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 Cover
 Table of Contents
 Faculty
 General information
 Societies and clubs
 Special information
 Degrees and curricula
 Departments of instruction
 University calendar, 1931-32














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00437
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: August 1, 1931
Copyright Date: 1932
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00437
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 507
        Page 508
    Table of Contents
        Page 509
    Faculty
        Page 510
    General information
        Page 511
        Page 512
    Societies and clubs
        Page 513
    Special information
        Page 514
        Page 515
        Page 516
    Degrees and curricula
        Page 517
        Page 518
        Page 519
        Page 520
        Page 521
    Departments of instruction
        Page 522
        Page 523
        Page 524
        Page 525
        Page 526
        Page 527
        Page 528
        Page 529
        Page 530
        Page 531
        Page 532
        Page 533
        Page 534
        Page 535
        Page 536
        Page 537
    University calendar, 1931-32
        Page 538
Full Text




The University Record

of the


University of Florida


Bulletin of the

College of Education

With Announcements for the
Year 1931-32


Vol. XXVI, Series I


No. 14


August 1, 1931


Published Semi-monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.





















The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual col-
leges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruction.
and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what in
formation is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in sev-
eral series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with insti
tutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is
under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual
copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to the University Bookstore, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville. Florida



























TABLE OF CONTENTS


F aculty ...................................


General Information ...........


Societies and Clubs ....... ...


Special Information .........

Degrees and Curricula .........

Departments of Instruction


University Calendar ...


..-....-....- ...- ...- --.... 510


.......--....-.....- ..- 511


... -......-...- ......- 513


-..........-. ..- -.. 514

.......................... 517


......................... 522


.... ................... 538













FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., President
JAMES MARION FARR, M.A., Ph.D., Vice-President
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, M.A., Ph.D., Dean
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, M.A., Assistant Dean
IRENE ERSKINE PERRY, B.S., Secretary
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
JOHN VREDENBURGH McQUITTY, B.A., Assistant Registrar

FACULTY

ALFRED CRAGO, M.A. (Nebraska), Professor of Educational Psychology and
Tests and Measurements
JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, M.A., Ph.D. (Nebraska), Professor of Public School
Administration
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, M.A., Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor of Agricultural
Education
ELLSWORTH GAGE LANCASTER, M.A., B.D., Ph.D. (Clark), LL.D., Assistant
Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychology
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, M.A., Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean, and Professor of
Education
.---.---.. --..--..--...........- .. .... .......... ..............., Professor of Secondary Education
ELLIS BENTON SALT, M.A. (Columbia), Associate Professor of Health and
Physical Education
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, M.A. (Florida), Assistant Dean, and Associate Pro-
fessor of Public School Administration
BUNNIE OTHANEL SMITH, B.S.E., Assistant Professor of Curriculum Revision
(on leave 1931-32).
JACOB HOOPER WISE, M.A. (Florida), Assistant Professor of Supervised Teach-
ing (on leave 1931-32).
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS

ROBERT C. MOON, A.B.E.








GENERAL INFORMATION


HISTORY

When the University was established by the Buckman Act in 1905, a normal
department was provided in the College of Arts and Sciences for the purpose
of training teachers. Normal instruction remained a part of the work of the
College of Arts and Sciences until 1912, when the Peabody Education Board
gave $40,000 to the University for the purpose of erecting a building for
Teachers College. This building was completed in 1913, and Teachers College
was established as a separate school. The expressed purpose of this college
was to train teachers, supervisors, and school administrators. John A. Thack-
ston was named as the first dean and served in that capacity until 1916, when
lie resigned to become Dean of the College of Education of the University of
Tennessee. He was succeeded by Harvey W. Cox, under whose administration
the College continued until 1920, when he resigned to become President of
Emory University. The present Dean was appointed in 1920. The name of the
college was changed from the Teachers College to the College of Education in
1931.
AIM AND SCOPE

The main purpose of the College of Education is to furnish such training as
will be most useful to its students in the profession of teaching. It is the
policy of the College of Education, emphasized on many occasions, that its
graduates shall know much about the subjects they expect to teach, but it is
equally as important that they should be resourceful in teaching a class and
skilful in managing a school, or a system of schools. This college attempts to
give both kinds of training. More specifically, it prepares its students for
positions as teachers, principals, supervisors and county or city superintendents
of public instruction. It strives also to develop in its students a keen insight
into human affairs, human relationships, and human problems. About one-
fourth of a student's time is devoted to professional subjects in education, the
other three-fourths to academic subjects.

LIBRARY

The University Library contains about 65,000 volumes, of which there ar-
more than 3,000 modern books in education. In addition it has thn irnm
file of the leading American educational journals.

FACILITIES FOR OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE

Through the courtesy of the public school authorities of Gainesville, .
tunity for educational investigation as well as student-teaching and observa-
tion under supervision is provided. Gainesville has two elementary schools
and one well equipped junior-senior high school. There are more than a score
of standard elementary and secondary schools within a twenty-mile radius of
the University. These offer opportunity for first-hand study of all phases of
education.







512 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

ADMISSION

For information relative to admission to the College of Education see the
Bulletin of General Information, 1931-32, pages 133-140.
Anyone not a high school graduate, who is 21 years of age may, with the
Dean's approval, register as a "special student."

REGULATIONS

The regulations governing the College of Education may be found in the
constitution and by-laws of the University.
The rules and regulations of the University are published in a separate
bulletin entitled By-Laws of the University of Florida, copies of which are dis-
tributed to all who register at the University. Each student is held responsible
for the observance of the rules and regulations of the University in so far as
they affect him.

SCHOLARSHIPS

To aid and encourage ambitious and worthy young people to become teach-
ers, the State provides scholarships of $200 per year for four years to enable
young men and women to attend the University of Florida, or Florida State
College for Women, respectively.
In each county one man and one woman may be selected for each of the
county's representatives in the state legislature.
To secure this aid it is necessary for the applicant to be a graduate of a
four-year high school and to pass a reasonable examination on high school
subjects, given by the state in the various county seats during the month of
August. The successful male applicants are required to register at the Uni-
versity of Florida, in the College of Education. After completing their courses
they will be expected to teach in the State for two years. The scholarships
may be used in the Regular Session, and also in the Summer Session of the
University. Students contemplating taking the examination for the scholar-
ships must make application to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction
and also to their county superintendents. The Dean of Students at the Uni-
Versify will be glad to give information relative to scholarship vacancies.
Similar scholarships are offered in every senatorial district in Florida. A
man holding a senatorial scholarship may register in any college of the Uni-
versity of Florida and is not required to teach after graduation.

GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS

For the purpose of encouraging graduate study the University offers twenty
scholarships, each in the sum of $250, open to graduate students only. Appli-
cation for these scholarships should be made to the Dean of the Graduate
School by March 15.








SOCIETIES AN.VD CLUBS


ESTIMATED EXPENSES

There are no special fees for the College of Education. However, students
registering in the College of Education must pay the annual fees which are re-
quired of all students registering in the University. These fees are as follows:

Registration and Contingent Fee ......................................................$ 7.50
Dormitory Breakage Fee (in the form of a deposit).................... 10.00
Student Activity Fee .......................................... 23.60
Infirm ary Fee ....... ............-.... ..-....... .. ... ........ ...... ... ....... ............ 9.00
Laboratory fees, varying for the various courses..........................
Locker Service Fee .......---..----... ---.. ............................................. 1.50
M military Fee ....................................................... .............. .............. ........... 1.00

Students not residents of Florida are charged a non-resident tuition fee of
$100, payable $50 per semester. For details concerning these various fees see
the Bulletin of General Information.
Annual necessary expenses in the College of Education for the average
student residing in Florida are estimated as follows:

Registration and Student Activity fees ...............--------- ....... --........ $ 42.60
Board and lodging in Commons and dormitory, if paid by the
semester in advance-
O ld D orm itory ....................... ......... .................... ...................... 209.00
N ew D orm itory ................. ........................... ...... ..... .............. 240.00
Laundry (approxim ately) ................................ ... ...... ..... ... 20.00
Book and laboratory fees.................................... ......................... 37.75


SOCIETIES AND CLUBS

PHI KAPPA PHI

A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the
University during the spring of 1912. To be eligible for membership a student
must have been in attendance at the University for at least one year, or three
summer sessions, have been guilty of no serious breaches of discipline, have
had at least three years of collegiate training, be within one year of finishing
a course leading to a degree, and stand among the first tenth of the senior
class of the University. Candidates for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have
attained an honor point average of two on all scholastic work, wherever done,
for which credit toward a degree is received.

