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 Table of Contents
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 General information
 Admission and degree requireme...
 Requirements for the majors
 Departments of instruction
 University calendar














Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00432
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 15, 1931
Copyright Date: 1932
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00432
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 323
        Page 324
    Table of Contents
        Page 325
    Faculty
        Page 326
        Page 327
        Page 328
    General information
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
    Admission and degree requirements
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
    Requirements for the majors
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
    Departments of instruction
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
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        Page 365
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    University calendar
        Page 390
Full Text




The University Record

of the


University of Florida


Bulletin of the

College of Arts and Sciences

With Announcements for the Year
1931-32


Vol. XXVI, Series 1


No. 9


May 15, 1931


Published Semi-monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.



















The University Record of the University of Florida is issued once every
month except June, when it is issued six times.

The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and -the Board of Control, the Bulletin
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual col-
leges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruction,
and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what in-
formation is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in sev-
eral series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with insti-
tutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is
under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual
copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to the University Bookstore, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida






























TABLE OF CONTENTS


F acu lty ..... ........ ..... ................

General Information .......

Admission and Degree Requirements

Requirements for the Majors .........

Departments of Instruction ..........

University Calendar .. ... ......


..... ...................... 326

................................ 329

................................ 334

............................... 347

.................... .......... 350

..... ... ...-...-............. 390







326 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

(as of 1930-31)

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., President.
JAMES MARION FARR, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Vice-President.
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, M.A., Ph.D., Acting Dean.
NAOMI V. KISLING, Secretary.
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar and Director of Admissions.

DEPARTMENT OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES

JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, M.A., Ph.D., Head Professor.
STANLEY SIMONDS, Ph.D., Professor (part time).
WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, M.A., Associate Professor (part time).

DEPARTMENT OF BIBLE

LUDWIG WILLIAM BUCHHOLZ, M.A., Head Professor.

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY

JAMES SPEED ROGERS, M.A., Head Professor (on leave 1930-31).
THEODORE HUNTINGTON HUBBELL, B.A., Associate Professor (Acting Head
1930-31).
HARLEY BAKEWELL SHERMAN, M.A., Associate Professor.
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor.
LEONARD GIOVANNOLI, M.A., Instructor.
ROBERT CLINTON UNKRICH, Curator.

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

Administered in the College of Agriculture

MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Head Professor.
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, M.S., Assistant Professor.

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

Administered in the College of Pharmacy

TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, M.A., Ph.D., Head Professor.
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, B.A., Professor.
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, M.S., D.Sc., Professor.
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., Professor.
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, M.S., Ph.D., Associate Professor.
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor.
BURTON J. H. OTTE. B.A., Curator.







FACULTY


DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS

Administered in the College of Commerce and Journalism

WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head Professor
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, M.A., Ph.D., Professor.
HOWARD DYKMAN, M.A., LL.B., Professor.
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Associate Professor.
HARWOOD BURROWS DOLBEARE, B.A., Associate Professor.
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, B.A., LL.B., Associate Professor.
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor.
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor.
JOSEPH PORTER WILSON, M.B.A., Assistant Professor.
WILLIAM TROTTER HICKS, M.S., Instructor.
PETER C. SCAGLIONE. B.S.B.A.. Instructor.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

JAMES MARION FARR, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Head Professor.
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., Professor.
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., Associate Professor.
WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, M.A., Associate Professor (part time).
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., Assistant Professor.
JESSE LEE PETERSON, M.A., Instructor (on leave 1930-31).
CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, M.A., Instructor.
ALTON CHESTER MORRIS, M.A., Instructor.
WILLIAM EDGAR MOORE, M.A., Instructor.
CHARLES SELLERIER, M.A., Instructor.
HERMAN E. SPIVEY, M.A., Instructor.
JOSEPH EDWIN PRICE, Instructor (part time).

DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH

ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, M.A., Ph.D., Head Professor.
RUFUS THOMAS CORNELIUS, M.A., Assistant Professor.
LINTON COOKE STEVENS, M.A., Instructor.
JAMES DALLAS McDOWELL, M.A., Instructor.
ROBERT WILLIAM HUSTON, M.A., Instructor.

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE

JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D., Professor of Americanism and Southern History,
Head Professor.
LESLIE BENNETT TRIBOLET, Ph.D., Assistant Professor.
ANCIL NEWTON PAYNE, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor.
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, M.A., Assistant Professor.
ANGUS MACKENZIE LAIRD, M.A., Instructor (on leave 1930-31).
WALLACE BARGER GOEBEL. M.A.. Instructor.









328 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS

THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, M.A., Ph.D., Head Professor.
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, M.A., Ph.D., Professor.
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor.
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor.
BERNARD FRANCIS DOSTAL, M.A., Assistant Professor.
CHARLES ARTHUR MESSICK, M.A., Assistant Professor.
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, M.A., Assistant Professor (on leave 1930-31).
ALLEN THORNTON CRAIC, M.A., Instructor (on leave 1930-31).
SAMUEL HOUSTON HUFFMAN, M.A., Instructor.
SAM W. MCINNIS, B.A., Instructor.
EDWARD SCHAUMBERG QUADE, B.A., Instructor.

DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY

HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, S.T.B., Ph.D., Head Professor.

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS

ROBERT C. WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Head Professor.
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S., Associate Professor.
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor.
STEPHEN WEEKS STARKE, B.A., Instructor.
DANIEL C. SWANSON, B.S., Instructor.
........................ ..........................-- ..... Curator.

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Head.
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor.

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

LucIus MOODY BRISTOL, M.A., Ph.D., Head Professor.
WILLIAM GRAVES CARLETON, B.A., Instructor (part time).

DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH AND GERMAN

CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, M.A., Ph.D., Head Professor.
WILLIAM BYRON HATHAWAY, M.A., Associate Professor.
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, M.A., Instructor.
THOMAS JEFFERSON HIGGINS, M.A., Instructor.
FRANCIS MARION DEGAETANI, B.A.E., Instructor.

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH

HENRY PHILIP CONSTANS, M.A., Associate Professor and Head.
ARTHUR ARIEL HOPKINS, M.A., Assistant Professor.








GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL INFORMATION

AIMS
Until about 1850 the classical course, leading to the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
degree, was practically the only type of college course offered in the United
States. Since that time there has been rapid expansion in American universi-
ties. Courses have been devised to meet almost every conceivable need. The
College of Arts and Sciences remains, however, the nucleus which unifies the
whole. The objectives attained by the College of Arts and Sciences are varied.
In the main, we may say that the primary purpose of the College of Arts and
Sciences is to interpret that vast body of experience which has grown to its
present vigor and stature through all the centuries of civilization, based on the
theory that the younger generation can know the richness and fullness of life
only by learning that which has been of sufficient worth to survive the selec-
tive processes of time. Coincidentally with the attainment of this primary pur-
pose, the College of Arts and Sciences stands for breadth of training and depth
of development. The value of such training is so clearly recognized by those
who are successful in many professions that it is a prerequisite of those who
wish to enter upon their professional studies.
The Acting Dean recently asked the members of the Faculty to name what,
in their estimation, are the most important aims of the College. Here are
some of the answers:
1. To develop character.
2. To impart information from, and concerning, that vast body of knowledge
and experience which mankind has accumulated through the centuries, and to in-
terpret much of that knowledge and experience.
3. To induce a sense of appreciation of the past and its achievements, and a
feeling of obligation to the present and to the future.
4. To prepare men to earn livelihoods in any of several fields.
5. To develop sound judgment.
6. To develop interests that will raise the physical, mental, and spiritual levels
of the individual's life through the worthy use of leisure time.
7. To encourage constructive intellectual curiosity.
8. To stimulate in each individual a cooperative attitude toward society.
9. To give the student who is undecided as to his life work a good general
foundation which will aid him in making the correct decision and on which he can
build when the decision is made.
10. To develop respect for truth regardless of prejudice.
11. To develop facility in the use of the English language, both oral and written.
12. To help the student formulate his own philosophy of life.
13. To prepare men to enter upon the study of the professions.
14. To develop a spirit of unbiased approach to a given question, whether in
the realm of the political, industrial, commercial, professional, or social life of the
people, or whether in the domain of natural philosophy.
15. To develop in the student a feeling of confidence in his ability to approach
a subject or problem with a view to obtaining a solution in some degree, and to
render him familiar with available methods and means of attack.
16. To enable the student to see himself and his country in proper perspective
with the activities of mankind as a whole.
17. To give the student an appreciation of his intimate relationship with the
rest of the organic world.
18. To train the mind to do accurate observing and clear reasoning.
19. To develop appreciation of the beautiful.
20. To encourage the student to think about the significance of things.








330 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

That such training is productive of tangible benefits is attested by the
fact that studies have been made which show that graduates of colleges of
arts and sciences rank unusually high in the salary scale of industries in which
they are in competition with graduates of professional colleges.

BUILDINGS

Most of the work of the College of Arts and Sciences is carried on in
Language Hall, Peabody Hall, Science Hall, Chemistry Building, and Benton
Engineering Building. The departments are well equipped for the conduct
of their work. Class rooms are provided with blackboards and other facilities
essential to the needs of instruction. Laboratories with essential material are
provided for those departments using the laboratory type of instruction.
The University Library is equipped to meet the needs and demands of
students insofar as possible. Aside from books and files of bound periodicals,
current issues of about five hundred general and technical periodicals and
many daily and weekly papers are received. The Library staff strives to en-
courage students in their reading and study and to assist them in obtaining
the material they desire. Bibliographies are prepared, references are found
and help is given in the use of the catalog. An instructive lecture on the use
of the Library is given to the freshmen during freshman week. Students in
the College of Arts and Sciences are expected to make good use of the library.
The Department of Biology is provided with laboratories in Science Hall
and with a field station on Newnan's Lake, six miles east of the campus. The
laboratories are equipped with individual microscopes and other essential ap-
paratus for each student in each course offered. In addition, there is consid-
erable equipment of special apparatus for the use of the instructional staff
and advanced students. The Biological Station is maintained for field work
on the animals and plants of the region. The area about the station provides
virgin, or nearly virgin, conditions of land and fresh-water life. Equipment
for class and research work is provided.
Botanical and Bacteriological laboratories are located in Science Hall.
They are well equipped for undergraduate work and to some degree for research
work. Studies of the plants of this region can be carried on at the Greenhouse
and at the Biological Station on Newnan's Lake.
Students taking chemistry have access to the well-equipped chemical lab-
oratories maintained by the College of Pharmacy.
The laboratories of the Department of Physics include two main labora-
tories, a junior electrical laboratory, an intermediate electrical laboratory, an
X-Ray laboratory, a workshop, and an apparatus room. These laboratories
are equipped to meet the needs of undergraduate work in physics as usually
given in American colleges. Graduate work is encouraged and facilities are
being added as fast as possible to meet the needs of such work.
The Department of Psychology is provided with a laboratory in which
mental and psychological tests can be conducted, and with equipment with
which class demonstrations, experiments, and research can be carried on.







GENERAL INFORMATION


FEES

For information regarding fees and expenses the reader is referred to
pages 142 to 146. inclusive, of the Bulletin of General Information. There are
no special fees assessed for study in the College of Arts and Sciences other
than fees for laboratory subjects as shown in the section entitled "Depart-
ments of Instruction," pages 350 to 389, inclusive, in this bulletin.

SCHOLARSHIPS

There are a number of scholarships available to students in the College of
Arts and Sciences. For information concerning these see the Bulletin of Gen-
eral Information, or write to the Dean of Students, University of Florida.
Gainesville, Florida.

SPECIAL STUDENTS

The College of Arts and Sciences strongly discourages registration of stu-
dents as "Specials." It is felt that every student in the College of Arts and
Sciences ought to regularize himself if it is at all possible.

THE GRADING SYSTEM

Grades are recorded by means of letters.
Grade A indicates work of exceptionally high quality.
Grade B indicates work considerably above the average, but not of suffi-
ciently high quality to justify a grade of A.
Grade C indicates work of average quality.
Grade D indicates work below the average in quality but sufficiently good
to merit credit in the course.
Grade E denotes unconditional failure in the course.
Grade I denotes work of passing quality but insufficient quantity.
Grade R denotes conditional failure and may be converted into a grade
of D provided the student passes a re-examination with a grade at least as
high as C. The grade R is given to freshmen and sophomores only. Juniors
and seniors are not entitled to a grade of R or to the re-examination privilege.
Grade X denotes that the student was absent from the final examination.

HONOR POINTS

In order to give recognition to work of high quality, honor points are dis-
tributed as follows:
3 honor points are given for every semester credit hour which the student
passes with a grade of A.
2 honor points are given to the student for every semester credit hour
which he passes with a grade of B.
1 honor point is given to the student for every semester credit hour which
he passes with a grade of C.
No honor points are given for other grades.







332 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Students desiring to earn degrees are required to do work of such quality
that the total number of honor points which they have earned in all of their
courses will equal the total number of semester credit hours required for the
degree.
HONORS

In recognition of meritorious work, an honor roll is published at the end
of each semester containing the names of all students who have earned an
honor point average of 2.3 or more per semester credit hour for the semester.
Students earning an honor point average of 2 or more but less than 2.3 per
semester credit hour for the semester are given honorable mention. Students
earning sufficiently high honor point averages are granted special privileges.
To those who do work of sufficiently good quality throughout a four-year
course membership in Phi Kappa Phi, national honor society, comes as a
mark of special distinction.
Phi Eta Sigma is a national honor society for freshmen who earn an honor
point average 2.5 or above for either the first semester or for the year. Mem-
bership in this society comes as a high honor to the freshmen who do work
of the order named.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM REGISTRATION

The minimum load which any student is allowed to carry (at any time)
is 12 semester credit hours. The maximum load, including work by corre-
spondence or extension, is regulated by the following table:

Honor point average for the Maximum
preceding session Load
Less than 1............................... ....... ...... .......16 semester credit hours
1 up to, but not including, 2 ....................................19 semester credit hours
2 up to, but not including, 3 .................................21 semester credit hours
3 ..-----................. .. .... ---------..................... 24 semester credit hours

Mature students who are regularly employed may register for less than 12
credit hours provided such registration meets with the approval of the dean
of the college.
CORRESPONDENCE STUDY

No student registered in the College of Arts and Sciences will be allowed
to do any correspondence study while in residence at the University. This
applies to the completion of correspondence study already begun as well as to
the taking up of new correspondence work.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper
courses and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should
confer with the Dean of the College regarding their choice of courses several
days before registration; in addition to this, juniors and seniors should con-
fer with the head of the department in which they expect to earn a major.








GENERAL INFORMATION


Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a de-
gree and mus: pay the diploma fee very early in the semester in which they
expect to receive the degree; the official calendar shows the latest date on
which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses
can be dropped or changed without penalty only through the office of the
Dean of the College.
The rules and regulations of the University are published in a separate bul-
letin entitled By-Laws of the University of Florida, and copies are distributed
to all who register at the University. Each student is held responsible for
the observance of the rules and regulations of the University insofar as they
affect him.

SOCIETIES

Farr Literary Society is the oldest society on the campus. Its meetings are
held weekly and are open to all students of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Every student is given an opportunity to train himself in oratory and debate,
to get acquainted with those who are interested in these fields of activity, and
to discuss problems of interest to all students in the College.
Leigh Chemical Society is organized by and for the students of the depart-
ment of Chemistry, from all Colleges for the purpose of stimulating the inter-
est of beginners and giving a view of the importance of the industry. It meets
monthly, with programs aided by faculty members and advanced students.
The International Relations Club is sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment
for International Peace. It is open to all students with good scholarship rec-
ords who are desirous of obtaining an understanding of the many problems
which are pressing upon the world today. Meetings are held the second and
fourth Thursdays of each school month.
The Mathematics Colloquium is open to all interested in mathematics. The
meetings are bi-weekly.

PLACEMENT BUREAU

The Bureau of Placements, which is under the direction of the Dean of
Students, seeks to help all graduates in securing positions. Parents and stu-
dents are urged to avail themselves of the facilities offered for securing help
on all matters which come within the scope of the activities of this office.

ARTS AND SCIENCES IN THE SUMMER SESSION

The College of Aris and Sciences offers a large number of courses in the
regular summer session of the University of Florida. For information con-
cerning these courses see the Bulletin of the University Summer Session. This
bulletin can be obtained from the office of the Registrar, University of Flor-
ida. Gainesville. Florida.







