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Title: University record
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Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: July 1, 1931
Copyright Date: 1932
Frequency: quarterly
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Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
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 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
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Volume ID: VID00435
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oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 459
        Page 460
    Table of Contents
        Page 461
        Page 462
    Faculty
        Page 463
        Page 464
    General information
        Page 465
        Page 466
        Page 467
        Page 468
        Page 469
        Page 470
    Degrees and requirements of the different curricula
        Page 471
        Page 472
        Page 473
        Page 474
        Page 475
        Page 476
    Departments of instruction
        Page 477
        Page 478
        Page 479
        Page 480
        Page 481
        Page 482
        Page 483
        Page 484
        Page 485
        Page 486
        Page 487
        Page 488
        Page 489
        Page 490
        Page 491
        Page 492
        Page 493
        Page 494
    University calendar, 1931-32
        Page 495
        Page 496
Full Text





The University Record

of the


University of Florida


Bulletin of the

College of Engineering

With Announcements for the
Year 1931-32


Vol. XXVI, Series I


No. 12


July 1, 1931


Published Semi-monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.


.4





















CONTENTS


F a c u lty ........................................................................................ ......... ................. 4 6 3

G general Inform action ................................................................................................ 465

Degrees and Requirements of the Different Curricula .. ............................. 471

C urriculum for Freshm en .................................. ................ ............ .......... 471

Curriculum for Chemical Engineering .............. ......... ....................... 472

Curriculum for Civil Engineering ........................... .. .................... 473

Curriculum for Electrical Engineering ........................... ....................... 474

Curriculum for Mechanical Engineering ....................... ....................... 475

Curriculum for the Engineering Pre-Business Course ............................ 476

D epartm ents of Instruction ... ................................................. .. .................... ... 477

U university C calendar ..................................... .............-......-.. ............. ...- ..- 495







THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
FACULTY

ADMINISTRATION

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., President
JAMES MARION FARR, M.A., Ph.D., Vice-President, Professor of English Lan-
guage and Literature
PERCY LAWRENCE REED, C.E., M.S., Acting Dean of the College of Engineering,
and Professor of Civil Engineering
AIRS. JEANNETTE B. JERNIGAN, Secretary to the Dean

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, M.S., D.Sc. (Princeton), Professor of Chemical
Engineering
WOODEN C. TUCKER, JR., M.S., Fellow

CIVIL ENGINEERING

PERCY LAWRENCE REED, C.E., M.S., Head of the Department and Professor
of Civil Engineering
CHARLES CARROLL BROWN, C.E., M.A., Acting Associate Professor of Civil
Engineering
THOMAS MARVEL LOWE, S.B., M.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering
WILLIAM LINCOLN SAWYER, B.S., Instructor in Civil Engineering

JOHN A. C. BOGART, B.S.C.E., Graduate Assistant

DRAWING AND MECHANIC ARTS

ALBERT J. STRONG, B.S.M.E., Head of the Department and Professor of Draw-
ing and Mechanic Arts
SILAS KENDRICK ESHLEMAN, JR., M.E., M.S., Assistant Professor of Drawing
and Mechanic Arts
EDGAR SMITH WALKER, Co'onel, U. S. Army (Retired), Instruc:or in Drawing
CHESTER HOWELL JANES, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Drawing and Mechanic Arts


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

JOSEPH WEIL, B.S.E.E., M.S., Head of the Department and Professor of Elec-
trical Engineering, and Head of Engineering Division, State Radio Station
WRUF
EDWARD FRANK SMITH, E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

Dow GARY BECK (part time), Instructor in Electrical Engineering





464 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

MELVIN PRICE, E.E., M.A., Head of the Department and Professor of Mechan-
ical Engineering
PHILIP OBORNE YEATON, B.S., S.B., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi-
neering
WILLIAM WARRICK FINEREN, M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engi-
neering
ALFRED EDGAR WILSON, Student Assistant


OTHER DEPARTMENTS

For faculties in other departments offering courses required in the various
curricula of the College of Engineering, see bulletins of College of Arts and
Sciences, College of Commerce and Journalism, and College of Agricult.ire.







GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL INFORMATION

HISTORY

When the University was established in 1905 it was divided into five de-
partments, or schools, and in one of these departments, the Technological
School, courses were offered in civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering.
These were four-year courses and led to the Bachelor of Science degrees in
the three branches of engineering. In 1909 this school became the College
of Engineering, with its own dean and faculty. The Department of Chemical
Engineering was established at the beginning of the collegiate year 1917-1918.
The curricula have been changed from time to time, and at present the courses
of instruction are similar to those of other American engineering schools of
college grade.
AIMS

There is a great demand for engineering graduates to fill positions, not
only in engineering, but also in related occupations, and it is the aim of the
College of Engineering to prepare its students to supply this demand by so
selecting its courses and giving them to the student that he may become thor-
oughly familiar with the fundamental principles of the selected courses. Schol-
astic training alone cannot make a competent engineer, and it is realized that
a college course must be supplemented by years of experience if the engineer-
ing graduate is to become successful in his chosen field. So far as possible,
the adaptation of theory to practice is stressed in the routine work of the
laboratory, drawing-room and field in order to impart such a knowledge of
the usual professional practice as shall make the student useful upon gradu-
ation in any position to which he may be called.
It sometimes happens that a man can become a competent engineer thru
practical experience and home study, without any systematic scientific educa-
tion, but such cases are rare; and engineers of this kind are likely to be
successful only in imitating the work of others, and to find themselves helpless
when they face new problems, since they lack an understanding of funda-
mental principles. The greater number of successful engineers have been
thru systematic courses of study in engineering colleges. Without this train-
ing a man may succeed to a certain point, but statistics concerning positions
and salaries show that in most cases he is hopelessly handicapped if he at-
tempts to reach the higher ranks of his profession.

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT

Benton Engineering Hall, 73' x 122', built of brick and tile, three stories
high, provides offices and class facilities for the departments of civil engineer-
ing, physics, and military science, also laboratories for civil engineering,
electrical engineering and physics. One wing, 40' x 163', one story high,
is used for wood shop, blacksmith shop, forge and foundry, a wing, 25' x 40',
one story high, for the machine shop, and another wing, 25' x 50', for testing
laboratory and equipment.
The new Mechanical Engineering Building, brick and concrete, three







466 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

stories high, the portion completed being 42' x 118' with a wing 32' x 50',
provides the offices of the Dean, and offices, class rooms and drawing-rooms
for the departments of Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and
Drawing and Mechanic Arts. The new mechanical laboratory is also located
in this building.
The general equipment for the Department of Chemical Engineering is
adequate for the usual undergraduate courses in industrial chemistry and
technical analysis. The Department also has equipment for metallurgy. The
chemical engineering department is administered by the Department of Chem-
istry, which is well equipped for graduate courses.
The Department of Civil Engineering has the usual equipment for courses
in highways, hydraulics, municipal sanitation, railroads, surveying, and test-
ing. Its new 400,000 lbs. Riehle testing machine is one of the largest in the
Southeast.
The Department of Electrical Engineering has a dynamo laboratory equip-
ped with standard electrical machinery of various kinds, a communication
laboratory for conducting classes in telephony, telegraphy, and radio engineer-
ing. and a measurements laboratory with the necessary instruments for te,.t-
ing equipment. The state radio station WRUF, located on the University
campus, contains a 5000 W. transmitter of the latest design, and affords s:u-
dents interested in radio engineering an opportunity to become familiar with
the construction and operation of a modern broadcasting station.
In the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the steam and aeronautics
laboratory is equipped to make gasoline and oil engine tests, heat exchange
and steam experiments. An ice and cold storage plant of two tons capacity,
together with an 80 h. p. Diesel engine, serve for complete refrigeration plart
tests. Tests on engines, pumps, and motors are made with standard size equip-
ment. The metallography laboratory has a polishing machine, metallographic
microscope with camera, and a Brinell hardness tester.
In the Department of Drawing and Mechanic Arts the various shops are
equipped with standard machines and tools for instruction in forge, foundry,
patternmaking, and machine shop. A recent addition is a complete arc-welding
outfit. Equipment for testing molding-sand, used for the first time this year,
is a start toward teaching industrial methods of testing foundry and forge
shop products.
FEES

For information regarding fees and other expenses the reader is referred tc
pages 142 to 146 inclusive, of the Bulletin of General Information. There are no
special fees assessed students in the College of Engineering other than for lab.
oratory subjects as shown in the section entitled, "Departments of Instruction".
pages 477 to 494 inclusive, in this bulletin.

FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS

There are three fellowships of $500 per year offered in engineering, one
each in chemical, civil, and mechanical engineering. Those who receive these
fellowships must devote half time as graduate assistants in the departments








GENERAL INFORMATION


concerned. There are no special scholarships for students in the College of
Engineering, and for information concerning fellowships, scholarships, loans,
prizes, and medals, see pages 41 to 46 inclusive, of the Bulletin of Generah
Information, or write to the Dean of Students, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida.
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Fifteen high school units are required for entrance to the College of Engi-
neering.
In addition to the seven units required of all candidates for admission
(three in English, one in algebra, one in plane geometry, one in history and
one in science) two additional units are required. These additional units are
one unit in advanced algebra, one half unit in solid geometry, and one half
in trigonometry. The required units are as follows:

E n g lish ...... .... .............................................. 3
H history ........................ ..................... ................ 1
A lgebra ...... ........ ..... ................. 2
P lane G eom etry 1.............. ........ .................. 1
Solid Geom etry .... .................................. ..........
T rigonom etry ......-.....------.- .. ..... .- ...... ...... 1-
Science ................. ....-- ...-- ... ....................... 1
Foreign Language .................... ....................... 2
Approved electives . .. -- ............. 4

15

The language requirement may be waived by additional history or science
credits.
A list of subjects from which the electives may be chosen, and further in-
formation concerning admission, may be found on pages 133 to 141 of the Bulle-
tin of General Information. Physics has been required for the science unit, and
is still preferred, but not required.
Qualifying Examinations. Qualifying examinations in English, mathe-
matics, and science are given all candidates for admission to freshmen engi-
neering classes. These are in the nature of intelligence tests. Pending the
provision of enlarged facilities for instruction, the right is reserved to limit
the number of freshmen admitted to the College of Engineering to such num-
ber as can be properly accommodated with the present facilities. This quali-
fying examination must be passed before a student will be registered in this
course. Students having successfully completed a year's course in another
college will be exempt from this examination.

SPECIAL STUDENTS

Students who wish to take special courses may be allowed to take those
classes for which they are prepared, but the number of such students in the
College is restricted to a small percent of the total enrollment. Special courses
do not lead to a degree. Persons twenty-one or more years of age who cannot
satisfy the entrance requirements but who give evidence that they will profit







468 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

by the courses they may take, may under exceptional circumstances be admitted
as "adult specials". The College of Engineering does not encourage regisLra-
tion of special students.

ADVANCED STANDING

Statements concerning advanced standing and classification may be found
on pages 138 and 139, Bulletin of General Information.

RELATION TO THE SUMMER SESSION

There have been no regular courses given in the College of Engineering
during the Summer Session, but courses may be given in the near futLre,
as many requests have been made for such courses.

CORRESPONDENCE STUDIES

There are a few regular engineering subjects being given thru the General
Extension Division when it seems advisable to do so.

REGISTRATION

No student will be registered until he has had his principal file with bhe
Registrar of the University a certified copy of his high school record, show-
ing that the candidate has the required units for admission, or until the stu-
dent has otherwise fulfilled all requirement's for admission. Students present-
ing credit for advanced standing will not be registered until they file a tran-
script from the university they last attended. For further information on reg-
istration see Bulletin of General Information.

THE GRADING SYSTEM

Grades are recorded by means of letters.
Grade A indicates work of exceptionally high quality.
Grade B indicates work considerably above the average, but not of sulfi-
ciently high quality to justify a grade of A.
Grade C indicates work of average quality.
Grade D indicates work below the average quality but sufficiently good
to merit credit in the course.
Grade E denotes unconditional failure in the course.
Grade I denotes work of passing quality but insufficient quantity.
Grade R denotes conditional failure and may be converted into a grade
of D provided the student passes a reexamination with a grade at least as
high as C. The grade R is given to freshmen and sophomores only. Juniors
and seniors are not entitled to a grade of R or to the reexamination privilege.
Grade X denotes that the student was absent from the final examination,
the reason for the absence meeting with the approval of the instructor in
charge of the course.







GENERAL INFORMATION


HONOR POINTS

In order to give recognition to work of high quality, honor points are dis-
tributed as follows:
3 honor points are given for every semester credit hour which the stu-
dent passes with a grade of A.
2 honor points are given to the student for every semester credit hour he
passes with a grade of B.
1 honor point is given to the student for every semester credit hour which
he passes with a grade of C.
No honor points are given for other grades.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

Students desiring to earn degrees in the College of Engineering must com-
plete the courses outlined in the curricula of the different departments and
must do work of such quality that the total number of honor points which
they have earned in all of their courses will equal the total number of semester
credit hours required for the degree.

RULES AND REGULATIONS

A few of the more important items have been stated in this bulletin. The
complete rules and regulations of the University are published in a separate
bulletin entitled, By-Laws of the University of Florida, copies of which are dis-
tributed to all who register at the University. Each student is held respon-
sible for the observance of the rules and regulations of the University in so far
as they affect him.
EMPLOYMENT FOR GRADUATES

Contacts are maintained with the leading concerns of the country which are
employing college graduates, and many of these companies send representatives
to the University each year to interview the senior students who are candi-
da:es for degrees. The College of Engineering has been very fortunate in
the matter of securing employment for its graduates.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Benton Engineering Society.-The meetings of this society are devoted to
addresses or discussions on technical subjects, or on affairs of general inter-
est. This society also serves as the medium thru which the student body of
the College of Engineering takes part in debates and athletic contests with
other colleges of the University, and in other student enterprises. Every stu-
dent registered in the College of Engineering is eligible to membership and
is expected to join.
Student Branch of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers.-Month-
ly meetings are held for the discussion of topics in electrical science and its
applications. Membership is open to seniors, juniors, and sophomores in the
electrical engineering course, under rules established by the American Insti-





470 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

tute. Members receive the Journal of the American Institute of Electrical
Engineers, and enjoy other privileges of that national organization.
Student Chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers.-Monthly
meetings are held. Membership is open to seniors, juniors, and sophomores
in civil engineering, under rules established by the American Society of Civil
Engineers. Members receive the monthly Journal of that society, and enjoy
other privileges.
Student Branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.-Month-
ly meetings are held. Under rules established by the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers, membership is open to students who expect to go into
the field of mechanical engineering. Members receive the Journal of the
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and enjoy other privileges of that
society.
Society of Chemical Engineers.-Membership is open to students specializ-
ing in chemical engineering. Meetings are held at regular intervals, at w ich
time practical applications of chemical engineering principles are discussed.
All of these student organizations have regular programs, and during the
year many prominent engineers address the students on important engineer-
ing subjects.
Sigma Tau.-Sigma Tau is a national honorary engineering fraternity.
Members are chosen by the fraternity from regular senior and junior students
in the College of Engineering who rank in the first third of the class and
show marked qualities both social and technical.
Phi Kappa Phi.-Phi Kappa Phi is a national honorary fraternity which
chooses its members from all the different colleges on the campus. The Society
elec:s annually the highest ten percent of the regular senior class in each
college.








DEGREES AND REQUIREMENTS OF CURRICULA


DEGREES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THE DIFFERENT CURRICULA

The College of Engineering offers professional four-year courses of study in
the four fields described below. The work of the freshman year is the same
for all engineering students, so that each student has the chance to choose
the branch of engineering he wishes to follow before the beginning of his
sophomore year.
DEGREES

The degrees given for the completion of the regular four-year courses of
study are Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, Bachelor of Science
in Civil Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, and Bach-
elor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.
The degree of Civil Engineer (C.E.), Electrical Engineer (E.E.), Mechan-
ical Engineer (M.E.), or of Chemical Engineer (Ch.E.) may be granted to
a graduate of the College of Engineering upon recommendation of the head
of the department in which it is sought, and with the concurrence of the fac-
ulty of the College, provided the candidate submits evidence that he has had
at least four years of satisfactory practical engineering experience, of which
two years must he responsible experience after graduation. By responsible
experience is meant work in which the candidate must use his own initiative,
as distinguished from the mere rendering of routine assistance. To obtain one
of these degrees, application should be made to the Dean of the College not
later than March 1 preceding the commencement at which the degree may be
awarded.
The four departments in the College of Engineering, under the jurisdiction
of the Graduate School of the University, offer graduate courses leading to a
degree of Master of Science in Engineering. It is recommended that the re-
quiremenis cover a period of two years, but the work may be completed in one
regular academic year. For more information concerning graduate study, write
to the Dean of the Graduate School, University of Florida.

CURRICULA REQUIEM CENTS

Curriculum for the Freshman Year for all Engineering Students

First Semester Second Semester

Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Cy. 101-General Chemistry ....... .... 5 Cy. 102-General Chemistry ............ 5
Dg. 101-Mechanical Drawing _..... 1 Dg. 104-Mechanical Drawing ........... 1
Eh. 101-Rhetoric and Composition 3 Eh. 102-Rhetoric and Composition 3
Pl. 101- Gym nastics ............................ 1 Pl. 102- Gym nastics ................................ 1
Ms. 151-Mathematical Analysis ........ 3 Ms. 152-Mathematical Analysis ........ 3
M y. 103- Artillery ......................... ...... 2 M y. 104- Artillery .................................. 2
Cl. 101- Surveying .................... 2 ( Mc. 0101- W oodworking ................ 1I
Dg. 0102-Mechanical Drawing.... 1 3 MI. 102-Descriptive Geometry .... 2 3
or or
Me. 101- Woodworking .... .. 1 | Cl. 0101- Surveying ........................ 2
MI. 0102-Descriptive Geometry. 2 j 3 Dg. 102-Mechanical Drawing ... 1 j 3
1 1is






472 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


CURRICULUM FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

The courses in chemical engineering are designed to familiarize the stu-
dent with the efficient construction and economic operation of chemical plants.
The problems involved in the commercial manufacture of organic and inor-
ganic chemicals, and the methods employed to solve these problems, are con-
sidered in detail.


