prior to the summer session in which he
receives his degree, but may not take more than 6 out of the
last 15 year hours by correspondence. In every case, attend-
ance is required at the summer school or scholastic term im-
mediately prior to the reception of a degree.
Correspondence study courses may not at any time be
offered to satisfy the residence requirements.
No students will be permitted to take work by correspon-
dence while they are in residence, without permission of the
dean.
CERTIFICATES
GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES.-Graduates of the Teach-
ers College and Normal School are granted Graduate State
Certificates without further examination, provided that one-
fifth of their work has been devoted to professional training
and provided that they have the recommendation of the Teach-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ers College Faculty. It is well for the student to note that a
Graduate State Certificate permits him to teach only those
subjects that are listed on such certificate, and that only those
subjects will be placed on his certificate in which he has spe-
cialized in his college course. This will ordinarily mean that a
subject must have been pursued for at least two years in col-
lege before a certificate to teach that subject will be granted.
In case a student has pursued a subject for three or four years
in high school, however, this rule may sometimes be abro-
gated.
Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life
Certificates by "presenting satisfactory evidence of having
taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under
a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of
three holders of Life State, Life Gradute State, or Life Pro-
fessional Certificates."
Requirements for Other Teachers' Certificates.-The fol-
lowing are the subjects in which applicants for Third Grade
Certificates will be examined: Orthography, reading, arith-
metic, English 'Grammar, composition, geography, United
States history, including the Constitution of the United States,
physiology and theory and practice of teaching.
Applicants for Second Grade Certificates will be examined
in the subjects prescribed for the Third Grade Certificate, and
in Agriculture, Civil Government, and algebra to Quadratics.
"Applicants for Second Grade Certificates who submit unex-
pired Third Grade Certificates as parts of their examinations
may be exempt from tests on Orthography, reading and physi-
ology."
In addition to the subjects prescribed for the Second Grade
Certificate, applicants for First Grade Certificates must be
examined in Algebra, quadratics and beyond, Biology, Psy-
chology, General History and Rhetoric, and by submitting an
unexpired Second Grade Certificate may be exempt from all
subjects covered by that certificate, provided the grades at-
tained on the Second Grade Certificate are equal to those re-
quired for the First Grade Certificate.






SUMMER SCHOOL


REGULATION GOVERNING THE EXTENSION OF
CERTIFICATES
When credit for the extension of certificate is desired,
regulations in addition to those mentioned under the heading
"Maximum and Minumum Hours" must be observed.
1. No teacher shall take less than five hours per week of
professional work.
(Any four or five hour course in Education and Psychol-
ogy, but not in Pedagogy, that has not been taken previously,
will satisfy the professional requirement necessary for ex-
tension of certificate.)
2. No student shall take less than 15 hours per week with-
out special permission, and at least 10 hours of this amount
shall be in courses not covered by the certificate held, or by
courses previously taken.
3. No student will be granted an extension of certificate
who does not apply for the same on the student REGISTRA-
TION CARD. A list of those who have applied will be posted
on the Bulletin Board in Peabody Hall not later than July 1st
for correction, and no student will be recommended for ex-
tension of certificate whose name does not appear on this list
by July 25th. Students should register under exactly the
same name that appears on the certificate which they wish
to have extended.
4. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any
change of registration after Saturday of the first week.
5. Certificates to be extended must be sent by Registered
mail to W. S. Cawthon, State Superintendent of Public In-
struction, at Tallahassee, Florida, immediately after the Sum-
mer Session. Those who expect to take the state examinations
immediately after the Summer School, however, should retain
their certificates until they have adjusted their exemptions
with the county superintendent. They should then send their
certificates as directed above.
The Summer School faculty will not recommend students
for extension of certificate for repeating courses which they
have taken in previous summer sessions, or those who are
not pursuing courses in order to raise the grade of certificate
already held. At the end of the term the faculty will recom-
mend for extension those that meet the above conditions, and
attend the full term, and do work satisfactory to the faculty.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR REGISTRATION

Please stop, look, listen and observe the following direc-
tions! It will be a great time-saver to you and your instruct-
ors if you will read and understand these directions before
you come to register.
1. Get your registration right the first time. Remember
the proverb, "Haste makes waste." More than 500 students
every year find it necessary to re-register. Don't hurry. Be
accurate. Make up your mind to take not less than one nor
more than three hours in registering.
2. Study the registration blanks reproduced immediately
after these directions.
3. Fill out the REGISTRATION CARD in complete de-
tail down to the word "COURSES." Answer every question
if possible.
4. Study the Bulletin and the daily program until you
know or at least think you know, what subjects you desire to
study. See that there are no conflicts in your class hours.
5. Consult freely with members of the faculty about your
schedule.
6. After you have decided which subjects you expect to
take, list them on the large REGISTRATION CARD under
the word "COURSES."
7. You are now ready to fill out the INSTRUCTOR'S
COURSE CARDS. Make out one of these cards for each
subject you are taking. For instance, if you are taking three
subjects, you will need three Course Cards, four subjects,
four cards, etc.
8. Do not register for more than 41/2 college credits or
more than 20 recitation hours per week.
9. Secure the signature on your REGISTRATION CARD
of each of your instructors and leave with him the INSTRUC-
TOR'S COURSE CARD made out for the subject which he
teaches.
10. Be sure you have your registration as you want it. Do
not change courses unnecessarily.
11. Present the REGISTRATION CARD to the Dean for
his approval.







SUMMER SCHOOL


12. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any
change in registration after Friday of the first week.
13. Pay fees at the Auditor's Office, first floor, Language
Hall.
14. Graduate students must register both with the Chair-
man of the Graduate Committee, and with the Dean of the
Summer School.

WHEN AND WHERE TO REGISTER.-Students who live in and
near Gainesville should register on Friday or Saturday, June
6 or 7, in Room 13, Peabody Hall. Those who can reach
Gainesville on the morning trains on Monday, June 9, should
register before 4 o'clock in Peabody Room 13. There will be
no registration after that time on Monday. All others should
register in the Gymnasium on Tuesday, June 10. No effort
will be made to meet trains or to transfer trunks on Sunday.










June........................................

192..................


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SUMMER SCHOOL
REGISTRATION CARD
This card for Male Students only


Mr. Surname First name Middle name



Home Address: P. 0. County State


Your Age? Are You Married?

In case of illness or accident, whom shall we notify?


What college degree do you hold?


Address of this person


Is this person your parent or guardian?


Do you intend to teach? Total number of months already taught What Certificate do you hold? Date issued

Date of expiration of this Certificate 'Do you desire extension of Certificate?
Where should telegram be delivered i. e.
Date of previous extension Your address while in Gainesville

What church do you care to attend?

COURSES

1 4

2 5











INSTRUCTOR'S COURSE CARD
This 'card for Male Students only
Surname First Name Middle Name

N am e of Student............................................................................................................................................................
June ...................................... 1924.


SUBJECT Course No. Sec.


Students fill in only above and to right of heavy line

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

M onday ....................................................... ............ ............ ............ ............

T tuesday .............................. ............ .................................... ............ ............

W wednesday .. ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............

T thursday .... ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............ ............

F riday .......... ............ .......... ........... ......... ............ .............. ..... ............
Q t d-


INSTRUCTOR


o
Q o

0



:0(-


i lg ce G r ...................... ............ ....F l ..... G r .. ............... ............ ............ s ...........

Diligence Gr................................. Final Gr................................. Days Present ..............................


