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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00471
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1924
Copyright Date: 1924
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00471
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Full Text
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The School of Pharmacy

University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Catalog and Announcements


1924-25















CONTENTS
Page

School of Pharm acy Calendar........................................................................ 3

A dm inistrative and Executive Boards ........................................................ 4

Officers of the School of Pharm acy............................................................. 5

General Statem ent ....................-........---........--..........--....... ............. ......-- 8

Location ...-....-..................................................-....................... .......... ..------.... 11

Equipm ent ... -- --........................ ......... ................-- ........--....-... ................ 11

Regulations ...............................................- ................-............. .............---...... 13

Studies ......................-........................................--......-- - ............................ 14

A athletic Team s, M musical Clubs...................................................................... 17

H honors ................................................................................................................ 17

Expenses .................................................................................................------- 18

Scholarships and Loan Funds ...................................................................... 21

Student Organizations and Publications .................................................... 23

A dm mission ...-....................................--..................---....--.................................. 24

Description of U nits........................................................................................ 26

A advanced Standing ......................................................................................... 28

D degrees .............................................................................................................. 28

Curriculum ........................................................................................................ 29

D epartm ent of Instruction ........................................................................... 31

Roll of Students............................................................................................... 46

U university of Florida Facts............................................................................ 50















THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1924-1925


1924-September 15, Monday..........................Examinations for Admission.
Registration of Students.
First Semester begins.
October 4, Saturday, 2:00 p. mn...........Re-examinations.
2:00 p. m...........Meeting of General Faculty.
November 11, Tuesday........................--Armistice Day.
November 27, Thursday........................Thanksgiving Day.
December 19, Friday 12:00 noon......Christmas Recess begins.
1925-January 5, Monday ................................Christmas Recess Ends.
January 6, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m...........Resumption of Classes.
January 31, Saturday............................First Semester ends.
February 2, Monday, 8:00 a. m...........Second Semester begins.
February 14, Saturday, 2:00 p. m.......Meeting of General Faculty.
March 7, Saturday, 2:00 p. m.............Re-examinations.
June 6, Saturday, 2:00 p. m............. .Meeting of General Faculty.
June 7 to 9........................................ Commencement Exercises.
June 7, Sunday, 11:00 a. m........... Baccalaureate Sermon.
June 8, Monday.................................Annual Alumni Meeting.
Class-Day Exercises.
Oratorical Contests.
June 9, Tuesday, 10:00 a. m ........ Graduating Day.
Summer Recess begins.
















BOARD OF CONTROL


P. K. YONGE, Chairman..Manager, Southern States Lumber Co., Pensacola
E. L. WARTMANN..........................................Planter and Stock Raiser, Citra
J. C. COOPER, JR..............................................Attorney-at-Law, Jacksonville
W. L. WEAVER................State Senator, Cashier First National Bank, Perry
GENERAL A. H. BLANDING..-..............................-....................-...........-...... Bartow
J. T. DIAMOND ...................................................... ...... Secretary to the Board





STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

CARY A. HARDEE, Chairman...............................................................Governor
H. CLAY CRAWFORD.............................................................. Secretary of State
J. C. LUNING............................................................. ......... State Treasurer
RIVERS H BUFORD....................................................................A ttorney-General
W. S. CAWTHON, Secretary ......................State Supt. of Public Instruction




UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

ALBERT A. MURPHREE, LL.D...............................President of the University
JAS. M. FARR, PH.D...................................Vice-President of the University
JAS. N. ANDERSON, PH.D............. Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc........................ Dean of the College of Agriculture
J. R. BENTON, PH.D............................... Dean of the College of Engineering
HARRY R. TRUSLER, LL.B.......................................Dean of the College of Law
JAS. W. NORMAN, PH.D.................................Dean of the Teachers College









THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

FACULTY

ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D.
President.

JAMES MARION FARR, A.M., PH.D. (Johns Hopkins),
Vice-President.
Professor of English Language and Literature.

JAMES NESBIT ANDERSON, M.A., PH.D. (Johns Hopkins),
Dean, College of Arts and Science,
Professor of Ancient Languages.

TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, A.M., PH.D. (Chicago),
Director, School of Pharmacy,
Professor of Chemistry.

JOHN ROBERT BENTON, B.A., PH.D. (G6ttingen),
Professor of Physics.

CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, M.A., PH.D. (Gottingen),
Professor of Modern Languages.

THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, M.A., PH.D. (Wisconsin),
Professor of Mathematics.

JAMES MILLER LEAKE, A.B., PH.D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of History and Political Science.

LUCIUS MOODY BRISTOL, PH.D. (Harvard),
Professor of Sociology and Economics.

ALBERT WHITMAN SWEET, M.A., PH.D. (Brown),
Professor of Pharmacology and Pharmacognosy.
Director of Health.

RAYMOND GEORGE MANCHESTER, A.B., D.O.,
Professor of Physical Education.

,CAPTAIN JAMES A. VAN FLEET, Infantry, United States Army,
Commandant of Cadets, and Professor of Military Science and Tactics

J. SPEED ROGERS, A.B., M.A.,
Professor of Biology.

WILLIAM J. HUSA, PH.C., A.M., PH.D. (Iowa),
Professor of Pharmacy.

ORTON WELLS BOYD, A.B., M.A.,
Professor of Accounting and Business Training.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, A.B., M.S.,
Assistant Professor of Physics.

ALVIN PERCY BLACK, A.B.,
Assistant Professor of Chemistry.

WILLIAM BYRON HATHAWAY, B.D., M.A.,
Assistant Professor of Spanish and English.

CAPTAIN FLOYD H. BAIN, Infantry, United States Army,
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics.

CAPTAIN LEWIS W. AMIS, Infantry, United States Army,
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics.

WILLIAM H. BEISLER, M.Sc., D.Sc. (Princeton),
Assistant Professor of Chemistry.

CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, A.B., A.M.,
Assistant Professor of English.

FRED H. HEATH, B.S., PH.D. (Yale),
Assistant Professor of Chemistry.

FRANK THONE, PH.D. (Chicago),
Acting-Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology.

ALBERT ROBERTS HALLEY, M.A., PH.D. (Harvard).
Assistant Professor of English.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN LUKER, A.B., PH.D. (Columbia),
Assistant Professor of French.

CAPTAIN EVERETT M. YON, Infantry, United States Army,
Assistant Professor Military Science and Tactics.

JOSEPH WEIL, B.S.E.E.
Assistant Professor of Physics.
CAPTAIN FRANCIS M. BRENNAN, Infantry, United States Army,
Assistant Professor Military Science and Tactics.

WILLIAM RICHARD HALE, M.A.,
Instructor in Mathematics.

HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, A.B., M.S.,
Instructor in Mathematics.

WARREN SNEDEN HIGGIN, E.E., M.E.E.,
Instructor in Physics and Electrical Engineering.

FRED LOUIS PRESCOTT, B.S., M.E.,
Instructor in Electrical Engineering.






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 7

JAMES V. GLUNT, A.B.,
Instructor in History.

THOMAS F. CARTER,
Assistant in Pharmacy.

E. L. DUPONT,
Assistant in Chemistry.

J. M. PRICE,
Assistant in Chemistry.

PAUL W. HILLS,
Assistant in Chemistry.

DONALD HUBBARD, B.S.,
Assistant in Chemistry.

CHARLES HOUSE, B.S.,
Assistant in Chemistry.


KLEIN H. GRAHAM,
Auditor and Purchasing Agent.

CORA MILTIMORE, A.B.,
Librarian.

ETHEL LORRAINE COWAN,
Registrar.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


GENERAL STATEMENT

The School of Pharmacy was inaugurated with the open-
ing of the session 1923-1924 of the University. The prime
object of its organization was to offer superior opportunities
to those who wish to train themselves thoroly for the import-
ant duties of the retail pharmacist, the pharmaceutical chem-
ist, or the professional or manufacturing pharmacist.
The opportunities in pharmacy were never brighter than
at the present time. With the universal adoption of higher
standards of education and a general concerted movement on
the part of colleges of pharmacy and state boards of pharmacy
in the United States to increase their requirements, we observe
an increasing number of men of ability who are devoting their
lives to the development of pharmacy. There is great demand
for properly qualified pharmacists, and corresponding oppor-
tunities are offered to good men, those having business ability,
industry, integrity and a thoro pharmaceutical education.
Employers are looking for the highest type of professional
pharmacists today, those who are competent prescriptionists
or skilled analysts. It is needless to say that the prepara-
tion for such work requires a college education.
There is a distinct advantage in studying pharmacy in a
university, where the students of pharmacy share all the
advantages and enjoy the spirit of a great educational estab-
lishment, which increases the incentive to prepare themselves
to meet the requirements of the trend of pharmaceutical edu-
cation.
The School of Pharmacy is an integral part of the College
of Arts and Sciences of the University and is governed by the
same general policy that characterizes that institution. The
method of work differs in no essential from those adopted by
the other scientific departments. A large amount of labora-
tory instruction is one requirement since none of the natural
sciences can be adequately taught without considerable in-
struction in the laboratory, and, whenever necessary, in the
field.
The School of Pharmacy makes consistent endeavor to pro-
vide a well balanced course in pharmacy, chemistry and allied
subjects that will fit students not only for the prescription






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


counter and commercial pharmacy, but also for a great var-
iety of professional positions in pharmaceutical chemistry as
well. The training in pharmacy in this school is, moreover,
especially valuable to a person desiring to engage in the man-
ufacture of chemical or medical products.
The following are some of the fields open to capable phar-
macists: as proprietors, managers and prescription clerks in
pharmacies; as pharmacists, chemists, department managers
or traveling salesmen for wholesale drug firms; as pharma-
cists in private, municipal and state hospitals; as pharma-
cists in the Army and Navy; as chemists and bacteriologists
in municipal and state public health laboratories; as chemists
and managers in the production departments of pharmaceuti-
cal and chemical manufacturing houses; as chemists for im-
porters and jobbers of drugs, groceries and other food prod-
ucts; as clinical chemists for physicians; as science teachers
in high schools and colleges; as food and drug inspectors in
government service; and as research chemists in scientific
and industrial laboratories. Success in the higher positions
depends largely on the student's native ability and desire for
achievement.
The American Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties
summarizes the following arguments in favor of requiring a
degree from a college of pharmacy of applicants for license:

"Public welfare requires the services of well trained pharmacists.
Such training can be given to best advantage in a college of pharmacy;
much of it, only in a college of pharmacy. The evolution of pharmacy
has carried us beyond the point where it is simply 'an apprenticeship
profession.' While drug store experience is essential, college training is
necessary to keep pace with the times and keep pharmacy abreast of
the other professions-all of which now demand college training as part
of the professional man's equipment.
"The prerequisite of college graduation affords the most acceptable
basis for reciprocal agreements between the States. So many of the
States now have prerequisite laws that reciprocal registration from non-
prerequisite States become increasingly difficult. The National Asso-
ciation of Boards of Pharmacy recognizes this fact and thoroughly ap-
proves the prerequisite standard. It has also the approval of the Amer-
ican Pharmaceutical Association, the American Conference of Pharma-
ceutical Faculties, and The National Association of Retail Druggists.
"The young man entering pharmacy now without a college training
will find himself at a great disadvantage in years to come when brought
into competition with the college trained man. Both physicians and
patrons have more confidence in the man who has received such train-
ing, and he, furthermore, has the confidence in himself which is essen-
tial to success. It is, therefore, a favor to the young man about to
enter pharmacy to require of him a college training.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


"College graduation furnishes the necessary foundation for quali-
fying the pharmacist as an expert in dispensing. When all pharma-
cists are college trained and when physicians recognize that the phar-
macist is an expert in dispensing, that because of his training and equip-
ment he is better qualified to compound and dispense than the physician
himself, there will be lessening of self-dispensing, and physicians will to
a great extent abandon the practice of prescribing the 'ready-made'
remedies now prevalent.
"The prerequisite would result in bringing into pharmacy a better
educated and more desirable class of young men and women, who
would be attracted by its professional character.
"The present and future advancement of pharmacy requires a bet-
ter professional preparation. The sciences underlying pharmacy, chem-
istry, physics, botany, and physiology, have developed with wonderful
rapidity during the last decade. Medicine has also made great forward
strides. Pharmacy must keep up the pace, in a measure at least, or
lose entirely its professional status."

