• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Cover
 Table of Contents
 Faculty
 General statement
 Degrees and curricula
 Departments of instruction
 University calendar, 1931-32














Title: University record
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Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00433
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: June 1, 1931
Copyright Date: 1932
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00433
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 391
        Page 392
    Table of Contents
        Page 393
        Page 394
    Faculty
        Page 395
        Page 396
        Page 397
        Page 398
        Page 399
        Page 400
        Page 401
        Page 402
    General statement
        Page 403
        Page 404
        Page 405
        Page 406
        Page 407
        Page 408
        Page 409
        Page 410
    Degrees and curricula
        Page 411
        Page 412
        Page 413
        Page 414
    Departments of instruction
        Page 415
        Page 416
        Page 417
        Page 418
        Page 419
        Page 420
        Page 421
        Page 422
        Page 423
        Page 424
        Page 425
        Page 426
        Page 427
        Page 428
        Page 429
        Page 430
        Page 431
        Page 432
        Page 433
        Page 434
        Page 435
    University calendar, 1931-32
        Page 436
Full Text




The University Record

of the


University of Florida


Bulletin of the

College of Agriculture

With Announcements for the Year
1931-32


Vol. XXVI, Series I No. 10


June 1, 1931


Published Semi-monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.



















The University Record of the University of Florida is issued once every
month except June, when it is issued six times.

The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual col-
leges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruction,
and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what in-
formation is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in sev-
eral series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with insti-
tutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is
under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual
copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to the University Bookstore, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida































TABLE OF CONTENTS


F acu lty .... ..................... .

General Statement .... .... ....

Degrees and Curricula .......

Departments of Instruction ....

University Calendar ............


.. ........................................... 395

.................................................. 403

................................................... 411

................................................... 415

...-................................................. 436







THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE FACULTY


ADMINISTRATION

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., President
WILMON NEWELL, M.S., D.Sc., Dean and Director
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S.. Assistant Dean. Administration, College ol
Agriculture
H. HAROLD HUME, M. S., Assistant Dean and Director, Research
SAMUEL TODD FLEMING, B.A., Assistant Director, Administration, Experiment
Station
\RTHUR PERCEVAL SPENCER, M.S.. Vice-Director and County Agent Leader.
Agricultural Extension Service
KLINE HARRISON GRAHAM. Business Manager
JOHN FRANCIS COOPER. M.S.A., Editor
RALPH MORRIS FULGHUM. B.S.A., Assistant Editor
EDWIN F. STANTON, Supervisor, Chipley, Egg Laying Contest
IDA KEELING CRESAP, Librarian
RACHEL MCQIJARRIE, Accountant
ELEANOR GWYNNETH SHAW, Secretary, College of Agriculture
RUBY NEWHALL, Secretary. Experiment Station and Extension Service


TEACHING STAFF

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY

ALVIN PERCY BLACK, A.B., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry
HARVEY A. IAST, B.S., Fellow in Agricultural Chemistry

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

JOHN EDWIN TURLINGTON, M.S., Ph.D.. Professor of Agricultural Economics
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, M.S.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marketing
RAYMOND HOLT HOWARD, B.S.A., Instructor in Farm Management
JOHN LEVI WANN, B.S.A., Instructor in Economics
........ .... ...-...... .. ...-. . Graduate Assistant in Farm Management
-........ -.....-.--.-..-.-.-......-.....-...- Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Economics

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A.. Professor of Agricultural Engineering
........ -....-..... ..... .. .......... Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Engineering

AGRONOMY

OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, M.S., Ph.D., Professor of Soils
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, M.S., Assistant Professor of Farm Crops and Genetics
ROBERT SPENCER EDSALL, B.S.A., Fellow in Agronomy









396 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

.................................................., Fellow in A gronom y
JOSEPH RUSSELL HENDERSON, B.S.A., Graduate Assistant in Agronomy
AARON WHITNEY LELAND, Foreman of College Farm

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING

CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, B.Ag., M.A., Professor of Animal Husbandry
and Dairying
FREEMAN GOODE MARTIN, M.S., Instructor in Animal Husbandry and Dairying
.......... ..---........................-..---..-- ..-.-... Graduate Assistant in Animal Husbandry
ALLEN PAUL MULLINS, Herdsman

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, M.S., Assis:ant Professor of Botany and Bacteri-
ology
ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY

RALPH DAVIS DICKEY, B.S.A., Assistant Professor of Entomology and Plant
Pathology
JOHN THOMAS CREIGHTON, M.S., Instructor in Entomology and Plant Pathology
-.-.-............-- ....- ....- Graduate Assistant in Entomology and Plant Pathology

HORTICULTURE

WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Professor of Ornamentals and Forestry
EARLL LESLIE LORD, M.S., Professor of Pomology
CHARLES ELLIOTT ABBOTT, M.S., Assistant Professor of Propagation and Vege-
table Growing
JOHN VERTREES WATKINS, M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist
GERVACIO E. JUAN, B.S.A., Graduate Assistant in Horticulture

LANDSCAPE DESIGN

ALAN BEVERLY BURRITT, M.L.A., Associate Professor of Landscape Design

POULTRY HUSBANDRY

NATHAN WILLARD SANBORN, M.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry

VETERINARY SCIENCE

ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY, B.S., D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Science







EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF


EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF

AGRONOMY

WILLIAM EUGENE STOKES, M.S., Agronomist, Head of Department
WALTER ANTHONY LEUKEL, Ph.D., Associate Agronomist
JOHN PERLIN CAMP, M.S.A., Assistant Agronomist
FRED HAROLD HULL, M.S., Assistant Agronomist
GEORGE EDGAR RITCHEY, M.S., Assistant Agronomist (In cooperation with
U.S. Department of Agriculture)
JACOB DEWEY WARNER, M.S., Assistant Agronomist
H:\NYi ZEIGLER, Farm Foreman for Agronomy and Animal Husbandry

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY. B.S., D.V.M., Veterinarian. Head of Department
RAYMOND BROWN BECKER, Ph.D., Associate in Dairy Husbandry
DORSEY ADDREN SANDERS, B.S., D.V.M., Associate Veterinarian, West Palm
Beach Field Laboratory
WAYNE MILLER NEAL, Ph.D., Assistant in Animal Nutrition
EZEKIEL FRED THOMAS, D.V.M., Assistant Veterinarian
CHARLES RALPH DAWSON. M.S.A., Assistant in Dairy Investigations

CHEMISTRY

RUDOLPH WILLIAM RUPRECHT, Ph.D., Chemist, Head of Department
ROBERT MARLIN BARNETTE, Ph.D., Associate Chemist
CHARLES EDWARD BELL, M.S., Assistant Chemist
JOHN MELTON COLEMAN. B.S., Assistant Chemist
JACKSON BOLING HESTER, M.S., Assistant Chemist
HERBERT WILLIAMS WINSOR, B.S.A., Assistant Chemist

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

CLARENCE VERNON NOBLE, PH.D., Agricultural Economist, Head of Department
BRUCE McKINLEY, A.B., B.S.A., Associate Agricultural Economist
MARVIN ADEL BROOKER, Ph.D., Assistant Agricultural Economist
ZACK SAVACE, M.S.A., Assistant Agricultural Economist

HOME ECONOMICS

OUIDA DAVIS ABBOTT, Ph.D., Head of Department
CHESTER FREDERICK AHMANN, Ph.D., Physiologist
LEONARD WILLIAM GADDUM, Ph.D., Biochemist







398 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

ENTOMOLOGY

JOSEPH RALPH WATSON, M.A., Entomologist, Head of Department
CARLOS C. GOFF, M.S., Assistant Entomologist, Leesburg Field Laboratory
EDGAR FREDERICK GROSSMAN, M.A., Assistant Entomo!ogist. Cotton
ARCHIE NEWTON TISSOT, M.S., Assistant Entomologist
JO0tN W. WILSON, Ph.D., Assistant Entomologist, Pierson Field Laboratory
FRED WINTER WALKER, Assistant Entomologist, Monticello Field LaboralorN
Louis WILLIAM ZIEGLER. B S.A., Assistant Entomo'ogist
HOMER EELLS BRATLEY, M.S.A., Assistant in Entomology

HORTICULTURE

ARTHUR FORREST CAMP, Ph D., Horticulturist, Head of Department
HAROLD MOWRY, B.S.A., Associate Horticulturist
GULIE HARGROVE BLACKMON, M.S.A., Pecan Culturist
MARTIN RUSSELL ENSIGN, M.S., Assistant Horticulturist
ARTHUR Louis STAHL, Ph.D., Assistant Horticulturist
CLINTON BURTON VAN CLEEF, M.S.A., Foreman of Test Grounds

PLANT PATHOLOGY

WILLIAM BURLEY TISDALE, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist, Head of Department
ALBERT NELSON BROOKS, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist, Plant City Field
Laboratory
ARTHUR STEVENS RHOADS, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist, Cocoa Field
Laboratory
CLARENCE MITCHELL TUCKER, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist, Hastings
Field Laboratory
MARION NEWMAN WALKER, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist, Leesburg Field
Laboratory
GEORGE FREDERICK WEBER, Ph.D., Associa:e Plant Pathologist
AUTHOR HAMNER EDDINS, Ph.D., Assistant Plant Pathologist
KENNETH WILFRED LOUCKS, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist
WILLIAM BYRON SHIPPY, Ph.D., Assistant Plant Patho'ogist, Leesburg Field
Laboratory
ERDMAN WEST, B.S., Mycologist
DAVID G. KELBERT, Field Assistant in Plant Pathology, Bradenton Field Lab-
oratory
ROBERT EMMETT NOLEN, M.S.A., Field Assistant in Plant Pathology, Plant
City Field Laboratory







EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF


CITRUS EXPERIMENT STATION, LAKE ALFRED

JOHN HENRY JEFFERIES. Superintendent
BONNIE REID FUDGE, Ph.D., Assistant Chemist
WILLIAM ABRAHAM KUNTZ, M.S., Assistant Plant Pathologist
GEORGE DEWEY RUEHLE, Ph.D., Assistant Plant Pathologist
WILLIAM L. THOMPSON, B.S., Assistant Entomologist

EVERGLADES EXPERIMENT STATION, BELLE GLADE

ROBERT VERRILL ALLISON, Ph.D., Soils Specialist in Charge.
BENJAMIN ARTHUR BOURNE, M.S., Associate Plant Physiologist, Sugarcane
Investigations
ADRIAN DAANE, Ph.D., Associate Agronomist
RICHARD NUGENT LOBDELL, M.S., Associate Entomologist
JOSEPH R. NELLER, Ph.D., Associate Biochemist
FREDERICK DELOS STEVENS, B.S., Associate Agronomist Sugarcane Investigations
HERMAN HAMILTON WEDGWORTH, M.S., Associate Plant Pathologist
MALCOLM ROY BEDSOLE, M.S.A., Assistant Chemist, Soils
RALPH WYMAN KIDDER. B.S., Farm Foreman
FRED YOUNT, Office and Field Assistant

