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Full Text





The University Record
of the

University of Florida


A Study of Educational Intent


by WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph. D.
Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences


Vol. XXVI, Series 1


No. 23 December 15, 1931


Published Semi-monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.



















The University Record of the University of Florida is issued twice every month.
The Record comprises:

The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin of Gen-
eral Information, the annual announcements of the individual colleges of the
University, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of the
University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The
applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired.
Address

THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida.

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of research
work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in several series.

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions
are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges
should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the
Committee on Publications. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies
not included in institutional exchanges, should be addressed to the University
Library, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

The Committee on University Publications,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida.










A Study of Educational Intent

INTRODUCTION

It is impossible to provide proper educational training without some knowledge
of the needs and desires of the students. For this reason certain data were collected
from the students registered in the College of Arts and Sciences, University of Florida,
during the academic years 1930-31 and 1931-32. The material presented herewith
shows some of the conditions that exist, and it may indicate certain tendencies. In
particular, the need for more opportunities for the young men of Florida to become
acquainted with various forms of desirable life work is called to the attention of
parents, school faculties, and civic clubs and other organizations interested in the
welfare of Florida.
Table I shows the distribution according to classification of the students from
whom information was obtained in 1930-31. The apparently large loss of students
from class to class is discussed in connection with Table III.

TABLE I
Distribution of Students According to Classification, 1930-31
BA BS PM PL Total
Freshm an .............................. 70 90 60 2. 243
Sophomore ............................. 46 52 26 28 152
Junior ................................. 38 44 .. .. 82
Senior ................................. 27 33 .. .. 60
Special ................................ 1 2 .. 4
Total .......................... 182 220 88 51 541

The abbreviations have the following meanings:

BA-Bachelor of Arts curriculum
BS-Bachelor of Science curriculum
PM-Pre-Medical curriculum
PL-Pre-Law curriculum

Table II shows the distribution of students according to classification in 1931-32
and compares this distribution with the corresponding distribution at the same
time of year in 1930-31. The first number, in each case, is the number of students
of that classification in the first semester of 1930-31, the second number is the
number of students of that classification in the first semester of 1931-32, and
the third number is the percent increase in the number of students of that clas-
sification from 1930-31 to 1931-32. Critics of American education claim that
students in American colleges and universities are governed too much by the
"trade-school" attitude. By this they mean that students are concerned too
much with that training which is supposed to give greater earning power, and
too little with that training which is designed to give greater cultural and
spiritual returns. Table II shows the striking shift that has taken place in the
direction of "trade-school" training in the student body of the College of Arts
and Sciences during the last year. Whether the numbers in Table II indicate
a tendency or whether they indicate random fluctuations cannot be foretold.









A STUDY OF EDUCATIONAL INTENT


TABLE II
Distribution of Students According to Classification, First Semester 1930-31 and First
Semester 1931-32
BA BS' M PL Total
Freshman .. 62, 41,-34% 81, 72.-11% 61, 92, 51% 21, 43,105% 225,248, 10%
Sophomore. 43, 38, -12% 51, 48, 6% 25, 49, 96% 28, 44, 57% 147, 179, 22%
Junior ..... 36, 30,-17% 41, 43, 5% 77, 73, -5%
Senior ...... 29, 19,-34% 29, 34, 17% 58, 53, -9%
Special ..... 1, 1 1, 6 2, 4 4, 11
Total ...171, 129. -25% 203, 203 0 88, 145, 65% 49, 87, 78% 511, 564, 10%

