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 Cover
 Table of Contents
 Faculty
 General information
 Admission
 Fees and special information
 Degrees and curricula
 Departments of instruction
 University calendar, 1931-32














Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00431
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1, 1931
Copyright Date: 1932
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00431
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 283
        Page 284
    Table of Contents
        Page 285
        Page 286
    Faculty
        Page 287
        Page 288
    General information
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
    Admission
        Page 292
    Fees and special information
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
    Degrees and curricula
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
    Departments of instruction
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
    University calendar, 1931-32
        Page 319
        Page 320
Full Text




The University Record

of the


University of Florida


Bulletin of the

College of Commerce and Journalism

With Announcements for the Year
1931-32


Vol. XXVI, Series I No. 7


May 1, 1931


Published Semi-monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.



















The University Record of the University of Florida is issued once every
month except June, when it is issued six times.

The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual col-
leges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruction,
and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what in-
formation is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in sev-
eral series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with insti-
tutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is
under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual
copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to the University Bookstore, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
























TABLE OF CONTENTS


F acully ......... ... ....... .......


General Information


A dm mission ..... .......................


Fees .... .. .. .


Special Informalion .... ... ..... .....


Degrees .....


Curricula in Business Administration


Curriculum in Journalism ............


Departments of Instruction ..............

[Jniversitv Calendar


..... ............. .. 287


...................... 28 9


.. ......... ...... 292


.-................. 293

........... ... .. 293


...... ... .. .. 296


.. ......... 296


............... .... 303


.......... ............ 30 5

319








THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM
FACULTY

ADMINISTRATION

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., President.
JAMES MARION FARR, M.A., Ph.D., Vice-President, Professor of English Lan-
guage and Literature.
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Dean of the College of Commerce and
Journalism, Director of Bureau of Economic and Business Research, and
Professor of Economics.
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, M.A., Ph.D. (Clark), Assistant Dean, and Associ-
ate Professor of Economic Geography.
NANNIE BELLE WHITAKER, B.A., Secretary to the Dean.
KATHERINE MOORMAN, Assistant Secretary.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A.. Head of the Department and Professor of
Economics.
MONTGO-MERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON. B.S.. Ph.D. (Robert Brookings), Profes-
sor of Business Statistics and Economics.
HOWARD WILLIAM GRAY, M.S.. C.P.A. (Illinois), Professor of Accounting.
HOWARD DYKMAN. B.A., LL.B. (Minnesota), Professor of Insurance and Eco-
rIomics.
TRUIMAN C. BIGHAM, M.A., Ph.D. (Stanford), Professor of Economics.
HARWOOD BURROWS DOLBEARE, B.A., Associate Professor of Finance.
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics.
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, B.A.. LL.B. (Florida), Associate Professor of Busi-
ness Law and Economics.
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, M.A., Ph.D. (Clark), Associate Professor of Eco-
nomic Geography.
JOSEPH PORTER WILSON, M.B.A. (Harvard), Assistant Professor of Marketing
and Salesmanship.
JAMES EDWARD CHACE, JR., M.B.A. (Harvard), Assistant Professor of Eco-
nomics and Business Management.
WILLIAM TROTTER HICKS, M.S., Instructor in Economics and Economic Geog-
raphy.
FRED C. WARD, B.S.B.A., Instructor in Accounting.
PETER C. SCAGLIONE, B.S.B.A., Instructor in Office Management and Economic
History.
ERNEST M. McCRACKEN, B.A., Research Assistant in Bureau of Economic and
Business Research.





















288 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

JOSEPH V. RICHARDS, Research Assistant in Bureau of Economic and Business
Research.
WILLIAM J. RIVERS, Graduate Assistant in Economics and Business Admin-
islration.
HOWARD L. PUTNAM, B.S.B.A., Graduate Assistant in Economics and Business
Administration.
GEORGE NUNEZ, Student Assistant in Economics and Business Administration.
ALBERT M. HAFT, Student Assistant in Economics and Business Administration.
FRED S. JAHN, Student Assistant in Economics and Business Administration.

JOURNALISM

ELMER JACOB EMIG, M.A., Head of the Department and Professor of Jour-
nalism.
At Stanford University for 1931-32 exchanging with Professor Buford 0. Brown.
BUFORD 0. BROWN, Exchange Professor of Journalism.
From Stanford University exchanging for 1931-32 with Elmer J. Emig, perma-
nent Head Professor.
WILLIAM LEONARD LOWRY, B.A., Assistant Professor of Journalism.
HOWARD M. NORTON, Student Assistant.

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

For faculty in other departments offering courses required in the various
curricula of the College of Commerce and Journalism, see bulletins of College
of Arts and Sciences, College of Engineering and College of Agriculture.







GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL INFORMATION
HISTORY
The College of Commerce and Journalism had its beginning in 1925. In
that year the School of Business Administration and Journalism was estab-
lished in the College of Arts and Sciences. The Dean of that College was
placed in charge. In the fall of 1926 a special director was appointed and the
School, though still in theory a part of the College of Arts and Sciences, began
to operate as a separate and distinct unit. Out of this unit the Board of Con-
trol in the spring of 1927 created the College of Commerce and Journalism
with a dean and faculty of its own and made it co-equal in every respect with
the other colleges of the University.

OBJECTIVES

The College of Commerce and Journalism offers instruction in two dis-
tinct fields of professional or semi-professional effort: business administration,
and journalism.
Business Administration.-Instruction in business administration is designed
to provide analysis of the basic principles of business. Its purposes are to
prepare students (1) to become business executives; (2) to assume the in-
creasing responsibilities of business ownership; and (3) to act in the capacity
of business specialists.
Modern business is highly complex in character. The business world is
made up of a multitude of specialized business units. These units not only
compete, but also co-operate with each other in creating goods and services
for the satisfaction of human wants. Those who would enter the field of busi-
ness must understand the economic organization of society. They must be
familiar with the fundamental elements of business management. They must
develop facility in the use of quantitative instruments in the determination of
business policies. They must recognize the larger relationships between busi-
ness leadership and general social well-being. To perform these functions
they must give attention to cultural as well as professional values.
Business education involves consideration of the following occupational
levels: (1) upper levels composed of proprietors and executives; (2) inter-
mediate levels composed of department heads and minor executives; and (3)
lower levels composed of clerical and routine workers. The scope of business
education includes preparation for all of these levels. While the College of
Commerce and Journalism has organized its curricula in business administra-
tion to prepare students primarily to occupy the upper and intermediate levels,
it has not entirely ignored the lower levels. While no short curricula have
been provided, students who cannot spend four years in preparing for the
upper and intermediate levels will find courses that will be of great assistance
to them in preparing for the lower levels.
Journalism.-Instruction in journalism proceeds upon the belief that the
press is a social institution, and that the increasing appreciation of its func-
tions as an educational agency creates a demand for thorough preparation,
educationally and ethically as well as technically, for journalistic endeavor.







290 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

The makers of modern newspapers and periodicals are compelled to deal with
all phases of complex modern life and civilization, and those who would par-
ticipate in journalistic activities as news writers, as creators or directors of
public opinion, or as owners or managers of newspapers, must possess genu-
ine training in English, history, economics, sociology, psychology, government,
business management, etc., as well as in the technique of newspaper proce-
dure. The purpose of university instruction in journalism is to accomplish, if
possible, these difficult objectives, and to help develop such abilities of future
newspaper workers as may lend assistance to solving the increasingly difficult
problems encountered by the press.
The College of Commerce and Journalism does not profess to turn out
finished business managers, executives, department heads and minor executives.
Neither does it profess to produce finished newspaper men. Its various cur-
ricula provide instruction that will help to shorten the period of apprenticeship
for those who expect to enter commercial and newspaper occupations. Those
who have learned business or newspaper fundamentals in this College must be-
come finished business and newspaper men by actual practice just as those
who have learned the principles of law or medicine in other colleges become
finished lawyers and physicians by actual practice.

BUSINESS AND NEWSPAPER CONTACT
Formal training cannot take the place of actual experience. Students reg-
istered in Business Administration and Journalism are urged to secure posi-
tions with business enterprises and newspapers during summer vacations. They
should choose types of occupation that will harmonize with their particular
fields of specialization. In this way they can secure valuable experience; they
can become acquainted with the technique of business and newspaper opera-
tion; and they can better co-ordinate classroom instruction with acual busi-
ness practice.
PREPARATION FOR INITIAL POSITIONS
While the College of Commerce and Journalism does not attempt to offer
specific types of training programs for specific types of positions, it does offer
certain courses that will assist students in securing and holding initial posi-
tions. Some of the courses in accounting and some of the courses in journal-
ism are of this character. Business Administration 83, in which typing is
taught, and Business Administration 84, and Business Administration 87. in
which shorthand is taught, are courses that will be especially serviceable to
students in securing initial positions and in making their advent in o busi-
ness. While these courses were provided primarily for students in the College
of Education preparing for commercial teaching, they are also available to
all students in the College of Commerce and Journalism.