KAPPA DELTA PI

Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary educational society. Juniors and seniors
in the College of Education making an honor point average of two are eli-
gible for membership.
ALPHA TAU ALPHA

Alpha Tau Alpha is a professional educational fraternity for teachers of
agriculture. Juniors with an honor point average of two and seniors with an
honor point average of one are eligible for membership if elected by the
fraternity.







514 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

KAPPA PHI KAPPA

Kappa Phi Kappa is a professional educational society in the College of
Education. Juniors and seniors who show a good professional spirit are eli-
gible for election by the membership of the society.

PEABODY CLUB

All students of the College of Education are eligible for membership in Pea
body Club. This organization meets weekly in Peabody Auditorium, where
delightful and instructive programs are rendered.

SPECIAL INFORMATION

ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN

A mimeographed sheet is issued each day during the session and appears
on all bulletin boards for the dissemination of information, changes in schedule,
club meetings, lost and found notices, etc. This is the medium used by fac-
ulty and students for making announcements, and each student should read the
Orange and Blue Bulletin daily.

EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

As the College of Education wishes to serve the whole state in every pos-
sible way, a teachers' employment bureau was established several years ago.
It is open throughout the year.
Its duties are to assist students and graduates of the University to obtain
positions in the teaching profession. It keeps on file information both as to
vacancies and as to available teachers. When called upon, the Bureau tries
to meet the needs of both tea",hers and school officials.
The Director of the Bureau will be glad to be informed of present or pros-
pective vacancies in positions for which college-trained men or women are
eligible. No charges are made for services, though students are required to
pay for all telegrams and telephone calls made in their behalf.
Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to
the Director of the Employment Bureau, University of Florida, Gainesville.

STUDENT LOAD
Students may register for classes according to the following schedule:
A student who has in the preceding semester or Summer Session an honor
point average of less than one may not register for more than 16 credits (8 in
Summer Session).
If a student's average in the preceding semester is from one honor point up
to, but not including, two, he may not register for more than 19 credits (10
in Summer Session).
If a student's average in the preceding semester is from two honor points
up to, but not including, three, he may not register for more than 21 credits
(11 in Summer Session).







SPECIAL INFORMATION


If a student's average in the preceding semester is three honor points, he
may not register for more than 24 credits (12 in Summer Session).
The minimum load is 13 credits.

CERTIFICATES

Graduate State Certificates.-Graduates of the University are granted Gradu-
ate State Certificates without further examination, provided that three-twen-
tieths of their work has been devoted to professional training and provided that
they have satisfied the requirement of the law as to the Constitution of the
United States. It is well for the student to note that a Graduate State Certifi-
cate permits him to teach only those subjects that are listed on such certifi-
cate, and that only those subjects in which he has specialized in his college
course will be placed on his certificate. This will ordinarily mean that a sub-
ject must have been pursued for at least two years in college, in addition to
credit for all high school courses offered in that subject by a standard high
school, before a certificate to teach that subject will be granted. Applicants for
the Graduate State Certificate must apply to the State Superintendent of Public
Instruction, Tallahassee, for application blanks and for further information.
Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by
"presenting satisfactory evidence of having taught successfully for a period
of twenty-four months under a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting en-
dorsement of three holders of Life State, Life Graduate State, or Life Profes-
sional Certificates." Application for a Life Graduate State Certificate must
be filed before the expiration of the Graduate State Certificate.

EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATE

Anyone enrolled in the College of Education and taking as much as one
2-credit course in education may, upon the recommendation of the faculty of
the College, receive an extension of one year on any or all valid Florida cer-
tificates.
GRADES AND HONOR POINTS

Marking System.-Results of work are recorded in the Registrar's office as
follows: A-Exceptionally high quality, valued at three quality points for
each credit; B-Good, valued at two quality points for each credit; C-Fair,
valued at one quality point for each credit; D-Unsatisfactory, indicating a
deficiency and giving no quality points, but giving credit for graduation; E-
Failure; I-Incomplete; R-Conditional (may be given to freshmen and sopho-
mores only) ; X-Absent from examination with excuse approved by the in-
structor.
Explanations.-A student must have an average of at least C on all work
offered for advanced standing. In addition, to obtain the degree applied for,
he must earn at the University of Florida as many honor points as credits.
The grade E means that, in order to be credited, the work must be taken
over in class.






516 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

The grade I means that some relatively small part of the term's work re-
mains undone because of sickness or of some other reason satisfactory to the
instructor. This work must be completed within two months after the student
renters the University, if credit for the course is to be gained. The grade I
is not given to a student whose work is below passing. If not removed within
two months it will be changed to E.
The grade R (given to freshmen and sophomores only) denotes a condi-
tion with re-examination privileges at the next re-examination period during
residence in the University. If the re-examination is not taken at this time, or
is taken and not passed, the grade R will automatically be changed to E.
The passing grade for graduate students is B.

AMOUNT OF CORRESPONDENCE WORK PERMITTED

No person shall be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits to-
ward a degree by correspondence study and extension class. No person shall be
allowed to take more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a Bachelor's
Degree by correspondence study or extension class. No person shall be allowed
to take more than 9 credits of work by correspondence during the summer
vacation period. While in residence, a student shall not be allowed to take
work by correspondence without the consent of the dean. This will be granted
only in exceptional cases. In the case of candidates for the Normal Diploma,
the students may not take more than 16 credits by correspondence or extension.








DEGREES AND CURRICULA


DEGREES AND CURRICULA

DEGREES OFFERED

Students completing any of the prescribed four-year courses may obtain
the respective degree: i.e., Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Education, Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education, Bachelor
of Science in Physical Education, Bachelor of Arts in Physical Education, or

Bachelor of Science in Manual Arts.
Students completing the prescribed two-year course may obtain the Normal
Diploma.
ABBREVIATIONS


The following abbreviations
Bly.-Biology
Bty.-Botany
Bs.-Business Administration
Cy.-Chemistry
Cg.-Coaching
Es.-Economics
En.-Education
Eh.-English
Fh.-French
Gn.-German


are used throughout this bulletin:
Hy.-History
Ln.-Latin
Ms.-Mathematics
My.-Military Science
P1.-Physical Education
Psy.-Psychology
Ps.-Physics
PcL--Political Science
Sy.-Sociology
Sh.-Spanish


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA


Course
Physical Education 101 and 102..................
E education 101 .............. ..... ...... ... .... ....
Education 102 1
o r ..............................................
Education 103
Education 203 ............... ... ..........................
Education 311, 312, 341, 371, or 372 .......
Education 415, 425. 435, 455, or 465..........
English 101 and 102 ......................................
English 201 and 202 ......................................
Military Science 103 and 104 ......................
Military Science 203 and 204 ......................
Elect one group (page 518)...
Elect another group (page 518) ........
Elective credits (approved by dean) .........


Credits
...................... ... ......................................... 2
.. ................................................................. 3


..................................... ................................ 3
.... ........................................................... 3
.. . . . . . ................ .............-- -- -- -- -- -- ...... ... 2
................................................................... 2
................................................................... 6
......................................................... ........... -
........--......--......--...........................................---.... 4
.................................................................... 4


Total credits ............................ ................................................... 66

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE

If after taking the Normal Diploma the student wishes to take the Bach-
elor's Degree he must take an additional 66 credits. The following work must
be included:


Course
Education 207 .......... ...........................................................................................................
Education 308 ............-.. .................. ........................................................... ......................
Education 311, 312, 341, 371, or 372.......................................................................
Education 415, 425, 435, 455, or 465............................................................................
Education 401 ..................................................... ........................................................
Education 403 .............................. ................. ............................ .... ............................
Complete two groups (see page 518) ..................... ............ .........
Students who expect to be principals must take:
Education 404 .............. ... ...................................... .......................... .........
and
Education 406
or ......... .. ......... ......................................................................... ................
Education 408


Credits
3
3
2
2
3
3


3


3


......................................................................................... 132


Total credits ...