................................................................................. ...... ..................Instructor

Note: The registration cards for women are exactly the same as those for men
except in color.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
The following abbreviations used in connection with the
courses, indicate the buildings in which the courses are held,
and the numbers after such abbreviations indicate rooms in
which they are held:
A-Agricultural Building; S-Science; P-Peabody; E-
Engineering; L-Language; G-Gymnasium.
ELEMENTARY AGRICULTURE.-A general course in agricul-
ture. This will introduce the student to the study of soils,
plants, common diseases of plants, insects, farm crops, domes-
tic animals and the like. Methods of teaching agriculture in
rural schools will be stressed. Review and extension credit
only. M. W. F. 11:00 E. 15. Mr. Day.
SWINE PRODUCTION.-Location and equipment of a hog
farm, breeds of swine suited to the South; growing feeds
for grazing and fattening; feeding and managing the herd;
marketing and slaughtering; and curing meats on the farm.
1 college credit. M. T. Th. S. 8:00 P. 2. Mr. Day.

RURAL LAW.-Classification of property, boundaries,
fences, stock laws, rents, contracts, deeds, abstracts, mort-
gages, taxes, laws governing shipping, etc. 1 college credit.
M. W. Th. S. 10:00 P. 2. Mr. Day.

FERTILIZERS.-The nature, composition, and sources of fer-
tilizers and their reaction on soils and crops. Fertilizer for-
mulas and home-mixing. The making and economical use of
farm manures. Fertilizer requirements for various crops, etc.
11/ college credits. Daily 9:00 P. 2. Mr. Day.

BIOLOGY
GENERAL BIOLOGY.-General introduction to the structure
and classification with special reference to the flowering plants,
the insects and vertebrates. Designed to prepare for state ex-
aminations. Three recitations and three laboratory periods
per week. 11/2 Normal credits.
Three sections:
Section 1. M. W. F. 9:00 S. 12. Laboratory M. W. Th.
3:00-5:00 S. 22. Mr. Goette.






SUMMER SCHOOL


Section 2. M. W. F. 2:00 S. 3. Laboratory T. 2:00-4:00
Th. F. 4:00-6:00 S. 22. Miss Borger.
Section 3. M. W. Th. 10:00 S. 3. Laboratory M. W. Th.
4:00-6:00 S. 22. Mr. Black.
BIOLOGY II.-General Botany.-The structure and physi-
ology of the seed plants; structure and phylogeny of the algae,
fungi, mosses and ferns; ecology and classification of the local
flora. This course may be taken as a whole for four college
credits, or it may be divided into:
BIOLOGY IIa.-Covering the first semester's work. 2 col-
lege credits. M. T. W. Th. 8:00 S. 23. Laboratory M. T. W.
Th. 2:00-4:30. Mr. Gray.
BIOLOGY IIb.-Covering the second semester's work. 2
college credits. T. W. Th. F. 9:00. Laboratory T. W. Th. F.
2:00-5:00 S. 23. Mr. Gray.
BIOLOGY VIb.-Agricultural Bacteriology.-This course is
a continuation of Biology VIa for Agricultural students. Spe-
cial attention will be given to the relationship of microorgan-
isms to soil, milk and its products and the common stock
diseases. 2 college credits. Class and laboratory periods to
be arranged. This course will be given only if there is suf-
ficient demand. Mr. Gray.

CHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY I.-General Chemistry.-A course designed for
those who wish to prepare for science teaching in the high
school. This course can be taken by those who have never
taken chemistry, or by those who have had a course before
and wish to review it. There will be two courses in General
Chemistry, one embracing non-metals and one embracing met-
als. The former is a prerequisite to the latter.
First Semester. A study of the non-metals. 21/2 college
credits. Daily 9:00 S. 3. Lab. M. T. W. Th. 2:00-4:00 S. 2.
Mr. Leigh.
Second Semester. A study of the metals. 21/2 college
credits. Daily 11:00 S. 12. Lab. M. T. W. Th. 2:00-4:00 S. 2.
Mr. Black.
CHEMISTRY III.-Qualitative Analysis.-Lectures and lab-
oratory course in this subject offered to those who have had






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


general chemistry. 11/2 college credits. T. Th. 2:00. S. 3. Lab.
M. T. W. Th. 2:00-5:00 S. 2. Mr. Leigh.

CHEMISTRY VIIa. Volumetric Analysis. A laboratory
course offered to those who have had qualitative analysis. 11/2
college credits. Laboratory 2:00-5:00, days to. be arranged.
S. 10. 12 hours per week. Mr. Black.

CHEMISTRY VIIb.-Gravimetric Analysis.-A laboratory
course offered to those who have had qualitative analysis. 11/2
college credits. Laboratory 2:00-5:00, days to be arranged.
S. 10. 12 hours per week. Mr. Black.

CHEMISTRY V.-Organic Chemistry.-This course is de-
signed to present the fundamentals of chemistry of the com-
pounds of carbon. The work in the classroom is presented by
means of lectures, quizzes, and oral and written recitations.
21/2 college credits. Daily 11:00 S. 3. Laboratory 2:00-6:00.
S. 2, days to be arranged. Mr. Leigh.

ATHLETIC COACHING
COACHING I.-Football.-Rules; offense and defense; gen-
eralship and strategy; training; conditioning; equipment;
kicking; forward passing; tackling; dummy and charging
sled; fundamentals and plays from coach's viewpoint. 1/2
college credits. Hours to be arranged. Dr. Manchester.

COACHING II.-Baseball.-Batting; base-running; fielding
each position; team work; coaching; rules; condition. 1/2
college credit. Hours to be arranged. Dr. Manchester.

COACHING III.-Basketball.-Coaching; p a s si n g; goal
throwing; team play; condition; different styles of play used
by leading coaches. 1/2 college credit. Hours to be arranged.
Dr. Manchester.

COACHING IV.-Track and Field Athletics.-Starting;
sprinting; distance running; hurdling; high and broad jump-
ing; pole vaulting; shot putting; hammer throwing; discus;
preparing contestants for events; individual peculiarities;
rules; physical condition; promotion, managing and officiat-
ing at meets. 1/2 college credit. Hours to be arranged. Dr.
Manchester.





SUMMER SCHOOL


CIVICS
CIvics.-Special attention will be given to school laws of
Florida and to local, town, city and county governments. Four
sections. Review and extension credit only.
Section 1. M. W. Th. 10:00 P. 23. Mr. Simmons.
Section 2. M. W. Th. 10:00 E. 15. Miss Carmack.
Section 3. T. W. F. 2:00 P. 23. Miss Carmack.
Section 4. M. Th. F. 3:00 L. 9. Mr. McMullen.

DRAWING, CONSTRUCTIVE WORK AND INDUSTRIAL ART
DRAWING I.-Grades I-III, inclusive. Application of Art
to everyday studies; construction work and design; paper cut-
ting, illustration; free-hand drawing; nature study in colors.
1/ college credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 E. 12. Miss Henderson.
DRAWING II.-Grades IV-VII, inclusive. Design and ap-
plied design; line and shade; theory of color and study of water
colors; nature study and still life in color; notebooks kept up
to date each week. 1/ college credit. M. T. W. Th. 2:00 E. 12.
Miss Henderson.
DRAWING III.-Grades VIII-XII, inclusive. Principles of
perspective and line drawing; pencil sketching; five-minute
sketches from life; black and white; charcoal and pencil; water
color study and nature study in colors; principles of design
and applied design; comparison of notebooks. 1/ college credit.
M. W. Th. F. 4:00 E. 12. Miss Henderson.
DRAWING IV.-Grades I to XII, inclusive. Decorative work
in enamels; stencilling and handwork that can be useful thru-
out the grades and high school. 12 college credit. M. T. Th.
S. 9:00 E. 12. Miss Henderson.
ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY
ECONOMICS Ia.-The first half of the course in Principles
of Economics, covering consumption, production, value and
market price. The second half will probably be given the
following summer. (Not open to Freshmen, and should be
preceded by Sociology B or Economics B, although this will
not be required of mature students.) 11/ college credits.
Daily 8:00 L. 34. Mr. Bristol.
SOCIOLOGY B.-Introduction to Sociology.-A brief study
of some of the fundamental factors and problems of social





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


welfare and social progress. 11/ college credits. Daily 11:00
L. 34. Mr. Bristol.
SOCIOLOGY IIIa.-Problems of Child Welfare.-The con-
servation of life; health and physique; training and education;
child labor, juvenile delinquency, problems of dependent chil-
dren. 11/ college credits. Daily 9:00 L. 34. Mr. Bristol and
special lecturers.
SOCIOLOGY IVa.-Elementary Case Work.-The methods
of case work as applied to the treatment of the socially inade-
quate. (Prerequisite, or co-requisite, Sociology B.) 11/ col-
lege credits. M. W F. 2:00-4:00 L. 34. Mr ..-....-.................
SOCIOLOGY VIIb.-Social Legislation.-A study of the laws
of selected states concerning various problems of social wel-
fare. (Open to graduate students and qualified seniors.) 11/2
college credits. M. T. W. F. 2:00-3:30 Law College Library.
Mr. Bristol and special lecturers.