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT
The College of Commerce and Journalism occupies quarters in Language
and Buckman Halls. The following offices are in Language Hall: The office
of the Dean and Assistant Dean, the office of the Head of the Department of







GENERAL INFORMATION


Journalism, the office of the Bureau of Economic and Business Research, and
the offices of three or four faculty members. The rest of the faculty members
have offices in the north end of Buckman Hall.
The accounting and statistical laboratories, the economic geography lab-
oratory, the journalism laboratory, and the typewriting laboratory are in Lan-
guage Hall. In these laboratories students are provided with desks, tables,
adding machines, typewriters, and other types of equipment. Class rooms are
located in both Language Hall and Buckman Hall.
The College does not have special library or reading rooms. All books,
reports, and magazines are located in the University Library. Comfortable
reading rooms are maintained there for the use of these books, reports, and
magazines.
SCHOLARSHIPS, ASSISTANTSHIPS, AND FELLOWSHIPS
The American Bankers' Association Foundation for Education in Economics
offers one annual loan scholarship amounting to $250. This scholarship is
open only to students in business administration. There are several other
scholarships open to students in this College along with students in other col-
leges of the University. For a description of these scholarships see Bulletin
of General Information.
The College of Commerce and Journalism has three undergraduate assist-
antships in economics and business administration and one in journalism.
These are awarded annually. They carry a stipend of $200 each. Students
receiving the awards read papers or act in the capacity of laboratory assist-
ants. To receive and hold these assistantships they must maintain an average
of B.
There are two research assistantships in the Bureau of Economic and Busi-
ness Research. They are awarded annually and carry a stipend of $450 each.
There are two graduate assistantships in economics and business administra-
tion. They are awarded annually and carry a stipend of $450 each. Students
holding the former assistantships are required to render 15 hours of service
per week in connection with the Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
Students holding the latter assistantships are required to render 15 hours of
service per week in reading papers or acting as laboratory assistants. Neither
research nor graduate assistants are allowed to complete the requirements for
the Master's degree in one academic year of nine months. While they may
complete their course requirements they will have to remain for the summer
session to finish their Master's theses. They may be eligible for re-appoint-
ment to these assistantships the second year. To become applicants for these
assistantships, students must have completed their Bachelor's degree and must
have maintained an average of B in their undergraduate courses.

RELATION TO THE SUMMER SESSION
The College of Commerce and Journalism operates during the Summer
Session as well as during the regular session. While there is a limited num-
ber of faculty members present during the Summer Session, the courses of-
fered, the regulations followed, and the credit given are the same as during
the regular session.







292 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

ADMISSION

There are two methods of gaining admission to the College of Commerce
and Journalism: (1) By Certificate.-The University will accept certificates of
graduation from accredited Florida high schools. Certificates of graduation
will also be accepted from Florida high schools that are members of the South-
ern Association of Secondary Schools, and from any secondary school else-
where which is accredited by its state university.
(2) By Examination.-Candidates not admitted by certificate of graduation
will be required to stand written examinations upon the entrance subjects.
Entrance examinations will be given upon the dates published in the Univer-
sity Calendar.
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Sixteen high school units are required for entrance to the College of Com-
merce and Journalism. They are as follows:

English .............................. .......... 3
A lgebra .............................................. 1
Plane Geometry .............................. 1
H history ............................................. 1
Science .............................................. 1
One Foreign Language ........... 2
Approved Electives ..... ............. 7
Total ................. ................. 16

REGISTRATION

No student will be registered until he has had his principal file with the
Registrar of the University a certified copy of his high school record, showing
that the candidate has the required units for admission, or until the student
has otherwise fulfilled all requirements for admission. Students presenting
credit for advanced standing will not be registered until they file a transcript
from the university they last attended. For further information on admission
see Bulletin of General Information.

SPECIAL STUDENTS

Persons twenty-one or more years of age who cannot satisfy the entrance
requirements, but who give evidence of ability to profit by the courses they
may take, may, under exceptional circumstances, be admitted as "Adult Spe-
cials." They are required to comply with the same regulations as regular stu-
dents.
GRADUATE STUDY

Both the Department of Economics and Business Administration and the
Department of Journalism, under the jurisdiction of the Graduate School of the
University, offer graduate courses leading to the degrees of Master of Arts,
Master of Science in Business Administration and Master of Science in Jour-
nalism. Students may major in economics and minor in business administra-
tion or vice versa. Ordinarily requirements for the above degrees may be
completed in one regular academic year.







SPECIAL INFORMATION


FEES

A special registration fee of $10 is charged annually to all regular stu-
dents registered in the College of Commerce and Journalism, and a fee of $1
per semester hour is charged for other students taking the following courses:
all courses in Journalism, and all courses in Business Administration not
marked "E."
In addition to these special fees for students registering in the College of
Commerce and Journalism, there are several other annual fees paid by all
students registered in the University. These fees are as follows:
Registration and Contingent Fee ............................................ $ 7.50
Dormitory Breakage Fee (in the form of a deposit). -.. 10.00
Student A activity Fee ............................. ................................... .. 23.60
Infirm ary Fee .......... ...... ......... ..... ..... ............................... 9.00
Laboratory Fees, varying for the various courses..................
Locker Service Fee .. .......--------... ................- ...... 1.50
M military F ee ......... ... ....... .. ............. ..... ........ ................... 1.00
Students not residents of Florida are charged a non-resident tuition fee of
$100, payable $50 per semester. For details concerning these various fees see
Bulletin of General Information.

LIVING EXPENSES

Annual necessary expenses of the average student in the College of Com-
merce and Journalism residing in Florida are estimated as follows:
T u ition .............................. .................... .................................. $ ..........
Registration and Student Activity Fees ............. .................. 42.60
Special Registration Fee ............................. ............................. 10.00
Board and Lodging in Commons and Dormitory (if paid
by the semester in advance) Old dormitory ................ 209.00
N ew dorm itory .................................... .............. ................. ..... 240.00
L laundry (about) ...... ........ ..... .... ............. .... ... .................... 20.00
Books and Laboratory Fees .................................... ......... .... 37.75

SPECIAL INFORMATION

GRADES AND HONOR POINTS

Marking System.-Results of work are recorded in the Registrar's office
as follows: A-Exceptionally high quality, valued at three quality points for
each credit; B-Good, valued at two quality points for each credit; C-Fair,
valued at one quality point for each credit; D-Unsatisfactory, indicating a
deficiency and giving no quality points, but giving credit for graduation; E-
Failure; I-Incomplete; R-Conditional (may be given freshmen and sopho-
mores only) ; X-Absent from examination with excuse approved by the in-
structor.
Explanations.-A student must have an average of at least C on all work
offered for advanced standing. In addition, to obtain the degree applied for,
he must earn at the University of Florida as many honor points as credits.
The grade E means that, in order to be credited, the work must be taken
over in class.
The grade I means that some relatively small part of the term's work re-
mains undone because of sickness or of some other reason satisfactory to the
instructor. This work must be completed within two months after the stu-







294 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

dent re-enters the University, if credit for the course is to be gained. The
grade I is not given to a student whose work is below passing. If not removed
within two months it will be changed to E.
The grade R (given to freshmen and sophomores only) denotes a condition
with re-examination privileges at the next re-examination period during resi-
dence in the University. If the re-examination is not taken at this time, or is
taken and not passed, the grade R will automatically be changed to E. The
passing grade for graduate students is B.

RULES AND REGULATIONS

In order that each student may acquaint himself with the rules and regu-
lations pertaining to him while connected with the institution, the By-Laws of
the University of Florida is published in a separate volume. This booklet is
issued during the registration period. Each person registering should secure
a copy and become thoroughly familiar with its contents. He will be held
responsible for all that is contained therein.

LECTURES BY BUSINESS EXECUTIVES

It is the policy of the College of Commerce and Journalism to invite from
time to time prominent business executives both from within and without the
State of Florida to address the students in business administration.
It is also the policy of the College of Commerce and Journalism to arrange
for speakers who are engaged in the work of editing or publishing newspapers,
to talk to the students at various times.

ADVISORY BOARD OF NEWSPAPER EDITORS

The Florida Press Association appoints each year an Advisory Board to
act in an advisory capacity to the Department of Journalism. The members
of the Board for the year, 1930-1931, are: Harry Brown, Gainesville Sun;
R. L. Sweger, Gadsden County Times, Quincy; J. E. Worthington, Lake Wales
Highlander; C. C. Carr, St. Petersburg Times; Mrs. Lucille Smith, Lake
Worth Herald; R. W. Simpson, Tampa Tribune; Elmer J. Emig, University of
Florida; and H. H. Hudson, Titusville Star-Advocate.

BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH
The College of Commerce and Journalism maintains a Bureau of Economic
and Business Research. This Bureau was established in 1930. It provides
faculty members and graduate students with an opportunity to engage in spe-
cific types of research work. Its activities are coordinated with the research
activities of the College as a whole.

MEMBERSHIP IN NATIONAL AND REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

The College of Commerce and Journalism is a member of the American
Association of Collegiate Schools of Business. It was admitted in 1929. It is
also a member of the Sou:heastern Economic Association.







