• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Table of Contents
 Map of the campus
 Summer session calendar
 Officers of administration
 Faculty
 Historical note
 Admissions
 General information
 Societies and clubs
 Demonstration school
 Expenses
 Loan funds
 Rooming facilities
 Certificates and extension...
 General regulations
 College of education
 Graduate school, College of arts...
 College of agriculture, College...
 College of commerce and journalism,...
 Departments of instruction














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00429
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: April 1, 1931
Copyright Date: 1932
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00429
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 215
        Page 216
    Table of Contents
        Page 217
    Map of the campus
        Page 218
    Summer session calendar
        Page 219
    Officers of administration
        Page 220
    Faculty
        Page 221
        Page 222
    Historical note
        Page 223
    Admissions
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
    General information
        Page 228
        Page 229
    Societies and clubs
        Page 230
    Demonstration school
        Page 231
        Page 232
    Expenses
        Page 233
        Page 234
    Loan funds
        Page 235
    Rooming facilities
        Page 236
    Certificates and extension of certificates
        Page 237
    General regulations
        Page 238
        Page 239
    College of education
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
    Graduate school, College of arts and sciences
        Page 244
    College of agriculture, College of engineering, and College of law
        Page 245
    College of commerce and journalism, School of architecture and allied arts
        Page 246
    Departments of instruction
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
Full Text





The University Record
of the

University of Florida


'Bulletin of
The University Summer Session
1931


Vol. XXVI, Series 1


No. 6


April 1, 1931


Published Semi-monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.






















The University Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin of General
Information, the annual announcements of the individual colleges of the University,
announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The
applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired.
Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of research
work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in several series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions
are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges
should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Com-
mittee on Publications. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not
included in institutional exchanges, should be addressed to the University Bookstore,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


[216]






TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE

Summer Session Calendar .......................................... 219
Officers of Administration ............. .......................... 220
Faculty ................. ............................................ 221
Historical Note ........................ .......................... 223
Admissions .......................... ............................ 224
General Information ............ .................................. 228
Societies and Clubs .................... ........................... 230
Demonstration School ................................................ 231
Employment Bureau .................... ........................... 231
Expenses .............. ............................ ............. 233
Loan Funds ........................... ........................... 235
Rooming Facilities .................. ............................. 236
Certificates and Extension of Certificates............................... 237
General Regulations ..................... ......................... 238
College of Education .................................................. 240
C urricula ......................................................... 241
G groups ........................................................... 242
Curriculum in Health and Physical Education ........................ 243
Graduate School ...................... ............................ 244
College of Arts and Sciences .......................................... 244
College of Agriculture .............................................. 245
College of Law ......................... ......................... 245
College of Engineering .... ................ ......................... 245
College of Commerce and Journalism.................................. 246
School of Architecture and Allied Arts......... ....................... 246
Departments of Instruction ............................................. 247
A gronom y ........................................................ 247
Animal Husbandry ................................................. 247
Architecture and Allied Arts......................... ............. 247
B otany ........................................................... 248
Business Administration ............... ............................. 248
Chem istry ........................................................ 249
E conom ics ........................................................ 250
E education ........................................................ 250
E english .......................................................... 254
French ........................................................... 255
General Natural Science .......................................... 256
H andw writing ...................................................... 256
H history ........................................................... 256
L atin ............................................................. 257
L aw .............................................................. 257
Library Science ................................................. 257
M them atics ...................................................... 258
M music ............................................................ 259
Nursing Education ................................................. 260
Philosophy ....................................................... 260
Health and Physical Education ...................................... 260
P physics ........................................................... 261
Political Science .................................................. 262
Psychology ....................................................... 262
Public School Art ................................................. 263
Sociology ......................................................... 263
Spanish ........................................................... 264
Speech ........................................................... 264

[217]































































[218]






SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR


SUMMER SI


June 15, Monday .............

June 15, Monday...................

June 15, Monday...................

June 16, Tuesday .................

June 17, Wednesday ...........


SSION CALENDAR
..........Dormitories open. (Students are request-


ed not to arrive on Sunday.)
..........................First Faculty Meeting, 8:00 a.m.
Basketball Auditorium.
..................... Registration of students in Basketball
Auditorium. 9:00-12:00; 1:30-5:00.
.......................... Registration continued, 8:00-12:00;
1:30-5:00.
..........................Classes begin, 8:00 a.m.


June 22, Monday, 12:00 noon ....................... Last day registration in the summer ses-
sion is allowed.
June 27, Saturday, 12:00 noon.....................Last day for filing with Registrar applica-


July 4, Saturday .................-- .....................
July 11, Saturday .........................................


July 13, Monday ..................-..- .................


tion for a degree at the end of the sum-
mer session.
.Holiday.
-Last day for those graduating at the end
of the summer session to submit theses
to Dean.
.Last day for those beginning graduate
work to file with Dean application
(form two) to be considered candi-
dates for advanced degrees.


July 18, Saturday .......................................... Classes suspended.
August 1, Saturday ........................................ Classes suspended.
August 2, Sunday, 8:00 p. m..........................Baccalaureate Sermon in the Auditorium.
August 5, Wednesday ................................... Last day for application for extension of
certificate.
August 6, Thursday, 8:00 p.m........................Graduation exercises in the Auditorium.
August 7, Friday, 12:00 noon.........................Summer School ends. Lunch, last meal
served in the University Cafeteria.
August 7, Friday, 7:00 p.m.............................Final Faculty Meeting for purpose of
recommending students for extension
of certificates.
IMPORTANT DIRECTIONS
TO STUDENTS
After arriving at the University:
1. For room reservations in the dormitories, see Mrs. Margaret Peeler, south end
of Buckman Hall, Room No. 43.
2. For outside boarding accommodations, see Dean of Women, Room 106, Pea-
body Hall, or New Dormitory, Room 144.
3. For arrangements for boarding in the University Cafeteria, see Cashier, first
floor of Language Hall.
4. For information concerning social activities among women students, or any
other matter of interest to women, see Dean of Women, Peabody Hall, Room
106, or New Dormitory, Room 144.
TO FACULTY
All members of the Faculty will meet in the Basketball Auditorium at 8:00 a.m.,
Monday, June 15, to assist in the registration of students.


---------.-..-







220 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION
JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., president of the University
JAMES MARION FARR, M.A, Ph.D., Vice-President of the University
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Director of the Summer Session.
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar and Director of Admissions
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture
KLINE H. GRAHAM, Business Manager
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Dean of the College of Commerce and Journalism
CORA MILTIMORE, B.S., Librarian
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, M.A.E., Acting Dean of the College of Education
G. C. TILLMAN, M.D., Resident Physician
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E., Dean of Students
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Dean of the College of Law
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences


ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION

MADGE BAKER, Secretary to the Business Manager
LEWIS F. BLALOCK, Recorder, Office of the Registrar
GLENN B. CALMES, Absence Clerk, Office of the Registrar
JOHN M. CROWELL, B.A.E., Director Employment Bureau
ALICE CUMMINS, B.A., B.S., Assistant in Catalog and Reference Department of the
University Library
ETHEL E. DONAHEY, B.A., B.S., Assistant in Periodicals and Binding Department of
the University Library
WALLACE 0. DONNELLY, Filing Clerk, Office of the Registrar
HENRIE MAY EDDY, B.A., Head of Reference Department of the University Library
FLORIDE E. GANTT, Secretary, Office of the Registrar
J. B. GOODSON, Cashier
PENELOPE GRIFFIN, B.A., Secretary, Office of the Registrar
ROSA GRIMES, R.N., Nurse
HELOISE B. HANDLEY (Mrs.), Secretary to Dean of Students
GARLAND HIATT, B.A., Auditor
NAOMI V. KISLINc, Secretary to the College of Arts and Sciences
BEATRICE C. McGARRAH, B.S., Dietitian
JOHN V. McQuITTY, B.A., Assistant Registrar
CLAUDE L. MURPHREE, B.A., University Organist
MARY E. PARROTT, Secretary to the President
MARGARET PEELER, Housekeeper
IRENE ERSKINE PERRY, B.S., Secretary to the College of Education
ILA ROUNTREE PRIDGEN (Mrs.), Secretary to the College of Law
MARY BEVERLY RUFFIN, B.A., B.S., Head of Catalog Department of the University
Library.
ELEANOR GWYNNETH SHAW, Secretary to the College of Agriculture
ELIZABETH RUTH THORNE, B.A., Assistant in Catalog Department of the University
Library
VANNITA WESELY, B.A., Head of Circulation Department of the Uniervsity Library







FACULTY


NANNIE BELLE WHITAKER, B.A., Secretary to the College of Commerce and Journal-
ism
LILLIAN WHITLEY, Secretary to the Graduate School

FACULTY
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Latin
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D., Business Administration
ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, M.A., Ph.D., French
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A., Sociology
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, M.S., D.Sc., Chemistry
LEE W. BERNER, Assistant in Physics
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, M.S., Ph.D., Physics
Lucius MOODY BRISTOL, M.A., Ph.D., Sociology
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, M.S., Ph.D., Agronomy
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., English
WILLIAM GRAVES CARLETON, B.A., Sociology
OMER CARMICHAEL, M.A., Education
RANDOLPH L. CARTER, A. B., Education
ROBERT SPRATT COCKRELL, M.A., LL.B., Law
MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Botany and Bacteriology
HENRY PHILIP CONSTANS, M.A., Speech
ALFRED CRAGO, M.A., Ph.D., Education
CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, AM.A., Ph.D., Spanish
JOHN WILLIAM DEBRUYN, M.A., Glee Club
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D., Philosophy
JAMES MARION FARR, Ph.D., English
JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, M.A., Ph.D., Education
ANNIE GABRIEL, B.A., Nursing Education
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, M.A., Ph.D., Agricultural Education
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, M.A., Ph.D., History
PHYLLIS JARRELL GRIMM, B.A., Fellow in French
WILLIAM BYRON HATHAWAY, M.A., English and Spanish
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., General Natural Science
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Psychology
VESTUS T. JACKSON, M.S., Ph.D., General Natural Science
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D., Mathematics
ANGUS MACKENZIE LAIRD, M.A., History and Political Science
ELLSWORTH GAGE LANCASTER, M.A., B.D., Ph.D., LL.D., Education
JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D., History
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Chemistry
GARDNER LA MOTTE LEWIS, B.A.E., French
WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, M.A., Education
LORNA LUDWICK, B.S.P.E., Health and Physical Education
GERTRUDE McARTHUR, M.A.E., Health Education
ETHEL A. --CRICKETT, B.A., B.S., Library Science
SAM W. MCINNIS, M.A., Mathematics
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Business Administration
ADAM ALBERT MERBLER, Fellow in Education










222 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

WILLIE A. METCALFE, Supervising Teacher
JEAN 0. MITCHELL; Public School Art
ALTON CHESTER MORRIS, M.A., English
CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, M.A., English
WILLIAM EDGAR MOORE, M.A., English
MORRIS LEE MOORE, Assistant in General Natural Science
CLAUDE L. MURPHREE, B.A., Organist
NOLIA NEIGHBORS, Handwriting
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, M.A., Ph.D., Education
NORA NORTON, Education
ANCIL N. PAYNE, Ph.D., History
RUTH PEELER, Supervising Teacher
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D., Mathematics
MARGUERITE STRATFORD PORTER, B.S., Mus.B., Public School Music
JOSEPH EDWIN PRICE, B.A.E., English
TRILLA REED, A.B., Education
JAMES S. RICKARDS, Fellow in Education
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., English
ELLIS BENTON SALT, M.A., Health and Physical Education
PETER C. SCAGLIONE, B.S.B.A., Business Administration
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, M.A.E., Education
DEAN SLAGLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
C. E. SPARKS, Assistant in General Natural Science
HERMAN E. SPIVEY, M.A., English
0. C. R. STAGEBERG, B.S., Architecture and Allied Arts
AGNES G. STORIE, M.A., Director Demonstration School
CLARENCE JOHN TESELLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
SILAS MELVIN THRONSEN, B.A., Fellow in Chemistry
BESS W. TIMIMERMAN, B.A., Library Science
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E., Education
LESLIE BENNETT TRIBOLET, Ph.D., Political Science
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Law
RUTH NEWELL UPSON, Supervising Teacher
FRED CURTIS WARD, B.S., Accounting
JAMES WATKINS, Assistant in Biology
RUTH WHITE, B.A., Assistant in Spanish
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Psychology
CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, M.A., Animal Husbandry
D. P. WILSON, M.A., Education
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Education
J. HOOPER WISE, M.A.E., Education
ALBERTA MURPHREE WORTH, Voice






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SUMMER SCHOOL


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SUMMER SCHOOL
TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL SUMMER SESSION

HISTORICAL NOTE
The University of Florida Summer Session is now a part of our educational
program so well established as to be taken for granted. It may not be wise, how-
ever, to forget the early stages, the pioneer work from which came our present favored
condition.
In 1893 a uniform law for the certification of teachers by examination was
enacted. To meet this emergency teachers and aspirants for teaching positions were
forced to prepare themselves for these examinations. At first principals in the larger
centers held private schools with courses to the purpose. Necessarily the fees were
low, the terms short, the method intensive cramming, the venture precarious.
During the next twenty years, the number of public schools increased rapidly,
courses were enlarged, standards raised. To meet this situation the State began to
employ the more able teachers to conduct summer schools at places most suitable,
the terms being from four to six weeks, depending upon attendance. Standards
continued to be raised, however, and needs increased so rapidly that the State finally
concentrated all of its efforts in the Florida State College for Women at Tallahassee
and the University of Florida at Gainesville.
As soon as the training of teachers was placed upon a more dignified and depend-
able basis a steady growth of the University Summer Session began. The enrollment
in the first Summer Session in 1913 was 140. Most of the students were taking review
courses for the teachers' examinations. The enrollment passed the 1,600 mark in
1929 and when upon investigation it was observed that most of the students were
pursuing courses leading to college degrees the question arose as to whether the time
had not arrived to discontinue the review courses entirely. After due consideration
this was done and in the session of 1930 the subjects of study were all of college rank.
This policy will be continued in 1931.