SUB-TROPICAL EXPERIMENT STATION, HOMESTEAD

HERBERT SNOW WOLFE, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist in Charge
LEONARD RAYMOND ToY, B.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist
STACY 0. HAWKINS, M.A., Field Assistant in Plant Pathology

TOBACCO EXPERIMENT STATION, QUINCY

LEVI OTTO GRATZ, Ph.D., Associate Plant Pathologist in Charge
WILLIAM ANGUS CARVER, Ph.D., Assistant Cotton Specialist
RAYMOND MERCHANT CROWN, B.S.A., Field Assistant, Cotton
RANDALL RICH KINCAID, M.A., Assistant Plant Patho!ogist
JESSE REEVES, Farm Foreman







400 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE STAFF

COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL DEMONSTRATION WORK

WILLIAM THOMAS NETTLES, B.S., District Agent
HAROLD GRAY CLAYTON, M.S.A., District Agent
JESSE LEE SMITH, District Agent
RAYMOND WILLIAM BLACKLOCK, B.A., Boys' Club Agent
HAMLIN L. BROWN, B.S.A., Dairyman
EZRA FRANKLIN DEBUSK, B.S., Citrus Pathologist and Entomologist
NORMAN RIPLEY MEHRHOF, M.Agr., Poultryinan
WALTER JEFFERSON SHEELY, B.S., Animal Husbandman (In cooperation with
U.S. Department of Agriculture)
JOHN EDWIN TURLINGTON, M.S., Ph.D., Agricultural Economist
FRANK WARNER BRUMLEY, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Farm Management
WYNFRED ROSCOE BRIGGS, B.S.A., Assistant Economist, Farm Management
DOYAL EDGAR TIMMONS, M.S.A., Agricultural Economist, Marketing

COOPERATIVE HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK, TALLAHASSEE

FLAVIA GLEASON, State Agent
LUCY BELLE SETTLE, B.S., District Agent
RUBY McDAVID, District Agent
MARY ELLEN KEOWN, M.S., District Agent
ISABELLE S. THURSBY, Food and Marketing Agent
......................................................... E extension N nutritionist
VIRGINIA PEARL MOORE, Home Improvement Specialist

COUNTY AGENTS

Alachua. Gainesville: F. L. Craft; Mrs. Grace F. Warren
Bradford, Starke: L. T. Dyer; Miss Pearl Jordan
Calhoun, Blountstown: John G. Kelly; Miss Josephine Nimms (for Liberty
County)
Charlotte and Highlands, Punta Gorda: Miss May Winfield
Citrus and Sumter, Inverness: I. R. Nolen; Mrs. Elizabeth W. Moore
Dade (North). Miami: J. S. Rainey; Miss Pansy Norton; (South) Home-
stead: C. H. Steffani
DeSoto. Arcadia: J. J. Heard
Dixie, Cross City: D. M. Treadwell
Duval, Jacksonville: W. L. Watson; Miss Pearl Lafitte; A. S. Lawton (Asst.);
C. H. Magoon (Asst.)









EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF


Escambia, Pensacola: E. P. Scott; Miss Ethel Atkinson
Gadsden, Quincy: Miss Elise Lafitte
Hamilton, Jasper: J. J. Sechrest
Hernando. Brooksville: J. H. Logan; Mrs. Florence Albert
Highlands, Sebring: L. H. Alsmeyer; Miss May Winfield
Hillsborough (East), Plant City: C. P. Wright; Miss Motelle Madole:
(W est), Tampa: ................ --.. ........; M iss Allie Rush
Homes. Bonifay: Mrs. Bettie A. Caudle
Indian River, Vero Beach: ........................ ...................... ; M iss Ethyl Holloway
Jackson, Marianna: S. H. Rountree; Miss Eleanor Clark
Jefferson. Monticello: E. H. Finlayson; Miss Ruby Brown
Lafayette. Mayo: D. C. Geiger
Lake, Tavares: C. R. Hiatt; Mrs. Mary Allen
Lee. Ft. Myers: W. P. Hayman; Miss Anna Mae Sikes
Leon, Tallahassee: G. C. Hodge; Mrs. Ruth C. Kellum
Levy. Bronson: N. J. Albritton
Liberty. Bristol: Dewey H. Ward
Manatee. Bradenton: L. H. Wilson; Miss Margaret Cobb
Marion, Ocala: Clyde H. Norton: Miss Tillie Roesel
Martin, Stuart: C. P. Heuck
Okaloosa. Crestview: Joseph W. Malone; Miss Berlha Henry
Okeechohee, Okeechobee: C. A. Fulford
Orange, Orlando: K. C. Moore; Mrs. Nellie W. Taylor
Osceola, Kissimmee: J. R. Gunn: Miss Albina Smith
Palm Beach, West Palm Beach: M. U. Mounts; Mrs. Edith Y. Barrus
Pinellas, Clearwater: William Gomme; Mrs. Joy Belle Hess
Polk, Barlow: F. L. Holland; Miss Lois Godbey; Miss Mosel Preston (Asst.)
St. Johns. St. Augustine: E. H. Vance; Miss Anna Heist
St. Lucie, Fort Pierce: Alfred Warren; Miss Ethyl Holloway
Santa Rosa, Milton: John G. Hudson; Miss Eleanor Barton
Suwannee, Live Oak: N. G. Thomas
Taylor, Perry: R. S. Dennis
Union, Lake Butler: L. T. Dyer; Miss Pearl Jordan
Volusia, DeLand: .....- ............ ....................... ; M iss Orpha Cole
Wakulla. Crawfordville: Henry Hudson
Walton. DeFuniak Springs: Mitchell Wilkins; Miss Eloise McGriff
Washington. Chipley: Gus York





402 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

NEGRO LOCAL FARM AND HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS

A. A. Turner, Local District Agent, Tallahassee
Julia A. Miller, Local District Agent, Tallahassee

COUNTY WORKERS

Alachua, Gainesville: A. W. Bowls
Columbia, Lake City: E. S. Belvin
Duval, Jacksonville: Ethel Mae Norman
Gadsden, Quincy: E. J. Bragg
Jackson, Marianna: J. E. Granberry
Jefferson, Monticello: M. E. Groover
Leon, Tallahassee: Alice W. Poole
Marion, Ocala: W. B. Young; Reddick: Idella Ranson
M adison, M adison: .................-...........------ ..----- ....-- .. .......--....- ; Althea Ayer
Orange, Orlando: Mamie W. Wright
Suwannee, Live Oak: C. T. Evans
St. Johns, St. Augustine: M. A. Caldwell
Sumter. Webster: Diana H. Buie







GENERAL STATEMENT


GENERAL STATEMENT

The College of Agriculture has three divisions:
1. Instruction Division (the College proper)
2. Research Division (Experiment Station)
3. Agricultural Extension Service

THE COLLEGE

AIM AND SCOPE
The College was established under the Act of Congress creating and en-
dowing institutions for the liberal and practical education of the industrial
classes. Recognition of agriculture as a branch of collegiate instruction is a
distinctive feature of schools thus founded.
The aim of the college is to afford young men the best possible opportunity
for gaining technical knowledge and training in the art and science of agri-
culture. About one-third of the student's time is devoted to technical studies,
the other two-thirds to cultural studies and basic sciences. A foundation is
thus laid which will enable graduates to become leaders in educational work
or effective producing agriculturists.

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT
The Agriculture Building, a brick and concrete structure three stories
high, provides offices, classrooms and laboratories for several departments of
the college, including Agronomy, Agricultural Engineering, Animal Husbandry
and Dairying, Horticulture, Landscape Design, Entomology and Plant Path-
ology. The Horticulture Building, of brick and concrete, three stories and
attic, contains the office of the Dean, offices of Agricultural Extension workers
and of the State Plant Board; also the classrooms and laboratories of the de-
partments of Agricultural Economics, Poultry Husbandry and Veterinary Sci-
ence. The Experiment Station Library and Mailing Rooms are included in
this building.
The College Farm consists of 145 acres, used primarily for instruction pur-
poses. The farm is equipped with a foreman's house, general barn for work
stock, modern dairy barn, silos, beef cattle barn, veterinary hospital, sweet
potato storage house, greenhouses, corn crib, fertilizer house, machinery shed,
slat house and cold frames, poultry houses, stock lots and sheds, irrigation
systems and a number of types and breeds of cattle, hogs and other farm
animals. The Experiment Station Farm of over 700 acres, joins the College
Farm and is also accessible for instruction and demonstration.

LIBRARIES
Many works on agriculture and horticulture have recently been added to
the general library. A trained librarian aids students in finding needed ref-
erences. Each department has, furthermore, a small collection of well selected
volumes which are always accessible. The Experiment Station Library con-







404 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

world and from the United States Department of Agriculture, all fully indexed
tains a very complete set of bulletins from the experiment stations of the
and carefully filed.
THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB

This is a voluntary association of students in the college. Its purpose is
to give training in public speaking and in preparation for leadership. The
programs consist mainly of essays and debates on agricultural or civic topics
or speeches by members and visitors. Meetings are held weekly.
The Agricultural Club publishes monthly during the school year, The Flor-
ida College Farmer. The purpose of this magazine is to give students in the
College of Agriculture experience and training in the field of agricultural
journalism; and to provide its readers with useful information.

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, LOAN FUND

Fellowships.-Chilean Nitrate of Soda; Penney-Gwinn.
Scholarships.-County Agricultural; Boys' Clubs.
Loan Fund.-William Wilson Finley Foundation.
For details concerning all of the above, see Bulletin of General Information.

REMUNERATIVE AND INSTRUCTIVE LABOR

Opportunities frequently occur for students to work in the fields and truck
gardens, about the barns, in the buildings, and at the Agricultural Experi-
ment Station. Those who engage in agricultural pursuits during vacation pe-
riods will be markedly benefited and after graduation will command more
desirable positions or find their efforts on the farm more effective. A few
students are employed as waiters, as janitors and in other capacities. Such
employment is not as a rule given to a student otherwise financially able to
attend the University, nor is it given to one who fails in any study. Applica-
tion for employment should be made to Mr. R. C. Beaty, Assistant to the
Dean of Students, Gainesville, Fla.

DONATIONS AND LOANS

The laboratories have been supplies with much of their farm machinery
for instructional purposes through the generosity of the following manufac-
turers and distributors: McCormick-Deering Co., Jacksonville; Gulf Fertilizer
Co., Tampa; Florida Agricultural Supply Co., Orlando; Southern States Lum-
ber Co., Pensacola; Peninsula Chemical Co., Orlando; Gould Pump Co.,
Seneca Falls, N. Y.; Owensboro Ditcher Co., Owensboro, Ky.; Oliver Chilled
Plow Works, South Bend, Ind.; Challenge Co., Batavia, Ill.; DeLaval Separator
Co., New York; Plow Mate, Inc., Cleveland, 0.; Caterpillar Tractor Co.,
Peoria, Ill.
SUMMER SESSION

The College of Agriculture is rotating the courses offered in summer so
that in a succession of two or three years all studies of greatest interest will
be given.