334 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

DESCRIPTION OF CURRICULA

The College of Arts and Sciences offers six essentially different curricula.
The following summaries will give the student some idea of the type of work
done in each of these six courses of study.
The course of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree.-This
is a four-year course in which the humanities and social sciences are empha-
sized. The study of foreign language is given some prominence, both ancient
and modern languages being offered. College English, foreign language, his-
tory, and mathematics are required of every student electing this course, and
to insure some understanding of scientific fact and method, every student is
required to study a basic year-course in one of the natural sciences, in addi-
tion to which he may elect a limited amount of additional work in natural
science if he so desires.
The course of study leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree.-Stu-
dents who are interested primarily in the sciences may hope to gain a thorough
introduction to the natural sciences and a working grasp of scientific methods
by pursuing this four-year curriculum. Each student must select one science
in which he is expected to gain a mastery. A limited amount of foreign
language study is required in order that the student may have a reading
knowledge of scientific writings from other countries. The candidate for the
Bachelor of Science degree is also expected to acquire breadth of viewpoint
and training by devoting some time to the study of mathematics, English, and
kindred subjects.
The Combined Academic and Law Course.-Many students intending to
study law desire the thorough training offered by one of the foregoing courses.
This has been made possible by granting the substitution of a fixed amount of
law credit for free electives in either the Bachelor of Arts course or the Bach-
elor of Science course. Under this arrangement the student may earn one
of the above degrees, together with a degree in law, by three years of inten-
sive study in the College of Arts and Sciences, followed by three years of
study in the College of Law. The Bachelor's degree in Arts and Sciences
will be conferred only after the candidate has satisfactorily completed the
second year of law. Attention should be called to the fact that one of the
requirements for the degree of Juris Doctor is that the candidate possess the
Bachelor of Arts degree or its equivalent.
The Pre-Law Course.-Two years of college work are required as a pre-
requisite to the study of law and in order to provide the most suitable two-
year course with which to fulfill this requirement the faculty of the College
of Arts and Sciences adopted the pre-law curriculum. This curriculum was
accepted, however, only after careful study of the entrance requirements and
recommendations of the law schools of the United States, the committee mak-
ing the study having the Dean of the College of Law of the University of
Florida as its chairman. The prescribed courses have been reduced to a mini-
mum consistent with a good foundation for the study of law, thus insuring







ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


the student a wide range of electives from which he may select courses that
will meet his own interests and needs.
The Pre-Medical Course.-A two-year pre-medical course is offered to meet
the requirements of some medical schools. Students wishing to attend medical
schools requiring more than two years of pre-medical training can meet the
requirement by taking the two-year pre-medical course here described, fol-
lowing which they can be registered as Bachelor of Science students. Emphasis
is placed on a good foundation in biology and physics, while special emphasis
is given to the study of chemistry.
Pre-Dental Course.-For most students this course is identical with the
first year of the Pre-Medical Course. The student should correspond with the
dean of the dental college which he wishes to enter, however, in order that he
may know the exact requirements for entrance to that college. Every legiti-
mate effort will be made to meet these requirements within one academic year,
unless the dental college specifies a longer period of pre-dental training.

ADMISSION
For information relative to admission to, and registration in, the College
of Arts and Sciences, the reader is referred to the University Record of the
University of Florida, General Information for the Year 1931-32, pages 135,
136. For the sake of clearness and emphasis, however, the specified entrance
units which are required of students entering given curricula are listed below
for the courses offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. To be admitted
to the College, the candidate should present seven, and cannot present less
than six, units of acceptable electives in addition to the nine prescribed units.
For admission to the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts
(B.A.), or to the combined Academic and Law Course, or to the Pre-Law
Course.-The nine required entrance units for these courses are three in
English, one in algebra, one in plane geometry, one in history, one in science,
and two in Latin. However, if a candidate does not present two units in Latin
but presents at least two units in some foreign language other than Latin, he
will be admitted to the course on the condition that he take up the study of
Latin upon entering the University and that he continue the study of Latin
until he has earned credit for two years of it. Credit for Latin studied in
the University will apply toward the degree.
For admission to the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science
(B.S.), or to the Pre-Medical Course, or to the Pre-Dental Course.-The nine
required entrance units for these courses are three in English, one in algebra,
one in plane geometry, one in history, one in science, and two in a foreign
language. However, candidates presenting two units in history together with
two units in science, or three units in history together with one unit in science,
or one unit in history together with three units in science, need not present
any foreign language for admission. One unit in a foreign language is not ac-
ceptable.
Recommendation.-All candidates are advised to present one-half unit in
trigonometry. Candidates for the Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Courses are ad-
vised to present one unit in physics.







GROUP I GROUP ir GROUP Ill GROUP IV MAJOR
COUE COURS COURSE S. SE. S COURSE


Military Science

Physical Educ 101
Physical Edue 102


French
German
Greek (except:
Greek 205,
Greek 206)

Latin (except:
Latin 206,
Latin 208,
Latin 255,
Latin 255)
Spanish


Bacteriology

Biology
Botany
Chemistry

Geology
Mathematics

Physics


____I] F ______ ________
______________ ______________ II f-i- ___________


CJ3


Bible

Economic
Education
English
Greek 805
Greek 206
History
Latin 806
latin 808
Latin 253
Latin 255
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Speech







ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


REQUIREMENTS OF THE DIFFERENT CURRICULA

GROUPS

The courses offered in the College of Arts and Sciences are grouped in
four groups for the purpose of describing the requirements for degrees. On
pages 338 and 342 the reader will find reproductions of the cards on which
records are checked. On page 336 the central portion of one of these cards
is reproduced and the courses offered in the College are shown in their proper
groups. For example, all courses in French are entered and counted in Group
II, while all courses in Bible are entered and counted in Group III. It some-
times happens that not all the courses offered in a given department are entered
in one group. For example, all courses offered in the Department of Ancient
Languages under Greek are entered and counted in Group II, except Greek
205 and Greek 206; these two courses are entered and counted in Group III.
In the section entitled "Departments of Instruction", pages 350 to 389 of this
bulletin, the group in which each course is entered, and in which credit for
the course is counted, is given with the description of the course. In all that
follows, these groups will be referred to by number as shown in the repro-
duction on page 336.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE
BACHELOR OF ARTS

On page 338 the reader will find a reproduction of the card on which
records are checked for the Bachelor of Arts degree. At the bottom of the
card will be found the courses which are required and the number of semes-
ter credit hours required in the different groups. If the student passed Latin
21-22, Latin 31-32, Mathematics 85 (trigonometry) before coming to the Uni-
versity, he does not repeat them, and were he to repeat them he would be
granted no credit for so doing. For those who desire a more detailed descrip-
tion of the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree the following outline
is given.
IN GROUP I
Military Science (see freshman year)................................... 4
Physical Education 101 and 102 (see freshman year).............................. 2
Military Science (see sophomore year) ... ....... ................ 4

T total in G group I.... .............................................. ........................................ 10

Students exempt from Military Science, or from Physical Education, or
from both, for any reason whatever must, in order to receive a degree, earn
an equal number of semester credit hours in some other group or groups.
Choice of these subjects must in all cases be approved by the Dean.

IN GROUP II
Twenty-four (24) semester credit hours of which 12 must be in subjects
numbered as high as 100. University credit for a single year in any foreign
language will be counted toward the fulfillment of this requirement but the







_MAU nceI rUroI uL SE si_ I I ....

.. .. ...... I .. ... ..... B A...
.... A-- ... 1 . la.a .... I.... ....... .1 ~.... ...'
GROUP I GROUP II GROUP III GROUP IV
























...0 24 3a AT LUsT I, *m. sW.
24UImt u ens --T----t-cs 24 TOCHEDoT *55OV5oU52 134







ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


student is advised to continue the study of the language for at least two
years. No credit will be allowed for courses taken in the University which
duplicate, either in whole or in part, courses passed before coming to the
University.
IN GROUP III
English 101 and 102 (see freshman year) ........ .... ........... ......-- 6
English 103 and 104 (see freshman year) .................. .... ....--. 4
History 101 and 102 (see freshman year) ... .............. ................ 6
E lectives from G roup III ............... ... ........ ....... ..... --.... ........................ 20

T total in G group III .......................... ............. ............. ......... ...... 36

IN GROUP IV
Mathematics 101 and 102 (see freshman year).......................................... 6
Either Biology 101 and 104, or Biology 101 and 0201,
or Chemistry 101 and 102,
or Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108,
or Physics 111, 112, 115, and 116 (see sophomore year) ........ .. ............. 10
Electives from Group IV" --............ .. ............. ....-.------.... .... ............ 8

Total in Group IV .................-- ------........ ......................... 24

The student may substitute Biology 106 for Biology 104 in which case he
will earn 8 semester credit hours for the year instead of 10; he must then
earn 10 semester credit hours in electives in this group. A student who is re-
quired to study trigonometry in the University may count the credit earned as
part of the 24 credit hour total required in this group; he will then need to
earn at least 5 semester credit hours of electives in the group instead of 8
as shown above. If the student earned credit for trigonometry before coming
to the University, he cannot take it again for credit.

IN GROUPS II AND III AND (PURE) MATHEMATICS

A total of 24 semester credit hours over and above those already listed
under Group II, Group III, and Group IV must be earned. The student is
free to choose the studies in which these credits are to be earned, subject only
to the restriction that they must be from Groups II and III and (pure) Mathe-
matics and that they must meet the approval of the Dean.

TOTAL

In addition to the above the student must earn enough credit to make a
total of not less than 134 semester credit hours acceptable to the faculty of
the College of Arts and Sciences. These additional credits may be selected
from any one or more of the four groups subject only to the approval of the
Dean.
MAJOR

Included in the work of Group II, or Group III, or (pure) Mathematics,
the student must complete a major. The majors are described on pages
347 to 349. inclusive.








340 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

RESIDENCE

At least the last 30 semester credit hours must be earned in residence at
this University.
FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS

Freshmen and sophomores taking the Bachelor of Arts Course are gener-
ally expected to follow the programs given below. Deviation from these pro-
grams is permissible only when the student can show cause satisfactory to
the Dean.


First Semester
Names of Courses Credits
English 101 .......... ................. 3
English 103 .............. ...................... 2
Foreign Language .............................. 3
H history 101 .......................................... 3
M them atics 101 .................................. 3
Military Science 103 ........................ 2
Physical Education 101 .................... 1


[AN YEAR
Second Semester
Names of Courses Credits
English 102 ...................................... 3
English 104 ........... ............ 2
Foreign Language .............................. 3
H history 102 .......................................... 3
Mathematics 102 ................................ 8
Military Science 104 ............................ 2
Physical Education 102 .................... 1


Greek 21 and 22 may be substituted for History 101 and 102 in the fresh-
man year; History 101 and 102 must then be taken in the sophomore year.
Every freshman is required to take a placement examination in English
during Freshman Week. If he passes this examination he will be admitted
to English 101. If he fails the placement examination he must register for
and pass English 21 before he will be admitted to English 101. No credit is
given for English 21.
Trigonometry (Mathematics 85) is a prerequisite for admission to Mathe-
matics 101. Students entering this curriculum without entrance credit in
trigonometry will be registered for Mathematics 85 and Mathematics 101 will
be deferred. College credit in trigonometry counts toward the degree.

SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits
Either Biology 104 or 0201
Either Biology 101 Or Chemistry 102
Or Chemistry 101 Or Physics 106 and 108
Or Physics 105 and 107 Or Physics 112, and 116
Or Physics 111, and 115................. 5 Or Biology 106 ................................ or 3
G roup II ..................... ...................... 3 Group II ........................................... 3
Group III ........................ ................... 3 Group III ........................................... 3
Group II or III or IV..................... 3 Group II or III or IV.................. 3
Military Science 203 ..... ................. 2 Military Science 204 ................... 2

16 16 or 14

In case the selection of subjects in the second semester of the sophomore
year, as indicated in the table, leads to a 14 credit hour total, the student is
expected to register for an additional subject in that semester.








ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


REQUIREMENTS OF THE COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

On page 342 the reader will find a reproduction of the card on which rec-
ords are checked for the Bachelor of Science degree. At the bottom of the
card will be found the courses which are required and the number of semes-
ter credit hours required in the different groups. If the student passed trigo-
nometry (Mathematics 85) before coming to the University, he does not
repeat it. and were he to repeat it he would be granted no credit for so doing.
For those who desire a more detailed description of the requirements for
the Bachelor of Science degree the following outline is given.

IN GROUP I
Military Science (see freshman year)......... ....... 4
Physical Education 101 and 102 (see freshman year) ......-........ .......... 2
Military Science (see sophomore year) ....... .. .. ....... 4

Total in G roup I ...... ....... .. .............. .................. 10

Students exempt from Military Science, or from Physical Education. or
from both, for any reason whatever must, in order to receive a degree, earn an
equal number of semester credit hours in some other group or groups. Choice
of these subjects must in all cases be approved by the dean.

IN GROUP II

Eighteen (18) semester credit hours of which 6 must be in a subject num-
bered as high as 100. University credit for a single year in any foreign lan-
guage will be counted toward the fulfillment of this requirement but the stu-
dent is advised to continue the study of the language for at least two years.
No credit will be allowed for courses taken in the University which duplicate,
either in whole or in part. courses passed before coming to the University.

IN GROUP III
English 101 and 102 (see freshman year) ... ... 6
Electives from Group III... ..... ... ..................... 24

Total in Group III .... 30

IN GROUP IV
Mathematics 101 and 102 (see freshman year) ...............-................. .. 6
Biology 101 and 104, or Biology 101 and 0201 .................... ................ 10
C hem istry 101 and 102 ....... ... ......................... ...... .......................... ........... ... 10
Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108, or
Physics 111, 112, 115, and 116 (see sophomore year) .............................. 10
Electives from Group IV. ..... ... .... ..... ... ............... ................. 18

Total in Group IV .. .. .............................. 54

Biology 106 may be substituted for Biology 104. However the credit for
Biology 101 and 106 is 8 semester credit hours instead of 10 and in case this
substitution is made the electives from Group IV must total at least 20 semes-
ter credit hours.














.. -I.. ...-0-.-00..-.._ _u-........_- ..o -,. ...... .._....
GROUP I GROUP II GROUP ill GROUP IV Oo. T ru e
















"coun_________ u"________ SS> couii

















__ __ .ito o A L -*i.
OUtUKO P0000*,00 00000







ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


A student who is required to study trigonometry in the University may
count the credit earned as part of the 54 semester credit hour total required
in this group; the number of semester credit hours which he will then have
to earn in elective subjects in this group will be reduced by three. If the stu-
dent earned credit for trigonometry before coming to the University, he can-
not take it again for credit.
TOTAL

In addition to the above the student must earn enough credit to make a to-
tal of not less than 134 semester credit hours acceptable to the faculty of the
College of Arts and Sciences. These additional credits may be selected from
any one or more of the four groups subject only to the approval of the Dean.

MAJOR
Included in the work of Group IV the student must complete a major.
The majors are described on pages 347 to 349, inclusive.

RESIDENCE
At least the- last 30 semester credit hours must be earned in residence at
this University.
FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS
Freshmen and sophomores taking the Bachelor of Science Course are gen-
erally expected to follow the programs given below. Deviation from these
programs is permissible only when the student can show cause satisfactory to
the Dean.
FRESHMAN YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits
Chem istry 101 .................................... 5 Chem istry 102 ...................................... 5
English 101 ........................................... 3 English 102 .................... ................. 3
Foreign Language ........................... 3 Foreign Language ........................... 3
M them atics 101 .................................. 3 M them atics 102 .................................. 3
Military Science 103 ................-- ....... 2 Military Science 104......................... 2
Physical Education 101 ................. 1 Physical Education 102................... 1

17 17

If the student prefers to take biology or physics in his freshman year he
may do so, provided he obtains the consent of the dean and of the head of
the department offering the course he wishes to take. The course in Chem-
istry must then be taken in the sophomore year.
Every freshman is required to take a placement examination in English
during Freshman Week. If he passes this examination he will be admitted
to English 101. If he fails the placement examination he must register for and
pass English 21 before he will be admitted to English 101. No credit is given
for English 21.
Trigonometry (Mathematics 85) is a prerequisite for admission to Mathe-
matics 101. Students entering this curriculum without entrance credit in
trigonometry will be registered for Mathematics 85 and Mathematics 101 will
be deferred. College credit in trigonometry counts toward the degree.