The School of Pharmacy owes its existence, in a great de-
gree, to the splendid efforts of the Florida State Pharmaceuti-
cal Association and the Florida State Board of Pharmacy.

In his presidential address in 1922, Mr. W. G. Perry,
speaking for the Florida State Pharmaceutical Association
said:

"The day of the private institution for teaching pharmacy, valuable
as it once was, has gone by. Laboratory equipment, and the modern acces-
sories of teaching now needed, mean the establishment of a plant which
only the state or a richly endowed institution can finance.
"So we should work for our University School of Pharmacy. Re-
construction of educational methods since the cessation of the world
war has given a new impetus to the study of pharmacy, and the ablest
thinkers in the calling are unanimous in the belief that higher entrance
requirements and more scientific training are necessary to meet the de-
mand for well-trained pharmacists. It is argued that not until the average
druggist becomes something more than a commercial handler of medicines
can he hope to be recognized as a professional man or to be considered as
a promising candidate for a commission in the government service.
Surely the trained pharmacist is needed to assist the physician in his
work and unless he is competent to make analyses, bacterial determina-
tions and related investigations, qualifications which can be learned only
through the college and laboratory, his opportunities for advancement
will be of little avail."

During the administration of President J. J. Gerig of the
Association, a committee, headed by F. C. Groover, was ap-
pointed to co-operate with the University in the establishment
of the School of Pharmacy. The excellent service by this com-
mittee resulted in the druggists of this state pledging $5000.00
to augment the legislative appropriation made for the School
of Pharmacy.
Since the election of Mr. Leon Hale to the presidency of





THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


the Association, the pledge is being promptly paid to the
Auditor of the University.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida State Pharmaceuti-
cal Association, of which Mrs. Leon Hale is president, has
solicited books and forwarded them to the Library of the
School of Pharmacy. The Auxiliary has moreover donated
over one hundred dollars for the purchase of new books and
has established a substantial loan fund for the benefit of
worthy, needy young men studying pharmacy in the univer-
sity.
Other valuable and appreciative gifts, such as books and
exhibits, to the School of Pharmacy, have been made by the
following persons and firms:
Ernest Berger, Tampa; Bogart Pharmacy, Daytona Beach; Cochrane
Drug Company, Punta Gorda; E. G. Coe, Hastings; Flagler Pharmacy,
Miami; J. H. Haughton, Palatka; Curtis Hickson, Tampa; Mrs. T. R.
Leigh, Gainesville; J. C. McLaulin, Tampa; Harry L. Miller, Tampa;
H. R. Monroe, Tampa; W. R. Ogden, Lake City; A. L. Scott, Starke;
H. B. Smith, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Wray's Pharmacy, Haines City; S. H.
Woods, Winter Haven; Richard Wrenshall, Honolulu, Hawaii; Goodrich
Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio; Green Book Directory, New York City;
Groover-Stewart Drug Company, Jacksonville; Eli Lilly and Company,
Indianapolis, Indiana; Merck and Company, New York City; The Sou-
thern Pharmaceutical Journal, Dallas, Texas; Squibb and Sons, New
York City.
LOCATION
The advantages that Gainesville presents as the seat of
the University are numerous. It is centrally located and easy
of access. It has well paved, lighted, and shaded streets, an
exceptionally pure water supply, and a good sewerage system.
The citizens are energetic, progressive, and hospitable. The
moral atmosphere is wholesome. The leading religious de-
nominations have attractive places of worship.

EQUIPMENT
The University occupies a tract of six hundred and thirteen
acres, situated in the western extremity of Gainesville. Ninety
acres of this tract are devoted to campus, drillgrounds, and
athletic fields; the remainder is used by the College of Agri-
culture.
The University is one of the few institutions in the United
States that made plans before laying the foundation of a single
building for all future development of the campus, as far as
this could be foreseen. Consequently the campus presents an






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


harmonious appearance. The liberality of the State has per-
mitted the erection of substantial and attractive modern build-
ings as fast as they were needed. Early in 1922 the contract
was let for the construction of the first unit of the Adminis-
tration Building, which is to be the outstanding architectural
feature on the campus. The entire building will cost $750,000.
This unit, which is to cost $200,000, will include an auditorium
accommodating 2,200 people.
There are at present thirteen brick buildings upon the
campus, and a few frame ones. The following buildings are
of particular interest to students of the School of Pharmacy:
The two dormitories, Thomas Hall and Buckman Hall,
brick and concrete structures, three stories in height, sixty
feet in width and three hundred and two hundred and forty
feet, respectively, in length. They are built in fire-proof sec-
tions, each containing twelve suites of dormitory-rooms and
on each floor of each section a shower-bath, lavatory and
toilet.
Science Hall, a brick and concrete building of two stories
and a finished basement, one hundred and thirty-five feet long
and sixty-six feet wide. It contains the class rooms and lab-
oratories of the Departments of Chemistry, Pharmacy and
Biology. The laboratories are adequately equipped with in-
struments of precision for the teaching of the technique and
manipulations involved in chemical and analytical work, in
operative pharmacy, bacteriology, botany and toxicology.
George Peabody Hall, erected primarily to house the
Department of Education and Philosophy, furnishes space for
the Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacognosy, whose
laboratories are especially well equipped.
Language Hall, a brick and stone structure of three stories,
one hundred and thirty-five feet long and sixty-six feet wide.
It is the home of the College of Arts and Sciences and provides
classrooms and offices for the Departments of Languages, His-
tory and Economics, Mathematics, Sociology and Political
Science, together with the administrative offices of the Uni-
versity. In the basement are the bookstore and the offices
and presses of the Alligator.
Auditorium and Gymnasium, a brick and stone structure
of two stories (one of which is mezzanine) and basement, one





THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


hundred and six feet long and fifty-three feet wide. It is
heated by steam, is fully supplied with hot water, and is well
lighted and ventilated. The main floor is used as an audito-
rium and gymnasium. A gallery extending around the whole
room provides space for the spectators at gymnastic exhibi-
tions. The basement contains rooms for the director and for
University and visiting teams, and for lockers, shower-baths
and toilets. Adjacent is a swimming pool, thirty-six feet long,
twenty-four feet wide, and from four and a half to seven feet
deep.
The University Commons, a brick building of one story and
basement, one hundred and fourteen feet long and forty-two
feet wide, with a wing forty-nine feet long and twenty-seven
feet wide. It provides a large dining-hall and kitchen. A
wooden annex, one hundred and twenty feet long by sixty feet
wide, is now used as a Y. M. C. A. "Hut".
The Hospital, located near the Y. M. C. A. "Hut", has been
equipped with accommodations for twenty-five men.
The General Library, housed in Peabody Hall, contains
about 38,000 volumes.
The Pharmaceutical Library is located in Science Hall and
contains books and journals from which the student of phar-
macy may obtain professional information.
ATHLETICS.-The University has provided a hard-surfaced
athletic field, including two football gridirons, baseball dia-
mond, with grandstand and enclosed field, and tennis-court
facilities. A basketball court and concrete swimming-pool
also are located on the campus.
MILITARY.-Military equipment of a value of more than
$50,000 is available for military instruction.

REGULATIONS
SUPERVISION.-An Officer in Charge, occupying quarters
in one of the dormitories, has immediate supervision of the
general life of the student-body.
OFFENSES AGAINST GOOD CONDUCT-Any offense against
good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the word, renders
a student liable to discipline, whether or not a formal rule
against the offense has been published.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


The following offenses will be treated with special sever-
ity: disrespect to an officer of the University; wanton de-
struction of property; gambling; having revolvers in pos-
session on the University grounds.
HAZING.-No student will be assigned to a room in a dormi-
tory until he has been matriculated and has signed the fol-
lowing pledge:
"I hereby promise upon my word of honor, without any
mental reservation whatsoever, to refrain from all forms of
hazing while I am connected with the University of Florida."
ATTENDANCE UPON UNIVERSITY DUTIES.-A student who
accumulates three unexcused absences from drill, or ten from
lecture or recitation, will be given a severe reprimand and
parent or guardian will be notified. Two additional unex-
cused absences will cause his dismissal from the University
for the remainder of the academic year. Ten unexcused ab-
sences from Chapel will involve, except in the case of a senior,
the same penalty.
A student who, because of ill health or of outside demands
upon his time, finds it impossible to be regular in his attend-
ance upon University duties, is requested to withdraw; but
this does not in any way reflect upon his good standing.
Delinquencies in University duties are reported to the Reg-
istrar, who brings them to the attention of the students con-
cerned and requires a prompt explanation to be made. A
careful record of all delinquencies is kept.