First Semester


Second Semester


Names of Courses


Credits Names of Courses


Credits


Sophomore Year
Cy. 0232-Physical Chemistry ............ 4 Cy. 0203-Qualitative Analysis .
Gn. or Fh.-German or French .......... 3 Gn. or Fh.-German or French .....
Ms. 253-Differential and Integral Ms. 254-Differential and Integral
Calculus ......... ............... ..........--------- 5 Calculus ................. ....................
My. 203-Artillery ............................... 2 My. 204-Artillery .. ................
Ps. 105-General Physics .................... 3 Ps. 106-General Physics .....................
Ps. 107-Physics Laboratory ............ 2 Ps. 108-Physics Laboratory ...............
19

Junior Year


Cy. 305-Quantitative Analysis ........ 5
Cy. 361-Organic Chemistry ............... 5
Es. 201-Economics, or Approved
E lective ............................................. 3
MI. 315-Applied Mechanics ................ 5



18

Senior Y

Cl. 405-Contracts and Specifications 2
CI. 407- Hydraulics ............................... 3
Cy. 335-Unit Processes ........................ 3
Cy. 343-Industrial Chemistry ........... 3
Cy. 351- Metallurgy ............................. 3
Cy. 415-Fuels Laboratory ................. 2


Cy. 362-Organic Chemistry .............. 5
Es. 0201-Economics, or Approved
Elective ........................................... 3
M e. 202- Foundry .................................... 1
Ml. 316-Applied Mechanics ................ 5
El. 0307-Elements of Electrical En-
gineering ........................................ 3
El. 0309-Electrical Laboratory ........ 1

18

ear

Cy. 422-Advanced Physical Chem-
istry ................................................... 4
Cy. 444-Industrial Laboratory ........ 3
Cy. 446-Industrial Chemistry ............ 3
Ml. 310-Thermodynamics .................... 3
MI. 410-Human Engineering ............ 2
Approved Elective ........................... ......... 3


The class of 1932 will take El. 202-204, 0-3, in place of approved elective, 0-3,
in the senior year.
The class of 1933 will take Ms. 351-352, 2-2, and Cy. 203, 4-0, in place of El.
0307-0309, 0-4, Me. 202, 0-1 and approved elective 0-3 in the junior year. Cy. 0305
will be substituted for Cy. 305, and Economics, Es. 201, will be taken during the
first semester.
The class of 1934 will take Cy. 101-110, 5-4, in place of Ps. 105-108, 5-5, and will
substitute approved elective, 3-0, for Cy. 0232, 4-0, in the sophomore year.
Cy. 0232, 4-0, will be substituted for approved elective, 3-0, in the junior yesr.






CURRICULUM FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING


CURRICULUM FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING

The courses in civil engineering are designed to give the student a com-
prehensive grasp of the principles underlying the practice of civil engineering,
so that upon graduation he will be prepared to fill such positions as are usu-
ally allotted to young engineers in general engineering, or in the special
branches such as highway, railroad, hydraulic, sanitary, structural, and topo-
graphical engineering.


First Semester

Names of Courses


Second Semester


Credits Names of Courses


Sophomore Year


Cl. 201- Surveying ............................... 4
Cl. 203-Engineering Exposition ........ 1
Ml. 209-Descriptive Geometry ............ 1
Ms. 253-Differential and Integral
Calculus .................- .... ....- 5
M y. 203- Artillery ............. ................ 2
Ps. 105-General Physics ................ 3
Ps. 107-Physics Laboratory ................ 2


Cl. 202- Surveying ..................................
Cl. 206-Highway Construction .
M e. 204- M etal Shop ..............................
Ms. 254-Differential and Integral
C alculus ...........................................
My. 204-Artillery .... ............. ....
Ps. 106-General Physics ......................
Ps. 108-Physics Laboratory ............


Junior Year


Cl. 301-Railway and Highway Sur-
veying ................-.. ..... ...---..... ..----- 4
El. 307-Elements of Electrical En-
gineering ........................................ 3
El. 309-Electrical Laboratory ......... 1
Gy. 201-Physical Geology .................... 3
Ml. 315-Applied Mechanics ....- ...... 5
Ml. 319-Materials of Engineering._.. 2
18


Cl. 302-Railway Construction ............
Cl. 306-Theory of Structures ...........
Cl. 310-Testing Laboratory ................
Cl. 312-Engineering Exposition .
Cy. 0215-Water and Sewage ............
Es. 0201-Principles of Economics ..
Ml. 316-Applied Mechanics ................


Senior Year


Bey. 0308-Sanitary Laboratory Prac-
tice ............................................... ..... 3
Cl. 403-Structural Design .................. 4
Cl. 405-Contracts and Specifications 2
Cl. 407- Hydraulics ............................. 3
Cl. 409-Water and Sewerage .......... 3
Approved Elective ... ....................... 3

18


Cl. 404- Structural Design .................... 3
Cl. 408-Hydraulic Engineering ........ 2
Cl. 410-Water and Sewerage ............ 3
Cl. 412- Concrete Design ..................... 3
MI. 410-Human Engineering ............ 2
Approved Electives -.......... .....-.....-..- 5

18


The class of 1934 will take Cy. 101 and 102, 5-5, instead of Ps. 105, 106, 107 and
108, 5-5; take Ps. 209, 3-0; omit Ml. 209, 1-0; take Cl. 201-202, 3-4 instead of 4-3.
The class of 1933 will omit El. 307 and 309, 4-0; take Cl. 0206, 2-0; take Cl.
203, 1-0; take Ms. 351 and 352, 2-2; omit Cl. 312 until senior year.
The class of 1932 will omit Bey. 0308, 3-0; take Gy. 201, 3-0; take Cy. 0215,
0-3; take Cl. 203 and 312, 1-1; take Cl. 403-404, 3-4 instead of 4-3.


Credits








474 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


CURRICULUM FOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

The courses in electrical engineering are designed to "give the student
thorough instruction in the principles of electrical design, installation, and
operation. Considerable time is given to problems pertaining to the generation,
transmission, distribution, and utilization of electrical energy. During the com-
ing year additional emphasis will be given to the field of communication.


First Semester

Names of Courses


Second Semester


Credits Names of Courses


Sophomore Year

Dg. 201-Machine Drawing ................ 1 Dg. 202-Machine Drawing ............... 1
Es. 201- Econom ics ................................ 3 Mc. 202- Foundry .................................. 1
Me. 201-Forge ........................................ 1 Me. 206-Machine Shop ................... 1
Ml. 209-Descriptive Geometry ........ 1 Ml. 202-Mechanism .......................... 3
Ms. 253-Differential and Integral Ms. 254-Differential and Integral
Calculus ............................................ 5 Calculus ........................................ 5
M y. 203- Artillery .................................. 2 My. 204- Artillery ............................... 2
Ps. 105-General Physics .................... 3 Ps. 106-General Physics .................. 3
Ps. 107-Physics Laboratory ................ 2 Ps. 108-Physics Laboratory .............. 2
18Junior 1

Junior Year


El. 315-D.C. Theory and Application 3
El. 317-Electricity and Magnetism.- 3
El. 319-Dynamo Laboratory ............ 1
MI. 301-Machine Elements ................ 1
MI. 315-Applied Mechanics ............... 5
Ml. 319-Materials of Engineering .... 2
Approved Elective .................. ...... 3
18


El. 316-A.C. Theory and Application
El. 318- A.C. Circuits ............................
El. 320-Dynamo Laboratory .........
Ml. 302-Machine Elements .
Ml. 316-Applied Mechanics ................
Ml. 310-Thermodynamics ...................


Senior Year


Cl. 405-Contracts and Specifications 2
Cl. 407- Hydraulics .............................. 3
El. 411-D.C. Machinery and Design 3
El. 413-Dynamo Laboratory ............... 2
Ml. 421-Power Engineering ............ 3
Electrical Elective ................................. 3
Approved Elective ................................... 2


El 412-A.C. Machinery and Design
El. 414-Dynamo Laboratory ........
MI. 410-Human Engineering ............
Ml. 420-Mechanical Laboratory ..
Ml. 424-Power Engineering ...............
Electrical Elective .................................
Approved Elective ............


The class of 1934 will take Cy. 101-102, 5-5, instead of Ps. 105, 106, 107 and 108,
5-5; take Dg. 0201 and Dg. 202, 0-2, instead of Dg. 201, 1-0, and Dg. 202, 0-1;
omit Ml. 209, 1-0; take Ps. 209, 3-0; the class of 1933 will omit El. 317, 3-0, El. 3: 8,
0-3, and approved elective; take Ms. 351 and 352, 2-2 ; Es. 201, 3-0, and Me. 206,
0-1. The class of 1932 will omit El. 411, 3-0, and take El. 0318, 3-0; take Me. 301,
2-0, for approved elective, 2-0.


Credits








CURRICULUM FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 475


CURRICULUM FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Mechanical engineering is a basic engineering course. Instruction in this
department is given in both theory and practice. Accuracy, neatness, and sys-
tematic presentation is required in all classes and home-study drawings and
problems. It is the aim of the course to produce engineers of independent
thought and original power. The graduate is well qualified to readily adjust
himself and give efficient service in the industries and public utility companies.