344 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

SOPHOMORE YEAR
First Semester Second Semester
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits
Either Biology 104 or 0201, or
Either Biology 101, or Physics 106 and 108, or
Physics 105 and 107, or Physics 112, and 116, or
Physics 111, and 115 .......... ... ......... 5 Biology 106 .................................... 5 or 3
Group II ......................... .............. 3 Group II ..................... ................. 3
Group III ........ ................... 3 Group III ........................................ 3
Group II, III, or IV......................... 3 Group II, III, or IV....................... 8
Military Science 203 .......................... 2 Military Science 204 ...................... 2

16 16 or 14

In case the selection of subjects in the second semester of the sophomore
year, as indicated in the table, leads to a 14 credit hour total, the student is
expected to register for an additional subject in that semester.
It will be noted that the student will have taken foundation courses in two
of the three fields, biology, chemistry and physics, in the freshman and sopho-
more years. The foundation course in the third of these fields must be taken
in the junior year.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAW COURSE

In order to earn the degree Bachelor of Arts, or the degree Bachelor of
Science, in the combined academic and law course, the student must fulfill
all requirements of the course leading to the degree for which he is working,
counting not more than 24 semester credit hours of law as free electives in
the College of Arts and Sciences. The degree in the College of Arts and Sci-
ences will not be conferred until the student has satisfactorily completed
two years of study in the College of Law.
During the semester, and preferably during the year, in which he expects
to receive the degree Bachelor of Arts or the degree Bachelor of Science the
student must be registered in the College of Arts and Sciences as well as in
the College of Law, although his studies may be confined to the College of
Law.

REQUIREMENTS OF THE PRE-LAW COURSE

Before a student can be admitted to the College of Law he must earn
creditable passing grades in at least 67 semester credit hours of college work
leading toward a degree. He can do this in two academic years by raeraging
17 semester credit hours with good grades each semester. Consequently, the
Pre-Law Curriculum was designed as a two-year course. Those who find at
the end of the second year that they need further pre-law training can con-
tinue in the course leading to the degree Bachelor of Arts without loss of
credit.
The Pre-Law Course is fully described in the following outline:








ADMISSION AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 345

First Year
PRESCRIBED COURSES
English 101 and 102.
Foreign Language:
If the student offers two or more units of Latin for entrance to the
University, he may elect any course in foreign language for which
he is prepared; if, however, the student does not offer two units
of Latin for entrance, the course in foreign language must be Latin
21 and 22.
Mathematics:
Students who present only algebra and geometry for entrance must
take
Mathematics 85 followed by Mathematics 101, or
Mathematics 85 followed by Surveying 0101, or
Mathematics 107 followed by Mathematics 108.
Students who present algebra, geometry, and trigonometry for en-
trance will take
Mathematics 101 followed by Mathematics 102, or
Mathematics 101 followed by Mathematics 108, or
Mathematics 101 followed by Surveying 0101.
Military Science 103 and 104.
Physical Education 101 and 102.

ADDITIONAL COURSES
In addition to the prescribed courses listed above, the student must select from
the following courses, the total not to exceed nineteen (19) credits per semester:
Economics 101 and 102, English 103-104, History 101-102, Polit-
ical Science 101-102, Sociology 102, Sociology 111-112.
Students entering the Pre-law course with the hope of being able to continue
their pre-law studies beyond the second year will do well to note that Mathematics
101 and Mathematics 102 are required of every candidate for either the degree
Bachelor of Arts or the degree Bachelor of Science and that English 103 and 104 and
History 101 and 102 are required of every candidate for the degree Bachelor of Arts.

Second Year

PRESCRIBED COURSES
Economics 201 and 202.
Foreign Language:
If, in his first year at the University of Florida, the student earned
passing grades in both semesters of a foreign language course num-
bered as high as 101 and 102, he may, at his request, be excused
from foreign language in the second year of this curriculum.
Military Science 203 and 204, Speech 201, Psychology 0201.

ADDITIONAL COURSES
In addition to the prescribed courses listed above, the student must select from
the following courses, the total to satisfy the rule regarding maximum and mini-
mum registration:
Bible 208, Business Administration 211 and 212, English 201 and
202, History 101 and 102 for those not electing or not passing it
in the first year, History 301 and 302, or History 303 and 304, or
History 305 and 306 for those passing History 101 and 102 in
the first year. Biology 101 and 104, or Biology 101 and 106, or
Chemistry 101 and 102, or Physics 105, 106, 107, and 108, or
Physics 111, 112, 115, and 116. Mathematics, Philosophy 205
(logic), Philosophy 301 (ethics), Political Science. Speech 212.








346 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

THE PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES

In the first pages of this bulletin, the need for good foundation train-
ing for those expecting to enter the professions is noted. The best evidence
of this, however, is the testimony of those vitally interested in the professions
per se. The Dean of one of the leading schools of medicine very kindly gave
us permission to print the following from the current issue of that university's
catalog.
"In no profession is a broad cultural and scientific training of greater ad-
vantage than in the profession of medicine and prospective students are urged
not to take up the study of medicine with only the bare preparation which
will satisfy minimum Association requirements. The best preparation is that
represented in a standard four-year college course, which includes thorough
training in English, chemistry, physics, biology, history, Latin, sociology, and
psychology, and a reading knowledge of German or French."
The two-year Pre-Medical Course described below is designed to cover the
minimum requirements of the Association of American Medical Colleges. It is
strongly urged that students preparing for the study of medicine earn the
Bachelor of Science degree. However, those who cannot earn the Bachelor
of Science degree can take the two-year course described below, and should
they find themselves in circumstances that permit further pre-medical train-
ing, they can continue in the Bachelor of Science curriculum.
First Year


First Semester
Names of Courses Credits
Biology 101 ..-..--..................-------.........-...-..--..-.... 5
Chemistry 101 ...................................... 5
English 101 ......................................... 3
Foreign Language .............................. 3
Military Science 101 ............................ 2
Physical Education 101 ...................... 1


Second Semester
Names of Courses Credits
Biology 104 ........................................ 5
Chemistry 102 .................................... 5
English 102 ......................................... 3
Foreign Language ............................ 3
Military Science 102 ........................ 2
Physical Education 102 .................. 1

19


Second Year


First Semester,
Names of Courses Credits
Chemistry 203 ...................................... 4
Physics 105 and 107, or
Physics 111 and 115........................... 5
E lective ....................... ................. 3
E lective ..................... ..................... 3
Military Science 201 ...................... 2


Second Semester
Names of Courses
Chemistry 262 ...............................
Physics 106 and 108, or
Physics 112 and 116....................
E lective ...................... ................
E lective ..................... ..............
Military Science 202 ...................


REQUIREMENTS OF THE PRE-DENTAL COURSE

In general this course is a one-year course the requirements of which are
identical with the first year of the Pre-Medical Course. Students desiring
pre-dental training should correspond with the dental college of their choice
several weeks before coming to this University. Insofar as possible the Pre-
Dental Course will be modified to meet the needs of the individual.


Credits
..... 5

.... 5
..... 3
..... 3
..... 2







REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS

Under each department name below will be found the minimum work for
which the student must earn credit in order to have a major in that depart-
ment. Obviously, the student may take as much more work in the depart-
ment as his own inclination and circumstances permit. As soon as he has
decided upon his major department the student should confer with the head
of that department regarding his courses.

BIBLE
Bible 101-102, 203-204, 305-306, and 307, and 3 semester hours from other
courses in the Department of Bible.

BIOLOGY
Not less than 24 semester credit hours, including Biology 101, 104, 0201,
and at least one semester of Biology 501-502. Geology may, with the approval
of the Head of the Department, be accepted as part of the major in Biology.

CHEMISTRY
Chemistry 101-102, 232, 203, 305, and 361-362.

ECONOMICS
Economics 101-102, 201-202, and 12 semester hours from other courses in
the Department of Economics. The selection of courses must be approved by
the Head of the Department.
ENGLISH
English 101-102, 103-104, 201-202, 301-302, and one of the senior courses
in the Department of English.
FRENCH
French 101-102 and 18 semester hours of work of higher level in the De-
partment of French of which at least 6 semester hours must be in composi-
tion and conversation; French 107-108 does not count toward a major.

GEOLOGY
No major is offered in Geology. See Biology.

GERMAN
The student must earn or have credit for German 102 and he must earn
a total of 24 semester hours of college credit in the Department of German;
the selection of courses must meet the approval of the Head of the Depart-
ment.
GREEK
Twenty-four semester credit hours in courses approved by the Head of
the Department. Usually grammar and prose composition are required.

HISTORY
Twenty-four semester credit hours in history in the Department of History
and Political Science, including in the 24 semester hours History 101-102.







348 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
History 101-102 and Political Science 101-102 and 18 semester credit
hours of other work in the Department of History and Political Science.

LATIN
Twenty-four semester credit hours in courses approved by the Head of the
Department. Usually grammar and prose composition are required.

MATHEMATICS
Mathematics 101-102, or their equivalents, and 18 semester hours selected
from courses offered by the Department of Mathematics; the courses selected
must include calculus and the selection must meet the approval of the Head
of the Department.
PHILOSOPHY
Not less than 24 semester hours in the Department of Philosophy. Any two
of the beginning courses should be taken after which the following courses
should be taken in order, as far as that can be arranged: Logic, Advanced
Logic, Philosophy of Nature, Ethics, and, if possible, Advanced Ethics. For
the two beginning courses Philosophy 303 and 304 are recommended.

PHYSICS
A general introductory course in college physics, preferably Physics 105,
106, 107, and 108, followed by the intermediate courses in light, heat, elec-
tricity and magnetism, and mechanics. The student must earn at least 28
semester hours credit in the Department of Physics. In addition to the re-
quired courses in chemistry and mathematics, it is recommended that the
student take calculus and differential equations.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
Political Science 101-102 and 18 semester credit hours in other courses
in political science in the Department of History and Political Science.
The major in political science and history is described above.

PSYCHOLOGY
Twenty-four semester hours in the Department of Psychology, including
Psychology 201, 304, and 401-402.

SOCIOLOGY
Twenty-four semester credit hours in the Department of Sociology. The
selection of courses must be approved by the Head of the Department. The
following courses are recommended: Sociology 111, 112, 301-302 or 381-382,
441, 442. It is also recommended that the student take the following courses
although they do not count in the above 24 semester credit hours: Psychology
201 and Economics 201-202.
SPANISH
The student must earn or have credit for Spanish 102 and he must earn
a total of 24 semester hours of college credit in the Department of Spanish;






REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS 349

the selection of courses must meet the approval of the Head of the Depart-
ment.
SPEECH
The work in the Department of Speech is divided into two classes as fol-
lows:
Class A. Speech 203, 204, 212, 214, 301, 305, 306, 401.
Class B. Speech 207, 208, 303, 304, 403, 404.
All students majoring in Speech are required to complete Speech 201,
202. If the student majoring in Speech is primarily interested in original
speaking, he should elect at least 12 semester hours from Class A and a mini-
mum of 6 semester hours (preferably Speech 207 and 404) from Class B. If
the student is primarily interested in the interpretative and dramatic aspects
of Speech, he should elect at least 12 hours from Class B and a minimum of
6 semester hours (preferably Speech 203, 214, and 301) from Class A.







350 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Subjects with odd numbers are given in the first semester and subjects
with even numbers are given in the second semester unless the number be-
gins with 0 in which case the reverse is true.
The number of hours given is the number of hours which the class meets
per week.
The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours earned by
each student who receives a passing grade (A, B, C, or D) when the subject
is completed. Unless specifically stated, credit will be allowed for one semes-
ter of a year course.
Subjects numbered 200 or above are not open to freshmen; subjects num-
bered 300 or above are not open to sophomores; subjects numbered 400 or
above are not open to juniors; subjects numbered 500 or above are for gradu-
ate students.
The abbreviations used are wherever possible the first and last letter of
the first word of the department name. Occasionally, a third central letter is
demanded to distinguish between departments where first and last letters are
identical.
BACTERIOLOGY

Bcy. 301.-General Bacteriology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. Group IV. Carroll.
Morphology, physiology and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms.
Prerequisites: Bty. 101, Bly. 101, Cy. 253 or equivalents.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bcy. 302.-Agricultural Bacteriology. 2 hours and 4 hours labora-
tory. 4 credits. Group IV. Carroll.
Bacteria and associated micro-organisms in relation to water, milk, soil, silage
and farm problems.
Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Bey. 304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. Group IV. Carroll.
Recognition, culture and special laboratory technique of handling pathogens
and viruses. Theories and principles of immunity and infection.
Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bcy. 306.-Bacteriology of Foods. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. Group IV. Carroll.
Relation of bacteria, yeast, molds, and other micro-organisms commonly found
in foods.
Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bcy. 308. Sanitary Laboratory Practice. 1 hour and 4 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. Group IV. Carroll.
Primarily for sanitary engineers, and deals with problems in sewage and public
sanitation.
Desirable antecedents: Some knowledge of biology, chemistry, bacteriology and
physics.
Laboratory fee, $5.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bey. 401.-Clinical Bacteriology. Hours to be arranged. 4 credits.
Group IV. Carroll.
Laboratory practice on special problems preparing for technical expert in field
of biological activities of bacteria and related micro-organisms. Animal experimenta-
tion and immunology upon pathogens. Work assigned to specific pathogens. A pre-
requisite to research in clinical bacteriology.
Prerequisite: Bcey. 304.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bcy. 501-502.-Problems in Soil Bacteriology. 8 credits. Group IV.
Either semester may be taken for credit without the other. Car-
roll.
A study of the occurrence and activities of special groups of bacteria or other
fungi in the soil.
Prerequisites: Bcey. 301-302.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bcy. 503-504.-Problems in Dairy Bacteriology. 8 credits. Group IV.
Either semester may be taken for credit without the other. Car-
roll.
A study of the occurrence and activities of any group of organisms which may
occur in milk or its products.
Prerequisites: Bey. 301-302.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bcy. 505-506.- Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology. 8 credits.
Group IV. Either semester may be taken for credit without the
other. Carroll.
An advanced study of organisms or groups which may cause or be associated
with disease.
Prerequisite: Bey. 301; desired antecedent: Bey. 304 and 307.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bey. 507-508.-Problems in Bacteriology of Water and Sewage. 8
credits. Group IV. Either semester may be taken for credit with-
out the other. Carroll.
A study of any group or groups of organisms which may occur in active form
in water or sewage.
Prerequisite: Bey. 301 and 307 or equivalents.
Laboratory fee, $5.

BIBLE

Be. 101-102.-Old Testament History. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III.
Either semester may be taken for credit without the other.
Buchholz.
Lectures, Bible readings, textbooks.
Be. 203-204.-New Testament History. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III.
Either semester may be taken for credit without the other.
Buchholz.
Lectures, Bible readings, textbooks.
Be. 205.-Old and New Testament Greek. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Anderson.
See Greek 203.
Be. 208.- Studies of Great Bible Characters. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Group III. Buchholz.







