• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Table of Contents
 The faculty
 General information
 The three-year curriculum
 The four-year curriculum
 Departments of instruction
 Other departments
 Graduates
 Awards and honors
 The university calendar, 1931-...














Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00426
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: February 15, 1931
Copyright Date: 1932
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00426
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 155
        Page 156
    Table of Contents
        Page 157
    The faculty
        Page 158
    General information
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
    The three-year curriculum
        Page 166
    The four-year curriculum
        Page 167
    Departments of instruction
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
    Other departments
        Page 179
    Graduates
        Page 180
    Awards and honors
        Page 181
    The university calendar, 1931-32
        Page 182
Full Text





The University Record

of the


University of Florida


Bulletin of the
College of Pharmacy

With Announcements for the Year
1931-32


Vol. XXVI, Series I


No. 3


February 15, 1931


Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.



















The University Record of the University of Florida is issued as often as
twice every month.

The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual col-
leges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruction,
and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what in-
formation is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in sev-
eral series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with insti-
tutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is
under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual
copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to the University Bookstore, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida















CONTENTS


T he F aculty ................ ...... ..... .... ....
General Information ---............-..... ..
Aim and Scope.

History.

Equipment.
Medicinal Plant Garden.
Chemistry-Pharmacy Library.
Rules and Regulations.

Expenses.
Scholarships and Loan Funds.
Awards and Medals.
Honor Societies.
Student Organizations.
Admission.
Advanced Standing.
Degrees.
The Three-Year Curriculum...............
The Four-Year Curriculum .................
Departments of Instruction ...............

Other Departments ...............-. -
G graduates -.....................- ......-- ..- .. --
Awards and Honors ................. ...........
Additional Information ....................-
The University Calendar .................-


Page
................................... -... ....... ..... 158

.... -..... --... ... ...... -...... ............ .. 159-166


-.-...-- ............. .. ..... ...... ..... -...... ......- ...- .... 16 6
--....-.-.. -.. -.-.....-.....-.........-- ..- ............. 167
........- ......... ........... .... .......... ........ 168-179

.........-.... .....-....--- --.....- ....-....-.....- .... 179
............................................. ................... 180
.. --... -.........-- -.... .............-- ...- ....--........... 18 1
.................................................... ........... 181
...................... -.................. ---... .... ...- .... ... 18 2







THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY FACULTY


ADMINISTRATION

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., President.
JAMES MARION FARR, M.A., Ph.D., Vice-President.
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, M.A., Ph.D. (Chicago), Dean.
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Director of Admissions and Registrar.
KLINE HARRISON GRAHAM, Business Manager.
HELEN F. LANGSLow, B.A., Secretary to the Dean.
MYRA A. McMILLAN, Secretary-Librarian.


CHEMISTRY

TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, M.A.,Ph.D.(Chicago), Head Professor of Chemistry.
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, B.A., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry.
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, M.S., D.Sc. (Princeton), Professor of Chemical
Engineering.
FRED H. HEATH, B.S., Ph.D. (Yale), Professor of Chemistry.
VESTIS T. JACKSON, M.S., Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor of Chemistry.
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, M.S., Ph.D. (Purduel. Assistant Professor of Chemistry.
BURTON J. OTTE, B.A., M.S., Curator of Chemistry.
GEORGE A. HAWKINS, B.S.E., Fellow in Chemistry.
HARVEY A. MAST, B.S., Fellow in Agricultural Chemistry.
MAURICE L. MOORE, B.S., Fellow in Chemistry.
SILAS M. THRONSON, A.B., Fellow in Chemistry.
WOODSON C. TUCKER, JR., M.S., Fellow in Chemical Engineering.
CHILES E. SPARKS, B.S., Fellow in Chemistry.
DAVE ADELSON, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
ROBERT B. BENNETT, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
WILLARD B. BIGGERS, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
JAMES DAVID, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
CARL KAZARIAN, Student Assistant in Chemisiry.
ARTHUR E. KROMER, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
Louis G. McDOWELL, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
ANDREW P. McLEAN, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
LouIS MAGID, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
JOHN A. ROBERTS, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
WILLIAM E. ROBINSON, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
WALTER E. SANSBURY, Student Assistant in Chemistry.
G. A. BARBER, Assistant to Curator.


PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY

BERNARD V. CHRISTENSEN, M.S.. Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Pharma-
cognosy and Pharmacology.
HAROLD W. WERNER, B.S. (Pharm.), M.S., Assistant Professor of Pharmacog-
nosy and Pharmacology.







GENERAL INFORMATION


LOVELL D. HINER, B.S. (Pharm.), Half-time Instructor in Pharmacognosy and
Pharmacology.
CLAUDE L. CONWAY, Student Assistant in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology.
F. B. PLEMMONS, Drug Gardener.

PHARMACY
WILLIAM J. HUSA, Ph.C., M.A., Ph.D. (Iowa), Head Professor of Pharmacy.
PERRY A. FOOTE, M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Pharmacy.
PAUL S. SHATTUCK, B.S. (Pharm.), Half-time Instructor in Pharmacy.
JOSEPH M. CARTER, Student Assistant in Pharmacy.
The faculty of the departments of Biology, English, French, Spanish, Ger-
man, Physics, and related subjects, will be found in the bulletin of the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences.
The faculty of the departments of Business Administration and Economics
will be found in the bulletin of the College of Commerce and Journalism.
The faculty of the department of Botany and Bacteriology will be found
in the bulletin of the College of Agriculture.
The faculty of the department of Physical Education will be found in the
bulletin of the College of Education.
The faculty of the department of Military Science will be found in the
bulletin of the Division of Military Science and Tactics.

GENERAL INFORMATION

AIM AND SCOPE
The School of Pharmacy was established in the University in 1923. Fos-
tered by the druggists of Florida, to whom the school owed its inception,
and aided by the liberal support of the Legislature, in two years the school
had grown to the point where the University recognized it as the College of
Pharmacy, which change in name was made in 1925.
As an integral part of the University, the College is governed by the same
general policy and maintains the same high standard of requirements as
do the other colleges in the institution. In common with the other natural
sciences, it requires a large amount of laboratory instruction.
There is a distinct advantage in studying pharmacy in the University,
where the students of pharmacy share all the advantages and enjoy the spirit
of a great educational establishment, which increases the incentive to pre-
pare themselves to meet the requirements of the trend of pharmaceutical
education.
HISTORY
The College of Pharmacy owes its existence, in a great degree, to the splen-
did efforts of the Florida State Pharmaceutical Association and the Florida
State Board of Pharmacy.
Mr. W. G. Perry, in his presidential address in 1922, speaking for the
Florida State Pharmaceutical Association, said:
"The day of the private institution for teaching pharmacy, valuable as it