EDUCATION
Any 4 or 6 hour course in Education, but not in Pedagogy,
will meet the professional requirement for the extension of
certificates.
PEDAGOGY.-School management, general and special meth-
ods of teaching, elementary principles of child nature, school
hygiene and sanitation, personality of teacher, relation of
school and community, and other practical pedagogical ques-
tions. Review. 1 normal credit. Three sections:
Section 1. T. W. F. S. 12:00 P. 25. Miss Griffin.
Section 2. M. T. Th. F. 11:00 P. 25. Miss Griffin.
Section 3. M. T. W. F. 3:00 P. 25. Miss Griffin.
EDUCATION IIa.-The Teaching of Geography and History
in Grades One to Six.-This course will include the teaching
and correlating of these subjects from the first through the
sixth grade. It will include biography, European background
in history, nature study, home geography, elemental science
and elementary civics as they enrich these subjects. 1/ col-
lege credits. Three sections:
Section 1. Daily 11:00 P. 1. Mrs. Carrier.
Section 2. Daily 8:00 P. 17. Mr. Woodley.





SUMMER SCHOOL


Section 3. Designed for teachers of rural schools who
have charge of several grades. Daily 8:00 L. 12. Miss
McArthur.
EDUCATION IIb.-The Teaching of English in Later Ele-
mentary Grades.-The choice and selection of reading matter
and literature in the upper elementary grades will be stressed
in this course. Students who are interested in the teaching of
English in the middle and early elementary grades should
register for Education XXII. 11/2 college credits. M. T. W.
Th. F. 3:00 P. 17. Mr. Woodley.
EDUCATION IIIa.-Administration and Supervision of Vil-
lage and Consolidated Schools.-A course stressing in a prac-
tical way problems peculiar to these schools in Florida; the
supervising principal, qualifications, relation to superinten-
dent, boards, teachers, pupils, patrons and community; adapt-
ing the school to the child's needs, organization, curriculum,
attendance, promotions, tests, health work; business prac-
tices, school finance, material equipment, school housekeeping,
records and reports. 11/ college credits. Daily 9:00 P. 23.
Mr. Fulk.
EDUCATION Va.-The Technique of Teaching.-The laws of
learning, lesson-planning, thinking, questioning, the problem-
project method, the socialized recitation, democracy in the
classroom as a preparation for democracy in life. 11/2 college
credits. Daily 11:00 P. 23. Mr. Norman.
EDUCATION VIa.-Child Study.-The nature, growth and
development of the child from birth to adolescence with refer-
ence to education; the original nature of the child and his edu-
cation; the meaning of protracted infancy; training in recog-
nition of types and individual differences, of common defects
and how to deal with them; the cultivation of intelligent sym-
pathy with children; the effect of Child Study on the practices
of elementary and secondary education. 11/2 college credits.
Daily 11:00 P. 17. Mr. Enwall.
EDUCATION VIb.-Supervised Teaching.-This course is
planned to give the student practice in conducting recitations
under close supervision. A study will be made of the develop-
ment of courses, and the present status of the subject taught.
Lesson plans will be required for all recitations, and the man-





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ner of teaching will be subject to criticism. Teaching 4 hours
a week; conferences 2 hours a week. 11/ college credits. Daily
11:00 P. 21. Mr. Woodley.
EDUCATION VIIb.-Educational Psychology. Psychology
applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill,
etc. 11/2 college credits. Daily 9:00 P. 17. Mr. Everett.
EDUCATION Xa.-Health Education. 11/2 college credits.
Section 1. Rural School Hygiene.-Conditions and forces
that affect the physcial and mental vigor of children and
teachers, and relate the school to the health of the home
and community. Location and sanitation of school build-
ings; hygienic furniture, etc.; diseases and physical defects;
medical inspection; hygiene of instruction; teacher's health;
play and recreation; teaching of hygiene. Daily 12:00 E. 17.
Miss McArthur.
Section 2. Health Education in Elementary Schools.-A
study of school health activities and methods of interesting the
child in the formation of health habits based on the new course
of study in Health Education for the Elementary Grades.
Information, outlines, specific acts, corrective exercises, pro-
jects, games and stories will be presented. Offered to teachers
of the elementary grades. Daily 8:00 L. 11. Miss Harris.
Section 3. Health Education in High Schools.-The goals
for an effective program of health education in the high
schools: a study of school health activities and methods of
presentation. Daily 9:00 L. 11. Miss Harris.
EDUCATION Xb.-The Elementary School Curriculum.-
The curriculum as a group of related problems and projects
of vital interest to children. An attempt to formulate a cur-
riculum based on social conditions and social needs. 11/ col-
lege credits. Daily 12:00 P. 23. Mr ......----.--...
EDUCATION XIVa.-Junior High School.-The purpose of
this course is to give principals and teachers a knowledge of
the junior high school and its organization. Since the move-
ment is in its formative period in Florida, much attention and
study will be given to concrete cases and local conditions.
Topics: Need of reorganization of the traditional high school;
changes needed in the program of studies, in discipline, meth-