223







224 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

LAWS GOVERNING ADMISSION

GENERAL STATEMENT
For the reason just cited admission to the Summer Session of 1931 will be
granted to only two classes of students:
(1) Students who can satisfy the requirements for admission (see below).
(2) Adult special students who are twenty-one years of age and who show
promise of profiting by the courses which they may pursue.

NOTICE TO NON-RESIDENT STUDENTS
The University of Florida, through its Committee on Admissions, reserves the
right to deny admission to students who are not residents of the State of Florida.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Admission to the schools and colleges of the University which accept students
directly from the high school is either by certificate, or examination, or both. The
methods are described below.

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE
The candidate must present a certificate of graduation from an accredited
preparatory school. Certificates representing examinations given by the College
Entrance Board or the New York Regents are likewise accepted. Applicants are
admitted on these certificates provided they offer nine required units: 3 in English,
1 in algebra, 1 in plane geometry, 1 in history, 1 in science, 2 as specified by the
individual colleges; and offer at least 15 acceptable units.
Candidates offering only 15 units will be conditioned 1 unit in entrance require-
ments, and must take six semester hours in addition to the work required for any
degree, unless this condition is removed within one year.
No condition will be permitted in any of the nine required units.

ADMISSION BY COLLEGE APTITUDE TEST
Worthy adult students who expect to receive a degree (or diploma) from the
University and who, for any good reason, are unable to offer the 16 necessary high
school entrance units may make a written application to the Committee on Admissions
to take a College Aptitude Test. The application must be submitted to the Registrar
and Director of Admissions before June 15, 1931. The application must set forth
the applicant's reasons for wishing to take the test; a complete statement of all high
school units (statements of work done in high school must be sent from the principal
directly to the Registrar) ; the approximate amount of college work already completed
with the name of the college where it was taken; and the applicant's plans for
graduation from college. The Registrar will notify the applicant whether the applica-
tion is accepted or rejected.
The aptitude test will be given just once during the 1931 Summer Session,
namely, on Monday, June 22, at 2:00 P. M., in Room 109, Language Hall. Success on
this test does not give any specific high school units but the person who passes it is
deemed worthy of receiving a degree or diploma from the University of Florida with-
out further concern about high school units.







LAW'S GOVERNING ADMISSION


ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION
Non-graduates of accredited or non-accredited high schools, presenting at least
15 acceptable units, including the nine required units as listed above, are admitted
provided they successfully pass the entrance examinations in the subjects presented
for admission.
Graduates of non-accredited high schools presenting the specific units are
admitted provided they successfully pass entrance examinations in the following
subjects:
English-Rhetoric and composition; American and English lit-
erature
Mathematics-First year algebra, plane geometry
History-one unit
Science-one unit
Entrance examinations will be given on Monday, June 15, 1931, at 9:00 A. M.,
in Room 109, Language Hall. Persons who wish to take these examinations must
submit written application to the Registrar prior to June 1, 1931. Entrance examina-
tions will be given at no other date during the 1931 Summer Session.

REGISTRATION

All Florida high schools are furnished with preparatory record blanks. Students
who are not residents of the State of Florida should write to the Registrar requesting
a Preparatory Record Blank. This will be sent promptly, and should be presented
to the principal of the high school last attended, with instructions that it be mailed
directly to
The Registrar
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
Upon receipt of the credentials at the University, the candidate will be sent an
application blank. When this is returned, the applicant will be sent an admission
certificate containing directions for registration.
A preparatory record will not be accepted unless it comes directly from the
principal to the Registrar.
A student will not be allowed to register until his credits have been received
and accepted.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE VARIOUS COURSES
ARTS AND SCIENCES-AB AND PRE- COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM
LAW COURSES
English .......................... 3 English .......................... 3
Algebra .......................... 1 Algebra .......................... 1
Plane Geometry ................... 1 Plane Geometry ................... 1
H history .......................... 1 H history .......................... 1
Science .......................... 1 Science .......................... 1
Latin* .......................... 2 One Foreign Language ............. 2
Approved electives ................ 7 Approved electives ................ 7


Total ........................... 16


T otal ........................... 16







226 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, COLLEGE OF
ARTS AND SCIENCES:-BS AND PRE-MEDICAL COURSES:
English .............................................................. 3
Algebra .............. .. ...................................... 1
Plane Geometry ....................................................... 1
History ............................... ... ........................ 1
Science ................. .......................................... 1
Foreign Languaget ................................................. 2
Approved electives ...................... ............................ 7

Total ............. .. ...................................... 16

*Two units in any foreign language may be substituted for Latin, but then Latin
must be taken in the first two years of college.
tApplicants not offering foreign language may offer, in lieu thereof, 2 additional
units in History, or 2 additional units in Science, or 1 additional unit in Science and
1 additional unit in History.
Note: One unit in a foreign language is never accepted to fulfill entrance
requirements.
Not over four units will be accepted to fulfill entrance requirements in:
a. English
b. History and social science
c. Mathematics
d. Natural science
e. Commercial and vocational subjects
Moreover, only one unit will be accepted in biology, zoology and botany
combined.
TEACHER'S CERTIFICATES
Teacher's certificates obtained by special examinations given by the State De-
partment of Education entitle the holder to entrance credit by examination.

THE FIRST GRADE CERTIFICATE
The first grade certificate entitles the holder to entrance credit by examination
as follows: rhetoric and composition, two units; ancient history, one unit; medieval
and modern history, one unit; psychology, one unit; biology, one unit (only if it
appears on certificate) ; civics, one-half unit; algebra, two units; agriculture, one-
half unit; total, nine units.

THE SECOND GRADE CERTIFICATE
The second grade certificate entitles the holder to entrance credit by examina-
tion as follows: composition, one unit; civics, one-half unit; agriculture, one-half
unit; total, two units.
THE PRIMARY CERTIFICATE
The primary certificate entitles the holder to entrance credit by examination as
follows: United States history, one-half unit; psychology, one unit; manual arts,
one unit; nature-study, one unit; drawing, one unit; composition, one unit; public
school music, one-half unit; total, six units.
SPECIAL CERTIFICATES
Special certificates will be considered on their merits.










LAWS GOVERNING ADMISSION


COLLEGE OF LAW
Applicants for admission to the College of Law as candidates for degrees must
be eighteen years of age and must present, in addition to sixteen high school units,
the completion of one-half of the work acceptable for a bachelor's degree on the
basis of a four-year period of study at this University. Evidence of t-his work must
be presented to the Registrar of the University on or before the date on which the
candidate wishes to register.
The College reserves the right to reject students whose admission credits do
not average C.
ADULT SPECIAL STUDENTS
No student will be admitted to any school or college of the University who has
not fully met the entrance requirements by one of the above methods, except appli-
cants 21 years of age or more, who may desire to pursue a special and limited course
of study. Such candidates for admission must secure the approval of the college
concerned for the work they wish to pursue.

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING
This University accepts credits from all reputable colleges and universities to-
ward advanced standing. Such credits are accepted as far as they represent courses
equivalent to those offered in this institution, if the marks are sufficiently high to
meet the quality credit requirement. The certified record of courses taken in other
institutions must be upon the official blank of the institution granting the certificate
and should show:
a. The subject studied, the catalog course number, and the descriptive title.
b. The number of weeks, and hours a week, spent upon each subject.
c. The value of the course expressed in credits.
d. The exact grades should be stated, accompanied by an explanation of the
marking system employed.
e. A list of the preparatory units presented upon entrance.
f. A letter or statement of honorable dismissal.
Applications for advanced standing should be made, if possible, at least one
month before the time when the student expects to enter the University.
Upon the University's receipt of a transcript of credit, the candidate will be
mailed an application for admission. When this is returned properly filled out, the
Registrar will present the applicant with a certificate of admission, giving the
applicant's classification and directions for registration.
All statements concerning advanced standing and classification are provisional,
subject to the satisfactory completion of one year's work at the University by the
applicant.
Students who, because of failure in studies, are not allowed to return to the
institution they last attended will ordinarily be denied admission to the University
of Florida.







228 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GENERAL INFORMATION
THE LIBRARY
The University Library contains about 65,000 volumes. Many new titles have
been added during the past year. The pedagogical library will be of especial interest
to the Summer Session students for it contains many books on educational theory,
general and special methods, history of education, psychology and philosophy. All
books are classified according to the Dewey Decimal Classification. The catalog is
a dictionary catalog of authors, subjects and titles in one alphabetical arrangement.
The Library receives 525 magazines of a general and scientific nature, besides
numerous newspapers from the cities of the state and nation. The periodical room,
where these publications are found, seats 22. The files of bound periodicals,
particularly valuable for use in reference work, are found in the stack room.
The Library now occupies the first part of the first unit of the Library building.
The main reading room is on the second floor and has a seating capacity of 336. The
lighting is semi-indirect with approximately ten foot candle on the reading tables.
The room is completely equipped with electric fans to make it comfortable in warm
weather.
An addition is being made to the Library building, which will greatly increase
facilities. Steel stacks, a book conveyor, elevator, and additional office space, are a
few of the features of this addition. The Gothic entrance to the Library is to be
completed also.
Attention is called to the courses in Library Science for the benefit of those
teachers who wish to equip themselves better for managing the libraries of their
own schools.
The Library will be open week days from 7:50 A. M. to 10:00 P. M., except
that on Saturday it will close for the day at 5:00 P, M.
LECTURES AND ENTERTAINMENTS
The Auditorium with a seating capacity of 1800, the magnificent pipe organ and
the Steinway concert grand piano make the facilities for lectures and musical enter-
tainments unsurpassed. A splendid program will be arranged. Stress will be
placed upon entertainments and performances by students, thus developing the
latent capacities already on the campus. Students in the Department of Speech
will from time to time produce plays and entertainments of a high order, which
will be acted and directed by the students themselves. The Department of Music,
featuring the pupils in Voice, the Glee Club and others of ability, will put on a
production of some popular light opera. It is hoped that a large number of good
voices, both male and female, will try out for this production.
RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The moral and religious atmosphere at the Summer Session is wholesome. The
leading religious denominations have attractive places of worship and students are
welcomed at every service. Transportation to and from church is provided for those
students who will attend. Once each week a devotional service is held in the
University Auditorium in connection with the Student Assembly.
THE Y. M.-W. C. A.
The Y. M. C. A. Hall will be operated this summer as a social center for the
campus. This is an excellent place to spend a part of one's recreation periods with
friends and visitors. A young lady assistant to the Dean of Women will be in charge







GENERAL INFORMATION


and will take pleasure in doing everything possible to make your stay pleasant so
far as this department is concerned. A piano, reading matter, committee rooms,
kitchenette, ice water, various games and other things to enable students to pass
their leisure hours comfortably are in this building.

THE HONOR SYSTEM
All class work at the University is on the honor basis. No espionage is prac-
ticed by teachers, and students will unanimously condemn and punish cheating.

COOPERATIVE GOVERNMENT
Government of student life on the campus is cooperative between students and
faculty. Cooperative government for the past few summers has proved successful
because of the splendid spirit existing between faculty and students. Representa-
tives elected from each section of the dormitories, and from the larger boarding
houses together with a faculty committee consisting of the Director of the Summer
Session, the Dean of Students and the Dean of Women, meet weekly to plan con-
structively for the benefit of student life, and University interests. Suggestions from
any member of the student body or faculty are welcomed at all times.
The Dean of Students and the Dean of Women will gladly advise with any
students who desire their services regarding any other matters concerning their
comfort and welfare.
STUDENT HEALTH AND MEDICAL ADVICE
The Summer Session makes diligent effort to conserve the health of its students.
The services of a resident physician assisted by consulting physicians of Gainesville
have been secured for the Summer Session of 1931. These eminent physicians will
make free physical examinations and prescribe means for remedying physical defects.
It is urged that early in the session all students apply at the infirmary for a thorough
physical examination. Especially does this apply to those who must present health
certificates when they apply for permission to take the state teachers' examinations.
Heretofore many students have deferred this examination until so late in the session
that much overcrowding has resulted. This should be attended to in the first two
or three weeks of Summer Session. The University maintains a well equipped
infirmary and has professional nurses constantly in attendance for those who may be
ill during the Summer Session. Opportunity is offered for individual and private
conference with the University Physician or assistants.
Courses in Health Education are listed below under "Courses of Instruction."

ATHLETICS
The gymnasiums, basketball court, the baseball grounds, tennis courts and
swimming pool are at the disposition of the students, and instructors are at hand to
direct athletic activities. A well-kept golf course is near the University and for a
nominal fee students of the Summer Session are permitted to play.
The brick gymnasium will be used for women students exclusively; the basket-
ball gymnasium will be for men students exclusively. Dressing rooms will be
provided in each of these buildings; hence, students will not be permitted to wear
swimming suits or gymnasium suits on the campus.
The University is proud of the new swimming pool, which has been built largely
with fees paid by students during the regular session. A small fee will be paid by







230 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

all the students of the Summer Session. The following schedule will be enforced
for the use of the swimming pool:
Women: T. Th. S., 2:00-6:00 P.M.
Men: W. F., 2:00-6:00 P. M.
THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
All students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly
on Wednesday at 10:00 o'clock. The Auditorium is near enough to the main lecture
halls to make it easily accessible to all students.
Many important announcements will be made at the General Assembly, for the
observance of which students will be held responsible, even though they may not
be in attendance at the time.