SPECIAL INFORMATION


BUREAU OF PLACEMENTS
The University of Florida maintains a Bureau of Placements. This Bureau
exists for the purpose of assisting graduates in securing positions. While ap-
pointments are not guaranteed, every effort will be made to place those who
make worthy records.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Commerce Club.--This club was founded in 1924 by a group of students
majoring in economics and business administration. Meetings are held weekly
for encouraging and developing critical interest in current problems in the
fields of commerce and industry, special attention being given to the economic
progress of Florida. The Commerce Club has been recognized by the Debating
Council of the University and has a representative on the Council. The Club
competes with the various colleges on the campus for debating honors and won
the freshman championship in 1925-26 and in 1930-31. All students in Busi-
ness Administration are eligible to membership.
Fourth Estate Club.-The Fourth Estate Club is an organization composed
of all students who are studying journalism, together with those who are in-
terested in the subject although they may not be pursuing journalistic courses.
The purposes of the Club are to promote journalistic activities on the campus
and to foster things of interest to newspaper men.
Alpha Kappa Psi.-The Alpha Phi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi, a national
professional commerce fraternity, was established at the University of Florida
in January. 1926. Its purpose is to afford a social and professional contact
among the students of business administration, and to cooperate with the fac-
ulty in furthering the interests of the College of Commerce and Journalism.
The membership is made up of men whose interests are broader than the
classroom, and whose personality and individual character give promise of
business success. Only those students of the sophomore class or above are
eligible.
Delta Sigma Pi.-The Beta E:a Chap:er of the International Fraterni:y of
Delta Sigma Pi was installed at the University of Florida in December, 1929.
It is a commercial fraternity organized to foster the study of business in the
universities: to encourage scholarship and the association of students for their
mutual advancement by research and practice; to promote closer affiliation be-
tween the commercial world and the students of commerce; and to further a
higher standard of commercial ethics and culture and the civic and the com-
mercial welfare of the community. It is also the aim of the fraternity to pro-
mote closer social relations among the members of the College of Commerce
and Journalism. In order to be eligible to membership, a student must he in
the sophomore class, or above. and must have attained an average of C in
scholastic work of the previous year.
Beta Gamma Sigma.-Beta Gamma Sigma is a national honorary commerce
fraternity. The purposes of this fraternity are to encourage and reward schol-
arship and accomplishment along the lines of business activity among students
and graduates of this college; to promote the advancement and spread of edu-
cation in the science of business; to foster principles of honesty and integrity







296 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

in business practice; and to encourage a more friendly attitude of the business
public toward graduates of commercial courses. Membership is taken from
among those who rank by weighted average in the upper one-fifth of the jun-
ior and senior classes.
Sigma Delta Chi.-The Florida Chap:er of Sigma Delta Chi, international
professional journalistic fraternity, was installed at the University on Febru-
ary 9, 1929. It seeks to promote the welfare and highest ideals of newspapers
and magazines. The personnel bureau of the fraternity attempts to obtain
positions for members and to find better positions for those already engaged
in the profession. Membership in the fraternity is the highest honor to which
a journalism student can attain.

DEGREES
Two undergraduate degrees are given in the College of Commerce and
Journalism: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Bachelor of
Science in Journalism.

THE CURRICULA IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The College of Commerce and Journalism offers three types of curricula
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration: First,
the Curriculum in Business Administration Proper; Second, the Curriculum
in Combination with Engineering; and Third, the Curriculum in Combination
with Law.
THE CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER
The Curriculum in Business Administration Proper extends over a period of
four years. It contains both general courses and professional courses. The first
two years are devoted wholly to required subjects largely cultural in nature and
are intended to provide the student with a broad intellectual foundation. The
last two years provide an opportunity for professional specialization directly in
the field of business.
When the student has completed his freshman and sophomore years. lie is
required to elect one of the eight groups described later and strictly adhere
to this group throughout his junior and senior years. These eight groups are
arranged in such a way as to represent the principal fields of business and to
provide the student with an arrangement of courses leading to professional
specialization in the field that best fits his needs and interests. In all of these
groups are certain required courses of a pervasive nature which are designed
to acquaint the student with the underlying principles of business organization
and management common to all types of business enterprises.
In each group there are six semester hours of approved electives in the jun-
ior year, and four semester hours in the senior year. If the student desires to
do so, he may elect foreign language in the first two years and postpone Po-
litical Science 101-102 and Philosophy 201-206 to his junior and senior years.
If he makes this election, his approved electives will consist of foreign lan-
guage. If he does not elect foreign language, he may be permitted, provided
he shows adequate cause therefore, to elect six of the ten semester hours of







CURRICULA


approved electives in any department of the University. The remaining four
semester hours must be taken in business administration.
For students who neither elect foreign language nor avail themselves of
the privilege of taking six semester hours from any department of the Univer-
sity, but who desire to elect the ten semester hours for which provisions have
been made from business administration, the following courses listed under
each of the following groups are suggested:
I. GENERAL BUSINESS: Business Administration 81, 82, 331, 332, 404E,
423, 381E, 435E, 461, 462E.
II. ACCOUNTING: Business Administration 81, 82, 422, 429, 430E, 423, 426E,
454E.
III. RISK-BEARING AND INSURANCE: Business Administration 81, 82, 331,
422, 404E, 423, 426E, Mathematics 208.
IV. MARKETING: Business Administration 81, 82, 331, 332, 362, 381E, 422.
469E, 470E.
V. BANKING AND FINANCE: Business Administration 81, 82, 331, 429E.
430E, 435E, 436, 404E, 470E.
VI. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY AND FOREIGN TRADE: Business Administra-
tion 81, 82, 381E, 432, History 203-204, two years of foreign language,
Political Science 303-304.
VII. ECONOMICS: Business Administration 81, 82, 361, 385E, 362, 461, 436,
401-402, 462E.
VIII. REALTY ADMINISTRATION: Business Administration 81, 82, 331, 422,
433, 434, 461, Sociology 102, Agricultural Economics 508.
THE CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH ENGINEERING
The Curriculum in Business Administration in Combination with Engineer-
ing also extends over a period of four years. It has been arranged for students
who wish to prepare for administrative and selling positions in the field of
manufacturing, railway and public utility operation. The student registers
directly in the College of Commerce and Journalism. Most of the courses he
pursues in his freshman and sophomore years are engineering courses and
are offered by the College of Engineering. There are ten semester hours of ap-
proved electives. These may be taken in business administration, in engineer-
ing, or in some other department of the University, provided cause therefore is
shown. All electives must be approved by the Dean.

THE CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
The College of Commerce and Journalism combines with the College of
Law in offering a six-year program of study for students in business admin-
istration who desire ultimately to enter the College of Law. The first three
years are spent directly in the College of Commerce and Journalism; the last
three years are devoted to the regular course in the College of Law. When
the student has satisfactorily completed the first two years of the course in
the College of Law, le may offer these two years of law as a substitute for
the fourth year in the College of Commerce and Journalism, and receive the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.
Students may postpone Political Science 101-102 and Philosophy 201 to
the junior year, and elect two years of foreign language instead of the ap-
proved electives specified in the curriculum. If they do not elect foreign lan-
guage. they may take three semester hours out of the eleven in any depart-
ment of the University, provided cause therefore is shown. The remaining eight
hours must be taken from courses in business administration.







298 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM


THE CURRICULUM PROPER
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.

First Semester Second Semester

Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Freshman Year

Business Administration 103................ 3 Business Administration 104 ................ 3
English 101........................ .................. 3 English 102 ........................... .............. 3
Mathematics 107 .................................... 3 Mathematics 108 .................................... 3
Political Science 101................................ 3 Political Science 102 ............................ 3
Business Administration 101E............ 3 Business Administration 102E -----.............. 3
Military Science 101 .............................. 2 Military Science 102 ............................ 2
Physical Education 101.......................... 1 Physical Education 102 ......................... 1

18 18

Sophomore Year

Business Administration 211................ 3 Business Administration 212 ................ 3
Business Administration 201E.............. 3 Business Administration 202E............ 3
Psychology 201 ........... .... ............... 3 Psychology 206 ...................................... 3
Laboratory Science*.................................. 5 Laboratory Science* .............................. 5
Military Science 201-........................... 2 Military Science 202................................ 2

16 16

I. GENERAL BUSINESS

Junior Year

E english 355.............................................. 3 E english 356 ...................... ....................... 3
Business Administration 321E.............. 3 Business Administration 322E .............. 3
Business Administration 351E.............. 3 Business Administration 302E .............. 3
Business Administration 341 ................ 2 Business Administration 372................ 2
Business Administration 311 ................ 3 Business Administration 312 ................ 3
Approved Elective .............................. 3 Approved Elective .............................------ 3

17 17

Senior Year

Business Administration 401............-.. 3 Business Administration 402 ................ 3
Business Administration 409 ............... 2 Business Administration 410 .............. 2
Speech 357 ...............-----........ .. -- 3 Business Administration 0431E ---........ 3
Business Administration 469E ............ 3 Business Administration 454E ............ 3
Business Administration 429E............ 3 Business Administration 422 ................ 3
Approved Elective .................................. 2 Approved Elective ..... .... ...........----------- 2

16 16

II. ACCOUNTING

Junior Year

E english 355............................................... 3 E english 356 .................... .......... ... 3
Business Administration 321E .............. 3 Business Administration 322 ............... 3
Business Administration 351E.............. 3 Business Administration 302E............. 3
Business Administration 341 ............ 2 Business Administration 372 ................ 2
Business Administration 311.............. 3 Business Administration 312 ................ 3
Approved Elective .............................S...... 3 Approved Elective ................-- ............. 3

17 17

Senior Year

Business Administration 401................ 3 Business Administration 402 ................ 3
Business Administration 409................ 2 Business Administration 410................ 2
Speech 357 ...............................................----- 3 Business Administration 0431E............ 3
Business Administration 411................ 3 Business Administration 412-..........---. 3
Business Administration 413 ................ 3 Business Administration 414 ................ 3
Approved Elective .................................... 2 Approved Elective .................................. 2

16 16

*Chemistry 107-108, Physics 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, or Biology 101-106.