GENERAL STATEMENT


Graduate students interested in agriculture may find these desirable.
Undergraduates may take them for college credit.
Mature students who have not completed entrance requirements may, on
the approval of the Dean and the Director of the Summer Session, enroll as
adult specials for the practical value of the information gained in courses
desired, provided they conform to other requirements of the Summer Session.

THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION
AIM AND SCOPE

The Agricultural Experiment Station is an institution founded by Congres-
sional act for the purpose of acquiring and diffusing agricultural knowledge.
From the enacting clause it is evident that Congress intended to establish
such an institution, for purely investigational work, in connection with every
college and university receiving the benefits of the original "Land-Grant Act".
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station was founded in 1887 and
has continued without interruption since that time. Part of its funds are ob-
tained from Federal sources and, in compliance with Federal law, such income
is used for acquiring new and important knowledge in regard to crops, soils
and livestock, and for research in agriculture and home economics. No funds
can be expended, either directly or indirectly, for teaching purposes or for
holding farmers' institutes, and only a small per cent of the Station's income
may be used for buildings. In order to receive the benefits of the Federal
Adams, Hatch and Purnell funds, the Station must, before any money is spent
in investigation, submit plans or projects for proposed experiments to the
Office of Experiment Stations of the United States Department of Agriculture
for approval.
Funds appropriated by the State of Florida are budgeted for definite in-
vestigations or lines of work, and it is the duty of the Station to conduct
these investigations and secure and publish the information needed.

LOCATION

The Main Experiment Station is located at the University. Its administra-
tive offices, editorial rooms and library are in the Horticulture Building and
the entire three floors of the Experiment Station Building are given over to its
departmental offices and laboratories. The advantages of having the Main
Station at the University are obvious. The research workers deliver popular
and technical lectures, either to the student-body as a whole or to special
clubs and local organizations. The experiment fields and orchards, as well as
the research laboratories, contribute to the opportunities of students for study-
ing methods of scientific investigation. Some with special aptitude have an
opportunity of assisting the specialists in charge. Minor positions, such as
those of laboratory assistants, are occasionally open and whenever possible are
given to students of the University. The fields and plots of the Main Station
adjoin the University campus and are a part of the University grounds.
In addition to the Main Station, it has been found necessary to establish
branch stations at four points in the State in order to serve areas in which






406 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

conditions, soils, etc., are radically different from those at the Main Station-
These are the Citrus Station at Lake Alfred, for the special study of problems
of the citrus grower; the Tobacco Station at Quincy, for the study of the
problems of particular interest to the tobacco grower and for research work on
general agricultural problems of West Florida; the Everglades Station at Belle
Glade, for the purpose of making investigations, tests and experiments in agri-
cultural problems as applied to conditions of the Everglades; and the Sub-
Tropical Station at Homestead, for problems peculiar to this sub-tropical
area.
The branch stations are units of a general experiment station system and
are directed and administered from the general office at the Main Station.
A superintendent, or other official, is in charge of each branch station and
research workers are permanently assigned to the various stations for work
upon the projects under investigation. These workers are responsible to depart-
ment heads at the Main Station for the work done by them or under their
direction.
The Main Station and its branches constitute a system which is operated
to give, as fully as possible, the maximum of scientific results with the mini-
mum of administrative expense.

FIELD LABORATORIES
Several field laboratories have been established at various points over the
State where problems peculiar to a particular crop or area require investiga-
tion. At present these include a field laboratory at Hastings for the study of
Irish potato diseases; a second at Bradenton for the study of nailhead rust
of tomatoes; a third at Cocoa for certain citrus investigations; a fourth at
Plant City for the study of strawberry diseases; a fifth at Monticello for
study of pecan insect pests and diseases; a sixth at Pierson for control work
on insect pests of fern; a seventh at Leesburg for the study of diseases and
insect pests of watermelons and diseases of ferns and ornamentals, and an
eighth at West Palm Beach for the study of anaplasmosis of cattle.
The field laboratory is not a permanent feature of the Experiment Station
system, like the branch stations, but may be established wherever the need is
apparent for work which cannot be performed at the regular stations. When
this work has been accomplished, the laboratory will be removed or abolished.
One or more research workers are placed at each field laboratory under the
general direction of the department, or departments, of the Main Station
concerned with the work to be done.

EXPERIMENT STATION LIBRARY
The library of the Experiment Station is maintained for the use of the
agricultural research workers. Its reading room, however, is open to anyone
caring to use it. It is a depository for the publications issued by the United
States Department of Agriculture and by all agricultural experiment stations
of this and many foreign countries. It contains also the most important gen-
eral scientific and technical journals and periodicals, as well as text books
and reference books relating to agriculture and the related sciences. The li-
brary is located on the second floor of the Horticulture Building.







GENERAL STATEMENT


LINES OF INVESTIGATION
The lines of investigation conducted by the Station fall into several depart-
ments: agronomy, agricultural economics, animal husbandry, chemistry, cot-
ton investigations, entomology, home economics, horticulture, and plant path-
ology. The work of the Station is, however, not sharply divided among these
different departments. The staff formulates what are known as projects, the
work of which is continued regardless of whether its ramifications take it into
one or another department, and it is possible for two or more departments
to he engaged in the study of various phases of the same problem.
At the present time more than 150 projects are being investigated and
these include as many as possible of the major problems of the State's agri-
cultural industries.
PUBLICATIONS
The publications fall into three classes: bulletins, press bulletins and annual
reports. The bulletins contain more or less complete results of particular in-
vestigations. At least four, and often as many as eight or ten, are issued
annually. 223 having appeared to date. The press bulletins are prepared in
order to bring to the citizens of Florida information connected with various
phases of certain projects in which all phases have not been completed, or
relative to small projects on which the information to be released does not
require a large publication. Press bulletins are issued at short intervals, 434
having already appeared. The annual reports contain brief statements of the
work done during each year. as well as the expenditure of funds; 41 have
been published. All of these publications are distributed free upon request
to the Director.

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
COOPERATIVE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION WORK
The Agricultural Extension Service supports a system of practical educa-
tion. It teaches the results of scientific experiments to the present and future
farmer and housewife. A synopsis of this work includes:
Demonstrations in agricultural and horticultural crops, dairying, animal
husbandry, poultry raising. cooperative organizations. agricultural economics.
insect and disease control.
Boys' agricultural clubs, including corn, pig, and fat barrow, peanut, calf,
potato, bee and citrus clubs.
Extension schools, including Farmers' Week. held annually at the Uni-
versity. county and home demonstration agents' meetings, boys' and girls'
annual club meetings, and extension schools, arranged by county agents.
Home demonstration work, including gardening, poultry, bee keeping, food
conservation, nutrition, clothing, home improvement clubs, and civic improve-
ment clubs. Headquarters are at the Florida State College for Women.
Tallahassee.
Demonstration work with colored farmers, including club work for bous
and girls, and demonstration work with men and women. Headquarters are
at the Florida Agricultural and Mechanical College for Negroes. Tallahassee.







408 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

SMITH-LEVER ACT
In accordance with the terms of the Smith-Lever Act, effective July 1,
1914, agricultural extension work is carried on cooperatively by the United
States Department of Agriculture and the State of Florida. In addition to
this, in 1919 Congress passed the Smith-Lever Supplementary Act, the Capper-
Ketcham Act in 1927 and an additional Cooperative Act in 1930.
The purpose of these acts may be seen in the following quotation:
. . cooperative agricultural extension work shall consist of giving of
instruction and practical demonstration in agriculture and home economics
to persons not attending or resident in said colleges in the several communi-
ties, and imparting to such persons information on said subjects through field
demonstrations, publications, and otherwise; and this work shall be carried
on in such a manner as may be mutually agreed upon by the Secretary of
Agriculture and the State agricultural college or colleges receiving the benefits
of this act."
Extension work is now conducted in 48 counties.
FUNDS AVAILABLE
By the terms of the Smith-Lever Act, the College of Agriculture receives
from Congressional appropriations $10,000 annually and an additional sum
which was increased annually until 1922, the State each year appropriating an
equal amount. The Legislature has enacted laws enabling the State to secure
the benefits of both the original Smith-Lever, the Capper-Ketcham and the
Supplementary Acts as well as making a direct State appropriation for plac-
ing agents in additional counties. The total amount of State and Federal funds
available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1931 is $235,140.24.
SCHOOLS OF INSTRUCTION FOR EXTENSION WORKERS
The annual meeting of the county and home demonstration agents is held
at the University of Florida. The purpose of this meeting is to give instruction
and make plans for future work.
This is the one meeting of the year when extension workers from the
United States Department of Agriculture and the State of Florida assemble
for joint sessions to discuss the work with county and home demonstration
agents.
This meeting is largely a series of conferences. Committees are appointed
to make recommendations for the conduct of the work throughout the coming
year.
BOYS' AGRICULTURAL CLUBS AND SHORT COURSES
Agricultural clubs are organized among the boys of the farms for the
purpose of teaching them by practical demonstrations better methods of
farming. Business men and agricultural organizations annually give success-
ful boys free trips to the University to attend the short courses in agriculture.
This is done to stimulate greater interest in club work and has caused many
boys to enter college for a four-year course. The Short Course is held from
June 1 to June 5.
Frank E. Dennis of Jacksonville offers a $250 scholarship in the College







GENERAL STATEMENT


of Agriculture to the State Pig Club champion. Three $100 scholarships
have been given annually by the Florida Bankers' Association.
The Chilean Nitrate of Soda Educational Bureau of New York offers a
$100 scholarship for award in a corn club contest in addition to other awards
for 4-H Club members.

WOMEN'S HOME DEMONSTRATION CLUBS
Home demonstration clubs are organized by home demonstration agents
for the benefit of the women of rural communities. These clubs have definite
programs and, under the leadership of the county home demonstration agent,
undertake to carry out such programs as will improve home life.

GIRLS' CLUBS
Girls between the ages of ten and eighteen are eligible for membership.
Each member is required to undertake a definite piece of work under the lead-
ership of her home demonstration agent. This club work enters into many
phases of home life and is intended to teach the girls the best practices for the
improvement and development of the rural home.

CLUB CONTESTS
Contests are conducted for the purpose of giving credit to club members
for the work they have accomplished, to display the year's work so that it will
be educational, and to stimulate interest in every phase of farm and home
life. Exhibits are placed on display, record books are examined and rewards
are based on quality, record and financial showing. Substantial prizes such
as money, merchandise, and scholarships to the University or to the State
College for Women are offered each year.