SOCIETIES AND CLUBS
PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the Univer-
sity during the spring of 1912. To be eligible for membership a student must have
been in attendance at the University for at least one year, or three summer sessions,
have been guilty of no serious breaches of discipline, be within one year of finishing
a course leading to a degree, and stand among the first tenth of the senior class of
the University. Candidates for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an
honor point average of 2 on all scholastic work, for which credit toward a degree is
received.
KAPPA DELTA PI
Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary fraternity, similar to Phi Kappa Phi, except that
only juniors and seniors in the College of Education are eligible for membership.
This fraternity plays an important part in the life of the Summer Session.
PI GAMMA MU
Pi Gamma Mu is an honor society in social science, electing members from the
junior and senior classes who have made an honor point average of 2 on all scholastic
work, credited toward the degree. Twenty hours of the work must have been done
in social science, with eighteen hours in one department. The purpose of the society
is to study current social problems.
PEABODY CLUB
All students of the College of Education are eligible for membership in Peabody
Club. This organization meets weekly in Peabody auditorium, where delightful and
instructive programs are rendered.
COUNTY CLUBS
During the session clubs are formed from each county of the State and many
interesting and delightful associations are formed among the students and members
of the faculty.
ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN
A mimeographed sheet is issued each day during the session and appears on all
bulletin boards for the dissemination of information, changes in schedule, club
meetings, lost and found notices, etc. This is the medium used by faculty and
students for making announcements and each student should read the Orange and
Blue Bulletin daily.







GENERAL INFORMATION


ANNOUNCEMENTS
Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Peabody Hall
and Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are responsible
for all announcements made in the General Assembly, on the bulletin boards and in
the Orange and Blue Bulletin.

DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL
As in the past five years, the College of Education will operate a Demonstration
school during the Summer Session. The School will enroll pupils from the first to
the sixth grades inclusive. The Demonstration School is located in the basement of
Peabody Hall.
The very best teachers in the State for this work will be employed, in order that
the children may be given the most expert instruction possible. A busy child is a
happy child, and it is our plan that these children have three hours each morning
of delightful employment in music, organized play, stimulating handwork, as well
astsplendid instruction in reading, history, arithmetic, geopraphy and other school
subjects.
Only a limited number of children can be accommodated, and those who wish
their children enrolled should make reservations at once. The term lasts for six
weeks, beginning Monday, June 22nd. Daily sessions extend from 8:30 A.M., to
11:50 A. M. A fee of $6 is required of each child. This fee will cover only the
actual cost of materials used.

THE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU
As the College of Education and the Summer Session wish to serve the whole
state in every possible way, a Teachers' Employment Bureau was established several
years ago. It is open throughout the year.
Its duties are to assist students and graduates of the University to obtain posi-
tions in the teaching profession. It keeps on file both information as to vacancies
and as to available teachers. When called upon the Bureau tries to meet the needs
of both teachers and school officials.
The Director of the Bureau will be glad to be informed of present or prospec-
tive vacancies in positions for which college-trained men or women are eligible. No
charges are made for services, though students are required to pay for all telegrams
and telephone calls made in their behalf.
Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the
Director of the Employment Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida,
Gainesville.

MUSIC DEPARTMENT
The Summer Session offers excellent courses in Public School Music, and
private work in Voice.
For private lessons in voice a tuition is charged, amounting to $25 for the eight
weeks for two lessons per week, or $15 for the term for one lesson per week. To en-
courage students who are talented in voice, two scholarships are offered based upon
a tryout before competent judges. The first scholarship is for the full amount of the
tuition, and the second is for the half-tuition. Everyone who sings is urged to com-
pete for these scholarships.







232 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

CONFERENCE OF COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS AND
SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS
The third annual conference of county superintendents, school board members,
and other administrative officers will be held July 13 to 17, 1931.
PURPOSE
The purpose of this conference is to bring about a better understanding among
the administrative officers of the public schools of Florida, and to strive to improve
their organization and administration through conferences and discussions.
SCHEDULE
A program of discussions will be followed each day. At least one period daily
will be given for an address by a prominent educator.

THE SUMMER SESSION ENGLISH COUNCIL
The Summer Session English Council meets every Tuesday evening at 7:3Q in
Language 212. All teachers of English in junior and senior high schools are invited
to attend and take part in round-table discussions of current teaching problems. In
addition to informal exchange of opinion, helpful talks are given by various members
of the Summer Session English faculty on such topics as the following: Minimum
Requirements in the Mechanics of Composition, The Reading of High School Pupils,
Spoken English, The Use of Standardized Tests, The Spelling Problem, Dramatic
Projects and Shakespeare, Needs of the College Entrant, The English Teacher and
the Library, The Teaching of Poetry, Stimuli for Better Writing.

SCHOOL EXHIBITS
Texts, library books, school supplies and equipment will be shown by many of
the leading publishing houses and manufacturers.






EXPENSES 233

EXPENSES
The cost of attending the Summer Session is very moderate when compared
with that at many other institutions. The tuition is free and other fees are very
low. For laundry, incidentals and books, expenditures vary, but necessary expedi-
tures are not very high. The estimate of the cost to a student living on the campus
follows:
GENERAL FEES
Tuition ......................... ....... ............... $ 0.00
Registration fee, residents of Florida............................ 15.00
Registration fee, non-residents of Florida........................ 17.50
Registration fee in the College of Law .......................... 25.00
Late Registration fee, per day ................ ................ 1.00
Change of course fee (after Friday of 1st week) .................. 1.00
Room reservation fee ........................ .............. 5.00
SPECIAL LABORATORY AND TUITION FEES
Fine Arts fee, per credit ..................................... 5.00
Agronomy 301 .................. .......................... 2.00
Biology laboratory fee ..................................... 5.00
Botany laboratory fee ....................... ............... 5.00
Business Administration 83 fee .................. ............. 15.00
Business Administration 84 fee .............................. 5.00
Business Administration 211-212, per semester hour............... 1.00
Chemistry laboratory fee ..................... .............. 5.00
Chemistry breakage fee .................................... 5.00.
Demonstration School fee ................................... 6.00
Health and Physical Education 115 ............................ .50
Health and Physical Education 116 ............................ .50
Health and Physical Education 213............... ............. 1.50
Health and Physical Education 221............................ 1.50
General Natural Science fee ................ ................. 3.00
Glee Club fee (for music scores) .............................. 1.00
Library Science 101 ............... ......... ............... 1.50
Library Science 202 ......................................... 1.50
Library Science 204 ........................ ............... 1.50
Physics laboratory fee ...................................... 2.50
Primary Handwork (Education 123) ........................... 1.00
Psychology 304 ............................ ............... 2.00
Public School Art fee, each course ................. ........... 1.00
Swimming Pool fee ........................ ................. 1.00
Tests and Measurements (Education 317 and Education 503) ...... 1.50
Voice tuition per term (2 lessons per week) ..................... 25.00
Voice tuition per term (1 lesson per week) ....................... 15.00
An estimate of personal expenses is as follows:
Lodging (in advance for session) :
High Low
Buckman and Thomas Halls (except Section D, Thomas) ..$12.00 $12.00
Section D, Thomas Hall ................ ............... 18.00 18.00
New Dormitory (first three floors) ....................... 20.00 20.00






234 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

New Dormitory (fourth floor) ......................... 18.00 18.00
Board in University Cafeteria (term) .................... 42.00 37.80
Books .............................................. 8.00 3.00
Incidentals ....................... ................ 16.00 8.00
Laundry .......................................... 12.00 4.00
A charge of $2 extra is made for single rooms in the New Dormitory.
THE UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES
Only women students will be admitted to the dormitories. Rooms are rented
for the term of eight weeks, payable in advance. All dormitories will be open June
15 and students are requested not to arrive on Sunday. The dormitories will close
at 8:00 o'clock Saturday morning, August 8.

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS OFF THE CAMPUS
For students living off the campus the estimated expense is the same except that
room and board will be somewhat higher. A list of approved rooming and boarding
houses may be had by applying to the Director of the Summer Session. In no case
will men and women students be permitted to room in the same house. In the case
of married couples, special arrangements will be made.
THE UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA
The Cafeteria is open to all students and their families. Tickets may be pur-
chased by the week or month. Students rooming in the dormitories are not required
to take their meals in the Cafeteria.
MONEY
Students may deposit their money with the Cashier of the University and draw
it out as needed.
The $5 sent to reserve dormitory room is not a registration fee. It is held as a
breakage fee, and will be returned at close of term if no damage by student has been
reported from dormitory.
The registration fee is paid at the time of registration.
For students registering after the days provided for this purpose, an extra fee
of $1 per day, up to $5, will be charged.
A fee of $1 will be charged for every change of course after Friday of the first
week of the Summer Session.
LAW COLLEGE FEES
During the Regular Session there is an extra registration fee of $20 per semester.
During the Summer Session the extra registration fee is half this amount or $10.
Any student in the Summer Session who meets the entrance requirements of the
College of Law will be permitted to take law courses without extra charge; but the
combined academic and law work must not exceed nine semester hours.

REFUND OF FEES
Fees paid in advance for room reservation will be refunded on application up to
and including June 1 but not after that date.
If by Friday of the first week students for any reason wish to withdraw from the
University, the fees paid less a flat overhead fee of $3, will be refunded. After this
date there will be no refund of any fee.
In case of students withdrawing from the University, for satisfactory reasons,
transfer of lease on dormitory rooms will be accepted in lieu of refund.







EXPENSES


Refund on meal tickets at the University Cafeteria will be made on the basis of
50% on all unused meals, as noted on the back of the ticket.
There will be no refund of fees paid after the first week of the Summer Session.
There will be no refund of laboratory fees after the first two weeks of the Sum-
mer Session. The instructor has the right to refuse any refund of laboratory fees
when these funds have been used in purchasing laboratory supplies.

REDUCED RAILROAD RATES
The Southeastern Passenger Association has authorized reduced rates to Sum-
mer Session students on the round trip identification plan from all stations in the
southeast territory except stations on the following railways: Louisville and Wadley,
Sylvania Central, Wadley Southern, New Orleans Great Northern, and Winston-
Salem Southbound. The rates are based on fare and one-half for the round trip,
the minimum excursion fare being one dollar. Round trip tickets will be sold
students and members of their families only upon presentation of identification cer-
tificates to ticket agent at time of purchase of tickets. The identification certificates
will be furnished by the Director of the Summer Session upon application.
Tickets will be sold from June llth to June 17th, inclusive, and the final limit
of all tickets will be August 13th. All round trip reduced rate tickets must be vali-
dated by the regular ticket agent at Gainesville before the return journey is com-
menced.
In order that the nearest railroad ticket agent may have a supply of tickets on
hand, students should make inquiry of him concerning these rates at least a week
before purchasing tickets to Gainesville. Railroad ticket agents will not be able
to supply the necessary "identification certificate." This can be secured only from
the Director of the Summer Session.
Students are urged to avail themselves of the reduced rates by obtaining in
advance from the Director of the Summer Session an identification certificate or care-
fully preserving the one which will be enclosed in the letters written to prospective
students.

LOAN FUNDS
By means of the "Florida State Scholarship Fund" and the "College Girls Club
Scholarship Loan Fupd," the Summer Session is able to make small loans to a
limited number of students in order to help defray expenses in the current session.
These loans are governed by the following regulations:
(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for succeeding term of school.
(3) Applicant must be in need of aid.
(4) Applicant should apply for Scholarship Loan at least two weeks before
opening of the Summer Session.
(5) Application must be made direct to the Director of the Summer Session.
(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in
which he or she is teaching at the time of application.
(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at the University of Florida Summer
Session.
(8) Loan will be for a period not to exceed nine months from the date on
which Summer Session begins.







236 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

(9) Loan is to bear interest at the rate of 8%, which will be added to the
main fund.
Blank form for application for a scholarship loan will be furnished upon ap-
plication to the Director of the Summer Session.
SCHOLARSHIPS
To aid and encourage ambitious and worthy young people to become teachers,
the State provides $200 per year for four years to enable one young man and one
young woman for each senator and representative in the legislature to attend one of
the State institutions. To secure this aid it is necessary for the applicant to be a
graduate of a four-year high school and to pass a reasonable examination on high
school subjects, given by the State in August in the various county seats. The
successful male applicants are required to register at the University of Florida, in
the College of Education. After completing their courses they will be expected to
teach in the State for two years. The scholarships may be used in the regular
session, and also in the summer session of the University. Students contemplating
taking the examination for the scholarships must make application to the State
Superintendent of Public Instruction and also to their County Superintendents. The
Dean of Students at the University will be glad to give information relative to
scholarship vacancies.

ROOMING FACILITIES
FOR WOMEN
Ample rooming facilities for women students will be provided in the New Dor-
mitory and in Buckman and Thomas Halls. Rooms in all dormitories may be re-
served at any time by application of the student to the Business Manager of the
University of Florida. A deposit of $5 is required of each student making room
reservation. This may be paid at time of reservation, but must be in by May 1st.
This amount is held as a breakage fee and will be returned to the student at the
end of the session, less any breakage which may be charged against her. Students
are not required to take their meals in the Commons.

FOR MEN
Men students cannot be accommodated on the campus, but are required to find
rooms outside. A number of comfortable rooming, boarding and fraternity houses
will be open to men. A list of approved houses will be furnished upon application
to the Dean of Students.
WHAT TO BRING
All bedrooms are comfortably furnished with single iron bedsteads and mat-
tresses, chiffonier or bureau, a table, washsteand and chairs. Students are required
to provide themselves with a pillow, bed linen, towels and other things that they
may wish for their own special comfort and convenience.

TEXTBOOKS
The University Book Store carries a full line of all textbooks used in the Summer
Session sold at list prices. The Book Store also handles necessary stationery and
other supplies. Students may well bring English dictionaries and other useful books
of reference. Students in Education courses should bring with them professional
books and textbooks related to the courses they plan to take. If students desire






CERTIFICATES


information in regard to the textbooks to be used in their courses, they should write
to the instructor in charge of the course.