First Semester Second Semester


Names of Courses


Credits Names of Courses


Sophomore Year


Dg. 201 and 0202-Machine Design 2
M c. 201- Forge .......................... --...... 1
Ml. 207-Decriptive Geometry ............ 2
Ms. 253-Differential and Integral
Calculus ...........................3... ..........- 5
M y. 203- Artillery ............... ............... 2
Ps. 105-General Physics ................. 3
Ps. 107-Physics Laboratory .............. 2


Ms. 202-Foundry ................................... 1
Ml. 202-Mechanism ................................ 3
M1. 208-Kinematics .. ... -................ 2
Ms. 254-Differential and Integral
Calculus ......................................... 5
My. 204-Artillery .................................... 2
Ps. 106-General Physics .................... 3
Ps. 108-Physics Laboratory ............ 2


Junior Year


El. 315-D.C. Theory and Application 3
El. 319-Dynamo Laboratory ............. 1
Es. 201-Economics ....- .... ..... 3
Mc. 301-Machine Shop .................. 2
Ml. 301-Machine Elements .... ..... 1
MI. 315-Applied Mechanics ........ 5
Ml. 319-Materials of Engineering .... 2
Ms. 420-Differential Equations (Part
of Course) ............................ .... ...... 2


El. 316-A.C. Theory and Application 3
El. 322-Dynamo Laboratory ................ 1
Mc. 304- Patternmaking ...................... 2
Ml. 302-Machine Elements ............ 2
MI. 310-Thermodynamics ......... 3
Ml. 316-Applied Mechanics ............. 5
Ml. 320- -Metallography ........... ........... 2


Senior Year


Cl. 405-Contracts and Specifications
Cl. 407- Hydraulics ................................
El. 411-D. C. Machinery and De-1
sign or ...........................................
Ml. 427- Aeronautics .................... J
Ml. 411-Mechanical Design .............------
MI. 417-Mechanical Laboratory ........
Ml. 421-Power Engineering ................
Approved Elective ........... ...--..... .....--


Cl. 408-Hydraulic Engineering
Ml. 428- Aeronautics ...................
Ml. 410-Human Engineering ...
Ml. 412-Mechanical Design .....
Ml. 418-Mechanical Laboratory
Ml. 422-Refrigeration or
Ml. 430-Aerodynamics .................
Ml. 424-Power Engineering ..
Approved Elective ......................


or l
.... 2
........ 2
..... .. 3
........ 2

.... 3
........ 3


The class of 1934 will take Cy. 101 and 102, 5-5, instead of Ps. 105, 106, 107
and 108, 5-5; omit Ml. 207, 2-0; take Ps. 209, 3-0; the class of 1933 will omit
Ms. 420, 2-0; take Ms. 351 and 352, 2-2; omit El. 315, 3-0; omit El. 319, 1-0; take
Ml. 0208, 2-0; take Mc. 0304, 2-0, instead of Me. 304, 0-2. The class of 1932
will take El. 417. 3 1%2, and El. 418, 0-1,%2; omit El. 411, 3-0; take Ml. 427, 3-0, or
an approved elective, 3-0.


Credits







476 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CURRICULUM FOR BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN COMBINATION
WITH ENGINEERING

This course has been arranged for students who wish to prepare for admin-
istrative and selling positions in the field of manufacturing, railway and public
utility operation.
It requires much of the first two years of the work in the College of
Engineering and of the last two years in the College of Commerce and Jour-
nalism. The work of the first two years of the course is shown in this bulle-
tin.
The student registers in the College of Commerce and Journalism for i.he
entire course and the curriculum for the full course is shown in the bulletin
issued by that college. The degree given upon the completion of the course
is Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Students interested in this
course should write to the Dean of the College of Commerce and Journalism
for further information.

First Semester Second Semester

Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Freshman Year

Dg. 101-0102-Mechanical Drawing.... 2 Dg. 104-Mechanical Drawing .......... 1
Eh. 101-Rhetoric and Composition.... 3 Eh. 102-Rhetoric and Composition.. 3
Ms. 101-College Algebra ................. 3 Ms. 102-Plane Analytic Geometry.... 3
Ps. 111, 113, 115-Elementary Physics 5 Ps. 112, 114, 116-Elementary Phy-
sics ........................................... .... 5
Ml. 0102-Descriptive Geometry ........ 2 Me. 0101-Woodworking ....................... 1
Cl. 0101- Surveying ................. ..... ......... 2
M y. 101- Infantry ................................... 2 M y. 102- Infantry ................................ 2
PI. 101- Gymnastics ........................ 1 Pl. 102- Gymnastics ......................... 1
18 18

Sophomore Year

El. 201-Elements of Electrical
Engineering ............................. 2 El. 202-Elements of Electrical
Engineering ................... ............... 2
El. 203-Electrical Laboratory ............ 1 El. 204-Electrical Laboratory ........... 1
Ml. 203-General Mechanical Engi- MI. 204-General Mechanical
neering ............................................... 3 Engineering ................................... 3
Ml. 205-Mechanical Laboratory ........ 1 MI. 206-Mechanical Laboratory ....... 1
Bs. 201E-Principles of Economics.... 3 Bs. 202E-Principles of Economics.... 3
Bs. 211-Principles of Accounting.... 3 Bs. 212-Principles of Accounting.... 3
Ms. 251-Differential and Integral Mc. 204-Metalworking ......................... 1
Calculus .............................................. 3
My. 201- Infantry ................................. 2 M y. 202- Infantry .................................. 2
Approved Elective .................................... 2
18 18








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Subjects with odd numbers are given in the first semester and subjects with
even numbers are given in the second semester unless the number begins with
0, in which case the reverse is true.
The number of hours given is the number of hours which the class meets
per week.
The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours earned by
each student who receives a passing grade (A, B, C, or D) when the subject
is completed. Unless specifically stated, credit will be allowed for one semester
of a year course.
Subjects numbered 200 or above are not open to freshmen; subjects num-
bered 300 or above are not open to sophomores; subjects numbered 400 or
above are not open to juniors; subjects numbered 500 or above are for gradu-
ate students.
The abbreviations used wherever possible are the first and last letter of the
first word of the department name. Occasionally, a third central le-ter is in-
cluded to distinguish between departments where first and last letters are
identical.
BACTERIOLOGY

Administered in the College of Arts and Sciences

Bsy. 308.-Sanitary Laboratory Practice. 1 hour, and 4 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Carroll.
Problems in sewage and public sanitation; field work; designed for students in
civil engineering.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of all fourth-year civil engineering students.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Administered in the College of Pharmacy

Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 4 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 5
credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in
Cy. 102 or Cy. 110 is earned. Beisler.
The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and the preparation and prop-
erties of the common non-metallic elements and their compounds. Students may
begin this course either the first or second semester.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of first-year engineering students entering in 1931-32; second-year en-
gineering students for 1931-32 only.
Cy. 102.-General Chemistry, continued. 4 hours, and 3 hours labora-
tory. 5 credits. Heath in charge.
Devoted largely to a study of the metallic elements and their compounds.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of first-year engineering students starting in 1931-32; second year
engineering students for 1931-32 only.
Cy. 110.-General Chemistry, continued. 4 hours. 4 credits. Beisler.
Devoted largely to a study of the metallic elements and their compounds.
Required of second-year chemical engineering students, 1931-1932 only.








478 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Cy. 0203.-Qualitative Analysis. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Jackson.
A systematic study of the metals and their chemical reactions, and theoretical
considerations of qualitative analysis. Practice in the separation and identification
of the common metals and acid radicals.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry, Cy. 0232.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of second-year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 0215.-Water and Sewage. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. Pollard.
A theoretical and practical study of the examination and treatment of water
and sewage.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of third-year civil engineering students.
Cy. 0232.-Elementary Physical Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours lab-
oratory. 4 credits. Jackson.
A study of the gaseous, liquid and solid states of matter, the properties of solu-
tions, and colloids.
Prerequisite: General chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of second-year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 305.-Quantitative Analysis. 2 hours, and 9 hours laboratory. 5
credits. Black.
The fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. The labora-
tory work may be varied somewhat to fit the needs of individual students.
Prerequisite: Cy. 0203.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of third-year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 335.-Unit Processes of Chemical Engineering. 3 hours or its
equivalent. 3 credits. Beisler.
A critical study of the fundamental chemical engineering processes, such as
filtration, evaporation and drying.
Prerequisites: Cy. 0232, College Physics and Calculus.
Required of fourth-year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 343.-Industrial Chemistry, Inorganic. 3 hours. 3 credits. Beisler.
Consideration of chemical principles involved in manufacturing and refining
inorganic products of commercial importance.
Prerequisites: Cy. 0232 or General Chemistry and College Physics.
Required of fourth year Chemical Engineering students.
Cy. 351.-Metallurgy. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Beisler, Yeaton.
A study of the preparation, properties, structure and uses of the more important
metals and alloys.
Prerequisites: General Chemistry and College Physics.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of fourth-year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 361-362.-Organic Chemistry. 3 hours, and 6 hours laboratory
or its equivalent. 10 credits. No credit toward a degree will be
allowed until the entire 10 credits are earned. Leigh.
A study of the preparation and properties of the various aliphatic and aromatic
compounds.
Prerequisites: Cy. 203 or Cy. 232.
Laboratory fee: $5 per semester.
Required of third-year chemical engineering students.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cy. 415.-Fuels Laboratory. 6 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 2
credits. Beisler.
Analysis and calorimetry of gaseous, liquid and solid fuels.
Prerequisite: Cy. 305.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of fourth-year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 422.-Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours labora-
tory. 4 credits. Jackson.
A study of the electrical theory of matter, radioactivity, atomic structure, rela-
tion between physical properties and chemical constitution, equilibrium, phase rule,
thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, chemical kinetics, and photochemistry.
Prerequisites: Cy. 0203, Cy. 0232, Cy. 361 and Cy. 362.
Required of fourth-year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 444.-Industrial Chemistry Laboratory. 9 hours laboratory or
its equivalent. 3 credits. Beisler.
A practical study of the commercial methods of manufacture and purification
of important chemicals.
Prerequisites: Cy. 335, Cy. 343.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of fourth-year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 446.-Industrial Chemistry, Organic. 3 hours. 3 credits. Beisler.
Consideration of chemical principles involved in manufacturing and refining
organic products of commercial importance. Visits are made to accessible fac-
tories and chemical plants.
Prerequisites: Cy. 361-362; Cy. 343.
Required of fourth year chemical engineering students.