518 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


In case a student is exempt from military science, he must substitute an
equal number of credits from other departments.

THE GROUPS

For the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education and Bachelor of Science
in Education the student must complete all courses in two of the following
groups. Group E must be elected if the student desires the degree of Bach-
elor of Science in Education:


A-ANCIENT
LANGUAGES
Latin 101-102 1
Latin 201-202 18
Latin 203-204 J credits









D-MATHEMATICS
Ms. 101-102 1
Ms. 251-252 18
Ms. 331 credits
Ms. 568


B-MODERN LANGUAGES


Fh. 21-22
F.h. 101-102
Fh. 201-202
or
Sh. 21-22
Sh. 101-102
Sh. 201-202
or
Gn. 21-22
Gn. 101-102
Gn. 201-202


E-NATURAL SCIENCE
Ely. 101
Bty. 101-102
Bly. 106
Cy. 101-102 36
Ps. 111-112 credits
Ps. 115-116


C-ENGLISH

Eh. 101-102 ]
Eh. 103-104 I
Eh. 201-202 25
Eh. 301-302 credits
Eh. 305 or 306 J
Foreign Language 1
6 credits 12
English or Foreign I credits
Language 6 creditsJ



F-SOCIAL SCIENCE
Hy. 101-102 1
Pel. 101-102 24
Es. 101-102 credits
Sy. 111-112

Adv. Hy. 12 36
credits or credits
Adv. Pel. 12
credits or 12
Adv. Es. 12 credits
credits or
Adv. Sy. 12
credits


G-COMMERCIAL
EDUCATION
Es. 101-102
Bs. 83- 84
Bs. 87
Bs. 103-104 35
Bs. 211-212 credits
Bs. 401-402
Eh. 355-356


18
credits











DEGREES AND CURRICULA


THE CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


Academic Subjects

English 101-102 ...... .....
Speech 201 ...................
Journalism 316 ....-..----
Psychology 201 .....
Mathematics 204 ...........
Sociology 102 or 322 ...


Military Science and Physical Education

M military Science 103-104 .......................................
Military Science 203-204 ............ ..................
Physical Education 101-102 .................................




Science Subjects

Chemistry 105-106 ........ ............
B otany 101-102 ....... .... ................. .. ............
B iology 101 ....... .......... .............. ........ ....... ....
P hysics 111 ................. ............... .. .. .. .........
Entomology 302 1
or -
Bacteriology 301 J


Credils
...................................................................................... 6
..................................................................................... 3
.................................................................................... 3
..................................................................................... 3
....... .......................................................................... 3
.............. ..................................................................... 3


9
.... 8
5
4

4


30


Professional Subjects


Education 207 .................
Education 303-304 .........
Education 306 ................
Education 401 ..............
Education 409-410 .


Agricultural Subjects
A nim al H usbandry 104 ..................... .............. ...... ............................................. ..... 4
Dairying 201 ....................... ................................................................................................ 3
Poultry Husbandry 202 ............... .... ............................................................... 3
Veterinary Science 302 ..............-- ........... ...................... ..........--.......... ................. 2
H orticulture 206 ............................... ........ ................................................................ 3
H orticulture 101 ................................ ........................................................................ 3
Agricultural Engineering 202 ............ ....................... ........ ................ ........................ 4
Agricultural Engineering 303 ....... ......................................................................... 3
Agronom y 301 ............... ....... .............................................................. .............. 5
Agronom y 302 ...................................................................................................................... 3
Agricultural Econom ics 306 ............................................................................................ 3
Agricultural Econom ics 308 ............................................................................................ 3
Electives in Agriculture .......................... ........ ........................................................... 8

47


Approved Electives ... ....... ........ ........... ................... .......................... 3

Total credits ............................................ ...... ........................................-- 132


..... ..............................................................................................
..... ..................................................................... I ...........................
................................................ ....................................................
-------- ------------------------- --------------------------------------------------
...... ............................................................................................. -






520 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


CURRICULUM IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION*


First Semester Second Semester
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Freshman Year

Eh. 101-Rhetoric and Composition.... 3 Eh. 102-Rhetoric and Composition.. 3
Bly. 101-Prin. Animal Biology .......... 5 HPI. 110-Anatomy ............................... 5
En. 101-How to Teach ......................... 3 HPI. 0107-Hygiene ............................. 2
HPI. 101-Football .................................. 2 HPl. 114-Natural Activities I ............ 2
HP1. 111- Basketball ......................... 2 Sociology** ..................................... : .......... 3
Military Science 103-Artillery............ 2 Military Science 104-Artillery............ 2
it 17

Sophomore Year

E english .................................. ...... ................ 3 E english .................................. .. ................. 3
Ps. 1ll***-General Physics, Lec....... 3 Ps. 112***-General Physics, Lec....... 3
Ps. 115***-General Physics, Lab....... 2 Ps. 116***-General Physics, Lab....... 2
HP1. 215-Hist. and Principles of Phy- HPI. 216-Principles of Physical Edu-
sical E education ................................ 2 cation .................................. .................. 2
HP1. 213-Natural Activities II............ 2 HPI. 214-Natural Activities III........ 2
HP1. 201-Football ............................... 2 En. 0103-Health Education................ 3
HPI. 251- Boxing .................................... 1 My. 204- Artillery .............................. 2
My. 203- Artillery ................................. 2
17 17

Junior Year

Cy. 101***-General Chemistry .......... 5 Cy. 102***-General Chemistry............ 5
HP1. 311-Organ. and Adm................. 4 HP1. 312-Organ, and Adm................... 4
HPI. 313-Natural Activities IV....... 2 HP1. 314-Natural Activities V.......... 2
En. 203-Child and Adol. Psychology.. 3 En. 0207-Educational Psychology ..... 3
HP1. 301- Football ................................ 1 HPI. 304- Track ..................................... 2
HPI. 303-Basketball ............................ 1 -
-- 16
19

Senior Year

En. 475-Supervised Teach. in Health En. 0401-School Adm. and Super- 1
and Physical Education ............. 3 vision or
En. -Methods and Materials course En. 406-Elementary School Prin- 3
in Group Selected ............................ 2 cipal or
HPl. 351-Intramurals ....................... 2 En. 408-High School Administra-
HPl. 353-Lab. for HPI. 351 ................ 1 tion J
Electives ................... ........... ................ 8 H P1. 344- Baseball ............................. 2
Sch. 0201-Public Speaking ................ 3
16 E lectives ................................................... 8

16

*If the sciences are taken as listed, this curriculum leads to the degree B.S. in
Health and Physical Education; if another Group is selected, it leads to the degree
B.A. in Health and Physical Education.
**Students who wish the B.S. degree in Health and Physical Education should
take Ms. 085 or 0101 and defer Sociology until a later year.
***If a student does not wish to take Natural Sciences as here listed, he may
substitute any Group as authorized in the current bulletin of the College of Educa-
tion.








