• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Table of Contents
 Main














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00390
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: January 1933
Copyright Date: 1934
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00390
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Main
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
Full Text






The University Record

of the


University of Florida


Bulletin of the

graduate School
With Announcements for the Year
1933-34







teo0


Vol. XXVIII, Series I


No. 1


January 1, 1933


Published semi-monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Ofice of publication, Gainesville, Florida






















The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual col-
leges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruction,
and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them.
The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is
desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in sev-
eral series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with insti-
tutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is
under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual
copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to the University Library, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida










CONTENTS


A dm inistration ............-.. ...-..-. ........- ..--..- ...-.- ............ .................................. 10
Administrative officers .......................................- .........-...........---................ 7
A dm mission ................................................................................................................. 10
A application --. ...- .........- ...- ..- ............. ... ...... ....- .. .................. .. ................ 12
A assistants, Graduate .... ..................... ............................ .... ....................... ... 39
A ssistantships, G graduate ............................--........ .- .... .... .. ....... ... ..-- ... 11
Calendar .....................................--... --..... .... ..-..................... 5
C om m ittees ........... ........- ...- ...- ...- ..- ..- ...- ...- ........- ............... ................ ... 13, 14
C council, G rad uate .......... ............................................................................ ........... 7
C courses ...............- ..- ........ ... ...- ...- ..- ...- ...- ..- .....- ........... ...- ....... ..................... 16
D degrees offered ..............................-...--...-..-...- .......... -- ........................ 12, 14
Departments of Instruction, arranged alphabetically ....................-.............. 16
D issertation .................-.-...- ..... ......- ..........- ...........- .....-..- ....................... 15
Examinations ............................................................................ 13, 14
F ees .................................... .................................................................. 10
G rades ......................... ... ... ..... ..... .............. ........ ... ... ........... 12
Instructions for Graduate Students ................ .....................--............... 6
Language Requirement .-..............- .-...........-..- ............................. 12, 14
R recipients of D degrees .............. ...................................................... ... ......... ... 41
R register of students ............................................. ............................................... 46
Registration ......... .... .... ............. ..... ....... ........... ........ 10
Requirements for Master's degree ............. ....... .............. 12
Requirements for Doctor's degree ................................. .......---....--- ..-..- 14
Scholars, G graduate .. .. ............................................................................ ............. 40
Scholarships, Graduate ............................. ..................... ....... ..... .......... .... 11
Sum m er Session ........... --... ...... .......- ......-.. ........- ....-.-.- ..-- ..- .... ............. 13
T teaching F faculty ........................ ......................................... ......................... 7, 8, 9
T hesis ..................................................................................................... .. ............. 12
Tim e required ................................. .. .......... ................ ............. ....... 12, 14
W ork done in absentia ......... ......................................- ..--..... .. .-............. 13
W ork required ......................... ......................... ...... ..................... 12, 14









GRADUATE SCHOOL CALENDAR
SECOND SEMESTER, 1933


February 2, 3, Thursday and Friday.
February 10, Friday...................

February 25, Saturday........................


March 15, Wednesday..--------........................





M ay 1, M onday...................................

June 5, M onday-...................................
SUMMER S
June 12, 13, Monday and Tuesday......
June 27, 12:00 noon...............................


July 4, Tuesday.


...Registration.
.--Last day for registration for the sec-
ond semester.
---Last day to file with Registrar appli-
cation for degree at end of second
semester.
...Last day for those beginning gradu-
ate work the second semester to file
with the Dean application (form
two) to be considered candidates for
advanced degrees.
...Last day for those graduating at end
of session to submit theses to Dean.
...Commencement Day.
SESSION, 1933
..Registration.
---Last day for filing with Registrar ap-
plication for a degree at the end of
the summer session.
...Holiday.