CERTIFICATES
GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES
Graduates of the University are granted Graduate State Certificates without
further examination, provided that three-twentieths of their work has been devoted to
professional training and provided that they have satisfied the requirement of the
law as to the Constitution of the United States. It is well for the student to note
that a Graduate State Certificate permits him to teach only those subjects that are
listed on such certificate, and that only those subjects will be placed on his certifi-
cate in which he has specialized in his college course. This will ordinarily mean that
a subject must have been pursued at least two years in college, in addition to credit
for all high school courses offered in that subject by a standard high school, before a
certificate to teach that subject will be granted. Applicants for the Graduate State
Certificate must apply to Superintendent W. S. Cawthon, Tallahassee, for application
blanks and for further information.
Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by "present-
ing satisfactory evidence of having taught successfully for a period of twenty-four
months under a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of three
holders of Life State, Life Graduate State, or Life Professional Certificates." Ap-
plication for a Life Graduate State Certificate must be filed before the expiration
of the Graduate State Certificate.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE EXTENSION OF
CERTIFICATES
When credit for the extension of certificate is desired, regulations in addition
to those mentioned under the heading "Maximum and Minimum Hours" (see below)
must be observed.
Every applicant for extension must take at least fifteen recitation hours a week.
Included among these fifteen recitations must be a course in Education (or Psy-
chology 201) of at least four hours a week.
The repetition of courses in Education or Psychology previously taken will not
satisfy the professional requirement for extension.
To be granted extension, a student's grades are taken into consideration. Usual-
ly a passing grade is required.
No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply for
the same on the student Registration Card. In case the student fails to apply on
the Registration Card at time of registration, request may be made to the Registrar,
Room 3, Language Hall to have his application for extension properly recorded. A
list of those who have applied will be posted on the bulletin boards in Language
Hall and Peabody Hall not later than July 1st. In case of error in this list, students
should report to the Registrar. No student will be recommended for extension whose
name does not appear on this list by August 5th. Students should register under
exactly the same name that appears on the certificate which they wish to have
extended.
Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to W. 5. Cawthon,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida, within a year after
the completion of the Summer Session. Otherwise extension will not be granted.







238 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GENERAL REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO ALL COLLEGES ALIKE
SYSTEM OF GRADING
Grades are recorded by use of the letters A, B, C, D, E, in order of excellence.
D is the lowest passing grade; E is failure. Other special grades are: I, incomplete;
X, missed examination; R, conditional failure with re-examination privilege.
HONOR POINTS
Each semester hour with grade A gives three honor points, each semester hour
with grade B gives two honor points, and each semester hour with grade C gives one
honor point. Other grades give no honor points.
For graduation a student must earn as many honor points as credits.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT
In order to receive a bachelor's degree from any college of the University, at
least 30 semester hours must have been completed in residence on the campus. In all
colleges except the College of Education these 30 semester hours must be the last
which one takes immediately prior to graduation. In the College of Education 12
of the last 36 may be taken by extension. Even in this case, 30 semester hours must
have been completed in residence.
In order to receive the Normal Diploma, the student is required to complete 27
semester hours in residence on the campus. Extension work may not at any time
be offered to satisfy the residence requirement.
AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED
By "extension" is meant work taken either by correspondence or in extension
classes. No person shall be allowed to take by extension more than 48 semester
hours for credit toward a degree. No person shall be allowed to take by extension
more than 12 semester hours of the last 36 semester hours necessary for a bachelor's
degree. No person shall be allowed to take by correspondence more than 9 semester
hours work during the summer vacation period. A student will not be permitted to
take work by correspondence while he is in residence without the consent of the
dean of the college in which he is registered. This will be granted only in excep-
tional cases. In the case of candidates for the Normal Diploma, the student may not
take by extension more than 24 semester hours.
Not more than fifty per cent of a major (or group) and not more than twelve
semester hours may be taken by extension in any department for credit.
RE-EXAMINATIONS
In order to receive credit for a course by re-examination, the student must earn
a grade of C or higher. The privilege of re-examination is given only to students of
freshman or sophomore standing.
MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM HOURS
The maximum load, including work by correspondence or extension, shall be
regulated by the following table:
A student who has an honor point average of:
Maximum Load
Regular Session Summer Session
Less than 1................................... 16 hours 8 hours
1 up to, but not including, 2 .................... 19 10 "
2 up to, but not including, 3 .................... 21 11 "
3 ....................... .. ............... 24 12 "








GENERAL REGULATIONS 239

The minimum load for the Summer Session is six semester hours. Mature
students who are regularly employed may register for less than this amount with
the approval of the dean of the college.
VISITING
On account of the large number of regularly registered students in the classes,
it has been found necessary to discourage visiting. The faculty has ruled, therefore,
that students wishing to attend classes as visitors may be admitted only upon the
presentation of a permission card issued by the dean of the college in which the
student is registered and approved by the dean of the college in which the course in
question is offered.











240 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

SPECIAL REGULATIONS APPLICABLE TO THE
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

DEGREES
The following degrees are offered in the College of Education:
1. Bachelor of Arts in Education. (For requirements, see below.)
2. Bachelor of Science in Education. For this degree the student must select
and complete the required courses in Group E. (See page 242.)
3. Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education. (For complete requirements
see Annual Catalog of the College of Education.)
4. Bachelor of Arts in Health and Physical Education. (For requirements
see page 243).
5. Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education. (For requirements
see page 243).
6. Normal Diploma. Given upon the completion of a two-year prescribed
course. (For complete requirements, see below.)

ABBREVIATIONS

The following abbreviations are used in this bulletin:
As. Agricultural Economics Jm. Journalism
Ag. Agricultural Engineering Le. Landscape Design
Ay. Agronomy Ln. Latin
Al. Animal Husbandry Lw. Law
Ae. Architecture Ly. Library Science
Bcy. Bacteriology Ms. Mathematics
Be. Bible Mc. Mechanic Arts
Bly. Biology MI. Mechanical Engineering
Bty. Botany My. Military Science
Bs. Business Administration Msc. Music
Cy. Chemistry Ng. Nursing ,Education
Cl. Civil Engineering Pg. Painting
Cg. Coaching Pgy. Pharmacognosy
Dy. Dairying Ply. Pharmacology
Dg. Drawing Phy. Pharmacy
Es. Economics Ppy. Philosophy
En. Education Pl. Physical Education
El. Electrical Engineering Ps. Physics
Eh. English Pt. Plant Pathology
Ey. Entomology Pel. Political Science
Fh. French Py. Poultry Husbandry
Gl. General Natural Science Psy. Psychology
Gy. Geology Pc. Public School Art
Gn. German Sch. Speech
Gk. Greek Sy. Sociology
HP1. Health and Physical Education Sh. Spanish
Hy. History Sp. Shop
He. Horticulture Vy. Veterinary Science






CURRICULA


CURRICULA


I. For Those Who Expect to Teach in
Primary and Intermediate Grades:

NORMAL DIPLOMA
Credits
En. 101-How to Teach ............... 3
En. 103-Health Education ............ 3
En. 121-Primary Methods ............ 3
En. 122-Teach., Read., and Lit. in Grades 3
En. 203-Child and Adol. Psychology... 3
En. -Supervised Teaching ......... 2
Eh. 101-102-Rhetoric and Comp. ...... 6
Eh. 201-202-Hist. of Literature ....... 6
One Group other than Group C ......... 12
GI. 101-102*-Gen. Nat. Science ........ 8
Sy. 111-112**-Intro. to Social Studies 4 or 5
Drawing ............................. 4
or
Drawing and En. 123-Elem. Handwork 4
Public School Music ................... 4
Electives** ......................... 4 or 5

Total .............................. 66
*Students who elect group E are not re-
quired to take Gl. 101-102. They may take
it prior to the required courses in Group E
but may not substitute it for any Group E
requirement.
**The elective hours and hours in Socio-
logy 111-112 must total 9.

BACHELOR'S DEGREE
If after taking the Normal Diploma the
student wishes to take a bachelor's degree,
he must take an additional 66 semester
hours. Included in this he must complete
two groups (see p. 242) and take the follow-
ing:
Credits
En. 207-Educational Psychology ...... 3
En. 308-Elem. School Curriculum ..... 3
En. 317-Tests and Measurements ..... 3
En. -Supervised Teaching ......... 2
En. 401-School Adm. and Supervision.. 3
En. 403-Principles of Education ...... 3


II. For Those Who Expect to Teach in the
Junior and Senior High School:

NORMAL DIPLOMA
Credits
PI. 101-102-Elem. Gymnastics ......... 2
En. 101-How to Teach ............... 3
En. 102 -Hist. and Prin. of Educ
or ...... 3
En. 103-Health Education
En. 203-Child and Adol. Psychology... 3
En. -Methods and Materials course. 2
En. -Supervised Teaching in same
course .................... 2
Eh. 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition. 6
Eh. 201-202-Hist. of Literature ....... 6
G1. 101-102*-Gen. Nat. Science. ....... 8
Sy. 111-112***-Intro. to Social Studies 4 or 5
One Group other than Group C ......... 12
Electives*** (students not exempt from
Military Science must take 8 semester
hours in that subject) ........... 15 or 14

T otal ............................... 66



BACHELOR'S DEGREE
If after taking the Normal Diploma the
student wishes to take a bachelor's degree,
he must take an additional 66 semester
hours. Included in this he must complete two
groups (see p. 242) and take the following:

Credits
En. 207-Educational Psychology ...... 3
En. 308-Elem. School Curriculum ..... 3
En. -Methods and Materials course. 2
En. -Supervised Teaching ......... 2
En. 401-School Adm. and Supervision.. 3
En. 403-Principles of Education ....... 3
***The elective hours and hours in Sociol-
ogy 111-112 must total 19.


In case a student is exempt from military science, he must substitute an equal number
of credits from other departments.








242 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

THE GROUPS
For the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education and Bachelor of Science in Education
the student must complete all courses in two of the following groups. Group E must be
elected if the student desires the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education:


A-ANCIENT LANGUAGES

Ln. 101-102 )
Ln. 201-202 18
Ln. 203-204J credits









D-MATHEMATICS

Ms. 101-102
Ms. 251-252 18
Ms. 331 credit
Ms. 568 J











G-COMMERCIAL
EDUCATION

Es. 101-1021
Bs. 83- 841
Bs. 87
Bs. 103-104 35
Bs. 211-212 credits
Bs. 401-402
Eh. 355-356


B-MODERN LANGUAGES


Fh. 21-22 1
Fh. 101-102 E
Fh. 201-202J
or
Sh. 21-22 1
Sh. 101-102 18
Sh. 201-202J credits

Gn. 21-22 1
Gn. 101-102 )
Gn. 201-202J J


E-NATURAL SCIENCE

Bly. 101 1
Bty. 101-102 I
Bly. 106 I
Cy. 101-102 36
Ps. 111-112 credits
Ps. 113-114 I
Ps. 115-1160


C-ENGLISH


Eh. 101-102
Eh. 103-104 22
Eh. 201-202 credits
Eh. 301-302J


Foreign Language 1
6 credits 12
English or Foreign credits
Language 6 creditsJ


F-SOCIAL SCIENCE


Hy. 101-102 ]
Pcl. 101-102 } 22 or 23
Es. 101-102 | credits
Sy. 111-112J

Adv. Hy. 12 1
credits or 34 or 35
Adv. Pcl. 12 credits
credits or E 12
Adv. Es. 12 credits
credits or
Adv. Sy. 12
credits J







CURRICULA 243


CURRICULUM IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION*


FRESHMAN YEAR

First Semester Second Semester
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Eh. 101-Rhetoric and Composition..... 3 Eh. 102-Rhetoric and Composition..... 3
Bly. 101-Prin. Animal Biology ........ 5 HPl. 110-Anatomy ................... 5
En. 101-How to Teach ............... 3 HPI. 0107-Hygiene ................... 2
HPI. 101-Football .................... 2 HP1. 114-Natural Activities I. ......... 2
HPL. Ill- Basketball .................. 2 Sociology** ........................... 3
Military Science 103-Artillery ......... 2 Military Science 104-Artillery ......... 2

Total ............................... 17 Total ............................... 17



SOPHOMORE YEAR


E english ............................... 3 E english .............................. 3
Ps. 1ll***-General Physics, Lee ....... 3 Ps. 112***-General Physics, Lee....... 3
Ps. 113***-General Physics, Dem...... 1 Ps. 114***-General Physics, Dem...... 1
Ps. 115***-General Physics, Lab ....... 1 Ps. 116***-General Physics, Lab ....... 1
HP1. 215-Hist. and Principles of HPI. 216-Principles of Physical
Physical Education ...... 2 Education .............. 2
HP1. 213-Natural Activities II ........ 2 HPI. 214-Natural Activities III........ 2
HPI. 201-Football .................... 2 En. 0103-Health Education ........... 3
HPI. 251- Boxing ...................... 1 My. 204- Artillery .................... 2
My. 203- Artillery .................... 2
Total .............................. 17
Total ............................... 17



JUNIOR YEAR


Cy. 101***-General Chemistry ........ 5 Cy. 102***-General Chemistry ........ 5
HPI. 311-Organ. and Adm. ........... 4 HPI. 312-Organ. and Adm. ............ 4
HPI. 313-Natural Activities IV ........ 2 HP1. 314-Natural Activities V......... 2
En. 203-Child and Adol. Psychology.... 3 En. 0207-Educational Psychology ..... 3
HPI. 301- Football ..................... 1 HPI. 304- Track ...................... 2
HPI. 303- Basketball .................. 1
Total .............................. 16
Total .............................. 16



SENIOR YEAR


En. 475-Supervised Teach. in Health En. 0401-School Adm. and Supervision ]
and Physical Education... 3 or
En. -Methods and Materials course En. 406-Elementary School Principal 3
in Group Selected ....... 2 or
HPI. 351-Intra-murals ............... 2 En. 408-High School Administration
HPI. 353-Lab. for HPI. 351............ 1 HPI. 344-Baseball .................... 2
Electives ............................. 8 Sch. 0201- Public Speaking ............ 3
Electives ............................. 8
Total .............................. 16
Total ............................... 16


*If the sciences are taken as listed, this curriculum leads to the degree B. S. in Health
and Physical Education ; if another Group is selected, it leads to the degree B. A. in Health
and Physical Education.
**Students who wish the B. S. degree in Health and Physical Education should take Ms.
085 or 0101 and defer Sociology until a later year.
***If a student does not wish to take Natural Sciences as here listed, he may substitute
any Group as authorized in the current bulletin of the College of Education.