CURRICULA


III. RISK-BEARING AND INSURANCE

First Semester Second Semester

Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Junior Year

English 355 .................... ...................... 3 English 356 ..........---- -.... .... .................. 3
Business Administration 321 ...... ... 3 Business Administration 322 ........... 3
Business Administration 351E ....... 3 Business Administration 302E ............ 3
Business Administration 341 ........-.....-- 2 Business Administration 372 ................ 2
Business Administration 361 ............... 3 Busines Admisnistration 362 ........... 3
Approved Elective ................................... 3 Approved Elective .................................. 3

17 .17

Senior Year

Business Administration 401 ................ 3 Business Administration 402 ................ 3
Business Administration 409................ 2 Business Administration 410 ................ 2
Business Administration 469E.............. 3 Business Administration 470E.............. 3
Business Administration 461 ................ 3 Business Administration 468E ............. 3
Speech 357 ............................................... 3 Business Administration 0431E........... 3
Approved Elective .................--........... 2 Approved Elective ................................----------- 2

16 16

IV. MARKETING

Junior Year

English 355 ..............................................--------- 3 English 356 ............... .......---- ......... 3
Business Administration 321E.............. 3 Business Administration 322...--....... 3
Business Administration 351E .............. 3 Business Administration 302E ........ 3
Business Administration 341 ................ 2 Business Administration 372 ............. 2
Business Administration 431E.............. 3 Business Administration 432 ............- 3
Approved Elective .......... ....... 3 Approved Elective ............................ 3

17 17

Senior Year

Business Administration 401 ............... 3 Business Administration 402................ 3
Business Administration 409 ................ 2 Business Administration 410........--- ...... 2
Business Administration 435E.............. 3 Business Administration 436 ............... 3
Business Administration 433............ 3 Business Administration 434 ................ 3
Speech 357 .............................................. 3 Business Administration 470 ................ 3
Approved Elective ...................... .......... 2 Approved Elective ............................... 2

16 16

V. BANKING AND FINANCE

Junior Year

English 355 .........................--- ---- --- -.. .... .... 3 English 356 ............................................ 3
Business Administration 321E .. 3 Business Administration 322 .............. 3
Business Administration 351E ....--- 3 Business Administration 302E .............. 3
Business Administration 341 ..... ....... 2 Business Administration 372................ 2
Business Administration 311 ........ 3 Business Administration 312................ 3
Approved Elective -............................. 2 Approved Elective .................................. 2

16 16

Senior Year


Business Administration 401 .........-...... 3
Business Administration 409 ....--..--......-- 2
Business Administration 469E ............. 3
Business Administration 423 ................ 3
Speech 357 .............................................. 3
Approved Elective ................................ 3

17


Business Administration 402 ................ 3
Business Administration 410................ 2
Business Administration 412................ 3
Business Administration 426E ............ 3
Business Administration 422................ 3
Business Administration 0431E ............ 3

17









300 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM


VI. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY AND FOREIGN TRADE

First Semester Second Semester

Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Junior Year

E english 355 .............. ......---...................... 3 E english 356 ............................................ 3
Business Administration 321E .........-.... 3 Business Administration 322................ 3
Business Administration 385E.......-...... 3 Business Administration 302E .......... 3
Business Administration 341 ................ 2 Business Administration 372................ 2
Business Administration 431E ... 3 Political Science 206............................ 3
Approved Elective ................................ 3 Approved Elective ............................. 3

17 17

Senior Year

Business Administration 351E.............. 3 Business Administration 402................ 3
Business Administration 409 ................ 2 Business Administration 410................ 2
Business Administration 401 ................ 3 Business Administration 440E ............ 3
Speech 357 ..................... ..................... 3 Business Administration 436................ 3
Business Administration 435E ............. 3 Business Administration 432................ 3
Approved Elective .................................. 2 Approved Elective ................................ 2

16 16

VII. ECONOMICS

Junior Year

Business Administration 321E -.......... 3 Business Administration 322................ 3
Business Administration 351E .............. 3 Business Administration 302E ............ 3
Business Administration 381E ...... 3 Business Administration 0431E .......... 3
Business Administration 435E ............. 3 Business Administration 404E ............ 3
Business Administration 429E ............. 3 Business Administration 430E ............ 3
Approved Elective .................................. 2 Approved Elective .................................. 2

17 17

Senior Year

Business Administration 409................ 2 Business Administration 410................ 2
Business Administration 469E ............. 3 Business Administration 470E .......... 3
Business Administration 423 ................ 3 Business Administration 426E ............ 3
Speech 357 .............................................. 3 Business Administration 440E ............ 3
Business Administration 461 ................ 3 Business Administration 454E ............ 3
Approved Elective ................................. 2 Approved Elective .................................. 2

16 16

VIII. REALTY ADMINISTRATION

Junior Year

Architecture 101 ................................. 3 Civil Engineering 0101....................... 2
English 355 .............................................. 3 English 356 ........... ............... ............. 3
Business Administration 321E .............. 3 Business Administration 322................ 3
Business Administration 351E ............. 3 Business Administration 302E ............ 3
Business Administration 361 ................ 3 Business Administration 362................ 3
Approved Elective .................................. 2 Approved Elective ................................. 3

17 17

Senior Year

Business Administration 401 .............. 3 Business Administration 402 ................ 3
Business Administration 409 ................ 2 Business Administration 410................ 2
Speech 357 .............................................. 3 Business Administration 0431E............ 3
Landscape Design 0306..............-- .......... 3 Landscape Design 408....................... 3
Business Administration 465 .---.......-- 3 Business Administration 466................ 3
Approved Elective .................................. 2 Approved Elective ........-- ......... ........... 2

16 16








CURRICULA


THE CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH ENGINEERING
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.

First Semester Second Semester

Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Freshman Year

Drawing 101 ..........- ......--- .... 2 Drawing 102 ... .............. ..... ........... 1
E english 101 ..... ... ........................ .... 3 E english 102 ...................... ................... 3
M them atics 101 .. .. .................. 3 M them atics 102 .. .... ......................... 3
Physics 111, 113, 115 ................. ... 5 Physics 112, 114, 116 .... ........ ............ 5
Mechanical Engineering 101 .....-..... 2 Mechanic Arts 106 -.1.............. 1
Military Science 101 ....... ...... ...... 2 Civil Engineering 0101 ......................... 2
Physical Education 101 ... ................... 1 M military Science 102 .... ........................ 2
Physical Education 102.... .................. 1

18 18

Sophomore Year

Electrical Engineering 201 .................... 2 Electrical Engineering 202.................... 2
Electrical Engineering 203 ................... 1 Electrical Engineering 204................... 1
Mechanical Engineering 203 ................ 3 Mechanical Engineering 204 ................ 3
Mechanical Engineering 205.......... 1 Mechanical Engineering 206 ................ 1
Business Administration 201E .......... 3 Business Administration 202E ...........
Business Administration 211 ............... 3 Business Administration 212 .............. 3
M them atics 251 .................................... 3 M echanic A rts 204.................................. 1
Military Science 201 ............................ 2 Military Science 202 ..........................------ 2
Approved Elective .............................. 2

18 18

Junior Year

Chemistry 107 ........................................ 4 Chemistry 108 ......... ....................---- -- 4
Business Administration 321E .............. 3 Business Administration 322 ............... 3
Business Administration 341 ................ 2 Business Administration 302E ............ 3
E english 355 .............................................. 3 E english 356 ...............--.... ...................... 3
Business Administration 431E............ 3 Business Administration 372 ................ 2
Approved Elective -- ........................ 2 Approved Elective .................................. 2

17 17

Senior Year

Business Administration 351E ............. 3 Business Administration 402 ................ 3
Business Administration 401 ................ 3 Business Administration 410 ............... 2
Business Administration 409 ............. 2 Business Administration 454E ............ 3
Business Administration 331 ............... 3 Business Administration 422 ................ 3
Business Administration 411 ............... 3 Business Administration 432 ............... 3
Approved Elective ................................ 2 Approved Elective ................................. 2

16 16









302 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM


THE CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.

First Semester Second Semester

Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Freshman Year

Political Science 101.................. 3 Political Science ................................... 3
E english 101 ........................................... 3 English 102 .............................................. 3
Journalism 103 ......... ........ ..................... 3 Journalism 104 ....................................... 3
Mathematics 107 ...............-.................... 3 Business Administration 104 ................ 3
Business Administration 101E ............ 3 Business Administration 102E ............ 3
Military Science 101 .......................... 2 Military Science 102 ........................-- 2
Physical Education 101 .......................... 1 Physical Education 102 ....................... 1

18 18
Sophomore Year

Business Administration 211 .............. 3 Business Administration 212 ................ 3
Business Administration 201E ............ 3 Business Administration 202E ............ 3
Laboratory Science* ........................ 5 Laboratory Science* ............--- ..........---- 5
Psychology 201 ............. ....................... 3 Speech 212 ....................... ...................... 3
M military Science 201 ........................ 2 M military Science 202............ ................. 2

16 16
Junior Year

Business Administration 351E ........... 3 Business Administration 404E ............ 3
Business Administration 429E .......... 3 Business Administration 302E .-.......... 3
Business Administration 431E ......... 3 Business Administration 410................ 2
Business Administration 321E ..........-- 3 Business Administration 322......... 3
Business Administration 409 .......... 2 Approved Electives .......----...................----- 7
Approved Electives ................................ 4

18 18
*Chemistry 107-108, Physics 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116 or Biology 101-106.





CURRICULA


THE CURRICULUM IN JOURNALISM

The curriculum in journalism, extending over a period of four years, has
been arranged with the primary aim of preparing students to meet successfully
the exacting demands of newspaper work. Courses have been arranged in ac-
cordance with the major purpose of training students to become efficient news-
paper workers.
Beginning with an introductory course in the first year, the courses in jour-
nalism are distributed throughout the four years. Provision is made for twelve
semester hours of electives in approved courses. Provided adequate cause is
shown therefore, a student may elect six semester hours of approved electives
in any department of the University.
The curriculum maintains a proper balance between the professional courses
and the cultural courses necessary to provide a solid foundation for profes-
sional studies. The first two years are devoted largely to subjects of a cul-
tural nature in order to provide the student with a deep and broad intellectual
background. Considerable emphasis is given to courses in economics, political
science, business administration, psychology, history, English, sociology, and
Germanic and Romance languages.
In addition to the courses prescribed for the degree in journalism, the stu-
dent is given an opportunity to specialize in that field of pournalism in which
he is most interested. If the student desires to specialize, he must elect at the
beginning of his junior year, with the approval of the Head of the Department,
the professional group which best fits his needs, and adhere to that group.
While courses in shorthand and typewriting are not required in the jour-
nalism curriculum, a working knowledge of them is very essential in newspaper
work, and it is advised that students arrange their work accordingly.