CURRICULA 521


CURRICULUM IN MANUAL ARTS

Leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Manual Arts


First Semester Second Semester
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Freshman Year

Ms. 85-Trigonometry 1 Dg. 104-Mechanical Drawing ............ 1
or ............ 3 Dg. 106-Mechanical Drawing ............ 1
Ms. 101-College Algebra Eh. 102-Rhetoric and Composition.... 3
Dg. 101-Mechanical Drawing .......... 1 En. 103-Health Education .............. 3
Dg. 102 -Mechanical Drawing ............ 1 Mc. 108-Woodworking ........................ 3
Eh. 101-Rhetoric and Composition.... 3 Ms. 83 -Solid Geometry
En. 101- How to Teach ........... ...... 3 or .......... 3
Mc. 107-Woodworking ................... 3 Ms. 102*-Analytic Geometry
M y. 103- Artillery ................................ 2 M y. 104- Artillery .................................. 2
P1. 101- Gym nastics ................ ..... 1 Pl. 102- Gym nastics .............................. 1

17 17

Sophomore Year

Dg. 201-Machine Drawing ............. 1 Dg. 202-Machine Drawing ................ 1
En. 203-Child Psychology .................. 3 En. 207-Educational Psychology...... 3
Mc. 207-Carpentry ............................. 3 Mc. 208-Carpentry ................................ 3
Me. 209-Metal Work ......................... 2 Mc. 210-Metal Work .......................... 2
M y. 203- Artillery .................... .............. 2 M y. 204- Artillery ................................. 2
Ps. Ill-Mechanics and Heat ......... 3 Ps. 112-Sound, Electricity, and Light 3
Ps. 115-Laboratory for Ps. 111........ 2 Ps. 116-Laboratory for Ps. 112 .......... 2

16 16

Junior Year

El. 201-Elements of Electrical En- El. 202-Elements of Electrical En-
gineering .. ............................ .......... 2 gineering ............................................ 2
El. 203-Electrical Laboratory .......... 1 El. 204-Dynamo Laboratory .... ....-. i
En. 373-Materials and Methods in En. 306-Theoretical Education ........ 3
M echanic Arts ................................. 2 M c. 212- Foundry ................................... 2
Mc. 211-Forge Shop .............................. 2 Mc. 308-Cabinet Work ........................ 3
Mc. 307-Cabinet Work ....................... 3 Electives in One Group ........................ 6
Electives in One Group ........................ 6

16 17

Senior Year

En. 317-Tests and Measurements...... 3 En. 408-High School Administration 3
En. 477-Supervised Teaching ............ 2 Mc. 304-Patternmaking ...................... 2
Mc. 301-Machine Shop ....................... 2 Mc. 406-Cabinet Work ........................ 3
Me. 405- Cabinet W ork ........................ 3 Electives in One Group .......................... 9
Electives in One Group ...................... 6

16 17

*Prerequisite: Ms. 101.










522 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Subjects with odd numbers are given in the first semester and subjects with
even numbers are given in the second semester unless the number begins with
0, in which case the reverse is true.
The number of hours given is the number of hours which the class meets
per week.
The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours earned by
each student who receives a passing grade (A, B, C, or D) when the subject
is completed. Unless specifically stated, credit will be allowed for one semes-
ter of a year course.
Subjects numbered 200 or above are for sophomores; subjects numbered 300
or above are for juniors; subjects numbered 400 or above are for seniors;
subjects numbered 500 or above are for graduate students.
The abbreviations used are wherever possible the first and last letter of
the first word of the department name. Occasionally, a third central letter is
demanded to distinguish between departments where first and last letters are
identical.
BIOLOGY

Bly. 101.-Principles of Animal Biology. 2 hours and 4 hours labora-
tory and 1 hour quiz. 5 credits. Hubbell and staff.
An introduction to the subject matter and principles of zoology.
A prerequisite for all other courses in this department except Bly. 0105. Re-
quired of first year pre-medical, physical education and agricultural students and
of all B.S. students.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bly. 104.-Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 2 hours, and 4 hours
laboratory and 1 hour quiz. 5 credits. Sherman.
A comparative study of the main classes of vertebrates.
Prerequisite: Bly. 101.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bly. 106.-Organic Evolution. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hubbell.
An examination of the data upon which the concept of organic evolution is
based, the status of evolution as a principle of biology, the theories to account for
the mechanism of evolution and a review of the history of the evolution idea in
biology.
Prerequisite: Bly. 101.
For other courses in biology see the Bulletin of the College of Arts and
Sciences.
BOTANY

Bty. 101.-General Botany.-2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 cred-
its. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Bty.
102 is earned. Cody, Carroll.
The plant cell; structure and life histories of spore plants.
Laboratory fee: $5.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bty. 102.-General Botany. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 cred-
its. Cody, Carroll.
Structure, life histories, and principles of classification of seed plants.
Laboratory fee: $5.
For other courses in botany and bacteriology see the Bulletin of the Col-
lege of Agriculture.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Bs. 83 or 083.-Office Management. 2 lectures and 4 hours labora-
tory. 2 credits. Scaglione.
Instruction in office organization; office function; duties of office manager; the
modern secretary in relation to office operation; practical use of modern office
appliances; instruction in typing.
Laboratory fee: $15.
Bs. 84 or 084.-Office Management. 2 lectures and 4 hours labora-
tory. 2 credits. Scaglione.
Shorthand. Instruction in principles of practical stenography; filing; office ap-
pliances and their use.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bs. 87 or 087.-Office and Shorthand Practice. 3 hours. 1 credit.
Scaglione.
The practical application of stenography in the modern business office.
Prerequisite: Bs. 84 or equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bs. 101E.-Economic History of England. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dyk-
man, Scaglione, Hurst, Chace.
Survey and interpretation, with brief reference to France and Germany. The
origin and development of economic institutions, the manor, industrial revolution,
commerce, transport, labor, agriculture, finance, effects on social and political de-
velopment and on development in the United States.
Bs. 102E.-Economic History of the United States. 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Dykman, Scaglione, Hurst, Chace.
Interpretative survey of industrial development; consideration of the develop-
ment of industry, agriculture, trade and transportation, labor, banking, finance,
population; the influence of economic development on political and social develop-
ment, and of foreign economic development on the United States.
Bs. 103.-Principles of Economic Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. At-
wood, Hicks, Putnam.
The adjustments to natural environment which man makes to secure a living;
a world-wide survey of the distribution and characteristics of land forms, surface
and ground waters, soils, minerals, climate, natural vegetation, and animal life
with particular reference to the bearing of natural environment on the economic
activities of man.
Bs. 104.-Principles of Economic Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. At-
wood, Hicks, Putnam.
A study of the economic resources of the world; sources and economic importance
of principal commodities; types of basic industries, including processes of production.
localizing factors and relative positions of various geographical territories. Special
attention will be devoted to the Sou.h in general and to Florida in particular.








524 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

Bs. 201E-202E or 0202E-0201E.-Principles of Economics. 3 hours. 6
credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until Bs. 202 is
completed. Eldridge, M. D. Anderson, Dolbeare, Bigham, Hicks.
An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption. Attention is devoted
to the principles governing value and market price, with a brief introduction to
money, banking and credit, industrial combinations, transportation and communica-
tion, labor problems, and economic reform.
Bs. 211-212 or 0212-0211.-Principles of Accounting. 2 hours, and 2
hours laboratory. 6 credits. No credit toward a degree will be
allowed until Bs. 212 is completed. Gray, Ward.
Lectures, problems, and laboratory practice. An introductory study of the
underlying principles of double entry records; basic types of records and reports;
accounting procedure and technique; the outstanding features of partnerships and
corporations; the form and content of the balance sheet and the statement of profit
and loss.
Bs. 401-402.-Business Law. 3 hours. 6 credits. Hurst.
Conveyances and mortgages of real property; sales and mortgages of personal
property; the law of negotiable instruments; partnership.
Bs. 404E.-Social Control of Business Enterprise. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Hurst.
General survey of the field of social control; purposes of social control; formal
and informal types of social-control; control of accounts, prices and capitalization;
government policy toward business, current government regulation; services and
agencies which modern governments undertake to provide for business enterprises.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
For other courses in business administration see the Bulletin of the Col-
lege of Commerce and Journalism.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 4 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 5
credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in
Cy. 102 is earned. Heath in charge.
The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and the preparation and prop-
erties of the common non-metallic elements and their compounds. Students may be-
gin this course either the first or second semester.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 102.-General Chemistry, continued. 4 hours, and 3 hours labora-
tory. 5 credits. Heath in charge.
Devoted largely to a study of the metallic elements and their compounds.
Laboratory fee: $5.
For other courses in chemistry see the Bulletin of the College of Arts and
Sciences.
DRAWING

Dg. 101-102.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours. 2 credits. Walker.
Geometrical problems, lettering and dimensioning.
Laboratory fee: $0.25.
Required of all first-year students in manual arts.