CHANGES IN THE STUDENT BODY OF THE COLLEGE

It is conceivable that the differences in classification noted in Table II are due
to several factors. It is desirable to discover some of the facts concerning this shift
in attitude. In this connection it is convenient to study the extent to which the
failure of students to return can be explained. Critics have claimed that the holding
power of liberal arts colleges is much lower than it should be. This study does not
support that claim.
Of the 540 students included in this study for the year 1930-31, 282, or 52%,
did not return to the College of Arts and Sciences, University of Florida, in the first
semester of 1931-32. This seems, at first sight, to be a very large number. However,
the facts presented in Table III tend to substantiate the statement made above that
this number is not larger than might have been expected. An examination of Table
III reveals the following facts: Of the 243 freshmen, 99 failed to return to this
College, but 18 of the 99 did return to the University. An examination of their data
sheets shows that these men entered the College of Arts and Sciences in September,
1930, intending to remain only one year, in which they studied certain subjects
required for admission to other colleges. Of the 99 freshmen who failed to return,
24 showed that they were unfitted scholastically, physically, or otherwise, to do
satisfactory college work, as judged by our standards. The records of those above
freshmen classification show rapidly decreasing ratios of failures and rapidly increas-
ing ratios of transfers to professional or semi-professional colleges; in this connection
it should be noted that since students wishing to study medicine are compelled to
go to other states for their professional training, it is practically impossible to gather
data on the number of students who transfer to medical schools.
The last three columns of Table III show the numbers of students who would
not be expected to return, as judged by their replies to the questions on the data
sheet, the numbers of students who might or might not be expected to return, and
the numbers of students for whom there is no expressed reason for failure to return,
respectively. It will be noted that in only 70 cases out of 282, that is, in less than
25% of the cases of failure to return, is there no expressed reason for failure to
return. Of these 70 students some undoubtedly failed to return for financial
reasons, some registered in colleges nearer home, and some failed to return for
other legitimate reasons. When these facts are taken into consideration we may con-
clude that the holding power of the College is remarkably high for the period
studied.








DEGREES


TABLE III
Report on the Students Registered in the College of Arts and Sciences in 1930-31 but
not in 1931-32


Classification
Freshman BA
BS

PM

PL
All Freshmen
Sophomore BA
BS
PM
PL
All Sophomores
Junior BA
BS
All Juniors
Senior BA
BS
All Seniors
Special BA
BS
PM
Totals


Predominating
Number of Choice of
Students Life Work
20 Law
43 Engineering or
Business
26 Dentistry or
Medicine
10 Law
99
29 Law
24 Medicine-Law
Undecided
12 Medicine
21 Law
86
21 Law
21 Medicine
42
24 Lnw
27 Medicine
51
1 Taw
1 Undecided
82
282


Number
Dropped
for Failure
in Studies
3


Number
Returning to
U. of Fla. in +
Other Colleges
3 5


10 9 23 9
4 5 12 4
7 1 i 7
24 18 41 22
1 18 21 1

4 2 11 4
1 2 10 1
1 10 17 1
7 32 59 7
0 16 16 0
2 2 15 1
2 18 31 1
0 4 24 0
1 4 24 0
1 8 48 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 1 0
0 0 2 0
34 76 182 30


Returning to a consideration of the differences in classification shown in Table II,
we find that the registration for the first semester of 1931-32 includes only 258 of
the students who were registered in 1930-31. Of these 258 students 31 changed
their classification with respect to curriculum. These changes represent net changes
in curricula as follows: a loss of 4 students in the BA curriculum, a loss of 4
students in the BS curriculum, a loss of 2 students in the PM curriculum, and a gain
of 10 students in the PL curriculum. These losses and gains are for all classes. It
is evident, therefore, that the shift in registrations in curricula is due to the difference
between the educational intent of the 282 students who did not return and the edu-
cational intent of the 308 students who are enrolled in 1931-32 but who were not
enrolled in 1930-31.
Further light is thrown on the question of student migration by the fact that
101, or 12%, of the 848 different individuals considered in this study came to the
University of Florida and registered in the College of Arts and Sciences after
attending other collegiate institutions. The number of institutions represented by
these transfers is almost as large as the number of students transferring. Of the
282 students who failed to return in 1931-32, 37 were transfers from other in-
stitutions.