PUBLICATIONS
The publications of the Service include bulletins, circulars, annual reports,
a club paper, a weekly clip-sheet for newspapers and an annual calendar. The
bulletins and circulars contain useful information on farm and home subjects,
while the annual reports give details of the work accomplished by the staff
and the county representatives. The weekly clip-sheet, or Agricultural News
Service, contains items of news from the Agricultural Experiment Station, Ex-
tension Service and College of Agriculture, as well as timely information on
varied agricultural topics. This sheet is sent to about 200 daily and weekly
papers of Florida. The calendar contains suggestions on farm work in Florida
for each month of tile year.
These publications are free to citizens of the state, upon request to the
Director.
AGRICULTURAL RADIO PROGRAMS
Radio programs are sent out from Station WRUF daily during the
week from 12:15 to 12:45. Talks are made by members of the College of
Agriculture faculty and the Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension
Service staffs. Material supplied by the United States Department of Agricul-
ture, and copies of questions received and answered by staff workers are read







410 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

by the Assistant Agricultural Editor, who has charge of the agricultural pro-
grams.
THE FLORIDA NATIONAL EGG-LAYING CONTEST
This contest is conducted under the supervision of the Agricultural Exten-
sion Service of the University. It is located at Chipley, Florida, and has
capacity for housing 100 pens of contest birds. The purpose of the contest is
to secure records on the production of breeding stock so that poultrymen of
Florida will have the benefit of these records with a view of securing high
producing breeding stock.
The contest is authorized by an act of the Legislature which provided for
its establishment, maintenance, and upkeep and which placed it under the
supervision of the Agricultural Extension Service.

FARMERS' WEEK
Beginning August 10, 1931; ending August 14. 1931.
Farmers' Week is especially suited to the needs of the following classes:
Farm men and farm women of all ages who recognize their need for some
training in scientific agriculture in order to render more effective the practical
knowledge they have already gained; young men who are compelled to drop
out of school and yet desire to devote a short time to special preparation for
work on the farm; city students who wish to fit themselves for farm life;
and colonists who wish information regarding Florida conditions and methods.
The laboratory equipment, the purebred livestock, and the farms will be
available for instructional purposes; the Agricultural Experiment Station and
State Plant Board will afford visitors an opportunity for observation and in-
quiry. Care has been taken to meet the needs of practical farmers. The
courses consist of lectures, laboratory work, and field observations and dem-
onstrations in general field crops, soils, vegetable gardening, citrus, animal
husbandry, dairying, poultry, veterinary science, bee culture, and agricultural
engineering.
There are no age limits and no educational requirements for admission.
No tuition fee is charged.
EXPENSES
The necessary expenses for room and board will approximate $1.50 per day.
The University dormitories and dining room are available to those attend-
ing Farmers' Week.

AGRICULTURAL MEETINGS
A number of meetings for people interested in agriculture are held annu-
ally at the University. Such people will find accommodations and facilities,
better for their purpose than any in the State. Laboratories, classrooms, and
exhibits, as well as growing crops, barns and other equipment, are placed
freely at service of visitors.

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES
Correspondence courses in agriculture are offered under the General Ex-
tension Division, of the University of Florida.







ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS


DEGREES AND CURRICULA

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Sixteen high school units are required for non-conditioned entrance to the
College of Agriculture. They are as follows:
E n g lish ........................................ ........................... 3
Algebra ........................... .......... ... ........... 1
Plane geom etry ............ ... ..............
H history ............... ............... ... ........................ 1
S c ie n c e ........... ..... ..... ...--------.-.. --. ----- .. .....-- .... ...---- 1
Foreign language ....... ... ....... ...... ....... ... 2
Approved electives .... .. .. .... ......... 7

16
The foreign language may be waived by presenting 2 extra units in his-
tory or science, or one extra in each. Graduates of accredited high schools
are admitted without examination, provided they offer units as listed above.
For further instructions, see Bulletin of General Information.

RULES AND REGULATIONS

In order that each student may have an opportunity to familiarize himself
with all the rules and regulations by which he is governed while a student at
the University, a separate volume, The By-Laws of the University of Florida,
is published. This booklet is distributed at the registration periods. It is the
duty of each person registering to secure a copy and become thoroughly ac-
quainted with its contents because he will be held responsible for everything
set forth therein.
THE FOUR YEAR COURSE

The student is expected to select by the beginning of his junior year, as
his major, some one department of the College, or agricultural education.
This gives him an opportunity to prepare for that branch of agriculture in
which he is most interested.

CREDIT FOR PRACTICAL WORK

By previous arrangement with the head of a department and the Dean,
students may do practical work under competent supervision in any recognized
agricultural pursuit during their course of study, and upon returning to Col-
lege and rendering a satisfactory written report showing faithful service, will
be entitled to one credit for each month of such work; such credits shall
not total more than six in the one-year and four-year courses.

DEGREE

The work outlined in the following tables, whatever the major subject,
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, or Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Landscape Design.
One hundred and thirty-six credits and one hundred and thirty-six honor
points are required for graduation in all groups.








412 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


CURRICULUM FOR FOUR-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE

Leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture


First Semester Second Semester

Name of Course Credit Name of Course Credit

Freshman Year

Biology 101 ............. ........... ................ 5 Animal Husbandry 104.......................... 4
Chem istry 105 .......................................... 4 Chemistry 106 ....................................... 5
English 101 ................................................ 3 English 102 .......................................... 3
Horticulture 101 ...................................... 3 Poultry Husbandry 102.......................... 3
Military Science 101 .............................. 2 Military Science 102 .............................. 2
Physical Education 101.....................---- .....-.. 1 Physical Education 102...........-----............ 1
18 18

Sophomore Year


Agricultural Economics 201 .............. 3
Botany 101 or Option (1).................... 4
E lectives ................................................. 4
Military Science 201 ...........-................ 2
Chemistry 0262 or Option (2).. .......... 5
18


Agricultural Engineering 202 ............ 4
Botany 102 ......................................... 4
Mathematics 204 (applied).................. 3
Military Science 202 ......................... 2
Chemistry 0305 or Elective ................ 5
18


Junior and Senior Years


Agronomy 301 .............. ................ 5
Bacteriology 301 or Option (3).......... 4
English, Journalism, Speech, Lan-
guage, Psychology, Education,
or History ........... ............... 3
*Physics 111 & 115 or Elective ........ 4
E lectives .......................... ........... .......... 16
32


Entomology 302 .................-.................... 4
English, Speech, Language, Psy-
chology, Education or History.... 3
Botany 302, Vet. Science 306 or Op-
tion (4) .......................................... 4
E lectives ............................... ..................21
32


*One additional credit will be earned by also taking Physics 113.


Option (1)
Option (2)

Option (3)

Option (4)


General Economics, Mathematics, or Physics
Chemistry, Engineering, Business Administration, Educational Psy-
chology, or Education.
Chemistry, Engineering, Education, Business Administration or
Mathematics.
Agricultural Bacteriology, Plant Pathology, Agricultural Engineer-
ing, Poultry Husbandry, Feeds and Feeding, or Agricultural Eco-
nomics.


Of the electives, all except 18 semester hours are to be in technical agri-
culture, agricultural education, or agricultural chemistry. A minimum of 15
and a maximum of 30 semester hours, of courses 200 or above, must be
taken in one department for major.
The student should select his major in sophomore year if he takes any of
the options of that year; it must be selected not later than the beginning
of junior year. He may major in any department of the College, or in agri-
cultural education. The head of the department in which he majors becomes
his adviser, and options must be selected with his consent, as well as required
work in the major department. Electives must have his approval, as well as
that of the Dean.









CURRICULA 41


CURRICULUM FOR FOUR-YEAR COURSE IN LANDSCAPE DESIGN


Leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Landscape Design


First Semester

Name of Course


Second Semester


Credits Name of Course


Credits


Freshman Year


Botany 101 ................................................ 4 Architecture 112 ..........................
Chem istry 105 ............................ ............ 4 Botany 102 ................ ....... .... ...
English 101 ................................................ 3 Chemistry 106 .............
Military Science 103.............................. 2 English 102 ...................................
*Modern Language .............................. 3 Military Science 104 ...................
Physical Education 101 .... ...-----....... 1 *Modern Language ......................
Physical Education 102 .............
17


Sophomore Year


.......... 1
.......... 4

.......... 2
...........3
.......... 1
19
19


Architecture 121 .................. ............ 2
Horticulture 101 .................................... 3
Landscape Design 207 ............................. 3
Military Science 203................................ 2
*Modern Language ............................... 3
Physics 211 ............................................ 4

17


A architecture 122 ..................................... 2
Landscape Design 208.......................... 3
Landscape Design 210 .......................... 3
Landscape Design 212......................... 3
Mathematics 204 ..... .............................. 3
Military Science 204............................ 2
*Modern Language ..................... 3

19


Junior Year


Agronomy 301 ............-......................... 5
E lective ..................................................... 2
English 201 .........................................- ..- 3
Geology 201 ............. ............................ 3
Landscape Design 309........................ 3

16


Agricultural Engineering 304.............. 3
Architecture 226 .................................... 2
English 202 ............................................ 3
Entomology 302 ..................... .. 4
Landscape Design 310 ....................... 3

15


Senior Year


Agricultural Engineering
Architecture 227 ...............
Architecture 231 ...............
Entomology 405 .................
Horticulture 411 ................
Landscape Design 405.......


301 ....
-.-.---------
.............
.............
I.-----------


.......... 3
.......... 2
.......... 2
.......... 3
.......... 3
.......... 3

16


Architecture 232 ................................ 2
Elective .................................................... 3
Entomology 406 ..................................... 3
Landscape Design 306 .......................... 3
Landscape Design 406 .......................... 3
Landscape Design 408 ......................... 3

17


*French preferred

SPECIAL STUDENTS

Students eighteen years of age and over may enter the four-months and
one-year courses offered in the College of Agriculture without the required
high school entrance units, and without examination. They are expected to
take not less than fourteen or more than nineteen hours per week from the
following list of courses. Those having a knowledge of common school

branches only, should first select subjects numbered below 100; while those
with high school or college training may at once select courses marked above
100. Each semester is as nearly as possible complete in itself.