Dg. 104.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours. 1 credit. Walker.
Projection, machine parts and tracing.
Required of all first-year students in manual arts.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Dg. 106.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours. 1 credit. Walker.
Project drawing in connection with wood and sheet metal work.
Laboratory fee: $0.25.
Required of all first-year students in manual arts.
Dg. 201-202.-Machine Drawing. 3 hours. 2 credits. Strong.
Detail and assembly drawings and tracings of machines and machine parts.
Prerequisite: Dg. 101 and Dg. 102.
Required of all second-year students in electrical and mechanical engineering
and in manual arts.
For courses in mechanic arts see "Mechanic Arts", this bulletin, page 535.

ECONOMICS

Courses in economics are scheduled under Business Administration.


EDUCATION

En. 21.-Educational Adjustment. 3 hours. No credit. Crago.
A course designed to meet the needs of students who may for any reason be
failing in their studies.
En. 101 or 0101.-Introduction to Classroom Teaching. 3 hours. 3
credits. Simmons.
For students who have not taken any courses in Education.
En. 102 or 0102.-History and Principles of Education. 3 hours. 3
credits. Simmons.
A study of the historical background of education, and of the fundamental
principles which should guide educational procedure and give appreciation of edu-
cational conditions of today.
En. 103 or 0103.-Health Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. Lancaster.
Conditions and forces that affect the physical and mental vigor of children,
youth and teachers, and relate the school to the health of the home and community;
the teacher's health; sanitation of school buildings; hygienic equipment; common
diseases and physical defects; mental hygiene; play and recreation; community hy-
giene; teaching of health education in elementary and high schools; the Florida
health program.
En. 203 or 0203.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Lancaster.
The nature, growth and development of the child from birth to adolescence
with reference to education will be the main consideration of this course.
En. 207 or 0207.-Educational Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Crago.
Psychology applied to education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc.
En. 243-244.-Methods of Teaching the Common Branches. 3 hours.
6 credits. Buchholz.
A course in methods of teaching the elementary school projects.
En. 303-304.-Methods of Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours.
3 credits. Garris.
The organization of a long-time teaching program: selection of proper equip-
ment, and the arrangement of the classroom and farm shop; organization of all-day,
day-unit, part-time and evening classes; and methods employed in teaching these
various groups.








526 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

En. 306.-Vocational Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. Garris.
The development, function and scope of vocational education; agricultural edu-
cation, home economics education, trade and industrial education, and commercial
education as provided for by the National Vocational Education Act of Congress.
En. 308.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Simmons.
The curriculum as a group of related problems and projects of vital interest to
children. An attempt to formulate a curriculum based on social conditions and
social needs.
En. 311.--Materials and Methods in English. 2 hours. 2 credits.
This course is open to juniors and seniors who have not had En. 301.
En. 312.-Materials and Methods in Foreign Languages. 2 hours. 2
credits.
This course is open to juniors and seniors who have not had En. 301.
En. 317.-Tests and Mealsurements. 3 hours. 3 credits. Crago
An elementary course designed to aid the teacher in the use of tests in the
improvement of instruction and in the solution of school problems. One hour of
laboratory work per week is required. Fee $1.50.
En. 341.-Materials and Methods in History. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Open to juniors and seniors who have not had En. 301.
En. 371.-Materials and Methods in Science. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Crago.
Open to juniors and seniors who have not had En. 301.
En. 372.-Materials and Methods in Mathematics. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Crago.
Open to juniors and seniors who have not had En. 301.
En. 373.-Materials and Methods in Manual Arts. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Open to juniors who are taking Manual Arts curriculum.
En. 401 or 0401.-Administration and Supervision of Village and Con-
solidated Schocls. 3 hours. 3 credits. Simmons.
Problems peculiar to schools in Florida; the supervising principal, qualifications,
relation to superintendent, boards, teachers, pupils, patrons and community; adapt-
ing the school to the child's needs; business practices. Required of seniors.
En. 402.-Admin'stration Practice. 3 hours. 3 credits. Fulk, Sim-
mons, Crago.
An intensive study of the supervision of instruction; visits to schools for the
study of administrative and supervising practice; a survey of one school system.
Prerequisite: En. 401 or administrative experience.
En. 403.-The Problem-Project Method. 3 hours. 3 credits. Norman.
The laws of learning, lesson-planning, thinking, questioning, the problem-project
method, the socialized recitation, democracy in the classroom as a preparation for
democracy in life.
En. 404.-History and Philosophy of Education. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Norman.
Standards in education, past and present; the development and present mean-
ing of the concept of culture, humanism, utility, growth, mental discipline, activity
leading to further activity, education according to nature, the significance of child
life in education. Textbook: Dewey, Democracy and Education.
Required of seniors who expect to be principals.
En. 406.-Elementary School Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Simmons.
The problems that usually confront the elementary school principal will be
stressed in this course.
This course or En. 408 is required of seniors who expect to be principals.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 408.-High School Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits.
This course is designed to study the practical management and administration
of the modern high school. Students may choose between Education 408 and Edu-
cation 406.
En. 409-410.-Supervised Teaching of Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours.
6 credits. Garris.
Under supervision, students observe the teaching and all other duties of the
agricultural instructor at Alachua during the first semester, and during the second
semester each student participates in all of these activities, taking the place of the
regular instructor.
En. 415.-Supervised Teaching in English. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Practice in conducting recitations under close supervision. Lesson plans will
be required for all recitations, and the manner of teaching will be subject to criti-
cism.
En. 425.-Supervised Teaching in Foreign Languages. 2 hours. 2
credits.
En. 435.-Supervised Teaching in History. 2 hours. 2 credits.
En. 455.-Supervised Teaching in the Sciences. 2 hours. 2 credits.
En. 465.-Supervised Teaching in Mathematics. 2 hours. 2 credits.
En. 475.-Supervised Teaching in Health and Physical Education. 5
hours. 3 credits. Salt.
En. 477.-Supervised Teaching in Manual Arts. 2 hours. 2 credits.
En. 501.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Simmons.
An intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary
school curriculum, including the kindergarten; the selection and evaluation of mate-
rial.
En. 503.-Seminar in Educational Measurements. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Crago.
Students will be guided in the investigation of educational problems involving
measurement and diagnostic and remedial measures. The course is primarily for
graduate students with experience in residence or in the field. Fee, $1.50.
En. 504.-The School Survey. 3 hours. 3 credits. Fulk, Crago, Sim-
mons.
En. 505.-The Organization and Administration of Extra-Curricular
Activities in Junior and Senior High Schools. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Not given 1931-32.
This course deals with constructive school policies which have to do with stu-
dent life in the development of initiative, leadership, cooperation, and other desirable
traits of character. Special study is made of the pupil programs existing in Florida
high schools.
En. 506.-Methods of Teaching Farm-Shop Work. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Garris.
The selection and organization of subject matter, the selection of equipment, and
the methods of teaching farm-shop jobs. Offered during the Summer Session and as
demands arise.
En. 507.-Seminar in Educational Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Crago.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems in directed learning, in-
dividual differences and adjustment of problem children. Primarily for graduate
students with experience in residence or in the field.