303







304 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM


THE CURRICULUM IN JOURNALISM
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism.

First Semester Second Semester

Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Freshman Year

Journalism 103 ................-.................. .. 3 Journalism 104 ........................................ 3
E english 101 .............................................. 3 E english 102 ............................................ 3
Foreign Language ......................... ........ 3 Foreign Language .................................. 3
Mathematics 107 ................ ....... 3 Sociology 102 .......................................... 3
Economics 101* .............................. 3 Economics 102* .. ............................. 3
Military Science 101 ................................ 2 Military Science 102 ............................. 2
Physical Education 101........................ 1 Physical Education 102.......................... 1

18 18

Sophomore Year

Journalism 205 ........................................ 3 Journalism 206 ..................................... 3
Foreign Language** ............................. 3 Foreign Language** ............. ......... 3
Laboratory Science*** ......................... 5 Laboratory Science*** ......................... 5
Economics 201 ........................................ 3 Economics 202 ..................................... 3
Military Science 201 ................................ 2 Military Science 202............................. 2

16 16

I. NEWSPAPER WRITING

Junior Year

Journalism 301 ............................... 3 Journalism 302 ........................................ 3
Journalism 309 ....................................... 3 Journalism 318 ........................................ 3
Journalism 313 ........................................ 3 Journalism 314 ..... ............................... 3
Political Science 101.............--............. 3 Political Science 102 ................................ 3
English 203 .............................................. 3 English 204 ............................................ 3
Approved Electives ................................ 2 Approved Electives ................................ 2

17 17

Senior Year

Journalism 407 ........................................ 3 Journalism 404 ........................................ 3
Journalism 409 ...................................... 3 Journalism 412 ..................................... 3
Psychology 201 ........................................ 3 Political Science 206 ........................... 3
Business Administration 433 ................ 3 Business Administation 434 ............... 3
Approved Electives ................................ 4 Approved Electives ............................. 4

16 16

II. NEWSPAPER MANAGEMENT

Junior Year

Journalism 301 ...................................... 3 Journalism 302 ........................................ 3
Journalism 309 ................................... 3 Journalism 318 ........................................ 3
Business Administration 211 ................ 3 Business Administration 212 ............ 3
Political Science 101 ............................... 3 Political Science 102............................ 3
Business Administration 341 ................ 2 Psychology 0201 .............................. 3
Approved Electives ................................ 3 Approved Electives ................................ 2

17 17

Senior Year

Journalism 407 ................................... 3 Journalism 404 .................................. 3
Journalism 409 .................................... 3. Business Administration 322 ................ 3
Business Administration 321E ............ 3 Business Administratinon 0431E........ 3
Business Administration 433 .............. 3 Business Administration 434................ 3
Approved Electives .............................. 4 Approved Electives ................................ 4

16 16

*History 101-102 may be substituted for Economics 101-102.
**Continue the language begun in the freshman year.
***Chemistry 107-108; Physics 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116; or Biology 101-106.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Subjects with odd numbers are given in the first semester and subjects
with even numbers are given in the second semester unless the number be-
gins with 0 in which case the reverse is true.
The number of hours given is the number of hours which the class meets
per week.
The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours earned by
each student who receives a passing grade (A, B, C, or D) when the subject
is completed. Unless specifically stated credit may be obtained for one semes-
ter of a year course.
Subjects numbered 200 or above are not open to freshmen; subjects num-
bered 300 or above are not open to sophomores; subjects numbered 400 or
above are not open to juniors; subjects numbered 500 or above are for gradu-
ate students.
The abbreviations used are wherever possible the first and last letter of
the first word of the department name. Occasionally, a third central letter is
demanded to distinguish between departments where first and last letters are
identical.
ARCHITECTURE

Ae. 101.-Architectural Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. Weaver and staff.
A beginning course in architectural design and consisting of lectures and small
problems in plan and elevation employing only the wall, roof, beam and pier as
structural elements, with mouldings and simple belt courses as decorative elements.
The orders are not introduced either as structural or decorative elements, until the
second semester.
Plan and elevation are studied without reference to historic precedent. The
student is encouraged to use his own judgment, without reference to books in this
course; the development of initiative and the creative faculties being placed above
draftsmanship and conventionality of result.

BIOLOGY

Bly. 101.-Principles of Animal Biology. 5 hours. 5 credits. Rogers
and staff.
An introduction to the subject matter and principles of zoology.
A prerequisite for all other courses, except Bly. 105.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bly. 106.-Genetics and Evolution. 3 hours. 3 credits. Rogers.
An introduction to the study of variation, selection, and inheritance in animals.
The last weeks of the course deal with some data of human heredity.
Prerequisite: Bly. 101.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Note 1: The courses in Business Administration are given by the Department of
Economics and Business Administration, instructors in this department dividing
their time between economics and business administration. The courses in economics
are described under the bulletin of the College of Arts and Sciences.
Note 2: The courses in Business Administration marked "E" are the same
courses as those in Economics. For example, Business Administration 101E is the
same as Economics 101, or Business Administration 302E is the same as Economics
302.








306 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

Bs. 83 or 083.-Office Management. 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours.
2 credits. Scaglione.
Instruction in office organization; office function; duties of office manager;
the modern secretary in relation to office operation ; practical use of modern office
appliances ; Instruction in typing.
Laboratory fee: $15.
Bs. 84 or 084.-Office Management. 3 lectures. 2 credits. Scaglione.
Shorthand. Instruction in principles of practical stenography-filing-office
appliances and their use.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bs. 87 or 087.-Advanced Shorthand. 3 lectures. 1 credit. Scaglione.
Proficiency in the practical use of shorthand.
Prerequisite: Bs. 84 or a knowledge of elementary shorthand.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bs. 101E.-Economic History of England. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dyk-
man, Scaglione, Hurst, Chace.
Survey and interpretation, with brief reference to France and Germany. The
origin and development of economic institutions, the manor, industrial revolution,
commerce, transport, labor, agriculture, finance, effects on social and political devel-
opment and on development in the United States.
Bs. 102E.-Economic History of the United States. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Matherly, Dykman, Scaglione, Hurst, Chace.
Interpretative survey of industrial development-consideration of the develop-
ment of industry, agriculture, trade and transportation, labor, banking, finance,
population-the influence of economic development on political and social develop-
ment, and of foreign economic development on the United States.
Bs. 103.-Principles of Economic Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. At-
wood, Hicks, Putnam.
The adjustments to natural environment which man makes to secure a living;
a world-wide survey of the distribution and characteristics of land forms, surface
and ground waters, soils, minerals, climate, natural vegetation, and animal life
with particular reference to the bearing of natural environment on the economic
activities of man.
Bs. 104.-Principles of Economic Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. At-
wood, Hicks, Putnam.
A study of the economic resources of the world; sources and economic import-
ance of principal commodities; types of basic industries, including processes of pro-
duction, localizing factors and relative positions of various geographical territories.
Special attention will be devoted to the South in general and to Florida in particular.
Bs. 201E-202E or 0202E-0201E.-Principles of Economics. 3 hours. 6
credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until Bs. 202
is completed. Matherly, Eldridge, M. D. Anderson, Bigham, Hicks.
An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption. Attention is devoted
to the principles governing value and market price with a brief introduction to
money, banking and credit, industrial combinations, transportation and communica-
tion, labor problems, and economic reform.
Bs. 211-212 or 0212-0211.-Principles of Accounting. 2 hours and 2
laboratory hours. 6 credits. No credit toward a degree will be al-
lowed until Bs. 212 is completed. Gray, Ward.
Lectures, problems, and laboratory practice. An introductory study of the under-
lying principles of double entry records ; basic types of records and reports; account-
ing procedure and technique; the outstanding features of partnerships and corpora-
tions; the form and content of the balance sheet and the statement of profit and
loss.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bs. 302E or 0302E.-Elements of Statistics. 3 hours. 3 credits. An-
derson.
An introduction to statistics ; brief consideration of statistical theory; collection,
classification and presentation of economic data; construction of graphs and charts;
study of index numbers ; problems of statistical research. Each student is required
to complete one or more projects in statistical investigation.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 311-312.-Advanced Accounting. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until Bs. 312 is completed. Gray.
Lectures and problems. An advanced study in accounting theory and practice.
Special types of problems involving partnerships; corporations; agencies and
branches; consignments ; insolvent concerns; valuation of various types of assets;
analysis of financial statements; etc.
Prerequisite: Bs. 211 and 212.
Bs. 321E.-Financial Organization of Society. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dol-
beare.
An introduction to the field of finance. Consideration of the pecuniary organi-
zation of society, of the functions performed by financial institutions, and of the
relationship between finance and business administration.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 322.-Financial Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare, Dyk-
man.
The financial manager's task in an operating business enterprise; the financial
policies, methods, and practices in raising both fixed and working capital; internal
organization and procedure for financial control; the financial function in business
administration.
Prerequisite: Bs. 321E.
Bs. 331.-Principles of Salesmanship. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.
Actual practice in sales methods, including preparation for and obtaining the
interview; presenting the sales talk ; meeting and overcoming objections; detailed
study of the stages of the sale; attention, interest, desire and action; sales tactics;
sales personality. Principles covered apply to all kinds of selling specialties, styles,
etc.
Bs. 332.-Retail Store Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.
Retail store problems ; types of stores ; executive control; purchasing; accounts;
location; service ; organization; management of employees and price policies.
Bs. 341.-Production Management. 2 hours. 2 credits. Wilson.
The problems involved in the construction, equipment and administration of a
manufacturing enterprise. The unit of study is the factory. The subject matter
is treated under four heads: the underlying principles of production, the agencies
of production, the control of production operations, and the establishment of produc-
tion standards.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 351E or 0351E.-Transportation Principles. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Bigham.
The development of transportation ; the place of transportation in the economic
order; types of transportation agencies; railway transportation ; rate making; gov-
ernment regulation of railroads.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 361.-Property Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dykman.
Fire and Marine. Introduction to property insurance; careful analysis of fire
and marine insurance; the nature of fire and marine risks ; fire and marine com-
panies and their operations; premiums; local agents and their functions; selling
fire and marine insurance.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.