352 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Be. 301.-The English Bible as Literature. Hours and credits to be
arranged. Group III. Farr.
Literary types found in the Bible, and the excellence of the work as compared
with other great examples of literature.
Be. 305-306.-The Bible as an Ethical and Religious Guide. 3 hours.
6 credits. Group III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed
until the entire 6 credits are earned. Buchholz.
Lectures, Bible readings, studies of great sermons, textbooks on evidences of
Christianity.
Be. 307.-The History of the Christian Church from Apostolic Times
Through the Reformation. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Buch-
holz.
Be. 309.-The Psychology of Jesus. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Buchholz.
Jesus, the Man.
Be. 310.-The Pedagogy of Jesus. 2 hours. 2 credits. Group III.
Buchholz.
Jesus, the Master Teacher.
BIOLOGY

Bly. 101-0101.-Principles of Animal Biology. 2 hours and 4 hours
laboratory and 1 hour quiz. 5 credits. Group IV. Rogers and staff.
An introduction to the subject matter and principles of zoology.
Laboratory fee, $5.
A prerequisite for all other courses in this department except Bly. 0105. Re-
quired of first year pre-medical, physical education and agricultural students and
of all B.S. students.
Bly. 104.-Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 2 hours and 4 hours
laboratory and 1 hour quiz. 5 credits. Group IV. Sherman.
A comparative study of the anatomy of the main classes of vertebrates.
Prerequisite: Bly. 101 or 0101.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Required of first year pre-medical students.
Bly. 0105.-Elementary Anatomy and Physiology. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Not open to students in the College of Arts and Sciences. Group
IV. Sherman.
The elements of vertebrate anatomy, with an introduction to the physiological
systems of man.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Open to Pharmacy students only.
Bly. 106.-Organic Evolution. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Hubbell.
An examination of the data upon which the concept of organic evolution is
based, the status of evolution as a principle of biology, the theories to account for
the mechanism of evolution and a review of the history of the evolution idea in
biology.
Prerequisite: Bly. 101 or 0101.
May be used together with Bly. 101 or 0101 to fulfill a minimum requirement
of 8 credits in biology in Group IV of the Arts and Sciences Curricula.
Bly. 108.-Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology. 2 hours and 6 hours
laboratory. 5 credits. Group IV. Sherman.
An introduction to the structure and functioning of the mammalian body, with
special reference to man. Individual dissection of the cat is accompanied by lec-
tures on the human body and physiological demonstrations.
Prerequisite: Bly. 101 or 0101.
Laboratory fee, $5.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bly. 0201.-Invertebrate Zoology. 3 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 5
credits. Group IV. Byers.
The comparative morphology, phylogeny and natural history of invertebrates,
exclusive of the insects.
Prerequisite: Bly. 101 or 0101.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bly. 0202.-Entomology. 3 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 5 credits.
Group IV. Hubbell.
The comparative morphology, classification and natural history of insects, with
emphasis on field work on the local insect fauna. A logical complement to Bly. 0201.
Prerequisite: Bly. 101 or 0101.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bly. 211.-Embryology. 3 hours and 6 hours laboratory. 5 credits.
Group IV. Sherman.
The principles of general embryology, followed by special attention to the devel-
opment of the vertebrates.
Prerequisites: Bly. 101 or 0101 and Bly. 104.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bly. 0301.-Advanced Invertebrate Zoology. Hours and credits to be
arranged. Group IV. Byers.
Special studies on the local invertebrate fauna.
Prerequisites: Bly. 101 or 0101 and Bly. 0201.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bly. 0302.-Advanced Entomology. Hours and credits to be arranged.
Group IV. Hubbell.
Studies of the classification and natural history of certain selected groups of
insects.
Prerequisites: Bly. 101 or 0101 and Bly. 0202.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bly. 305.-Genetics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Rogers.
An introduction to the subject matter, methods and data of genetics, with
special reference to animals.
Prerequisites: Bly. 101 or 0101 and Bly. 0201 or 211.
Bly. 311-312.-Vertebrate Zoology. 2 hours and 6 hours laboratory.
8 credits. Group IV. No credit toward a degree will be allowed
until the entire 8 credits are earned. Sherman and Giovannoli.
The classification and natural history of vertebrate animals, with special atten-
tion to the recognition and habits of the local fauna.
Prerequisites: Bly. 101 or 0101 and Bly. 104.
Laboratory fee: $3 per semester.
Bly. 323.-Animal Histology. 4 hours laboratory, 1 hour quiz. 3
credits. Group IV. Sherman.
An introductory study of animal tissues, chiefly those of the vertebrates.
Prerequisites: Bly. 101 or 0101 and Bly. 104.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bly. 402.-Animal Ecology. 3 hours and 8 hours field work. 5 credits.
Group IV. Rogers.
Studies on the local fauna as an introduction to the methods of animal ecology.
Prerequisites: Bly. 101 or 0101 and Bly. 0201 or 0202 or 311-312.
Laboratory fee, $5.









354 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Bly. 403.-Zoogeography. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Hubbell.
The principles governing the spatial distribution of animals, and the bearing
of geographic distribution on problems of evolution.
Prerequisites: Bly. 101 or 0101 and Bly. 0201 or 0202 or 311-312; it is desirable
that Gy. 202 either precede or accompany this course.
Bly. 415.-Medical Zoology. 3 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 5 cred-
its. Group IV. Byers.
The animal organisms, especially the protozoa, worms and arthropods, produc-
ing disease in man and the higher vertebrates.
Prerequisites: Bly. 101 or 0101.
Bly. 501-502.-Current Literature of Biology. 1% hours. 2 credits.
Group IV. Undergraduates may take either semester for credit
without the other. Rogers, Hubbell, Sherman, Byers and Giovan-
noli.
An informal Journal Club that meets once a week to review some of the cur-
rent biological journals and books.
Undergraduate assistants are required to take part and will be given full
credit.
Bly. 503.-Advanced General Biology. 2 hours and 1 hour discussion
section. 3 credits. Group IV. Rogers, assisted by staff.
The fundamental theories and concepts of biology are discussed from the stand-
point of the advanced student, with emphasis on the objects and methods of modern
biological research. Collateral readings and reports required.
Prerequisites: an undergraduate major in biology, including Bly. 0201 or 0202
or 311-312, or their equivalents.
Required of all graduate students majoring in biology.
To be followed by Bly. 0505, and by Bly. 506 or 516 or 518.
Bly. 0505.-History of Biology. 2 hours. 2 credits. Group IV. Rogers.
An outline of the development of the modern content and theories of biology.
Prerequisites: Bly. 104, 106, 0201 or the equivalents.
Bly. 506.-Zoological Classification and Nomenclature. 1 hour and 8
hours laboratory work. 5 credits. Group IV. Rogers, Hubbell,
Sherman, Byers or Giovannoli.
An approved group of animals is studied under the direction of one of the mem-
bers of the department as an illustration of the biological and taxonomic problems
involved in animal classification.
Prerequisite: Bly. 503.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bly. 516.-Advanced Morphology. 1 hour and 8 hours laboratory
work. 5 credits. Group IV. Hubbell, Sherman, or Byers.
Morphological studies on a species or group of animals are made under the di-
rection of one of the above members of the department, as an illustration of the
principles of morphology and an introduction to methods of research in this field.
Prerequisite: Bly. 503.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bly. 518.-Bionomics. 1 hour and 8 hours laboratory. 5 credits.
Group IV. Rogers, Hubbell, Sherman, Byers or Giovannoli.
A species or group of local animals is studied from the standpoint of ecology
or life history under the direction of one of the members of the department, as an
illustration of the problems involved in a consideration of the relations of animals to
their environments.
Prerequisite: Bly. 503.
Laboratory fee: $5.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bly. 519-520.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Hours to be
arranged. Group IV. Thesis required.
All applicants for the Master's degree are required to undertake some approved
individual problem in biology, the results of which will be embodied in a Master's
thesis. Such problems will be carried out under the direction of one of the members
of the staff. Problems may be chosen from one of the following fields: vertebrate
or invertebrate morphology or embryology; classification or taxonomy of certain ap-
proved groups ; natural history or distribution of a selected group of local animals;
investigations of animal habitats in the Gainesville area.
Prerequisites: An undergraduate major in biology, including Bly. 0201 or 0202
or 402 or 311-312.
Laboratory fee: $5.

BOTANY

Bty. 101.-General Botany. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 cred-
its. Group IV. Cody, Carroll.
Structure and life histories of important algae, fungi, mosses and ferns.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 102.-General Botany. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 cred-
its. Group IV. Cody, Carroll.
Structure, environment, principles of identification of seed plants.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 210.-Taxonomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
Group IV. Cody.
Identification of common seed plants and ferns of the Gainesville region. (An
extra hour's credit may be earned by assignment of a special field problem.) Pre-
requisites: Bty. 101, 102.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 0302 or 302.-Plant Physiology. 2 class and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. Group IV. Cody.
Physiological processes of plants with respect to absorption, assimilation, tran-
spiration, metabolism, respiration and growth.
Desired prerequisites: Cy. 232 or 262, or equivalent; Ay. 301, Ps. Ill, or
equivalents.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 310.-Advanced Taxonomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Group IV. Cody.
A critical study of a plant family or genus. Field work.
Prerequisite: Bty. 210, or equivalent.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 320.-General Morphology of Seed Plants.-1 hour and 6 hours
laboratory. 4 credits. Group IV. Cody.
Structure and life histories of certain gymnosperms and angiosperms; process
of ovule fertilization.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 331.-Plant Histology. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
Group IV. Cody.
Methods and practice in killing, fixing, sectioning and staining of plant tissues
and organs. (An extra hour's credit may be earned on assignment of a special
problem.)
Desired prerequisite: Bty. 302, Cy. 262.
Laboratory fee, $5.









356 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Bty. 332.-Plant Anatomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
Group IV. Cody.
Origin, structure and function of principal tissues and organs of plants. (An
extra hour's credit may be earned on assignment of a special problem.)
Desired prerequisite: Bty. 331, Cy. 262, Ps. 111.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 401, or 0401.-Plant Ecology. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Group IV. Cody.
The relation of plants to their environment with special reference to plant as-
sociations, plant successions, and modes and effects of plant migration; plant sur-
veys.
Prerequisites: Bty. 210, 302. Ay. 301 and some knowledge of biology, chemistry
and geology.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 402.-Advanced Plant Physiology. 1 hour and 6 hours labora-
tory. 4 credits. Group IV. Cody.
Special studies in digestion, assimilation, nutrition, respiration and growth.
Preliminary course to research in plant physiology.
Prerequisite: Bty. 302.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 500.-Seminar. 1 hour, 2 credits. Group IV. Cody.
Study of current botanical and bacteriological literature; assigned topics and
discussion.
Bty. 501-502.-Problems in Taxonomy. 8 credits. Group IV. Cody.
Special problem will be assigned in taxonomy.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 503-504.-Research in Plant Physiology. 8 credits. Group IV.
Cody.
Special studies in nutrition, assimilation, growth or respiration.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 506.-Problems in Plant Histology. 4 credits. Group IV. Cody.
Comparative methods and critical studies in killing, fixing, staining of plant
tissues.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Bty. 507, or 0507. Special Problems in Plant Anatomy. 4 credits.
Group IV. Cody.
Assignment of a special problem for a critical study of certain plant tissues
and organs.
Laboratory fee, $5.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 4 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 5 cred-
its. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Cy.
102 is earned. Group IV. Heath in charge.
The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and the preparation and prop-
erties of the common non-metallic elements and their compounds. Students may be-
gin this course either the first or second semester.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 102.-General Chemistry, continued. 4 hours and 3 hours labora-
tory. 5 credits. Group IV. Heath in charge.
Devoted largely to a study of the metallic elements and their compounds.
Laboratory fee, $5.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cy. 0203.-Qualitative Analysis. 2 hours and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Group IV. Jackson.
A systematic study of the metals and their chemical reactions and theoretical
considerations of qualitative analysis. Practice in the separation and identification
of the common metals and acid radicals.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 215.-Water and Sewage. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. Group IV. Pollard.
A theoretical and practical study of the examination and treatment of water
and sewage.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 0232.-Elementary Physical Chemistry. 3 hours and 3 hours lab-
oratory. 4 credits. Group IV. Jackson.
A study of the gaseous, liquid and solid states of matter, the properties of solu-
tions, and colloids.
Prerequisite: Cy. 203 or College Physics.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 262 or 0262.-Organic Chemistry. 3 hours and 6 hours labora-
tory. 5 credits. Group IV. Black.
A brief course embracing the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds,
designed chiefly for students in applied biological fields. Suitable for those pre-
medical students who desire only 5 hours of organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 305 or 0305.-Quantitative Analysis. 2 hours and 9 hours labora-
tory. 5 credits. Group IV. Black.
The fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. The labora-
tory work may be varied somewhat to fit the needs of individual students.
Prerequisite for Arts and Sciences students: Cy. 203.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 343.-Industrial Chemistry, Inorganic. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
IV. Beisler.
Consideration of chemical principles involved in manufacturing and refining
inorganic products of commercial importance.
Prerequisites: Cy. 232 or General Chemistry and College Physics.
Cy. 361-362.-Organic Chemistry. 3 hours and 6 hours laboratory or
its equivalent. 10 credits. Group IV. No credit toward a degree
will be allowed until the entire 10 credits are earned. Leigh.
A study of the preparation and properties of various aliphatic and aromatic
compounds.
Prerequisites: Cy. 203 or Cy. 232.
Laboratory fee, $5 per semester.
Cy. 403.-Water Analysis. 9 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 3
credits. Group IV.
The analysis of waters to determine their potability and fitness for steam rais-
ing and other purposes.
Prerequisites: Cy. 305.
Laboratory fee, $2.50.
Cy. 405.-Gas Analysis. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Group IV.
The analysis of fuel and illuminating gas and products of combustion. Some
attention given to the theory and use of automatic gas recorders.
Prerequisite: Cy. 305.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Not offered in 1931-32.







358 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Cy. 410.-Historical Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
The historical development of the more important chemical theories and their
influence on the development of the science.
Prerequisites: Cy. 361 and 362; Cy. 305.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Cy. 415.-Fuels Laboratory. 6 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 2
credits. Group IV. Beisler.
Analysis and calorimetry of gaseous, liquid and solid fuels.
Prerequisite: Cy. 305.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 422.-Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3 hours and 3 hours labora-
tory. 4 credits. Group IV. Jackson.
A study of electrical theory of matter, radioactivity, atomic structure, relation
between physical properties and chemical constitution, equilibrium, phase rule,
thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, chemical kinetics, and photo-chemistry.
Prerequisites: Cy. 203, Cy. 232, Cy. 361 and 362.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 444.-Industrial Chemistry Laboratory. 9 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. Group IV. Beisler.
A practical study of the commercial methods of manufacture and purification
of important chemicals.
Prerequisites: Cy. 335, Cy. 343.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 446.-Industrial Chemistry, Organic. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
IV. Beisler.
Consideration of chemical principles involved in manufacturing and refining
organic products of commercial importance. Visits are made to accessible fac-
tories and chemical plants.
Prerequisites: Cy. 361-362; Cy. 343.
Cy. 462.-Photographic Chemistry. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 cred-
its. Group IV. Heath.
Deals with the chemical action of light, the preparation, properties, and uses of
photographic materials. The practical applications of photography will be shown,
as well as the theory of the subject.
Prerequisites: Cy. 262, or Cy. 361 and Cy. 362; Cy. 232 or College Physics.
Given alternate years. Offered in 1931-1932.
Cy. 481.-Chemical Literature. 1 hour or its equivalent. Group IV.
Pollard.
A general study of the present sources of published chemical information.
Cy. 501.-Organic Preparations. 9 hours laboratory or its equivalent.
3 credits. Group IV. Leigh.
The preparation of some typical compounds. Occasional discussions of principles
and theories. A reading knowledge of French and German desired.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations. 9 hours laboratory or its equiv-
alent. 3 credits. Group IV. Leigh.
Laboratory work involving the preparation of a number of typical inorganic
compounds in addition to collateral reading and discussions. A reading knowledge
of French and German desired.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
IV. Leigh.
Special lectures and collateral reading relative to the electronic and other theo-
retical conceptions of organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives; pseudo
acids, certain dyes; alkaloids; proteins; etc.
Given alternate years. Offered in 1931-1932.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cy. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Group IV. Beisler.
Lectures and collateral reading. In general topics to be studied will be chosen
from the following list: stereochemistry, tautomerism, the configuration of the
sugars, acetoacetic ester syntheses, malonic ester syntheses, the Grignard reaction,
benzene theories, diazo compounds and dyes.
Given alternate years. Not offered in 1931-32.
Cy. 509.-Electrochemistry. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
Group IV. Jackson.
A theoretical study of the applications of electrochemical principles.
Given alternate years. Not offered in 1931-32.
Cy. 513.-Colloid Chemistry. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 cred-
its. Group IV. Beisler.
The theories, practice and applications of colloid chemistry.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Given alternate years. Offered in 1931-1932.
Cy. 516.-Chemistry of the Rare Elements. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
IV. Heath.
Deals with the mineral occurrences, preparation, properties, and uses of the
rarer elements and their compounds. Relations to the more common elements will
be clearly shown as well as methods for separation and purification.
Given alternate years. Not offered in 1931-1932.
Cy. 519.-Atomic Structure. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
Group IV. Black.
Special lectures and collateral reading dealing with modern theories of the
structure of the atom. The Journal literature is largely used as the basis of study.
Given alternate years. Not offered in 1931-1932.
Cy. 525.-Chemistry of the Terpenes. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Pollard.
A study of hydroaromatic compounds, including the terpenes and their deriva-
tives.
Given alternate years. Not offered in 1931-32.
Cy. 531.-Advanced Qualitative Analysis. 9 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. Group IV. Jackson.
Systematic laboratory study of the qualitative reactions for the detection and
confirmation of rare and precious elements.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 533.-Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 9 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. Group IV. Black.
The application of physico-chemical methods to quantitative analysis. Electro-
metric titrations. Nephelometry. Colorimetry. Emphasis is placed upon instru-
mental methods.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Given alternate years. Offered in 1931-32.
Cy. 537.-Qualitative Organic Chemistry. 1 hour and 6 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Group IV. Pollard.
Deals with the methods of identifying organic compounds.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Cy. 538.-Quantitative Organic Chemistry. 9 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. Group IV. Pollard.
Ultimate analysis of organic compounds, chiefly by combustion.
Laboratory fee, $5.








360 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Cy. 551-552.-Chemical Research. Required of those majoring in
chemistry. Group IV. Leigh, Black, Beisler, Heath, Jackson and
Pollard.
Prerequisite or corequisite: Cy. 481 (Chemical Literature).