244 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

THE MASTER'S DEGREE
The major courses are regularly numbered above 500 and the minors between
300 and 500, but there is no objection to counting a course above 500 in one depart-
ment as a minor in another.
As a usual thing, undergraduate students are not permitted to register for
courses that are numbered above 500.
A number of courses have already been arranged that may count as majors.
Efforts will be made to arrange still others upon request. If the major work wished
is not listed, requests for it should be made at an early date.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE
A candidate for the Master's Degree must be in residence for at least one
scholastic year, or four summer terms, devoting his entire time during this period to
study and research.
In addition to registration for the courses which a graduate student wishes to
take, he must have an application blank (Form 2) properly filled out and presented
to the Dean of the Graduate School not later than July 13th. These blanks may be
secured at the time of registration from the Dean of the Graduate School.
The candidate must complete one major and two minors. A major consists of
twelve semester-hours of rank above the senior class. A minor consists of six
semester-hours of rank above the sophomore class.
In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, cover-
ing the whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required.
This may embrace not only the thesis and the courses taken, but also any questions
that a student majoring in that department may reasonably be expected to be able
to answer.
A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely allied to
the major subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first
summer. The thesis itself should be completed and submitted by the end of the
fourth week of the Summer Session in which the student expects to receive his degree.
All students majoring in Education are required to take Education 527. All
others are advised to take this course.
Passing grade for graduate students is B.
The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from
the time of registering for graduate work.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Until about 1850 the classical course, leading to the Bachelor of Arts (A.B.)
Degree, was practically the only type of college course offered in the United States.
Since that time there has been rapid expansion in American universities. Courses
have been devised to meet almost every conceivable need. The College of Arts and
Sciences remains, however, as the nucleus which unifies the whole. The objectives
attained by the College of Arts and Sciences are varied. In the main, we may say
that the primary purpose of the College of Arts and Sciences is to interpret that vast
body of experience which has grown to its present vigor and stature through all the
centuries of civilization, based on the theory that the younger generation can know
the richness and fulness of life only by learning that which has been of sufficient
worth to survive the selective processes of time. Coincidentally with the attainment







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


of this primary purpose, the College of Arts and Sciences stands for breadth of train-
ing and depth of development. The value of such training is so clearly recognized
by those who are successful in many professions that it is a prerequisite of those who
wish to enter upon their professional studies.
The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula leading to the degrees Bachelor
of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, and in combination with the College of Law, to the
degrees Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws, and to the degrees Bachelor of
Science and Bachelor of Laws. The College of Arts and Sciences also offers pre-
medical, pre-dental, and pre-law courses fitting students for admission to profes-
sional schools.
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
The College of Agriculture is rotating the courses offered in the summer so
that in a succession of three or more years all studies of greatest interest will have
been given.
Graduate students interested in agriculture will find these courses profitable.
Undergraduates may take them for college credit.
Mature students who have not completed entrance requirements may, on the
approval of the Dean and Director of the Summer Session, enroll as Adult Specials
for the practical value of the information gained in courses desired, provided all
other requirements of the summer sessions are met.

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
There have been so many requests for Summer Session courses in subjects
under the College of Engineering that it is desirable to know what is the demand
for such courses in the Summer Session of 1932, that provision may be made for
them if it is warranted.
Those interested should communicate directly with Dean Percy L. Reed, College
of Engineering.
In connection with the Summer Session of 1931 members of the faculties of
the Departments of Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Drawing will
give combination individual and correspondence courses in subjects thereunder for
which there is sufficient demand.

COLLEGE OF LAW
HISTORY
Largely through the influence of Hon. Nathan P. Bryan, then a member of the
Board of Control, the College of Law was established in 1909.
At first the College was quartered in Thomas Hall, one of the dormitories. At
the opening of the session of 1913-14 more spacious rooms were provided in Lan-
guage Hall. During the following summer and fall the present structure was erected
and on Thanksgiving Day, 1914, the College, with fitting ceremonies, took possession
of its own home.
From 1909 until 1917 the course comprised the work of two years. With the
session of 1917-18 the present three-year course was established.
In the summer of 1927, in response to a long demand, law courses were in-
augurated and have proved popular and helpful, affording opportunities for study
to those unable to attend the regular sessions, supplementing the curriculum, reliev-
ing congestion, and enabling students to graduate at the close of the summer term.







246 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

The requirements and standards of the regular session are in effect. (See p...)
Evidence of pre-law work must be presented on or before the date on which the
candidate wishes to register. The College reserves the right to reject those whose
required pre-law credit does not average C.
The minimum age of applicants for admission is eighteen years for men and,
by statute, twenty-one years for women.

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM
The College of Commerce and Journalism will operate during the Summer Ses-
sion as during the regular session. The courses offered will appeal to two different
types of students. First, to students attending the regular session who wish to
return during the summer session; and second, to teachers and others who wish to
take courses to prepare for the teaching of commercial subjects in high schools or
to prepare for the teaching of the social sciences.
The attention of undergraduates preparing for commercial teacher training is
called especially to the following courses: Bs. 83 and Bs. 84 in which shorthand and
typewriting is taught; Bs. 211-212.-Principles of Accounting; and Bs. 491.-
Principles of Business Education.
The College of Commerce and Journalism offers two graduate courses during the
Summer Session: Bs. 507E.-Seminar in the Theories of Economic Reform; and Bs.
591.-Problems in Business Education. Graduate students might also take Bs. 302E
as a minor.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
The School of Architecture and Allied Arts is a division of the University offer-
ing curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Architecture and
Bachelor of Fine Arts. Courses in this division will be offered in the Summer Session
for the benefit of students who wish to make up deficiencies in their regular work
and for those who are interested in increasing their knowledge of Architecture,
Painting, Drawing, and the various allied arts and crafts. By special arrangement,
these courses may be taken without University credit by qualified individuals who
do not desire to matriculate in the University.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AGRONOMY
Ay. 301.-Soils. Daily at 9:00. A-204. Laboratory 1:00-5:00 T. and Th.
A-203. 5 credits. BRYAN.
The nature and properties of soils as related to fertility and crop production. Text-
book: Lyon & Buckman, The Nature and Properties of Soils.
Prerequisite: Cy. 105 and 106.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Ay. 501.-Seminar. 11 M. and W. A-204. 1 credit. BRYAN.
Discussion of Agronomy problems. Review of literature dealing with soils and crops.
Ay. 505.-Special Problems in Soils. Hours and room to be arranged. 1 to 3
credits. BRYAN.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
Al. 304.-Meat Production. Daily at 8:00. A-104. 3 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Feeding, management and marketing of beef cattle and hogs. Text-books: Snapp, Beef
Cattle; Ewing, Southern Pork Production.
Prerequisite: Al. 104 or equivalent.
Dy. 305.-Dairy Farming. Daily at 11:00. A-104. 3 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Feeding and management of the dairy herd; testing dairy products. Text-book: Eckles,
Dairy Cattle and Milk Production.
Prerequisite: Al. 104 or equivalent.
Al. 501.-Animal Production. Hours, credits, and room to be arranged.
WILLOUGHBY.
Seminar and research problems on selected topics.

ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
In Addition to the University registration fee, in the following courses there is
a fee of $5 for each semester hour of credit. Students who desire to take these
courses without credit are not required to pay the University registration fee.
Ae. 101.-Architectural Design. 1:00-5:00. M. T. W. Th. F. P-301. 3
credits. STAGEBERG.
The beginning course in architecture. Small problems in design using only the wall,
roof, pier and beam as structural elements. Simple decorative elements. Lectures on
composition.
Ae. 121-122.-Freehand Drawing. 8:00-12:00. T. Th. P-300. 2 credits.
STAGEBERG.
Freehand perspective, outdoor sketching in pencil, and charcoal drawing from casts.
Either Ae 121 or Ae. 122 may be completed in one summer session.
Ae. 201.-Architectural Design. 1:00-5:00. M. W. F. P-301. 2 credits.
STAGEBERG.
First semester sophomore architectural design. Minor buildings in plan, elevation,
section and details.
Prerequisite: Ae. 102.
Ae. 221-222.-Freehand Drawing. 8:00-12:00. T. Th. 2 credits. STAGE-
BERG.
Outdoor sketching and still life drawing in any approved medium. Either Ae. 221 or
Ae. 222 may be completed in one summer session.
Prerequisite: Ae. 122.
Ae. 225-226.-Elementary Water Color. 8:00-12:00. T. Th. 2 credits.
STAGEBERG.
Color theory and methods of applying water co'or. Still life and simple landscapes.
Either Ae. 225 or Ae. 226 may be completed in one summer session.
Other courses in Architecture as described in the General Bulletin may be offered by
special arrangement with the Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts.







248 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Pg. 100.-Manual Arts. 1:00-5:00. T. Th. P-300. 2 credits. STAGEBERG.
A special course of interest to summer school students. Linoleum block cutting, cane
weaving, Benda masks, paper mache and similar crafts. Students may specialize in any
one of these subjects, or may undertake one problem in each.
Pg. 115.-Poster Design. 1 :00-5:00. T. Th. P-300. 2 credits. STACEBERG.
Analysis of the essentials of a good poster. Methods of handling tempera color and
other mediums. Poster lettering; practical designing of posters for all uses.
Pg. 117.-Advertising Design. 1:00-5:00. T. Th. P-300. 2 credits. STAGE-
BERG.
Designing of original advertisements and a study of the methods and mediums
employed in making drawings for reproduction. A major part of the work will be in pen
and ink and dry brush.
BOTANY
Bty. 101.-General Botany. 10:00. M., T., Th. and S. S-111. Laboratory
2:00-4:00. M., T., Th. and F. S-2. 4 credits. CODY.
Structure and life history of important algae, fungi, mosses, and ferns. Attention will
be given to their environment.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 102.-General Botany. 11:00. M., T., Th. and S. S-111. Laboratory
4:00-6:00. M., T., Th. and F. S-2. 4 credits. ConY.
Structure, environment, and principles in classification of seed plants. Excursions will
be made about the campus in studying the more common plants.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Note: Students should take Bty. 101 and 102 in order to complete the year's require-
ment in Bty. and to satisfy the prerequisite for other courses in the department.
Bty. 210.-Taxonomy. 9:00. W., F. S-111. Laboratory 2:00-4:00. F. S-1.
4 credits. CODY.
Identification of plants, including some common ferns and flowering plants in the region
of Gainesville. Field excursions and collection of plants.
Laboratory fee: $5.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS*
Bs. 73.-Office Management. Lecture hours to be arranged. Laboratory 2:00-
4:00. M., T., W. and Th. Bu-103. 2 credits. SCAGLIONE.
Instruction in office organization ; office function ; duties of office manager; the modern
secretary in relation to office operation ; practical use of modern office appliances. Instruc-
tion in typing.
Laboratory fee: $15.
Bs. 84.-Office Management. 1:00. M., T., W. and Th. Bu-103. 2 credits.
SCACLIONE.
Shorthand. Instruction in the principles of practical stenography.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bs. 101E.-Economic History of England. Daily at 8:00. Bu-101. 3
credits. SCAGLIONE.
A survey of economic history; the evolution of capitalistic economy in England; the
origin and development of the wage system; the Industrial Revolution ; the growth of British
trade; the relation of economic development to political policy; and the effect of England's
industrial progress on the United States.
Bs. 102E.-Economic History of the United States. Daily at 9:00. L-204.
3 credits. MATHERLY.
The industrial development of America, the exploitation of natural resources; the
history of manufacturing, banking, trade, transportation, etc.; the evolution of industrial
centers ; the historical factors contributing to the growth of the United States.
Bs. 201E.-Principles of Economics. Daily at 11:00. Bu-101. 3 credits.
WARD.
A general understanding of present day economic organization ; brief, analysis of pro-
duction, distribution, and consumption.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bs. 202E.-Principles of Economics. Daily at 9:00. L-314. 3 credits. M. D.
ANDERSON.
Continuation of Bs. 201E. With permission of the instructor, students may take this
course together with Bs. 201E.
Bs. 211-212.-Principles of Accounting. Daily at 8-10. L-201. 6 credits.
WARD.
Lectures, problems, and laboratory practice. Bs. 211 will be completed the first four
weeks ; and Bs. 212, the second four weeks.
Laboratory fee: $1 for each semester hour.
Bs. 302E.-Elements of Statistics. Daily at 12:00. L-314. 3 credits. M. D.
ANDERSON.
An introduction to statistics ; brief consideration of statistical theory; collection, classifi-
cation and presentation of economic data; construction of graphs and charts; study of index
numbers; and problems of statistical research.
Bs. 407E.-Theories of Economic Reform. Daily at 11:00. L-314. 3 credits.
M. D. ANDERSON.
Critical analysis of systems of economic theory; establishment of criteria of economic
fallacy; application of these criteria to various types of present-day economic reform.
Bs. 491F*.-Principles of Business Education. Daily at 11:00. L-307.
3 credits. MATHERLY.
The scope of commercial education; the development of commercial education; present
and probable future needs; organization and administration ; analyses of raw materials or
students; curriculum construction; commercial teacher training; the teaching of commercial
and economic subjects.
Bs. 507E.-Seminar in the Theories of Economic Reform. Daily at 11:00.
L-314. 3 credits. M. D. ANDERSON.
Advanced economic theory; various systems of economic theory; attempt is made to
establish criteria of economic fallacy; application of these criteria to the various types of
present day economic reform.
Bs. 591.-Problems in Business Education. Daily at 11:00. L-307. 3
credits. MATHERLY.
Methods of determining the needs for business education; problems in organization and
administration ; commercial teacher training; problems in curriculum construction.