THE EXTENT TO WHICH STUDENTS EXPECT TO EARN EITHER THE B.A.
DEGREE OR THE B.S. DEGREE

Table IV shows the extent to which the students who were registered in the
College of Arts and Sciences in 1930-31 but did not return in 1931-32 expected to
earn either the degree Bachelor of Arts or the degree Bachelor of Science. It is
not surprising that the expectation varies greatly from curriculum to curriculum.
Of those registered according to the Bachelor of Arts curriculum, 66% expected to








A STUDY OF EDUCATIONAL INTENT


earn the Bachelor of Arts degree, 33% did not expect to earn either degree, and
one man was undecided. The corresponding numbers for those registered accord-
ing to the Bachelor of Science curriculum are 53%, 47%, 0, respectively; for those
registered in the Pre-Medical curriculum 13%, 84%, 1, respectively; and for those
registered in the Pre-Law curriculum 10%, 90%, 0, respectively. Great variation
from class to class is to be expected also. Of the 99 freshmen in this group, 34%
expected to earn one of these degrees, 65% did not expect to earn one of these
degrees, and one man was undecided. For the 86 sophomores these numbers are
31%, 68%, 1; for the 42 juniors, 48%, 52%, 0; and for the 51 seniors, 98%, 2%, 0.
The obvious explanation of these variations is that students who intend to enter a
professional college without first earning either the degree Bachelor of Arts or the
degree Bachelor of Science tend to transfer at the end of the sophomore and junior
years, while those who do not find themselves fitted for college work or who do not
find in college what they want tend to drop out during the first two years.


TABLE IV
Intent to Earn Either the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or the Degree of Bachelor of Science
(Including only those students registered in the College in 1930-31 but not
returning in 1931-32)
Number Intending Number NOT Intend-
Classification to Earn BA or BS ing to Earn BA or Number Total
Degree BS Degree Undecided
Freshman BA 12 8 0 20
BS 16 27 0 43
PM 5 20 1 26
PL 1 9 0 10
Sophomore BA 14 14 1 29
BS 11 13 0 24
PM 0 12 0 12
PL 2 19 0 21
Junior BA 12 9 0 21
BS 8 13 0 21
Senior BA 24 0 0 24
BS 26 1 0 27
Special 0 4 0 4
Totals by Classes:
Freshman 34 64 1 99
Sophomore 27 58 1 86
Junior 20 22 0 42
Senior 50 1 0 51
Special 0 4 0 4
Totals by Intent 131 149 2 282

Table V shows the extent to which those who are here in 1931-32, but who
were not here in 1930-31, expect to earn either the degree Bachelor of Arts or the
degree Bachelor of Science. The shift in registration with respect to curricula
results in an appreciable difference in distribution of percent of expectation to
earn one of the degrees named in the Bachelor of Arts curriculum only. Of the
61 students of this group who are registered according to the BA curriculum,
74% expect to earn one of these degrees, 21% do not expect to earn one of these
degrees, and 5% are undecided. The corresponding percent for the 94 registered
according to the BS curriculum are 53%, 42%, 5%; for the 99 registered accord-
ing to the PM curriculum, 17%, 76%, 6%; and for the 44 registered according
to the PL curriculum, 9%, 91%, 0%, respectively. The corresponding percent
for the 235 freshmen in the group are 35%, 60%, 5%; for the 39 sophomores,
44%, 54%, 2%; for the 18 juniors, 61%, 39%, 0%; and for the 6 seniors, 100%.








DEGREES


0%, 0%, respectively. These percent show little difference for the freshmen and
senior classes, as might be expected, but they show an appreciable increase for
the sophomores and juniors in the expectation to earn one of the degrees named.
When we remember that Table IV refers to a group of students who did not return,
while Table V refers to a group of students of whom many may be expected to
return, the results need some explanation. The probable explanation of the
agreement of intent on the part of the freshmen is that at the time of their
entrance to university life they have not had sufficient opportunity to estimate the
value of a degree to them, and they have had no opportunity to measure their own
ability to do satisfactory college work. The agreement in senior intent is explained
in the discussion of Table IV. The increase in the intent of sophomores and
juniors to earn one of the degrees named may be explained on the ground that
those sophomores and juniors who return after a lapse of time, or who transfer
from other institutions, are likely to be students who, more than the average, have
discovered considerable value for them in the possession of one of these degrees.