ECONOMICS

Es. 101.-Economic History of England. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Staff.
Survey and interpretation, with brief reference to France and Germany. The
origin and development of economic institutions, the manor, Industrial Revolution,
commerce transport, labor, agriculture, finance, effects on social and political de-
velopment and on development in the United States.
Es. 102.-Economic History of the United States. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Staff.
Interpretative survey of industrial development-consideration of the develop-
ment of industry, agriculture, trade and transportation, labor, banking, finance,
population-the influence of economic development on political and social develop-
ment, and of foreign economic development on the United States.
Es. 201-202.-Principles of Economics. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III.
Staff. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire
6 credits are earned.
An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption. Attention is devoted
to the principles governing value and market price with a brief introduction to
money, banking and credit, industrial combinations, transportation and communica-
tion, labor problems, and economic reform.
Es. 302 or 0302.-Elements of Statistics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Anderson.
An introduction to statistics; brief consideration of statistical theory; collec-
tion, classification and presentation of economic data; construction of graphs and
charts; study of index numbers; problems of statistical research. Each student is
required to complete one or more projects in statistical investigation.
Prerequisite: Es. 201 and 202.
Es. 321.-Financial Organization of Society. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Dolbeare.
An introduction to the field of finance. Consideration of the pecuniary organi-
zation of society, to the functions performed by financial institutions, and to the
relationship between finance and business administration.
Prerequisite: Es. 201 and 202.
Es. 351 or 0351.-Transportation Principles. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Bigham.
The development of transportation; the place of transportation in the economic
order; types of transportation agencies; railway transportation; rate making; gov-
ernment regulation of railroads.
Prerequisite: Es. 201 and 202.
Es. 381.-Economic Geography of North America. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Atwood.
A detailed study of the principal economic activities in each of the major geo-
graphic regions of North America involving an analysis of these activities from
the standpoint of their relation to the natural environmental complex.
Prerequisites: Es. 201 and 202, and Bs. 103 and 104.
Not given 1931-32.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Es. 385.-Commercial Geography of South America. 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Group III. Atwood.
A geographic survey of the continent of South America organized around the
growth of trade, exports and imports, trade by countries, and general business
trends-the elements of the environment favoring or discouraging production and
movement of commodities-and the economic conditions that influence commercial
advance or decline-the major geographic regions of each country as to their im-
portance in supplying export products and in consuming import commodities.
Prerequisites: Es. 201 and 202, and Bs. 103 and 104.
Es. 404.-Government Control of Business. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Hurst.
General survey of the field of government control; purposes of government con-
trol; control of accounts, prices and capitalization ; government policy toward busi-
ness, current government regulation; services and agencies which modern govern-
ments undertake to provide for business enterprises.
Prerequisites: Es. 201 and 202.
Es. 426.-Banking Systems. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Dolbeare.
An analytical history of the evolution of the banking system of the United
States, followed by a critical study of the banking systems of other countries, espe-
cially Canada, England, France and Germany. The aim of the course is to give
the student an understanding of the functions of banking in modern economic socie-
ties.
Prerequisite: Els. 321.
Es. 429.-Government Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. El-
dridge.
Principles governing expenditures of modern governments; sources of revenue;
public credit; principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as
revealed in the fiscal systems of leading countries.
Prerequisite: Es. 201 and 202.
Es. 430.-State and Local Taxation. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Eldridge.
An intensive study and evaluation of the systems of taxation found in opera-
tion in the more progressive American states; the general property tax; taxation of
corporations; individual incomes; inheritances; estates; various methods of dis-
tributing state funds to the local taxing jurisdictions; valuation and assessment
for tax purposes.
Prerequisite: Es. 429.
Es. 431 or 0431.-Principles of Marketing. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Wilson.
A survey of the marketing structure of industrial society; fundamental func-
tions performed in the marketing process and the various methods, agencies and
factors responsible for the development and execution of these functions; market-
ing problems of the manufacturer, wholesaler, and the different types of retailers;
the marketing functions in business management.
Prerequisite: Es. 201 and 202.
Es. 435.-International Trade. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Atwood.
World economics involving the principles and policies of international trade;
the international aspects of the economic policies and activities of modern nations.
Prerequisite: Es. 201 and 202.
Es. 440.-Trade Horizons in Caribbean America. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Atwood.
Economic and commercial geography of Mexico, Central America, the West
Indies, and the countries of South America bordering the Caribbean Sea; the his-
torical background of the republics and islands of the Caribbean; the major geo-
graphic regions of the different countries; the economic positions of the republics
and islands; the commercial importance of the various republics and islands as a
market for manufactured wares and as a source of foodstuffs and raw materials.
Prerequisite: Bs. 103 and 104.








362 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Es. 454.-Principles of Public Utility Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Bigham.
The place of public service corporations in the economic organization of society;
valuation; rate making, finance; organization and administration of public utilities.
Prerequisite: Es. 201 and 202.
Es. 468.-Economic History in the Making. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Dykman.
The era of industrialism; a survey of contemporary economic organization in
the leading European countries; types of economic reform; capitalism, socialism,
communism; special consideration of current, social and economic problems in
England, Germany, Soviet Russia and the United States.
Es. 469.-Business Forecasting. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. An-
derson.
This course aims to survey the problem of the reduction of business risk by
forecasting general business conditions. A study will be made of the statistical
methods used by leading commercial agencies in forecasting the volume of trade,
the wholesale price level, the market rate of interest, and other generalized meas-
ures of business equilibrium.
Prerequisite: Es. 302.
Es. 470.-Business Forecasting, continued. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Anderson.
A study of various techniques employed to forecast the production and price of
specific commodities. An intensive examination of the more important contributions
to this subject appearing in scientific journals during recent years will constitute
the nucleus of the course.
Prerequisite: Es. 302.
Es. 504.-Problems in Trust Regulation. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Hurst.
A critical study of industrial combinations.
Es. 505.-The Development of Economic Thought. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Eldridge.
The development of economic thought-careful analysis of the theories of the
various schools of economic thought-study of the Physiocrats, Mercantilism, the
Classical Economist, the leading economists of the Austrian School, and a brief
survey of the beginnings of Socialism-the development of theoretical background
for research and graduate work of an advanced nature.
Required of candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in Economics.
Es. 506.-The Development of Economic Thought, continued. 3 hours.
3 credits. Group III. Eldridge.
Analysis of the thought of the followers and defenders on the one hand and of
the abler critics on the other of the Classical Economists-appraisals of recent con-
tributions of the various schools in formulating a system of economic analysis.
Required of candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in Economics.
Es. 526.-Seminar in Banking Systems. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Dolbeare.
A special study of types of banking.
Es. 529-530.-Problems in Government Finance. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group III. Bigham.
Special studies in federal, state and local taxation.
Es. 531.-Seminar in Marketing. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Wil-
son.
Advanced study involving the principles of marketing and the economics of
distribution.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Es. 535.-Seminar in International Trade. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Atwood.
Advanced work dealing with the development of international trade.
Es. 554.-Problems in Public Utility Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Bigham.
Advanced study of public utility problems.
Es. 568.-Special Studies in Economic History. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Dykman.
Special problems in current economic history; changes in world economic or-
ganization ; types of economic reform; current, social and economic problems of
the United States and leading European countries.
Es. 569-570.-Seminar in Statistics and Business Forecasting. 3
hours. 6 credits. Group III. Anderson.
Critical study of special problems in statistics and business forecasting.
Es. 585.-Seminar in Economic Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Atwood.
Special studies in regional geography. Students may select any area in which
they are interested and intensely study this area. The results of such study will
be presented in formal reports.

EDUCATION

For courses in education see the Bulletin of the College of Edu-
cation.
Courses in education must meet the approval of the Dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences.

ENGLISH

Eh. 21.-Minimum Essentials of English. 3 hours. No credit. Group
III. Robertson and staff.
An elementary course in fundamentals of grammar, punctuation and sentence
construction, designed to meet the needs of freshmen deficient in preparatory English.
For such deficient students this course is prerequisite to English 101. Entry to the
course will be determined by examinations to be given all entering freshmen dur-
ing Freshman Week.
Required of all freshmen who, upon entering the University, are found deficient
in minimum essentials of high school English.
Eh. 101-102.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6
credits are earned. Robertson and staff.
Designed to train students in methods of clear and forceful expression. Instruc-
tion is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in theme writing, and in cor-
rective studies and exercises adapted to the needs of the individual student. In
addition, all students are encouraged to read extensively for extra credit.
In order to receive credit for this course, the student is required to meet the
following conditions: (1) He must pass a spelling test based on a list of 500 com-
mon words. (2) He must pass objective tests in the elements of capitalization,
punctuation, grammar and sentence structure. (These tests form a part of the
final examination.) (3) He must have a passing average in composition, to secure
which he must have learned to avoid certain especially gross errors.
Required of all freshmen.







364 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Eh. 103-104.-Introduction to Literature. 3 hours. 4 credits. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 4
credits are earned. Farr and staff.
A survey of the literatures of the Western world from the beginnings to the
Renaissance.
Required of freshmen in the course leading to the degree Bachelor of Arts.
Eh. 201-202.-History of Literature to 1800. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the
entire 6 credits are earned. Farr and staff.
A basic course in the historical development of English literature.
Eh. 203.-The Short Story. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Farris.
Narrative practice in the anecdote and tale, with particular attention to the
technique and development of the short story.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101 and 102.
Eh. 204.-The English Essay. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Farris.
A practical study of the various types of exposition, with special attention to
the essay.
Eh. 207-208.-English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. 3 hours.
6 credits. Group III. Robertson.
The first semester covers English poetry and prose of the first half of the nine-
teenth century. The second semester is a continuation to the present day.
Eh. 301-302.-Shakespeare and the Drama. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6
credits are earned. Farr.
The English Drama from its beginning through Shakespeare. In the first se-
mester the comedy will be stressed; in the second, the tragedy.
Eh. 303-304.-English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. 3 hours. 6
credits. Group III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed
until the entire 6 credits are earned. Farris.
Discussion of the roots of the Romantic Revival; the work of Wordsworth, Byron,
Shelley, and Keats ; poetry of the Victorian age.
Eh. 305.-The English Ballad. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Farr.
A study of the English and Scotch Ballads; a brief survey of American bal-
lads; and an introduction to comparative European balladry.
Eh. 306.-Spenser and Milton. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Farr.
A study of the Fairy Queen and the Paradise Lost.
Eh. 355-356.-Business Writing. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III. No
credit allowed toward a degree until the entire 6 credits are earned.
Mounts.
A practical study of the principal types of business letters and reports.
Required of students in Business Administration.
No credit for this course is given to students in the College of Arts and Sciences.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101 and 102.
Eh. 401.-American Poetry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Farris.
A rapid survey of the development of poetry in the United States.
Eh. 402.-Southern Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Farris.
A detailed study, with extensive reading and essay work; examination of the
claims of Florida authors.
Eh. 403-404.-The English Novel. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits
are earned. Farr.
The historical development and technique of the English Novel.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Eh. 405.-English Drama from Shakespeare to Sheridan. 3 hours. 3
credits. Group III. Robertson.
The decline of drama after Shakespeare; Restoration drama; eighteenth cen-
tury comedy.
Eh. 406.-Modern Drama. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Robertson.
Recent and contemporary playwrights, from Ibsen to Eugene O'Neill.
Eh. 407.-Modern Novel. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Robertson.
Reading and discussion of the work of English and American novelists of the
present, with some attention to continental influences.
Eh. 408.-Contemporary Poetry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Rob-
ertson.
The influence of Whitman; contemporary English and American poets.
Eh. 409-410.-Chaucer. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III. No credit to-
ward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are earned.
Robertson.
Extensive reading in the "Canterbury Tales," "Troilus," and minor works.
Eh. 413-414.-Anglo-Saxon. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are
earned. Farr, Robertson.
Anglo-Saxon grammar; reading of Alfredian prose, "Beowulf," and other Anglo-
Saxon literature.
Eh. 503 and 504.-Seminar. 6 hours. 3 credits each semester. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6
credits are earned. Farr, Robertson.
Reading course for graduate students.

FRENCH

A student who passed 1 year of French in high school will be
admitted to French 22 without having to study French 21; if he reg-
isters for French 21 in the University he will not be allowed credit
for it. A student who passed 2 years of French in high school will be
admitted to French 101 without having to study French 21 and 22;
if he registers for French 21 or 22 in the University he will not be
allowed credit for either. Students who have passed more than 2
years of French in the high school should confer with the Head of
the Department of French before registering for college courses in
French; failure to do so may result in loss of credit because of dupli-
cation.
Fh. 21-22.-Elementary French. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until the 6 credits are
earned.
Elements of pronunciation and grammar-reading of simple prose.
For beginners.
Fh. 101-102.-Third and Fourth Semester French. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group II. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the 6
credits are earned.
Second-year college French: Reading of modern texts-grammar review- trans-
lation of simple English into French.
Prerequisite: Fh. 21 and 22 (or the equivalent, such as two years of high school
French).
In place of this course science students may substitute Fh. 107-108.








366 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Fh. 105-106.-Elementary Conversation and Composition. 3 hours. 6
credits. Group II.
Oral and written practice accompanied by review of grammar.
Prerequisite: Fh. 101 and 102 (or the equivalent, such as four years of high
school French), or concurrent enrollment in Fh. 101 and 102.
Credit may be counted for the first semester without the second, but the sec-
ond semester may not be taken for credit without the first except by permission
of the head of the department upon satisfactory evidence of qualification.
Fh. 107-108.-Scientific French. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until the 6 credits are
earned. May not be taken for credit in addition to Fh. 101-102,
nor counted toward a major in French.
Same as Fh. 101-102 except that the reading material is scientific French. For
science students who may substitute it for Fh. 101-102.
Prerequisite: Fh. 21 and 22 (or the equivalent, such as two years in high school
French).
Fh. 201-202.-Third-Year Reading. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No
credit for this subject will be given to those who have earned
credit in Fh. 207 and 208.
A translation course.
Prerequisite: Grade of C or D in Fh. 102. Students who earned a grade of A
or B in Fh. 102 should take Eh. 207 and 208 instead of Fh. 201 and 202.
Credit may be counted for the first semester without the second, but the sec-
ond semester may not be taken for credit without the first except by permission of
the head of the department upon satisfactory evidence of qualification.
Fh. 205-206.-Intermediate Conversation and Composition. 3 hours.
6 credits. Group II. Credit may be counted for the first semester
without the second, but the second semester may not be taken
for credit without the first except by permission of the head of
the department upon satisfactory evidence of qualification. Atkin.
Current vocabulary and phraseology of spoken French. French life and insti-
tutions.
Prerequisite: Fh. 105 and 106.
Fh. 207-208.-Survey of French Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group
II. No credit for this subject will be given to those who have
earned credit in Fh. 201 and 202. Credit may be counted for the
first semester without the second, but the second semester may not
be taken for credit without the first except by permission of the
head of the department upon satisfactory evidence of qualification.
Atkin.
Historical outline-representative selections from important prose writers and
poets.
Prerequisite: Fh. 102 with grade of A or B, or permission of instructor.
Fh. 303-304.-Nineteenth-Century French Literature. 3 hours. 6 cred-
its. Group II. Credit may be counted for the first semester without
the second, but the second semester may not be taken for credit
without the first except by permission of the head of the depart-
ment upon satisfactory evidence of qualification. Atkin.
Leading authors of the period studied in representative works-literary move-
ments and tendencies.
Prerequisite: Fh. 207 and 208, or permission of instructor.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Fh. 409-410.-Contemporary French Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group II. Credit may be counted for the first semester without
the second, but the second semester may not be taken for credit
without the first except by permission of the head of the depart-
ment upon satisfactory evidence of qualification. Atkin.
Modern tendencies as revealed in outstanding authors. Lectures, readings and
reports.
Prerequisite: Fh. 303 and 304, or permission of instructor.
Fh. 505-506.-The French Novel. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II.
Either semester may be taken for credit without the other. Atkin.
Evolution of the novel from the seventeenth century to the present, with special
emphasis on the nineteenth century-reading of representative novels-reports.
Fh. 507-508.-Special Study in French Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group II. Either semester may be taken for credit without the
other. Atkin.
Individual reading and reports under supervision of the instructor, on selected
topics in the field of French literature from the sixteenth century onward.