160 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

once was, has gone by. Laboratory equipment, and the modern accessories
of teaching now needed, mean the establishment of a plant which only the
state or a richly endowed institution can finance.
"So we should work for our University School of Pharmacy. Reconstruc-
tion of educational methods since the cessation of the World War has given
a new impetus to the study of pharmacy, and the ablest thinkers in the calling
are unanimous in the belief that higher entrance requirements and more scien-
tific training are necessary to meet the demand for well-trained pharmacists.
It is argued that not until the average druggist becomes something more than
a commercial handler of medicines can he hope to be recognized as a profes-
sional man or to be considered as a promising candidate for a commission in
the government service. Surely the trained pharmacist is needed to assist
the physician in his work and unless he is competent to make analyses, bac-
terial determinations and related investigations, qualifications which can be
learned only through the college and laboratory, his opportunities for ad-
vancement will be of little avail."
During the administration of President J. J. Gerig of the Association, a
committee, headed by F. C. Groover, was appointed to co-operate with the
University in the establishment of the School of Pharmacy. The excellent
service by this committee resulted in the druggists of this state pledging
$5,000 to augment the legislative appropriation made for the School of Phar-
macy. This sum was paid to the Auditor of the University before the expira-
tion of the time limit of the pledge.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida State Pharmaceutical Association has
provided many current journals and books for the Library of the College of
Pharmacy.
Standard of Work.-All work offered in the College of Pharmacy meets
the highest requirements of pharmaceutical instruction in this country. As a
member of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the College
receives due recognition for its courses from all state boards requiring at-
tendance in a school of pharmacy as a prerequisite for examination and regis-
tration. Although all schools of the Association are required to maintain
certain minimum requirements for entrance and for graduation, the College
prides itself on the fact that all of its requirements are in excess of this
minimum.
Registration and Reciprocity.-Every applicant applying to the Board of
Pharmacy for the State of Florida for examination to become, a registered
pharmacist in the State of Florida, as a prerequisite to making such appli-
cation, shall furnish the Secretary of the Board:
a. With the written statement of at least two reputable citizens, who shall
not be related to the applicant by either consanguinity or affinity, certifying
that the applicant is a person of good moral character.
b. The applicant shall furnish a certificate in writing that he is over twenty-
one (21) years of age.
c. That the applicant shall present to the Board, through its Secretary, a
diploma from an accredited school or college of pharmacy, such accredited
school being a school or college of pharmacy, holding membership in the







GENERAL INFORMATION


American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, provided that a diploma of
any other school or college of pharmacy not a member of said American
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, but whose standard of requirements for
the issuance of its diploma are equal or equivalent to the requirements of
an accredited school as now established by said American Association of
Colleges of Pharmacy, shall be recognized by the Board as a diploma sufficient
to entitle the applicant to be examined by the Board. And further provided
that the requirements herein provided shall not apply to any person who
has been apprenticed for a period of one year or more under the provisions
of the Laws of this State as the same existed prior to the passage of said
Chapter 10201 of the 1925 Laws of Florida, and further providing that the
provisions of these rules shall not apply to any legally qualified physician,
practicing in the State of Florida for three years, prior to June 5, 1915, and
further provided that nothing in these rules shall be deemed or held to im-
pair or affect the now existing rules and regulations of this Board or the
Laws of this State as now in force governing the right of a pharmacist reg-
istered in some other State, whose standards of requirement and examination
shall be fully equal to the standard of requirements and examination as
established and maintained by the Board, from registering with the Board
without examination.
Further information concerning registration in Florida may be obtained
by writing Mr. J. H. Haughton, Secretary of the State Board of Pharmacy.
Palatka, Florida.
Opportunities for Graduates.-The three-year curriculum is designed pri-
marily to train retail pharmacists. Only a small amount of latitude can be
allowed in the selection of courses, since the minimum requirements of the
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy must be met. But the four-
year curriculum offers an opportunity for specialization, either in Commercial
Pharmacy, in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, or in Pharmacognosy and Pharma-
cology. The course in Commercial Pharmacy should qualify a man for a
position as manager in a drug store, or as a salesman of drugs and chemicals.
The work in Pharmaceutical Chemistry is designed to train men for positions
in food and drug laboratories, or as manufacturing pharmacists. The com-
pletion of the work of the fourth year in pharmacognosy or pharmacology
should qualify one to act in the capacity of pharmacognocist or inspector of
crude drugs with a manufacturing concern, or with the Federal Customs
Service, or as pharmacologist for manufacturing houses, or for hospitals. The
above-named positions are only a few of the many open to men who possess
training along any of the above lines. At the present time the difficulty
is not to find a position for the trained man, but to find sufficient men with
adequate training for the technical positions now open.

EQUIPMENT

Grounds and Buildings.-The University occupies a tract of nine hundred
and fifty-three acres situated in the western part of Gainesville. Ninecy acres
of this tract are devoted to campus. drillgrounds, and athletic fields; the re-








162 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY


mainder ,is used by the College of Agriculture and Agricultural Experiment
Station.
The University is one of the few institutions in the United States that
made plans for all future development of the campus, as far as this could be
foreseen, before laying the foundation of a single building.
The liberality of the State has permitted the erection of substantial and
attractive modern buildings as they were needed. The present buildings on
the campus of interest to the College of Pharmacy are:
The Pharmacy-Chemistry Building, which contains all of the class rooms, lab-
oratories, office and equipment used by the College of Pharmacy and the Depart-
ment of Chemistry. Kewaunee furniture and alberene wall type hoods are standard
equipment in all of the laboratories. The laboratories are piped for hot and cold
water, high pressure steam, gas, compressed air, and A. C. and D. C. electricity.
They are well equipped for graduate as well as undergraduate work in pharmacy
and chemistry.
The first unit of this building was erected in 1927. It is a brick and reinforced
concrete structure 204' 6" by 145' 11". The present value of the building and
equipment is estimated at $390,000. The completed building will be in the form of a
hollow square with the stock room and large lecture hall occupying a portion of
the center.
The attractiveness of the building is enhanced by carvings of alchemistic
symbols, gargoyles and the names of famous pharmacists and chemists. At the
entrance to the building appears the following motto: "Enter to Think God's
Thoughts After Him; Go Forth to Apply His Thoughts in Service."
Science Hall, which now houses the departments of Botany, Biology and Bac-
teriology. The Florida State Museum is also located in this building.
Language Hall, in which are located the departments of Languages, Economics,
together with the executive offices of the University. The College of Commerce and
Journalism and the General Extension Division offices are also located in this build-
ing.
The Administration Building, one unit of which has been completed and is now
used as an auditorium which seats 2200 persons. In this building has been in-
stalled the $50,000 Anderson Memorial organ, the gift of Dr. Andrew Anderson of
St. Augustine.
The University Library Building, which contains the main library of some
60,000 volumes. The Pharmaceutical and Chemical Library of technical books and
periodicals, is located in the Pharmacy-Chemistry Building.
The University Commons, which building contains the University cafeteria, also
the campus Y. M. C. A.
The Infirmary.
The Gymnasium, in which are located the offices of the Department of Physi-
cal Education.
Military.-For information concerning this department consult the special
bulletin of the Division of Military Science and Tactics, or the Bulletin of
General Information.
MEDICINAL PLANT GARDEN

A ten-acre tract has been allotted to the College of Pharmacy for use as
a medicinal plant garden. This tract has been divided into three sections--
(1) about three acres in the natural wooded state and including a small
lake for aquatic plants; (2) about three acres from which all underbrush
has been cleared and which is used largely for the development of trees and
of plants that require shade; (3) about four acres under cultivation and which
is used for the propagation of medicinal plants that grow under cultivation.