308 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

Bs. 362.-Property Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dykman.
Bond, Title and Casualty. Continuation of property insurance; the nature of
bonding, premiums charged and companies underwriting; the principles of title and
casualty insurance.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 372.-Personnel Management. 2 hours. 2 credits. Chace.
The problems of labor adjustment, and various methods of dealing with them;
an examination of the functions of a personnel department, methods of supply, selec-
tion, training, promotion, and discharge of employees, and various methods of main-
taining industrial good will, as works councils, profit-sharing, etc.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 381E.-Economic Geography of North America. 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Atwood.
A detailed study of the principal economic activities in each of the major geo-
graphic regions of North America involving an analysis of these activities from the
standpoint of their relation to the natural environmental complex.
Prerequisites: Bs. 103 and 104 and 201E and 202E.
Bs. 385E.-Commercial Geography of South America. 3 hours. 3
credits. Atwood.
A geographic survey of the continent of South America organized around the
growth of trade, exports and imports, trade by countries, and general business trends
-the elements of the environment favoring or discouraging production and move-
ment of commodities-and the economic conditions that influence commercial ad-
vance or decline-the major geographic regions of each country as to their import-
ance in supplying export products and in consuming import commodities.
Prerequisite: Bs. 103 and 104 and 201E and 202E.
Not given 1931-32.
Bs. 401.-Business Law.-3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.
Contracts and agency; the formation, operation, interpretation, and discharge of
binding agreements; creation of the relation of agency; types of agents; rights and
obligations of the agent, principal, and third party; termination of the relation-
ship of agency.
Bs. 402.-Advanced Business Law.-3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.
Conveyances and mortgages of real property; sales and mortgages of personal
property; the law of negotiable instruments ; partnership.
Bs. 404E.-Government Control of Business. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.
General survey of the field of government control; purposes of government con-
trol; control of accounts, prices and capitalization; government policy toward busi-
ness, current government regulation; services and agencies which modern govern-
ments undertake to provide for business enterprises.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 409-410.-Business Policy. 2 hours. 4 credits. No credit toward
a degree will be allowed until Bs. 410 is completed. Matherly,
Chace.
Correlation, coordination and tying together of the various specialized courses
in business administration. The point of view is that of the chief executive. The
forms of organization, external and internal relationships of the business, lines of
authority, duties and responsibilities of functional departments, methods of deter-
mining policies, and standards of operating efficiency. Various faculty members and
outside business executives assist the instructor in charge in the presentation of
specific business cases and problems. Students are required to apply business prin-
ciples to these cases and problems and make written reports thereon.
Bs. 411.-Cost Accounting. 3 hours. 3 credits. Gray.
Lectures and problems. A study of the methods of collection, compilation, and
interpretation of cost data for industrial enterprises; preparation of records and
reports; uses of cost data in business control.
Prerequisite: Bs. 211 and 212.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bs. 412.-Auditing. 3 hours. 3 credits. Gray.
Lectures and problems. A study of auditing theory and practice, principal kinds
of audits, and the solution of illustrative problems.
Prerequisite: Bs. 311 and 312.
Bs. 413.-Advanced Accounting. 3 hours. 3 credits. Gray.
Lectures and problems. A continuation of Business Administration 311-312. An
advanced study in accounting theory and practice.
Prerequisite: Bs. 311 and 312.
Bs. 414.-Income Tax Procedure. 3 hours. 3 credits. Gray.
Lectures and problems. A study of the Federal Income Tax law, and the related
accounting problems. Exercises in the preparation of tax returns for individuals and
corporations.
Prerequisite: Bs. 311 and 312.
Bs. 422.-Investments. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.
The various forms of investments with reference to their suitability for the dif-
ferent types of investors; the money market, its nature and the financial factors
which influence the price movements of securities ; elements of sound investment
and methods of computing net earnings, amortization, rights and convertibles. The
aim will be to train the student to act efficiently in a financial capacity either as
a borrower or lender, as investor or trustee, or as fiscal agent of a corporation.
Prerequisite: Bs. 321E.
Bs. 423.-Banking. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.
The theory, organization, and practice of commercial banking: the theory and
principles involved; the banking system of the United States compared with other
leading countries ; and a survey of banking practice as regards internal organization
and operation of an individual bank.
Prerequisite: Bs. 321E.
Bs. 426E.-Banking Systems. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.
An analytical history of the evolution of the banking system of the United
States, followed by a critical study of the banking systems of other countries, espe-
cially Canada, England, France and Germany. The aim of the course is to give the
student an understanding of the functions of banking in modern economic societies.
Prerequisite: Bs. 321.
Bs. 429E.-Principles of Government Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Bigham.
Principles governing expenditures of modern governments ; sources of revenue;
public credit; principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as
revealed in the fiscal systems of leading countries.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 430E.-State and Local Taxation. 3 hours. 3 credits. Bigham.
An intensive study and evaluation of the systems of taxation found in operation
in the more progressive American states ; the general property tax; taxation of cor-
porations ; individual incomes; inheritances; estates; various methods of distributing
state funds to the local taxing jurisdiction ; valuation and assessment for tax pur-
poses.
Prerequisite: Bs. 429E.
Bs. 431E or 0431E.-Principles of Marketing. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Wilson.
A survey of the marketing structure of industrial society; fundamental func-
tions performed in the marketing process and the various methods, agencies and
factors responsible for the development and execution of these functions ; marketing
problems of the manufacturer, wholesaler, and different types of retailers ; the mar-
keting functions in business management.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.







310 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM


Bs. 432.-Market Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.
The function of marketing in the operation of business enterprise from the point
of view of the sales manager and the purchasing agent. An introduction to market
analysis, market research, formulation of marketing policies, choice of channels of
distribution, methods of advertising and administrative control of marketing activi-
ties.
Prerequisite: Bs. 431E.
Bs. 433.-Advertising. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.
A study of the history and economics of advertising. Attention is also devoted
to the types of advertising and their adaptation to the various lines of business, to
the relative value of various advertising media, to the psychological principles under-
lying advertising, and to the administrative control of advertising expenditures.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 434.-Advertising Practice. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.
The technique and practice of advertising. Consideration of the mechanics of
advertising, types of advertising copy, theories of literary style as applied to copy
writing, advertising policies, and methods of testing the effectiveness of advertising
activities.
Prerequisite: Bs. 433.
Bs. 435E.-International Trade. 3 hours. 3 credits. Atwood.
World economics involving the principles and policies of international trade;
the international aspects of the economic policies and activities of modern nations.
Prerequisites: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 436.-Foreign Trade Technique. 3 hours. 3 credits. Atwood.
Foreign trade as a business profession ; the problems and practices involved in
exporting and importing.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 440E.-Trade Horizons in Caribbean America. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Atwood.
Economic and commercial geography of Mexico, Central America, the West In-
dies, and the countries of South America bordering the Caribbean Sea; the histori-
cal background of the republic and islands of the Caribbean; the major geographic
regions of the different countries ; the economic positions of the republic and islands;
the commercial importance of the various republics and islands as a market for
manufactured wares and as a source of foodstuffs and raw materials.
Prerequisite: Bs. 103 and 104.
Bs. 454E.-Principles of Public Utility Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Bigham.
The place of public service corporations in the economic organization of society;
valuation ; rate making; finance; organization and administration of public utilities.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 461.-Life Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dykman.
The functions of life insurance ; the science of life insurance and the computa-
tion of premiums ; types of life companies ; life insurance law; the selling of life
insurance.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 465.-Realty Principles. 3 hours. 3 credits. Chace.
Fundamentals of realty economics; the place of the realty business in the eco-
nomic order; economic aspects of realty developments; the realty business; the
functions of real estate concerns; the place of other business courses in preparing
for realty administration.
Prerequisites: Bs. 201E and 202E.
Bs. 466.-Realty Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. Chace.
The organization of realty enterprises; finance; accounting; advertising; sales-
manship; the management of real property; the handling of rentals; the administra-
tion of real estate developments ; relationship of other business courses to training
in realty management.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E and 202E.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bs. 468E.-Economic History in the Making. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Dykman.
The era of industrialism; a survey of contemporary economic organization in
the leading European countries; types of economic reform; capitalism, socialism,
communism, special consideration of current, social and economic problems in
England, Germany, Soviet Russia and the United States.
Bs. 469E.-Business Forecasting. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.
This course aims to survey the problem of the reduction of business risk by
forecasting general business conditions. A study will be made of the statistical
methods used by leading commercial agencies in forecasting the volume of trade,
the wholesale price level, the market rate of interest, and other generalized meas-
ures of business equilibrium.
Prequisite: Bs. 302E.
Bs. 407E.-Business Forecasting, continued. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Anderson.
A study of various techniques employed to forecast the production and price of
specific commodities. An intensive examination of the more important contributions
to this subject appearing in scientific journals during recent years will constitute
the nucleus of the course.
Prerequisite: Bs. 302E.
GRADUATE COURSES

Bs. 504E.-Problems in Trust Regulation. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.
A critical study of industrial combinations.
Bs. 505E.-The Development of Economic Thought 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Eldridge.
The development of economic thought-careful analysis of the theories of the
various schools of economic thought-study of the Physiocrats, Mercantilism, the
Classical Economist, the leading economists of the Austrian School, and a brief sur-
vey of the beginnings of Socialism-the development of theoretical background for
research and graduate work of an advanced nature.
Required of candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in Economics.
Bs. 506E.-The Development of Economic Thought, continued. 3
hours. 3 credits. Eldridge.
Analysis of the thought of the followers and defenders on the one hand and of
the abler critics on the other of the Classical Economists-appraisals of recent con-
tributions of the various schools in formulating a system of economic analysis.
Required of candidates for the degree of Master of Arts in Economics.
Bs. 509-510.-Seminar in Business Management. 2 hours. 4 credits.
Matherly and Chace.
Special studies in management theory and practice.
Bs. 511-512.-Seminar in Accounting. 3 hours. 6 credits. Gray.
Special problems and investigations will be assigned to individual students.
Bs. 522.-Problems in Investments. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.
Problems, investigations, and analyses in the field of investments.
Bs. 523.-Seminar in Banking. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.
Individual and group studies of special phases and problems of banking.
Bs. 526E.-Seminar in Banking Systems. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.
A special study of types of banking.
Bs. 529E-530E.-Problems in Government Finance. 3 hours. 6 cred-
its. Bigham.
Special studies in federal, state, and local taxation.
Bs. 531E.-Seminar in Marketing. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.
Investigation of special problems in marketing.