*Courses marked E are courses in Economics. **Bs. 491 is the same as En. 391.

CHEMISTRY
Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. Daily at 9:00. C-212. Laboratory and quiz
1:00-5:00. T., Th. C-130. 5 credits. LEIGH.
The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and the preparation and properties of
the common non-metallic elements and their compounds. No credit toward a degree will be
allowed until credit in Cy. 102, 104 or 110 is earned.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 102.-General Chemistry, continued. Daily at 8:00. C-212. Labor-
atory 1:00-5:00, and quiz T., Th. C-130. 5 credits. BEISLER.
Most of the time is devoted to a study of the metallic elements and their compounds.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 203.-Qualitative Analysis. 10:00. M., T., Th. and F. C-112. Labor-
atory 2:00-5:00. M.. T., Th. and F. C-230. 4 credits. BEISLER.
A systematic study of the metals and their chemical reactions and theoretical consid-
erations of qualitative analysis. Practice in the separation and identification of the common
metals and acid radicals.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.







250 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Cy. 305.-Quantitative Analysis. 11:00. M., T., Th. and F. C-110. Lab-
oratory hours to be arranged. 5 credits. BEISLER.
The fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. The laboratory
work may be varied somewhat to fit the needs of individual students.
Prerequisite: Cy. 104, Cy. 106, or Cy. 203.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 361.-Organic Chemistry. Daily 11:00. C-212. Laboratory hours to
be arranged. 5 credits. LEIGH.
A study of the preparation and properties of various aliphatic compounds. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until Cy. 362 is completed.
Prerequisite: Cy. 102, Cy. 203, or Cy. 232.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations. Hours and room to be arranged. 3
credits. LEIGH.
Laboratory work involving the preparation of a number of typical inorganic com-
pounds in addition to collateral reading and discussions. A reading knowledge of French
and German desired.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 513.-Colloid Chemistry. Hours and room to be arranged. 3 credits.
BEISLER.
The theories, practice and applications of colloid chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 551.-Chemical Research. Required of graduate students majoring in
chemistry. LEIGH AND BEISLER.
Note: In addition to the above courses listed in chemistry other courses may be given
upon petition of five or more students.

ECONOMICS

Courses in Economics are scheduled under Business Administration and are
marked E.
EDUCATION

Every student who applies for extension of certificate must register for one
course in Education or Philosophy 201.
En. 101.-How to Teach. 3 credits. Six sections:
Section 1. (Designed for those who have never taught.) Daily at
9:00. P-112. WISE.
Section 2. (Designed for those who have never taught.) Daily at
11:00. H-205. D. P. WILSON.
Section 3. Daily at 9:00. H-205. D. P. WILSON.
Section 4. Daily at 12:00. H-215. MERBLER.
Section 5. Daily at 8:00. P-206. LITTLE.
Section 6. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. and S., 2:00 W. P-206. LITTLE.
Introduction to the study of classroom teaching.
En. 102.-History and Principles of Education. Daily at 11:00. P-206. 3
credits. LITTLE.
A study of the historical background of education, and of the fundamental principles
which should guide educational procedure and give appreciation of educational conditions
of today.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 103.-Health Education. 3 credits. Three sections:
Section 1. (For teachers in primary and middle elementary grades.)
Daily at 9:00. A-303. McARTHUR.
Section 2. (Same as Section 1.) Daily at 11:00. A-303. McAR-
THUR.
Section 3. (For principals and teachers not included in Sections 1
and 2. Daily at 12:00. A-303. McARTHUR.
Conditions and forces that affect the physical and mental vigor of children, youth and
teachers, and relate the school to the health of the home and community; the teacher's
health ; sanitation of school buildings; hygienic equipment ;'common diseases and physical
defects; mental hygiene; play and recreation ; community hygiene; teaching of health
education in elementary and high schools; the Florida health program.
En. 121.-Primary Methods. 3 credits. Three sections:
Section 1. For teachers of the First Grade. Daily at 9:00. P-2.
Section 2. For teachers of the first three grades. Daily at 11:00.
P-2.
Section 3. The same as Section 2. Daily at 8:00. P-2.
Arithmetic, Language, Writing and Spelling in the first three grades.
Prerequisites or parallel courses: En. 101, En. 207, or any methods course.
En. 122.-The Teaching of Reading and Literature in the First Six
Grades. 3 credits. Three sections:
Section 1. Mechanics of reading as a tool study. Daily at 9:00.
P-4. CARTER.
Section 2. The same as Section 1. Daily at 11:00. P-4. CARTER.
Section 3. Designed for teachers of the middle elementary grades.
Daily at 12:00. P-4. CARTER.
The basic importance of reading in the elementary school, reading as a tool study, the
various methods of teaching, reading, etc., will constitute the course. Methods of teaching
phonics, appreciation, memorization and dramatization will be presented. Observation of
demonstration lessons and criticisms will be required.
Prerequisite or parallel courses: En. 101 or En. 207.
En. 123.-Handwork for Elementary Grades. 2 credits. Three sections:
Section 1. Designed for teachers of the early elementary grades.
2:00. M. T. W. Th. and F. A-206. NORTON.
Section 2. Designed for teachers of the early elementary grades.
11:00. M. T. W. Th. and F. A-206. NORTON.
Section 3. Designed for teachers of the upper elementary grades.
3:00. M. T. W. Th. and F. A-206. NORTON.
The purpose of the course is to develop the real function of handwork in the elementary
grades. The various types of handwork will be emphasized, such as, paper cutting, free
hand drawing, clay modeling, etc.
Laboratory fee: $1.
En. 203.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. Daily at 8:00. P-205. 3
credits. LANCASTER.
The nature, growth and development of the child from birth to adolescence with refer-
ence to Education.
En. 207.-Educational Psychology. 3 credits. Two sections:
Section 1. Daily at 9:00. P-101. TOLBERT.
Section 2. Daily at 11:00. L-204. W. H. WILSON.
Psychology applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc.







252 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

En. 308.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. and S.,
2:00 W. P-101. 3 credits. D. P. WILSON.
The curriculum as a group of related problems and projects of vital interest to children.
An attempt to formulate a curriculum based on social conditions and social needs.
En. 311.-Materials and Methods in English. 10:00 M. T. Th. and F.
P-209. 2 credits. WISE.
Open to juniors and seniors who have not had En. 301.
En. 312.-Materials and Methods in Foreign Languages. 12:00 M. T.
Th. and F. P-209. 2 credits. WISE.
En. 312.-Tests and Measurements. Daily at 9:00. H-207. 3 credits.
CRAGO.
An elementary course designed to aid the teacher in the use of tests in the improvement
of instruction and in the solution of school problems. One hour of laboratory work per
week is required.
Laboratory fee: $1.50.
En. 341.-Materials and Methods in History. 9:00 M. T. Th. and F.
P-206. 2 credits. LANCASTER.
Open to juniors and seniors who have not had En. 301.
En. 371.-Materials and Methods in Science. 12:00 M. T. Th. and F.
C-112. 2 credits. JACKSON.
Open to juniors and seniors who have not had En. 301.
En. 372.-Materials and Methods in Mathematics. 2:00 M. T. Th. and
F. L-204. 2 credits. W. H. WILSON.
En. 391.-Materials and Methods in Commercial Education. Daily at
11:00. L-307. 3 credits. MATHERLY.
The scope of commercial education; the development of commercial education; present
and probable future needs; organization and administration ; analyses of raw materials or
students; curriculum construction ; commercial teacher training; the teaching of commercial
and economic subjects.
En. 401.-Public School Administration. Daily at 9:00. P-201. 3 credits.
SIMMONS.
Problems peculiar to Florida schools stressed in a practical way.
En. 403.-The Problem-Project Method. Daily at 11:00. P-205. 3 credits.
NORMAN.
The laws of learning, lesson-planning, thinking, questioning, the problem-project
method, the socialized recitation, democracy in the classroom as a preparation for democracy
in life.
En. 405.-Supervised Teaching. 3 credits. Five sections:
Section 1. Designed for teachers of the primary grades. Daily at
12:00. P-7. PEELER.
Section 2. Designed for teachers of the third and fourth grades.
Daily at 12:00. P-11. METCALFE.
Section 3. Designed for teachers of the fifth and sixth grades. Daily
at 12:00. P-10. UPSON.
Section 4. Designed for teachers of the high school. Hours and
room to be arranged. REED.
Section 5. Directed observation for teachers of the elementary
grades. Daily except S., at 3:00. P-10. STORIE.
Practice in conducting recitations under close supervision.
En. 406.-The Elementary School Principal. Daily at 8:00. A-205. 3
credits. RICKARDS.
The problems that usually confront the elementary school principal will be stressed.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 408.-High School Administration. Daily at 9:00. P-208. 3 credits.
GARRIS.
Practical management and administration of the modern high school.
En. 501.-The Elementary School Curriculum. Daily at 8:00. P-101. 3
credits. SIMMONS.
An intensive study of the development, and present content of the elementary school
curriculum, including the kindergarten ; the selection and evaluation of material.
En. 503S.-Educational Tests and Measurements. Seminar. 10:00 M. T.
Th. and F. P-208. 2 credits. CRAGO.
This is an intensive study of intelligence and educational tests. It is recommended that
En. 317 be taken before this course.
Laboratory fee: $1.50.
En. 505S.-The Organization and Administration of Extra Curricular
Activities in Junior and Senior High Schools. 2 credits. (Not offered in 1931).
An attempt will be made in this course to work out constructive school policies having
to do with the developing of the pupil's initiative, leadership, cooperation, etc.
En. 509.-Problems in School Administration. Daily at 8:00. H-207. 3.
credits. CARMICHAEL.
Open to graduate students who are qualified by experience and training to pursue
advanced study on selected problems in administration. Special attention is given to school
house planning.
En. 511.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. Daily at
8:00. P-208. 3 credits. GARRIS.
The selection and organization of subject matter from the vocational point of view.
En. 514.-Pre-Adolescent Psychology. 11:00 M. T. Th. and F. P-101. 2
credits. LANCASTER.
A study of the child covering the years from nine to thirteen. The growth, health,
habits, mental and moral characteristics of the child in this stage of its development will
be discussed. The course will bring out the meaning and social importance of adolescent
growth and interests.
En. 517.-Educational Statistics. 10:00 M. T. Th. and F. H-207. 2 cred-
its. CARMICHAEL.
The chief purpose of this course is to acquaint students with statistical methods as
applied to education. It is recommended that this course be taken before En. 503.
En. 519.-High School Curriculum. 3 credits. (Not offered in 1931).
A comprehensive view of the basic principles in curriculum construction.
En. 521.-The Business Administration of a School System. Daily at
12:00. H-207. 3 credits. CARMICHAEL.
Open to graduate students qualified by training and experience to pursue advanced work
in this field. Each student selects some problem for special study and presents the results
of this study in the form of a thesis.
En. 527.-How to Write a Thesis. No credit. Four sections:
Section 1. 2:00 M. and F. P-201. FULK.
Section 2. 10:00 T. and F. P-201. FULK.
Section 3. 2:00 T. and Th. P-201. FULK.
Section 4. 10:00 M. and Th. P-201. FULK.
Designed primarily to help graduate students in Education in writing their theses. Open
to all graduate students. Required of all students majoring in Education.
En. 528.-Educational Supervision. Daily at 8:00. L-306. 3 credits.
CRAGO.
A graduate course in the supervision of instruction. Designed for principals, super-
visors, and teachers.







254 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

En. 562S.-Vocational Guidance. 11:00 M. T. W. and F. P-208. 2 credits.
GARRIS.
Guidance and counseling high-school students. Educational and vocational guidance and
problems of personality adjustment.