GENERAL INFORMATION


The drug garden is conducted primarily to serve as a teaching adjunct.
Students go to the garden to study, and learn to recognize the medicinal plants
in the growing state and also to study methods of propagation, culti-
vation, harvesting and curing of plants for the commercial market. It also
serves as a source of supply for fresh material for study, investigation and
classroom illustration. For these reasons, as many as possible of the official
plant drugs are grown. There are at present about one hundred thirty medic-
inal plants growing in the garden. In addition, investigations pertaining to
the successful growth of exotic plants are being carried on, particularly in
reference to tropical and sub-tropical medicinal plants. Whenever possible,
rootstock or seeds are furnished to individuals who are interested in the pro-
duction of medicinal plants. The helpful cooperation of the United States
Bureau of Plant Industry, the State Commissioner of Agriculture and of in-
terested citizens of the state is much appreciated.

CHEMISTRY-PHARMACY LIBRARY

The Chemistry-Pharmacy branch of the Main Library is housed in the
Chemistry-Pharmacy Building. It is open daily except Sunday, during the
business hours of the University with a librarian in attendance.
The books are kept in stacks in one portion of the library room, and the
remainder of the room is furnished with comfortable chairs and a large table
for reading and studying.
The collection of books include text and reference books and several of
the American and foreign periodicals on chemical and pharmaceutical sub-
jects. Additional volumes are added each year.

RULES AND REGULATIONS

Students are referred to the handbook "By-Laws of the University of
Florida" for complete information concerning the rules and regulations by
which they are to be governed. A copy of this handbook is furnished each
student upon registering in the University. Every student is held responsible
for reading and abiding by these By-Laws.

EXPENSES

Consult the Bulletin of General Information, pages 142-146, for information
concerning expenses.
Estimate of Laboratory Fees and Books for a Student in the College of
Pharmacy:
Freshman Year:
Military, $1; Biology, $15; Chemistry, $15; Pharmacy, $10; Books,
$27.50 ................................... ....... .......... ........... ..... .. ...... .........-.................. $68.50
Sophomore Year:
Military, $1; Chemistry, $20; Biology, $10; Pharmacy and Phar-
m acognosy, $25; Books, $27.50 ...................... ........... ...... .................... 83.50
Junior Year:
Pharmacy and Pharmacognosy-Pharmacology, $38 ; Books, $27.50 .... 65.50
Senior Year:
Laboratory work, elective; Books, $27.50 ......................................... 27.50







164 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS

Groover-Stewart Scholarship.-For several years past the Groover-Stewart
Drug Company of Jacksonville, Florida, has maintained three scholarships
having a total annual value of $1,000. No scholarship will he awarded after
1930-31 and for that year it has already been awarded.
Fairchild Scholarship (National).-Mr. Samuel W. Fairchild of New York
City offers annually a scholarship amounting to $500. The award is made,
by competitive examination, to a graduate in pharmacy who will do post-
graduate work in the year immediately following his graduation. Examina-
tions are held in June at the various colleges of pharmacy which are mem-
bers of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.
Further information may be obtained from the Dean of the College of
Pharmacy.
Other Scholarships.-For information concerning other scholarships offered
consult the Bulletin of General Information, pages 147-151.

AWARDS AND MEDALS

For information concerning the awards and medals listed below consult
the Bulletin of General Information, page 152.
Groover-Stewart Drug Company Cup
Blinche Winfield Leigh Medal
The Ramsaur Medal

HONOR SOCIETIES

Rho Chi Honorary Pharmaceutical Fraternity.- Iota Chapter of Rho Chi,
national honorary pharmaceutical fraternity, was established at the University
in 1928. Chapters of this organization are established only at colleges that
are members in good standing of the American Association of Colleges of
Pharmacy and which meet the high standards established by the national
chapter. Membership is based primarily on scholastic ability as indicated by
average percentage of grades, participation in student activities, and gentle-
manly qualities. All candidates for membership must have completed at least
sixty hours of scholastic work and be recommended by the Dean of the Col-
lege of Pharmacy.
Gamma Sigma Epsilon Honorary Chemical Fraternity.-Gamma Sigma
Epsilon is a national honorary chemical fraternity. Its members are elected
from those students whose grades in chemistry for the two years prior to
election are up to the high standard set by the local chapter. Graduate
students majoring in chemistry are also eligible for membership. Election
to membership in this fraternity is regarded by chemistry students as one of
the highest honors to be attained at the University.
Phi Kappa Phi.-A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was
established at the University during the spring of 1912. To be eligible for
membership a student must have been in attendance at the University for at
least one year, or three summer sessions, have been guilty of no serious







GENERAL INFORMATION


breaches of discipline, have had at least three years of collegiate training,
be within one year of finishing a course leading to a degree, and stand among
the first tenth of the senior class of the University. Candidates for election to
Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor point average of two on all
scholastic work. wherever done, for which credit toward a degree is received.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Mortar and Pestle Society.-The Mortar and Pestle Society of the Uni-
versity of Florida was organized by the students of the College of Pharmacy
at a meeting in Science Hall, September 21, 1923. Lectures and debates on
interesting phases of scientific and commercial pharmacy are held each month.
Leigh Chemical Society.-The Leigh Chemical Society was organized by and
for the students of the Department of Chemistry. The purpose of the society
is to stimulate the interest of the beginning student of chemistry by giving
him a correct idea of the broadness of the field and its far-reaching importance
in the arts and industry. All chemistry students are urged to affiliate with
the society and attend its programs which are held on the second Thursday
evening of each month.
For information concerning other student organizations consult the Bul-
letin of General Information, pages 153-154.

ADMISSION

For rules and information concerning admission consult the Bulletin of
General Information, pages 137-138.
In addition to the seven units required of all candidates for admission
(three in English, one in algebra, one in plane geometry, one in history, and
one in science) two additional units are required.
For the courses leading to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy and the de-
gree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy.-For these courses two units of a
foreign language are required. However, candidates presenting two units in
history, and two units in science, or three units in history or three units in
science, need not present any foreign language for admission.

ADVANCED STANDING

Advanced standing will be granted only upon recommendation of the heads
of the departments concerned. Fitness for advanced work may be determined
by examination or by trial. Students from other institutions of like standing
will ordinarily be classified according to the ground already covered.

DEGREES

The College offers a three-year curriculum leading to the certificate of
Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph.G.), and an additional year's work, upon com-
pletion of which the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (B.S. in
Pharm.) is conferred. In the work of the fourth year opportunity is given


165








166 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY


for specialization in Commercial Pharmacy, in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, or
in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology.
Students entering in 1932 can register only for the four-year course. In
accordance with the action of the American Association of Colleges of Phar-
macy and the National Boards of Pharmacy the three-year course will be dis-
continued.
The Degree of Master of Science.-Courses are offered leading to the degree
of Master of Science in Pharmacy. Candidates for that degree must possess the
Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy of this institution or of one of like
standing.
The student must spend at least one entire academic year in residence at
the University as a graduate student, devoting his full time to the pursuit
of his studies.
For further requirements for the Master's Degree, see the Bulletin of the
Graduate School.
The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.-Courses are offered leading to the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy with specialization in Chemistry, Pharmacy.
and Pharmacognosy. For further information consult the special Bulletin of
the Graduate School.