528 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

En. 508.-Democracy and Education Seminar. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Norman.
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the
individual, society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, edu-
cation its own end.
En. 509.-Problems in the Administration of a School System. 3
hours. 3 credits. Fulk.
Given in summer session.
Problems selected to meet individual needs; each student selects some problem
for special study and presents the results of his study in the form of a thesis.
Prerequisite: En. 401 or equivalent or administrative experience.
En. 510.-The History of Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. Fulk.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-
the teacher, the student, the curriculum, the educational plant, the means of control
and support-back to their beginnings; and to point out present tendencies and pos-
sible developments.
En. 511.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours.
3 credits. Garris.
The selection and organization of subject-matter from the vocational point of
view. Offered when demand arises and during the summer school.
En. 512.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours.
3 credits. Garris.
A continuation of En. 511.
En. 514.-Pre-Adolescent Psychology. 2 hours. 2 credits. Lancaster.
This course will cover the years from nine to thirteen in the life of the child.
The growth, health, habits, mental and moral characteristics of the child in this
stage of its development will be discussed. The course will bring out the meaning
and social importance of adolescent growth and interests.
En. 518.-Special Problems in High School Organization and Admin-
istration. 3 hours. 3 credits. Fulk.
This course will consist of an intensive study of specific problems in organizing
and administering the modern high school. Special reference will be made to Florida.
Prerequisite: En. 408.
En. 519.-High School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits. Fulk.
The problems of the curriculum of the high school in its organization; standards
for the selection of the curriculum; factors to be considered-age of pupils, social
standing, probable school life, probable vocation; traditional subjects and their pos-
sible variations; new subjects and their values, systems of organization, election and
prescription; problems of articulation with the elementary school, the college, the
vocational school, and the community.
En. 521.-Business Administration of a School System. 3 hours. 3
credits. Fulk.
Problems concerned with the procuring and spending of revenue; a thesis on a
special problem.
Prerequisite: Wide administrative experience.
En. 527.-Research and Thesis Writing. 1 hour. No credit. Fulk.
Designed primarily to help graduate students in education in writing their theses.
Required of all students majoring in Education; open to all graduate students.
En. 528.-Supervision. 3 hours. 3 credits.
A graduate course in the supervision of instruction.
En. 541.-Control and Support of Public Education. 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Fulk.
State, federal and other agencies of control and support of education in the
United States; world hi tory background; present tendencies and possible develop-
ments. Saturday class; planned primarily for teachers in service.
Not given 1931-1932.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 542.-The Curriculum and the Educational Plant. 3 hours. 3
credits. Fulk.
Present status of curriculum and plant and their relation in all types of schools,
viewed in the light of their historical development; a world view with emphasis on
present tendencies in the United States.
En. 543.-The Teacher and the Learner. 3 hours. 3 credits. Fulk.
A study of some outstanding teachers, including educational theorists, phil-
osophers, reformers and statesmen and their students; the training and profession-
alizing of the teacher; the spread, compulsion and extension of education and its
relation to world revolutions.
Not given 1931-1932.
En. 547.-Mental Hygiene in Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. Lancaster.
Based upon a thorough knowledge of the nervous system and our biological and
social inheritance, this course will inquire into the causes of mental abnormalities, or
diseases, and will discuss methods of preventing them and also the best ways of
conserving nervous energy of children and strengthening the normal mind.
En. 562.-Guidance and Counseling. 2 credits. Crago.
The course will include a study of guidance and counseling of high school stu-
dents. Educational and vocational guidance and problems of personality adjustment
will be considered.
En. 565-566.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours.
6 credits. Garris.
Designed for graduate students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced
problems. Problems will be selected to suit individual needs and the results of the
study reported in the form of term papers. The class will meet for three hours every
other Saturday during both semesters.
En. 567-568.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours.
6 credits. Garris.
Similar to and offered in alternate years with En. 565 and 566.
En. 569.-Problems in Organizing Part-time and Evening Classes. 6
hours. 3 credits. Garris.
The class will organize and teach a part-time or evening class in vocational
agriculture in the Alachua community. Offered only in the summer session.
En. 603.-Foundations of Method. 3 hours. 3 credits. Norman.
The improvement of college and high school teaching. Open to graduate stu-
dents and members of the University faculty who care to enroll.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

El. 201.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Smith.
Lectures and recitations on fundamental principles of electrical engineering.
Prerequisite: One year of college physics.
Textbook: Benton, Introductory Textbook of Electrical Engineering.
El. 202.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Beck.
The general course covering methods of producing electrical energy, its dis-
tribution and application, direct and alternating current motors and generators,
storage batteries, communication.
Prerequisite: 1 year of college physics, including electricity and magnetism.
Textbook: Benton, Introductory Text on Electrical Engineering.








530 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

El. 203.-Electrical Laboratory. 2 hours laboratory. 1 credit. Smith.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 201.
Laboratory fee: $3.00.
El. 204.-Dynamo Laboratory. 2 hours laboratory. 1 credit. Smith
and Beck.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 202.
Corequisite: El. 202.
Laboratory fee: $3.00.
ENGLISH

Eh. 21.-Minimum Essentials of English. 3 hours. No credit. Rob-
ertson and staff.
For freshmen deficient in preparatory English.
Eh. 101-102.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 hours. 6 credits. Staff.
Required of all freshmen.
Eh. 103-104.-Introduction to Literature. 3 hours. 4 credits. No cred-
it toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 4 credits are
earned. Farr and staff.
A survey of the literature of the Western World from the beginnings to the
Renaissance.
Required of freshmen in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts.
Eh. 201-202.-History of Literature to 1800. 3 hours. 6 credits. No,
credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits
are earned. Farr and staff.
A basic course in the historical development of English literature.
Eh. 301.-Shakespeare and the Drama. 3 hours. 3 credits. Farr.
A study of principal Shakespearean plays, through lectures, essays, and readings.
Eh. 302.-The Drama Before Shakespeare. 3 hours. 3 credits. Farr.
The classical drama, the religious play, the beginnings of secular drama, and
Shakespeare's predecessors.
Eh. 305.-Historical Grammar. 3 hours. 3 credits. Farr.
A course based on Lounsbury's History of the English Language designed to
give the student some knowledge of the historical development of the English
language, with a view especially of giving insight into modern English grammar.
Eh. 306.-English Grammar. 3 hours. 3 credits. Robertson.
A study of mo ern English inflection and syntax. The course is designed to be
of practical value to teachers of English, and is intended especially for students
choosing Group C in the College of Education.
Eh. 355-356.-Business Writing. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit allowed
toward a degree until the entire 6 credits are earned. Mounts.
A practical study of the principal types of business letters and reports.
Required of students in Business Administration.
No credit for this course is given to students in the College of Arts and Sciences.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101 and 102.
For other courses in English see the Bulletin of the College of Arts and
Sciences.
FRENCH

Fh. 21-22.-Elementary French. 3 hcurs. 6 credits. No credit to-
ward a degree will be allowed until the 6 credits are earned. Staff.
Elements of pronunciation and grammar; reading of simple prose.
For beginners.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Fh. 101-102.-Third and Fourth Semester French. 3 hours. 6 credits.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the 6 credits are
earned. Staff.
Second-year college French: Reading of modern texts, grammar review, transla-
tion of simple English into French.
Prerequisite: Fh. 21 and 22 (or the equivalent, such as two years of high school
French).
Fh. 201-202.-Third-Year Reading. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit for
this subject will be given to those who have earned credit in Fh.
207 and 208. Stevens.
A translation course.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or D in Fh. 102. Students who earned a grade of A
or B in Fh. 102 should take Fh. 207 and 208 instead of Fh. 201 and 202.
For other courses in French see the Bulletin of the College of Arts and
Sciences.
GERMAN

Gn. 21-22.-Elementary German. 3 hours. 6 credits. Crow and
Hauptmann.
Gn. 101-102.-Intermediate. 3 hours. 6 credits. Crow.
Gn. 203-204.-Third Year Reading. 3 hours. 6 credits. Crow.
For other courses see the Bulletin of the College of Arts and Sciences.


HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HPI. 101.-Football. 10 hours. 2 credits. First half of first semester.
Cowell.
Lectures, discussions, demonstrations and practice on the field. A combined lec-
ture and practice course given largely on the practice field. Lectures are followed
by actual demonstrations by the instructor, and students then put into practice the
various fundamentals taught them. Course stresses individual play and its relation
to team play. Students are thoroughly drilled in offensive and defensive tactics,
each position on the team being analyzed. Fundamentals, such as falling on the
ball correctly, blocking and tackling, passing and kicking receive special attention.
Stress is placed upon the desirable qualities of a player for the various positions, and
the manner in which men are selected is thoroughly studied.
HPI. 0107.-Personal Hygiene. 2 hours. 2 credits. Salt.
This course presents personal and general hygiene as a means for the improve-
ment of living. It considers the meaning of health in terms of life values, the bio-
logic approach for the study of health, the place of intelligent control in modern
civilization, unscientific and irrational health proposals, ways for improvement of
health and prevention of disease.
HPI. 110.-Applied Anatomy and Physiology. 5 hours. 5 credits. Salt.
This course considers human embryology, the cell, tissues, basis of and essen-
tial facts concerning the structure and the function of the skeletal, muscular, nerv-
ous, respiratory, digestive, reproductive, endocrine, excretory, and circulatory sys-
tems. Particular attention will be given to child growth and development. Applica-
tions to health and physical education will be one of the main objectives of this
course.