ENGLISH
Eh. 21.-Minimum Essentials of English. Daily at 8:00. L-212. No
credit. MOUNTS.
An elementary course in the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation and sentence con-
struction, designed to meet the needs of freshmen deficient in preparatory English. For
such deficient students this course is prerequisite to Eh. 101. Entry to the course will be
determined by examinations to be given during the registration period.
Note: Required of all freshmen who, upon entering the University, are found deficient
in minimum essentials of high school English.
Eh. 101.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 credits. Six sections:
Section 1. Daily at 8:00. L-314. SPIVEY.
Section 2. Daily at 8:00. L-209. MORRIS.
Section 3. Daily at 9:00. Bu-201. PRICE.
Section 4. Daily at 9:00. S-101. MOORE.
Section 5. Daily at 11:00. A-205. SPIVEY.
Section 6. Daily at 12:00. L-311. MOUNTS.
Designed to train students in methods of clear and forceful expression. Instruction is
carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in theme writing, and in corrective studies
and exercises adapted to the needs of the individual student. In addition, all students are
encouraged to read extensively for extra credit.
Note: All students expecting to take Eh. 101 must report at Language Hall, Room 210,
at nine o'clock on the first morning of registration, Monday, June 15, to take the required
Freshman English Placement Test. No student will be registered for Eh. 101 who has not
taken the Placement Test.
Eh. 102.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 credits. Four sections.
Section 1. Daily at 8:00 P-209. HATHAWAY.
Section 2. Daily at 11:00. L-209. MOUNTS.
Section 3. Daily at 11:00. P-209. HATHAWAY.
Section 4. Daily at 12:00. L-203. SPIVEY.
A continuation of Eh. 101, supplemented by the study and rhetorical analysis of models
of good writing.
Eh. 103.-Introduction to Literature. Daily at 9:00. L-211. 2 credits.
CALDWELL.
A survey of the literature of the western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance.
Eh. 201.-History of Literature. 3 credits. Two sections:
Section 1. Daily at 11:00. L-211. CALDWELL.
Section 2. Daily at 12:00. L-209. MORRIS.
An outline course in the historical development of the English literature and language.
Selections from important prose writers and poets; lectures on the history of the language
and literature; a manual for reference; frequent reports from the individual students;
constant use of the University Library.
Eh. 202.-History of Literature. Daily at 9:00. L-306. 3 credits. MORRIS.
A continuation of Eh. 201, completing the study of English literary history to the end
of the eighteenth century.
Eh. 206.-Historical Grammar. Daily at 9:00. L-210. 3 credits. FARR.
A course based on Lounsbury's "English Language" designed to give the student some
knowledge of the historical development of the English language, with a view especially of
giving insight into modern English grammar.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Eh. 301.-Shakespeare. Daily at 11:00. L-210. 3 credits. FARR.
The life and earlier work, including the history, plays, romantic comedies and non-
dramatic poetry. Three plays will be read in class. Written reviews on plays read outside
the class will alternate with essays from the students and lectures by the instructor. This
course is open to those who have had Eh. 201 and 202 or equivalent work in English litera-
ture.
Eh. 302. Shakespeare. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. and S., 2:00 W. L-210. 3 cred-
its. FARR.
Continuation of Eh. 301 in which the later tragedies will be emphasized.
Eh. 408.-Contemporary American Poetry. Daily at 11:00 L-212. 3
credits. ROBERTSON.
Beginning with the study of Whitman and his influence, this course treats such recent
and contemporary poets as Emily Dickinson, Sidney Lanier, Moody, Markham, Millay,
Lindsay, Sandburg, Frost and Robinson.
Eh. 409.-Chaucer.' Daily at 9:00. L-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
Extensive reading in the "Canterbury Tales"; study of Chaucer's language and verse;
the historical background of his work; some attention to the "Troilus and Criseyde" and
minor poems.
Eh. 501.-Anglo-Saxon. Daily at 8:00. L-210. 3 credits. FARR AND ROB-
ERTSON.
Anglo-Saxon grammar; reading of Alfredian prose, "Beowulf," and other Anglo-Saxon
literature.
Eh. 503.-Seminar. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. and S. L-213. 3 credits. ROBERT-
SON.
Reading course in English literature for graduate students.
Eh. 505. The Renaissance. Daily at 8:00. L-211. 3 credits. CALDWELL.
Origin and nature of the Renaissance movement, and the effects of the movement on
English prose, poetry, and drama under the Tudors.

FRENCH

Fh. 21.-Elementary French. Daily at 8:00. L-311. 3 credits. ATKIN.
The first semester of the course in beginning French; pronunciation; elements of gram-
mar; and translation.
Note: Credit is not given for Fh. 21 until Fh. 22 is completed.
Fh. 22.-Elementary French. Daily at 11:00. L-311. 3 credits. GRIMM.
The second semester of the course in beginning French.
Prerequisite: One semester of French in college, or one year in high school.
Fh. 101.-Third Semester French. Daily at 8:00. L-307. 3 credits. LEWIS.
The first semester of second-year college French: reading, oral practice, composition.
Prerequisite: One year of French in college, or two years in high school.
Note: Credit is not given for Fh. 101 until Fh. 102 is completed.
Fh. 102.-Fourth Semester French. Not given in summer of 1931.
Fh. 511.-Teachers' Course in French. Daily at 9:00. L-311. 3 credits.
ATKIN.
Careful study of French sounds and connected speech, to secure intelligent handling of
pronunciation difficulties and perfect the student's accent; intensive study of selected read-
ings ("explication de texts") ; practice in writing French. Designed primarily for teachers
and prospective teachers of French.
Fh. 513.-Eighteenth Century French Literature. 10:00 M. T. Th. F.
and S. L-311. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Reading and interpretative criticism of representative selections from the literature of
the eighteenth century. Presupposes some acquaintance with the history of French litera-
ture, and the ability to read French easily.







256 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

GENERAL NATURAL SCIENCE

Gl. 101.-General Natural Science. 4 credits. Two sections:
Section 1. Daily at 8:00. C-112. Laboratory and conference hours
to be arranged. HEATH.
Section 2. Daily at 11:00. C-112. Laboratory and conference
hours to be arranged. HEATH.
The aim of the course will be to give the student something of the fundamentals of all
sciences, with the further purpose of weaving them together into a unified whole. Particu-
larly valuable for teachers in elementary and high schools.
Laboratory fee: $3.
GI. 102.-General Natural Science. Daily at 9:00. C-112. Laboratory and
conference hours, and room to be arranged. 4 credits. JACKSON.
Laboratory fee: $3.

HANDWRITING

Hg. 101.-Handwriting. Hours and room to be arranged. NEIGHBORS.
During the month of July a course in Handwriting will be offered. Students enrolling
for this course will have an opportunity not only to improve their own handwriting, but to
learn by instruction and demonstration the correct presentation of Handwriting in all
grades of the elementary schools. The value of measuring diagnostic and remedial teaching
will be emphasized. The State adopted text will be used.


HISTORY

NOTE: Courses in History are year courses and both semesters must be com-
pleted before final credit is given.
Hy. 101.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 credits. Two sections:
Section 1. Daily at 12:00. L-5. PAYNE.
Section 2. Daily at 11:00. L-109. GLUNT.
The development of Western Europe from the Teutonic Migrations to the First Crusade.
Hy. 102.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 credits. Two sections:
Section 1. Daily at 11:00. L-5. PAYNE.
Section 2. Daily at 12:00. L-109. GLUNT.
Western Europe from the Crusades to the Reformation. A continuation of Hy. 101.
Note: Hy. 101 and 102 is a prerequisite for all advanced work in History.
Hy. 203.-Latin-American History. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. and S., 2:00 W.
L-5. 3 credits. GLUNT.
The discovery, settlement, and development of Central and South America.
Hy. 302.-American History 1783 to 1830. Daily at 8:00. L-109. 3
credits. LEAKE.
A continuation of Hy. 301.
Hy. 304.-American History 1876 to 1931. Daily at 9:00. L-109. 3 cred-
its. LEAKE.
A continuation of Hy. 303.
Hy. 306.-English History. Daily at 9:00. L-5. 3 credits. PAYNE.
This course covers the second semester's work in Hy. 305-306.
Hy. 509.-Seminar in American History. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. and S.
L-109. 3 credits. LEAKE.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


LATIN
Ln. 301.-Juvenal and Tacitus. Daily at 11:00. L-111. 3 credits. J. N.
ANDERSON.
Selections from the Satires of Juvenal and from the Histories of Tacitus.
Prerequisite: Two years of college Latin.
Ln. 508.-The Roman Satire, mainly Horace and Juvenal. Daily at
11:00. Additional hours to be arranged. L-111. 3 credits. J. N. ANDERSON.

LAW
Lw. 308.-Common Law Pleading. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. and S., 9:00 W. Law-
204. 3 credits. COCKRELL.
Lw. 311.-School Law. 9:00 M. T. Th. and F. Law-105. 2 credits. TaUS-
LER.
Lw. 350.-Administrative Law. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. and S., 9:00 W. Law-
105. 3 credits. SLAGLE.
Lw. 402.-Evidence. Daily from 11:00 to 12:15. Law-204. 4 credits. TE-
SELLE.
Lw. 408S.-Legal Ethics. 11:00 to 12:15 T. Th. and S. Law-105. 2 credits.
TRUSLER.
Lw. 411.-Florida Constitutional Law. 11:00 to 12:15 M. W. and F. Law-
105. 2 credits. TRUSLER.
Lw. 412.-Florida Civil Practice. Daily at 8:00. Law-204. 3 credits.
COCKRELL.
Lw. 523.-Taxation. Daily at 8:00. Law-105. 3 credits. SLAGLE.
Lw. 527.-Suretyship. 9:00 M. T. Th. and F. Law-204. 2 credits. TE-
SELLE.
LIBRARY SCIENCE
The adoption of standards for High School Libraries by the Southern Associa-
tion has created the demand for a large number of school libraries. The concen-
sus of opinion seems to be that if this demand is to be met, Library Science courses
will have to be given by a certain number of colleges and universities in addition to
the regular accredited library schools. It is impossible to repeat all courses each
summer but the foundation courses are repeated when necessary and supplementary
courses and electives are offered each year. Practice work is given in the University
Library under the supervision of the University Library Staff. Education 203 is
recommended as an elective for all students majoring in Library Science.
The entrance requirement for all students is the completion of sixty credit
hours of college or university work. No others will be admitted to any of the Library
Science courses except by special permission. A transcript of work done must be
sent to the Registrar of the University and approved by him before registration. It is
important that this be done before the opening of summer school.
Ly. 101.-Cataloging I. Daily at 8:00. P-5. 3 credits.
A study of the principles and methods of the simpler forms of cataloging. Two hours
supervised practice work will follow each lecture. The cards will be revised and form a
sample catalog for the use of the student.
Laboratory fee: $1.50.
Ly. 102.-Classification I. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. P-5. 2 credits. TIMMER-
MAN.
The Dewey Decimal system is used as the basis of the instruction. The study of book
numbers is included. Problems will be given with each lecture.







258 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Ly. 103.-Library Economy. 9:00 M. T. Th. S. P-5. 2 credits.
This course includes the general routine of adding books to the library with instruction
in order work, accessioning, mechanical preparation and care of books and the checking of
periodicals. Simple charging systems and various circulation records will be studied.
Ly. 104.-Book Selection I. 3 credits. (Not given summer, 1931.)
This course includes lectures covering the general principles of book selection, with the
needs of the high-school library particularly in view, the examination and discussion of
selected books in the various fields of literature and the writing of annotations. Problems
involving the use of standard guides to book selection and reading lists will be required of
each student. As a final project the class will make up a list of books for a school library.
Ly. 202.-Reference I. 3 credits. (Not given summer, 1931.)
A study of important reference books and their value and use. Encyclopedias, diction-
aries, periodical indexes, and other reference books.
Ly. 204.-Children's Literature. Daily at 8:00. P-4. 3 credits. TIMMER-
MAN.
A study of children's literature and a study of children's reading interests.
Laboratory fee: $1.50.
Ly. 205.-Teaching Use of Library. 9:00 W. F. P-5. 1 credit.
A study of the purpose and place of the library in the school, including the organiza-
tion of a course of lessons for teaching the use of the library.
Ly. 301.-School Libraries. 12:00 M. T. Th. F. P-5. 2 credits. TIMMER-
MAN.
A study of the functions of the school library in the modern school organization and its
relation to the public library and the community.
Ly. 305.-Practice Work. Daily at 11:00. P-5. 2 credits. UNIVERSITY LI-
BRARY STAFF.
Practice work will be given in the University Library.

MATHEMATICS
NOTE: The following courses will be given in successive summers in the order
in which they appear in the list, the first being given in 1931:
Ms. 534.-Projective Geometry.
Ms. 331.-College Geometry.
Ms. 536.-The Foundations of Geometry.
Ms. 85.-Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms. Daily at 11:00. M-301. 3
credits. McINNIs.
The solution of the triangle; practical applications of logarithms; and trigonometric
analysis. Textbook: Simpson, Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms.
Ms. 101.-College Algebra. Daily at 9:00. M-211. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
A study of the quadratic equation, proportion, progressions, the binomial theorem, func-
tions, graphs, theory of equations, permutations, combinations, probability, and determi-
nants. Textbook: Harding and Mullins, College Algebra.
Ms. 102.-Plane Analytic Geometry. Daily at 8:00. M-301. 3 credits.
McINNIs.
The algebraic study of the figures of geometry and the plane sections of a cone. Text-
book: Curtiss and Moulton, Analytic Geometry.
Ms. 251.-Differential Calculus. Daily at 9:00. M-301. 3 credits. Mc-
INNIS.
The study of a process known as differentiation, which, with its numerous and widely
different applications, constitutes one of the most important practical and theoretical fields
of mathematics. Textbook: March and Wolff, Calculus.
Note: No credit toward a degree is allowed until Ms. 252 is completed.
Ms. 252.-Integral Calculus. Daily at 11:00. M-209. 3 credits. PHIPPS.
Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas,
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems. Textbook: March and Wolff,
Calculus.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ms. 351 and 352.-Advanced Calculus. Daily at 9:00. M-209. 2 or 4
credits. PHIPPS.
A further study of the calculus, the treatment of more advanced topics, and the use of
analytic geometry of three dimensions. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until
the four credits have been earned.
An intensive study covering the work of both courses. A student may obtain credit in
one or both, but students expecting credit in both courses should not elect more than one
other subject. Textbook: March and Wolff, Calculus.
Ms. 534.-Projective Geometry. Daily at 11:00. M-211. 3 credits. KOKO-
MOOR.
Pure geometry dealing primarily with properties unaltered by the processes of projec-
tion and section; principal theorems involved, theory of poles, polars, involution, and
kindred topics. Textbook: Holgate, Projective Pure Geometry.
Ms. 549.-Theory of Infinite Processes. Daily, except W. 10:00. M-209.
3 credits. PHIPPS.
This is a continuation of Ms. 550 offered last summer. Textbook: Small, Elements of
the Theory of Infinite Processes.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. Daily at 8:00. M-211. 3
credits. KOKOMOOR.
A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special emphasis
upon the changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching. No specific text
is followed, but numerous works are used as references.


MUSIC

Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades I, II and III. Section
1: 9:00 M. T. W. Th. F. C-110; Section 2: 4:00 M. T. W. Th. F. C-110. 2 credits.
PORTER.
Study of the child voice; rote songs, the toy symphony, art and rythm songs; sight
singing from rote to note; oral and written dictation ; appreciation.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades IV, V and VI. 8:00 M.
T. W. Th. C-110. 2 credits. PORTER.
Development of sight singing; ear training, oral and written dictation ; part singing;
appreciation.
Msc. 105.-Materials and Methods for Junior and Senior High Schools.
10:00 M. T. Th. F. S. C-110. 2 credits. PORTER.
Sight singing; study of the changing voice; beginning harmony; appreciation.
Msc. 301.-Glee Club. Technique of Ensemble Singing. 5:00 or 7:00
M. T. Th. F. Stage of Auditorium. 1 credit. DEBRUYN.
Fee: $1.
Voice.-Private lessons in voice. Hours to be arranged with the Instructor.
Two scholarships in voice will be given. Two lessons per week unless otherwise
arranged.
Course I.-Theory of Voice Building. Stage of Auditorium. 1 credit.
WORTH.
Breathing, tone placing, simple songs.
Course II.-For Advanced Students. Stage of Auditorium. 1 credit.
WORTH.
A continuation of Course I. Students registering in this course will be expected to
appear in the opera at the close of the term.