STUDIES
No applicant for a degree shall be allowed to make a change
in the curriculum selected, unless such change be submitted
to the faculty of his college at its first meeting in the semester
in which the change is desired and be approved by a two-thirds
vote of those present.
CONDITIONS.-A student prepared to take up most of the
studies of a certain year in a regular curriculum, but deficient
in some, will be permitted to proceed with the work of that
year subject to the condition that he make up the deficiency.
In the event of conflicts in the schedule or of excessive quantity
of work, higher studies must give way to lower.
MINIMUM AND MAXIMUM HOURS.-The student must take






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


at least fourteen hours of work (not including Military Drill
and Physical Education) and in general will not be permitted
to take more than twenty; but if in the preceding semester
he has attained an average of eighty-seven or more and has
not failed in any subject he may be permitted to take as many
as twenty-one hours, and if he has attained an average of
ninety with no failures he may be permitted to take as many
as twenty-three hours.
Two hours of laboratory work are considered equivalent
to one hour of recitation.
CHANGES IN STUDIES.-A student once registered is not
permitted to discontinue a class or to begin an additional one
without written permission from the Dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences, which must be shown to the instructor in-
volved; and if he is undergoing military training, he will not
be permitted to discontinue that work on account of transfer-
ring, within a particular year, to a college in which military
instruction is not compulsory. A student who has been reg-
istered for two weeks will not be permitted to make any
change in studies, except during the first two days of the sec-
ond semester, without the payment of a fee of two dollars
($2.00).
GRADES AND REPORTS.-Each instructor keeps a record of
the quality of work done in his classes and monthly assigns
each student a grade, on the scale of 100. This grade is
reported to the Registrar for permanent record and for entry
upon a monthly report to the student's parent or guardian.
If the monthly grades of a student are unsatisfactory, he
may be required to drop some of his studies and substitute
those of a lower class, or he may be required to withdraw from
the University.
EXAMINATIONs.-Examinations on the ground covered are
held at the end of each semester.
FAILURE IN STUDIES.-A final grade, based upon the ex-
amination and the monthly grades, is assigned for each
semester's work. If this grade falls below 75, the student is
considered to have failed and may proceed only subject to a
condition in the study in which failure has occurred.
A student failing in more than fifty per cent of his class
hours for two consecutive months, will be dropped for the re-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


mainder of the College year. Students so dropped will be en-
titled to honorable dismissal, unless their failure is clearly due
to negligence. Upon petition, such a student may, at the dis-
cretion of the President of the University and the Dean of his
College, be reinstated upon such terms as to them may seem
best.
RE-EXAMINATIONS.-A student who has made a semester
grade of 60 or more, but less than 75, in any subject shall be
entitled to a re-examination in that subject on the first Satur-
day of March or of October; altho a senior failing on an
examination at the end of the second semester shall be allowed
a re-examination during the week preceding commencement.
Only one re-examination in any subject is permitted; in case
of failure to pass this, with a grade of 85, the student must
repeat the semester's work in that subject.
SPECIAL STUDENTS.-Students desiring to take special
courses will be allowed to take those classes for which they
may be prepared. The number of such students in a college
is, however, restricted to not more than twenty-five per cent
of its enrolment. These students are subject to all the laws
and regulations of the University. Special courses do not lead
to a degree.
The University permits special courses to be taken solely
in order to provide for the occasional exceptional requirements
of individual students. Abuse of this privilege, for the sake of
avoiding studies that may be distasteful, cannot be tolerated.
Accordingly, no minor is permitted to enter as a special stu-
dent except upon written request of his parent or guardian.
Minor special students must offer fifteen entrance units.
ADULT SPECIALS.-Persons twenty-one or more years of
age who cannot satisfy the entrance requirements, but who
give evidence of ability to profit by the courses they may take,
may, under exceptional circumstances, be admitted as "Adult
Specials". Such students appear before the Committee on
Admission for enrolment and are not excused from military
duty; altho, if more than twenty-two years of age, they may,
under certain conditions, secure exemption.
CLASSIFICATION OF IRREGULAR STUDENTS.-Until all en-
trance credits have been satisfied a student shall not rank
higher than a freshman; a student deficient in any freshman






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


work shall not rank higher than a sophomore; and one de-
ficient in sophomore work not higher than a junior. But a
special student is not considered as belonging to any of the
regular classes.
When special students make up their deficiencies they
may become regular students and candidates for a degree.

ATHLETIC TEAMS, MUSICAL AND OTHER CLUBS
ABSENCES ON ACCOUNT OF ATHLETICS, ETC.-The members
of regular athletic teams, of musical and of other student
organizations, together with necessary substitutes and man-
agers, are permitted to be absent from their University duties
for such time, not to exceed nine days per semester, as may
be necessary to take part in games, concerts, etc., away from
Gainesville. All classwork missed on account of such trips
must be made up, as promptly as possible, at such hours as
may be arranged by the professors concerned. All drills
missed, which so reduce the semester total that it averages
less than three hours per week, must be made up before
semester credits can be given.
SCHEDULES.-Schedules of games, concerts, etc., must be
arranged so as to interfere as little as possible with Uni-
versity duties. Schedules of games must receive the approval
of the Committee on Athletics; schedules of concerts, of dra-
matic entertainments, etc., the approval of the Committee on
Student Organizations.

HONORS
Students of the College of Pharmacy will have the oppor-
tunity of winning such honors and medals for which they are
entitled to compete. A chapter of the honor society of Phi
Kappa Phi was established at the University during the spring
of 1912. The Gamma Sigma Epsilon Fraternity, a national
honorary chemical society, granted a chapter to the Depart-
ment of Chemistry in 1921.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


EXPENSES
UNIVERSITY CHARGES.-Tuition.-In the School of Phar-
macy a student whose legal residence is in Florida, is subject
to no charge for tuition; a student who is not a legal resident
of the State is required to pay a tuition fee of forty dollars
($40.00) per year.
Registration Fee.-This fee of ten dollars ($10.00) per
year is charged all students, except one scholarship student
from each county in Florida and all graduate students pursu-
ing work leading to a degree higher than that of Bachelor.
These two classes of students are charged five dollars ($5.00).
The scholarships referred to are to be obtained from
County Superintendents of Public Instruction and must be
filed with the auditor on the day of registration.
An additional fee of two dollars ($2.00) is required of
students who enter after the day scheduled for registration.
Student Activity Fee.-This fee of fifteen dollars ($15.00),
payable on entrance, was voted by the students and ap-
proved by the Board of Control. The moneys so derived
are used to foster and maintain athletic sports, student pub-
lications, literary and debating societies, and other student
activities.
Breakage Fee.-In order to secure the University against
damage, the sum of $2.50 is charged. No refund will be made,
as damage done by individuals and not reported usually con-
sumes all the moneys provided by this fee.
Damage known to have been done by any student will be
charged to his individual account.
Laboratory Fees.-A small fee is required for each course
that includes laboratory work, to cover cost of consumable
materials, wear and tear of apparatus, and similar items. The
amount of the fee varies with the different courses, in no case
exceeding $6.00 per semester for any one course. In every
case payment in advance is required.
Infirmary Fee.-All students are charged an infirmary fee
of five dollars ($5.00). This secures for the student, in
case of illness, the privilege of a bed in the infirmary and the
services of a professional nurse and of the resident physician,
except in cases involving major operations. All students will
be given a careful physical examination at the beginning of
the session.






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


Diploma Fee.-A diploma fee of five dollars ($5.00),
payable on or before April 1st of the year of graduation, is
charged all candidates for degrees.
Board and Lodging.-Board, lodging, and janitor service
will be furnished by the University at a cost of eighty-seven
dollars and fifty cents ($87.50) per semester (not including
the Christmas vacation). To get advantage of this rate,
payment must be made at the beginning of each semester.
No refund will be made for less than a month's absence.
When not engaged by the semester, board and lodging will
be furnished at twenty-two dollars and fifty cents ($22.50)
per month.
Under Board and Lodging are included meals in the com-
mons and room with heat, light, janitor service, and access
to a bathroom. All rooms are partly furnished and adjoin
bathrooms equipt with marble basin and shower with both
hot and cold water. The furniture consists of two iron bed-
steads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table, washstand,
and chairs. The students are required to provide pillows, bed-
ding, towels and toilet articles for their own use. The doors
of the rooms are provided with Yale locks. A deposit of 50
cents is required for each key, which will be returned when
the key is surrendered. Janitor service includes the care of
rooms by maids, under the supervision of a competent house-
keeper.
Board and lodging in private homes may be secured at the
rate of thirty-five to forty dollars ($35.00-$40.00) per month.
Board without Lodging.-Board without lodging will be
furnished at the rate of $20.00 per calendar month, payable
in advance. No part of this sum will be refunded.
Lodging without Board.-Lodging without board is not
furnished.*
Books.-The cost of books depends largely upon the course
taken, but is, in no case, a large item of expense, tho in the
higher classes the student is encouraged to acquire a few
works of permanent value. The average cost of books to the
students of pharmacy is between $12.00 and $20.00 per an-
num,
REMITTANCES.-All remittances should be made to the
Auditor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.
*Attention is called here, however, to the large number of rooming-houses
near the campus that have recently been built.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


No refund of any fees or tuition will be made for any rea-
son by the Auditor's office, after ten days have elapsed from
date of registration.
The room reservation fee of $10.00 charged students mak-
ing application for rooms in the dormitories and commons,
will be held as a deposit to protect the Institution from prop-
erty damage. No refund of this fee will be made unless notice
of cancellation of reservation is made to the Registrar's office
prior to August 15th.
It is expected that all registration, laboratory and tuition
fees will be paid on or before date of entrance; preferably
when application is made for registration.
Parents may send check to the University in care of Aud-
itor's office to cover these expenses, in which event refund
will be made in case student finds it impossible to enter, notice
being mailed to Auditor three (3) days prior to date of reg-
istration.
The Cashier is not expected to extend credit or stamp cards
of admission to classes unless these fees and tuition have
been paid.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR EARNING EXPENSES.-It is often pos-
sible for a student to earn a part of his expenses by working
during hours not required for his University duties.
A few students are employed as waiters, as janitors, and
in other capacities. Such employment is not, as a rule, given
to a student otherwise financially able to attend the Univer-
sity, nor is it given to one who fails in any study. Application
for employment should be made to Dr. J. E. Turlington, Chair-
man of the Self-Help Committee.
Altho the employment of students is designed to assist
those in need of funds, the payment for their services is in
no sense a charity. The rate of remuneration is no higher
and the standard of service demanded is no lower than would
be the case if the work were done by others than students. If
a student employee fails to give satisfaction, he is discharged.
Otherwise, provided it is not found to interfere with reason-
able success in his studies and provided he does not commit
any breach of good conduct, he is continued in his position as
long as he cares to hold it.
Great credit is due those willing to make the necessary
sacrifices, nevertheless students are advised not to undertake





THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


to earn money while pursuing their studies, unless such action
is unavoidable. Proper attention to studies makes sufficient
demand upon the time and energy of a student, without the
burden of outside duties; such time as the studies leave free
can be spent more profitably in recreation.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS
SCHOLARSHIPS.-Thru the generosity of friends, the Uni-
versity is able to offer several scholarships. Application for
a scholarship should be made to the President of the Univer-
sity and should be accompanied by a record of the student's
work, statement of his need, and testimonials as to his char-
acter. To secure a scholarship:
(a) The student must actually need this financial help to enable
him to attend the University.
(b) He must be of good character and habits and sufficiently far
advanced to enter not lower than the Freshman Class.
A scholarship has been established by the United Daugh-
ters of Confederacy for the grandson of a Confederate soldier.
The Kirby Smith Chapter of U. D. C. and the Jacksonville
Chapter of U. D. C., and the Tampa Chapter of U. D. C., have
each established a scholarship for the lineal descendant of a
Confederate veteran.
The Katherine Livingstone Chapter, D. A. R., has estab-
lished and maintained a scholarship.
The Knight & Wall Co., of Tampa, has also established a
scholarship.
Sister Esther-Carlotta, S. R. Scholarship.-Established
and maintained by Sister Esther-Carlotta, S. R., and friends,
of St. Augustine, for a worthy, needy boy from St. Augustine.
The value of these scholarships varies from $90.00 to
$250.00.
Gator Competitive Scholarships.-The Gator Competitive
Scholarship Club was organized to promote the best inter-
ests of the State by establishing scholarships for students who
in their high-school days have distinguished themselves, but
who are financially unable to attend college.
The Club makes awards of these scholarships thru its
Scholarship Committee.
For other scholarships see index of the catalog of the
University.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


LOAN FUNDS.-The generosity of friends enables the Uni-
versity to lend a few needy students money with which to help
defray their expenses. A joint note is to be made by the
recipient of a loan and one responsible holder of property
valued at not less than $1,000 over and above the exemption
privilege. Interest on such loans is at the rate of 7% and is
payable yearly, but does not begin until the first of July after
graduation, or until one month after a non-graduating recip-
ient has severed his connection with the University. The prin-
cipal is to be repaid in annual instalments of $100 each, due
at the time of interest payments.
The Ladies' Auxiliary Fund.-The Ladies' Auxiliary of the
Florida State Pharmaceutical Association has established a
loan fund for deserving students of pharmacy needing assist-
ance. Application should be made to Mrs. Leon Hale, P. O.
Box 872, Tampa, Florida.
Willoughby Memorial Loan Fund.-Established by Pro-
fessor and Mrs. C. H. Willoughby in memory of their son
Paul Willoughby, who died at the University in 1918 while
a member of the S. A. T. C.; providing loans, each of $150 per
year, to two advanced students in science, under conditions
similar to those affecting loan funds offered by the University.
State U. D. C. Foundation.-Loan to a lineal descendant
of a Confederate soldier to an amount not exceeding $100 per
year.
Rotary Loan Fund.-The University here wishes to make
manifest its appreciation of the great interest shown in higher
education by the Rotarians of Florida, who have set aside a
considerable sum of money to be used in making loans to poor
boys who otherwise would not be able to attend college. This
loan fund was not established in order to benefit the Univer-
sity of Florida as such, but to advance the whole State by help-
ing in the development of such of its youth as are capable of
leadership. No action could be more patriotic, none more
worthy of praise.
Applications for loans should not be made to the Univer-
sity, but to the President of the Gainesville Rotary Club or to
Mr. John Turner, Vice-President International Rotary, Tam-
pa, Florida.





THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS
ORGANIZATIONS.-Practically every interest of the student-
body has a student-controlled organization, but with faculty
supervision, for its support. Some of these organizations are
mainly religious in character, some social, others purely lit-
erary or scientific, still others combine social with other
features. Hence there are athletic clubs, in addition to the
general Athletic Association of the University; associations
of men who have distinguished themselves or who are greatly
interested in some activity or study. Among those of special
interest to the student of pharmacy are the following:
MORTAR AND PESTLE SOCIETY.-The Mortar and Pestle So-
ciety of the University of Florida was organized by the students
of the School of Pharmacy at a meeting in Science Hall, Sep-
tember 21, 1923. Lectures and debates on interesting phases
of scientific and commercial pharmacy are held each month.
All students of the School of Pharmacy are invited to sign a
pledge of loyalty to the ideals of Pharmacy and by this sig-
nature become members of the Mortar and Pestle Society.
CHEMICAL SOCIETY.-The Flint Chemical Society is organ-
ized by and for the students of the Department of Chemistry.
The purpose of the Society is to stimulate the interest of the
beginning student of chemistry by giving him a correct idea
of the broadness of the field and its far-reaching importance
in the arts and industry. Those students who are so inclined
are thus encouraged to continue the study of chemistry. The
programs consist of lectures by various members of the fa-
culty, by advanced students of the department, and by outside
speakers when they can be secured. An open forum is held
at intervals when all members take part in the discussion.
Motion pictures are used to good advantage to illustrate the
application of chemical principles in various important indus-
tries. There are no restrictions as to membership, all chem-
istry students being urged to affiliate with it and attend its
programs. It meets on alternate Wednesday evenings during
the college year.
Y. M. C. A.-The Y. M. C. A., under the leadership of the
General Secretary, seeks to promote the ideal of the Univer-
sity, that every man should have a strong body, a trained





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


mind, and a Christian experience in order that he may go
forth prepared to meet the problems of life.
Clean, wholesome athletics is fostered, efficiency in the
classroom urged, and systematic Bible study promoted. The
best available ministers and laymen are brought before the
students to the end that the latter may become acquainted
with the problems of today.
The Y. M. C. A., in carrying forward this work, deserves
the support of every student, alumnus, and parent.
Honor Committee.-In order to carry out the spirit of the
"Honor System," which has been in operation at the Univer-
sity for years, each class elects one of its members to represent
it on the Student Honor Committee. This committee strives
in every way possible to promote among the students honesty
in all their work and conducts a fair trial in the rare cases of
breaches of the system. Its verdict is final, but is kept secret
from all save those concerned.
The Orchestra, The Glee, Mandolin and Guitar Clubs, The
Military Band, The Masqueraders, and other student activities.
PUBLICATIONS. -Beginning with the session of 1909-10
each junior (or senior) class has published an illustrated an-
nual, known as the "Seminole".
The "Florida Alligator" is a weekly newspaper owned and
controlled by the student-body. Its editorial articles discuss
University problems from the viewpoint of the undergradu-
ates. It seeks the support of the alumni, who find in it the
best means of keeping in touch with the University.
ADMISSION
A candidate for admission must present along with his
scholastic record, a certificate of good moral character. If he
is from another college or university, this certificate must
show that he was honorably discharged.
No candidate of less than 16 years of age will be admitted.
METHODS.-There are two methods of gaining admission:
(1) By Certificate.-The University will accept certifi-
cates from the approved senior high schools and from accred-
ited academies and preparatory schools of Florida, and from
any secondary school elsewhere which is accredited by its
state university.





THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


The certificate must be officially signed by the principal of
the school attended, and must be presented to the Committee
on Admission on or before the date on which the candidate
wishes to be matriculated. It must state in detail the work of
preparation and, in the case of Florida high schools, that the
course thru the twelfth grade has been satisfactorily com-
pleted.
Blank certificates, conveniently arranged for the desired
data, will be sent to all high-school principals and, upon
application, to prospective students.
(2) By Examination.-Candidates not admitted by cer-
tificate will be required to stand written examinations upon
the entrance subjects. For dates of these examinations, see
University Calendar, page 3.
REQUIREMENTS. "Entrance Units." The requirements
for admission are measured in "Entrance Units," based upon
the curriculum of the high schools of Florida. A unit repre-
sents a course of study pursued thruout the school year with
five recitation periods (two laboratory periods being counted
as one recitation period) of at least forty-five minutes each
per week, four courses being taken during each of the four
years. Thus the curriculum of the standard senior high
school of Florida is equivalent to sixteen units.
Number of Units.-Admission to the freshman class will
be granted to candidates who present evidence of having com-
pleted courses amounting to sixteen such units.
In no case will credit for more than sixteen units be given
for work done at a high school.
Deficiency.-A deficiency of one unit will be allowed, but
must be removed by the end of the first year after admission.
Students who have registered for a University study will
not be allowed to make up an entrance condition by examina-
tion in this subject, unless the examination be taken on the
first Saturday in October of the same school year. The Uni-
versity credit may, however, be used as a substitute for en-
trance credit, a three-hour course continued thruout the year
counting as one unit.
Distribution of Units.-Seven specified units are required
in common by all the colleges of the University; other specified
units are given below; the remaining units are elective.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY
English .................................................................. 3 units
H history .................................................................. 1 unit
M them atics ............................................................2 units
Science .......................................................................1 unit

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
One Foreign Language
or
H history .....................................2 units
and
Science
ELECTIVE UNITS.-Elective units are to be chosen from
among the subjects regularly taught in a standard high school,
altho not more than four will be accepted in vocational sub-
jects-agriculture, mechanic arts, stenography, typewriting,
etc.

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT COURSES
The minimum requirements for the specified units, and
for the elective units most frequently offered, are as follows:
BOTANY.-One-half or one unit.-Anatomy and morphol-
ogy; physiology; ecology; natural history and classification of
the plant groups. At least twice as much time should be
given by the student to laboratory work as to recitation.
CHEMISTRY (PHYSICS).-One unit.-Study of a standard
high-school text; lecture-table demonstrations; individual lab-
oratory work, comprising at least thirty exercises from a rec-
ognized manual.
ENGLISH.-Four units.-The exercises in Composition and
the use of the Classics should be continued thruout the whole
period of preparation. No candidate will be accepted whose
work is notably defective in spelling, punctuation, division
into paragraphs, or idiom.
(1) Grammar.-English Grammar, both in its technical
aspects and in its bearings upon speech and writing.
(2) Composition and Rhetoric.-The fundamental prin-
ciples of Rhetoric as given in any standard high-school text;
practice in Composition, oral and written.
(3) Classics.-The English Classics generally adopted by
schools and colleges.
(4) History of American Literature; History of English





THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


Literature.-One unit.-Supposed to represent the work of
the fourth year in English in the high school.
HISTORY.-Four units.
(1) Ancient History, with particular reference
to Greece and to Rome......................................1 unit
(2) European History since Charlemagne............1 unit
(3) English H istory..................................................1 unit
(4) American History..............................................1 unit
A year's work based on a textbook of at least 300 pages
is required for each unit. The student should know something
of the author of the textbook used and give evidence of having
consulted some works of reference.
LATIN.-Four units.-The minimum work required is:
(1) First Year.-One unit.-Completion of Collar &
Daniell's First Year Latin, Potter's Elementary Latin Course,
or other good first-year book.
(2) Second Year.-One unit.-Four books of Caesar's
Gallic War; grammar and prose composition thruout the year.
(3) Third Year.-One unit.-Six of Cicero's Orations;
grammar and prose composition thruout the year.
(4) Fourth year.-One unit.-The first six books of the
Aeneid and as much prosody as relates to accent, versification
in general, and to dactylic hexameter.
MATHEMATICS.-Four units.
(1) Algebra. First Year. One unit. Elementary
operations: factoring, highest common factor, least common
multiple, fractions, simple equations, inequalities, involution,
evolution, and numerical quadratics.
(2) Algebra. Second Year. One unit. Quadratic
equations, ratio and proportion, the progressions, imaginary
quantities, the binomial theorem, logarithms, and graphic
algebra.
(3) Plane Geometry.-One unit.
(4) Solid Geometry.-One-half unit.
(5) Plane Trigonometry.-One-half unit.
MODERN LANGUAGES.-Two units.-If the student offers
only one unit, he must study the language a second year in
the University.
First Year.-One unit.-Pronunciation; grammar; from
100 to 175 pages of graduated texts, with practice in trans-





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


lating into the foreign language variations of sentences read;
dictation; memorizing of short selections.
Second Year.-From 250 to 400 pages of easy prose; trans-
lation into the foreign language of variations upon the texts
read; abstracts; grammar; exercises; memorizing of short
poems.
PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY.-One unit.-Study of a standard
high-school text, together with laboratory and field course.
PHYSICS.-Requirements similar to those for chemistry,
which see.
ZOOLOGY.- One-half or one unit.- Study of a standard
high-school text and dissection of at least ten specimens.
Notebooks with drawings, showing the character of the work
completed, must be presented on entrance to the University.