GRADUATE COURSES

Cy. 501.-Organic Preparations.
Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations.
Cy. 505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds.
Cy. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry.
Cy. 509.-Electrochemistry.
Cy. 513.-Colloid Chemistry.
Cy. 516.-Chemistry of the Rare Elements.
Cy. 519.-Atomic Structure.
Cy. 525.-Chemistry of the Terpenes.
Cy. 531.-Advanced Qualitative Analysis.
Cy. 533.-Advanced Quantitative Analysis.
Cy. 537.-Qualitative Organic Chemistry.
Cy. 538.-Quantitative Organic Chemistry.
Cy. 551-552.-Chemical Research.
See Bulletin of Graduate School for description of the courses
above.







480 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Cl. 101 or 0101.-Surveying. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory. 2 cred-
its. Sawyer.
Recitations on the use of chain, compass, transit and level; determination of
areas, and instrumental adjustments. Field work in chaining, leveling, compass
and transit surveys. Drawing-room work in calculations from field notes, and map-
drawing. Textbook: Breed and Hosmer, Vol. I, The Principles and Practice of Sur-
veying.
Prerequisite: Trigonometry.
Laboratory fee: $3.
Required of engineering students, first year.
Cl. 201.-Surveying. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
Sawyer.
Recitations on balancing of surveys and calculating of areas; methods of mak-
ing topographical surveys, including the use of the stadia and plane table; methods
of solving other problems in land, topographical and city surveying. Field work:
The making of a complete topographical survey; tests and adjustments of inst:lu-
ments. Drawing-room work on balancing surveys, calculating areas and reducing
field notes; plotting maps and profiles; contour problems. Textbook: Davis, Foote
and Rayner, Surveying: Theory and Practice.
Prerequisite: Cl. 101.
Laboratory fee: $3.
Required of second-year civil engineering students.
Cl. 202.-Surveying. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Lowe.
Problems involving the principles of precise leveling, baseline measurement,
triangulation, and determination of meridian, latitude and time. Field work: Pre-
cise leveling, base-line work, meridian and latitude observations. Drawing-room
work on triangulation and astronomical computations. Textbook: Davis, Foote a id
Rayner, Surveying: Theory and Practice.
Prerequisite: Cl. 201.
Laboratory fee: $3.
Required of second-year civil engineering students.
Cl. 203.-Engineering Exposition. 1 hour, 1 credit. Brown.
A course in accuracy and clearness in form and content of engineering exposition,
both literary and technical.
Textbook: Howell's Handbook of English in Engineering Usage.
Collateral reading: Wait and McDonald's Composition of Technical Papers;
Marcoux's Business Correspondence Principles and Practice; Reeder's How to Write
a Thesis; Gaum and Graves' Report Writing.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101 and 102.
Required of second-year civil engineering students.
Cl. 206.-Highway Construction. 2 hours, 2 credits. Brown.
Lectures and recitations on highway location, drainage, foundations, surfaces,
methods of construction, maintenance and repair.
Textbook: Wiley's Principles of Highway Engineering.
Prerequisite: CI. 101.
Required of second-year civil engineering students.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cl. 301.-Railway and Highway Surveying. 2 hours and 6 hours lab-
oratory. 4 credits. Lowe and Brown.
The first half of the semester is devoted to recitations and laboratory work
on simple, compound, reversed and vertical curves, and railway and highway location;
the second half of the semester the work is divided; one recitation and one lab-
oratory period are devoted to earthwork and preliminary location of a railway line;
one recitation and one laboratory period on final location and construction of
a highway, with computations of quantities and costs.
Textbook: Pickle and Wiley's Route Surveying. Wiley's Principles of Highway
Engineering.
Prerequisite: Cl. 101.
Laboratory fee: $1.50.
Required of third-year civil engineering students.
Cl. 302.-Railways. 1 hour and 3 hours laboratory. 2 credits. Lowe.
Recitations on transmission curves, turnouts and earthwork. Field and draw-
ing-room work in final location of a railroad; plotting of lines and profiles; earth-
work computations.
Textbook: Pickle and Wiley's Route Surveying.
Prerequisite: CI. 301.
Laboratory fee: $1.50.
Required of third-year civil engineering students.
Cl. 306.-Theory of Structures. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3
credits. Sawyer.
Recitations and drawing room exercises in the computation of forces ; the plot-
ting of diagrams in elementary graphics and roof truss, bridge and masonry prob-
lems ; design of a roof truss.
Textbook: Southerland and Bowman, Structural Theory.
Prerequisite: Ml. 315.
Required of third-year civil engineering students.
Cl. 308.-Theory of Structures. 1 hour and 3 hours laboratory. 2
credits. Reed.
Similar to Cl. 306 except the work concerning bridges.
Textbook: Hool and Kinne, Steel and Timber Structures.
Prerequisite: Ml. 315.
Required of third-year architecture students.
Cl. 310.-Testing Laboratory. 2 hours laboratory. 1 credit. Lowe.
Laboratory work in the testing of stone, brick, asphalt, and other road mate-
rials and in cement, sand, concrete, timber, steel and other materials used in con-
struction. Textbook: E. E. Bauer, Plain Concrete.
Prerequisite: MI. 315L
Laboratory fee: $2.
Required of third-year civil enginereing students.
CI. 312.-Engineering Exposition. 1 hour. 1 credit. Brown.
Intensive practice in forms of engineering exposition for general articles,
technical publications, theses, reports on projects for laymen, for engineering bodies.
Reports of research on scientific and technical subjects. Textbook: See Cl. 203
for texts recommended.
Required of third-year civil engineering students.
Prerequisite: Cl. 203.
Cl. 403.-Structural Engineering. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory.
4 credits. Reed and Sawyer.
Recitations and drawing-room work in the theory and design of wooden and
steel roof trusses and girders. Textbook: Hool and Kinne, Steel and Timber Struc-
tures.
Prerequisite: MI. 315, MI. 316, and Cl. 306 or CI. 308.
Required of fourth-year students in civil engineering and in architecture.






482 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Cl. 404.-Structural Engineering. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3
credits. Sawyer.
Recitation and drawing-room work in the theory and design of foundations,
highway and railroad bridges, and buildings.
Prerequisite: CI. 403.
Required of fourth-year students in civil engineering and in architecture.
Cl. 405.-Contracts and Specifications. 2 hours. 2 credits. Brown.
The contract and its relation to the engineer. Specifications. Textbook: D. W.
Mead, Contracts and Specifications and Engineering Relations.
Required of fourth-year engineering students. Elective for non-engineering
students.
Cl. 407.-Hydraulics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Lowe.
Recitations and laboratory work on the elements of hydraulics; the princip es
of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure; the measurement of water by orific-s,
short tubes, nozzles, weirs, and other measuring instruments; flow thru pipes
and open channels; losses from friction and other sources; and other related topic's.
Textbook: Schoder and Dawson, Hydraulics.
Prerequisite: MI. 315 and MI. 316.
Laboratory fee: $3.
Required of fourth-year engineering students.
Cl. 408.-Hydraulic Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits. Lowe.
Recitations on stream gaging and hydrographic surveying; water power, hy-
draulic turbines and impulse wheels; pumps and hydraulic machinery. Textbooks:
Schoder and Dawson, Hydraulics; Barrows, Water Power Engineering.
Prerequisite: Cl. 407.
Required of fourth-year students in civil and in mechanical engineering.
Cl. 409.-Water and Sewerage. 2 hours, 3 hours laboratory. 3 cred-
its. Brown.
Lectures, recitations and designs for supply and distribution systems for a
public water supply and a collection system for the sewage and storm water of a
municipality.
Textbook: Parts of Turneaure and Russell's Public Water Supplies and of
Metcalf and Eddy's Sewerage and Sewage Disposal.
Collateral reading: Elliott's Engineering for Land Drainage. Williams and
Hazen's Hydraulic Tables. Standard Specifications.
Prerequisite: Ml. 315-316.
Required of fourth-year civil engineering students.
Cl. 410.-Water and Sewerage. 2 hours, 3 hours laboratory. 3 cred-
its. Brown.
Lectures and recitations. Collection of data and general design of a small
sewage treatment plant and of a water filtration plant.
Textbook: same as 409.
Prerequisite: Cl. 409.
Required of all fourth-year civil engineering students.
Cl. 412.-Concrete Design. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 cred-
its. Lowe.
Recitations and drawing-room work on the theory and design of reinforced
concrete structures. Textbook: Southerland and Clifford, Reinforced Concrete De-
sign.
Prerequisite: Ml. 315 and Ml. 316.
Required of fourth-year students in civil engineering.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


GRADUATE COURSES

Cl. 501-502.-Advanced work in Structural Engineering. 3 hours, and
6 hours laboratory. 12 credits. Reed.
This advanced course for graduate students will cover advanced work in the
theory, design and drawing of structures, particularly in connection with buildings.
Prerequisite: Cl. 403 and CI. 404.
CI. 507-508.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 2 hours, and
3 hours laboratory. 6 credits. Brown.
Study of action and operation of Imhoff sewage disposal plant of the University.
Physical, biological, bacteriological, and chemical observations to determine effi-
ciency and economy of various methods of operation and improvements in operation
to increase the same.
Prerequisite: Cl. 409.
Cl. 509-510.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 2 hours, and
3 hours laboratory. 6 credits. Brown.
A course supplementing Cl. 507 and Cl. 508 covering similar investigations in
connection with septic tanks.