532 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


HPI. 111.-Basketball. 10 hours. 2 credits. Second half first semester.
Cowell.
Lectures, discussions and demonstrations on the basketball court. A complete
study is made of the game of basketball from an offensive and defensive point of
view. The play of the individual is stressed. Fundamentals such as passing, drib-
bling, shooting, stops and pivots, are given special emphasis. Analysis is made of
the systems of play used by leading coaches of the country. Students are assigned
positions in actual scrimmage and practice games, the practical work being stressed
as much as the theoretical.
HPI. 114.-Theory and Practice of Natural Activities. 4 hours. 2
credits. Haskell.
This course includes the selection and presentation of some of the activities of
the natural program in physical education.
HPl. 201.-Football. 10 hours. 2 credits. First half first semester.
Higgins.
Discussions, lectures and demonstrations by students on the field. Course covers
the technique of playing the various positions on the team, both offense and defense,
under actual game conditions. Various systems of play employed by celebrated
coaches are discussed and analyzed. A sequence of plays from standard formations
are worked out in signal drills and actual scrimmages. Special emphasis is laid
upon team play.
HiP1. 213-214.-Theory and Practice of Natural Activities. 4 hours. 2
credits each semester. Salt and Stanley.
This is a continuation of HP1. 114 with special emphasis being placed upon
handball, swimming, speedball, tennis, badminton, and others.
HPI. 215-216.-History and Principles of Physical Education. 2 hours.
2 credits each semester. Salt.
A study is made of the basis of physical education in the present organization
of society in America; relations of physical education to education in general; stan-
dards for judging physical education practice; psychological, sociological, and hy-
gienic guides in selection of material, the natural program of physical education,
its objectives and its methods; evaluation of all types of physical education in terms
of educational standards.
HPl. 251.-Boxing. 2 hours. 1 credit.
Scientific boxing. Course includes position of on guard, footwork, how to step
and duck, how to block or guard the different blows. Instruction given in all at-
tacks from the simple left lead at head to counters and cross counters on head or
body. Feints and shifts. Rules governing bouts, definition of a foul blow, judging
of bouts.
HPI. 301.-Football. 2 hours. 1 credit. First half first semester.
Bachman.
A course in advanced theory dealing with the science and generalship of tho
game from the point of view of the coach, the psychology of the game, rules, and
scouting. An intensive study is made of the strength and weaknesses of various
systems of play as they are related to one another.
Prerequisite: Cg. 101 and Cg. 201.
HPI. 303.-Basketball. 2 hours. 1 credit. Last half of first semester.
Cowell.
This course is a continuation of HPI. 111, with special emphasis being laid
upon the game from the standpoint of the high school coach.
HPl. 304.-Track. 4 hours. 2 credits. Higgins.
This course will present the coaching of the standard track and field events.
In addition to technics and procedures for development of individual performers, at-
tention is given to placement of men in a team for effective results, and other as-
pects of team play and cooperation.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


HPI. 311-312.-Organization and Administration of Health and Phy-
sical Education. 4 hours. 4 credits each semester. Salt.
The organization and administration of the school health and physical education
program will be considered and discussed from the standpoint of the teacher, ad-
ministrator, and the aims of general education.
Prerequisite: HPI. 215-216.
HPI. 313-314.-Theory and Practice of Natural Activities Applied. 4
hours. 2 credits each semester. Salt and Stanley.
A consideration of teaching techniques and testing devices from the viewpoint of
the teacher with regard to the activities learned in previous courses. Opportunity
for practice in the various skills will also constitute a major portion of the course.
Prerequisite: HPI. 213-214, or consent of instructor.
HPI. 344.-Baseball. 4 hours. 2 credits. Cowell.
Lectures, discussions, and demonstrations on the practice field. A complete dis-
cussion of the rules and a study of the fundamentals as applied to each department
of the game are offered. Practical demonstrations in the theory of pitching, with
special emphasis on delivery and a study of batters' weaknesses, are frequent. Bat-
ting, base-running, and the art of playing each position under actual game condi-
tions are stressed. Individual and team play are correlated on the field so that a
student becomes acquainted with the fundamentals of the game as applied to tech-
nique and strategy.
HPI. 351.-Organization and Administration of the Intramural Pro-
gram. 2 hours. 2 credits. Holsinger.
This course will consider the aims and objectives underlying the subject of
intra-scholastic and intra-collegiate athletics. Various types, methods, plans, ar-
rangements and officiating techniques will be discussed in the light of contemporary
practice and from the viewpoint of the school director.
HPI. 353.-Practice in Conducting the Intramural Program. 3 hours.
1 credit. Holsinger.
A laboratory course in which the student is assigned weekly duties by the in-
structor varying all the way from work in the intramural office itself to officiat-
ing in regularly scheduled games of the department.
Corequisite: HPI. 351, or consent of the instructor.

HISTORY

The courses in American history and in American government and Con-
stitutional law are made possible by the Chair of Americanism and Southern
History, partly endowed by the American Legion, Department of Florida.
Hy. 101.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 hours. 3 credits. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Hy. 102 is
earned. Leake and staff.
A course in the history of Western Europe from 476 to the Crusades.
Required of all freshmen in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts.
Hy. 102.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 hours. 3 credits. Leake
and staff.
A continuation of Hy. 101 covering the period from the Crusades to the Renais-
sance and Reformation.
Hy. 101 and 102 are prerequisites for all higher courses in history.
Required of all freshmen in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts.
For other courses in History see the Bulletin of the College of Arts and









534 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

LATIN

Ln. 101.-Ovid. 3 hours. 3 credits. No credit toward a degree will
be allowed until credit is earned in Ln. 102. Anderson.
Selections; review of grammar; prose composition; prosody.
Ln. 102.-Cicero or Livy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.
Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia or selections from Livy.
Ln. 201.-Pliny. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.
Selections from Pliny's letters.
Ln. 202.-Horace. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.
Selections from the Satires, Epistles, Odes and Epodes, with study of the Hora-
tian metres.
Ln. 203-204.-Grammar and Prose Composition. 2 hours. 4 credits.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 4 cred-
its are earned. Anderson.
An intermediate course in prose composition in connection with a systematic
study of Latin grammar.
Not offered in 1931-32.

MATHEMATICS

Ms. 85 or 085.-Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms. 3 hours. 3
credits. Staff.
Ms. 101 or 0101.-College Algebra. 3 hours. 3 credits. Simpson and
staff.
Prerequisite: Ms. 85.
Ms. 102 or 0102.-Plane Analytic Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Simpson and staff.
The algebraic study of the figures of geometry and the plane sections of a cone.
Systems and transformation of coordinates. Textbook: Curtis and Moulton, Analytic
Geometry.
Prerequisite: Ms. 101.
Ms. 251-252.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 3 hours. 3 credits
each semester. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until
the entire 6 credits have been earned.
The study of a process known as differentiation, which, with its numerous and
widely different applications, constitutes one of the most important practical and
theoretical fields of mathematics. Integration, the inverse operation of differentia-
tion, is used in the calculation of areas, volumes, moments of inertia, and many other
problems. Textbook: March and Wolff, Calculus.
Prerequisites: Ms. 102 or Ms. 152.
Ms. 331.-College Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Kokomoor.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Kokomoor.
A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special
emphasis upon the changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching.
No specific text is followed, but numerous works are used as references.
For other courses in mathematics see the Bulletin of the College of Arts
and Sciences.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