July 8, Saturday....................................Last day for those graduating at the
end of the summer session to submit
theses to Dean.
July 10, Monday .................................... Last day for those beginning graduate
work to file with Dean application
(form two) to be considered can-
didates for advanced degrees.
July 15, Saturday ..............................Classes suspended.
July 29, Saturday ................................ -----Classes suspended.
August 3, Thursday, 8:00 P.M ..............Summer Session Commencement Exer-
cises.
August 4, Friday........ ---............................. Summer session closes.
REGULAR SESSION. 1933-34
September 15-16, Friday and Saturday- Registration.
September 23, Saturday ...................... Last day for change of course without
payment of $2 fee.
September 23, Saturday ............................ Last day for registration for the first
semester.
October 7, Saturday.................................Last day to make application to the
Registrar for a degree at the end of
the first semester.
November 1, Wednesday.......................Last day for those beginning graduate
work to file with Dean application
(form two) to be considered candi-
dates for advanced degrees.


-----------------------------









December 16, Saturday, 12:00 noon......Christmas recess begins.

1934
January 2, Tuesday....................................Last day for those graduating at end
of the first semester to submit theses
to Dean.
January 29, Monday, 10:00 A.M ..........Commencement exercises.
February 1-2, Thursday and Friday .....Registration for second semester.
February 9, Friday ...................................Last day for registration for the sec-
ond semester.
February 24, Saturday ..............................Last day to file with Registrar appli-
cation for degree at end of second
semester.
March 15, Thursday..-........... ..............Last day for those beginning graduate
work the second semester to file with
the Dean application (form two) to
be considered candidates for ad-
vanced degrees.
May 1, Tuesday.........................................Last day for those graduating at the end
of session to submit theses to Dean.
June 4, Monday .........................................Commencement Day.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

1. Correspond with the Dean and if necessary with the head of the de-
partment in which you propose to take your major work.
2. If you are found eligible and decide to come to the University of
Florida, have the Registrar of your school send a transcript of your work to
the Dean of the Graduate School. This should be in the hands of the Dean at
least a month before the date for registration.
3. At the proper time, register with the Dean. He will give you blank
form No. 1 to take to your department head. Either the head of the depart-
ment or some other professor in the department will become the professor of
your major subject and will suggest courses for which you should register for
the session. Take this blank to the Dean and complete your registration.
4. Within the time indicated in the calendar, get blank form No. 2 and
have it signed by your professors and file it with the Dean.
5. See that the language requirements are satisfied at the proper time.
6. Early in your last semester or last summer session, notify the Registrar
by the time indicated in the calendar that you are a candidate for a degree.
7. When you are ready to put the thesis in final form, get instructions at
the Dean's office. Watch your time. Consult the calendar.
8. Look to the professor of your major subject and your special supervisory
committee for guidance.
9. Always feel free to seek information at the Dean's office if you have any
doubt in regard to the requirements.









ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., President of the
University
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
LILLIAN WHITLEY, Secretary to the Dean

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
THE DEAN
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agronomy
WILLIAM JOHN HUSA, Ph.D., Head Professor of Pharmacy
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean,
College of Pharmacy
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D., Professor of Education
JAMES SPEED ROGERS. Ph.D., Head Professor of Biology and Geology
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Mathematics

TEACHING FACULTY
Those offering courses listed in this bulletin
CHARLES ELLIOTT ABBOTT, M.S., Assistant Professor of Horticulture
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Ancient Languages and
Dean of the Graduate School
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D., Professor of Business Statistics
and Economics
ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D., Head Professor of French
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economic Geography
ROBERT MARLIN BARNETTE, Ph.D., Associate Chemist, Experiment Station
RAYMOND BROWN BECKER, Ph.D., Associa:e in Dairy Husbandry, Experiment
Station
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, D.Sc., Professor of Chemical Engineering
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, Ph.D., Professor of Economics
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, B.A., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry (on leave first
semester, 1932-1933)
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physics
Lucius MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D., Head Professor of Sociology
MARVIN ADEL BROOKER, Ph.D., Assistant Agricultural Economist, Experiment
Station
CHARLES CARROLL BROWN, C.E., M.A., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agronomy
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., Assistant Professor of English
ARTHUR FORREST CAMP, Ph.D., Horticulturist, Experiment Station
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteri-
ology
BERNARD V. CHRISTENSEN, M.S. Pharm., Ph.D., Head Professor of Pharma-
cognosy and Pharmacology









BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Head Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
LEWIS BRISCOE COOPER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Supervised Teaching
ALFRED CRAGO, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology, Tests and Measure-
ments
JOHN THOMAS CREIGHTON, M.S., Instructor in Entomology and Plant Pathology
CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, Ph.D., Head Professor of German and Spanish
RALPH DAVIS DICKEY, B.S.A., Assistant Professor of Entomology and Plant
Pathology
HARWOOD BURROWS DOLBEARE, B.A., Associate Professor of Finance
BERNARD FRANCIS DOSTAL, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics
HOWARD DYKMAN, B.A., LL.B., Professor of Economics and Insurance, and
Assistant Dean, College of Commerce and Journalism
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics
LINUS MARVIN ELLIS, JR., Ph.D., Instructor in Chemistry
ELMER JACOB EMIG, M.A., Head Professor of Journalism
HASSE OCTAVIUs ENWALL, Ph.D., Head Professor of Philosophy
JAMES MARION FARR, Ph.D., Head Professor of English and Vice-President of
the University
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., Associate Professor of English
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Head Professor of Horticulture and Assistant
Dean, College of Agriculture
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy
JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D., Professor of Education
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education
HALLETT HUNT GERMOND, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marketing Agricul-
tural Products
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, M.A., Instructor in Spanish
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry
THOMAS JEFFERSON HIGGINS, M.A., Instructor in Spanish
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Head Professor of Psychology
THEODORE HUNTINGTON HUBBELL, M.A., Associate Professor of Biology
FRED HAROLD HULL, M.S., Assistant Agronomist, Experiment Station
WILLIAM JOHN HUSA, Ph.D., Head Professor of Pharmacy
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry
HENRY NORTON JUNE, B.S. Arch., A.I.A., Professor of Architecture
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics
ELLSWORTH GAGE LANCASTER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Child and Adolescent
Psychology
JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D., Head Professor of History and Political Science
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean,
College of Pharmacy
WALTER ANTHONY LEUKEL, Ph.D., Associate Agronomist, Experiment Station
EARLL LESLIE LORD, M.S., Professor of Horticulture
WILLIAM LEONARD LOWRY, B.A., Assistant Professor of Journalism










TEACHING FACULTY


WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head Professor of Economics and Dean,
College of Commerce and Journalism
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D., Professor of Education
CARL E. MITTELL, B.F.A., Instructor in Drawing and Painting
A. MOULTRIE MUCKENFUSS, Ph.D., Acting Professor of Agricultural Chemistry,
First semester, 1932-1933
CLARENCE VERNON NOBLE, Ph.D., Agricultural Economist, Experiment Station
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Education and Dean,
College of Education
ANCIL N. PAYNE, M.A., Assistant Professor of History and Political Science
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S., Associate Professor of Physics
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry
MELVIN PRICE, E.E., M.A., Head Professor of Mechanical Engineering
PERCY LAWRENCE REED, C.E., M.S., Head Professor of Civil Engineering
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., Professor of English
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Head Professor of Agricultural Engineering
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D., Head Professor of Biology and Geology
STEPHAN D. SASHOFF, B.S.E.E., M.Sc., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engi-
neering
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agronomy
ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY, B.S., D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Science
HARLEY BAKEWELL SHERMAN, M.S., Associate Professor of Biology (on leave
1932-1933)
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, M.A. in Education, Associate Professor of Edu-
cation and Assistant Dean, College of Education (on leave 1932-1933)
STANLEY SIMONDS, Ph.D., Professor of Ancient Languages
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Mathematics
ROBERT CLOSSON SPENCER, B.M.E., F.A.I.A., Instructor in Drawing and
Painting
0. C. R. STAGEBERG, B.S. Architecture, Assistant Professor of Architecture
ARTHUR Louis STAHL, Ph.D., Assistant Horticulturist, Experiment Station
EZEKIEL FRED THOMAS, D.V.M., Assistant Veterinarian, Experiment Station
LESLIE BENNETT TRIBOLET, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science
JOHN EDWIN TURLINGTON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agricultural Economics
BLAKE RAGSDALE VAN LEER, M.E., M.S., Professor of Engineering and Dean
of the College of Engineering
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., A.I.A., Head Professor of Architecture and Director,
School of Architecture
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S., Head Professor of Electrical Engineering
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology
ROBERT CROZIER WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Physics
CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, M.A., Head Professor of Animal Husbandry
and Dairying
PHILIP OSBORNE YEATON, B.S.M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical En-
gineering









BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


GENERAL INFORMATION
ADMINISTRATION
The affairs of the Graduate School are administered by the Graduate
Council, which consists of the Dean who is ex officio chairman, and certain
members of the faculty, who are appointed annually by the President.
ADMISSION
For unqualified admission to the Graduate School, two things are needed:
(1) graduation from a standard college or university; (2) foundation work
in the major subject sufficient in quantity and quality to satisfy the require-
ments of the department in which the student proposes to major.
If the student cannot meet these two requirements, he may nevertheless be
permitted to register and take such courses as may be required as prerequisites
to satisfy either, or both, of the above requirements. The work done under
these conditions does not count toward the degree. Therefore such students
will often be required to spend longer than the prescribed time in completing
the requirements for the degree. It is permissible for well-qualified students
to take courses in the Graduate School without becoming candidates for the
advanced degree.
REGISTRATION
All graduate students, old or new, are required to register in the Office of
the Dean on the regular registration days as indicated in the bulletin. The
student should consult in advance the Dean and the head of the department in
which he purposes to major, and inquire if he is eligible to register for this
work. A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work should be
sent direct to the Dean of the Graduate School from the institution from which
the credits have been earned.
This transcript should be in the Dean's hands at least one month before
the beginning of the session. If the student seems eligible, he will be referred
by the Dean to the head of the department concerned. Either the Head of
the Department or some professor in that Department will become the pro-
fessor of the major subject for the student, and will plan the courses for
which he is to register. A blank form is furnished at the Dean's Office.
FEES
A registration fee of $7.50 is required of all students; for the summer
session this fee is $15. Students taking laboratory courses will pay the labora-
tory fees that are listed with those courses. All students pay a diploma fee
of $5 before graduation.
When students come from other states or countries and have not estab-
lished residence in the State of Florida, they are required to pay an additional
fee of $100 for the regular session and an additional fee of $2.50 for the
summer session.
Holders of graduate assistantships and graduate scholarships are exempt
from the non-resident tuition fee and from laboratory fees, but not from
breakage fees.











GENERAL INFORMATION


There are some fees that are optional: for instance, students' activity fee
and the infirmary fee. If the student wishes to use the privileges that go
with these fees, he must pay the fees in advance.

LIST OF GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS, AND GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
With the Annual Stipend
Agriculture:
Agricultural Economics-
Graduate Assistant in Marketing .................. ................- ......-- $ 600
Graduate Assistant in Farm Management ..................................-------....... 600
Agricultural Engineering- Graduate Assistant ........... .............-.....-- 600
Agronomy- Graduate Assistant --....--........... ------ -600... .. ............ 600
Animal Husbandry- Graduate Assistant ..--........................ ...........-- .... 600
Entomology and Plant Pathology-Graduate Assistant .............-.......... 600
Horticulture- Graduate Assistant -......................---- .. .......................... 600
(Agricultural Chemistry is included in Chemistry)
Architecture and Allied Arts:
F yellow .............--.. -............. ...................- ...... ...........-.-- .-- ..- . .......... .. 500
Biology and Geology:
G graduate A assistant .............. .................-.....- .... .. .............-----. 500
Business Administration and Economics:
Two Graduate Assistants at $450 each ............................ ................ 900
Two Research Assistants at $400 each .......................... .................... 800
Chemistry:
Six Graduate Assistants at $500 each ......-.........- ......... .................. 3000
Engineering:
Civil Engineering-One Graduate Assistant ..................-- ................. 500
Mechanical Engineering-One Graduate Assistant ............................ 500
(Chemical Engineering is included in Chemistry)
Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology:
Two Graduate Assistants at $500 each .................... .. .................... 1000
Pharmacy:
Two Graduate Assistants at $500 each ................ --...................... 1000
Psychology:
One Graduate Assistant ...... ................................................... 400
Physics:
Four Graduate Assistants at $400 each ............... ........................... 1600
Sociology:
One Graduate Assistant, second semester .................................................... 200
General:
Fifteen Graduate Scholarships at $250 ........ ......................................... 3750
(These scholarships may be in any department that offers major
work for a Master's degree. File application not later than March
15. Students accepting these scholarships are not permitted to take
other remunerative positions.)









BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

Degrees Offered.-Master of Arts; Master of Arts in Architecture; Master
of Arts in Education; Master of Science; Master of Science in Agriculture;
Master of Science in Engineering; Master of Science in Journalism; and Mas-
ter of Science in Pharmacy.
Application.-Those who wish to be considered candidates for the Master's
degree must present to the Dean a written application not later than the first
of November of the first year's residence, or March 15 for students beginning
work the second semester. The blank for this application may be obtained
at the Office of the Dean. This application must name the major and minor
subjects offered for the degree, and the title of the thesis, and carry the signed
approval of the professor of the major subject and the professors of the minor
subjects.
Residence Requirement.-The student must spend at least one entire
academic year at the University as a graduate student devoting his full time
to the pursuit of his studies. If there is a break in the student's work, his
whole course must be included within a period of seven years.
Work Required.-The major work consists of twelve semester hours in
courses designed for graduate students only (courses numbered above 500).
Twelve semester hours are also required as one or more minors. The courses
selected for the minor or minors, as well as the courses for the major work,
must meet the approval of the professor of the major subject and the approval
of the Dean or Graduate Council. The minors may be taken from courses
numbered above 300. The work in the minors is estimated to take about
one-third of the student's time, the other two-thirds being devoted to the
major work and the thesis. As a rule the student will have had four years
of college work, or its equivalent, in the subject selected for his major, and not
less than two years of college work in the subject, or subjects, selected as
minors. As a rule, it is not permissible to select a minor in the same depart-
ment as the major, but the departments should be allied.
Grades.-To obtain credit for a graduate course the student must attain a
grade of not less than B in both major and minor work. Reexaminations are
not permitted.
Foreign Language.-A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language
is required of all candidates. The examination in the foreign language will be
conducted by the language department concerned. This requirement must be
satisfied before the beginning of the last semester. In case the student is
completing all his work in the summer sessions the foreign language require-
ment must be satisfied before the beginning of the third summer's work. If
the student is majoring in a language, that language cannot be used to satisfy
this requirement.
Thesis.-Every candidate for the Master's degree must present a thesis
showing original research and independent thinking on some subject accepted
by the professor under whom the major work is taken, and duly submitted
to the Dean or to the Graduate Council for approval. The student should
consult the Dean's office for instructions concerning the form of the thesis.









REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE


Two copies of this thesis must be in the hands of the Dean not later than May
1 of the regular session. If the student expects to graduate at the end of
the first semester, the thesis must be submitted by January 2. These copies
are deposited in the Library if the thesis is accepted.
Special Committee.-When the student has qualified as a candidate by
having his course of study and the title of his thesis approved, a Special
Supervisory Committee consisting of not less than three members will be ap-
pointed by the Dean. The professor of the major subject will be the chair-
man of this committee. The Dean is ex-officio a member of all supervisory
committees.
General Examination.-It will be the duty of the Special Supervisory Com-
mittee, when all work is complete or practically complete, including the regular
courses and the thesis, to conduct a general examination, either written or
oral, or both, to embrace: first, the thesis; second, the major subject; third,
the minor or minors; fourth, questions of a general nature pertaining to the
student's field of study. The Committee shall report in writing to the Dean
not later than one week before the time for the conferring of the degree if
all work has been completed in a satisfactory manner and the student is
recommended for the degree.
Work Done in Absentia.-Credit is not given for work done in absentia.
No courses may be taken for credit by extension or correspondence. Under
the following conditions, however, the Graduate Council may vote to allow the
student to finish and submit his thesis when not in residence:
(1) If he has completed his residence requirement.
(2) If he has completed his course requirements.
(3) If he has submitted while in residence a draft of his thesis and
obtained the approval of his supervisory committee as to the sub-
stance of his thesis.
(4) If the Supervisory Committee recommends to the Graduate Council
that the student be given the privilege of finishing the thesis in
absentia and submitting it later.
In case this privilege is granted and the final draft of the thesis is approved,
it will be necessary for the student to appear and stand the final examination.
His presence will also be necessary at Commencement if the degree is con-
ferred.
Summer Session.-Four complete summer terms devoted entirely to gradu-
ate work will satisfy the time requirement. The terms need not be consecu-
tive, but the work must be completed within seven years. The application,
blank form 2, must be presented not later than four weeks after the beginning
of the first term. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of
the first summer. It must be submitted and approved by the end of
the second summer, or else the student will not be permitted to graduate
in two more summers. Unless the student presents by the end of his third
summer a draft of his thesis sufficient to convince the professor of his major
subject that he will have a satisfactory thesis, the student will not be eligible to
graduate by the end of his fourth summer. The thesis itself must be com-









BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


pleted and submitted to the Dean not later than the end of the fourth week
of the summer session in which the student expects to receive his degree.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The University of Florida is now prepared to register students who wish
to enter upon a course leading to the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, but
only in the departments of Chemistry and Pharmacy.
It is expected that other departments will he added from year to year as
our facilities increase.
Time and Residence.-A minimum of three academic years of resident
graduate work, of which at least the last year shall be spent at the University
of Florida, is required of all candidates for the Doctor's degree. In many
cases, it will be necessary to remain longer than three years, and necessarily
so when the student is not putting in his full time in graduate work.
Distribution of Work.-Two-thirds of the student's time is expected to be
spent upon his major subject and the dissertation, and about one-third on his
minor or minors. The student will be guided by the professor of his major
subject and by his special committee in regard to his whole course of study.
The Graduate Council does not specify just what courses or how many courses
will be required. The work is now mainly research, and the student will be
thrown largely upon his own responsibility. He is expected to familiarize
himself thoroughly with his field of study, and as a result of his studies and
investigations, to produce a work which will add something to human
knowledge.
Minors.-The student must take one minor and may not take more than
two minors. In general, if two minors are taken, the second minor will re-
quire at least one year. The first minor will require twice as much work as
the second, and if only one minor is taken it will require as much work as
two minors.
Special Committee.-When the student has advanced sufficiently towards
his degree, a special committee will be appointed by the Dean, of which com-
mittee the professor of the major subject will be chairman. This committee
will direct, advise, and examine the student. The Dean is ex-officio a member
of all supervisory committees.
Language Requirement.-A reading knowledge of both French and Ger-
man is required of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. The examinations in
the languages are held by the language departments concerned. These re-
quirements should be removed as eary as possible in the student's career,
and must be satisfied before the applicant can be admitted to the qualifying
examination.
Qualifying Examination.-A qualifying examination is required of all
candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. This examination will be
held during the second semester of the second year of residence. The exam-
ination is both written and oral and covers both major and minor subjects.
It will be conducted by his Special Supervisory Committee. The qualifying
examination must be passed at least a year before the student comes up for
the degree. If the student fails in his qualifying examination, he will not





REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 15

be given another opportunity unless for special reasons a reexamination is
recommended by his special committee and approved by the Graduate Council.
Dissertation.-A satisfactory dissertation showing independent investiga-
tion and research is required of all candidates. Two typewritten copies of this
dissertation must be presented to the Dean not later than May 1 of the year
in which the candidate expects to receive his degree. If the student should
be a candidate for the degree in a summer term, July 1 would be the final
date for submitting the dissertation to the Dean.
Printing of Dissertation.-One hundred printed copies of the dissertation
must be presented to the University within one year after the conferring of
Ihe degree. After the dissertation has been accepted, the candidate must de-
posit with the Business Manager, not later than one week before the degree
is conferred, the sum of $50 as a pledge that the dissertation will be published
within the prescribed time. This sum will be returned if the printed copies
are received within the year.
Final Examination.-After the acceptance of the dissertation and the
completion of all the work of the candidate. he will be given a final examina-
tion, oral or written, or both oral and written. bv his Special Supervisory Com-
mittee.
Recommendation.-If the final examination is passed, the Special Committee
will report to the Dean in writing not later than one week before the time for
conferring the degree that the student has met all requirements for the degree,
and that lie is presented to the Graduate Council for recommendation to the
Board of Control for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.









BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Graduate Courses.-Only strictly graduate courses are listed in this bul-
letin. For other courses in the various departments see the bulletin of the
college in which the courses are offered.
The courses are arranged alphabetically. Not all the courses will be given
in 1933-34. In some cases the courses not offered for that year are indicated.
In other cases the courses actually given will be determined by the demand.