ADVANCED STANDING
Advanced standing will be granted only upon recommen-
dation of the heads of the departments concerned. Fitness for
advanced work may be determined by examination or by trial.
Students from other institutions of like standing will ordinar-
ily be classified according to the ground already covered.

DEGREES
The School of Pharmacy offers a three-year course leading
to the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist (Ph.C.), and a four-
year course for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy
(B. S. in Phar.)
In 1923 a two-year course leading to the degree of Graduate in
Pharmacy (Ph.G.) was offered. Students who have had one year of this
course may enroll for the second year in 1924. The two-year course
will be entirely discontinued after 1924-5.
The three-year course is designed to train students not
only for the prescription counter and commercial pharmacy,
but for a great variety of professional positions as well. In
the four-year course appropriate cultural studies, and mathe-
matics or physics, are added to the scientific and professional
courses of the three-year curriculum.







THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

CURRICULUM
THE THREE-YEAR COURSE
Leading to the Degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist
First Year


First Semester


Second Semester


COURSES HOURS PER WEEK COURSES HOURS PER WEEK

Chemistry I ...........................--------.. 5 Chemistry I .................................. 5
B iology IIa ...................................... 4 B iology IIb .................................. 4
Pharmacognosy I .......................... 4 Pharmacy I .................................... 5
Military Science I Military Science I
Theoretical ................................ 2 Theoretical .................................. 2
Pharm acy V .................................. 3 H ygiene I ...................................... 1
18 17
Second Year
Pharmacognosy II ........................ 4 Pharmacy II .................................. 5
Pharmacy I .................................--- 5 Biology IIIb ..................-................. 4
Chemistry V .................................. 5 Chemistry V .................................. 5
Chemistry III ................................ 3 Chemistry III ................................ 3
Military Science II Military Science II
Theoretical .................................. 2 Theoretical ................................. 2

19 19
Third Year
Pharmacology I ............................ 4 Pharmacy III ................................ 3
Pharmacy II .................................. 5 Chemistry XVI .............................. 2
Chemistry VIIa ............................ 3 Chemistry VIIb ............................ 3
Biology Via .................................. 4 Chemistry XV ............................ 3
Pharmacy VI ................................ 3 Pharmacology III ........................ 4
Pharmacognosy III ...................... 4
19 -
19

Physical Education is required thruout the first two years
of the three year course.

THE FOUR-YEAR COURSE
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy
First Year


First Semester


Second Semester


COURSES HOURS PER WEEK COURSES HOURS PER WEEK

Chem istry I .................................... 5 Chem istry I .................................... 5
English I ........................................ 3 English I ........................................ 3
Foreign Language ........................ 3 Foreign Language ....................... 3
Mathematics I* .............................. 3 Mathematics I*.............................. 3
Military Science and Military Science and Drill I ....... 2
Drill I................................... 2 Physical Education I .................... 1
Physical Education I.................... 1 Hygiene I ........................................ 1

17 18







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Second Year

COURSES HOURS PER WEEK COURSES HOURS PER WEEK

Chemistry III .............................. 3 Chemistry III .............................. 3
Pharm acognosy I .......................... 4 Pharmacy I .................................... 5
Biology IIa ..........................-........ 4 Biology IIb .................................. 4
Pharm acy V .................................. 3 Econom ics ...................................... 3
Military Science and Military Science and
D rill II ........................................ 2 D rill II ........................................ 2
Physical Education II .................. 1 Physical Education II .................. 1

17 18
Third Year

Chem istry V .................................. 5 Chem istry V .................................. 5
Chemistry VIIa ............................ 3 Chemistry VIIb ............................ 3
Pharm acognosy II ........................ 4 Biology IIIp .................................... 4
Pharm acy I ................................ 5 Pharmacy II .................................. 5

17 17
Fourth Year

Pharm acy II .................................. 5 Chemistry XVI .............................. 2
Pharmacy VI ................................ 3 Pharmacology III .......................... 4
Pharmacology I ............................ 4 Chemistry XV ................................ 3
Biology VIa ................................ 4 Pharmacognosy III ...................... 4
Pharmacy III ........-------.....---........... 3
16 -
16
*Physics V may be taken in place of Mathematics I.

THE TWO-YEAR COURSEt
Leading to the Degree of Graduate in Pharmacy
Second Year

Pharm acy II .................................. 5 Pharm acy II .................................. 5
Chemistry Vp ................................ 5 Chemistry XVI .............................. 2
Pharmacology IV ..........-............... 2 Pharmacy IV ................................ 2
Chemistry VIIa ............................ 3 Pharmacognosy III ...................... 4
Biology V Ia .................................... 4 Pharm acy VI .................................. 3
Military Science II Chemistry XV .............................. 3
Theoretical .................................. 1 Military Science II
Theoretical .................................. 1
20
20
tThe first year of the Two-Year Course was discontinued in June,
1924.
Practical Military Science (Drill, etc.) and Physical Edu-
cation are required thruout the two-year course.






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION
PHARMACY
Professor Husa
The Department of Pharmacy offers courses in Theoreti-
cal and Practical Pharmacy, Prescriptions and Dispensing,
Pharmaceutical Arithmetic, and Drug Analysis. Particular
attention is given to the scientific aspects of Pharmacy, and
the extensive laboratory courses afford every opportunity for
acquiring the technical skill needed in identifying, preparing,
testing, and dispensing drugs and medicines.
PHARMACY I.-Theoretical and Practical Pharmacy.-A
course defining pharmacy and its relation to allied sciences,
and treating of the history of pharmaceutical literature, in-
cluding a study of pharmacopoeias (especially the United
States Pharmacopoeia), National Formulary, dispensatories
and other commentaries, pharmaceutical journals, etc. A study
is made of all operations of a physico-chemical nature used in
pharmacy, such as solution, evaporation, distillation, subli-
mation, precipitation, filtration, dialysis, etc. Comminution
is then explained: slicing, bruising, grinding and pulverizing,
in mills, in mortars, and by other means; also extraction, sift-
ing, elutriation, clarification and decolorization. The lecture
and recitation work is accompanied by laboratory exercises;
each student is required to make a large number of United
States Pharmacopoeial, National Formulary and special prep-
arations, illustrating the various processes used in pharmacy.
(Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. A year course starting
either semester; 3 class and 2 laboratory periods per week.'
Credit, 5 year-hours.)
PHARMACY II.-Theoretical and Practical Pharmacy.-A
detailed consideration of inorganic and organic acids and offi-
cial salts; fixed and volatile oils and fats, alkaloids and gluco-
sides. The course includes lectures and recitations, followed
by laboratory work on the preparation of syrups, elixirs, solid
and fluid extracts, scale salts, and other types of prepara-
tions. The pharmacy of the new synthetic drugs receives due
attention. (Prerequisite: Pharmacy I. Laboratory fee, $5.00
per semester. A year course starting either semester; 3 class
and 2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 5 year-hours.)






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


PHARMACY III.-Prescriptions and Dispensing.-A course
in which the history of the prescription is studied. Instruction
is given in prescription reading and translation, the Latin
phrases of prescriptions, incompatibilities. Each student will
be given practice in dispensing. Attention will also be given
to the laws governing the practice of pharmacy, and to the
pharmacists' liability, both criminal and civil, for their own
violation of laws and for violations on the part of their
agents. (Prerequisites: Pharmacy I and II. Laboratory fee,
$5.00. Second semester; lectures, recitations and laboratory
work: 3 hours. Credit, 11/ year-hours.)
PHARMACY IV.-Prescriptions and Dispensing.-A briefer
course than Pharmacy III for two-year students. (Prerequisite:
Pharmacy I. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Second semester; 2
hours. Credit, 1 year-hour.) Not offered after 1924-5.
PHARMACY V.-Pharmaceutical Arithmetic.-The practice
of pharmacy requires a knowledge of some operations of
arithmetic not touched upon in secondary schools. This course
teaches the application of arithmetic to pharmacy, and in-
cludes a thoro study of the systems of weight and measure in
use in the United States, and their relation to each other.
Problems are solved which involve the use of allegation. (First
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours.)
PHARMACY VI.-Drug Analysis.-A laboratory and reci-
tation course which deals with the theory and practice of
drug analysis especially in its application to substances and
preparations of the United States Pharmacopoeia. The stu-
dent makes assays in the laboratory that are typical of the
various classes of assaying processes of the U. S. P. as well as
those that every pharmacist should be able to carry out. A
study is made of the principles upon which each assay is
based. (Prerequisites: Pharmacy I and II, Chemistry Ip, IIIp,
V, and VII. Laboratory fee, $5.00. First or second semester;
3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours.)