TABLE V
Intent to Earn Either the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or the Degree of Bachelor of Science
(Including only those students who registered in the College in 1931-32 but
who were not enrolled in 1930-31)
Number Intending Number NOT Intend-
Classification to Earn BA or BS ing to Earn BA or Number Total
Degree BS Degree Undecided
Freshman BA 32 6 2 40
BS 32 32 5 69
PM 14 68 6 88
PL 4 34 0 38
Sophomore BA 4 3 1 8
BS 10 4 0 14
PM 3 8 0 11
PL 0 6 0 6
Junior BA 6 4 0 10
BS 5 3 0 8
Senior BA 3 0 0 3
BS 3 0 0 3
Special 2 7 1 10
Totals by Classes:
Freshman 82 140 13 235
Sophomore 17 21 1 39
Junior 11 7 0 18
Senior 6 0 0 6
Special 2 7 1 10
Totals by Intent 118 175 15 308

Table VI shows the expectations to earn either the degree Bachelor of Arts
or the degree Bachelor of Science on the part of that group of students registered
in the College of Arts and Sciences in 1930-31 and returning in 1931-32. Table
VI also contains a record of the change of intent by individuals. Of the 258
students involved, 62, or 24%, changed their intent as shown in the table. It is
apparent, however, that these changes have had no appreciable effect on the totals,
there being one less student answering "yes" in 1931-32 than in 1930-31, and one
more student answering "undecided" in 1931-32 than in 1930-31. It is also
apparent that most students have fairly well defined intent with regard to a degree
at the registration period even though approximately one out of every four changes
his mind. The tendency to change in this regard is indicated by the fact that


769













-J







TABLE VI

Intent to Earn either the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or the Degree of Bachelor of Science
(Including only those students who registered in the College in 1930-31 and returned in 1931-32)
The numbers show the frequency of answers to the question. Do you intend to earn either the BA degree or the BS degree in the University of
Florida? Y indicates the answer "Yes", N indicates "No", and U indicates "Undecided."

Classification, Number of "Yes" Number of "No" Number Answering
'30--31 Answers Answers "Undecided" Record of Individual Changes from 1930-31 to 1931-32
'30-31 '31-32 '30-31 '31-32 '30-31 '31-32 N to Y U to Y Y to N U to N Y to U N to U
Freshman BA 28 22 20 26 2 2 5 0 10 1 1 0
BS 30 29 15 17 2 1 2 1 3 1 1 0
PM 6 5 26 27 2 2 3 0 4 2 0 2
PL 4 2 9 11 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0
Sophomore BA 11 11 5 4 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1
BS 23 23 5 4 0 1 4 0 3 0 1 0
PM 3 7 11 7 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0
PL 0 2 7 5 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0
Junior BA 17 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BS 18 21 5 2 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0
Senior BA 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
BS 6 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals by Classes: t
Freshman 68 58 70 81 6 5 10 1 19 4 2 2
Sophomore 37 43 28 20 0 2 12 0 5 0 1 1
Junior 35 38 5 2 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 9
Senior 9 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals 149 148 1 10 1 03 6 7 26 1 25 4 3 3 9