THE THREE-YEAR CURRICULUM

Leading to the Certificate of Graduate in Pharmacy

First Year


Second Semester
Credits Names of Courses
.................................... 3 English 102 .............
................................ 4 Botany 102 ...............


.................................... 5


Pharmacy 101 --........--............................ 3
Military Science 103 ................--.......... 2
Physical Education 101 ...................... 1


Chemistry 361 ................
Chemistry 303 ...........
Pharmacognosy 221 ....
Pharmacy 211 ..............
Military Science 203 .-


Pharmacology 351 ..........
Pharmacy 351 ..................
Pharmacy 331 ...................
Pharmacy 361 .................
Pharmacy 381 .................


Chemistry 104 ...............--.....
Pharmacy 102 .......................
Military Science 104 .........
Physical Education 102 .....


Credits
................. 4


.....--.......--.... 8
................ 2
................. 1


Second Year
......................... 5 Chem istry 362 .................... ................... 5
........................ 2 Biology 0105 ........................................ 2
..................... ... 3 Pharm acognosy 222 .......-........................ 3
........................ 5 Pharm acy 222 .................................... 5
.......................... 2 M military Science 204 ............................ 2


Third Year
....................... 3 Pharm acy 372 .............. ......................... 4
...................... 5 Pharm acognosy 342 .............................. 3
.. ................-- .. 3 Pharm acology 362 .................................. 4
...................... 3 Pharm acy 332 ........................................ 2
...................... 2 Pharm acy 362 .................... .................. 3

16 16


First Semester
Names of Courses
English 101 ..........
Botany 101 ............


Chemistry 101







CURRICULUM


THE FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUM

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy.

The first three years of the four-year curriculum are identical with the
three-year curriculum as outlined above. In the senior year a major may be
selected in Commercial Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Pharmacognosy,
or Pharmacology.
Wherever the term "approved elective" occurs in the curriculum it shall
be understood that the electives are to be recommended by the Head of the
Department concerned and approved by the Dean.
Senior Year
Commercial Pharmacy Major
First Semester Second Semester
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits


Pharmacy 471 .-...
Business Administration 331
Business Administration 211 ......
French, German or Spanish ....
Business Administration 401. or
Approved Elective ....... ----....
Approved Elective ....... .


Pharmaceutical


Pharmacy 451 ......
French or German
Approved Electives


......... 3
. ... ....... 3
. ........lo(


Business Administration 332 ........... 3
Business Administration 212 .............. 3
French, German or Spanish ............. 3
Business Administration 402, or
Approved Elective .................... 3
Approved Elective ......................... 4


Chemistry Major
Pharmacy 432 .
Chemistry 232 .
Chemistry 406 .........
French or German
Approved Electives


Pharmacognosy 425 .....
*Pharmacognosy 435 ...
Pharmacognosy 491, or
Approved Elective ........
French or German ..........
Approved Electives outside
Department ...............




Pharmacology 451 ..............
Pharmacology 455 ........
Pharmacology 491, or
Approved Elective ...........
French or German .....----
Approved Electives outside
Departm ent ......................


Pharmacognosy Major
........... 4 Pharmacognosy 426 .
4 *Pharmacognosy 436
Pharmacognosy 492, or
............ 2 Approved Elective ..............
........... 3 French or German ......--....
Approved Electives outside
.... .. 3 Departm ent .........- .....---...


16 16
Pharmacology Major
.................. 4 Pharm acology 452 .................................. 4
-.- ..-..--..- 4 Pharmacology 456 ................................ 4
Pharmacology 492, or
....... ........ 2 Approved Elective ............................ 2
................... 3 French or German ................................ 3
Approved Electives outside
... -...... 3 Departm ent .................. .............. ... 3


*Pharmacognosy 231-232 may be substituted if student has not already completed
this course.

Students entering in 1932 can register only for the four-year course. In
accordance with the action of the American Association of Colleges of Phar-
macy and the National Boards of Pharmacy the three-year course will be dis-
continued.


.









168 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Subjects with odd numbers are given in the first semester and subjects with
even numbers are given in the second semester unless the number begins with
0, in which case the reverse is true.
The number of hours given is the number of hours which the class meets
per week.
The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours earned by
each student who receives a passing grade (A, B, C, or D) when the subject
is completed.
Subjects numbered 200 or above are not open to freshmen; subjects num-
bered 300 or above are not open to sophomores; subjects numbered 400 or
above are not open to juniors; subjects numbered 500 or above are for gradu-
ate students.
The abbreviations used are wherever possible the first and last letter of
the first word of the department name. Occasionally, a third central letter
is demanded to distinguish between departments where first and last letters
are identical.
Three hours of laboratory work or equivalent are considered of equal
value to one hour of recitation.

BIOLOGY

Bly. 0105.-Elementary Anatomy and Physiology. 2 hours. 2 credits.
Sherman.
The elements of vertebrate anatomy with an introduction to the physiological
systems of man.
Fee for demonstration material: $2.

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

Bty. 101.-General Botany. 2 hours and 4 laboratory hours. 4 credits.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit in Bty. 102
is earned. Cody, Carroll.
The plant cell; structure and life histories of spore plants.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 102.-General Botany. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
Cody, Carroll.
Structure, life histories and principles of classification of seed plants.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bcy. 301.-General Bacteriology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Carroll.
The morphology, physiology and cultivation of bacteria and related microorgan-
isms.
Prerequisite: College Botany or Biology; a knowledge of chemistry desired.
Laboratory fee: $5.








CURRICULUM


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Bs. 201E-202E.-Principles of Economics. 3 hours. 6 credits. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits
are earned. Anderson, Bigham, Dolbeare, Eldridge, Hicks.
An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption. Attention is de-
voted to the principles governing value and market price with a brief introduction
to money, banking and credit, industrial combinations, transportation and com-
munication, labor problems, and economic reform.
Bs. 211-212 or 0211-0212.-Principles of Accounting. 2 hours and 2
laboratory hours. 6 credits. No credit toward a degree will be
allowed until Bs. 212 is completed. Gray, Ward.
Lectures, problems, and laboratory practice. An introductory study of the
underlying principles of double entry records; basic types of records and reports;
accounting procedure and technique; the outstanding features of partnerships and
corporations; the form and content of the balance sheet and the statement of
profit and loss.
Bs. 331.-Principles of Salesmanship. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.
Actual practice in sales methods, including preparation for and obtaining the
interview; presenting the sales talk; meeting and overcoming objections; detailed
study of the stages of the sale; attention, interest, desire and action; sales tactics:
sales personality. Principles covered apply to all kinds of selling specialties,
styles, etc.
Bs. 332.-Retail Store Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.
Retail store problems; types of stores; executive control; purchasing; accounts;
location; service; organization; management of employees and price policies.
Bs. 401.-Business Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.
Contracts and agency; the formation, operation, interpretation, and discharge
of binding agreements; creation of the relation of agency; types of agents; rights
and obligations of the agent, principal, and third party; termination of the relation-
ship of agency.
Bs. 402.-Advanced Business Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.
Conveyances and mortgages of real property; sales and mortgages of personal
property; the law of negotiable instruments; partnership.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 4 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 5
credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit
in Cy. 102, 104 or 110 is earned. Heath in charge.
The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and the preparation and prop-
erties of the common non-metallic elements and their compounds. Students may
begin this course either the first or second semester.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 102.-General Chemistry, continued. 4 hours and 3 hours lab-
oratory. 5 credits. Heath in charge.
Devoted largely to a study of the metallic elements and their compounds.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 104.-General Chemistry, continued, and Qualitative Analysis. 4
hours and 3 hours laboratory. 5 credits. Jackson.
A study of the metallic elements and their compounds, and the qualitative
analysis of the metals and acid radicals.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of first year pharmacy students.