312 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

Bs. 532E.-Seminar in Market Management. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Wilson.
Special studies in market management. Students may select special types of
research in selling and in purchasing.
Bs. 533-534.-Special Studies in Advertising. 3 hours. 6 credits. Wil-
son.
Special problems are assigned individual students, opportunity is offered to in-
vestigate specific phases of modern advertising.
Bs. 535E.-Seminar in International Trade. 3 hours. 3 credits. At-
wood.
Advanced work dealing with the development of international trade.
Bs. 536.-Seminar in Foreign Trade Technique. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Atwood.
A study of the specific problems and practices involved in exporting and im-
porting.
Bs. 540.-Special Studies in Caribbean Trade. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Advanced course dealing with trade relationships between the Caribbean area
and the United States.
Bs. 554E.-Problems in Public Utility Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Bigham.
Advanced study of public utility problems.
Bs. 561.-Special Studies in Life Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dyk-
man.
Advanced course in the science of life underwriting, life insurance problems
and life insurance organization and management.
Bs. 565.-Problems in Realty Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Chace.
Problems selected to meet individual needs. Each student makes special study
of some phase of realty economics and presents results in form of thesis.
Bs. 566.-Problems in Realty Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. Chace.
Special studies dealing with the control and development of urban and rural
lands.
Bs. 568E.-Special Studies in Economic History. 3 credits. 3 hours.
Dykman.
Special problems in current economic history; changes in world economic or-
ganization; types of economic reform; current, social and economic problems of
the United States and leading European countries.
Bs. 569E-570E.-Seminar in Statistics and Business Forecasting. 3
hours. 6 credits. Anderson.
Critical study of special problems in statistics and business forecasting.
Bs. 585E.-Seminar in Economic Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. At-
wood.
Special studies in regional geography. Students may select any area in which
they are interested and intensely study this area. The results of such study will be
presented in formal reports.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 107-108.-Elementary Descriptive Chemistry. 3 class and 3 lab-
oratory hours. 8 credits. No credit will be allowed toward a de-
gree until Cy. 108 is completed. Heath, Goodwin.
A study of the elements and their compounds with a minimum of the underlying
principles of chemistry. The laboratory work will be of general nature and will in-
clude no systematic qualitative analysis. This course does not fulfill prerequisite
requirements for a second course in chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5 per semester.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


CIVIL ENGINEERING

Cl. 101 or 0101.-Surveying. 1 hour, and 3 hours' laboratory. 2 cred-
its. Sawyer.
Recitations on the use of chain, compass, transit and level; determination of
areas, and instrumental adjustments. Field work in chaining, leveling, compass and
transit surveys. Drawing-room work in calculations from field notes, and map-
drawing. Textbook: Breed & Hosmer, Vol. I, The Principles and Practices of Sur-
veying.
Prerequisite: Trigonometry.
Laboratory fee: $3.
Required of engineering students, first year.

DRAWING

Dg. 101.-Mechanical Drawing. 5 hours. 2 credits. Walker.
Geometrical problems, lettering and dimensioning.
Laboratory fee: $.25.
Dg. 102.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours. 1 credit. Walker.
Projections, machine parts and tracing.
Required of all engineering and engineering pre-business freshmen.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

El. 201.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Weil.
Lectures and recitations on fundamental principles of electrical engineering.
Textbook: Benton, Introductory Textbook of Electrical Engineering.
Prerequisite: Ps. 111 to 116. Required of second-year students in engineering
pre-business course.
El. 202.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Weil and staff.
The general course covering methods of producing electrical energy, its distri-
bution and application, direct and alternating current motors, and generators, stor-
age batteries, communication. Textbook: Benton, Introductory Text on Electrical
Engineering.
Prerequisite: 1 year of college physics, including electricity and magnetism.
Required of all engineering and engineering pre-business students.
El. 203.-Electrical Laboratory. 2 hours' laboratory. 1 credit. Weil.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 201.
Laboratory fee: $3.
Required of second-year engineering pre-business students.
El. 204.-Dynamo Laboratory. 2 hours' laboratory. 1 credit. Weil
and staff.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 202.
Corequisite: El. 202.
Laboratory fee: $3,
Required of all engineering and engineering pre-business students.

ENGLISH

Eh. 101-102.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 hours. 6 credits. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until Eh. 102 is completed.
Robertson and staff.
To train students in methods of clear and forceful expression. Instruction is
carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, and in theme writing.








314 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

Eh. 355-356.-Business Writing. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit toward
a degree will be allowed until Eh. 355 is completed. Mounts, Morris.
Rapid review of basic principles of English composition ; study of stylistic quali-
ties demanded in the best modern business writing; extensive reading, analysis, and
construction of the common types of business letters and reports. No credit will be
allowed until the student has attained a definite objective standard in English mini-
mum essentials.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101 and 102.

JOURNALISM

Jm. 103-104.-Introduction to Journalism. 3 hours. 6 credits. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until Jm. 104 is completed.
Lowry.
A general survey of the broad field of journalism, together with an introduc-
tion to the most vital problems with which the press, as a social institution, deals in
contemporary civilization. The course is non-technical, and is designed to broaden
and deepen the student's mind, and to stimulate him, by reading, and discussion,
and writing to sober and sound thinking about literature, government, business,
education, science, etc.
Jm. 205.-History of American Journalism. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Brown.
A study of the evolution of the newspaper with special emphasis on the rela-
tion of the press to the dominant economic, political, and social problems of the
various periods in American history.
Jm. 206.-Principles of Journalism. 3 hours. 3 credits. Brown.
Lectures, readings, and discussion on the principles of journalism. A considera-
tion of practical problems arising out of the newspaper treatment of crime, labor,
religion, politics, news suppression, propaganda, publicity, advertising, etc. A study
of the principles of news writing. Intensive practice in writing news stories.
Jm. 301-302.-News Writing. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit toward a
degree will be allowed until Jm. 302 is completed. Brown.
Lectures, and intensive practice in news gathering and writing under condi-
tions prevailing in a newspaper office. Students are taught by practice, followed
by class discussion and frequent conferences with the instructor.
Jm. 309.-Newspaper Editing. 3 hours. 3 credits. Brown.
Instruction in the scientific, as well as the mechanical phases of newspaper
editing. Intensive practice in editing, and writing headlines, using copy from the
various press associations in the class room. A detailed study of the mechanics of
editing and publishing.
Jm. 313-314.-The Writing of Special Feature Articles. 3 hours.
6 credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until Jm. 314
is completed. Jm. 313 must be completed before Jm. 314 is en-
tered. Lowry.
Analysis of appeals and technique in preparing special feature articles for
newspaper and magazine publication. Intensive practice in writing articles follows
study of principles in each semester. Emphasis placed on attempts to market
articles.
Jm. 316.-Agricultural News Writing. 3 hours. 3 credits. Lowry.
A course in journalistic writing as applied to agricultural subjects. Special at-
tention to writing technique. Requires no previous study or experience in journal-
ism on the part of the student. Instruction in collecting and writing agricultural
news and special articles for the press.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Jm. 318.-Newspaper Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. Brown.
A searching study of the problems of editorial management, advertising, circu-
lation, and business, which are encountered by editors and publishers of community
weekly and small-town daily newspapers. The study considers editorial, financial,
production, and mechanical management, cost-finding and accounting systems, adver-
tising campaigns, mechanical equipment needs and costs, business policy, etc.; the
organization and administration of the various departments of newspapers.
Jm. 404.-The Development of Public Opinion. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Brown.
A study of the elements and factors entering into the formation and direction
of public opinion; the influence of public opinion on sound government and think-
ing; and the relation of the press to the various institutions of society.
Jm. 407.-Editorial Writing. 3 hours. 3 credits. Brown.
The theory of editorial writing, and an analysis of editorial policies. Extensive
reading required. Intensive writing of editorials involving an interpretation of cur-
rent events and the problems which they create.
Jm. 409.-Law of the Press. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.
Instruction and practice in the methods of handling news of the courts; munici-
pal and state administration ; finance, bankruptcy, and politics. A study of libel,
contempt of court, and other phases of the law of the press.
Jm. 412.-Contemporary Thought. 3 hours. 3 credits. Lowry.
A critical survey of literature, the sciences, and social action, designed to cor-
relate the fragments of the student's educational experience with his knowledge of
the press. Its purpose is also to prepare students for critical writing in terms of
the highest literary standards, as well as sound thinking in terms of extensive knowl-
edge. An orientation course involving intensive reading in literature, science, his-
tory, biography, economics, sociology, and political science.