SUMMER SCHOOL


ods of teaching, etc.; development of the Junior High School;
special function of the Junior High School; organization, cur-
ricula and courses of study, methods of teaching, etc., of the
Junior High School. Daily 9:00 P. 21. Mr. Roemer.
EDUCATION XIVb.-High School Administration.-This
course is designed to study the practical management and ad-
ministration of the modern high school. It will consider such
topics as: duties of principal as head of school; relation of
principal to board of education, superintendent, teachers, pu-
pils and community; legal status of high school; systems of
financing; selection, supervision, promotion, retention and
dismissal of teachers; adjustment of teaching load; testing
and grading of pupils; problem of discipline; pupil guidance,
athletics, wider use of school plant, supervised study, student
activities, teachers' meetings, etc. (Junior students may
choose between Education XIVb and Education IIIb.) 11
college credits. Daily 8:00 P. 21. Mr. Roemer.
EDUCATION XVIIa.-Tests and Measurements. An element-
ary course confined mainly to achievement tests. 11/2 college
credits. Daily 8:00 L. 33. Mr. Everett.
EDUCATION XIXa.-The History of Education: General
Course.-The development of educational thought and practice
viewed as a phase of social progress. 11/ college credits. Daily
8:00 P. 1. M r. .......-..... .....
EDUCATION XXI.-Newer Type of Elementary School.-
This course will discuss some recent departures from the tra-
ditional and will consider causes for these changes. The course
will include organization of the elementary school curriculum,
and a discussion of the relationship between the kindergarten
and elementary school. It is planned to meet the needs of
teachers of the first four grades. Prerequisite, 4 years of
teaching experience or two years of college training. Students
admitted only after conference with instructor. 112 college
credits. Daily 9:00 E.-10. Mrs. Roemer.
EDUCATION XXII.-The Teaching of Reading and Litera-
ture in the First Six Grades.-The basic importance of read-
ing in the elementary school, reading as a tool study, the vari-
ous methods of teaching reading, etc., will constitute the
course. Methods of teaching phonics, appreciation, memoriz-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ation and dramatization will be presented. Observation of
demonstration lessons and criticisms will be required. Two
sections. 11/2 college credits each.
Section 1 will be confined largely to the teaching of the
mechanics of reading as a tool study. Daily 9:00 P. 25. Mrs.
Carrier.
Section 2 is designed for those teachers who will teach in
the middle elementary grades. Daily 8:00 P. 25. Mrs. Carrier.
EDUCATION XXIII.-Hand-work for Elementary Grades.-
The purpose of this course is to develop the real function of
handwork in the elementary grades. The various types of
hand work will be discussed, paper cutting, free hand drawing,
clay modeling, etc. A constructive project for each grade will
be developed during the course. 1 college credit.
Section 1. Designed for teachers of the early elementary
grades. Daily 11:00 P. Attic. Mrs. Roemer.
Section 2. Designed for teachers of the upper elementary
grades. Daily 12:00 P. Attic. Mrs. Roemer.
EDUCATION XXIV.-The Teaching of Arithmetic in the
Elementary School.-The broad concept of number as it relates
to child life and the means of working out definite standards
of measurements are stressed. The four fundamental opera-
tions and how to teach them, fractions, decimal fractions and
denominate numbers, will be taken up. Emphasis will be
laid on careful gradation in the teaching, the use of problems
and drill within the limits of life use. A course of study for
the elementary school will be worked out. Observation of
demonstration lessons, and criticisms of these lessons will be
required. 11/ college credits.
Section 1 is designed for teachers in the early elementary
school. M. T. W. Th. F. 3:00 P. 23. Mrs. Mahan.
Section 2 is-designed for teachers in the later elementary
school. Daily 12:00 P. 28. Mrs. Alstetter.
EDUCATION XXVII.-Rural and Village School Manage-
ment.-How to organize and conduct a rural school. 11/ col-
lege credits. Daily 11:00 E. 17. Miss McArthur.
EDUCATION XXXI.-History and Theory of Vocational Ed-
ucation.-A study of the causes leading up to the establishment






SUMMER SCHOOL


of vocational courses, the changing conception, the underlying
principles of present practices. Such topics will be included
as: the old apprenticeship, the sloyd and manual training
movements, industrial progress, the Smith-Hughes and similar
Acts, types of vocational education, etc. This course is parti-
cularly valuable to school administrators. 11/2 college credits.
Daily 8:00 L. 32. Mr. Sawyer.
EDUCATION XXXII.-The Part-Time School.-A study of
the work-permit youth,-why he leaves school before or upon
completing the grammar grades, the social, economic and edu-
cational status of the junior worker, vocational guidance, pre-
vocational opportunity, legislation affecting junior workers,
the employer and youthful workers, aims, objectives and the
organization of the part time school. A study of the problems
influencing the very foundations of our elementary school
system. Such a course brings new light and inspiration to
the school teacher and administrator. 11/2 college credits.
Daily 11:00 L. 32. Mr. Sawyer.
EDUCATION XXXIII.-Trade Analysis and Methods.-Each
member of the class will analyze a vocational subject. The
several kinds of theoretical and related knowledge will be
classified, and re-arranged into an instructional order. A
detailed and systematized course of study will be completed
followed by discussions of teaching methods, lesson planning,
etc. Very helpful for manual training and vocational teachers.
11/2 college credits. Daily 12:00 L. 32. Mr. Sawyer.
Anyone interested in attending any of the preceding three
courses should write at once asking that the courses be offered.
EDUCATION XXXV.-A Study of the School Laws of Flor-
ida. 1/ normal credit. W. S. 11:00 P. 25. Mr. Everett.

GRADUATE COURSES IN EDUCATION
It is planned to offer five semester courses of graduate
rank in Education. It is impossible to offer all the courses
during any one Summer School, but by taking one each summer
a student can complete four in four summers, which will
equal the two majors required for the Master's Degree.
EDUCATION 110b.-The Elementary School Curriculum.
Seminar.-An intensive study of the development, and pres-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ent content of the elementary school curriculum, including the
kindergarten; the selection and evaluation of material; the
importance of the classroom teacher. 11/2 college credits. Daily
8:00 P. 23. Mr. Fulk.
EDUCATION 111a. (formerly Education XIa).-Educational
Tests and Measurements. Seminar.-This is an intensive
study of intelligence and educational tests. A thorough and
systematic study is made of all the chief tests in both fields
with laboratory material for class use so as to familiarize
the student with the process of actually handling tests. 11/2
college credits. Mr. Roemer. (Not offered in the summer
of 1924.)
EDUCATION 111b (formerly Education XIb).-School Sur-
veys. Seminar.-An intensive and analytical study of the
principles and practices followed in making the leading sur-
veys of the country. 11/2 college credits. Mr. Fulk. (Not
offered in the summer of 1924.)
EDUCATION 114a.-A Seminar in the organization and man-
agement of high schools. 11/2 college credits. Mr .Roemer.
(Not offered in the summer of 1924, but to be offered in the
summer of 1925.)
EDUCATION 115b.-Democracy and Education. Seminar.-
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social
inheritance, the individual, society, socialization, social con-
trol, dynamic and static societies, education its own end. 11/2
college credits. Mr. Norman. (Not offered in the summer of
1924.)

ENGLISH
ENGLISH GRAMMAR.-Six sections. Five sections carry
review and extension credit only. Section 6 is for advanced
students and gives 1 normal credit.
Section 1. M. T. W. F. 4:00 L. 9. Mrs. Ramsay.
Section 2. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 S. 23. Miss Sheppard.
Section 3. M. T. W. Th. 2:00 L. 12. Mrs. Ramsay.
Section 4. M. T. Th. F. 12:00 E. 16. Miss Sheppard.
Section 5. M. T. Th. F. 4:00 E. 16. Miss Sheppard.
Section 6. 1 normal credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 L. 25.
Mrs. Ramsay.






SUMMER SCHOOL


COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC.-A general course in composi-
tion and rhetoric will be given in sections as follows:
Section 1. For those who have never taught and wish to
prepare for examination. Review and extension credit only.
M. T. W. Th. 9:00 E. 15. Mrs. Ramsay.
Section 2. For those who hold third or second grade cer-
tificates, or who have taught one or two years. Review and
extension credit only. M. T. W. Th. 8:00 E. 16. Miss Sheppard.
Section 3. For those who hold first or higher grade cer-
tificates, or have taught three or more years under such cer-
tificate. 1 normal credit. M. T. W. Th. 11:00 L. 11. Mr.
Wise.
AMERICAN LITERATURE.-Study of American Literature as
outlined in Metcalf's "American Literature." 1 normal credit.
M. T. W. Th. 8:00 L. 25. Mrs. Ramsay.
ENGLISH LITERATURE.-The history of English Literature
as outlined in Metcalf's "English Literature" will be given. 1
normal credit. M. T. Th. F. 2:00 L. 26. Miss Sheppard.
COLLEGE ENGLISH
ENGLISH Ia.-Advanced College Rhetoric.-Designed to
train students in methods of clear and forceful expression.
Instruction is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric,
in rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing, the constant cor-
relation of the three as methods of approach to the desired goal
being kept in view. In addition a reading course is assigned
each student. 112 college credits. Daily 8:00 P. 28. Mr.
Hathaway.
ENGLISH Ib.-Advanced College Rhetoric.-This is the
work covered during the second semester of Freshman Eng-
lish. It is a continuation of English Ia. The chapters on In-
vention in Genung's "Working Principles of Rhetoric" will be
studied. A minimum of ten compositions is required. 11/
college credits. Daily 9:00 P. 28. Mr. Hathaway.
ENGLISH IIa.-Introduction to Literature.-This is a course
now required of all A.B. students. It is designed to give stu-
dents an elementary knowledge of the progress of human
thought as expressed in literary form from its earliest mani-
festations to the present. The immediate object is to equip the