GEOLOGY

Gy. 201.-Physical Geology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Hubbell.
An introduction to geology, dealing with the materials and structure of the
earth, and the agencies which produce geological change.
Gy. 202.-Historical Geology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Hub-
bell.
An introduction to the history of the earth and of its inhabitants.
Prerequisite: Gy. 201.
Gy. 302.-Physiography of North America. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group IV. Hubbell.
A consideration of the surface features and physiographic regions of the North
American continent, in relation to their structure, the processes which have formed
them, and their stage of geographic development.
Prerequisite: Gy. 201.
GERMAN

A student who passed 1 year of German in high school will be
admitted to German 22 without having to study German 21; if he
registers for German 21 in the University he will not be allowed
credit for it. A student who passed 2 years of German in high school
will be admitted to German 101 without having to study German 21
and 22; if he registers for German 21 or 22 in the University he will
not be allowed credit for either. Students who have passed more
than 2 years of German in the high school should confer with the
Head of the Department of German before registering for college
courses in German; failure to do so may result in loss of credit be-
cause of duplication.
Gn. 21-22.-Elementary. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No credit to-
ward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are earned.
Crow.
Pronunciation, grammar, written and oral exercises, memorizing of vocabularies,
dictation, translation.








368 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Gn. 101-102.-Second Year. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are
earned. Crow.
Continuation of Gn. 21-22. Review of grammar, written and oral exercises,
reading of modern texts.
Gn. 213-214.-Elementary Composition and Conversation. 3 hours. 6
credits. Group II. Credit will be given for the first semester
without the second if the student so desires; however, the second
semester cannot be taken without the first. Crow.
Drill on pronunciation, review of syntax, stylistics, writing of themes, prac-
tice in conversation.
Prerequisite: Gn. 101-102.
Gn. 225-226.-Scientific German. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. Either
semester may be taken for credit without the other. Crow.
Reading of selections from writers on various sciences, journals and books in
chosen science.
Prerequisite: Gn. 101-102.
Gn. 303-304.-Survey of German Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group II. Either semester may be taken for credit without the
other. Crow.
Historical outline; reading of selections from representative authors.

GREEK

Gk. 21-22.-First Year Greek. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No cred-
it toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are
earned. Anderson.
Based on a book for beginners. Anabasis Book I with grammar and prose com-
position.
Gk. 103-104.--Grammar and Prose Composition. 2 hours. 4 credits.
Group II. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the en-
tire 4 credits are earned. Anderson.
An intermediate course in Prose Composition. A systematic study of Greek
Grammar.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Gk. 105-106.-Xenophon and Plato-Anabasis Continued. 3 hours. 6
credits. Group II. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until
the entire 6 credits are earned. Anderson.
The easier dialogues of Plato-Prose Composition-Grammar.
Gk. 0202.-Lysias. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Selected orations of Lysias or other Attic Orators.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Gk. 203.-Biblical Greek. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Selections from the Septuagint and New Testament.
Gk. 205.-Greek History. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Political History and History of Greek Civilization during the creative period
of ancient Hellas, with emphasis on its influence on the development of modern
institutions.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Gk. 206.-History of Greek Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Preceded by a short study of Greek life and customs. A knowledge of the Greek
language is highly desirable, but is not required for this course.
Not offered in 1931-32.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Gk. 207.-Homer. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Selections from the Iliad and the Odyssey.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Gk. 301.-Herodotus and Thucydides. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II.
Anderson.
Selections from the Greek historians.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Gk. 302.-Euripides and Sophocles. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. An-
derson.
Selections from the Greek dramatists.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Gk. 501-502.-Homer. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. Anderson.
All the Iliad and Odyssey, and selections from allied poets.
Gk. 503-504.-Historians. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Herodotus and Thucydides.

HISTORY

The courses in American History and in American Government
and Constitutional Law are made possible by the Chair of American-
ism and Southern History, partly endowed by the American Legion,
Department of Florida.
Hy. 101.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Hy.
102 is earned. Leake and staff.
A course in the history of Western Europe from 476 to the Crusades.
Required of all freshmen in the course leading to the degree Bachelor of Arts.
Hy. 102.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Leake and staff.
A continuation of Hy. 101 covering the period from the Crusades to the Renais-
sance and Reformation.
Hy. 101 and 102 are prerequisites for all higher courses in history.
Required of all freshmen in the course leading to the degree Bachelor of Arts.
Hy. 201.-Modern European History. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Hy. 202
is earned. Leake.
The characteristic features of the Old Regime, the French Revolutionary and
the Napoleonic Periods and the development of Europe up to 1856 are covered in
this course.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 202.-Modern European History. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Leake.
The history of Europe from the Congress of Paris to the Congress of Versailles.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 203.-Latin America. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Hy. 204 is earned.
Payne.
The discovery, settlement and early development of South and Central America.
Given in 1931-32.







370 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Hy. 204.-Latin America. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Payne.
A continuation of Hy. 203 covering the history of Latin America from about
1850 to the present.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 208.-History of Rome. The same as Latin 208.
Hy. 209.-The French Revolution. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Hy. 210 is
earned. Leake.
A thorough and detailed study of the French Revolution and its various phases
and aspects.
Given in 1932-33.
Hy. 210.-The Napoleonic Era. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Leake.
A comprehensive and close study of the Napoleonic Period.
Given in 1932-33.
Hy. 301.-American History, 1492 to 1776. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Hy.
302 is earned. Leake.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 302.-A~merican History, 1776. to 1830. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Leake.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 303.-American History, 1830 to 1876. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit is
earned in Hy. 304. Leake.
Given in 1932-33.
Hy. 304.-American History, 1876 to 1930. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Leake.
Given in 1932-33.
Hy. 305.-English History to 1714. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit is earned in
Hy. 306. Payne.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 306.-English History since 1714. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Payne.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 307.-The Renaissance and the Reformation. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit
is earned in Hy. 308. Payne.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 308.-The Renaissance and the Reformation. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Leake.
A continuation of Hy. 307.
Given in 1931-32.
Hly. 501-502.-American History, 1492 to 1830. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group III. Leake.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 503-504.-American History, 1830 to Present. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group III. Leake.
Given in 1932-33.
Hy. 505-506.-English History. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III. Payne.
Given in 1931-32.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Hy. 507-508.-The Renaissance and the Reformation. 3 hours. 6
credits. Group III. Leake.
Given in 1931-32.
Hy. 509-510.-History Seminar for Graduate Credit. 3 hours. 6 cred-
its. Group III. Leake.
Given in 1931-32.
LATIN

Students who have passed one or more years of Latin in the high
school should be careful to register for such courses in Latin in the
University that there will be no repetition of any work done in high
school; failure to do this will result in loss of credit to the extent
of duplication.
Ln. 21-22.-First Year Latin. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are
earned. Little.
Based on a book for beginners.
Ln. 31-32.-Caesar. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No credit toward
a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are earned.
Little.
With grammar and prose composition.
Ln. 41-42.-Cicero and Virgil. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are
earned. Little.
With grammar and prose composition.
Ln. 101.-Ovid. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. No credit toward a de-
gree will be allowed until credit is earned in Ln. 102. Anderson.
Selections-review of grammar-prose composition-prosody.
Ln. 102.-Cicero or Livy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia or selections from Livy.
Ln. 201.-Pliny. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Selections from Pliny's letters.
Ln. 202.-Horace. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Selections from the satires, epistles, odes and epodes, with study of the Hora-
tian metres.
Ln. 203-204.-Grammar and Prose Composition. 2 hours. 4 credits.
Group II. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the en-
tire 4 credits are earned. Anderson.
An intermediate course in prose composition in connection with a systematic
study of Latin grammar.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Ln. 206.-History of Roman Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Simonds.
Preceded by a short study of Roman life and customs.
Ln. 208.-History of Rome. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Simonds.
Ln. 253.-Roman Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Simonds.
Fundamental legal conceptions which are found in Roman Law.
Prerequisite desirable: at least two years of Latin.








372 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Ln. 255.-Roman Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Simonds.
An extension of the preceding course but independent of it; course 253 not a
prerequisite.
Ln. 301.-Juvenal and Tacitus. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Ander-
son.
Selections from the satires of Juvenal and from Histories or Annals of Tacitus.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Ln. 302.-The Elegy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Selections from Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Ln. 303-304.-Advanced Prose Composition. 2 hours. 4 credits. Group
II. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 4
credits are earned. Anderson.
A continuation of Ln. 203 and 204, open only to those students who have com-
pleted Ln. 203 and 204 or equivalent.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Ln. 401.-Plautus. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Selected comedies.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Ln. 402.-Terence and Seneca. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Ander-
son.
Selected plays.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Ln. 501-502.-Cicero and the Ciceronian Age. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group II. Anderson.
Based mainly on the Ciceronian correspondence.
Ln. 505.-Virgil. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Mainly the Bucolics and Georgics.
Ln. 506.-Poetry of the Silver Age. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II.
Simonds.
Selections from Manilius, Lucan, Valerius Flaccus, Statius, Silius Italicus, and
Claudian. Study of the technique of these poets and their influence on modern lit-
erature.
Ln. 507.-Ovid. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Mainly Heroides and Fasti.
Given in the summer of 1930.
Ln. 508.-The Roman Satire. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group II. Anderson.
Mainly Horace and Juvenal.
Given in the summer 1931.

MATHEMATICS

Not all of the courses numbered above 200 are given each year.
Prerequisites to the courses numbered above 400 should be deter-
mined by consultation with the instructor.
The textbooks listed are subject to change without notice.
Ms. 85.-Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms. 3 hours. 3 credits ex-
cept to those who present trigonometry for entrance credit. Group
IV. Simpson and staff.
The solution of the triangle-practical applications of logarithms-trigonometric
analysis. Textbook: Simpson, Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ms. 101.-College Algebra. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Simpson
and staff.
A study of the quadratic equation, proportion, progressions, the binomial theo-
rem, functions, graphs, theory of equations, permutations, combinations, probability,
and determinants. Textbook: Harding and Mullins, College Algebra.
Prerequisite: Ms. 85.
Ms. 102.-Plane Analytic Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Simpson and staff.
The algebraic study of the figures of geometry and the plane sections of a cone.
Systems and transformation of coordinates. Textbook: Curtiss and Moulton, Ana-
lytic Geometry.
Prerequisite: Ms. 101.
Ms. 107.-Elementary Commercial Algebra. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group IV.
Elementary algebraic notions fundamental to the study of mathematical prob-
lems arising in business and finance. Textbook: Crenshaw, Pirenian, Simpson, Mathe-
matics of Finance Preceded by Elementary Commercial Algebra.
Open only to students in the College of Commerce and Journalism and to those
pursuing the Pre-Law Course.
Ms. 108.-Business Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Modern mathematical treatment of the problems of banking and business. Deri-
vation and application of numerous formulas of importance in the financial world.
Textbook: Crenshaw, Pirenian, Simpson, Mathematics of Finance Preceded by
Elementary Commercial Algebra.
Prerequisite: Ms. 101 or Ms. 107.
Required of students in Business Administration.
Ms. 151-152.-Elementary Mathematical Analysis. 3 hours. 6 cred-
its. Group IV. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until
the entire 6 credits are earned.
The material of Ms. 101 and Ms. 102 rearranged and changed to meet the pri-
mary needs of engineering students. Textbook: Slichter, Elementary Mathematical
Analysis.
Required of all regularly admitted engineering freshmen.
Ms. 204.-Mathematics for Agricultural Students. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group IV.
Practical problems in agricultural engineering, farm management, dairying, in-
vestments, statistics, and averages. Textbook: Roe, Smith, Reeve, Mathematics for
Agriculture and Elementary Science.
Required of all sophomore students of agriculture.
Ms. 208.-Life Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Phipps.
A continuation of Ms. 108 with special applications to the problems of life in-
surance.
Prerequisite: Ms. 108.
Ms. 251-252.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 3 hours. 3 credits
each semester. Group IV. No credit toward a degree will be al-
lowed until the entire 6 credits have been earned.
The study of a process known as differentiation, which, with its numerous and
widely different applications, constitutes one of the most important practical and
theoretical fields of mathematics. Integration, the inverse operation of differentia-
tion, is used in the calculation of areas, volumes, moments of inertia, and many
other problems. Textbook: March and Wolff, Calculus.
Prerequisites: Ms. 102 or Ms. 152.








374 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Ms. 253-254.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 5 hours. 10 credits.
No credit will be allowed toward a degree until the entire 10 cred-
its have been earned. Group IV. Staff.
The study of differentiation and integration, which, together with their numer-
ous and widely different applications constitute one of the most important fields of
mathematics. Typical problems solved by these methods are calculation of rates of
change, computation of areas, volumes, moments of inertia, energy, power, and
many others. In addition, various advanced topics of special value to engineers and
scientists are studied.
Ms. 311.-Advanced College Algebra. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Wilson.
The further treatment of some of the material and processes of Ms. 101 and
the introduction to more advanced topics.
Prerequisite: Ms. 101.
Ms. 320.-Theory of Equations. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Wil-
son.
Theorems and methods of solution relating to equations of higher degree.
Prerequisite: Ms. 101.
Ms. 331.-College Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Koko-
moor.
The use of elementary methods in the advanced study of the triangle and circle.
Special emphasis on solving original exercises. Valuable to prospective high school
geometry teachers. Textbook: Altshiller-Court, College Geometry.
Ms. 351-352.-Advanced Calculus. 3 hours. 4 credits. Group IV. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 4 credits
are earned. Phipps, Messick.
Further study of the calculus, the treatment of more advanced topics, and the
use of analytic geometry of three dimensions.
Prerequisite: Ms. 252.
Ms. 461.---he Teaching of Mathematics Above Plane Geometry. 3
hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Wilson.
Emphasis is placed on the choice, arrangement, and method of presentation of
the subject matter of mathematics above plane geometry.
Prerequisite: To be determined by consultation with the instructor.
Ms. 420.-Differential Equations. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Kokomoor.
The classification, solution, and application of various equations which contain
expressions involving not only variables, but also the derivatives of these variables.
Textbook: Fry, Elementary Differential Equations.
Ms. 511-512.-Introduction to Higher Algebra. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group IV. Simpson.
A more advanced course in the subject, based on the work of Bocher, whose
Introduction to Higher Algebra is used as a Textbook.
Ms. 518.-Theory of Groups of Finite Order. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group IV. Simpson.
An introduction to the group concept, a treatment of the pure group-theory, and
numerous examples and applications. Textbook: Mathewson, Elementary Finite
Groups.
Ms. 520.-Mathematical Statistics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Wilson.
A presentation of the various mathematical theories involved in statistical analy-
sis. Textbook: Rietz, Mathematical Statistics.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ms. 534.-Projective Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Ko-
komoor, Kusner.
Pure geometry dealing primarily with properties unaltered by the processes of
projection and section-principal theorems involved-theory of poles, polars, involu-
tion, and kindred topics. Textbook: Holgate, Projective Pure Geometry.
Ms. 536.-Foundations of Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Kokomoor.
An investigation of the assumptions of geometry-the parallel postulate-steps
leading to non-Euclidean geometries-consequent development of modern branches
of the subject. Textbook: Carslaw, The Elements of Non-Euclidean Plane Geom-
etry and Trigonometry.
Ms. 540.-Fourier Series and Harmonic Analysis. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group IV. Dostal.
The use of series of terms involving sines and cosines in the solution of physical
problems such as those relating to the flow of heat, conduction of electricity, and
vibrating strings. Textbook: Carslaw, Introduction to the Theory of Fourier's Se-
ries and Integrals.
Ms. 542.-Heaviside Operational Calculus. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
IV. Dostal.
Introduced by an elementary exposition of the solution of differential equations
by classical operational methods, followed by treatment of the Heaviside Operational
Theory, with applications mainly to electrical circuit theory. Textbook: Berg,
Heaviside's Operational Calculus.
Ms. 549-550.-Theory of Infinite Processes. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group
IV. Phipps.
The study of infinite classes and processes fundamental in various branches of
analysis. Some topics considered are infinite aggregates, sequences, series, products,
determinants, and integrals. Textbook: Smail, Elements of the Theory of Infinite
Processes.
Ms. 551-552.-Advanced Topics in Calculus. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group
IV. Kokomoor.
Topics of advanced nature selected from the Calculus, including partial differen-
tiation, Taylor's theorem, infinite series, continuation of simple and multiple inte-
grals, line and surface integrals, Green's theorem, etc. Textbook: Osgood, Advanced
Calculus.
Ms. 555.-Functions of a Complex Variable. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group IV. Simpson.
Fundamental operations with complex numbers-differentiation and integration
theorems-mapping-transformation-series. Textbook : Townsend, Functions of a
Complex Variable.
Ms. 557.-Differential Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Wilson.
The work follows somewhat closely the earlier chapters of Eisenhart's Differen-
tial Geometry which is used as a textbook.
Ms. 559-560.-Functions of Real Variables. (Numbered 500 and 501
in 1929-30). 3 hours. 6 credits. Group IV. Simpson.
The real number system-theory of point sets-rigorous investigation of many
questions arising in the calculus-Lebesgue integrals-infinite series. Textbook:
Townsend, Functions of Real Variables.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group IV. Kokomoor.
A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special
emphasis upon the changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching.
No specific text is followed, but numerous works are used as references.