DRAWING

Dg. 101-102.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours. 2 credits. Walker.
Geometrical problems, lettering and dimensioning.
Laboratory fee: $0.25.
Required of all first-year students in engineering, engineering pre-business, and
manual arts.
Dg. 104.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours. 1 credit. Walker.
Projections, machine parts and tracing.
Required of all first-year students in engineering, engineering pre-business,
and manual arts.
Dg. 106.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours. 1 credit. Walker.
Project drawing in connection with wood and sheet metal work.
Laboratory fee: $0.25.
Required of all first-year students in manual arts.
Dg. 201-202.-Machine Drawing. 3 hours. 2 credits. Strong.
Detail and assembly drawings and tracings of machines and machine parts.
Prerequisite: Dg. 101 and Dg. 102.
Required of all second-year students in electrical and mechanical engineering
and in manual arts.
For courses in mechanic arts see "Mechanic Arts", this bulletin, page 488.

ECONOMICS

Administered in the College of Commerce and Journalism

Es. 201.-Principles of Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
A general understanding of present day economic organization; brief analysis
of production, distribution, and consumption.
Required of all engineering students.








484 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

El. 201.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Smith.
Lectures and recitations on fundamental principles of electrical engineering.
Textbook: Benton, Introductory Textbook of Electrical Engineering.
Prerequisite: One year of college physics. Required of second year students
in engineering pre-business course.
El. 202.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Beck.
The general course covering methods of producing electrical energy, its dis-
tribution and application, direct and alternating current motors, and generators,
storage batteries, communication.
Textbook: Benton, Introductory Text on Electrical Engineering.
Prerequisite: 1 year of college physics, including electricity and magnetism.
Required of second-year students in engineering pre-busipess.
El. 203.-Electrical Laboratory. 2 hours laboratory. 1 credit. Smith.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 201.
Laboratory fee: $3.00.
Required of second-year students in engineering pre-business.
El. 204.-Dynamo Laboratory. 2 hours laboratory. 1 credit. Smi:h
and Beck.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 202.
Corequisite: El. 202.
Laboratory fee: $3.00.
Required of second-year students in engineering pre-business.
El. 305.-Elementary Radio Engineering. 2 hours, and 2 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. Weil.
Characteristics of tubes, radio frequency circuits and amplification detection,
audio frequency circuits and amplification. Textbook: Henney, Radio Principles.
Prerequisite: 1 year of college physics, including electricity and magnetism.
El. 306.-Radio Apparatus. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 cred-
its. Weil.
Theory and operation of modern receiver and transmitting sets.
Textbook: Sterling, Radio Manual.
Laboratory fee: $2.00.
El. 307.-Electrical Engineering Equipment. 3 hours. 3 credits. Beck.
A course similar to the combination of El. 201 and El. 202 but slightly shorter.
Textbook: Benton, Introductory Text on Electrical Engineering.
Prerequisite: 1 year college physics, including electricity and magnetism.
Required of third year students in chemical and civil engineering.
Not given in 1931-32.
El. 309.-Dynamo Laboratory. 2 hours laboratory. I credit. Smith
and Beck.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 307.
Corequisite: El. 307.
Laboratory fee: $3.00.
Required of third-year students in chemical and civil engineering.
Not given in 1931-32.
El. 315.-Direct Current Machinery. 3 hours. 3 credits. Weil and
staff.
Theory, design, application of direct current generators, and motors. Con-
trolling apparatus, armature windings, and miscellaneous appliances.
Prerequisite: 1 year of college physics.
Required of third-year students in electrical and mechanical engineering.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


El. 316.-Alternating Current Machinery. 3 hours. 3 credits. Weil.
Characteristics, design and operation of alternating current machinery.
Prerequisite: El. 315.
Required of third-year students in electrical and mechanical engineering.
El. 317.-Electricity and Magnetism. 2 hours and 3 laboratory hours.
3 credits. Weil.
Electric and magnetic circuit calculations, electrostatics, electro-magnetics,
magnetic and dielectric properties of materials, varying currents.
Prerequisite: 1 year college physics, including electricity and magnetism.
Required of third-year students in electrical engineering.
Laboratory fee: $2.00.
El. 318.-Principles of Alternating Currents. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Weil.
Representation of alternating currents by vectors and complex quantities, wave
form, measurement of power, Kirchoff laws.
Textbook: Lawrence, Principles of Alternating Currents.
Prerequisite: El. 315.
Required of third-year students in electrical engineering.
El. 319.-Direct Current Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit.
Smith and Beck.
Operation and characteristic curves, heat runs, miscellaneous testing of gen-
erators, tests of direct current control apparatus and appliances.
Corequisite: El. 315.
Laboratory fee: $5.00.
Required of third-year students in electrical and mechanical engineering.
El. 320.-Alternating Current Laboratory. 6 hours laboratory. 2
credits. Smith and Beck.'
Continuation of El. 319 but using alternating current apparatus.
Corequisite: El. 316.
Laboratory fee: $5.00.
Required of third-year students in electrical engineering.
El. 322.-Dynamo Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. Smith.
A dynamo laboratory course somewhat shorter than El. 320.
Corequisite: El. 316.
Laboratory fee: $3.00.
Required of third-year students in mechanical engineering.
El. 405.-Telegraph Engineering. 1 hour and 2 hours laboratory.
2 credits. Weil and staff.
Theory of telegraphic service, telegraphic apparatus.
Textbook: Hausman, Telegraph Engineering.
Prerequisite: El. 311 and El. 313.
Laboratory fee: $2.00.
El. 406.-Telephone Engineering. 1 hour and 2 hours laboratory.
2 credits. Weil and staff.
Telephone circuits, telephone apparatus, manual and automatic switching.
Textbook: Kloeffler, Telephone Communication.
Prerequisite: El. 319.
Laboratory fee: $2.00.
El. 409.-Electric Power Plant Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. Weil.
The relation of various machines in the power plant with one another, switch
gear, manual and automatic controls for operating apparatus, public policies and
finance.
Prerequisite: at least 8 credits in electrical engineering courses.






486 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

El. 410.-Electrical Transmission and Distribution Systems. 3 hours.
3 credits. Smith.
Efficiency, regulation surges, corona effects, mechanical problems on trans-
mission lines.
Prerequisite: 8 credits in electrical engineering courses.
El. 411.-D.C. Machinery and Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. Weil.
Study and design of D.C. apparatus.
Prerequisite: El. 315.
Required of fourth-year students in electrical engineering.
El. 412.-A.C. Machinery and Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. Weil.
Study and design of A.C. apparatus.
Prerequisite: El. 316.
Required of fourth-year students in electrical engineering.
El. 413.-Dynamo Laboratory. 6 hours laboratory. 2 credits. Smith.
A laboratory course more advanced than El. 319 and El. 320.
Corequisite: El. 411.
Laboratory fee: $5.00.
Required of fourth-year students in electrical engineering.
El. 414.-Dynamo Laboratory. 6 hours laboratory. 2 credits. Smith.
A laboratory course more advanced than El. 413.
Required of fourth-year students in electrical engineering.
El. 417.-Essentials of Electrical Engineering. 3 hours, and 3 hours
laboratory. 41/ credits. Smith.
A course more advanced than El. 204.
Prerequisite: El. 202 and El. 204.
Laboratory fee: $5.00.
El. 418.-Dynamo Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 11 credits.
Smith.
Additional laboratory work supplementing El. 317.
Prerequisite: El. 417.
Laboratory fee: $5.00.
El. 430.-Instruments and Meters. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Weil.
Design, construction and application of instruments, meters, and relations,
with particular emphasis on their application and use in alternating current circuits.
Prerequisite: 8 credits in electrical engineering courses.
El. 456.-Essentials of Electricity for Architects. 1 hour. 1 credit.
Smith.
A general course covering wiring methods, illumination and miscellaneous ap-
plications of electricity.
Textbooks: National Electric Code and Bulletins of National Lamp Works.
Required of fourth-year architectural students.
El. 501-502.-Advanced Experimental Electrical Engineering. Vari-
able credit. Weil and staff.
Experimental investigation on electrical apparatus.
Prerequisite: Not less than 9 credits in electrical engineering theory and ekc-
trical engineering laboratory work.
El. 503.-Advanced Electrical Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. Weil.
Laws of the electric and magnetic circuit, transient phenomena.
Prerequisite: El. 311.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


El. 504.-Electric Measurements. 2 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
Weil and staff.
Theory and Practice of the Measurements of Electrical Quantities with par-
ticular attention to measurements in alternating current circuits.
Prerequisite: El. 401.
El. 505-506.-Advanced Course in Radio Engineering. 3 hours. 6
credits. Weil.
High frequency circuits and apparatus.
Text: Morecroft, Principles of Radio Communication, and assigned reading.
El. 507-508.-Radio Engineering Laboratory. 4 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Weil and staff.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 505-506.
El. 509.-Electric Power Plant Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. Weil.
The relation of various machines in the power plant to one another, switch-
gear, control apparatus, selection of types of units, construction problems. A part
of this course includes the design of the electrical end of a power plant.
Prerequisite: El. 401.
Text: Tarboux, Electric Power Equipment, and outside reading.
El. 510.-Electric Transmission Line Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Weil.
A study of the theory of transmission line circuits.
Prerequisite: El. 401.