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Professor Sweet
The aim of the department is to supplement the work in
pharmacy and to prepare the student for practical work in
pharmaceutical technic. Courses are outlined and conform to






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


the required work according to the third edition of the phar-
maceutical syllabus. It is the aim to make the subject matter
broad enough and sufficiently well balanced to be acceptable
to Boards of Pharmacy. The scientific needs of the students
are considered as regards their preparation for work as phar-
macists and pharmaceutical chemists. The study comprises
crude and refined animal and vegetable drugs, in which the
botany of the pharmaceutical plants receives emphasis. This
is followed by the physical, chemical, physiological and thera-
peutic properties of the drugs upon the animal body. Oppor-
tunities are offered for advanced and research study.
PHARMACOGNOSY I.-Elementary Drug Study.-A course
for first year pharmacy students in the macroscopical and mi-
croscopical structure of plants. The source, official means,
description and appearance of crude drugs, the classification,
identification and adulterations are described. Plant anatomy
and physiology of the tissues of vegetable drug plants are in-
cluded. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work upon foods,
drugs and spices. Laboratory fee $5.00; first semester; 2 lec-
tures and 2 laboratory periods; 4 hours; credit, 2 year hours.)
PHARMACOGNOSY II.-Crude and Prepared Drugs.-A
course in which plant tissues are studied as regards selection,
preservation, evaluation with special reference to morphologi-
cal characteristics to particular parts of plants used. The
seed plants and the animal crude drugs are treated which are
official in the United States Pharmacopeia and National For-
mulary and some unofficial drugs are included. The appear-
ance upon the market of crude and powdered drugs is de-
scribed. Lectures and recitations. (Prerequisite: Pharma-
cognosy I; first semester; 4 hours; credit, 2 year hours.)
PHARMACOGNOSY III.-Commercial Drugs.-The study of
the collection, cultivation, quality estimation, testing of plant
drugs and methods of handling. Course includes the sorting,
cutting, budding, curing, marketing, with special reference to
local flora and the detection of adulteration and substitution
in the crude or refined state. Lectures and recitations. (Pre-
requisite: Pharmacognosy II; second semester; 4 hours; credit,
2 year hours.)
PHARMACOLOGY I.-Materia Medica.-This course directs
the student to the principle of therapeutics and treats primar-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ily of pharmaco-dynamics. It includes the classification of
medicines, defining and explaining the different classes. This
instruction is given with a regard to body functions and in-
cludes the animal, vegetable and mineral drug substances in
their actions upon vital, body systems. It treats the prepara-
tion, uses and constituents. Lectures and recitations. (Pre-
requisite: Pharmacognosy II; first semester; 4 hours; credit,
2 year hours.)
PHARMACOLOGY II.-A briefer course than Pharmacology
I; for two-year students. (Seecond semester; 2 hours; credit,
1 year hour.) Not offered after 1923-24.
PHARMACOLOGY III.-Materia Medica and Therapeutics.-
A course to assist the student of Pharmacy to form the proper
attitude toward pharmaco-dynamics. The actual experience
of the use of drugs for testing upon laboratory animals is ob-
tained. The posology, properties, standardization, classifica-
tion, substitution, dangers and limits of drug use are presented.
Lectures, recitations and laboratory. (Prerequisite: Pharma-
cology I. Laboratory fee $5.00; second semester; 4 hours;
credit, 2 year hours.)
PHARMACOLOGY IV.-A briefer course than Pharmacology
III; for two-year students. (Laboratory fee $2.50. First
semester; 2 hours; credit, 1 year hour.) Not offered after
1924-25.

CHEMISTRY
Professor Leigh Assistant Professor Black
Assistant Professor Beisler Assistant Professor Heath
CHEMISTRY I.-General Chemistry.-Lectures and recita-
tions on the elements and their compounds and on the funda-
mental laws and theories of chemistry, supplemented by lab-
oratory work. Three lectures or recitations and two labora-
tory exercises of two hours each a week. Emphasis is placed
upon the intelligent writing of reactions, and the solving of
problems. Required of students taking the three-year or the
four-year course in pharmacy. (First and second semesters; 5
hours; credit, 5 year hours; Laboratory fee $5.00 per semester.)
CHEMISTRY III.-Qualitative Analysis.-This course in-
cludes the general reactions of the metals and acids, with their
qualitative separation and identification. While chiefly lab-






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


oratory work, it is amply supported by lectures. This course
extends thruout the year; one class starts the first semester,
the other the second semester. Required of students taking
the three-year or the four-year course in pharmacy. (Prere-
quisite: Chemistry I; Laboratory fee $5.00 per semester,
First and second semesters; 3 hours; credit, 3 year hours.)
CHEMISTRY V.-Organic Chemistry.-Three lectures or
recitations and four hours laboratory work are given each
week, including a study of the preparation, properties, and re-
actions of various classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds.
Special stress is laid upon the theories underlying the subject
and the proof of the constitution of the most important sub-
stances studied. Attention is given to the consideration of the
effect of constitution on physical and chemical properties, and
to the application of the electronic theory to organic com-
pounds. This course is arranged to meet the needs of those
who specialize in chemistry, in pharmacy, in medicine, or in
biology. It serves as a general introductory to specialized phases
of organic chemistry. Required of students taking the three-
year or four-year course in Pharmacy. (Prerequisite:
Chemistry 1; Laboratory fee $5.00 per semester. First and
second semesters; 5 hours; credit, 5 year hours.)
CHEMISTRY Vp.-Organic Chemistry.-Three lectures or
recitations and two laboratory periods of two hours each will
be given each week thruout the first semester. The course will
consist of a study of the aliphatic and aromatic series of car-
bon compounds, and the therapeutic action and commercial
preparation of organic compounds used in medicine will be
considered in detail. Required of students taking the two-
year course in Pharmacy. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 1p; Lab-
oratory fee $5.00. First semester; 5 hours; credit, 2 1-2 year
hours.) Not offered after 1924-25.
CHEMISTRY VIIa. Quantitative Analysis. Volumetric
methods in acidimetry and alkalimetry, oxidation and reduc-
tion, iodimetry, and precipitation. Lectures and laboratory
hours are the same as for Chemistry VIIb. Required for all
degrees. (Prerequisites: Chemistry Ip and 3p, or Chemistry
1 and 3; Laboratory fee $5.00. First semester; 3 hours; credit,
1 1-2 year hours.)
CHEMISTRY VIIb.-Quantitative Analysis. Gravimetric





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


analysis of simple compounds, followed by the analysis of such
materials as phosphate rock, simple alloys, limestone and Port-
land cement. One lecture or recitation on the theory and prac-
tice of Stoichiometric calculations and the use of logarithmic
factors, and five hours laboratory work is given each week for
one semester. Required of students taking the three-year or
the four-year course in Pharmacy. (Prerequisites: Chemis-
try 1 and 3; Laboratory fee $5.00. Second semester; 3 hours;
credit 1 1-2 year hours.)
CHEMISTRY XV.-Physiological Chemistry.-The chem-
istry and physiology of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and body
tissues. The examination of body secretions and excretions
such as milk, blood, urine, etc. Course includes routine analy-
ses of value to pharmacists and physicians. Required of all
students in Pharmacy. Lectures and laboratory. (Prerequis-
ite: Organic Chemistry. Laboratory fee $5.00. Second sem-
ester; 3 hours; credit, 1 1-2 year hours.)
CHEMISTRY XVI.-Toxicology.-Deals with the detection,
isolation, and quantitative determination of poisons in foods,
artificial mixtures, and animal bodies. The lectures deal with
the descriptions of poisons and the chemistry of the more im-
portant members of each class. The course does not pretend to
turn out finished toxicologists, but it is believed that some
training in careful manipulations and precise methods of
forensic chemistry will be a great benefit to the student of
pharmacy. Required of all students in Pharmacy. (Labora-
tory fee $5.00. 1 lecture and 2 hours laboratory, or 4 hours
laboratory per week; second semester; 2 hours; credit, 1 year
hour.)
For other courses in Chemistry see the catalog of the
University of Florida.

BIOLOGY
Professor Rogers Acting Assistant Professor Thone
Mr. Hubbell
BIOLOGY II.-General Botany.-The structure and physiol-
ogy of seed plants; structure and phylogeny of the algeae, fungi,
mosses and ferns; ecology and classification of the local flora.
(Laboratory fee $3.50 per semester. 2 class and 2 laboratory






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


periods per week, throughout the year; 4 hours; credit, 4 year
hours.)
BIOLOGY IIIp.-Vertebrate Anatomy and Physiology for
Pharmacy.-The principles of vertebrate anatomy and the
functioning of the physiological systems in man. (Laboratory
fee $3.50. 2 class and 2 laboratory periods per week; second
semester; 4 hours; credit, 2 year hours.) This course is open
only to students in the school of Pharmacy.
BIOLOGY VIa.-General Bacteriology.-The morphology,
physiology and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organ-
isms. (Prerequisites: Biology II and Chemistry I. Labora-
tory fee $5.00. 2 class and 2 laboratory periods per week;
first semester; 4 hours; credit, 2 year hours.)
For other courses in Biology see catalog of the University
of Florida.

PHYSICS
Professor Benton Assistant Professor Perry
Assistant Professor Weil Mr. Higgins
Mr. Prescott

The work of this department is intended to meet the needs,
on the one hand, of those who study physics as a part of a lib-
eral education and, on the other hand, of those who will have
to apply physics as one of the sciences fundamental to engi-
neering, to medicine, or pharmacy.
PHYSICS V.-General physics designed to meet the needs
of the general student, and of those taking the Pre-Medical
or the Pharmacy Course; divided as follows:
PHYSICS Va.-Mechanics and Heat.--(Laboratory fee
$1.50. First semester; 3 recitations and 2 two-hour periods
per week; 5 hours; credit, 2 1-2 year hours.)
PHYSICS Vb.-Sound, Light, Electricity and Magnetism.-
(Laboratory fee $1.50. Second semester; 3 recitations and 2
tzo-hour laboratory periods per week.)
For other courses in Physics see the catalog of the Uni-
versity of Florida.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ANCIENT LANGUAGES
Professor Anderson
Courses A, B, and C, if not used for entrance units, may
be taken for college credit.
LATIN
LATIN A.-First Year Latin, based on a book for begin-
ners. (3 hours.)
LATIN B.-Second Year Latin, based on Caesar, with
grammar and prose composition. (3 hours.)
LATIN C.-Third Year Latin, based on Cicero and Virgil,
with grammar and prose composition. (3 hours.)
LATIN I.-Ovid, about 2,000 verses selected from his vari-
ous works, but mainly from the Metamorphoses; Versification,
with especial reference to the Dactylic Hexameter and Pen-
tameter; Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia. A rapid
review of forms and the principal rules of Syntax; a short
weekly exercise in prose composition. (3 hours.)
GREEK
GREEK A.-The forms and most important principles of
the syntax; numerous exercises, partly oral, partly written,
and some practice in conversation and sight reading. One
book of Xenophon's Anabasis, with exercises in Prose Com-
position and study of the Grammar. (3 hours.)
GREEK I.-Xenophon's Anabasis, Books II, III, and IV,
selections from Lucian and the easier dialogues of Plato; sight
translation; Prose Composition; Grammar. (3 hours.)
For other courses see the catalog of the University of
Florida.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
Professor Farr Assistant Professor Robertson
Assistant Professor Hathaway Mr. McLaughlin
Assistant Professor Halley
ENGLISH I. Rhetoric and Composition. Designed to
train students in methods of clear and forceful expression.
Instruction is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in
rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing, the constant corre-
lation of the three as methods of approach to the desired goal
being kept in view. In addition a reading course is assigned
each student. (Required of all Freshmen taking the four-
year course; 3 hours.)





THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


ENGLISH IIa.-Introduction to Literature.-This course is
designed to give the student an elementary knowledge of the
progress of human thought as expressed in literary form from
its earliest manifestations to the present. Chief stress will be
laid upon the Greek and Latin and the more important Euro-
pean literatures. The object of the course is to furnish the
student with some general idea of world literature both as
desirable in itself and as necessary to the more detailed study
of English and American literary history of subsequent years.
Text-book, lectures, preparation of papers on assigned topics,
and extensive readings in translation will be the methods of
instruction. (First semester; 2 hours.)
ENGLISH IIb.-Types of Literature.-This course will
cross-section that of the first semester. The various established
types of literature will be studied as to their historical de-
velopment and their technique. The method of instruction will
be similar to that of the first semester. (Second semester; 2
hours.)
For other courses in English see the catalog of the Uni-
versity of Florida.