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


student of English literature with some idea of world litera-
ture both as desirable in itself and as necessary to the more
detailed study of English and American literary history. The
first semester work now offered will therefore include the
origin of literature and the development of the various primal
types through the classical periods of Greece and Rome. Lec-
tures, and extensive readings in translation. 1 college hour.
Daily 9:00 L. 26. Mr. Robertson.
ENGLISH IVb.-Advanced Composition.-The regular
Sophomore course in composition; open to those who have com-
pleted satisfactorily English I or English IVa. The text will
be Curl's "Expository Writing". The course will include study
and composition of the various forms of Exposition, with em-
phasis on the essay. Some attention will be given to news and
editorial writing. This is the class that publishes the "Florida
Alligator". 11/ college hours. Daily 8:00 L. 26. Mr. Robert-
son.
ENGLISH Va.-Shakespeare.-The life and earlier work,
including the history plays, romantic comedies and non-dra-
matic poetry. Three plays will be read in class. Written -re-
views on plays read outside the class will alternate with essays
from the students and lectures by the instructor. This course
is open to those who have had English III or equivalent work
in English literature. 1/ college hours. Daily 11:00 L. 26.
Mr. Robertson.
FRENCH
FRENCH Ab.-Elementary French, second semester's
course; continuation of French Aa; grammar, prose composi-
tion, reader, oral practice. Fraser & Squair's Shorter French
Course; La Belle France. Prerequisite: French Aa or equiva-
lent. 11/ college credits. Daily 11:00 L. 9. Mr. Luker.
FRENCH SIb.-Second year French, second part. Gram-
mar, prose composition, reader. Prerequisite: French A
and first part of second year French or equivalent. 11/ college
credits. Daily 12:00 L. 9. Mr. Luker.

GEOGRAPHY
POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY.-Special attention will be given to
Florida and its relation to other states. A thoro review of the






SUMMER SCHOOL


geography of the United States and the world. Instruction
will be given in the use of textbooks, maps, globes, industrial
products as a help and guide for the teaching of the subject.
Review and extension credit only. Five sections:
Section 1. M. W. Th. 10:00 S. 3. Mr. Goette.
Section 2. M. W. F. 2:00 S. 12. Mr. Goette.
Section 3. M. W. F. 3:00 P. 1. Mr. Buchholz.
Section 4. M. W. Th. 4:00 P. 1. Mr. Buchholz.
Section 5. M. T. Th. 11:00 L. 32. Mr. Buchholz.

HISTORY
Elementary United States and Florida History. Four
sections, each covering thoro review of state adopted text book.
Review and extension credit only.
Section 1. M. T. Th. F. 8:00 L. 9. Mr. Simmons.
Section 2. M. T. Th. F. 9:00 L. 25. Mr. McMullen.
Section 3. M. T. Th. F. 11:00 L. 25. Mr. Simmons.
Section 4. M. T. Th. F. 2:00 L. 25. Mr. McMullen.
HISTORY.-General.-Review and extension credit only.
Daily, 8:00 E. 10. Mr. McMullen.
HISTORY.-Ancient.-11/2 Normal credits. Daily, 8:00 E.
15. Miss Carmack.
HISTORY.-Medieval and Modern.-From the 12th century
to the French Revolution. 11/2 Normal credits. Daily, 12:00
E. 15. Will not be offered in the summer of 1925. Miss Car-
mack.
HISTORY.-Medieval and Modern.-From the French Rev-
olution to the present time. Not offered Summer 1924, but
will be offered in the Summer of 1925.
HISTORY.-English.-A brief study of English history from
the Anglo-Saxon Invasions to the Norman Conquest, and a
more detailed study from 1066 to The Restoration, 1660. 1
Normal and extension credit. M. T. W. Th. 2:00 L. 10. Will
not be offered in the Summer of 1925. Mr. Simmons.

HISTORY.-English.-A detailed study of the period from
1660 to the present. 1 Normal and extension credit. Not of-
fered Summer 1924, but will be offered in the Summer 1925.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


HISTORY.-American.-A detailed study of American his-
tory from the period of discovery and colonization to Jackson's
administration. 1 Normal and extension credit. M. T. W. Th.
12:00. L. 25. Will not be offered in the Summer of 1925.
Mr. Simmons.
HISTORY.-American.-A detailed study of American his-
tory from Jackson's administration to the present time. 1
Normal and extension credit. Not offered Summer 1924, but
will be offered in the Summer of 1925.
AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS.-This course is
recommended for teachers of Civics in high schools through-
out the State. The course is designed thoroughly to familiar-
ize the student with the framework and functions of Federal,
State, and municipal governments. 11/2 college credits. Daily
9:00 L. 10. Mr. Leake.
AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY.-An advanced course
stressing American constitutional development up to 1876.
11/ college credits. Daily 8:00 L. 10. Mr. Leake.
DEVELOPMENT OF EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION.-This course
aims to give the student a knowledge of the institutions and
elements which go into the making of present day civilization.
It is essential for advanced work in any period of modern his-
tory and is recommended to teachers of history and to students
who desire advanced work in other fields of history. 11/
college credits. Daily 11:00 L. 10. Mr. Leake.

HYGIENE
PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE.-Preparatory to the state ex-
aminations. Special efforts are made to impress the teacher
with the importance of hygiene and sanitation. How to keep
well and how to teach others to keep well and physically effi-
cient is the special aim of the course. 1 Normal credit. M. T.
Th. S. 8:00 S. 12. Mr. Black.
HYGIENE I.-Instruction by lecture, recitation and written
exercise in general and individual hygiene. Course comprises
educational, informational, defensive and constructive Hy-
giene, with especial reference to infectious diseases, causes,
effects and prevention; sex hygiene and social diseases; the
general features concerning the destructive agents of health.






SUMMER SCHOOL


Required of all first year students. (Acceptable for credit for
pre-medical work by the American Medical Association.) /2
college credit. M. T. W. S. 9:00 E. 16. Dr. Sweet.
HYGIENE II.-Instruction by lecture in the common groups
that make up the community. Treats of the hygiene of the
family, school, industry, farm, institution, and other groups
which are typical of every village or town. Elective for all
students. 1/ college credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 E. 16. Dr.
Sweet.
HYGIENE III.-Instruction by lecture in the intergroup fac-
tors of community, state, nation. Treats of water supply,
sewage disposal, garbage disposal, streets, infectious diseases,
disinfection, fumigation, clinics and other destructive and con-
structive elements of community, state and national health.
Elective for all students. 1/2 college credit. M. W. Th. S. 11:00
E. 16. Dr. Sweet.
LATIN
BEGINNER'S LATIN.-Review.-Review and extension credit
only. M. T. Th. F. 3:00 E. 12. Mr. Metcalfe.
CAESAR.-Review.-In this course three books will be stud-
ied. Composition. 1 Normal credit. M. T. W. Th. 4:00 L.
12. Mr. Wise.
LATIN Ib.-Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia. Prose
composition. Prerequisite: Three years of High School Latin.
11/ college credits. Daily 9:00 L. 12. Mr. Anderson.
LATIN IIa.-Selections from Pliny's Letters with some
study of Roman Life. Prerequisite: Latin I or equivalent.
11/ college credits. Daily 11:00 L. 12. Mr. Anderson.
GRADUATE COURSE.-Seminar.-Cicero's Correspondence.
Papers on assigned subjects. Parallel readings in English
and Latin. Students should provide themselves beforehand
with the complete Teubner text in two volumes. Hours to be
arranged. 11/ hours graduate credit. L. 12. Mr. Anderson.