411 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE



First Semester

Hrs.
Name of Course Subject Per Week

Agricultural Economics 202 .................... Agricultural Resources ................ 3
Agricultural Economics 303 ......................Farm Records ................................... 3
Agricultural Engineering 21 .....................Farm Machinery ........... .......... 3
Agricultural Engineering 301 .--.......-- .........Drainage and Irrigation....-............. 3
Agricultural Engineering 303........................Farm Shop .............................................. 3
Agricultural Engineering 401................. Farm Buildings .................................... 3
Agronomy 21 .................................................... Elements of Agronomy ... .............. 2
Agronomy 201 ...............................................Farm Crops ....................... ............... 3
Animal Husbandry 21 .......................................Elements of Animal Husbandry... 3
Animal Husbandry 201....--------...........................Animal Feeding ................................... 3
Animal Husbandry 203....................... Beef Production .................................... 3
Chemistry 105 .------..... ..............................General Chemistry ................................ 4
Dairying 201 ..................... ............................. Farm D airying ...................................... 3
Entomology 21 ....- .....---.............................Farm, Garden and Orchard Insects.. 3
Entomology 405 ................................. ... ............Insecticides and Fungicides............... 3
Horticulture 21 ..........................................Introduction to Horticulture ............... 3
Horticulture 101 ........................................Elements of Horticulture................... 3
Horticulture 301 ............................................Advanced Trucking ............................. 3
Horticulture 303 ....--- .. ..--- ......................Floriculture .......................................... 3
Horticulture 305 .. .... ........ ...............Citrus Culture ................................... 3
Horticulture 307 ........----- ........................Subtropical Fruits ............................... 3
Plant Pathology 301 .... -- ........................General Pathology ............................... 4
Plant Pathology 303 ....-- ............. ............ .. Diseases of Florida Crops................ 3
Poultry Husbandry 21 ................................Poultry Essentials ................................ 3
Poultry Husbandry 201 .........................Commercial Poultry Keeping ....---... 3

Courses with odd numbers, under 100, in other colleges on the Campus.




Second Semester

Agricultural Economics 54 ......... ................Farm Management ............................ 3
Agricultural Economics 202 ........................... Fundamental Principles ................. 3
Agricultural Engineering 202 ............ .Farm Machinery .................................. 4
Agricultural Engineering 302 ........................Farm Motors .....................-----................ 3
Agricultural Engineering 402 ................ ......Farm Concrete ..............................- 2
Agronomy 22 ......... ...... ................Elements of Agronomy ................... 2
Agronomy 304 .................. -------.................... Forage Crops ...................................... 3
Animal Husbandry 104 ...... ....................Types and Breeds of Animals........-- 4
Animal Husbandry 204 ...... .................... Swine Production .............................. 3
Chemistry 106 ............ ............ .......General Chemistry ............................ 5
Dairying 22 .......-- --- ........................... Elements of Dairying....................... 3
Dairying 202 ........................................ ......... Dairy M anagem ent ............................. 3
Entomology 302 ..............- ......... ...... Economic Entomology ........................ 4
Entomology 406 ............------................... Fungicides and Insecticides .......... 3
Horticulture 22 .............. ................... Agricultural Botany ............................ 3
Horticulture 204 ............. ............. -- --- ......Pruning ..............---- ....................---- -- ............. 3
H orticulture 206 ............... ................... Trucking ................. .... ................... 3
Horticulture 306 .............---- .................... Citrus Harvesting, Marketing, etc.-- 3
Horticulture 308 ...............-------...................Deciduous Fruits ................................ 3
Horticulture 314 ................................. ......... Principles of Fruit Production............ 3
Landscape Design 210 ...................................... History of Landscape Design............ 3
Landscape Design 212 ....................................Plant Materials .................................. 3
Plant Pathology 22.......................................... Diseases and Insects of Citrus... 3
Plant Pathology 304 .................................Diseases of Florida Crops............... 3
Poultry Husbandry 102 .................................Farm Poultry ................--- --------................ 3
Poultry Husbandry 204 .............................. Commercial Poultry Keeping.............. 3
Veterinary Science 302 ................................ Veterinary Elements ........................... 2
Veterinary Science 402...................... ..... Poultry Diseases .................................. 2

Courses with even numbers, under 100, in other colleges on the Campus.









DEP4RTIMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Subjects with odd numbers are given in the first semester and subjects
with even numbers are given in the second semester unless the number begins
with 0, in which case the reverse is true.
The number of hours given is the number of hours which the class meets
per week.
The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours earned by
each student who receives a passing grade (A, B, C, or D) when the sub-
ject is completed. Unless specifically stated, credit may be obtained for one
semester of year courses.
Subjects numbered 200 or above are not open to freshmen; subjects num-
bered 300 or above are not open to sophomores; subjects numbered 400 or
above are not open to juniors; subjects numbered 500 or above are for gradu-
ate students.
The abbreviations used are wherever possible the first and last letter of
the first word of the department name. Occasionally, a third central letter
is demanded to distinguish between departments where first and last letters
are identical.

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY

Cy. 105.-General Chemistry. 3 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 4
credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in
Cy. 106 is earned. Black.
The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry and the preparation and prop-
erties of the common non-metallic elements and their compounds. Designed espe-
cially for students of agriculture.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of first year agricultural students.
Cy. 106.-General Chemistry, continued, and Qualitative Analysis. 3
hours and 6 hours laboratory. 5 credits. Black, Jackson.
A study of the metallic elements and their compounds and the essentials of
qualitative analysis. Designed especially for students of agriculture.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of first year agricultural students.
Cy. 0203.-Qualitative Analysis. 2 hours and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Jackson.
A systematic study of the metals and their chemical reactions and theoretical
considerations of qualitative analysis. Practice in the separation and identification
of the common metals and acid radicals.
Prerequisite: Cy. 0232.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 0232.-Elementary Physical Chemistry. 3 hours and 3 hours lab-
oratory. 4 credits. Jackson.
A study of the gaseous, liquid and solid states of matter, the properties of solu-
tions, and colloids.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.








416 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

Cy. 0262.-Organic Chemistry. 3 hours and 6 hours laboratory. 5
credits. Black.
A brief course embracing the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds,
designed chiefly for students in applied biological fields. Suitable for those pre-
medical students who desire only 5 hours of organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 305 or 0305.-Quantitative Analyisis. 2 hours and 9 hours labora-
tory. 5 credits. Black.
The fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. The labora-
tory work may be varied somewhat to fit the needs of individual students.
Prerequisite: Cy. 106 or 0203.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 361-362.-Organic Chemistry. 3 hours and 6 hours laboratory, or
its equivalent. 10 credits. No credit toward a degree will be al-
lowed until the entire 10 credits have been earned. Leigh.
A study of the preparation and properties of various aliphatic and aromatic
compounds.
Prerequisite: Cy. 203 or Cy. 0232.
Laboratory fee: $5 per semester.
Cy. 432.-Agricultural Analysis. 2 hours and 9 hours laboratory. 5
credits. Black.
The quantitative analysis of agricultural products. The laboratory work may
be varied somewhat to fit the needs of individual students.
Prerequisites: Cy. 305; Cy. 361-362.
Laboratory fee: $5.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
The Department seeks to present to students the nature of economic forces as
they affect the value of agricultural commodities. Courses are offered in agricul-
tural economics, farm management, marketing, statistics and prices. These courses
are designed to meet the demand for training in the organization and management
of farms, private or corporate owner; for specialists in marketing agricultural
products; and for research and extension workers along these lines.
Not only students who expect to engage in farming or marketing agricultural
products, but also county agents, Smith-Hughes instructors, country bankers, and
other business men whose businesses are closely related or partially dependent upon
farming, will find the courses in this Department useful.
The Department has more than 2,000 individual farm records covering dif-
ferent types of farming in the State, and approximately 300 marketing records. In
addition, access is had to a large number of records in both farm management and
marketing in the Department of Agricultural Economics of the Florida Experiment
Station.
As. 54.-Farm Management. 3 hours. No credit. Howard.
An elementary course in the organization of the farm business, laying out of
fields, location of buildings, farm accounting and important factors affecting profits.
As. 201.-Agricultural Economics. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Turlington.
The fundamental principles of economics in their relation to agriculture.
Required of second year agricultural students.
As. 202.-Agricultural Resources. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3
credits. Wann.
Potentialities and limitations of agricultural production in the various regions
of the United States and the world. Development of surplus and deficit agricul-
tural areas.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


417


As. 303.-Farm Records. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Wann.
Methods and practice of making and keeping farm inventories, feed records and
crop records.
Laboratory fee: $3.
As. 306.-Farm Management. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3
credits. Turlington.
The factors of production-systems of farming-their distribution and adapta-
tion-problems of labor, machinery, layout of farms and rotation systems.
Prerequisite: As. 201.
Laboratory fee: $2.
As. 308.-Marketing. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Hamilton.
Marketing and distributing farm products-marketing organizations and laws
governing them-the relation of foreign trade and general business conditions to
the farmer's market.
Laboratory fee: $2.
As. 311.-Rural Law. 2 hours. 2 credits. Turlington.
Classification of farm property-study of farm boundaries, fences, stock laws,
rents, contracts, deeds, abstracts, mortgages, taxes, and laws governing shipping
farm products.
As. 403.-Advanced Farm Management. 2 hours and 2 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. Turlington, Howard.
Laying out and locating various buildings, lots, fields and crops-cropping sys-
tems-farm surveys and a study of successful Florida farms.
Prerequisite: As. 306.
Two-day field trip, estimated at a cost of $10, paid at time trip is made.
Laboratory fee: $1.
As. 405.-Agricultural Prices. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3
credits. Hamilton, Howard.
Prices of farm products and the factors affecting them.
Laboratory fee: $1.
As. 408.-Marketing Fruits and Vegetables. 2 hours and 2 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. Hamilton.
Marketing of citrus, tomatoes, beans, potatoes and other Florida products.
Two-day field trip, estimated at a cost of $10, paid at time trip is made.
Laboratory fee: $2.
As. 409.-Cooperative Marketing. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3
credits. Hamilton.
Cooperative buying and selling organizations, their successes and failures-
methods of organization, financing and business management.
Two-day field trip, estimated at a cost of $10, paid at time trip is made.
Laboratory fee: $2.
As. 410.-Statistics. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Ham-
ilton, Howard.
The principles involved in the collection, tabulation and interpretation of agri-
cultural statistics.
As. 412.-Land Economics. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Hamilton, Wann.
Rural taxation-colonization and adjustments of rural laws to their best uses.
This course is the same as As. 508, less one problem.








418 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

GRADUATE COURSES

As. 501-502.-Agricultural Economics Seminar.
As. 503-504.-Marketing Seminar.
As. 505-506.-Research Problems.
Ais. 508.-Land Economics.
As. 509.-Citrus Grove Organization and Management.
As. 510.-Organization and Management of Truck Farms.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers courses covering the prin-
ciples of engineering as applied to various phases of agriculture, including such
subjects as buildings, concrete construction, drainage, farm machinery, farm shop
work, farm water and light systems, irrigation, surveying and tractors.
The demand for agricultural engineers is steadily increasing, due to the in-
creased amount of power and machinery now being used in agricultural production.
Graduates in agricultural engineering enter such fields of work as agricultural
production, the teaching of farm mechanics in schools and colleges, drainage and
irrigation work, and various positions with equipment and machinery manufacturers.
Ag. 21.-Farm Machinery. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory. No
credit. Rogers.
Care, construction, operation and selection of farm machinery.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Ag. 104.-Wood Work. 4 hours laboratory. 2 credits. Eshleman.
Practice in adjustment, care and use of wood working tools, exercises in bench
work, farm equipment and farm building construction.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Ag. 202.-Farm Machinery. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
Rogers.
Construction, operation and selection of harvesting, seeding, spraying and till-
ing machinery.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Ag. 204.-Agricultural Organization. 1 hour. 1 credit. Rogers.
The organization and proceedings of agricultural societies.
Ag. 301.-Drainage and Irrigation. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Rogers.
Farm surveying, drainage and irrigation systems; field practice in surveying
and designing systems.
Ag. 302.-Farm Motors. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Rogers.
The sources of power on the farm-automobile, tractor and stationary gaso-
line engines, electric motors and windmills.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Ag. 303.-Farm Shop. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Rogers.
Belt lacing, carpentry, concrete construction, soldering and other farm shop
operations. Specially useful for students intending to teach agricultural engineer-
ing in vocational schools.
Ag. 304.-Landscape Construction. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Rogers.
Theory and practical design of special details, such as fountains, retaining
walls, pools and walks-also problems in plane and topographical surveying.
































































LABORATORY CLASS IN S~OILS


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op







420 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Ag. 401.-Farm Buildings. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Rogers.
Construction, cost, management, sanitation and ventilation of farm buildings-
laboratory exercises in designing and estimating costs.
Ag. 402.-Farm Concrete. 1 hour and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits.
Rogers.
Selection of materials-curing, mixing, placing, reinforcing, testing and water-
proofing concrete.
Ag. 403-404.-Agricultural Engineering Investigations. 2 hours. 4
credits. Rogers.
Reports on investigational work as found in recent literature.
Required of all seniors majoring in agricultural engineering.