376 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Ms. 575.-Fundamental Concepts of Modern Mathematics. 3 hours. 3
credits. Group IV. Simpson.
An introduction to such topics as the number system of algebra, sets of points,
group theory, theories of integration, postulational systems, and non-Euclidean
geometry. No text book is used, but many references are assigned.

MILITARY SCIENCE

My. 101-102.-Freshmen Infantry, Compulsory. 2 hours and 3 hours
practical. 4 credits. Group I. Captain Becker.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: National Defense Act-mil-
itary courtesy and discipline-drill and command-scouting and patrolling-hygiene.
(b) Practical: close and extended order drill-ceremonies-infantry equipment-
rifle marksmanship and gallery firing-first aid. Text: The ROTC Manual, Infantry,
Vol. I.
My. 103-104.-Freshmen Field Artillery, Compulsory. 2 hours theory
and 3 hours practical. 4 credits. Group I. Captains Hepner and
Donnovin.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: organization-hygiene and first
aid-elementary gunnery-explosives, ammunition and fuzes-military courtesy and
discipline-drill and command. (b) Practical: dismounted drill-ceremonies-pistol
instruction-individual equipment-materiel-75 mm. gun drill-gunner's examina-
tion. Text: Wilson Field Artillery Manual, Vol. I.
My. 201-202.-Sophomore Infantry, Compulsory. 2 hours theory and
3 hours practical. 4 credits. Group I. Captain Bell.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: drill and command-scouting
and patrolling-combat principles-musketry-automatic rifle. (b) Practical: close
and extended order drill--ceremonies-squad leadership-musketry. Text: The ROTC
Manual, Infantry, Vol. II.
Prerequisite: My. 101 and 102.
My. 203-204.-Sophomore Field Artillery, Compulsory. 2 hours the-
ory and 3 hours practical. 4 credits. Group I. Captain Barco.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: Care of Animals-Map Read-
ing-and Sketching-Fire Control Instruments-Communications. (b) Practical:
Dismounted Drill-Ceremonies-Equitation-Driving-Mounted Drill-Reconnaissance,
selection and occupation of position. Text: Wilson Field Artillery Manual, Vol. I.
Prerequisite: My. 103 and 104.
My. 301-302.-Junior Infantry, Elective. 3 hours theory and 3 hours
practical. 4 credits. Group I. Captain Morris.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: map reading and sketching-
combat principles-infantry weapons-drill and command. (b) Practical: com-
mand and leadership-close and extended order drill-ceremonies-duties as sergeants
-machine gun drill-rifle firing. Text: The ROTC Manual, Infantry, Vol. III.
Students are paid $9 per month and $20 uniform allowance by U. S. War Department.
Prerequisite: My. 201 and 202.
My. 303-304.-Junior Field Artillery, Elective. 3 hours theory and 3
hours practical. 4 credits. Group I. Captain Alexander.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: administration and supply--
field fortifications-communications and liaison-preparation and conduct of fire.
(b) Practical: command and leadership-pistol marksmanship-equitation and horse-
manship-mounted drill-75 mm. gun drill-reconnaissance, selection and occupation
of position. Text: Wilson Field Artillery Manual, Vol. II. Students are paid $9 per
month and $20 uniform allowance by U. S. War Department.
Prerequisite: My. 203 and 204.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


My. 401-402.-Senior Infantry, Elective. 3 hours theory and 3 hours
practical. 4 credits. Group I. Major Moore.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: military law and Organized
Reserve Regulations-military history and policy-administration-combat principles
-drill and command-field engineering. (b) Practical: command and leadership-
close and extended order drill-ceremonies-minor tactics-duties as staff and com-
pany officers. Text: The ROTC Manual. Infantry, Vol. IV. Students are paid'
$9 per month and $20 uniform allowance by U. S. War Department.
Prerequisite: My. 301 and 302.

PHILOSOPHY

Ppy. 205.-Logic. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Enwall.
The use of syllogisms, inductive methods, logical analysis, and criticism of fal-
lacies.
Ppy. 208.-Introduction to Philosophy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Enwall.
An introductory survey of philosophic principles, with special reference to their
bearing on science, ethics and religion.
Ppy. 301.-Ethics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Enwall.
Principles of ethics-study of such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty,
freedom, progress, etc.
Ppy. 302.-Advanced Ethics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Enwall.
The history of various ethical systems. Theism and Agnosticism.
Prerequisite: Ppy. 301.
Ppy. 303.-History of Ancient Philosophy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Enwall.
The development of philosophic thought from its appearance among the Ionic
Greeks to the time of Descartes. Special attention will be given to the philosophy
of Plato and Aristotle.
Ppy. 304.-History of Modern Philosophy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Enwall.
A continuation of Ppy. 303. Special attention will be given to the works of
Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Hume, and Kant.
Ppy. 401-402.-Advanced Logic, Seminar. 4 hours. 6 credits. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6
credits are earned. Enwall.
Theories of thought and knowledge.
Prerequisite: Ppy. 205, 303, 304.
Given with Ppy. 403 and 404 in alternate years.
Offered in 1931-32.
Ppy. 403-404.-Philosophy of Nature, Seminar. 4 hours. 6 credits.
Group III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the
entire 6 credits are earned. Enwall.
Man's relation to nature; the various philosophical doctrines: animism, pan-
theism, materialism, realism, agnosticism, humanism, idealism, etc.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 303, 304.
Given with Ppy. 401 and 402 in alternate years.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Ppy. 407.-The Philosophic Conceptions of the Great English Poets.
3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Enwall.
Selected plays from Shakespeare; and the philosophic poems of Wordsworth,
Tennyson and Browning.
Prerequisite: Ppy. 303, 304.







378 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Ppy. 503-504.-Advanced History of Philosophy. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the en-
tire 6 credits are earned. Enwall.
The problems of philosophy in their historical development. Textbook: History
of Philosophy by Windelband; supplemented by special readings from the original
sources.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 301, and 403 and 404.
Ppy. 505-506.-Hume and Kant, Seminar. 4 hours. 6 credits. Group
III. Enwall.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 301, 401 and 402.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PI. 101.-Gymnasium work and mass games. 2 hours of activities. 1
credit. Group I. Staff.
PI. 102.-Minor Sports. 2 hours of activities. 1 credit. Group I. Staff.
No credit will be allowed toward a degree in the College of Arts
and Sciences for other courses in Physical Education.

PHYSICS

Students desiring to elect a course in general college physics are
advised to take the sequence Ps. 111 to 116, carrying the theory,
demonstration, and laboratory work simultaneously.
Those who desire a more comprehensive course with greater em-
phasis on the mathematical treatment may elect the sequence Ps.
105 to 108 and 209 instead, provided they have the necessary prereq-
uisites.
Ps. 105-106.-Theory of Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Electricity and
Light. 4 hours. 6 credits. Group IV. Credit will be given for the
first semester without the second, if the student so desires; how-
ever, the second semester cannot be taken without the first. Perry
in charge.
General Physics, designed primarily for engineering students, open to any
student having the necessary prerequisites.
Required of Engineering students.
Prerequisite: Trignometry.
Ps. 107-108.-General Laboratory Physics. 4 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Group IV. Perry in charge.
Fundamental experiments in Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Electricity and Light.
Supplementing Ps. 105-106.
Required of Engineering students.
Laboratory fee: $3 each semester.
Ps. 111-112.-Elementary Theory of Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Electri-
city and Light. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group IV. Credit will be given
for the first semester without the second, if the student so desires;
however, the second semester cannot be taken without the first.
Williamson in charge.
A college course designed to meet the needs of the general student. Required
of Architecture, Bachelor of Science, and Pre-Medical students.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ps. 115-116.-Elementary Laboratory Physics. 1 hour demonstra-
tion and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits. Group IV. Credit will be
given for the first semester without the second, if the student so
desires; however, the second semester cannot be taken without
the first. Bless in charge.
A series of laboratory experiments in general physics designed to supplement
Ps. 111-112 and should be taken by all students electing those courses.
Required of Bachelor of Science, and Pre-Medical students.
Laboratory fee: $2.25 each semester.
Ps. 209.-Theory of Electricity and Magnetism. 2 hours and 2 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. Group IV. Perry.
A continuation of general physics, designed for engineering students.
Given only 1931-32.
Laboratory fee: $1.50.
Ps. 213.-Glass Blowing. 3 hours laboratory. No credit. Williamson
in charge.
Technique of glass blowing. Designed for students interested in this type of
work as an aid in experimental work.
Laboratory fee: $2.25.
Ps. 291.-Astronomy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Perry.
A brief general course in descriptive astronomy. Star maps will be plotted
and occasional evenings will be spent in observation work.
Open to freshmen, with the approval of the head of the Department.
Ps. 292.-Meteorology. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Group IV. Perry.
A brief general course. Textbook: Milham, Meteorology.
Open to freshmen, with the approval of the head of the Department.
Ps. 299.-Advanced General Physics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Bless.
A transition course between the elementary courses in physics and the special
studies enumerated below. It presents a somewhat advanced survey of the whole
field of physics.
Prerequisite or corequisite: Calculus.
Ps. 299, or its equivalent is a prerequisite or a corequisite for any of the fol-
lowing advanced courses.
Ps. 303-304.-Experimental Physics. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
6 credits. Group IV. Either semester may be taken for credit
without the other.
Experiments of a more advanced type than those of the elementary courses,
together with study of the theory of the experiments and assigned reading.
The particular experiments assigned vary with the needs and interests of the
individual student.
Corequisite: Ps. 299 or its equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $3 each semester.
Ps. 307.-Heat. 2 hours and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Group
IV. Bless.
A general survey of this branch of physics from the theoretical as well as
the experimental point of view. The laboratory work will include accurate measure-
ments of the heat of combustion of materials, thermal conductivity of metals, melting
points of metals, and specific heats of gases.
Corequisite: Ps. 299 or its equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $2.25.






380 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Ps. 309.-Light. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Group IV.
Williamson.
Study of the phenomena of refraction, interference, diffraction, and polariza-
tion.
Corequisite: Ps. 299 or its equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $2.25.
Ps. 311-312.-Electricity and Magnetism. 2 hours and 3 hours labora-
tory. 6 credits. Group IV. Credit will be given for the first se-
mester without the second, if the student so desires; however, the
second semester cannot be taken without the first. Perry.
The theory of magnetism and electrostatics, the electric current and its effect,
thermo-electricity, electromagnetism, the elementary theory of alternating currents.
Laboratory fee: $2.25.
Ps. 315.-Demonstration Physics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
A series of demonstration experiments designed primarily for teachers.
Corequisite: Ps. 299 or its equivalent.
Given in Summer School only.
Ps. 317.-Modern Theories of Physics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Corequisite: Ps: 299 or its equivalent.
Given in Summer School only.
Ps. 405.-Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Bless.
Corequisite: Ps. 299 or its equivalent.
Statics of systems of rigid bodies. Motions of particles and of rigid bodies
under constant and variable forces.
Note:-For the benefit of those who are interested in courses in
applied electricity, attention is called to the courses offered in the
Department of Electrical Engineering of the College of Engineering.
These courses may be approved as accepted courses for students
majoring or minoring in Physics.
Ps. 503.-Kinetic Theory of Gases. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV.
Williamson.
The elements of the kinetic theory, the application of the theory to gases and
liquids, the electrical and magnetic properties of the molecules from the standpoint
of the theory.
Ps. 505.-Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Bless.
Statics of systems of rigid bodies. Motions of particles and of rigid bodies
under constant and variable forces. Assigned reading, problems, and reports.
Ps. 506.-Advanced Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
IV. Bless.
A continuation of Ps. 405. Introduction to vector analysis and generalized
coordinates.
Ps. 508.-Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group IV. Bless.
The laws of Thermodynamics, Chemical Reactions from the Thermodynamical
standpoint, Electrochemistry, and the Nernst Heat Theorem.
Ps. 510.-Physical Optics and Spectroscopy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
IV. Williamson.
The electro-magnetic theory of light, interference, refraction, and polarization,
and the theory of optical instruments and spectroscopy.
Ps. 513-514.-Advanced Experimental Physics. 6 or 8 laboratory
hours. 6 or 8 credits. Group IV. Either semester may be taken
for credit without the other. Williamson, Perry, Bless.
A series of experiments on a particular topic of physics, a review of classical
experiments, or the development of an assigned experimental problem. The work
will be assigned to meet the needs and interests of the particular student.
Laboratory fee, $5.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ps. 518.-Modern Physics. 3 or 4 hours. 3 or 4 credits. Group IV.
Williamson.
The electronic theory of atomic structure, and the interpretation of the prop-
erties of matter and radiation from the standpoint of this theory.
Ps. 520.-X-ray Laboratory. 6 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Group
IV. Bless.
Refraction and diffraction of X-rays, crystal analysis, X-ray spectroscopy.
Laboratory fee, $5.
Ps. 522.-Electron Physics. 4 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Group IV.
Perry.
The theory and actual performance of a number of fundamental experiments
of "Modern Physics".
Prerequisite: Ps. 311 or its equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $3.
Ps. 523-524.-Seminar in Modern Theory. 2 or 3 hours. 4 or 6 credits.
Credit will be given for the first semester without the second if
the student so desires; however, the second semester cannot be
taken without the first. Williamson.
Some particular phase of the most recent developments in theoretical physics
is taken up in detail, "Wave Mechanics" being the topic in 1930-1931.
Ps. 527-528.-Colloquium. % hour. 1 credit. Either semester may be
taken for credit without the other. Williamson.
The most interesting papers are selected from the current literature in physics
and these papers are reported upon by the students.
Ps. 551-552.-Thesis. Either semester may be taken for credit with-
out the other. Williamson, Perry, Bless.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Pcl. 101.-American Government and Politics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit
in Pcl. 102 is earned. Leake and staff.
A study of the structure and functions of the Federal Government.
Pcl. 102.-State and Municipal Government. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Leake and staff.
A study of state, county, and municipal government.
Pel. 101 and 102 prerequisite for all other courses in political science.
Pcl. 203.-American State and Municipal Administration. 3 hours. 3
credits. Group III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed
until credit is earned in Pcl. 204. Laird.
Given in 1931-32.
Pcl. 204.-American State and Municipal Administration. 3 hours. 3
credits. Group III. Laird.
A continuation of Pol. 203.
Given in 1931-32.
Pcl. 207.-Principles of Political Science. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit is
earned in Pcl. 208. Tribolet.
Given in 1931-32. See Pel. 208.