170 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY


Cy. 105.-General Chemistry. 3 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 4
credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until credit
in Cy. 106 is earned. Black.
The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry and the preparation and prop-
erties of the common non-metallic elements and their compounds.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of first year agricultural students.
Cy. 106.-General Chemistry, continued, and Qualitative Analysis.
3 hours and 6 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 5 credits. Black,
Jackson.
A study of the metallic elements and their compounds and the essentials of
qualitative analysis.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of first year agricultural students.
Cy. 107-108.-Elementary Descriptive Chemistry. 3 hours and 3
hours laboratory. 8 credits. No credit toward a degree will be
allowed until the entire 8 credits are earned. Pollard.
A study of the elements and their compounds with a minimum of the under-
lying principles of chemistry. The laboratory work will be of general nature
and will include no systematic qualitative analysis. This course does not fulfill pre-
requ'site requirements for a second course in chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5 per semester.
Cy. 110.-General Chemistry, continued. 4 hours. 4 credits. Beisler.
Devoted largely to a study of the metallic elements and their compounds.
Required of second year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 203.-Qualitative Analysis. 2 hours and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. Jackson.
A systematic study of the metals and their chemical reactions and theoretical
considerations of qualitative analysis. Practice in the separation and identification
of the common metals and acid radicals.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 215.-Water and Sewage. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. Pollard.
A theoretical and practical study of the examination and treatment of water
and sewage.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of fourth year Civil Engineering students.
Cy. 232.-Elementary Physical Chemistry. 3 hours and 3 hours lab-
oratory. 4 credits. Jackson.
A study of the gaseous, liquid and solid states of matter, the properties of
solutions, and colloids.
Prerequisite: Cy. 203 or College Physics.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 262.-Organic Chemistry. 3 hours and 6 hours laboratory. 5
credits. Black.
A brief course embracing the more important aliphatic and aromatic com-
pounds, designed chiefly for students in applied biological fields. Suitable for those
premedical students who desire only 5 hours of organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cy. 303.-Quantitative Analysis. 6 hours laboratory or its equivalent.
2 credits. Black.
A brief survey of the fundamental methods of gravimetric and volumetric
analysis. The laboratory work is selected especially for students of pharmacy.
Prerequisite: Cy. 104.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of second year pharmacy students.
Cy. 305 or 0305.-Quantitative Analysis. 2 hours and 9 hours lab-
oratory. 5 credits. Black.
The fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. The lab-
oratory work may be varied somewhat to fit the needs of individual students.
Prerequisite: Cy. 104, Cy. 106, or Cy. 203.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 335 or 0335.-Unit Processes of Chemical Engineering. 3 hours. 3
credits. Beisler.
A critical study of the fundamental chemical engineering processes, such as
filtration, evaporation and drying.
Prerequisites: Cy. 232, College Physics and Calculus.
Required of fourth year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 343.-Industrial Chemistry, Inorganic. 3 hours. 3 credits. Beisler.
Consideration of chemical principles involved in manufacturing and refining
inorganic products of commercial importance.
Prerequisites: Cy. 232 or General Chemistry and College Physics.
Required of fourth year Chemical Engineering students.
Cy. 351.-Metallurgy. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Beisler, Yeaton.
A study of the preparation, properties, structure and uses of the more important
metals and alloys.
Prerequisites: General Chemistry and College Physics.
Required of fourth year chemical engineering students.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 361-362.-Organic Chemistry. 3 hours and 6 hours laboratory or
its equivalent. 10 credits. No credit toward a degree will be
allowed until the entire 10 credits are earned. Leigh.
A study of the preparation and properties of various aliphatic and aromatic
compounds.
Prerequisites: Cy. 104, Cy. 203, or Cy. 232.
Laboratory fee: $5 per semester.
Cy. 403.-Water Analysis. 9 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 3
credits. Pollard.
The analysis of waters to determine their potability and fitness for steam
raising and other purposes.
Prerequisite: Cy. 305.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
Cy. 405.-Gas Analysis. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
The analysis of fuel and illuminating gas and products of combustion. Some
attention given to the theory and use of automatic gas recorders.
Prerequisite: Cy. 305.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Not offered in 1931-1932.








172 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY


Cy. 406.-Physiological Chemistry. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Pollard.
The chemistry and physiology of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and body tissues.
The examination of body fluids such as milk, blood, urine, etc. An elementary
course.
Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of fourth year pharmaceutical chemistry students.
Cy. 410.-Historical Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits.
The historical development of the more important chemical theories and their
influence on the development of the science.
Prerequisites: Cy. 361, Cy. 362 and Cy. 305.
Not offered in 1931-1932.
Cy. 415.-Fuels Laboratory. 6 hours laboratory or its equivalent.
2 credits. Beisler.
Analysis and calorimetry of gaseous, liquid and solid fuels.
Prerequisite: Cy. 305.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of fourth year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 421.-Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3 hours and 3 hours lab-
oratory. 4 credits. Jackson.
A study of electrical theory of matter, radioactivity, atomic structure, relation
between physical properties and chemical constitution, equilibrium, phase rule,
thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, chemical kinetics, and photo-chemistry.
Prerequ:sites: Cy. 203, Cy. 232, Cy. 361 and Cy. 362.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 432.-Agricultural Analysis. 2 hours and 9 hours laboratory.
5 credits. Black.
The quantitative analysis of agricultural products. The laboratory work may
be varied somewhat to fit the needs of individual students.
Prerequisites: Cy. 305, Cy. 361, and Cy. 362.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 444.-Industrial Chemistry Laboratory. 9 hours laboratory or
its equivalent. 3 credits. Beisler.
A practical study of the commercial methods of manufacture and purification
of important chemicals.
Prerequisites: Cy. 335, Cy. 343.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of fourth year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 446.-Industrial Chemistry, Organic. 3 hours. 3 credits, Beisler.
Consideration of chemical principles involved in manufacturing and refining
organic products of commercial importance. Visits are made to accessible fac-
tories and chemical plants.
Prerequisites: Cy. 361-362; Cy. 343.
Required of fourth year chemical engineering students.
Cy. 462.-Photographic Chemistry. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3
credits. Heath.
Deals with the chemical action of light, the preparation, properties, and uses of
photographic materials. The practical applications of photography will be shown,
as well as the theory of the subject.
Prerequisites: Cy. 262, or Cy. 361 and Cy. 362; Cy. 232 or College Physics.
Given alternate years. Offered in 1931-1932.
Cy. 481.-Chemical Literature. 1 hour or its equivalent. Pollard.
A general study of the present sources of published chemical information.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