DEGREES


26% of the freshmen changed their minds, 29% of the sophomores, 12Ui% of the
juniors, and none of the seniors. As may be expected, the changes are concen-
trated to a very great extent in the freshman and sophomore years, again marking
these years as years of adjustment and orientation.
Again referring to Table VI, we find that of the 86 students registered accord-
ing to the BA curriculum in 1930-31, 69% expected to earn either the degree
Bachelor of Arts or the degree Bachelor of Science, 29% did not expect to earn
one of these degrees, and 2% were undecided. The corresponding numbers for
those registered according to the BA curriculum in 1931-32 are 62%, 35%, 3%.
The corresponding sets of numbers for those registered according to the BS cur-
riculum are 74%, 24%, 2% for 1930-31, and 76%, 22%, 2% for 1931-32; for
those registered according to the PM curriculum, 19%, 77%, 4% for 1930-31, and
25%, 71%, 4% for 1931-32; and for those registered according to the PL cur-
riculum, 20%, 80%, 0% for 1930-31, and 20%, 80%, 0% for 1931-32. It will be
noticed that of the students in this group those registered according to the BA
curriculum indicate about the same ratio of expectancy to earn one of the degrees
named as do the students registered according to the BA curriculum in the groups
represented by Tables IV and V. Students registered according to the other cur-
ricula show a rather marked increase in the ratio of those expecting to earn one
of these degrees. The extent of agreement among the four sets of numbers obtained
for the three groups of students registered according to any one curriculum is a fair
indication of the reliability of these numbers.
Also from Table VI, we find that of the 144 students of this group who were
registered as freshmen in 1930-31, 47% expected to earn either the degree Bachelor
of Arts or the decree Bachelor of Science, 49% did not expect to earn one of these
degrees, and 4% were undecided. The numbers for the same men, according to
their 1931-32 replies, are 40%, 56%, 4%. For the 65 sophomores in this group
these numbers are 57%, 43%, 0% for 1930-31, and 66%, 31%, 3% for 1931-32;
for the 40 juniors in the group, 871/%, 121/%, 0% for 1930-31, and 95%, 5%,
0% for 1931-32. Of the 9 seniors in the group, all expect to earn one of the degrees
named. When compared with the corresponding figures for the groups repre-
sented by Tables IV and V, we find that with but one exception each of the seniors
in these three groups expects to earn one of the degrees named. Of the students
in the other three classes, however, those represented by Table VI show much
greater expectation of earning one or the other of the degrees named. This result
seems reasonable in view of the fact that the groups represented by Tables IV and
V contain many students who registered in the College of Arts and Sciences for
one year in which to fulfill requirements for admission to professional and semi-
professional schools, whereas the group represented by Table VI contains no such
men.









A STUDY OF EDUCATIONAL INTENT


VOCATIONAL INTENT

In providing for students, and in guiding them, it is frequently helpful to have
information concerning their choices of life work. Table VII shows certain facts
connected with frequency of choice of life work. The column headed "Number
considering in 1930-31" shows the number of students registered in the College of
Arts and Sciences in 1930-31 who intended to engage in the work named at the left.
For example, 170 of the students registered in this College in 1930-31 intended to
study and practice law, 145 intended to study and practice medicine, 74 had not
decided upon a life work, and so on. The column headed "Number Considering
in 1931-32" gives the corresponding numbers for the students registered in the
College during the first semester of 1931-32. The column at the extreme left of
this table contains the name of every life work chosen by as many as three students
in one of the two years under consideration. The remaining choices of life work
are named at the bottom of the table, none of these being the choice of as many
as three students in 1930-31 or in 1931-32.


TABLE VII
Frequency of Choice of Life Work
Number Number Number Number Number
Life Work Considering Considering Unchanged Changed Students Not
in 1930-31 in 1931-32 Decisions Decisions Returning
Law 170 144 66 4 100
Medicine 145 174 77 3 65
Undecided 74 63 19 24 31
Chemistry or
Chemical Engineering 31 69 16 1 14
Dentistry 24 39 7 1 16
Business 15 11 3 5 7
Engineering (other than
Chemical) 13 3 0 1 12
Teaching 11 13 4 2 5
No reply 11 1 1 5 5
Aviation 6 9 2 0 4
Ministry 5 8 4 0 1
Banking 4 6 0 0 4
Journalism 4 1 0 0 4
Architecture 2 3 0 1 1
Writing 2 3 1 0 1
Biology 1 3 0 0 1
The remaining choices are: Accounting, Actuarial Science, Advertising, Aeronautical
Engineering, Agriculture, Archaeology, Art, Bacteriology, Curatory, Dramatics, Entertain-
ment, Foreign Marketing, Foreign Service, Geology, History, Hotel Management, Insurance,
Library Science, Mission Service, Military Science, Naval Science, Optometry, Osteopathy,
Petroleum Engineering, Physics, Politics, Psychology, Radio, Real Estate, Salesmanship,
South American Banking, Telephone Work, Undertaking, University Teaching.