ENGLISH

Administered in the College of Arts and Sciences

Eh. 101-102.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 hours. 6 credits. No cred-
it toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are
earned. Robertson and staff.
To train students in methods of clear and forceful expression. Instruction is
carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric and in theme writing.
Required of all freshmen.
FRENCH
Administered in the College of Arts and Sciences

Fh. 21-22.-Elementary French. 3 hours. 6 credits. Atkin and staff.
Course for beginners. Elements of pronunciation and grammar, reading of
simple prose.
Elective for second-year students in chemical engineering.

GEOLOGY
Admiristeicd in the College of Arts and Sciences

Gy. 201.-Physical Geology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hubbell.
The origin, materials, and structure of the earth, and the agencies which pro-
duce geological changes.
Required of third-year civil engineering students.

GERMAN
Administered in the College of Arts and Sciences

Gn. 21-22.-Elementary German. 3 hours. 6 credits. Crow.
Elective required of second-year chemical engineering students.







488 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

MATHEMATICS

Administered in the College of Arts and Sciences

Ms. 151-152.-Elementary Mathematical Analysis. 3 hours. 6 credits.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 cred-
its are earned. Simpson and staff.
The material of college algebra, analytic geometry and trigonometry rearranged
and changed to meet the primary needs of engineering students. Textbook: Slichter,
Elementary Mathematical Analysis. Required of all regularly-admitted engineering
freshmen.
Ms. 253-254.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 5 hours. 10 credits.
Simpson and staff.
No credit will be allowed engineering students toward a degree until the entire
10 credits have been earned.
The study of differentiation and integration, which, together with their numer-
ous and widely different applications, constitute one of the most important fields
of mathematics. Typical problems solved by these methods are calculation of rates
of change, computation of areas, volumes, moments of inertia, energy, power,
and many others. In addition, various advanced topics of special value to engin-
eers and scientists are studied.
Prerequisite: Ms. 151-152.
Required of all sophomore engineering students.

MECHANIC ARTS

Mc. 101-0101.-Woodworking. 3 hours shop. 1 credit. Eshleman.
Joinery. Lectures and shop work.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of first-year engineering and pre-business students.
Mc. 104.-Shop Work. 4 hours shop. 2 credits. Eshleman and Janes.
Instruction and practice in the care and use of hand tools in working woc d,
and in forging, welding and tempering metal.
Shop fee: $1.50.
Required of second-year agricultural students.
Mc. 107-108.-Woodworking. 1 hour, 6 hours shop. 6 credits. Eshle-
man.
Instruction and practice in the care and use of hand tools and working wood.
Joinery. Wooden machine parts and machine work.
Shop fee: $3.00.
Required of first-year manual arts students.
Me. 201.-Forge Shop. 1 hour and 2 hours shop. 1 credit. Janes.
Study and practice of hand and machine forging, welding and heat treating,
with special reference to specifications for forging iron and steel machine-parts.
Class room and shop. A textbook is used.
Shop fee: $3.00.
Required of second-year electrical and mechanical students.
Mc. 202.-Foundry. 1 hour, and 2 hours shop. 1 credit. Janes.
Work in moulding, core making, melting and pouring metal, using standard
foundry equipment.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of second-year electrical, mechanical and third-year chemical engineer-
ing students.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Me. 204.-Metalworking. 1 hour, and 2 hours shop. 1 credit. Strong.
Study and practice of methods of forging, molding and machine shop work
with special reference to the influence of shop-requirements on design. A text
book is used.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of second-year civil engineering students.
Mc. 206.-Machine Shop. 1 hour, and 2 hours shop. 1 credit. Strong.
Study and practice of the methods of finishing machine parts.
Class room and shop. A textbook is used.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of second-year electrical engineering students.
Mc. 207-208.-Carpentry. 1 hour and 6 hours shop. 6 credits. Strong,
and staff.
Prerequisite: Mc. 107-108.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of second-year manual arts students.
Mc. 209-210.-Metal Work. 1 hour and 3 hours shop. 4 credits.
Strong and staff.
Sheet metal work.
Prerequisite: Mc. 107-108.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of second-year manual arts students.
Me. 211-212.-Forge and Foundry. 1 hour and 4 hours shop. 4 cred-
its. Strong and staff.
Me. 201 with advanced forge work and Me. 202 with advanced foundry work.
Prerequisite: Mc. 209-210.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of third-year manual arts students.
Mc. 301.-Machine Shop. 1 hour and 3 hours shop. 2 credits. Strong.
Study and practice of the methods of finishing and assembling machine parts.
Class room and shop. A textbook is used.
Prerequisite: Junior Classification.
Shop fee: $5.
Required of third-year mechanical engineering students.
Me. 304.-Patternmaking. 1 hour, and 3 hours drawing. 2 credits.
Strong.
Study and practice of the principles underlying the design and construction of
patterns and core boxes for machine parts and other articles of cast metal. Class
room and shop. A textbook is used.
Prerequisites: Mc. 101 and Me. 202.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of third-year mechanical engineering students.
Mc. 307-308.-Cabinetwork. 1 hour and 6 hours shop. 6 credits.
Strong and staff.
Prerequisite: Mc. 207-208.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of third-year manual arts students.
Me. 405-406.-Cabinetwork. 1 hour and 6 hours shop. 6 credits.
Strong and staff.
Advanced cabinetwork, including furniture.
Prerequisite: Mc. 307-308.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of fourth-year manual arts students.








490 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Ml. 102.-Descriptive Geometry. 2 hours. 2 credits. Walker and Fin-
eren.
Methods of representing points, lines, surfaces and projections.
Required of first-year engineering and pre-business students.
Ml. 202.-Mechanism. 3 hours. 3 credits. Fineren.
Investigation of link-work, construction of gears and cams, belt and p lley
drives, trains of mechanism, the velocity ratio and directional relation of the mov-
ing parts of various machines.
Required of second-year electrical and mechanical engineering students.
Ml. 203.-General Mechanical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. Fineren.
The fundamental laws, theories, and problems of mechanism, mechanics, and
strength of materials.
Prerequisite: Ps. 203.
Required of second-year pre-business students.
MI. 204.-General Mechanical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. Price.
The fundamental laws, theories and problems of thermodynamics, refrigeration,
and power engineering.
Prerequisite: Ps. 204.
Required of second-year pre-business students.
Ml. 205.-General Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. 3 hours. 1
credit. Fineren.
Laboratory exercises supplementary to Ml. 203.
Corequisite: Ml. 203.
Required of second-year pre-business students.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Ml. 206.-General Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. 3 hours. 1
credit. Fineren.
Laboratory exercises supplementary to Ml. 204.
Corequisite: Ml. 204.
Required of second-year pre-business students.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Ml. 207.-Descriptive Geometry. 4 hours drawing. 2 credits. Walker
and Fineren.
Solids, intersections, developments, and solution of many original problems on
the drawing-board.
Required of mechanical engineering sophomores.
Ml. 208.-Kinematics. 1 hour and 3 hours drawing. 2 credits. Fin-
eren.
Drawing-board solution of problems in link-work, cams, toothed gears, slider-
crank, and other mechanisms, with velocity and acceleration diagrams.
Prerequisites: MI. 201 and MI. 202.
Required of third-year mechanical engineering students.
Ml. 209.-Descriptive Geometry. 2 hours drawing. 1 credit. Walker
and Fineren.
Solids, intersections and developments.
Required of civil and electrical engineering sophomores.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Ml. 301.-Machine Elements. 3 hours drawing. 1 credit. Fineren.
Sizes and proportions of standard machine details, screw threads, bolts and nu'.s,
pipes and fittings, shafting and shaft mountings, bearings, etc., as approved Dy
practice.
Required of third-year electrical and mechanical engineering students.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ml. 302.-Machine Elements. 1 hour and 3 hours drawing. 2 credits.
Fineren.
Design of simple machines, lectures and working drawings.
Prerequisite: Ml. 301.
Required of third-year electrical and mechanical engineering students.
MI. 310.-Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Price.
The laws governing the emission and reception of heat, and the transformation
of heat into mechanical energy. A study of the pressure volume and the tempera-
ture entropy diagrams of various theoretical and practical cycles.
Prerequisites: Ms. 251, Ms. 252, Ps. 209, Cy. 101, Cy. 102, MI. 315.
Required of third-year electrical and mechanical, and fourth-year chemical engi-
neering students.
Ml. 315-316.-Applied Mechanics. 4 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
10 credits. Yeaton.
(a) Statics, embracing the resolution of forces and moments; equilibrium as
applied to trusses, machines, etc. ; centers of gravity, moments of inertia and fric-
tion. (b) Mechanics of materials; stresses and deformation in beams, columns,
pipes, machine and structural parts, with various methods of loading. (c) Kinetics,
embracing inertia, centrifugal force, kinetic and potential energy.
Prerequisites: Ms. 251 and Ms. 252.
Laboratory fee: $1 each semester.
Required of third-year engineering students, and with the exception of part
(c), 1 credit, of third-year architecture students.
MI. 319.-Materials of Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits. Yeaton.
A saudy of the properties, manufacture, and testing of brick, concrete, timber,
iron, steel, alloys and non-ferrous metals ; heat treatment and modifying processes.
Prerequisites: Ps. 105, Ps. 106, Cy. 101 and Cy. 102.
Required of third-year civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering students.
MI. 320.-Metallography. 1 hour and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits.
Yeaton.
A study of the iron-carbon diagram, heat treatment and use of steel and cast-
iron. Laboratory periods are used for the preparation of polished and etched speci-
mens for microscopic examination and photomicrographs.
Prerequisite: MI. 319.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of third-year mechanical engineering students.
Ml. 351.-Metallography Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit.
Yeaton.
Preparation of polished and etched specimens for microscopic examination and
photomicrographs.
Corequisite: Cy. 351. Lectures.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of fourth-year chemical engineering students as part of course Cy. 351.
Ml. 410.-Human Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits. Price.
A study of some of the problems of production engineering and certain questions
of personnel management. The human factors in industry.
Prerequisite: Es. 201.
Required of fourth-year engineering students.
Ml. 411.-Mechanical Design. 2 hours and 3 hours drawing. 3 cred-
its. Price.
The calculation, proportioning and detailing of machine parts, and the design
of machines to perform certain functions. Steel structures, reinforced concrete,
piping, and mechanical equipment of power and manufacturing plants.
Prerequisites: Ml. 201, Ml. 202, MI. 301, MI. 302, Ml. 305, MI. 306, MI. 315, MI.
316, and MI. 319.
Required of fourth-year mechanical engineering students.