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
Professor Leake Mr. Glunt
HISTORY
HISTORY Ia and Ib.-Europe During the Middle Ages.-A
general course in the history of Western Europe from the
Teutonic migrations to the close of the Seven Years' War.
(3 hours.)
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLITICAL SCIENCE Ia. American Government and
Politics.-A study of the structure and functions of our
national and state governments. Thruout the course present-
day political problems of national and local interest will be
made subjects of class discussion. (First semester; 3 hours.)
For other courses in History and Political Science see the
catalog of the University of Florida.





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


HYGIENE
Professor Sweet
HYGIENE I.-Instruction by lecture, recitation and written
exercise in general and individual Hygiene. Course com-
prises educational, informational, defensive and constructive
Hygiene, with especial reference to infectious diseases, causes,
effects and prevention; sex Hygiene and social diseases; the
general features concerning the destructive agents of health.
Required of all first year students. (Second semester; 1 hour.)
Proportional treatment and reference to human physiology.

MATHEMATICS
Professor Simpson Mr. Hale
Mr. Chandler
MATHEMATICS A.-Solid Geometry. (2 hours.)
MATHEMATICS B.-Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms.
(2 hours.)
MATHEMATICS I.-Plane Analytic Geometry and College
Algebra. (3 hours.)
MATHEMATICS Ie.-Plane Analytic Geometry and College
Algebra. (3 hours.)
MATHEMATICS III. Differential and Integral Calculus.
(3 hours.)
For other courses in mathematics see the catalog of the
University of Florida.

MODERN LANGUAGES
Professor Crow
Assistant Professor Hathaway Assistant Professor Luker
Extensive courses of reading, in and out of class, frequent
exercises, oral and written, and studies in literature and
language form the chief feature of instruction.
FRENCH
FRENCH A.- Elementary Course.- Pronunciation, forms,
elementary syntax, dictation, written exercises, memorizing
of vocabularies and short poems, translation. (3 hours.)
FRENCH I.- Intermediate Course.-Work of elementary
course continued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose





THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


composition, translation of intermediate and advanced texts,
sight reading, parallel. (3 hours.)
SPANISH
SPANISH A.-Elementary Course.-Pronunciation, forms,
elementary syntax, dictation, written exercises, memorizing
of vocabularies and short poems, translation. (3 hours.)

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY
Professor Bristol Professor Boyd
Mr. Langworthy
ECONOMICS VIa.-Introduction to Economics.-A brief
study of the principles of economics and their application to
practical problems. (Primarily for Juniors and Seniors in the
Colleges of Agriculture and Engineering and the School of
Pharmacy. First semester; 3 hours; credit, 1 1-2 year hours.)
ECONOMICS VIb.-Principles of Business.-(Prerequisite:
Economics I or Via. Primarily for Juniors and Seniors in the
Colleges of Agriculture and Engineering and the School of
Pharmacy. Second semester; 3 hours; credit, 1 1-2 year hours.)
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION B.-Office Technique and Man-
agement.-Business correspondence; filing systems; office
routine and practice. (Prerequisite: proficiency in touch sys-
tem of typewriting. Registration fee, $3.00. Instruction in
touch system for those who do not have prerequisite, $1.50 ad-
ditional. First and second semesters; 1 hour; credit, 1 year
hour. New sections covering entire course, second semester,
2 hours; credit, 1 year hour.)
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION I.-Administration and Ac-
counting Principles.-Internal organization and management
of business concerns; accounting as an aid to administration;
accounting records and reports. (Prerequisite or corequisite,
Economics I or Via. Not open to Freshmen. First and second
semesters; two class and one two-hour laboratory period a
week; credit, 3 year hours.)
SOCIOLOGY B.-Introduction to Sociology.-A brief study
of some of the fundamental factors and problems of social wel-
fare and social progress. (Open to qualified upper classmen





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


without prerequisite, but with some extra reading. Second
semester; 3 hours; credit, 1 1-2 year hours.)
For other courses in Economics, Business Administration
and Sociology see catalog of the University of Florida.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Professor Manchester.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION I.-Required class work in physical
exercises in the Gymnasium. Consists of exercises for gen-
eral development and instruction in use of gymnasium ap-
paratus, also minor sports. (Required of all students; 3
hours; two semesters).
PHYSICAL EDUCATION II. Elementary Gymnastics. -
Theory and practice in elementary exercises on mats, horse,
horizontal bar, parallel bar, and rings. Accuracy of form and
executions emphasized. (Required of all students; 2 hours;
two semesters.)





THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE
AND TACTICS
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
SENIOR INFANTRY UNIT.
J. A. VAN FLEET, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army, Commandant
of Cadets and Professor of Military Science and Tactics.
L. W. Amis, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army;
F. H. Bain, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army;
F. M. BRENNON, Captain, Infantry. U. S. Army;
E. M. YON, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army;
Assistant Professors of Military Science and Tactics.
Two sergeant instructors.

The basic course is compulsory, and is usually pursued
during the Freshman and Sophomore years, but must be
taken prior to graduation and in two consecutive years.
The basic course students are issued by the War Department
a complete uniform, except shoes, and necessary equip-
ment, free of charge. A six-weeks Summer Camp is op-
tional with the course. These camps afford a fine oppor-
tunity for the student to improve his military knowledge and
to engage in healthful recreation. He is surrounded by every
moral safeguard and provided with every recreation and
healthful amusement that a young man could wish. Chaplains
look after his moral welfare, and every effort is made to im-
prove him mentally, morally, and physically. The War De-
partment pays all expenses, including mileage, rations, medi-
cal attendance, clothing, and laundry service.
Students who complete the basic course and are selected
by the Professor of Military Science and Tactics and the
President of the University, may elect the advanced course.
Students electing this course are expected to carry it to com-
pletion as a prerequisite to graduation. Upon its completion
those students recommended by the Professor of Military
Science and Tactics and the President of the University, will
upon their own application be offered a commission in the
Infantry Reserve Corps, United States Army. Students in the
advanced course are given the same allowances as the basic





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


course students and in addition 40 cents a day. An advanced
course Summer Camp is compulsory usually between the jun-
ior and senior years. All the expenses are paid as outlined for
the basic course camp and in addition one dollar a day is
granted.
The War Department maintains at the University a full
assortment of Army uniforms and infantry equipment, valued
at over $65,000.00. Included in this equipment is a 48-piece
set of band instruments. The Department is well supplied
with office and class rooms, a military exhibit room, supply
rooms, an indoor and outdoor gallery range, a full size modern
rifle range of eight double sliding targets, excellent drill,
parade, and maneuver grounds, and an open climate the year
round, which facilitates the practical instruction.
The Corps of Cadets at present is organized as a battalion
of infantry of four companies, A, B, C, and D, and a Military
Band. Assignments to the band are made upon the recom-
mendation of the Professor of Music, and the work substituted
for part of the practical course. The Battalion Staff and
Company and Band Officers are appointed from the students
in the advanced course by the Professor of Military Science
and Tactics, with the approval of the President of the Uni-
versity.
Students are required to purchase a uniform shoe of army
design, and to pay one dollar registration fee for the safe-
keeping of the uniforms and equipment, which remain the
property of the United States. A supply of these shoes is kept
by the University and sold at the wholesale price.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
INFANTRY
Basic Course
MILITARY SCIENCE I.-Freshman year, first and second
semesters. Lectures, recitations, drills, calisthenics, and cere-
monies. (6 hours a week. 2 year credits.)
The work is divided as follows:
(a) Practical.-Infantry drill, school of the soldier, squad,
platoon, company and ceremonies; gallery and rifle firing;
scouting and patrolling; setting up exercises and mass play;
organization; infantry equipment.






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


(b) Theoretical.-Infantry drill regulation, the school of
the company and ceremonies; theory of rifle marksmanship;
minor tactics; security; military courtesy.
MILITARY SCIENCE II.-Sophomore year, first and second
semesters. Lectures, recitations, drills, calisthenics, and cere-
monies. (6 hours a week; 2 year credits. Prerequisite: Mili-
tary Science I.)
The work is divided as follows:
(a) Practical. Command and leadership; ceremonies;
setting up exercises and mass play; gallery, rifle and auto-
matic rifle firing; bayonet drill; rifle and hand grenades;
musketry.
(b) Theoretical.L--First aid; military hygiene and sanita-
tion; map reading, topography and military sketching; mus-
ketry, theory of fire, target designations and recognition, con-
trol of fire.
For advanced courses in Military Science see the cata-
log of the University of Florida.


For further information address Townes R. Leigh, Direc-
tor, School of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ROLL OF STUDENTS

1923-24

Alden, Charles Edmund............................................. St. Augustine, Florida
Anderson, Milan Ross..................................................Lake Wales, Florida
Anderson, William B. Jr...............................................Floral City, Florida
Bennett, Morris Charles ............................................ Tampa, Florida
Black, Arthur Keith....................................................Lakeland, Florida
Boyd, Charles W. .................................................... Jacksonville, Florida
Bruner, Edward ........... --..- -.........-.......................-- Ashford, Alabama
Chance, Staten H......--------........-.---.. ..... ............. Wauchula, Florida
Combs, Jesse J ....................................................... Miami, Florida
Cook, Sammie G ........................................................Ft. White, Florida
Dansby, Bradley Lavier .............................................. Reddick, Florida
Dehon, Arthur L. ........................................................St. Petersburg, Florida
Duren, Robert H. ....................................... ........ Brooksville, Florida
Edwards, Jr., Thomas J............................................ Chattahoochee, Florida
Ellis, Ben F. ................................................................Panama City, Florida
Ellsworth, Lloyd H .................................................. Gainesville, Florida
Gardner, John A. ........................................................Key West, Florida
Holmes, W. J................................................................ Abbeville, Louisiana
Johns, Carl ................................................................. Starke, Florida
Jones, Robert A. .............................. ...................... Micanopy, Florida
Keezel, Joseph Otto ................................ ...............Winter Park, Florida
Leikvold, Honroe N................................................Daytona Beach, Florida
Maddox, Marshall M. ................................................ Alachua, Florida
Massey, Jack C. ............................... ...................... Wauchula, Florida
McLaulin, Leon V......................................................... Sanford, Florida
Mobley, Ralph H...................................................... DDade City, Florida
Moore, Dewey Rex ................................................ Darlington, Florida
Niblack, Charles T. ............................. .................... Dunnellon, Florida
Paniello, J. 0. .-.......--................................ Tampa, Florida
Pearce, J. D. Jr. ....................................-............... St. Petersburg, Florida
Perry, Roy A. ....----................... ........ ............. CocoanutGrove, Florida
Potter, Anderson H ................-......--.....-.........-......Leesburg, Florida
Quimby, Maynard W. ..-----................-- ......--...---- ..... Corinna, Maine
Rambo, Edwin C. .............................................Orlando, Florida
Roberts, Sidney D. ...............-...... ...................... Trenton, Florida
Scotten, Rawley W ............................................... Gainesville, Florida
Smith, Horace E ................................................... Jacksonville, Florida
Stokes, Everett 0. ................................................... Lake Wales, Florida
Tooke, William L. ........................ .........................Floral City, Florida
Vaughan, Richard Ferguson ......................................Dover, Florida
Wainwright, Edward J ......................... ................ Starke, Florida
Williams, Hoy M. ........................... .................. Alachua, Florida
Work, Burton N.......................................................... DeFuniak Springs, Fla.