It is significant that 58%, or nearly 3 of every 5, of the students registered in
the College of Arts and Sciences in 1930-31 intended to study and practice either
law or medicine, and that 56% of the students registered in the College in the
first semester of 1931-32 intend to study or practice either law or medicine. The
relatively large number of students registered in the College of Arts and Sciences
in 1930-31 but expressing a preference for engineering as a life work is due to the fact
that these students failed to take the proper courses in preparatory school to admit








VOCATIONAL INTENT


them to the College of Engineering. The requirements for admission to the Col-
lege of Engineering have been changed, and we may eliminate engineering from
further consideration as a choice of life work by students in the College of Arts
and Sciences. We may consider, therefore, that law, medicine, chemistry, den-
tistry, business, and teaching are the only vocations which were seriously con-
sidered by the students registered in the College during the period under con-
sideration. The need for more vocational guidance seems imperative. The
University of Florida is attempting to meet this need in the newly created Bureau
of Vocational Guidance, and by other means, but the need is so great that it
should challenge the attention of all who are concerned with the welfare of the
young men of Florida. Especially is this need urged upon the attention of
secondary school faculties, parents, and civic clubs and similar organizations. It
seems safe to assert that in the majority of cases the best time to give students
help of this nature is during their secondary school age. It is not the desire of
the University to avoid assuming its share of responsibility in this direction,
however, and it is gratifying to see that one-third of those who were undecided
as to life work in 1930-31 reached a decision by September, 1931. Undoubtedly
this ratio will increase as the students become acquainted with the functions of
the Bureau of Vocational Guidance.
The extent to which the numbers in Table VII can be considered significant
depends on the relative numbers of students who actually engage in the vocations
for which they have indicated preference. It is, of course, too early to determine
these relative numbers, but the last three columns of Table VII may give some
indication of what to expect. The column headed "Number Unchanged Deci-
sions" shows for each vocation named at the left the number of students who
indicated that vocation both years; the column headed "Number Changed Deci-
sions" shows for each vocation the number of students who indicated that voca-
tion in 1930-31 and returned to this College, but indicated some other vocation
in 1931-32; and the column headed "Number Students Not Returning" shows for
each vocation the number of students, including seniors, who indicated that
vocation in 1930-31 and who did not return to this College in 1931-32. For ex-
ample, of the 170 students who in 1930-31 expressed a decision to study and
practice law, 66 are again registered in this College and expect to study and
practice law, 4 are again registered in this College but have decided not to study
law, and 100 did not return to the College of Arts and Sciences. While it is
impossible to secure accurate data, the information which is available indicates
that a large majority of those counted in the number of students not returning
are following their original decision. The number of changed decisions of those
returning, as compared with the number of unchanged decisions, may be enlight-
ening. Leaving the numbers of "Undecided", "Engineering", and "No reply" out
of consideration, we find that the vocations named at the left of the table were
chosen in 1930-31 by 197 students who also registered in this College in 1931-32.
Of the 197 students only 17 changed their preferences. In other words, of the
197 students 9% changed their preferences, while 91% did not. This seems to








A STUDY OF EDUCATIONAL INTENT


uphold the conclusions reached by others that vocational preference is rela-
tively stable.

PRE-LAW AND PRE-MEDICAL STUDY

The quantity and quality of pre-professional training are of vital concern to
all who are interested in the upbuilding of the profession. Table VIII shows the
time, in years, that students expecting to study and practice law intend to devote
to pre-law training. For example, there were 47 freshmen registered according
to the BA curriculum in 1930-31 who expressed their decision to study and prac-
tice law. Of these 47 freshmen, 23 intended to devote two years to pre-law train-
ing, 2 intended to devote three years, and 22 intended to devote three or more
years. It is evident from the table that the 1931-32 group intends to devote much
less time to pre-law training than did the 1930-31 group. While this may be a
random fluctuation which may be explained by present economic conditions or
by chance, it is noticeable that 62% of the 1931-32 group intend to devote only
two years to pre-law study, while 49% of the 1930-31 group intended to devote
only two years to such study. The result is a significant drop in the estimated
average from 2.7 years in 1930-31 to 2.5 years in 1931-32. Data are not available
with which to make a similar comparison with respect to pre-medical training.