GRADUATE COURSES

Ag. 501-502.-Agricultural Engineering Seminar.
Ag. 503-504.-Research Work.

AGRONOMY
The courses in the Department of Agronomy are intended to qualify students
for teaching in high schools and colleges, for agricultural extension work, farming,
and research work in experiment stations and Federal departments of agriculture.
Courses are offered in farm crops and soils. A knowledge of these subjects is
fundamental for the most economical production of both plants and animals. Op-
portunity is given on the College Fhrm for correlating the theoretical, laboratory
and greenhouse studies with practical farm operations.
The courses in farm crops place special emphasis on methods of production and
plant improvement through breeding for yields, quality, and disease resistance;
while the courses in soils emphasize the nature and properties of the soil as related
to crop production, to the principles of soil fertility, and to fertilizer-practice. Stu-
dents may major in either farm crops or soils.
Students majoring in Agronomy will not take any option. They take courses
indicated in the curriculum only.
Agronomy students will be required to take Quantitative Chemistry in Sopho-
more or Junior year. They may elect Mathematics, Chemistry or Biology instead of
Physics 111 and 115.
Ay. 21-22.-Elementls of Agronomy. 2 hours. No credit. Bryan.
A practical course in farm crops and soils, designed to meet the needs of special
students.
Ay. 201.-Farm Crops. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Senn.
A general survey of the leading farm crops, including characteristics, adapta-
tions, fertility requirements, cultural practices, rotation systems and uses of the
more important field crops.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Ay. 301.-Soils. 3 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 5 credits. Bryan.
The nature and properties of soils as related to fertility and crop production.
Prerequisite: Cy. 105-106.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Required of all agricultural juniors.
Ay. 302.-Fertilizers and Manures. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Bryan.
The composition, nature and source of fertilizer materials-their influence on
crops and soils-fertilizer requirements for different crops-calculating fertilizer
formula.
Prerequisite: Ay. 301.
Laboratory fee: $1.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ay. 304.-Forage Crops. 3 hours. 3 credits. Senn.
Plants that produce feed for livestock, including grasses and legumes for hay
and grazing purposes-their characteristics, composition adaptations and cultural
practices. Methods of establishing pastures are considered.
Ay. 305.-Crop Judging. 2 hours. 2 credits. Senn.
Designed to fit one to judge competitive farm crop displays. Specially adapted
to students preparing for Smith-Hughes and county agent work. Practice in identi-
fication and judging the principal farm crops. Arranging of exhibits, premium lists,
fairs, and judging teams are discussed.
Prerequisite: Ay. 201.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Ay. 309.-Principles of Breeding. 2 hours. 2 or 3 credits.. Senn.
An elementary course dealing with the basic principles of heredity, variation
and selection, and the application of these principles to plant and animal improve-
ment. Courses may be taken with or without laboratory.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Ay. 402.-Plant Breeding. 3 hours. 3 credits. Senn.
The fundamental principles of crop improvement, including breeding, selection
and experimental methods. Course is designed to give the student a working knowl-
edge of genetic principles and to acquaint him with modern methods of breeding
and the production and distribution of pure seeds.
Prerequisite: Ay. 309.
Ay. 405.-Soil Fertility. 3 hours. 3 credits. Bryan.
The factors involved in crop production-source and loss of plant nutrients-
mineral cycles in nature-green manuring-methods and results obtained by lab-
oratory and field study.
Prerequisite: Ay. 301.
Ay. 407-0407.-Special and Cover Crops. 2 hours. 2 credits. Senn.
A study of cotton and other fiber crops, tobacco, sweet potato and sugar crops-
their characteristics, adaptations, cultural practices, improvement, marketing and
manufacturing processes. Consideration will be given to plants suited for cover
crops in rotation systems of the South.
Prerequisite: Ay. 201.
GRADUATE COURSES
Ay. 500-501.-Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. Bryan.
Discussion of agronomy problems-review of literature dealing with soils and
crops.
Required of all seniors and graduate students in agronomy.
Ay. 502.-Advanced Plant Breeding.
Ay. 504.-Soil Classification.
Ay. 505-506.-Research in Soils or Crops.
Ay. 507.-Advanced Soils.
Ay. 508.-Methods of Crop Investigation.
Ay. 510.-Soil Biology.
Ay. 511.-Soil Analysis.
Ay. 512.-Soils of Florida.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
Animal husbandry includes subjects relating to the domestic animals, their his-
tory, classification and judging; breeding, selection and improvement: feeding, care
and management; the production and marketing of beef, pork and other animal
products.













lull
Ill
Ill


CLASS IN STOCK JUDGING









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Live stock raising commands a steady income and is a most valuable aid in
maintaining soil fertility. The industry has long been an important factor in the
general prosperity of Florida. The general principles apply to all parts of America,
and special instruction is given for Florida and southeastern conditions.
Al. 21.-Elements of Animal Husbandry. 3 hours. No credit toward
degree. Willoughby.
Breeds of farm animals-principles of feeding, breeding and management.
For students in four-months course.
Al. 104.-Types and Breeds of Animals. 3 hours and 2 hours labora-
tory. 4 credits. Willoughby, Martin.
Types, breeds and market classes of horses, cattle, sheep and swine-score-card
and comparative judging-principles of animal feeding.
Required of all freshmen in agriculture.
Al. 203.-Beef Production. 3 hours. 3 credits. Willoughby.
Selection, feeding and management of beef cattle-finishing and marketing. Brief
study of mutton production.
Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Al. 204.-Swine Production. 3 hours. 3 credits. Martin.
Selection, feeding and management of hogs-forage crops and grazing-nitro-
genous supplements-disease and parasite control-slaughtering-marketing.
Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Al. 205 or 0205.-Advanced Stock Judging. 1 hour and 2 hours lab-
oratory. 2 credits. Willoughby.
Special training in live stock judging, show ring methods and contests at fairs:
Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Fee: travel expense on judging trips, as needed.
Al. 207.-Animal Breeding. 2 hours. 2 credits. Willoughby.
Principles of breeding applied to animals-pedigree and record work-founda-
tion and management of a breeding enterprise.
Al. 301 or 0301.-Breed History. 2 hours. 2 credits. Willoughby.
History of live stock breeds-pedigree studies and registration methods.
Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Al. 303.-Meat Products. 2 hours. 2 credits. Willoughby.
Farm slaughtering and packing house methods-curing, processing and market-
ing of meats and special products.
Al. 305.-Advanced Animal Feeding. 2 hours. 2 credits. Willoughby,
Martin.
Feeds, feeding and management of farm live stock.
Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Al. 306.-Advanced Animal Feeding. 2 hours. 2 credits. Willoughby,
Martin.
Continuation of Al. 305.
Al. 401-402.-Seminar. 2 or 3 hours. Credits to be arranged. Wil-
loughby, Martin.
History of live stock industry in America--special dairy and live stock topics-
reviews of recent research. For seniors only.

GRADUATE COURSES

Al. 501-502.-Animal Production.
Al. 503-504.-Animal Nutrition.
Al. 505-506.-Live Stock Records.








424 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

DAIRYING

Dairying includes the production of milk, its composition and testing; the sani-
tary handling and sale of market milk; the manufacture of butter, cheese and ice
cream; factory and milk plant management and accounting.
The opportunities in the South for supplying dairy products at good prices are
practically unlimited, while under proper management the cost of production is
lower than in some other sections. As the population of Florida increases the num-
ber of dairy farms and dairy plants will increase, and expert workers will be re-
quired to handle properly this important industry.
Dy. 22.-Elements of Dairying. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. No
credit toward degree. Martin.
The composition and handling of milk and milk products-composition and test-
ing of dairy products.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Dy. 201.-Farm Dairying. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Martin.
The secretion and composition of milk-testing dairy products-farm butter
making-ice cream and soft cheese making.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Dy. 202.-Dairy Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. Martin.
Selection, feeding and management of the dairy herd-herd improvement -barns--
equipment-marketing.
Dy. 301.-Buttermaking. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Martin.
Buying and testing cream pasteurization-cream ripening and butter making.
Laboratory fee: $3.
Dy. 302.-Market Milk. 3 hours. 3 credits. Martin.
Methods of producing clean milk-operation of milk plants-sanitary supervision
of milk supply.
Dy. 303 or 0303.-Creamery Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. Mar-
tin.
Creamery construction-sewage disposal-refrigeration-creamery calculation--
bookkeeping-marketing.
Dy. 306.-Cheese Making. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Martin.
Selection of milk for cheese making. Making hard cheese. Soft cheese making.
Laboratory fee: $3.00.
Dy. 307.-Ice Cream Making. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3
credits. Martin.
Ingredients of the ice cream mix. Preparation of the mix. Freezing and hard-
ening ice cream.
Laboratory fee: $3.00.