LIBRARY SCIENCE
LIBRARY SCIENCE I.-A course designed to help the teacher-
librarian in the small high school. The subjects of book
selection, the study of reference books and the organization, in






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


a simple way, of the small high school library will be empha-
sized. 1/2 college credit. M. W. Th. 10:00 P. 28. Miss Milti-
more.
MATHEMATICS
ARITHMETIC.-A thoro review of Arithmetic is made, that
the student may view it from both the teacher's and child's
point of view. Common and decimal fractions, denominate
numbers, percentage and all other'subjects covered by the
textbooks adopted by the state. Principles and methods of


teaching arithmetic are thoroly covered.
sion credit only. Eight sections:
Section 1. M. T. W. F. 11:00 P. 20.
Section 2. M. T. Th. F. 8:00 P. 20.
Section 3. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 P. 20.
Section 4. M. T. W. F. 12:00 L. 32.
Section 5. M. T. Th. F. 3:00 E. 17.
Section 6. M. T. Th. F. 5:00 P. 1. Mr


Review and exten-

Mr. Little.
Mr. Little.
Mr. Little.
Mr. Buchholz.
Mr. Hamon.
SCassels.


ALGEBRA A.-Elementary course covering the fundamental
operations, simple and simultaneous equations, factoring and
fractions. Designed for those who have had little or no Alge-
bra. Review and extension credit only.
Section 1. M. T. W. Th. 3:00 P. 20. Mr. Hollingsworth.
Section 2. M. T. Th. F. 9:00 E. 17. Mr. Hamon.


ALGEBRA B.-Review of
mitted who does not have a
semester first year Algebra.
Section 1. M. T. W. F.
Section 2. M. T. W. Th.
Section 3. M. W. Th. F.


first year Algebra. No one ad-
rather thoro knowledge of first
Review and extension credit only.
5:00 P. 20. Mr. Hamon.
F. 3:00 P. 21. Mr. Cassels.
9:00 P. 1. Mr. Buchholz.


ALGEBRA C.-Advanced Algebra.-Involution, Evolution,
quadratic equations, progressions, ratio and proportion. No
one admitted who has not a rather thoro knowledge of first
year Algebra. 1 Normal and extension credit. Four sections:
Section 1. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 P. 1. Mr. Hollingsworth.
Section 2. M. T. W. Th. 5:00 E. 17. Mr. Metcalfe.
Section 3. M. T. W. Th. 4:00 P. 23. Mr. Little.
Section 4. M. T. W. F. 12:00 P. 20. Mr. Hollingsworth.
BEGINNER'S PLANE GEOMETRY I.-Books I and II. 11/2 Nor-
mal credits. Daily 8:00 E. 17. Mr. Hollingsworth.






SUMMER SCHOOL


PLANE GEOMETRY II.-Books III to V. Those desiring to
review all of Plane Geometry should either take both Geometry
I and Geometry II, or Geometry II. Prerequisite to Geometry
]I is Geometry I. 11/2 Normal credits. Daily 12:00 P. 21.
Mr. Cassels.

SOLID GEOMETRY.-11/2 Normal credits. Daily 9:00 P. 20.
Mr. Cassels.

PLANE TRIGONOMETRY.-1 college credlit. M. W. Th. S.
10:00 P. 21. Mr. Hamon.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA.-Selected topics in Fite's "College Al-
gebra". 11/2 college credits. Daily 8:00 L. 23. Mr. Simpson.

PLANE ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY.-The first five chapters of
Roberts and Colpitts "Analytic Geometry". 11/2 college credits.
Daily 9:00 L. 23. Mr. Simpson.

ELEMENTARY CALCULUS.-112 college credits. Daily 11:00
L. 23. Mr. Simpson.

MUSIC
MUsIC I.-Rudiments of Music and Sight Singing. 1/2 col-
lege credit. M. T. W. Th. 2:00 E. 10. Mrs. Wall.
MUSIC II.-Sight Singing and methods of teaching public
school music in the primary grades. 1/ college credit. M. T.
Th. F. 3:00 E. 10. Mrs. Wall.
MUSIC III.-Advanced Sight Singing: Two, three and four
part music; methods of teaching public school music in all
grades. Elementary theory and harmony and simple composi-
tion. 1/ college credit. M. T. W. F. 4:00 E. 10. Mrs. Wall.
Chorus and glee club work will also be offered.

NATURE STUDY
NATURE STUDY.-A course for teachers wishing to prepare
themselves better for teaching nature study. A study of the
classification of plants, and the study of insects and small ani-
mals. Bird protection will be a special feature. Three reci-
tations and three laboratory periods per week. 11/ Normal
credits. W. Th. F. 3:00; Laboratory M. T. W. 4:00-6:00 S. 3.
Miss Borger.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY
ELEMENTARY PSYCHOLOGY.-A beginner's course in psy-
chology with applications to teaching. 1 Normal credit. Four
sections:
Section 1. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 P. 25. Miss Griffin.
Section 2. M. T. W. F. 4:00 P. 25. Miss Griffin.
Section 3. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 L. 11. Mr. Everett.
Section 4. M. W Th. S. 11:00 E. 10. Mr ... ..................
PHILOSOPHY Ia.-General Psychology.-Facts and theories
current in general psychological discussion: the sensations,
the sense organs, and the functions of the brain; the higher
mental functions-attention, perception, memory, feeling, emo-
tion, volition, the self; and like topics. This course satisfies
the professional requirement for the extension of certificates.
11/2 college credits. Daily 12:00 P. 17. Mr. Enwall.
PHILOSOPHY IVb.-History of Modern Philosophy.-A con-
tinuation of IVa. Special attention will be given to the works
of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Kant, Hume, etc. 1 college
credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 P. 17. Mr. Enwall.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The courses in this department are designed to meet the
needs of teachers, who, even though not graduates of Physical
Education, are nevertheless expected to have a practical know-
ledge of physical training, gymnastics, plays and games, and
are expected to teach them in the public schools. All teachers
preparing to qualify under the new State law regarding Physi-
cal Education will find these courses particularly to their
needs. Local problems of the members of the classes will be
met as far as possible. Plans will be formulated whereby un-
healthy physical conditions may be eradicated from the en-
vironment of the schools and physical defects found among
school children properly handled. The aim of the department
is to have in every community as many trained leaders in play-
ground and school athletic activities as possible.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION I.-Elementary Gymnastics.-This
class is for beginners and consists mainly of marching, calis-
thenics and simple apparatus work. Exercises applicable for
school room will be given in graduated scale leading up to the






SUMMER SCHOOL


more advanced form of exercise. 1/2 college credit. Women.
M. T. W. Th. 4:00 Gymnasium. Dr. Manchester.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION II.-Soccer and Speedball.-The ele-
ments of the game, fundamentals, training, rules, individual
and team development, and psychology of game from coaches'
viewpoint. 1/2 college credit. M. T. W. Th. 5:00 Gymnasium.
Dr. Manchester.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION III.-Corrective Exercise.-A course
to enable the teacher to recognize physical defects and to have
an intelligent use in the natural and artificial methods for cor-
rection through exercise. Action, use and relation of different
organs of body and exercise to stimulate and normalize them.
General laws governing the body and health. 1/ college credit.
M. T. W. Th. 2:00. Gymnasium. Dr. Manchester.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION IV.-Plays and games for the Early
Elementary Grades.-A course giving Story Plays, Rythmic
Plays, Folk Dancing, Mimetic Plays and the theory and prac-
tice of outlining exercises for the early elementary grades.
1,/ college credit. M. T. W. Th. 11:00. Gymnasium. Dr. Man-
chester.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION V.-Minor Sports.-This course will
include interpretation of rules, organization, promotion, and
competition in the following: playground ball, volley ball, cage
ball, scrimmage ball, playground games, indoor games, tennis,
swimming, and mass play games. The importance of mass play
in the school and playground curriculum. /2 college credit.
M. T. W. Th. 3:00 Gaymnasium. Dr. Manchester.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION VI.-Playground and Play.-Theory
and practice in planning playground activities and arranging
games suitable for age and environment. 1/ college credit.
Hours to be arranged. Dr. Manchester.