GRADUATE COURSES


Cy. 501.--Organic Preparation.
Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations.
Cy. 505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds.
Cy. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry.
Cy. 509.-Electrochemistry.
Cy. 513.-Colloid Chemistry.
Cy. 516.-Chemistry of the Rare Elements.
Cy. 519.-Atomic Structure.
Cy. 525.-Chemistry of the Terpenes.
Cy. 531.-Advanced Qualitative Analysis.
Cy. 533.-Advanced Quantitative Analysis.
Cy. 537.-Qualitative Organic Chemistry.
Cy. 538.-Quantitative Organic Chemistry.
Cy. 551-552.-Chemical Research.
See Bulletin of Graduate School for description
above.


of the courses


ENGLISH


Eh. 101-102.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 hours. 6 credits. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits
are earned. Robertson and staff.
To train students in methods of clear and forceful expression. Instruction is
carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, and in theme writing.
Required of all freshmen.

MILITARY SCIENCE

My. 103-104.-Freshman Field Artillery, Cumpulsory. 2 hours theory
and 3 hours practical. 4 credits. Captains Hepner and Donnovin.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: organization-hygiene and
first aid-elementary gunnery-explosives, ammunition and fuzes-military courtesy
and discipline-drill and command. (b) Practical: dismounted drill-ceremonies-
pistol instruction-individual equipment-materiel-75 mm. gun drill -gunner's
examination. Text: Wilson Field Artillery Manual, Vol. I.
My. 203-204.-Sophomore Field Artillery, Cumpulsory. 2 hours the-
ory and 3 hours practical. 4 credits. Captain Barco.
The work is divided as follows: (a) Theoretical: Care of Animals-Map Read-
ing-and Sketching-Fire Control Instruments-Communications. (b) Practical:
Dismounted Drill-Ceremonies-Equation-Driving-Mounted Drill-Reconnaissance,
selection and occupation of position. Text: Wilson Field Artillery Manual, Vol. I.
Prerequisite: My. 103 and 104.
Students may take four years Military Science, if desired. See Bulletin of
the Division of Military Science and Tactics.







174 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY


MODERN LANGUAGES

At least one year of modern language is required for the degree of B.S. in
Pharmacy.
FRENCH

Fh. 21-22.-Elementary French. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until the 6 credits are earned.
Huston.
Elements of pronunciation and grammar-reading of simple prose.
For beginners.
Fh. 101-102.-Third and Fourth Semester French. 3 hours. 6 credits.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the 6 credits are
earned. Huston.
Second-year college French: Reading of modern texts- grammar review-trans-
lation of simple English into French.
Prerequisite: Eh. 21 and 22 (or the equivalent, such as two years of high school
French).
GERMAN

Gn. 21-22.-Elementary German. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit
toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are
earned. Crow and Hauptmann.
Gn. 101-102.-Intermediate. 3 hours. 6 credits. Crow.
Second-year College German.
Prerequisite: Gn. 21 and 22 or their equivalent.

SPANISH

Sh. 21-22.-Elementary. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit toward a
degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits are earned. De
Gaetani.
Sh. 101-102.-Intermediate. 3 hours. 6 credits. DeGaetani.
Second-year college Spanish.

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY

The Department of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology offers courses designed
to provide a practical foundation for professional pharmacy and a fundamental
training for scientific work in related fields and in addition, such electives as are
deemed adequate to enable students to acquire the technical information and skill
necessary for scientific work in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology. Courses in
Pharmacognosy are supplemented with field work in the Medicinal Plant Garden
conducted by the Department. Laboratories are well equipped for both under-
graduate and graduate work.
Pgy. 221-222.-Practical Pharmacognosy. 12 hours laboratory. 6
credits. Christensen, Hiner.
Sources of crude drugs and a systematic classification of the vegetable and animal
drugs of the United States Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary. Laboratory
work on the methods of identifying the crude drugs, illustrated with authentic
specimens.
Laboratory fee: $5 per semester.
Required of second semester pharmacy students.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Pgy. 231-232.-Cultivation of Medicinal Plants. Lectures and field
periods to be arranged according to credits, which may vary from
4 to 10 credits. Christensen, Werner.
Medicinal plants that are being cultivated, methods of cultivation, harvesting,
curing, and preparation for the market. Field work with plants grown in the
Medicinal Plant Garden.
Pgy. 342.-Microscopy of Drugs. 1 hour and 4 hours of laboratory.
3 credits. Christensen, Werner, Hiner.
Microscopic structure and characteristics of types of drugs, methods of identi-
fying powdered drugs and food products, and of detecting adulterations.
Prerequisite: Pgy. 222.
Laboratory fee: $3.
Required of third year pharmacy students.
Ply. 351.-Pharmacology. 3 hours. 3 credits. Christensen.
The manner of action, dosage, therapeutic uses and toxicology of official and
non-official drugs and poisons. Illustrated with carefully planned demonstrations.
Prerequisite: Pgy. 222.
Required of third year pharmacy students.
Ply. 362.-Pharmacological Standardization. 2 hours and 4 hours
laboratory. 4 credits. Christensen, Werner, Hiner.
Biological assaying, employing the official methods of the United States Phar-
macopoeia.
Prerequisite: Ply. 351.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of third year pharmacy students.
Pgy. 425-426.-Classification of Drug Plants. 2 to 3 hours and 8 to
14 hours laboratory and field work. 6 to 10 credits. Christensen.
Systems of classification, family characteristics and methods of identification.
Preparation and filing of herbarium specimens and use of herbarium.
Prerequisites: Pgy. 221 and Pgy. 222.
Laboratory fee: To be arranged.
Pgy. 435-436.-Comminution of Crude Drugs. 2 to 3 hours and 8 to
14 hours laboratory. 6 to 10 credits. Christensen.
Types of milling machinery and milling processes. Legal standards for pow-
dered drugs. Deterioration of drugs, causes and prevention. Preservation from
insects. Lectures and laboratory, collateral reading, oral and written reports.
Prerequisites: Pgy. 221 and Pgy. 222.
Laboratory fee: To be arranged.
Ply. 451-452.-The Principles of Biologicals. 2 to 3 hours and 4 to
14 hours laboratory. 4 to 10 credits. Christensen.
Advanced study of the pharmacology of drugs and pharmacological standardi-
zation with special reference to serums, vaccines, antitoxins, enzymes, pollen ex-
tracts, and gland products.
Prerequisite: Ply. 362.
Laboratory fee: To be arranged.
Ply. 455-456.-New Remedies. 4 to 10 hours. 4 to 10 credits. Chris-
tensen.
A brief history of the organization, policies and accomplishments of the Council
on Pharmacy and Chemistry of the American Medical Association. The Pharma-
cology of new remedies accepted and placed on the market. Lectures, discussions,
collateral reading, oral and written reports. Open to seniors and graduates.
Prerequisite: Ply. 362.