535


MECHANIC ARTS

Mc. 107-108.-Woodworking. 1 hour, 6 hours shop. 6 credits. Eshle-
man.
Instruction and practice in the care and use of hand tools, and working wood.
Joinery. Wooden machine parts and machine work. Shop fee: $3.00.
Mc. 207-208.-Carpentry. 1 hour and 6 hours shop. 6 credits. Strong
and staff.
Prerequisite: Me. 107-108.
Shop fee: $3.00.
Required of second-year students in Mechanic Arts curriculum.
Mc. 209-210.-Metal Work. 1 hour and 3 hours shop. 4 credits. Strong
and staff.
Sheet metal work.
Prerequisite: Me. 107-108.
Shop fee: $3.00.
Mc. 211.-Forge Shop. 1 hour and 4 hours shop. 2 credits. Strong
and Janes.
Study and practice of hand and machine forging, welding and heat, treating iron
with special reference to specifications, and forging iron and steel machine-parts.
Class-room and shop. A textbook is used.
Shop fee: $3.00.
Mc. 212.-Foundry. 1 hour and 2 hours shop. 1 credit. Janes.
Work in moulding, core making, melting and pouring metal, using standard
foundry equipment.
Shop fee: $3.00.
Mc. 301.-Machine Shop. 1 hour and 3 hours shop. 2 credits. Strong.
Study and practice of the methods of finishing and assembling machine parts.
Classroom and shop. A text book is used.
Prerequisite: Junior classification.
Shop fee: $5.00.
Mc. 304.-Patternmaking. 1 hour and 3 hours drawing. 2 credits.
Strong.
Study and practice of the principles underlying the design and construction of
patterns and core boxes for machine parts and other articles of cast metal. Class
room and shop. A text book is used.
Prerequisites: Me. 101 and Me. 202.
Shop fee: $3.00.
Mc. 307-308.-Cabinetwork. 1 hour and 6 hours shop. 6 credits.
Strong and staff.
Prerequisite: Me. 207-208.
Shop fee: $3.00.
Mc. 405-406.-Cabinetwork. 1 hour and 6 hours shop. 6 credits. Strong
and staff.
Advanced cabinetwork, including furniture.
Prerequisite: Mc. 305-306.
Shop fee: $3.00.






536 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

MILITARY SCIENCE

My. 103-104.-Freshman Field Artillery. Compulsory. 2 hours theory
and 3 hours practice. 4 credits. Captains Hepner and Donnovin.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: organization, hygiene and first
aid, elementary gunnery, explosives, ammunition and fuzes, military courtesy and
discipline, drill and command. (b) Practical: dismounted drill, ceremonies, pistol
instruction, individual equipment, materiel, 75 mm. gun drill, gunners' examination.
Text: Wilson Field Artillery Manual, Vol. I.
My. 203-204.-Sophomore Field Artillery. Compulsory. 2 hours the-
ory and 3 hours practice. 4 credits. Captain Barco.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: care of animals, map reading
and sketching, fire control instruments, communications. (b) Practical: dismounted
drill, ceremonies, equitation, driving, mounted drill, reconnaissance, selection and
occupation of position. Text: Wilson Field Artillery Manual, Vol. I.
Prerequisite: My. 103 and 104.
For other courses in military science see the Bulletin of the College of Arts
and Sciences.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PI. 101-102.--Gymnastics. 2 hours. 1 credit. Haskell and staff.
Instruction in free exercises for general development and muscular coordination.
Elementary work on apparatus, emphasizing form, approach, and execution.
Instruction and play in tennis, football, basketball, playground ball, track, and
baseball.
PHYSICS

Ps. 111-112.-Elementary Theory of Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Electri-
city and Light. 3 hours. 6 credits. Credit will be given for the
first semester without the second, if the student so desires; how-
ever, the second semester cannot be taken without the first. Wil-
liamson in charge.
A college course designed to meet the needs of the general student. Required of
Manual Arts students.
Ps. 115-116.-Elementary Laboratory Physics. 1 hour demonstration
and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits. Credit will be given for the
first semester without the second, if the student so desires; how-
ever, the second semester cannot be taken without the first. Bless
in charge.
A series of laboratory experiments in general physics designed to supplement
Ps. 111-112 and should be taken by all students electing those courses.
Required of Manual Arts students.
Laboratory fee: $2.25 each semester.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


POLITICAL SCIENCE

Pel. 101.-American Government and Politics. 3 hours. 3 credits. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Pel. 102 is
earned. Leake and staff.
A study of the structure and functions of our American, national, state, local,
and municipal governments.
Pel. 102.-State and Municipal Government. 3 hours. 3 credits. Leake
and staff.
A study of state, county, and municipal government.
Pel. 101 and 102 prerequisite for all other courses in political science.
For other courses in political science see the Bulletin of the College of
Arts and Sciences.
PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 201.-General Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hinckley, Wil-
liams.
Facts and theories current in general psychological discussion-the sensations,
sense organs, and functions of the brain; the higher mental processes of attention,
perception, memory, emotion, volition and the self.
For oaher courses in psychology see the Bulletin of the College of Arts and
Sciences.
SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 102.-Introduction to Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Beatty.
An approach to the art of living together in society by a study of the develop-
ment of customs, morals and institutions. Brief consideration of some of the social
problems growing out of industrial development, immigration, rural migration and
depletion and racial contacts.
Required of freshmen in journalism.
Sy. 111-112.-Introduction to Social Studies. 3 hours. 6 credits.
An approach to the social sciences through biology and psychology; early man;
landmarks in the history of civilization ; problems of American citizenship.
Required of all freshmen in the College of Education.
Sy. 332.-Public Health. 2 hours. 2 credits. Bristol.
Sy. 441.-Principles of Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Bristol.
Prerequisite: By. 102 or Sy. 111, or special consent of instructor.
For other courses in sociology see thie Bulletin of the College of Arts and
shence.os.
SPANISH

Sh. 21-22.-Elementary. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit toward a de-
gree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are earned. Staff.
Sh. 101-102.-Intermediate. 3 hours. 6 credits. Staff.
Second year college Spanish.
Sh. 203-204.-Third Year Reading. 3 hours. 6 credits. Hathaway.
For other courses in Spanish see the Bulletin of the College of Arts and
Sciences.







538 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1931-32
First Semester
1931
September 14, 15, Monday, Tuesday......Entrance examinations.
September 16, Wednesday 11:00 a.m.....1931-32 session begins.
September 16-22, Wednesday-Tuesday..Freshman Week.
September 21, 22, Monday, Tuesday......Registration of upperclassmen.
September 23, Wednesday......................Classes for 1931-32 session begin; late
registration fee $5.
September 30, Wednesday..................... Last day for changing course without
paying the $2 fee.
October 7, Wednesday ..............................Last day for registration for the first
semester 1931-32.
November 11, Wednesday......................Armistice Day; special exercises but
classes are not suspended.
November 26, Thursday..............Thanksgiving Day, a holiday.
December 19, Saturday 12:00 noon........Christmas recess begins.
1932
January 4, Monday 8:00 a.m.................Christmas recess ends.
January 25, Monday 8:00 a.m............. Final examinations for the first semes-
ter begin.
January 31, Sunday 8:00 p.m.................Baccalaureate Sermon.
February 3, Wednesday............................ Inter-semester Day, a holiday.
Second Semester
February 4, 5, Thursday, Friday............Registration for second semester; all
students whose names begin with "A"
through "M" register on Thursday; all
others on Friday.
February 6, Saturday 8:00 a.m...............Classes for second semester begin:
change of course fee, $2; late registra-
tion fee, $5.
February 11, Thursday ..................... Last day for registration for second
semester.
March 23, Wednesday 5:00 p.m.............Spring recess begins.
March 28, Monday 8:00 a m....... ..... Spring recess ends.
May 26, Thursday 8:00 a.m...................Final examinations begin.
June 4-6, Saturday to Monday..............Commencement Exercises.

Entrance Examinations
Entrance examinations for admission to the various colleges of the Univer
sity will be conducted for students whose credits do not meet the requirements.
Candidates wishing to take any of these examinations should notify the
Registrar in writing, not later than September 1, January 15, June 1, or
June 20.
For further information concerning these examinations see under "Admis-
sion by Examination", Bulletin of General Information, page 133.




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