PHYSICS
HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS.-A general course, such as is usual-
ly given in standard secondary schools-lectures, recitations,
demonstrations, and a limited amount of individual laboratory
work. 11/ normal credits. M. T. Th. S. 10:00 E. 33. Labo-
ratory W. F. 2:00-4:00 E. 33. Mr. Perry.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GENERAL PHYSICS.-A course designed for those who wish
to prepare for science teaching in the high school or for those
who wish to take a course in general physics more extensive
and more mature than that offered in the elementary course.
This course may be taken by those who have had no previous
work in physics, but in that case, Va must be taken as a pre-
requisite to Vb. The course is divided into two parts as
follows:
PHYSICS Va.-Mechanics and Heat. 21/ college credits.
Daily 11:00 E. 33. Lab. T. W. Th. F. 2:00-4:00. Mr. Perry.
PHYSICS Vb.-Sound, Light and Electricity-2 college cred-
its. Daily 9:00 E. 33; Lab. T. Th. 2:00-4:00. Mr. Perry.

PUBLIC SPEAKING
On account of limited funds, a nominal fee will be charged
for the following courses:
EXPRESSION AND PUBLIC SPEAKING.-In the courses offered
particular attention will be given to establishing a correct
method of breathing, to correcting faulty articulation, and to
teaching the principles of interpretation by voice, gesture, and
facial expression. In these studies special attention will be
given to preparing teachers for carrying on this work in the
public schools. Those interested see Professor J. M. Chapman.
Law Building. Hours to be arranged.
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
SUNDAY SCHOOL METHODS.-A course in Bible study and
preparation for teaching in Sunday School. 1 college credit.
M. W. Th. S. 10:00 L. 12. Mr. White.
BIBLE.-An advanced course in Bible, especially planned
for college credit. The second half of this course will be given
in the summer of 1925. 1 college credit. M. T. W. F. 12:00
L. 12. Mr. White.

SCIENCE
GENERAL SCIENCE.-A course designed especially to meet
the needs of high school teachers. Laboratory work and ma-
terial to use with the Guide will be emphasized. 11/ Normal
credits. M. T. W. F. 8:00; Laboratory T. F. 4:00-6:00. Mr.
Goette.






SUMMER SCHOOL


SOCIOLOGY (See Economics and Sociology)
SPANISH
SPANISH Aa.-Elementary Course-Pronunciation, forms,
elementary syntax, dictation, written exercises, memorizing
of vocabularies. 11/2 college credits. Daily 9:00 L. 9. Mr.
Luker.
SPANISH Ia.-Intermediate Course-Work of Elementary
Course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose
composition. 11/2 college credits. Daily 11:00 P. 28. Mr.
Hathaway.

ROOMING FACILITIES

All rooms in Buckman Hall and Thomas Hall are reserved
for women in the summer. These rooms, which in every case
are comfortable and commodious, are supplied with two good
iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, a table,
washstand and chairs. All students are required to provide
for themselves a pillow, bed linen, towels, and other things as
they may want for their own special convenience.
All who expect to occupy dormitory rooms, which have in
previous years usually been reserved by May 1, should make
reservations as soon as possible. If for sickness or other rea-
sons a student finds it impossible to come to the Summer
School, reservation should be cancelled so that other students
may have an opportunity to occupy the room that has been re-
served. A fee of $5.00 should be sent with request for reser-
vation, but may be sent as late as May 1. If reservations are
made without the payment of this fee (which is the regular
Registration Fee required of all students) these reservations
will be automatically cancelled on May 1. In case a student
deposits this fee and reserves space in the dormitories, then
finds it impossible to attend the Summer School, she will of
course, have the money refunded to her, provided cancellation
of her reservation is made by June 1.
Those who cannot be accommodated in the dormitories can
obtain good rooms adjacent to the campus at a moderate price.
Within the past two years several large rooming houses and
private dwellings have been built within three blocks of the






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


campus, which will greatly increase the rooming facilities for
those who cannot obtain rooms in the dormitory.
Students should engage rooms in approved rooming houses
only, a list of which will be sent on request. Rooming houses
for girls will not be approved unless their owners have ar-
ranged for house mothers for the entire summer session.

BAGGAGE DELIVERY

Students who engage rooms in the dormitories in advance
will receive tags properly addressed to be attached to baggage.
To secure prompt delivery, students should place these tags
on their baggage and should give their checks to authorized
transfer agents who will meet all trains.
For room reservations and general information as to the
Summer School, address,
J. W. NORMAN,
Dean of Teachers College,
Gainesville, Fla.






SUMMER SCHOOL


THE GATOR SUMMER SCHOOL

Composed by 0. I. Woodley.


(Tune: The Quilting Party)
In this place we love so dearly,
'Mid the pines where honors rule,
There is found a noble institution,
'Tis the Gator Summer School.

(Chorus)
In the Gator Summer School,
In the Gator Summer School,
Here we come for daily inspiration,
In the Gator Summer School.

Here we gather life's rich treasures,
Help to read from life's great scroll,
From the learned, wise and skilful teachers
In the Gator Summer School.

Here are formed sincerest friendships,
For the years that will unroll,
And our lives will ever be the richer
For the Gator Summer School.

We will ever sing her praises,
As we reach our highest goal,
And our hearts will always thrill while singing
Of the Gator Summer Scho.ol.









INDEX
Page
A abbreviations .......................................................................... ...................... 45
A dm inistration .......................................... .................................................. 32
Administration, High School --.................------..............----- -..- -................ 37
A dm mission .......----............. ..........----....------ --....-... .. ----....--...................... 17
Admission, Age limit ------................................ ----------...................... 17-182
Advanced Standing ...----........--..-.......--------.. ..... ........---- ...----... ....................... 19
A agriculture ............................... ........... .......... ............. .... ....................:. 32
A lgebra ....................-...........--------.........- -....-...... ---................. -- .......... 48-49
A llig ator ..................................................................... ....................... 13, 44
American Constitutional History ..........-.......................----..---.................... 46
American Government and Politics ............................................................ 46
A nalytical Geom etry ........................................-..................................-.... ...- 49
A nnouncem ents ............................................................... .................. 12, 16
Application for Extension .................... ....--- ....----.--... .....-.................... 27
Arithmetic .....--................ ....-------..............-----------.. --..-----------............... 48
Arithmetic, Teaching of .................. ........... -------............. 40
Athletics ...................................----------- --- ...-- ---.---.--...... 13, 50-51
Athletic Coaching --......................-................-.----- ---------.... ... 34
Auditorium ................................--------....----------------.................... --..-.. 15
Bachelor's degrees, requirements ................................... ........... ... 20-22
Bacteriology, A agricultural ............................................................................ 33
Baggage Delivery ..................-- .................----------- ......--- .......--.............. 54
B baseball .............................................................................................................. 34
B basketball ............................................................................... .................... .. 34
Bible ...................----------------------.........-------...----- ---- ----5-------52
B biology .................................................................. ......................... .... .. .. 32-33
B otany ................................................................................................................ 33
Botany ..............................--........ .---. --.--------------------. 33
Buildings and Equipment ............................................................................. 14
B bulletin B oards ................................................................................................ 16
C aesar ................................................................................................................ 47
Calculus, E lem entary .................................................................................... 49
Case Work ..........................................................................----------- ... 36
Certificates ...............................................---..........---------.......... ..... 25-27
C hem istry .................................................................................................... 33-34
Children ...............................................------.........- -------............. 15, 17
C hild Study ..................................................................................................... 37
C hild W welfare .................................................................................................... 36
'Civics ............................. ..........:........ ... ..-- ... ...-----------.................. 35
Coaching ......----...........- --...................----..... ..------------------------------- 34
'Composition .........-- ......-..................--------- ..................------------------ 43, 44
Consolidated Schools ........--.......-------...-.... ................--- ..- .---------.. ---..-.. 37
Constructive W ork .......................................................................................... 35
Corrective E exercise .............................................-- ---....- -----........ ...... 51
Correspondence Work ................ ................................... .........----- 25
Courses of Instruction .................................................................................. 32
C credit .................................................................................................... 23-24, 25
C curriculum ............................................................................ ......-------- --- 21