TABLE VIII
Length of Period Intended for Pre-Law Study
Time Given by 1930-31 Students Time Given by 1931-32 Students
Three Three
Classification Two Three or More Two Three or More
Freshman BA 23 2 22 1 0 8
BS 4 0 1 3 0 0
PL 15 2 2 38 0 3
Sophomore BA 14 6 8 5 4 7
BS 4 0 2 0 1 0
PL 23 1 1 36 2 0
Junior BA 15 7 12 6
BS 2 1
Senior BA 1 12 4 3
BS 1 1
Special BA 1
Totals 83 23 58 83 23 28
Proportional Part 49% 17% 34% 62% 17% 21%
Estimated Average Period 2.7 years ........................................ 2.5 years

Table X shows the time, in years, which the 1931-32 group intends to devote
to pre-medical study. The estimated average is 3.1 years, which is more than
one-half year more than the average for the group training for the study of law.
The intent to earn either the degree of Bachelor of Arts or the degree of
Bachelor of Science, either in combination with the law degree or before entering
the College of Law or before entering a medical school, may be taken as a rough
approximation of the character of training which the majority of students desire
and are in a position to acquire. Table IX shows the intent of the groups pre-
paring for the study of law. In 1930-31, 41% of the group expected to earn
either the degree Bachelor of Arts or the degree Bachelor of Science. In 1931-32
this ratio dropped to 34%. A tabulation shows that change of intent by students
registered both years accounts for only a small part of this drop. Table X shows









PRE-LAW AND PRE-MEDICAL STUDY


the intent of the students giving medicine as their choice of life work in 1931-32.
The 95 students who expect to devote two or three years to pre-medical study do
not intend to earn the degree of Bachelor of Science, and the 76 students who
expect to devote four years to pre-medical study do expect to earn the degree of
Bachelor of Science. Of the 171 students represented in the 1931-32 group in
Table X, 44% intend to earn the degree of Bachelor of Science. We may con-
clude, therefore, that of the students now registered in the College of Arts and
Sciences, 3 of every 9 of those who are preparing for the study of law expect to
earn either the degree of Bachelor of Arts or the degree of Bachelor of Science,
while 4 of every 9 of those who are preparing for the study of medicine expect
to earn the degree of Bachelor of Science.


TABLE IX
Intent to Earn either the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or the Degree of Bachelor of Science
(Including only those students who intend to study law)
The numbers show the frequency of answers to the question, Do you intend to earn a degree
in the College of Arts and Sciences?


Classification
Freshman BA
BS
PL
All Freshmen
Sophomore BA
BS
PL
All Sophomores
Junior BA
BS
All Juniors
Senior BA
BS
All Seniors
Special BA
Total all classes


Answers in 1930-31
'es No Undecided
4 23 0
1 4 0
3 16 0
8 43 0
1 16 1
1 5 0
1 24 0
3 45 1
3 9 0
2 1 0
5 10 0
3 0 0
1 0 0
4 0 0
0 1 0
0 99 1


Answers in 1931-32 Total
Yes No Undecided '30-31 '31-32
9 1 0 47 10
1 3 0 5 4
3 38 0 19 41
13 40 0 71 53
14 4 0 28 18
0 1 0 6 1
1 A1 0 25 42
15 46 0 59 61
11 6 1 22 18
0 0 0 3 0
11 5 1 25 17
8 0 0 13 8
1 0 0 1 1
9 0 0 14 9
S 4 1 170 143
43 94 1 170 143


TABLE X

Frequency of Choice of Medicine and Length of Period of Pre-Medical Study


Classification
Freshman BA
BS
PM
All Freshmen
Sophomore BS
PM
All Sophomores
Junior BS
Senior BS
Special
Total all classes


Number of Years Intended for Pre-
Number Giving Medicine Medical Study by Students in Attend-
as choice in ance in 1931-32
1930-31 1931-32 Two Three Four
1 1
17 6 6
43 62 45 3 14
60 69 45 3 21
13 13 2 2 9
23 39 17 11 11
36 52 19 13 20
27 26 12 14
17 20 20
1 4 3 0 1
141 171 67 28 76







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