176 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY


Pgy., or
Ply. 491-492.-Pharmacognosy Thesis or Pharmacology Thesis. 4
credits. Christensen.
Research problems in Pharmacognosy or Pharmacology for senior thesis or
equivalent electives may be arranged upon consultation.

GRADUATE .COURSES

Pgy. 425-426.-Classification of Drug Plants.
Ply. 451-452.-The Principles of Biologicals.
Pgy. 521-522.-Special Problems in Pharmacognosy.
Pgy. 525-526.-Drug Plant Analysis.
Pgy. 533-534.-Seminar in Pharmacognosy.
Ply. 551-552.-Special Problems in Pharmacology.
Ply. 555-556.-Pharmacological Testing.
Pgy., or
Ply. 591-592.-Pharmacognosy Thesis or Pharmacology Thesis.
See Bulletin of Graduate School for description of the courses
above.

PHARMACY

The Department of Pharmacy offers courses designed to give the proper em-
phasis to Pharmacy in its professional, scientific, commercial and legal aspects.
Particular attention is given to the scientific side of Pharmacy, and the extensive
laboratory courses afford every opportunity for acquiring the technical skill needed
in identifying, preparing, testing and dispensing drugs and medicines. The ap-
plication of the principles of chemistry, physics, mathematics, bacteriology, etc., to
the work of the pharmacist is emphasized.
Phy. 101.-Pharmaceutical Arithmetic. 2 hours and 2 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. Husa and Shattuck.
The application of arithmetic to pharmacy; a thorough study of the systems
of weight and measure in use in the United States, and their relation to each
other. Laboratory work acquaints the student with the weights and measures
studied, and experiments are carried out on specific gravity, percentage solutions,
thermometry, etc.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
Required of first year pharmacy students.
Phy. 102.-Theoretical Pharmacy. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Foote, Shattuck.
The history and nomenclature of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the
National Formulary, and of the apparatus and processes of operative pharmacy.
Students conduct in the laboratory operations illustrating the principles considered
in lecture, and perform the simpler pharmaceutical operations.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
Required of first-year pharmacy students.
Phy. 211.-Inorganic Pharmacy. 3 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 5
credits. Foote, Shattuck.
Consideration of the inorganic compounds used in medicine-their origin and
their physical, chemical and physiological properties; the preparation of these in-
organic substances, and their use in compounding remedies.
Prerequisites: Cy. 104 and Phy. 102.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of second-year pharmacy students.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Phy. 222.-Galenical Pharmacy. 3 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 5
credits. Foote, Shattuck.
Galenical preparations, such as syrups, spirits, tinctures, extracts, emulsions,
etc. The preparation of these materials extemporaneously on a small scale, and
also their manufacture in larger amounts by use of pharmaceutical machinery.
Prerequisites: Cy. 361 and Phy. 102.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of second-year pharmacy students.
Phy. 331.-Qualitative Drug Analysis. 1 hour and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. Foote.
The detection of the common synthetics, glucosides, and alkaloids in pharma-
ceutical preparations, particularly those of high toxicity. The tests used are those
commonly accepted as evidence in medico-legal cases. Laboratory work on powders,
solutions, emulsions, etc.
Prerequisite: Cy. 302. Corequisite: Phy. 351.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of third-year pharmacy students.
Phy. 332.-Quantitative Drug Analysis. 1 hour and 2 hours labora-
tory. 2 credits. Foote.
The quantitative analysis of medicinal preparations by physical means or by
chemical methods. Certain analyses are made by the use of the polariscope and
the refractometer, while alkaloids are determined both gravimetrically and vol-
umetrically.
Prerequisites: Cy. 362 and 303, Phy. 351.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Phy. 351.-Organic Pharmacy. 3 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 5
credits. Foote.
The preparation, properties, and uses of natural and synthetic organic drugs.
Prerequisites: Cy. 362 and Phy. 222.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of third-year pharmacy students.
Phy. 361.-Prescriptions and Dispensing. 2 hours and 2 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed
until credit in Phy. 362 is earned. Husa, Shattuck.
To train the student for practical and efficient work at the prescription counter,
each student is given extensive practice in filling prescriptions. Incompatibilities,
with emphasis on the methods for overcoming apparent incompatibilities. Pre-
scription reading, translation of prescription Latin, accepted methods of checking
and filing perscriptions, and prescription pricing.
Prerequisites: Phy. 211 and Phy. 222.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of third year pharmacy students.
Phy. 362.-Prescriptions and Dispensing, continued. 1 hour and 4
hours laboratory. 3 credits. Husa, Shattuck.
Prerequisites: Phy. 211, Phy. 222 and Phy. 361.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Required of third-year pharmacy students.
Phy. 372.-Commercial Pharmacy. 4 hours. 4 credits. Husa.
The management of the retail pharmacy; business management, including mer-
chandise information, retail buying, advertising, salesmanship, and accounting.
Prerequisites: Phy. 211 and Phy. 222.
Required of third-year pharmacy students.








178 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY


Phy. 381.-Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. 2 hours. 2 credits. Husa.
National, state and local laws and regulations governing the practice of
pharmacy, and the pharmacist's liability, both criminal and civil, for his own viola-
tion of laws and for violation on the part of his agents.
Prerequisites: Phy. 211 and Phy. 222.
Required of third-year pharmacy students.
Phy. 432.-Advanced Drug Analysis.. 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
Husa.
The more difficult analytical methods of the United States Pharmacopoeia,
supplemented by other methods recommended by the Bureau of Chemistry.
Prerequisites: Phy. 331 and Phy. 332.
Laboratory fee: $6.
Required of fourth year pharmacy students majoring in pharmaceutical chemistry.
Phy. 451.-Synthetic Pharmaceuticals. 2 hours and 2 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. Foote.
The manufacture and use of the newer synthetic remedies. A comparative
study of the different manufacturing methods for each product. The laboratory
work consists of the preparation of these products.
Prerequisite: Phy. 351.
Laboratory fee: $2.50.
Required of fourth-year pharmacy students majoring in pharmaceutical chem-
istry.
Phy. 471.-Advanced Commercial Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. Husa.
A study of the commercial problems and business methods of the manufacturer,
wholesaler, and retail chain store executive.
Prerequisite: Phy. 372.
Required of fourth-year pharmacy students majoring in commercial pharmacy.