382 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

*Pcl. 208.-Comparative Government. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit is earned in
Pcl. 207. Tribolet.
Given in 1931-32.
*Students who have credit for Political Science 201-202 or 205-206 should secure
permission from the Head of the Department before registering for Political Science
207 or 208. Failure to secure such permission is likely to cause loss of credit because
of duplication of courses.
Pcl. 301.-American Constitutional Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit is
earned in Pcl. 302. Leake.
Given in 1930-31.
Pcl. 302.-American Constitutional Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Leake.
A continuation of Pel. 301.
Given in 1930-31.
Pcl. 303.-International Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. No cred-
it toward a degree will be allowed until credit is earned in Pel. 304.
Tribolet.
Pcl. 304.-International Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Tribolet.
A continuation of Pcl. 303.
Pel. 305.-Political Theories. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until credit is earned in Pel. 306.
Tribolet.
Given in 1930-31.
Pcl. 306.-Political Theories. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Tribolet.
A continuation of Pcl. 305.
Given in 1930-31.
Pcl. 309.-International Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit is earned in
Pcl. 310. Tribolet.
Given in 1931-32.
Pel. 310.-International Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Tribolet.
A continuation of Pel. 309.
Given in 1931-32.
Pcl. 501-502.-American Constitutional Law. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group III. Leake.
Given in 1930-31.
PcI. 503-504.-International Law. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III.
Tribolet.
Given in 1931-32.
Pcl. 505-506.-Political Theories. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group III. Tri-
bolet.
Given in 1930-31.
Pcl. 507-508.-Seminar in Political Science, for graduate credit. 6
credits. Tribolet.
Given in 1931-32.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 201.-General Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Hinck-
ley, Williams.
Facts and theories current in general psychological discussion-the sensations,
sense organs, and functions of the brain-the higher mental processes of attention,
perception, memory, emotion, volition and the self.
Required of Teachers College students and of third-year Commerce students.
Psy. 203.-Physiological Psychology. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Group III. Williams.
Lectures and laboratory work on the nervous system-sense organs-muscles
-glands-reflexes-instincts -emotions-simple habits.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201, or this course may be taken with Psy. 201.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Psy. 206.-Business Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Hinckley.
The application of the main facts of theoretical, experimental, and social psy-
chology to the fields of business problems-special consideration of the fields of ad-
vertising, selling, employment, and efficiency in work.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.
Required of third year Commerce students.
Psy. 304.-Experimental Psychology. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Group III. Williams.
Methods of Psychological investigation--collection and treatment of data-
individual differences-simple and complex reactions-sensations-perceptions-il-
lusions-images-memory-attention-learning.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201; and Psy. 203 is strongly recommended.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Psy. 305.-Social Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Wil-
liams.
Influence of the social environment upon the mental and moral development of
the individual.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.
Psy. 403.-Theories of Personality. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Hinckley.
The more inevitable problems of human life and their normal and abnormal
solutions. A critical consideration of the most important explanations of these ad-
justments. The development and organization of the self.
Prerequisites: Psy. 201.
Psy. 405.-Theory of Psychological Measurement. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Hinckley.
Quantitative methods of experimental psychology-collection and treatment of
data-correlation-prediction-theory of probability.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.
Psy. 406.-Psychological Tests. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Hinck-
ley.
Tests of general intelligence, special aptitudes, personality traits, and busi-
ness ability-organization and administration-critical evaluation of methods and
results-theory of test construction and scoring--practical uses of tests.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201 and Psy. 405.
Psy. 408.-Comparative Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Williams.
A review of the psychological experiments in which animals were employed
as subjects with an attempt to trace the phylogenetic development of human in-
telligence.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.








384 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Psy. 410.-Abnormal Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Hinckley.
Abnormal phases of mental life-dreams, illusions, hallucinations, suggestions,
hypnotism, hysteria, diseases of the memory, diseases of the will, mental hygiene, etc.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.
Open to seniors, advanced pre-medical, and law students only.
Psy. 421.-Learning. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Hinckley.
Lectures, readings and class demonstrations on the experiments on learning.
Psy. 422.-Space Perception. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Hinckley.
Lectures, readings and class demonstrations on the experiments on space per-
ception.
Psy. 424.-Sensation. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Hinckley.
Lectures, readings and class demonstrations on the experiments on sensation.
Psy. 501-502.-Readings in Experimental Psychology. 3 hours. 6
credits. Group III. Either semester may be taken for credit with-
out the other. Hinckley.
Psy. 503.-Studies in Personality. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Hinckley.
Lectures and readings in experimental studies of personality. Special attention
will be given to the clinical work of the personnel bureau.
Prerequisites: Psy. 201, 405, 406. Ppy. 303, and 304.
Psy. 505.-Advanced Statistical Methods. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Hinckley.
Studies in correlation, regression and prediction as applied to psychological
measurement.
Prerequisites: Psy. 201, 405.
Psy. 506.-Psychophysical Theory in the Construction of Tests. 3
hours. 3 credits. Group III. Hinckley.
The application of psycho-physical theory in the measurement of psychological
and social values. Critical discussion of Weber's Law, Fechner's Law, and the
Law of Comparative Judgment. Special attention is given to the problems of
psychological scale construction.
Psy. 507.-History and Systems of Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Williams.
A critical survey of the historical development of psychology, with special
emphasis on representative writers and the more recent systems and programs.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.
Psy. 508.-Advanced Comparative Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Group III. Williams.
A study of the intelligence and learning capacity of animals, with an attempt
to formulate and explain the psychological concepts of reflex, conditioned reflex,
instinct, learning, memory, intelligence, thinking, and motivation as problems pri-
marily in nerve physiology.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.
SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 102.-Introduction to Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Bristol.
An approach to the art of living together in society by a study of the develop-
ment of customs, mores and institutions. Brief consideration of some of the social
problems growing out of industrial development, immigration, rural migration and
depletion, and racial contacts. Poverty and crime-causes, treatment and prevention.
Not open to those who have taken Sy. 111, 112. Required of freshmen in Jour-
nalism.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Sy. 111.-Introduction to Social Studies. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Bristol and Beaty.
An approach to the social sciences through Biology and Psychology. Social life
as conditioned by geographical environment. Early man. Development of folkways,
mores and institutions, with special emphasis on the development of private prop-
erty and the family. Not open to those who have taken Sy. 102, except by special
permission.
Sy. 112.-Introduction to Social Studies. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group
III. Bristol and Beaty.
A continuation of the preceding course with special emphasis on the Industrial
Revolution and its effect on various aspects of social life and institutions.
Prerequisite: Sy. 111.
Sy. 303.-Cultural Development of the United States. 3 hours. 3
credits. Group III. Bristol.
Indian cultures in the fifteenth century. Contrasted cultures in the colonies
with causal explanation. Influence of the Industrial and Political Revolutions on
social institutions and life. Westward migrations and influence on personal, com-
munity and national life. A sociological evaluation of slavery. Special emphasis
will be given to a study of familial, intellectual, esthetic, philanthropic, ethical
and religious institutions and development, with outline treatment of the industrial
and political.
Prerequisite: One of the following: Sociology 111, History 101-102 or Economics
101.
Sy. 304.-Cultural Development of the United States. 3 hours. 3
credits. Group III. Bristol.
A continuation of the preceding course carrying the study from the Civil War
to the present.
Prerequisite: Sy. 301.
Sy. 322.-Community Leadership. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Bristol.
Psychological basis of community leadership. Community self-knowledge through
surveys, "scoring", investigations. Social institutions, with suggested programs
for improvement. Importance of leadership in community building. The discovery
and training of leaders.
Prerequisite: Sy. 102, 111 or consent of instructor.
Sy. 323.-Social Pathology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Bristol.
A case method of approach to a study of problems connected with the socially
inadequate together with approved methods of social action. Visit to social agencies
in Jacksonville.
Prerequisite: Sy. 102 or 111, or consent of instructor.
Not offered in 1931-1932.
Sy. 324.-Crime and Punishment. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Bristol.
Nature and causes of crime; punishment, correction, prevention. Sociological
aspects of criminal law and procedure. Constructive proposals. Visit to State
Prison Farm at Raiford and Girls' Industrial School at Ocala.
Prerequisite: One of the preceding courses in sociology or equivalent.
Sy. 332.-Public Health. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Bristol and
special lecturers from the University and State Board of Health.
This course is a general introduction to the field of public health with special
emphasis on the sociological and economic aspects. Historical approach; bacterio-
logical and biological foundations; community hygiene and sanitation; communi-
cable diseases and their control; nostrums and quackery; school, industrial and
community health programs. Recommended especially for pre-medical students.







386 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Sy. 381.-Cultural Development of Asia and Europe. 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Group III. Carleton.
A survey of Far-Eastern, Near-Eastern and Classical civilizations; a comparative
treatment of industrial, political, familial, intellectual, esthetic, ethical and religious
development.
Not offered in 1931-1932.
Sy. 382.-Cultural Development of Asia and Europe. 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Group III. Carleton.
A continuation of the preceding course. Comparative study of medieval and
modern European civilizations.
Prerequisite: Sy. 381.
Not offered in 1931-1932.
Sy. 441.-Principles of Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Bristol.
A brief study of the principles of social evolution, social organization and social
progress, with special emphasis on the science of social relations.
Prerequisite: Sy. 102, 111 or consent of instructor.
Sy. 442.-Applied Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Bristol.
The principles of efficient living together in society, developed in the preceding
course, will be applied to concrete problems in the interest of social improvement.
Prerequisite: Sy. 441 or consent of instructor.
Sy. 443.-Race Problems. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Beaty.
Origin and dispersion of races; the sociological concept of race; causes of
racial antagonism; racial inequality; race mixtures; basis of racial adjustment.
Prerequisite: Sy. 102, 111 or equivalent.
Sy. 541-542.-Development of Social Thought. 2% hours. seminar.
6 credits. Group III. Bristol.
An introduction to social philosophy by a critical and constructive study of
representative writers in the field of social theory.
For advanced students in sociology and philosophy.
Sy. 551-552.-Social Progress. 21/2 hour seminar. 6 credits. Group
III. Bristol.
Theories of social progress. Evaluation of proposed goals and of programs
looking to the attainment of these goals.
Not offered in 1931-1932.
Sy. 561.-Scientific Philanthropy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Bristol.
Not offered in 1931-32.
Sy. 562.-Criminology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Bristol.
A survey of the fields of criminology and penology with a study of Florida
Institutions dealing with delinquents.
Prerequisite: Sy. 323 or consent of instructor.

SPANISH

A student who passed 1 year of Spanish in high school will be ad-
mitted to Spanish 22 without having to study Spanish 21; if he reg-
isters for Spanish 21 in the University he will not be allowed credit
for it. A student who passed 2 years of Spanish in high school will
be admitted to Spanish 101 without having to study Spanish 21 and
22; if he registers for Spanish 21 or 22 in the University he will not
be allowed credit for either. Students who have passed more than










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


2 years of Spanish in the high school should confer with the Head of
the Department of Spanish before registering for college courses in
Spanish; failure to do so may result in loss of credit because of dupli-
cation.
Sh. 21-22.-Elementary. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No credit to-
ward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are earned.
Staff.
Pronunciation, grammar, written and oral English, memorizing of vocabularies,
dictation, translation.
Sh. 101-102.-Second Year. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are
earned. Staff.
Continuation of Sh. 21-22. Review of grammar, written and oral exercises,
reading of modern texts.
Sh. 203-204.-Third Year Reading. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II.
Either semester may be taken for credit without the other. Hath-
away.
Selections from representative modern authors; study of literary backgrounds
and trends.
Prerequisite: Sh. 101-102.
Sh. 205-206. Spanish American Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group II. Either semester may be taken for credit without the
other. Higgins.
Study of the works of representative authors of Spanish-America. Lectures,
reports, translation.
Prerequisite: Sh. 101-102.
Sh. 213-214.-Elementary Composition and Conversation. 3 hours. 6
credits. Group II. Credit will be given for the first semester with-
out the second if the student so desires; however, the second se-
mester cannot be taken without the first. Higgins.
Drill on pronunciation, review of syntax, stylistics, writing of themes, practice
in conversation.
Prerequisite: Sh. 101-102.
Sh. 223-224.-Commercial Spanish. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II.
Credit will be given for the first semester without the second if
the student so desires; however, the second semester cannot be
taken without the first. Higgins.
Writing of business letters, circulars and advertisements; study of commercial
documents and business practice, stress being placed upon those of Spanish-America.
Prerequisite: Sh. 101-102.
Sh. 303-304.-Survey of Spanish Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group II. Either semester may be taken for credit without the
other. Higgins.
Historical outline; reading of representative selections.
Prerequisite: Sh. 101-102 and permission of instructor.
Sh. 305.-Argentine Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group II. Higgins.
Study of romanticism, realism, modernista movement. Lectures, readings, reports.
Prerequisite: Sh. 205-206.








388 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Sh. 313-314.-Advanced Composition and Conversation. 3 hours. 6
credits. Group II. Credit will be given for the first semester
without the second if the student so desires; however, the second
semester cannot be taken without the first. Hathaway.
Continuation of Sh. 213-214. Attention paid to details of pronunciation and
style.
Prerequisite: 3 years of college Sh., including Sh. 213-214.
Sh. 403-404.-Literature of the Golden Age. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group II. Credit will be given for the first semester without the
second if the student so desires; however, the second semester can-
not be taken without the first. Crow.
Study of the leading dramatists and prose writers of the sixteenth and seven-
teenth centuries. Special attention paid to stylistics peculiarities.
Prerequisite: 3 years of college Sh.

SPEECH

Sch. 201.-Public Speaking. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Staff.
Presentation of the principles used in public speaking with considerable practice
in the delivery of original speeches. Individual improvement is emphasized and en-
couraged by constructive criticism.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.
Sch. 202.-Persuasive Speaking. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Staff.
The subject and purpose of the speech and the occasion on which it is to be
delivered are all considered with the aim of influencing the specific audience. Much
practice in speaking.
Prerequisite: Sch. 201.
Sch. 203-204.-Argumentation and Debating. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Group III. Credit will be given for the first semester without the
second; however, the second semester cannot be taken without
the first. Hopkins.
A consideration of the principles involved in winning an argument. How to
expose the inadequacy of your opponent's evidence or the error in his reasoning.
All students expecting to join the varsity debate squad should take this course.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-2.
Sch. 207-208.-Interpretation of Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. Group
III. Either semester may be taken for credit without the other.
Constans.
Oral reading of the lyric, ballad, narrative, short story, and drama. Abridg-
ment and readings of novels and plays.
Given in 1932-33.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.
Sch. 212.-Oratory of the Courtroom. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Constans.
Reading and analysis of courtroom speeches by famous lawyers, such as Webster,
Choate, Ingersoll, Borah, Littleton, and Darrow.
Prerequisite. Eh. 101-102.
Sch. 214.-Parliamentary Practice in Public Discussion. 2 hours. 2
credits. Group III. Hopkins.
Practice in facilitating group discussions by the proper use of "Parliamentary
Law".
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-2.
















DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Sch. 301.-Advance Public Speaking. 2 hours. 2 credits. Group III.
Hopkins.
In preparing speeches for the more formal occasions attention will be given
to structure, style, and delivery, with special emphasis on the psychology of audience
persuasion.
Prerequisite: Sch. 202.
Sch. 303.-One-Act Play. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Constans.
The one-act play as a type of drama. The reading and criticism of a large
number of the best one-act plays by contemporary writers.
Given in 1932-33.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.
Sch. 304.-Modern Drama. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Constans.
A survey of the life and works of recent playwrights (1860 to 1915) ; extensive
reading of plays.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.
Sch. 305.-British Oratory. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Hopkins.
Speeches of the greatest British authors will be studied against the background
of their lives and the issues of their times.
Given in 1932-33.
Sch. 308.-American Oratory. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III. Hopkins.
The same procedure will be followed with the same objectives as in British
Oratory.
Given in 1932-33.
Sch. 357.-Business Speaking. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory. 3 cred-
its. Group III. Staff.
Reading of written reports- conduction of business conferences --analysis of
speech composition-delivery of informational and argumentative talks.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101 and 102.
Required of seniors in the course in business administration proper. This course
can be taken only by juniors or seniors in the College of Commerce and Journalism.
Sch. 403.-Contemporary Drama. 3 hours. 3 credits. Group III.
Constans.
A survey of drama from 1915 to 1930; special attention is given to the best
plays produced in America.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.
Sch. 404.-Dramatic Production. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3
credits. Group III. Constans.
Consideration of voice, line reading, technique of acting, and principles of
character interpretation, the problem of directing, stage equipment, costuming.
lighting, and make-up. Rehearsal of one-act plays.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.





390 BULLETIN COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1931-32
First Semester
1931
September 14, 15, Monday, Tuesday ..Entrance examinations.
September 16, Wednesday 11:00 a.m..._.1931-32 session begins.
September 16-22, Wednesday-Tuesday..Freshman Week.
September 21, 22, Monday, Tuesday......Registration of upperclassmen.
September 23, Wednesday................... Classes for 1931-32 session begin; late
registration fee $5.
September 30, Wednesday......................Last day for changing course without
paying the $2 fee.
October 7, Wednesda y............................. Last day for registration for the first
semester 1931-32.
November 11, Wednesday...................Armistice Day; special exercises but
classes are not suspended.
November 26, Thursday......................... Thanksgiving Day, a holiday.
December 19, Saturday 12:00 noon........Christmas recess begins.
1932
January 4, Monday 8:00 a.m ...................Christmas recess ends.
January 25, Monday 8:00 a.m............... Final examinations for the first semes-
ter begin.
January 31, Sunday 8:00 p.m.................Baccalaureate Sermon.
February 3, Wednesday........................... Inter-semester Day, a holiday.
Second Semester
February 4, 5, Thursday, Friday ............ Registration for second semester; all
students whose names begin with "A"
through "M" register on Thursday; all
others on Friday.
February 6, Saturday 8:00 a.m. ............Classes f or second semester begin;
change of course fee, $2; late registra-
tion fee, $5.
February 11, Thursday ..............................Last day for registration for second
semester.
March 23, Wednesday 5:00 p.m.............Spring recess begins.
March 28, Monday 8:00 a.m.......-.....Spring recess ends.
May 26, Thursday 8:00 a.m...................Final examinations begin.
June 4-6, Saturday to Monday ........... Commencement Exercises.




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