260 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

NURSING EDUCATION
Ng. 103.-Home Nursing. 10:00 M. F. and 2:00-4:00 T. Th. A-304. 2
credits. GABRIEL.
Home Hygiene and care of the sick. A study of the health and problems of individual
homes and community with demonstrations and student practice work based upon Red Cross
textbook. Open to students and teachers. Class limited to fifteen students but the course
will not be given if less than ten register. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratories
per week. Recognition of this work is given by the Red Cross. Textbook: Home Hygiene
and Care of the Sick. (Revised).
Ng. 203.-Child Care and Training. Daily at 11:00. A-304. 3 credits.
GABRIEL.
A brief study of the mental and emotional development of the child from birth to six
years of age with special emphasis on habit formation, including habits of eating, sleep, and
rest, cleanliness and elimination, etc. Open to students and teachers. Lectures and assign-
ments. Daily class periods.
Ng. 204. Maternal and Infant Care. 2:00-4:00 M. W. F. A-304. 3 cred-
its. GABRIEL.
A brief study of maternal and infant mortality with special reference to Florida condi-
tions; clothing and food for the expectant mother, preparation for confinement, care of
the newborn, the layette, growth and development during the first year, diseases and defects
of infancy. Open to students and teachers.

PHILOSOPHY
Ppy. 301.-Ethics. Daily at 11:00. P-201. 3 credits. ENWALL.
Principles of Ethics. Study of such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty, freedom,
civilization, and progress.
Ppy. 304.-History of Modern Philosophy. Daily at 12:00. P-112. 3
credits. ENWALL.
A continuation of Ppy. 303. Special attention will be given to the works of Descartes,
Spinoza, Leibnitz, Hume, Kant, and Hegel.
Ppy. 508.-The Philosophic Conceptions of the Great English Poets.
Seminar hours to be arranged. P-114. 3 credits. ENWALL.
Prerequisite: Ppy. 303 and 304, or Ppy. 301.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
HPl. 115.-Plays and Games for Grades I, II and III. 9:00 M. T. Th. F.
Gymnasium. 1 credit. LUDWICK.
The content and method of physical education in the early elementary grades. The
games, plays, and rhythmic activities of these grades will be taken up from the standpoint
of the teacher. For women students only.
Fee: Fifty cents.
HPI. 116.-Plays and Games for Grades IV, V and VI. 10:00 M. T. Th.
F. Gymnasium. 1 credit. LUDWICK.
A continuation of Hpl. 115 with the exception that emphasis is placed upon the activi-
ties for the later elementary grades. Self-testing activities, rhythmic activities, and team
games are the types of activity to be considered from the teaching standpoint. For women
students only.
Fee: Fifty cents.
HPl. 213-s.-Theory and Practice of Natural Activities. Section 1. For
women, 3:00 M. T. W. Th. Gymnasium. LUDWICK. Section 2. For men, 3:00
M. T. W. Th. Basketball Gymnasium. SALT. 1 credit.
The organization, promotion, and participation in the following: playground ball, volley
ball, handball, speedball, tennis, swimming, basketball, badminton, etc. Primarily an
activities course. This course may be substituted for Pl. 101 or 102.
Fee: $1.50.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


HPi. 221.-Rhythmic Activities. 2:00 M. T. W. Th. Gymnasium. 1 credit.
LuDWICK.
Presents opportunity for participation in athletic, clog, and tap dancing suitable for
use in physical education classes. Open to men and women students.
Fee: $1.50.
HPh. 311-s.-Organization and Administration of Health and Physi-
cal Education. Daily at 11:00. B-210. 3 credits. SALT.
The organization and administration of Health and Physical Education in the public
schools from the standpoint of a physical education teacher and director. The student
should have completed HPI. 341 or should be taking the course concurrently. Open to
men and women students.
HPI. 341.-Principles of Physical Education. Daily at 12:00. B-210. 3
credits. SALT.
A consideration of the fundamental principles upon which the present day philosophy
of physical education is based. A study of the history, aims, objectives, and contemporary
trends in this field. This course should be completed as soon as possible by those students
majoring or teaching in this field. Open to men and women students.


PHYSICS

Physics 105, 106, 107 and 108 will not be given this summer. Students in the
College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in Physics may enroll in the courses
outlined below. Substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher is made.
Only two of the following group of courses will be offered this summer.
Ps. 111.-Elementary Theory of Mechanics and Heat. Daily at 11:00.
B-203. 3 credits. BLESS.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
Ps. 112.-Elementary Theory of Light and Electricity. Daily at 9:00.
B-203. 3 credits. BLESS.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
Ps. 115.-Laboratory Work in Mechanics and Heat. Hours to be ar-
ranged. B-306. 2 credits. BLESS AND ASSISTANT.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
Ps. 116.-Laboratory Work in Light and Electricity. Afternoons to be ar-
ranged. B-306. 2 credits. BLESS AND ASSISTANT.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
The following courses are designed for advanced undergraduate students and
for graduates. A college course in Physics is a necessary prerequisite for these
courses. In addition, calculus is required if graduate credit is desired. Only two
of the courses listed below will be offered during the summer. Hours of each
are to be arranged.
Ps. 311.-Electricity and Magnetism. Hour to be arranged. B-203. 3
credits. BLESS.
A course in the theory, of intermediate difficulty, designed to follow Ps. 112.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
Ps. 399.-Advanced Physics. Hour to be arranged. B-203. 3 credits. BLESS.
A survey of Physics from an advanced point of view.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
Ps. 517.-Modern Physics. Hour to be arranged. B-203. 3 credits. BLESS.
A survey of theories of atomic structure, X-rays, radioactivity.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.







262 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Ps. 525.-The History of Physics. Hour to be arranged. B-203. 3 credits.
BLESS.
The historical evolution of the present-day physical theories.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
The Department has a fairly well equipped X-ray laboratory and students with the
proper preparation will be given the opportunity to make use of these facilities.
Graduate and special courses in Electrical Engineering may be arranged for upon
application to Professor Weil.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Political Science courses are year courses and both semesters must be com-
pleted for final credit.
Pcl. 101.-American Government and Politics. Section 1. Daily at 12:00.
L-211. TRIBOLET. Section 2. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. S., 2:00 W. L-211. 3 credits.
LAIRD.
A study of the structure and functions of the federal government.
Pcl. 102.-American Government and Politics. Section 1. Daily at
8:00. L-204. LAIRD. Section 2. Daily at 9:00. L-307. 3 credits. LAIRD.
A study of state, county, and municipal government; continuation of PcI. 101.
Pcl. 101 and 102 prerequisite for all advanced work.
Pcl. 309.-International Relations. Daily at 11:00. L-306. 3 credits.
TRIBOLET.
Pcl. 310.-International Relations. Daily at 9:00. L-209. 3 credits.
TRIBOLET.
A continuation of Pcl. 309.


PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 201.-General Psychology. Four sections. 3 credits.
Section 1. Daily at 8:00. P-112. HINCKLEY.
Section 2. Daily at 9:00. A-104. WILLIAMS.
Section 3. Daily at 10:00; W. 2:00. P-112. WILLIAMS.
Section 4. Daily at 11:00. P-112. HINCKLEY.
Facts and theories current in general psychological discussion: The sensations, the
sense organs, and the functions of the brain ; the higher mental functions-attention, per-
ception, memory, feeling, emotion, volition, the self, and like topics. This course satisfies
the professional requirement for the extension of certificates.
Psy. 304.-Experimental Psychology. Daily at 11:00. Laboratory 1:00-
4:00 M. P-114. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Mainly laboratory work with standard apparatus on the current problems in Experi-
mental Psychology. Special attention given to methods of psychological investigation and
the collection and treatment of data.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.
Laboratory fee: $2.
Psy. 403.-Theories of Personality. Daily at 9:00. P-114. 3 credits.
HINCKLEY.
The more inevitable problems of human life and their normal and abnormal solutions.
A critical consideration of the most important explanations of these adjustments. The
development of personality traits and attitudes, and the organization of the self. The
improvement of personality.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


PUBLIC SCHOOL ART

Pc. 101.-Elementary Art. Two sections. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
Section 1. M. W. F. at 9:00. P-302. MITCHELL.
Section 2. M. W. F. at 3:00. P-302. MITCHELL.
Production and methods of teaching the following subjects to all grades from the first
through the junior hig school: lettering, posters, design, note book and portfolio construc-
tion, nature study, and picture study.
Pc. 102.-Frieze Development. 2:00 M. W. F. P-302. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
Prcdu-tion and methods of teaching the following subjects to all grades from the first
through the junior high school: color, costumes, figures, trees, landscapes, perspective
combined in frieze painting.
Pc. 201.-Design and Application. 8:00 T. W. Th. P-302. 1 credit.
MITCHELL.
Production and methods of teaching the following subjects to all grades from the first
through the junior high school: floral design, floral design applied, animal drawing
simplified, developing patterns for toys, animal design applied, book ends, color review, and
note book.
Pc. 209.-Design Applied; Arts and Crafts. 11:00 M. W. F. S. P-302.
1 credit. MITCHELL.
The fundamentals of elementary design and its application to such problems as: the
tea tile, wall plaque, book ends, wall hangings, pillow tops, plaited lamp shades, and greet-
ing cards.

SOCIOLOGY
Sy. 111.-Introduction to Social Studies. Section 1. Daily at 8:00. B-
210. BEATY. Section 2. Daily at 12:00. B-209. 3 credits. CARLETON.
An approach to the social sciences through Biology and Psychology. Social life as
conditioned by geographical environment. Early man. Development of folkways, mores and
institutions, with special emphasis on the development of private property and the family.
Required of all freshmen in the College of Education.
Sy. 112.-Introduction to Social Studies. 10:00 M. T. Th. F. B-210. 2
credits. CARLETON.
(Continuation of Sy. 111.) Special emphasis on the Industrial Revolution and its effect
on various aspects of social life and social institutions.
Prerequisite: Sy. 111 or special consent of instructor.
Sy. 311.-Problems of Child Welfare. 2:00-4:00 T. Th. B-210. 2 credits.
BRISTOL, BEATY AND SPECIAL LECTURERS.
A study of the findings and recommendations of the White House Conference on Child
Health and Protection with special reference to Florida, together with a consideration of
sociological principles involved.
Sy. 381.-Development of Asiatic and European Cultures. Daily at
9:00. B-210. 3 credits. CARLETON.
A survey of the Far-Eastern, Near-Eastern and Classical civilizations; a comparative
treatment of industrial, political, familial, intellectual, esthetic, ethical and religious
development. (Should be followed by Sy. 382 which studies the development of medieval
and modern European civilizations.)
Sy. 441.-Principles of Sociology. 10:00 M. T. Th. F., with two hours to
be arranged. P-8. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
A study of the principles governing successful living and working together in society,
built around a sociological interpretation of the life of Woodrow Wilson, with parallel read-
ings.
Sy. 443.-Race Problems. Daily at 11:00. B-209. 3 credits. BEATY.
Origin and dispersion of races; the sociological concept of race; causes of racial
antagonism ; racial inequality; race mixtures ; basis of racial adjustment.
Prerequisite: Sy. 111 or 102, or consent of instructor.






264 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Sy. 531.-Science of Social Relations. Hours to be arranged. 3 credits.
BRISTOL.
Seminar in Social Theory to be taken largely in connection with Sy. 441.
Sy. 552.-Community Leadership. 2:00-4:00 M. W. F. P-8. 3 credits.
BRISTOL.
Psychological basis of community leadership. Community self-knowledge through
surveys, "scoring," investigations. Social institutions with suggested programs for im-
provement; importance of leadership in community building; the discovery and training
of leaders.
For advanced students in sociology and social administration.

SPANISH

Credit is not given for Spanish 21 or Spanish 101 until Spanish 22 is completed
in the one case, and Spanish 102 in the other. Students who have had one year
of Spanish in the high school are admitted to Spanish 22, two years, to Spanish
101, three years, to Spanish 102.
Sh. 21.-Elementary Course. Daily at 8:00. L-203. 3 credits. CRow.
Pronunciation, grammar, dictation, acquisition of vocabulary, written exercises, read-
ing of easy texts, conversation.
Sh. 102.-Intermediate Course. Daily at 9:00. P-209. 3 credits. HATH-
AWAY.
Advanced grammar, composition, reading of modern stories, conversation.
Sh. 302.-General Survey of Spanish Literature. Daily at 9:00. L-203.
3 credits. CROW.
A study of the history of Spanish literature, supplemented by the reading of texts,
emphasis being laid upon the modern period.
Prerequisite: Spanish 102, or equivalent.
Sh. 501.-Old Spanish. Daily at 11:00. L-203. 6 credits. CROW.
A study of Spanish Historical Grammar. Readings from XII, XIII and XIV centuries.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.


SPEECH
Prerequisite: All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have
completed English 101 and English 102.
Sch. 201.-Public Speaking. Daily at 12:00. P-205. 3 credits. CONSTANS.
A presentation of the principles of correctness, clearness and effectiveness in speaking
with considerable practice in the delivery of original speeches.
Sch. 309.-Dramatic Production. Daily at 9:00. P-205. 3 credits. CON-
STANS.
Consideration of voice, technique of acting, and principles of character interpretation.
The problem of directing, stage equipment, lighting, make-up. Rehearsal of one-act plays.




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