GRADUATE COURSES

Phy. 502.-Selected Topics in Pharmacy.
Phy. 503.-Advanced Pharmacy.
Phy. 504.-Advanced Galenical Pharmacy.
Phy. 541.-Manufacturing Pharmacy.
Phy. 553.-Advanced Synthetic Pharmaceuticals.
Phy. 554.-Advanced Pharmacy.
See Bulletin of the Graduate School for description of the courses
above.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Pl. 101-102.-Gymnastics. 2 hours. 2 credits. Dr. L. G. Haskell and
staff.
Instruction given in free exercises for general development and muscular co-
ordination. Elementary work on apparatus, emphasizing form, approach, and execu-
tion.
Instruction and play in tennis, football, basketball, playground ball, track
and baseball.
PHYSICS

Ps. 111.-Elementary Theory of Mechanics and Heat. 3 hours. 3
credits.
A college course designed to meet the needs of the general student.
Required of agriculture, architecture, Bachelor of Science,. and pre-medical
students.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 179


Ps. 112.-Elementary Theory of Sound, Light, and Electricity. 3
hours. 3 credits.
A college course designed to meet the needs of the general student.
Required of architecture, Bachelor of Science, and pre-medical students.
Ps. 113-114.-Lecture Demonstration Course. 1 hour. 2 credits. No
credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 2 credits
are earned.
Demonstration lectures designed to supplement Ps. 111 and 112 and should be
taken by all students electing those courses.
Required of architecture, Bachelor of Science, and pre-medical students.
Ps. 115-116.-Elementary Laboratory Physics. 3 hours laboratory.
2 credits.
A series of laboratory experiments in general physics designed to supplement
Ps. 111 and 112 and should be taken by all students electing those courses.
Laboratory fee: $2.25 each semester.
Required of Bachelor of Science and pre-medical students. Ps. 115 is re-
quired of agriculture students.


OTHER DEPARTMENTS

For description of courses which may be used for approved elec-
tives and those courses listed above consult the bulletins of the
respective colleges in which the course is described.








180 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY


GRADUATES

1924-25


Dewey Rex Moore, B.S. in Pharmacy.
Milanm Ross Anderson, Ph.G.


Lloyd Maury Chew, B.S. in Phar.
Staten Hardee Chance, B.S. in Phar.




Morris Charles Bennett, Ph.C.
James Yarbrough Blake, Ph.C.
Bradley Lanier Dansby, B.S. in Phar.



Lyman David Fonda, M.S. in Phar.



*Gordon Alonzo Baker, Ph.C.
Jonathan Archibald Black, Ph.C.
Richard Harry DeBoer, Ph.C.
Chancey George Hamilton, Ph.C.
Joseph Huske Pearce, Ph.C.


Albert Colcord Deen, Ph.G.,
B.S. in Phar.
LeRoy Tilson Fisher, Ph.G.
Clarence Joseph Lee, Ph.G.
Orlen B. Lewis, Ph.G.


William Birt Anderson, Jr., Ph.G.
John Adolphus Gardner, Ph.G.


1925-26

Thomas Jefferson Edwards, Jr., B.S. in
Phar.
Burton Nathaniel Work, B.S. in Phar.


1926-27

J. Webster Merritt, Ph.C.
Emil Richard Russell, Ph.C.




Ernst T. Stuhr, M.S. in Phar.


1927-28

Erwin Mason Seay, Ph.C.
Richard Harrison Swaine, Ph.C.
Marcus DeVoe Waldron, Ph.C.
Bertram David Walton, B.S. in Phar.
Frank I. Zumwalt, Ph.G

1928-29

Burness Vernon Padgett, Ph.G.
George Garrison Smith, Ph.G.,B.S. in Phar.
Helman Smith, Ph.G.
Arnold DeMerritt Welch, Ph.G.


William Walter F. Enz, M.S. in Phar. Harold Willard Werner, M.S. in Phar.

1929-30


Leslie Earle Arnow, Ph.G., B.S. in Phar.
Henry Leon Hicks, Ph.G.
Carl Kazarian, Ph.G.
Harry Kazarian, Ph.G.
Leon Shepard McLean, Ph.G.
Louis Magid, Ph.G.


James Clifford Pratt, Ph.G.
James Trapani Scaglione, Ph.G.
Bryant Mason Stone, Ph.G.
Arnold DeMerritt Welch, B.S. in Phar
Sidney Thornton Zemp, Ph.G.


AUGUST 8, 1930

Frank Spencer Anderson, Jr., B.S. in Pharmacy

JANUARY 31, 1931

Manuel Sama Carranza, Ph.G.


*Deceased.







AWARDS AND HONORS


AWARDS AND HONORS

1926-28

Groover-Stewart Scholarship................- ................... .........
Groover-Stewart Scholarship................... ----------
Groover-Stewart Scholarship .............. ...... .. ..---- ..
Blanche Winfield Leigh Medal, 1927. -.. -- .--
D. W. Ramsaur Medal, 1927........... ..... ....... --- ..--- .....
F. C. Groover Loving Cup............-..--...... ...- ...............
Blanche W infield Leigh Medal, 1928 ........... ............ .........
D. W Ramsaur Medal, 1928 ................ .. ...... .....


....Joseph H. Pearce, Jr.
..............--..Arnold D. Welch
.. ............... Joseph M. Carter
............. J. Webster Merritt
............... J. Webster Merritt
.. ...................... -Class of 1927
...............Richard H. Swaine
........Joseph H. Pearce. Jr.


1928-30


Groover-Stewart Scholarship ......
Blanche Winfield Leigh Medal, 1929.
D. W. Ramsaur Medal, 1929.....
Blanche Winfield Leigh Medal, 1930.
D. W. Ramsaur Medal, 1930.........


-Wesley J. Alonso
.....Clarence J. Lee
.Arnold D. Welch
..Arnold D. Welch
.........Louis Magid


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

For further information address Townes R. Leigh. Dean. College of
Pharmacy. University of Florida, Gainesville. Florida.







182 BULLETIN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
1931-32
First Semester
1931
September 14, 15, Monday, Tuesday......Entrance examinations.
September 16, Wednesday 11:00 a.m.....1931-32 session begins.
September 16-22, Wednesday-Tuesday..Freshman Week.
September 21, 22, Monday, Tuesday......Registration of upperclassmen.
September 23, Wednesday...................Classes for 1931-32 session begins; late
registration fee $5.
September 30, Wednesday......................Last day for changing course without
paying the $2 fee.
October 7, Wednesday.............................Last day for registration for the first
semester 1931-32.
November 11, Wednesday ...-...............Armistice Day; special exercises but
classes are not suspended.
November 26, Thursday................. .....Thanksgiving Day, a holiday.
December 19, Saturday 12:00 noon........Christmas recess begins.
1932
January 4, Monday 8:00 a.m............----.....Christmas recess ends.
January 25, Monday 8:00 a.m.................Final examinations for the first semes-
ter begin.
January 31, Sunday 8:00 p.m.................Baccalaureate Sermon.
February 3, Wednesday-....--- ..............Inter-semester Day, a holiday.
Second Semester
February 4, 5. Thursday, Friday............Registration for second semester; all
students whose names begin with "A"
through "M" register on Thursday; all
others on Friday.
February 6, Saturday 8:00 a.m...............Classes for second semester begin:
change of course fee, $2; late registra-
tion fee, $5.
February 11, Thursday .............----- ..........Last day for registration for second
semester.
March 23, Wednesday 5:00 p.m ............Spring recess begins.
March 28, Monday 8:00 a.m............... Spring recess ends.
May 26, Thursday 8:00 a.m ..... ....... Final examinations begin.
June 4-6, Saturday to Monday..............Commencement Exercises.
Entrance Examinations
Entrance examinations for admission to the various colleges of the Univer-
sity will be conducted for students whose credits do not meet the requirements.
Candidates wishing to take any of these examinations should notify the
Registrar in writing, not later than September 1, January 15, June 1, or
June 20.
For further information concerning these examinations see under "Admis-
sion by Examination", Bulletin of General Information, page 133.




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