GRADUATE COURSES

Jm. 503-504.-Special Studies in Newspaper Production. 3 hours. 6
credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until Jm. 504
is completed. Lowry.
Jm. 505-506.-Special Studies in Public Opinion. 3 hours. 6 credits.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until Jm. 506 is com-
pleted. Emig.
LANDSCAPE DESIGN

Le. 306 or 0306.-Theory of Landscape Design. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Burritt.
The principles and practice of a fine art from a professional point of view-no
drafting or laboratory work-text required: Hubbard and Kimball, An Introduction
to the Study of Landscape Design.
Prerequisite: Le. 210 for landscape design students.
Required in junior or senior year.
Le. 408.-City Planning. 3 hours. 3 credits. Burritt.
Historical development and broader phases of civic design.
Prerequisite: Le. 306; or Le. 0306 (for Le. students).
Required in senior year.

MATHEMATICS

Ms. 101 or 0101.-College Algebra. 3 hours. 3 credits. Simpson and
staff.
An elementary treatment of the nature of mathematics and a somewhat de-
tailed study of a few of the simpler branches of algebra.








316 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

Ms. 102 or 0102.-Plane Analytic Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Simpson and staff.
A modern approach to the ancient science of geometry. Geometric concepts ex-
pressed in algebraic language with a study of rectilinear figures and the plane sec-
tions of a cone.
Prerequisites: Ms. 85 and Ms. 101.
Ms. 107 or 0107.-Elementary Commercial Algebra. 3 hours. 3 cred-
its. Simpson and staff.
Elementary algebraic notions fundamental to the study of mathematical prob-
lems arising in business and finance.
Open only to students in the College of Commerce and Journalism and to those
pursuing the Pre-Law Course.
Ms. 108 or 0108.-Business Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Simpson
and staff.
Modern mathematical treatment of the problems of banking and business. De-
rivation and application of numerous formulas of importance in the financial world.
Prerequisite: Ms. 101 or Ms. 107.
Ms. 251-252.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 3 hours. 6 credits.
Simpson and staff. No credit will be allowed toward a degree until
the entire 6 credits are earned.
The study of a process known as differentiation, which with its numerous and
widely different applications, constitutes one of the most important, practical and
theoretical fields of mathematics. Integration, the inverse operation of differentia-
tion, is used in the calculation of areas, volumes, moments of inertia, and many
other problems. Textbook: March and Wolff, Calculus.
Prerequisite: Ms. 151 and 152 or its equivalent.

MECHANIC ARTS
Mc. 106.-Woodworking. 3 hours' shop. 1 credit. Eshleman.
Joinery. Lectures and shop work.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of first-year engineering pre-business students.
Mc. 204.-Metalworking. 1 hour, and 2 hours' shop. 1 credit. Strong.
Study and practice of methods of forging, molding and machine shop work
with special reference to the influence of shop-requirements on design. Class room
and shop. A text book is used.
Shop fee: $3.
Required of second-year civil engineering students.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
MI. 101.-Descriptive Geometry. 2 hours. 2 credits. Walker and
Fineren.
Methods of representing points, lines, surfaces and projections.
Required of first-year engineering and pre-business students.
Ml. 203.-General Mechanical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. Yea-
ton.
The fundamental laws, theories, and problems of mechanism, mechanics, and
strength of materials.
Prerequisite: Ps. 203.
Required of second-year pre-business students.
Ml. 204.-General Mechanical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. Price.
The fundamental laws, theories and problems of thermodynamics, refrigeration,
and power engineering.
Prerequisite: Ps. 204.
Required of second-year pre-business students.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ml. 205.-General Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. 3 hours. 1
credit. Fineren.
Laboratory exercises supplementary to Ml. 203.
Corequisite: MI. 203.
Required of second-year pre-business students.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Ml. 206.-General Mechanical Engineering Laboratory. 3 hours. 1
credit. Fineren.
Laboratory exercises supplementary to MI. 204.
Corequisite: MI. 204.
Required of second-year pre-business students.
Laboratory fee: $5.

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS

My. 101-102.-First Year Infantry. 5 hours. 4 credits. Van Fleet
and staff.
Freshman year, compulsory. Lectures, recitations, drills, calisthenics, and cere-
monies.
My. 201-202.-Second Year Infantry. 5 hours. 4 credits. Van Fleet
and staff.
Sophomore year, compulsory. Lectures, recitations, drills, calisthenics, and cere-
monies.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION

P1. 101-102.-Gymnastics. 2 hours. 1 credit. Dr. L. G. Haskell and
staff.
Instruction given in free exercises for general development and muscular co-
ordination. Elementary work on apparatus, emphasizing form, approach, and execu-
tion.
Instruction and play in tennis, football, basketball, playground ball, track and
baseball.
PHYSICS

Ps. 111.-Elementary Theory of Mechanics and Heat. 3 hours. 3
credits.
A college course designed to meet the needs of the general student. Required
of agriculture, architecture, Bachelor of Science, and pre-medical students.
Ps. 112.-Elementary Theory of Sound, Light, and Electricity. 3
hours. 3 credits.
A college course designed to meet the needs of the general student. Required of
architecture, Bachelor of Science, and pre-medical students.
Ps. 113-114.-Lecture Demonstration Course. 1 hour. 2 credits. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 2 credits
are earned.
Demonstration lectures designed to supplement Ps. 111 and Ps. 112 and should
be taken by all students electing those courses.
Required of architecture, Bachelor of Science, and pre-medical students.
Ps. 115-116.-Elementary Laboratory Physics. 3 hours' laboratory.
2 credits.
A series of laboratory experiments in general physics designed to supplement
Ps. 111 and Ps. 112 and should be taken by all students electing these courses.
Laboratory fee: $2.25 each semester.
Required of Bachelor of Science students. Ps. 115 is required of agriculture
students.






318 BULLETIN OF COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Pcl. 101.-American Government and Politics. 3 hours. 3 credits. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Pcl. 102 is
earned. Leake and staff.
A study of the structure and functions of our American national, state, local,
and municipal governments.
Pcl. 102.-State and Municipal Government. 3 hours. 3 credits. Leake
and staff.
An outline of the growth of American municipalities and a study of the organs
and functional mechanism of modern cities of the United States and Europe. Empha-
sis is laid upon the newer tendencies in municipal government, including the com-
mission form and city manager plan.

PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 201 or 0201.-General Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hinckley,
Williams.
Facts and theories current in general psychological discussion, the sensations,
the sense organs, the functions of the brain, the higher mental processes-attention,
perception, memory, emotion, volition, the self; and like topics.
Psy. 206 or 0206.-Business Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hinckley.
The main facts of theoretical, experimental, and social psychology will be pre-
sented and applied to the fields of business problems; especially, advertising, selling,
employment, and efficiency in work.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.

SPEECH

Sch. 212.-Oratory of the Court Room. 3 hours. 3 credits. Constans.
Reading and analysis of court room speeches by famous lawyers, such as Web-
ster, Choate, Ingersoll, Borah, Littleton, and Darrow; Hicks, Famous American Jury
Speeches.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101 and 102.
Sch. 357 or 0357.-Business Speaking. 2 hours and 1 two-hour lab-
oratory period. 3 credits. Constans.
Reading of written reports -conduction of business conferences- analysis of
speech composition-delivery of original informational and argumentative talks.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101 and 102.
Required of seniors in the course in business administration proper.
This course can be taken only by juniors or seniors in the College of Commerce
and Journalism.







THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR


THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1931-32
First Semester
1931
September 14, 15, Monday, Tuesday ...... Entrance examinations.
September 16, Wednesday 11:00 a.m...--1931-32 session begins.
September 16-22, Wednesday-Tuesday-Freshman Week.
September 21, 22, Monday, Tuesday ... Registration of upperclassmen.
September 23, Wednesday.....................Classes for 1931-32 session begins; late
registration fee $5.
September 30, Wednesday.....................Last day for changing course without
paying the $2 fee.
October 7, Wednesday ........................ Last day for registration for the first
semester 1931-32.
November 11, Wednesday ........................Armistice Day; special exercises but
classes are not suspended.
November 26, Thursday ...........................Thanksgiving Day, a holiday.
December 19, Saturday 12:00 noon ........Christmas recess begins.
1932
January 4, Monday 8:00 a.m ..................Christmas recess ends.
January 25, Monday 8:00 a.m................ Final examinations for the first semes-
ter begin.
January 31, Sunday 8:00 p.m..-..-......--......-Baccalaureate Sermon.
February 3, Wednesday..........................- Inter-semester Day, a holiday.
Second Semester
February 4, 5, Thursday, Friday ...........Registration for second semester; all
students whose names begin with "A"
through "M" register on Thursday; all
others on Friday.
February 6, Saturday 8:00 a.m.............. Classes f or second semester begin;
change of course fee, $2; late registra-
tion fee, $5.
February 11, Thursday.......................... Last day for registration for second
semester.
March 23, Wednesday 5:00 p.m.............Spring recess begins.
March 28, Monday 8:00 a.m...................Spring recess ends.
May 26, Thursday 8:00 a.m.....................Final examinations begin.
June 4-6, Saturday to Monday..............Commencement Exercises.
Entrance Examinations
Entrance examinations for admission to the various colleges of the Univer-
sity will be conducted for students whose credits do not meet the requirements.
Candidates wishing to take any of these examinations should notify the
Registrar in writing, not later than September 1, January 15, June 1, or
June 20.
For further information concerning these examinations see under "Admis-
sion by Examination", Bulletin of General Information, page 133.




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