SUMMER SCHOOL 57

'Page
Curriculum Elem entry School .................................................................. 38
Dancing ...................................................... .... .............. ................................... 16
D degrees ...................................................................................................... 19-20
Dem onstration School .................................................................................... 15
Developm ent of European Civilization ..................................................... 46
D orm stories ....................................................................................................... 53
D raw ing and Industrial A rts ...................................................................... 35
Econom ics and 'Sociology ..................................................................... 10, 35
Education ...................................................................................................... 36-42
Elem entary aCalculus ...................................................................................... 49
Elem entry School Curriculum ........ ................................................... ...... 38
Elem entary School, N ew er Type of .................................................... 38, 41
Em ploym ent ,Bureau ............................................................................ 15-16
English .................................................................................................. 37, 42-44
Enrollm ent ........................................................................................................ 7
Entertainm ents ................................................................................................. 13
Entrance exam nations .................................................................................. 18
Entrance units required ............................................................................... 17
Expenses ..................................................................................................... 16-17
Expression and Public Speaking ............................................................... 52
Extension of 'Certificates .......................................................................... 27, 28
Faculty ........................................................................................ ...... 3-6, 9
Faculty Com m ittees ...-------..-....---- --...... -----.---....... ..............-- 6
Fertilizers ................................. ................................................................... 32
First Grade Certificate ............................................. ................................ 26
Football .............................................................................................................. 34
French ............-..............- -................................- ................- ...........--..............-- 44
Gator Sum m er School ................................................................................. 55
General A ssem bly ................ .... .....................-.......- .......................... 12-13
Geography ......................................... ........... ......... .............. .... 36, 44-45
Geom etry .......................................................................... ...................... 48-49
Governm ent ..................................................................................................... 13
Graduate Courses ........................-.................................----...............-----..- .. 41
Graduate State Certificates ................................................................... 25-26
.Graduate students .............................................................. .................. 20, 29
Gram m ar ................................................................ ........................................ 42
Gym nastics .......................... ........... .. ............ ................... -- 50-51
H and-W ork ............................................................................. ..................... 40
H health ................................................................................................................ 14
H health Education ............................................................................................ 38
H igh School, The Junior .......................................................................... 38-39
H history .......................................................................................................... 45-46
H history, Teaching of ....................................................-........- .................... 36
H history of Education .......................... ....................................................... 39
History of V ocational Education ...................... ..................................... ..... 40
H ygiene, Physiology and .......................................... ................................ 46
H ygiene ................................................................................ .................... 46-47
Industrial Arts, Draw ing and .............................................. ............ 35
Infirm ary ............................................... ........................... .............................. 14







58 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Page
Latin ....................... ...................................................... ............................ 47
Law R ural --... -....... ..-.............................. -......... ------..................................... 32
Lectures .............................................................................................................. 13
Legislation, Social .......................................................................................... 36
L. I. D degree ........................................................ ................................... 22-23
Library ............................................................................................................... 14
Library Science .................................................................. ..................... 47-48
Literature, A m erican ...................................................................................... 43
Literature, English ........................................................................................ 43
Literature, Teaching of ................................................................................ 39
Location ............................................................................................................ 11
M asters D degrees, R equirem ents ................................................................ 20
M them atics -- --........-...... .....--- ... ---....-....- ........... ..............-...................... 48-49
M axim um and M inim um hours .................................................................... 24
M medical A advice ............................................................................................. 14
M inor Sports ................................................................................................... 51
M music .................................................................................................................. 49
,N nature Study .................................................................................................... 49
N orm al D iplom a, R equirem ents .............................................................. 22-23
Officials of the Sum m er School .................................................................... 6
O organization ........................................................................................................ 8
Part-Tim e School ............................................................................................ 41
Paym ent of fees .................................................................................. 16-17, 29
Peabody Club .................................................................................................... 13
Pedagogy ........................................................................................................... 36
Petitions to the faculty ................................................................................ 25
Philosophy and Psychology ......................................................................... 50
Physical E education ................................................................................... 50-51
Physics .........--- ..... ...-............................................................................. ....... 51-52
Plane A nalytical G eom etry .......................................................................... 49
Plays and G am es for grades ........................................................................ 51
Playground and play ...................................................................................... 51
Psychology ................................................................. .......... .................... 50
Psychology, E educational ............................................................................... 38
Public Speaking ............................................................................................. 52
Purposes of the Sum m er School ................................................................ 7
R leading, Teaching of ............... ................................................................. 39
R registration .................................................................................... 27-29, 30-31
R religious and Social Life .......... ............................................................. 11-12
R religious E education ........................................................................................ 52
R required courses ...................................................................................... 21, 22
R equirem ents for Certificates ...................................................................... 26
R reservations in dorm stories ................................................... ................. 53
R rhetoric .............................................................................................................. 43
R oom ing Facilities .................................... .. ....................... .... ............ 53-54
R oom s off cam pus ............................................................ .................. ....... 54
R ural Law ........................................................................................................ 32
Rural School H ygiene ..................................................................... ..... 38
R ural School M anagem ent ............................................................................ 40







SUMMER SCHOOL 59

'Page
Scholarships ........... ................................................................................ 18-19
School Laws of Florida .............................................................................. 41
School M anagem ent ....................... ..................................... .... ................ 40
Science, G general ............................................................................................. 52
Shakespeare ................................................................................................... 44
Sight Singing -----..............----...........-............................... ..............-...-- 49
Second G rade Certificate ............................................................................. 26
Sm ith-H ughes E education ......................................................... ................... 41
Soccer and Speedball ......----.......- ---..-....-.-......----..........--............................ 51
Social Legislation .................................................................... ..................... 36
Sociology .....................-- .................. --.............. .................................. 10, 35-36
Spanish ..................................................................................... .....-----................ 53
Substitutions perm itted ....................................... ........... ............................ 22
Sunday School M ethods ............................................................................... 52
Supervised Teaching ..................................................................................... 37
Supervision .................. ... ... ..................................... .................................... 37
Surveys .......-------.... ........................- .............--........................ ...-.................-- 42
Sw ine Production ................................. --. ................................... ............ 32
Technique of Teaching ....--...-................. ..-------------------.................. 37
Tests and Measurements ............................---... .......................... 39, 42
Third Grade Certificates ........................................... .............................. 26
T rack A athletics .......................................... ........ ........... ............................. 34
Trade Analysis and Methods ..................................................................... 41
Trignometry ............------------................... .-............................................... 49
Village School Management ........................................................................ 40
Vocational Education .........----............---------...... ....... --................... 10, 40
Vocational Education, History and Theory of --------.................................... 40







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