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

Botany 101 and 102 or their equivalents are prerequisite to all courses in this
department; and Bacteriology 301 or its equivalent is prerequisite to all courses in
bacteriology except Bey. 0308.
BOTANY

Bty. 101.-General Botany. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
Cody, Carroll.
Structure and life histories of important algae, fungi, mosses and ferns.
Laboratory fee: $5.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bty. 102.-General Botany. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 cred-
its. Cody, Carroll.
Structure, environment and principles of identification of seed plants.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 210.-Taxonomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4 or 5 credits.
Cody.
Identification of common seed plants and ferns of the Gainesville region. (An
extra hour's credit may be earned by assignment of special field problem.)
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 302 or 0302.-Plant Physiology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. Cody.
Physiological processes of plants with respect to absorption, assimilation, tran-
spiration, metabolism, respiration and growth.
Desired prerequisites: Cy. 0262, or equivalents; Ay. 301; Physics 111 and 115,
or equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 310.-Advanced Taxonomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Cody.
A critical study of a plant family or genus. Field work.
Prerequisite: Bty. 210, or equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 320.-General Morphology of Seed Plants. 1 hour and 6 hours
laboratory. 4 credits. Cody.
Structure and life histories of certain gymnosperms and angiosperms; process
of ovule fertilization.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 331.-Plant Histology. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4 or 5
credits. Cody.
Methods and practice in killing, fixing, sectioning and staining of plant tissues
and organs. (An extra hour's credit may be earned on assignment of a special
problem.)
Desired prerequisites: Bty. 302; Cy. 0262.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 332.-Plant Anatomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4 or 5
credits. Cody.
Origin, structure and function of principal tissues and organs of plants. (An
extra hour's credit may be earned on assignment of a special problem.)
Desired prerequisites: Bty. 302, 331: Cy. 0262; Physics 111 and 115.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 401 or 0401.-Plant Ecology. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Cody.
The relation of plants to their environment with special reference to plant
associations, plant successions and modes and effects of plant migration; plant
surveys.
Prerequisites; Bty. 210 or equivalent; Ay. 301; some knowledge of Biology,
Chemistry and Geology.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 404.-Advanced Plant Physiology. 1 hour and 6 hours labora-
tory. 4 credits. Cody.
Special studies in digestion, assimilation, nutrition, respiration and growth.
Preliminary course to research in plant physiology.
Prerequisite: Bty. 302.
Laboratory fee: $5.







426 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

GRADUATE COURSES

Bty. 500.-Seminar.
Bty. 501-502.-Problems in Taxonomy.
Bty. 503-504.-Research in Plant Physiology.
Bty. 506.-Problems in Plant Histology.
Bty. 507 or 0507.-Special Problems in Plant Anatomy.

BACTERIOLOGY

Bey. 301.-General Bacteriology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Carroll.
Morphology, physiology and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms.
Prerequisites: Bty. 101; Bly. 101; Cy. 0262, or equivalents.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bcy. 302.-Agricultural Bacteriology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. Carroll.
Bacteria and associated micro-organisms in relation to water, milk, soil, silage
and farm problems.
Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bcy. 304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. Carroll.
Recognition, culture and special laboratory technique of handling pathogens and
viruses. Theories and principles of immunity and infection.
Prerequisite: Boy. 301.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bcy. 306.-Bacteriology of Foods. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Carroll.
Relation of bacteria, yeasts, molds and other micro-organisms commonly found
in foods.
Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bcy. 0308.-Sanitary Laboratory Practice. 1 hour and 4 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. Carroll.
This course is primarily for sanitary engineering students and deals with prob-
lems in sewage and public sanitation. Desirable antecedents: some knowledge of bi-
ology, chemistry and physics.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bcy. 401.-Clinical Bacteriology. Hours to be arranged. 4 credits.
Carroll.
Laboratory practice on special problems preparing for technical expert in field of
biological activities of bacteria and related micro-organisms. Animal experimenta-
tion and immunology upon pathogens. Work assigned to specific organisms. A
prerequisite to research in bacteriology.
Prerequisite: Bey. 304.
Laboratory fee: $5.

GRADUATE COURSES

Bey. 501-502-Problems in Soil Bacteriology.
Bey. 503-504.-Problems in Dairy Bacteriology.
Bey. 505-506.-Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology.
Bcy. 507-508.-Problems in Bacteriology of Water and Sewage.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY

The purpose of the courses given in this department are as follows: to give a
student the fundamental knowledge concerning entomology and plant pathology, a
knowledge of value in agricultural work ; to give certain students specialized work
that will fit them for positions as county agents, teachers in high schools, colleges
and universities; to train specialists for state experiment station or Federal depart-
mental work in these fields.

ENTOMOLOGY

Ey. 21.-Farm, Garden and Orchard Insects. 2 hours and 2 hours
laboratory. No credit. Creighton.
A general survey of some of the economic insects of Florida in reference to their
distribution, life history, injury and control on the principal agricultural crops of
the State.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Ey. 101.-Introduction to the Study of Economic Entomology. 2 hours
and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Creighton.
A survey of the principles of economic entomology that will prepare students
for course Ey. 302. A study of the structure, life histories and control of the more
important insects will be made.
Laboratory fee: $1.50.
Ey. 302.-Economic Entomology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. Creighton, Dickey.
An introduction to applied entomology, based on the structure, classification,
life histories, recognition and control of the injurious insects of Florida.
Laboratory fee: $3.50.
Required of all students in Agricultural College.
Ey. 303-304.-Advanced Economic Entomology. 1 hour and 6 hours
laboratory. 8 credits. Creighton.
Field and laboratory problem work and insectary work in the rearing of some
of the more common Florida insects. Study of natural parasites and the special
technique required by professional work in this line will be given.
Prerequisite: Ey. 302.
Laboratory fee: $3.50.
Ey. 401.-Taxonomy. Hours and credit to be arranged. Creighton.
The collection, study and classification of local economic insects with special
emphasis on some one group.
Prerequisite: Ey. 302.
Ey. 402.-Fruit Insects. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Creighton.
A study of pests encountered in deciduous, tropical and citrus fruits, with de-
tailed study of representative life histories and measures adapted to their control.
Prerequisite: Ey. 302.
Laboratory fee: $3.50.
Ey. 403.-Garden and Greenhouse Pests. 2 hours and 2 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. Creighton.
The study of insects encountered in the home, commercial garden, and green-
house. A detailed study of life history and specific control measures adapted to
these conditions.
Prerequisite: Ey. 302.
Laboratory fee: $3.50.








428 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Ey. 405.-Insecticides and Fungicides. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Creighton, Dickey.
Origin and history of insecticides and fungicides-systematic survey of mixtures
now used-chemical and physical reactions of same. Special emphasis on soaps,
oils, coppers, etc. Class, laboratory and field work.
Laboratory fee: $3.50.
Ey. 406.-Insecticides and Fungicides. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Creighton, Dickey.
A special study of lime sulphur, arsenates, dusts, etc. Practical problems that
apply to Florida and the southeast. Class, laboratory and field work.
Laboratory fee: $3.50.
Ey. 407-408.-Advanced Insect Morphology. Hours and credit to be
arranged. Creighton.

GRADUATE COURSES

Ey. 501-502.-Methods of Research in Entomology.
Ey. 503-504.-Problems in Entomology.
Ey. 505-506.-Advanced Insect Histology.
Ey. 507-508.-Advanced Insect Taxonomy.
Ey. 509-510.-Advanced Insect Embryology.
Ey. 511-512.-Thesis Research.

PLANT PATHOLOGY

Pt. 22.-Diseaseis and Insects of Citrus. 2 hours and 2 hours lab-
oratory. No credit. Dickey.
The important physiological and fungous diseases with a survey of the major
insects and methods of control.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Pt. 301.-General Pathology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 cred-
its. Dickey, Creighton.
A study of the principal causal agents that produce disease in plants. Diag-
nosis and treatment of plant diseases.
Laboratory fee: $3.50.
Pt. 303.-Diseases of Florida Crops. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Dickey.
Practical methods of combatting fungous and bacterial diseases of Florida crops.
Signs of infection, diagnosis, means of transmission and methods of control. A study
of citrus, cotton, grape and certain vegetable diseases, etc.
Prerequisite: Pt. 301.
Laboratory fee: $3.50.
Pt. 304.-Diseases of Florida Crops. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Dickey.
A survey of the diseases in subtropical and ornamental plants and in certain
vegetables.
Prerequisite: Pt. 301.
Laboratory fee: $3.50.
Pt. 401-402.-Laboratory Technique in Plant Pathology. 1 hour and
6 hours laboratory. 8 credits. Dickey.
Preparation of culture media-isolation, cultivation and physiological study of
plant pathogenes-inoculation of host plants-relation to disease and the prepara-
tion of histological material.
Laboratory fee: $5.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 429











.,I. .


HORTICULTURAL GROUNDS









430 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Pt. 403-404.-Mycology. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 6 credits.
Dickey.
Detailed study of fungi in reference to origin, systematic relationships, cytology,
and economic bearing on plant disease work. Collection and classification of local
fungi.
Prerequisite: Pt. 301 or its equivalent.

GRADUATE COURSES

Pt. 501-502.-Methods of Research in Plant Pathology.
Pt.503-504.-Problems in Plant Pathology.
Pt. 505-506.-Advanced Mycology.

HORTICULTURE

The general subject of horticulture is divided into the tree fruits, vine and bush
fruits, floriculture, vegetable growing and forestry.
A number of courses relate to more than one of these subjects and are there-
fore grouped here.
Situated in a sub-tropical climate, we have unusual opportunities for study.
The wonderful variety of plants, the peculiar problems involved in their growth and
development, and the accomplishments of those who have given time and labor to
the solution of those problems, offer inviting fields for study and experimentation.
He. 21.-Introduction to Horticulture. 2 hours and 2 hours labora-
tory. No credit. Abbott.
The fundamental principles of horticulture-practice in the culture, propagation,
pruning and training of the important fruit and ornamental plants of Florida.
He. 22.-Agricultural Botany. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. No
credit. Juan.
The relationship, habits, characteristics and environmental relations of the im-
portant crop plants, with laboratory study of principal types.
He. 101.-Elements of Horticulture. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Abbott.
The fundamental activities of plant life with reference to the growth of orchard
and garden crops. A study of propagation by budding, grafting, cuttings, seed selec-
tion, transplanting, pruning, spraying, frost protection, etc.
Laboratory fee: $1.
He. 204.-Pruning. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Floyd.
Principles of pruning and training-the physiological principles involved-prac-
tice in pruning and training fruit and ornamental plants.
Laboratory fee: $1.
He. 206.-Trucking. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Ab-
bott.
Origin, relationship and classification of different truck crops-varieties-cul-
tural methods in different sections-fertilizing-irrigating and harvesting. Planning
the home garden.
Laboratory fee: $1.
He. 303.-Floriculture. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Floyd.
The growing of flowers upon the home grounds-pot plants-greenhouse crops
and their cultural requirements, including ventilation, watering and heating.
Prerequisite: He. 101.
Laboratory fee: $1.