492 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


MI. 412.-Machine Design. 1 hour and 6 hours drawing. 3 credits.
Price.
Continuation of Ml. 411.
Prerequisite: Ml. 411.
Required of fourth-year mechanical engineering students.
Ml. 417-418.-Mechanical Laboratory. 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
Fineren.
Study of gauges, thermometers, calorimeters, flow meters, indicators, dynamom-
eters, flue-gas apparatus and other instruments and their use in conducting tests
of engines, turbines, boilers, and other mechanical equipment. Boiler tests, valve
setting, power measurement, fuel tests, refrigeration tests, efficiency and heat bal-
ance calculations, with complete reports of experiments.
Prerequisite: MI. 310.
Laboratory fee: $5 each semester.
Required of fourth-year mechanical engineering students.
MI. 420.-Mechanical Laboratory. 4 hours laboratory. 2 credits. Fin-
eren.
A portion of Mechanical Laboratory MI. 417 and Ml. 418.
Prerequisite: Ml. 310.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of fourth-year electrical engineering students.
Ml. 421.-Power Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. Price.
The steam boiler, fuels, combustion, engines, turbines, condensing apparatus and
boiler-plant auxiliaries.
Prerequisite: MI. 310.
Required of fourth-year electrical and mechanical engineering students.
Ml. 422.-Refrigeration. 3 hours. 3 credits. Price.
Heat transmission and refrigeration. Compression and absorption systems. The
economics of power and refrigeration plant.
Prerequisites: MI. 310, MI. 419.
Required of fourth-year mechanical engineering students.
Ml. 424.-Power Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. Price.
Gas and liquid fuel internal combustion engines, hot-air engines, and gas pro-
ducers.
Prerequisite: MI. 310.
Required of electrical and mechanical engineering students.
Ml. 427.-Aeronautics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.
The fundamentals of aircraft. The engineering requirements of mechanical
flight. The aircraft power plant. Structural features of planes and dirigibles.
Prerequisites: Ps. 105, Ps. 107, Ms. 85.
MI. 428.-Aeronautics. 2 hours. 2 credits. Wilson.
Air commerce, navigation, maintenance and safety. Instruments and aviation
materiel.
Prerequisite: MI. 427.
Ml. 430.-Aerodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Price.
The flow of compressible fluids. The airfoil. The wing and control surfaces
of aircraft. Propellers, impellers and wind channels.
Prerequisites: Ml. 310, MI. 315-316.
MI. 464.-Heating and Ventilating. 1 hour. 1 credit. Yeaton.
Furnaces, boilers, heat transmission and ventilating.
Prerequisite: Ps. 105 and Ps. 106.
Required of fourth-year architectural students.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


GRADUATE COURSES

Ml. 501-502.-Advanced Mechanical Design. 6 hours laboratory. 6
credits. Price.
The design of some machine with critical attention to some phase thereof, usu-
ally accompanied by some laboratory work illustrative of the application of theory
or of behavior of materials under assumed special working conditions.
Ml. 503-504.-Mechanical Research. 6 hours laboratory. 6 credits.
Yeaton.
An experimental study of a mechanical engineering project, acceptable to the
Department. Design and construction of apparatus. Operation of tests. Collection
of data and presentation of results in form of reports.
Prerequisites: Ml. 320. Ml. 411.
Laboratory fee: $5 and cost of materials.

MILITARY SCIENCE

My. 103-104.-Freshman Field Artillery, Compulsory. 2 hours theory
and 3 hours practice. 4 credits. Hepner, Donnovin.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: organization-hygiene and first-
aid, elementary gunnery; explosives, ammunition and fuses; military courtesy and
discipline; drill and command. (b) Practical: dismounted drill ceremonies; pistol
instruction; individual equipment material; 75 numm. gun drill; gunner's examina-
tion. Text: Wilson Field Artillery Manual. Vol. I.
My. 203-204.-Sophomore Field Artillery, Compulsory. 2 hours the-
ory and 3 hours practice. 4 credits. Barco.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: care of animals; map-reading
and sketching; fire control instruments; communications. (b) Practical: dismounted
drill; ceremonies; equitation; driving; mounted drill; reconnaissance, selection and
occupation of position. Text: Wilson Field Artillery Manual, Vol. 1.
Prerequisite: My. 103 and My. 104.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PI. 101-102.-Gymnastics. 2 hours. 1 credit. Haskell and staff.
Instruction given in free exercises for general development and muscular co-
ordination. Elementary work on apparatus, emphasizing form, approach, and exe-
cution.
Instruction and play in tennis, football, baseball, basketball, playground ball,
and track.

PHYSICS

Administered in the College of Arts and Sciences

Ps. 105-106.-Theory of Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Electricity and
Light. 4 hours. 6 credits. Credit will be given for the first
semester without the second, if the student so desires; however,
the second semester cannot be taken without the first. Perry in
charge.
General Physics, designed primarily for engineering students, open to any
student having the necessary prerequisites.
Required of Engineering students.
Prerequisite: Trigonometry.





494 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Ps. 107-108.-General Laboratory Physics. 4 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Perry in charge.
Fundamental experiments in Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Electricity and Light.
Supplementing Ps. 105-106.
Required of Engineering students.
Laboratory fee: $3 each semester.
Ps. 209.-Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. 2 hours and 2 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. Perry.
A continuation of general physics, designed for engineering students.
Given only in 1931-32.
Laboratory fee: $1.50.

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

A description of courses administered in the College of Engineering and
required of engineering students, has been printed in this bulletin. For de-
scriptions of other courses, see bulletins of the colleges in which these courses
are administered.






THE UNIVERSITY CALEND 4R


THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1931-32
First Semester
1931
September 14, 15, Monday, Tuesday .....Entrance examinations.
September 16, Wednesday 11:00 a.m.....1931-32 session begins.
September 16-22, Wednesday-Tuesday-Freshman Week.
September 21, 22, Monday, Tuesday ...... Registration of upperclassmen.
September 23, Wednesday ......................Classes for 1931-32 session begin; late
registration fee $5.
September 30, Wednesday..................... Last day for changing course without
paying the $2 fee.
October 7, Wednesday................................Last day for registration for the first
semester 1931-32.
November 11, Wednesday.--......................Armistice Day; special exercises but
classes are not suspended.
November 26, Thursday............................Thanksgiving Day, a holiday.
December 19, Saturday 12:00 noon........Christmas recess begins.
1932
January 4, Monday 8:00 a.m.....--........... Christmas recess ends.
January 25, Monday 8:00 a.m................ Final examinations for the first semes-
ter begin.
January 31, Sunday 8:00 p.m .................Baccalaureate Sermon.
February 3, Wednesday..........................Inter-semester Day, a holiday.
Second Semester


February 4, 5, Thursday, Friday......



February 6, Saturday 8:00 a.m ........


February 11, Thursday .......................


...... Registration for second semester; all
students whose names begin with "A"
through "M" register on Thursday; all
others on Friday.
......Classes for second semester begin:
change of course fee, $2; late registra-
tion fee, $5.
......Last day for registration for second
semester.


March 23, Wednesday 5:00 p.m.............Spring recess begins.
March 28, Monday 8:00 a.m..................Spring recess ends.
May 26, Thursday 8:00 a.m..................Final examinations begin.
June 4-6, Saturday to Monday..............Commencement Exercises.







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