INDEX Page
Page
A absences .................................................................. .......................... ........... 17
A dm inistration Building ................................................. ............... .... 12
A dm mission .................................................................... ......... 24, 25, 26, 27, 28
A dult Specials ................................................................................................... 16
A advanced Standing-------------- ............. ...........- ----....... .... --- --....... ....... ....... 28
A m erican Conference of Pharm aceutical Faculties .................................... 9
A ancient Language Courses ............................................................................ 38
A athletics ................................................................................ ..................... 13
A athletic A association .......................................... ...... ... ............ .............. 23
A athletic Com m ittee ............................................................... ......................... 17
A athletic Team s .............................................. ...... ....... ........ ........... 17
A attendance U pon Duties ............................................................................... 14
A auditor ................................................................................................................ 20
A auditorium .................................................................................................... 12, 13
Bacteriology Courses ........................-.........-.............-....------..............---. 37
Battalion ........................................................................................................... 44
Biology Courses ................................................ .................................... 36, 37
Board and Lodging ...............................- ......--......... .........---.....................-..... 19
Board W without Lodging ................................................................................. 19
Board of Control ................................................................... ....................... 4
Board of Education (State) ............................................................................ 4
Board of Pharm acy (State) .......................................................................... 10
Botany Courses .......................................................................................... 36, 37
Books (Cost of) ............................................................................................... 19
B.S. in Pharm acy .............................-- ................................-.......................- 28, 29
Buckm an H all .................................................................................................. 12
Business A dm inistration ............................................... ............................... 41
Calendar ...............................................--.........-.......------ ................................. 3
Cam pus ................................................... --.......................... ...........----............ 12
Changes in Studies .......................................................................................... 15
Chem istry Courses .............................................................................. 34, 35, 36
Chem ical Societies ............................................................................................ 23
Com m mission in U S. Arm y ............................................................................ 43
Com position ...................................................................................................... 38
Conditions ......................................................................................................... 14
Curriculum ...................................................... .. ........................................ 29, 30
Dean ....................................................................................................... 5, 13, 15
Deficiencies ........................................................................................................ 25
D degrees ................................................................................................................ 28
Departm ent of Instruction.......................................................................... 31-45
Director .......................................................................................................... 5, 45
Description of U nit Courses ........................................................................... 26
Dispensing ......................................................................................................... 32
Drill ...................................................................................................................... 30
Drugs ................................................................................................................. 32
E conom ics ......................................................................................................... 41
English Language Courses .............................................................................. 38
English Literature ................... ................................................................ 38, 39
Entrance U nits .................................................................................................. 25
47






48 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

E quipm ent ....................................................................................................... 11
Exam nations ..................................................................................... .......... 15
Expenses ........................................................................................ 18, 19, 20, 21
Faculty ........................................................................................................ 5, 6, 7
Farr Literary Societyy........................................................................ ............ 23
Failure in Studies.............................................................................................. 15
Fees ............................................................................................................... 18, 19
Fields open to Pharm acists................................................................. 9
Flint Chem ical Society...................................................................................... 23
Florida A alligator ............................................................................................. 24
Florida State Pharmaceutical Association................. .................... 10
Four Y ear Courses .................................................................................... 29, 30
French ........................................................................................................ 40, 41
Gam m a Sigm a E psilon .................................................................................... 17
General Library .................................................................. ............... .......... 13
George Peabody H all ...................................................................................... 12
Gifts to the School of Pharm acy.................................................................... 11
Glee Club ............................................................................................................ 24
Grades ................................................................................................................ 15
Greek .............................................................................................. ................. 38
Gym nasium ............................. ................................................................ 12, 13
H azing ........................................................................................................... 14
H history ............................................................................................................... 39
H honors ............................................................................................................... 17
H onor Com m ittee .............................................................................................. 24
H hospital .............................................................................................................. 13
H ygiene .............................................................................................................. 40
Integral Part of College of A rts and Science .... ......... ........ ................... 8
Irregular Students .................................................................................... 16, 17
Laboratories ..................................... ........... ............................................... ... 12
Language H all .................................................................................................. 12
Latin ...................................... .......................... ..... .. ........ 38
Library (Pharm aceutical) .............................................................................. 13
Loan Funds ...................................................................................................... 22
Location .......................................................... ................ ............ ............ 11
M andolin and Guitar Club .............................................................................. 24
M asqueraders .................................................................................................... 24
M ateria M edica .................................................................................................. 34
M them atics ...................................................................................................... 40
M axim um H ours .......................................................................................... 14, 15
M military .............................................................................................................. 13
M military Band .............................................................................................. 24, 44
M military Board .................................................................................................. 43
M military Science .................................................................................... 43, 44, 45
M inim um H ours ................................................................................................ 40
M modern Languages .......................................................................................... 40
M ortar and Pestle Society................................................................................ 23
M musical Clubs .................................................................................................... 17
Offenses A against Good Conduct................................................................ 13, 14






THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 49

Opportunities in Pharm acy .............................................................................. 8
O opportunities for E warning E expenses ...................................................... 20, 21
O organizations ...........-.................................................................................... 23
O orchestra ........................................................................................................... 24
O their Clubs .......................................-.......................................................... 17
Pharm acy ........................ -.......... ......................................................... 31, 32
Pharm acognosy and Pharm acology ........................................................ 32, 33
Pharm aceutical A rithm etic ............................................................................ 32
Pharm aceutical Courses ................................................................... .......... 28
Ph. 'C. Curriculum .......................................................................................... 29
Ph. G Curriculum ................................. ...... ......... ... ................................. 30
Phi K appa Phi ................................................................................................ 17
Physics .......................................... ..... .. .......... ... ..... .............. ..... 37
Physiology ..................................................................... ................................... 37
Physical E education ......................................................................................... 42
Political Science ......................................-.................................................. 39
Prescriptions .................................................................................................... 32
President ............................. ............................................. ............................. 16
President Florida State Pharmaceutical Association.................................. 10
Publications ........................................................................................................ 24
R e-exam nations ......................... ......--... .......... ............-....................... 16
R registrar ....... ................................................................................................. 15
R regulations ....................... ......................................................................... 13, 14
R em ittances ................................................................................................ 19, 20
R reports ........- ................................................................................................ 15
R rhetoric ..................................................................... ................................ 38
R O T. C. ....................................................... ...................... ............. 19, 43, 46
Scholarships ...................................................... .............................. ....... 21, 22
Schedule Gam es ........................ ........... ..........-................ ........................... 17
School of Pharm acy (General Statem ent) ...................................................... 8
Science H all .......................................................................... ........................... 12
Self H elp Com m ittee ................................ ............. .......................... ...... .. 20
Sem inole ...................................................................................................... . 24
Sociology .......................................................... .............. ..... ........ 41
Spanish .......................................... ............ ....... ................................. 41
Special Students ................................................................................................ 16
Studies ................................................................................................................ 14
Student O organizations Com m ittee ............................................... ....... 23, 24
Supervision ........................................................................................................ 13
Therapeutics ......... ........................................ ............................ ................. 34
Thom as H all ...................... ......................... ............................................... 12
Three-year Course ............................................................................................ 29
Tw o-year Course .............................................................................................. 30
Toxicology .......................................................................................................... 36
U university Charges ................................................................................... 18, 19
U nits for A dm mission ........................................................................................ 25
U university Council ............................................................................................ 14
U university Com m ons ....................................................................................... 13
Y M C. A .................................................................................................. 23, 24








THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Consists of Five Separate and Distinct Colleges and Five Other
Branches of Varied Activities located on a domain of 613 acres.
The College of Arts and Sciences offers a Two-year Pre-\Med-
ical course. and excellent advantages for a liberal education in
four-year courses leading to the degrees of B.A. and B.S.
.lames N. Anderson, A.M., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins). Dean.
The College of Ag-riculture provides splendid advantages for
instruction an'I training in all branches of agriculture in short
couLrses from four months to.: two years and in a fouir-year course
leading to the degree of B.S.A. Wilmon Newell. D.Sc.. (Iowa
State). Dean.
The College of Engineering affords the best technological
training in four-year courses in chemical, civil, electrical and
mechanical engineering, leading to correspo.:nding Bachelors'
dlegres in engineering. John R. Benton. B.Sc., Ph.D. (G;Bttin-
gen Dean.
The Collge of Law-Member of the American Law School
Association-offers a standard three-year course and confers
LL.B. and I.D. degrees. Harry R. Truler. A.M.. LL.B. I Mich-
igan), Dean.
The Teachers' Collc-.e provides normal training for those de-
siring to enter any department of public school service, and
off,''Irs four-y'ea courses leading t the degrees of B.A. and B.S.
in Edclcation and :.S. in .Ag-ricultural Education. James \V.
Norman. Ph.,D. c Columnbia), Dean.
The Graduate School offers courses leading to the degrees of
M.A.. M.S., M.S.A.. M.A. in Ed.. and M.S. in Ed.
The Summer School is co-educational, and maintained largely
for the benefit of teachers of the State. but college courses are
also offered.
The School of Pharmacy, a branch of the College of Arts and
Sciences. offers a two-year course. a three-year course, and a
four-year course, leading to the degrees of Ph.G., Ph.C., and
B.S. in Pharm., respectively. Townes R. Leigh. A.M., Ph.D.
(Chicago), Director.
The Ag\ricultural Experiment Station conducts agricultural
research wor:k of far-reaching results and saves thousands of
dollars annually for the State.
The Agricultural Extension Division maintains branches of
Farm andI Home Demonstration work which is carried on by
Agents and through correspondence courses.
The General Extension Division carries the benefits of the
University to tho.:se who are unable to study in residence,
through correspondence-study and publli welfare wok. relpre-
senting the Colleges of Arts and Sciences. Education. Engineer-
ing, and Law.
Sixteen units. or four full yea's of successful high school
work are required for admission to the Freshman Cla-.s.
For catalog or further information address
THE REGISTRAR.
University of Florida. Gainesville.


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