DEP,4RTMENTS OF INSTRICTIONI


431


He. 304.-Commercial Floriculture. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Floyd.
A study of commercial flower crops grown either in the open, under lath, or il
greenhouse. Methods of packing and marketing will receive attention.
Prerequisite: He. 101 and 303.
Laboratory fee: $2.
HIe. 305.-Citrus Culture. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Lord.
The citrus grove-site and soil selection-preparation, planting and manage-
ment-selection of varieties and stocks-the use of cover crops.
A three-day field trip is required; approximate cost $12.50, paid at time trip
is made.
He. 306.-Citrus Harvesting, Marketing and Judging. 2 hours and 2
hours laboratory. 3 credits. Lord.
Methods of picking, handling, washing, drying, packing and shipping citrus
fruits-identification and judging of varieties.
Prere-uisite: He. 305.
A two-day trip to commercial packing-houses and by-products factories is re-
quired. Approximate cost $10, paid at time trip is made.
He. 307.-Subtropical Fruits. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3
credits. Lord.
Avocados, mangoes, pineapples and other tropical and subtropical fruits par-
ticularly adapted to Florida--culture, varieties, insects, diseases, etc.
Prerequisite: He. 101.
Laboratory fee: $1.
He. 308.-Deciduous Fruits. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 cred-
its. Lord.
Peaches, pears, grapes, pecans and other deciduous fruits with special reference
to Florida conditions-culture, varieties, insects, diseases, etc.
Prerequisite: He. 101.
Laboratory fee: $1.
He. 314.-Principles of Fruit Production. 3 hours. 3 credits. Abbott.
A study of the principles underlying fruit production, such as water relations,
nutrition, temperature, fruit setting and geographic influences.
Prerequisite: Cy. 105-106.
He. 401.-Advanced Citrus Problems. 2 hours and 2 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Lord.
An advanced course especially emphasizing the problems offered by varying sites,
soils, climates, stocks, varieties, etc.
Prerequisite: He. 305.
Laboratory fee: t1.
He. 402.-Breeding Horticultural Plants. 2 hours and 2 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Lord.
The application of the principles of genetics to the breeding and improvement of
horticultural plants. Methods of successful breeders of horticultural plants.
Prerequisite: Bly. 106.
Laboratory fee: $1.
He. 405.-Advanced Vegetable Gardening. 3 hours. 3 credits. Abbott.
A systematic study of the results of experiments and research in the production
and handling of vegetables, and their application to present day problems.
Prerequisite: He. 206.
He. 411.-General Forestry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Floyd.
The principles of forestry-forest cropping-protecting the home wood lot-use
of Florida woods-varieties of timber trees-the influence of forests on other indus-
tries of the State.








432 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

GRADUATE COURSES

He. 503-504.-Horticulture Seminar.
He. 505-506.-Horticultural Problems.
He. 507-508.-Research Work.


LANDSCAPE DESIGN

By landscape design or landscape architecture we mean the systematic arrange-
ment of landscape. It may be defined as that one of the fine arts which is con-
cerned with the preservation and the laying out of areas of land for use and beauty.
The landscape architect is concerned with any arrangement of land for any purpose
wherever agreeable appearance is required. The scope of the profession is such that
it is difficult to say, in every case, where it ends and where one of the allied pro-
fessions begins.
In 1929 the Department of Landscape Design was created, which offers work lead-
ing to the Bachelor's degree. Previous to that time some of these courses had been
given in the Department of Horticulture.
The curriculum is eminently practical, from a professional point of view; the
problems are given out exactly as they would be in a landscape architect's office.
Theory is especially stressed, for sound theory is essential to sound practice.
This is a great field, and an ever-increasing one, for the trained man or woman,-
not only in landscape architecture, but in the sister profession of city planning.
Le. 207.-Elements of Landscape Design. 1 hour and 4 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. Burritt.
Drafting plates-elementary design-simple rendering with pen and ink, cray-
on, etc.
Le. 208.-Elements of Landscape Design. 1 hour and 4 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Burritt.
Elementary design-water color rendering adapted to the landscape architect's
plans-tree sketching.
Prerequisite: Le. 207.
Required in sophomore year.
Le. 210.-History of Landscape Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. Burritt.
A study of nature's and man's organization of landscape-its development from
ancient to modern times-its relation to other arts-a cultural non-technical course.
Required in sophomore or junior year.
Le. 212.-Plant Materials. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Floyd, Burritt.
Trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants suited to Florida conditions-their char-
acteristics-landscape value and arrangement-field trips-planting plans.
Prerequisites: He. 101; Bty. 101-102.
Required in sophomore or junior year.
Le. 306 or 0306.-Theory of Landscape Design. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Burritt.
The principles and practice of a fine art from a professional point of view--
no drafting or laboratory work.
Prerequisite: Le. 210 for landscape design students.
Required in junior or senior year.
Le. 309.-Advanced Landscape Design. 1 hour and 4 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Burritt.
Design of home grounds, public and semi-public properties, based upon actual
topographical surveys-tree sketching.
Prerequisite: Le. 207 and 208; Le. 210.
Required in junior year.
























































BROODEIH AND POULTHY HOUSES








434 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Le. 310.-Advanced Landscape Design. 1 hour and 4 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Burritt.
Design of home grounds, public, and semi-public properties based upon actual
topographical surveys-tree sketching.
Prerequisite: Le. 207 and 208; Le. 210; Le. 309.
Required in junior year.
Le. 405.-Planting Composition and Design. 1 hour and 4 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. Burritt.
Relationship of planting to architecture-planting plans of public and private
grounds at large scale.
Prerequisite: Le. 207 and 208; Le. 212.
Required in senior year.
Le. 406.-Planting Composition and Design, continued. 1 hour and
4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Burritt.
Planting plans for parks, parkways, country clubs, large private estates, etc.,
on small scale.
Required in senior year.
Le. 408.-City Planning. 3 hours. 3 credits. Burritt.
Historical development and broader phases of civic design.
Prerequisite: Le. 306; or Le. 0306 (for Le. students).
Required in senior year.

POULTRY HUSBANDRY

The student of agriculture should know something about poultry. Whether he
turns to teaching, becomes a business man, or settles down on the farm, some
foundation instruction in the classroom will be useful to him. Valuable changes,
some of which are not yet in the text books, have come into poultry management;
these are usually available through the staff of instruction.
Florida conditions are favorable to successful poultry keeping, because Florida
escapes severe winters and hot summers.
The income in Florida, in 1929, from poultry and eggs, was $14,090,000 and the
value of the imports amounted to $7,000,000. Florida needs not only more poultry
products, but a far better grade of eggs and poultry.
The graduate in poultry can well consider the producing of winter-hatched baby
chicks to meet the northern demand; also the growing of exhibition stock for the
early fall agricultural fairs in those states that have long winters.
As a side-line, or as a business, poultry should appeal to most of those who
turn to an agricultural education as part of their preparation for a useful life.
Py. 21.-Poultry Essentials. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. No
credit. Sanborn.
Culling, feeding, housing, breeding, etc.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Py. 102.-Farm Poultry. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Sanborn.
Poultry as a modest side line on the farm. Breeds and varieties-location and
construction of buildings-feeding and management-incubation, breeding, rearing,
care of adult birds on the farm.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Required of freshmen in College of Agriculture.
Py. 201.-Commercial Poultry Keeping. 2 hours and 2 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Sanborn.
Growing and maturing pullets-fall and winter eggs-feeding and care-houses
and yards-showing and advertising.
Laboratory fee: $2.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Py. 204.-Commercial Poultry Keeping. 2 hours and 2 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Sanborn.
Incubation, breeding, rearing, spring and summer work, culling, farm grown
feeds and poultry pastures, marketing.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Py. 303.-Advanced Poultry Culture. 2 hours. 2 credits. Sanborn.
Origin and study of breeds and varieties-score card and comparison judging-
latest methods of selecting high and low producing hens--mating for producing
breeders and winners-practice judging.
Prerequisites: Py. 201, 204.
Laboratory fee: $1.
Py. 405.-Poultry Management. 2 hours. 2 credits. Sanborn.
Study of large farms-equipment of poultry plants-planning of various build-
ings- laying out and conducting poultry farms.
Prerequisite: Py. 201, 204.
Laboratory fee: $1
Py. 406.-Project Problems. 2 hours. 2 credits. Sanborn.
Problems to be arranged with instructor; egg hatching, investigations, poultry
feeding, artificial lighting, chicken diseases, etc.
Prerequisite: Py. 201, 204.

\ETERIN RY SCIENCE

Students who are interested in livestock should have quite a thorough knowledge
of the normal animal, including especially the functions of the various organs an.]
parts of the body. The courses offered in this department include such a study.
Also, it is very essential for students in animal husbandry and others who will
probably engage in work including the care of livestock to know something about
the important animal diseases, their causes, symptoms, and means of prevention.
Courses are offered which deal with a study of certain phases of the most important
diseases of livestock. Since the poultry industry is also quite important in this
State, a course in poultry diseases is offered.
Vy. 302.-Elementary Veterinary Science. 2 hours. 2 credits. Shealy.
Elementary anatomy and physiology of domestic animals-causes-symptoms and
methods of prevention of common diseases of farm animals.
Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Vy. 306.-Animal Physiology. 3 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Shealy.
The skeleton-articulations-muscles-circulatory, digestive, urogenital, respiri-
tory and nervous systems-endocrine glands-special senses.
Prerequisites: Al. 104; Cy. 105 and 106.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Required of third year students specializing in animal sciences.
Vy. 401.-Animal Diseases. 2 hours. 2 credits. Shealy.
Causes--symptoms-treatment-method of prevention of common diseases of
farm animals.
Prerequisites: Vy. 302 or 306.
Vy. 402.-Poultry Diseases. 2 hours. 2 credits. Shealy.
Causes- symptoms-methods of prevention-treatment for diseases of poultry.

GRADUATE COURSES

Vy. 501-502.-Poultry Disease Seminar.
Vy. 503-504.-Problems in Poultry Pathology.






436 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1931-32
First Semester
1931
September 14, 15, Monday, Tuesday......Entrance examinations.
September 16, Wednesday 11:00 a.m.....1931-32 session begins.
September 16-22, Wednesday-Tuesday..Freshman Week.
September 21, 22, Monday, Tuesday......Registration of upperclassmen.
September 23, Wednesday......................Classes for 1931-32 session begin; late
registration fee $5.
September 30, Wednesday.....................Last day for changing course without
paying the $2 fee.
October 7, Wednesday................................Last day for registration for the first
semester 1931-32.
November 11, Wednesday-..................... Armistice Day; special exercises but
classes are not suspended.
November 26, Thursday...........................Thanksgiving Day, a holiday.
December 19, Saturday 12:00 noon........Christmas recess begins.
1932
January 4, Monday 8:00 a.m .................Christmas recess ends.
January 25, Monday 8:00 a.m........... Final examinations for the first semes-
ter begin.
January 31, Sunday 8:00 p.m........... Baccalaureate Sermon.
February 3, Wednesday .........................Inter-semester Day, a holiday.
Second Semester
February 4, 5, Thursday, Friday............Registration for second semester; all
students whose names begin with "A"
through "M" register on Thursday; all
others on Friday.
February 6, Saturday 8:00 a.m...............Classes for second semester begin:
change of course fee, $2; late registra-
tion fee, $5.
February 11, Thursday..............................Last day for registration for second
semester.
March 23, Wednesday 5:00 p.m.............Spring recess begins.
March 28, Monday 8:00 a.m.................Spring recess ends.
May 26, Thursday 8:00 a.m............... Final examinations begin.
June 4-6, Saturday to Monday..............Commencement Exercises.




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