GRADUATE COURSES

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

As. 501-502.-Agricultural Economics Seminar. 2 hours. 2 credits.
TURLINGTON and the Agricultural Economics staffs.
A study of recent literature and research work in agricultural economics. (An
entire change of subject matter will be made.)
As. 505-506.-Research Problems-Farm Management. Hours to be
arranged by the Head of the Department. TURLINGTON and NOBLE.
As. 508.-Land Economics. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
HAMILTON.
Rural taxation, colonization and adjustment of rural lands to their best uses.
As. 509.-Citrus Grove Organization and Management. 1 hour and
2 hours laboratory. 2 credits. TURLINGTON.
The organization and management of successful citrus properties in Florida.
As. 510.-Organization and Management of Truck Farms. 1 hour
and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits. TURLINGTON.
The economic organization and management of successful truck farms in Florida.
As. 511-512.-Research Problems-Marketing Agricultural Products.
Hours and credit to be arranged and approved by the Head of
the Department. HAMILTON, NOBLE, BROKER.
As. 514.-Advanced Marketing of Agricultural Products. 2 hours and
2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. HAMILTON.
Study of private and cooperative agencies engaged in marketing agricultural
products and commodities.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Ag. 501-502.-Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. ROGERS.
Discussion of agricultural engineering problems and review of literature.
Required of all graduate students registered in the Department.
Ag. 503-504.-Research. 6 hours. 6 credits. ROGERS.
Special problems in agricultural engineering.

AGRONOMY

Ay. 500.-Plant Breeding. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN.
Variation and inheritance in plants and the application of genetic principles to
plant improvement. Sterility, hybrid vigor, inbreeding, pure lines, disease resistance,
chromosomal variations and the newer cytological approach into genetical investiga-
tions are subjects considered.
Prerequisite: Ay. 309.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ay. 501-502.-Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. Bryan and Senn.
Discussion and review of current literature dealing with soils and crops.
Ay. 503.-Chemistry of Plant Growth. 2 hours and 5 hours labora-
tory. 4 credits. LEUKEL.
A study of biochemical principles and changes involved in the growth of plants
as affected by structure, age, environment, and plant functions; preparation of
plant material and methods of plant analysis.
Prerequisites: Ay. 302, Cy. 305.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.
Ay. 504.-Soil Development and Classification. 2 hours and 2 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. BRYAN.
Origin, nomenclature and classification of soil materials; effect of climate, vege-
tative cover, and parent material on the development of the soil profile; basis of soil
classification, mapping and utilization; soil groups and genetic types of the world.
Prerequisite: Ay. 301.
Ay. 505-506.-Special Problems in Soils and Crops. 2 to 5 credits.
BRYAN, SENN, and staff.
Ay. 507.-Soils of Florida. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
BRYAN.
The origin and development of Florida soils and their stage of development in
relation to the soil groups and types of the world; soil series, types and regions in
relation to plant growth; comparative value of the major soils of Florida.
Prerequisite: Ay. 301.
Given in alternate years. Not offered in 1933-1934.
Ay. 508.-Methods of Crop Investigation. 2 hours. 2 credits. SENN.
Field plot technic, statistical analysis of data based on biometrical methods;
consideration of environmental factors influencing experimental results.
Prerequisite: Ay. 201.
Ay. 509.-Biometrical Methods. 2 hours. 2 credits. HULL.
The theory and application of statistical methods in biological research; survey
of standard methods followed by practice in designing basic and efficient experi-
ments in plant and animal investigation.
Prerequisite: Ay. 508.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.
Ay. 510.-Soil Biology. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
BRYAN.
The miero*6rganisms of the soil and their effect on weathering and solution of
minerals ; biochemical changes and transformation of the carbon and nitrogen com-
pounds in the soil; factors affecting the accumulation of organic matter in rela-
tion to soil management.
Prerequisites: Ay. 301, Bty. 302.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.
Ay. 511.-Soil Analysis. 1 hour and 5 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
BARNETTE.
Methods of total and partial analysis of soils and technic in soil research; physi-
cal, chemical and biological principles involved; quantitative methods of measuring
soil reaction, replaceable bases and carbon.
Prerequisites: Ay. 301, Cy. 305.
Ay. 513.-Soil Utilization. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRYAN.
The soil resources of the world, as related to the welfare of nations; soil regions
and civilization; characteristics, modifications, and utilization of soils; factors
determining the value of soils for crops; forests, parks, and pastures.
Prerequisite: Ay. 301.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.










BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Ay. 514.-Advanced Soils. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
BARNETTE.
The organic and inorganic components of the soil and their physico-chemical
properties, including the origin, nature and significance of soil colloids, replaceable
bases ; reaction, and solubility of minerals as related to plants.
Prerequisite: Ay. 511.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

AI. 501-502.-Animal Production. Hours as arranged. 6 credits. WIL-
LOUGHBY.
Problems in the production of domestic animals; development of types and
breeds ; management of herds; research on selected topics.
AI. 503-504.-Animal Nutrition. 3 hours. 6 credits. BECKER.
Relative composition of feeds; digestion in ruminants; development of feeding
standards; protein, energy, vitamins, and mineral elements in nutrition.
Prerequisite: Cy. 0262.
Given in alternate years. Not offered in 1933-1934.
AI. 505-506.-Live Stock Records. Hours as arranged. 4 credits.
WILLOUGHBY.
History of live stock in the South; methods of breed associations; research on
selected topics.
Al. 508.-Methods in Animal Research. 2 hours. 2 credits. BECKER.
Methods employed in nutritional, feeding and management investigations with
farm animals.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-193-1.

ARCHAEOLOGY

Agy. 501-502.-Roman Archaeology. 3 hours. 6 credits. SIMONDS.
Acceptable as a minor for those majoring in Greek or Latin.

ARCHITECTURE

Ae. 501-502.-Architectural Design. 18 hours drafting and research.
12 credits. WEAVER and staff.
Research on some special phase of architectural design which shall be selected
by the student with the approval of the Director.
Prerequisite: Ae. 402.
Laboratory fee: $5 per semester.
Ae. 521-522.-Advanced Freehand Drawing. 6 hours studio. 4 credits.
MITTELL.
Prerequisite: Ae. 321.
Laboratory fee: $5 per semester.
Ae. 525-526.-Advanced Water Color. 6 hours studio. 4 credits.
SPENCER.
Outdoor sketching from nature. Advanced architectural rendering.
Prerequisite: Ae. 326.
Laboratory fee: $5 per semester.
Ae. 531-532.-Historical Research. 2 hours. 4 credits. JUNE, STAGE-
BERG.
Research on some historical phase or phases of architecture and allied arts
which shall be determined by the student in consultation with his advisors.
Prerequisite: Ae. 332.














DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ae. 551-552.-Building Construction. 2 hours. 4 credits. JUNE and
others.
Research on various types of building materials, their methods of and fitness for
use in various parts of the country, with advancement of some original theories in
connection with such subjects.
Prerequisite: Ae. 352 and 465.

BIOLOGY

Bly. 501-502.-Current Literature of Biology. 1j, hours. 2 credits.
STAFF.
An informal Journal Club that meets once a week to review some of the cur-
rent biological journals and books.
Required of all graduate students majoring in biology.
Bly. 503.-Advanced General Biology. 2 hours and 1 hour discussion
section. 3 credits. ROGERS.
The fundamental theories and concepts of biology are discussed from the stand-
point of the advanced student, with emphasis on the objects and methods of mod-
ern biological research. Collateral readings and reports required.
Prerequisite: an undergraduate major in biology.
Required of all graduate students majoring in biology.
Bly. 0505.-History of Biology. 2 hours. 2 credits. ROG;E7S.
An outline of the development of the modern content and theories of biology.
Prerequisite: an undergraduate major in biology.
Bly. 506.-Zoological Classification and Nomenclature. 1 hour and
12 hours laboratory work. 5 credits. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN,
BYERS.
An approved group of animals is studied under the direction of one of the mem-
bers of the department as an illustration of the biological and taxonomic problems
involved in animal classification.
Prerequisite: Bly. 503.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bly. 514.--Vertebrate Morphology. 1 hour and 12 hours laboratory.
5 credits. SHERMAN.
Prerequisite: an undergraduate major in biology, including Bly. 211.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bly. 516.-Invertebrate Morphology. 1 hour and 12 hours laboratory.
BYERS or HUBBELL.
Prerequisite: an undergraduate major in biology, including Bly. 201 or 0302.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bly. 518.-Bionomics. 1 hour and 12 hours laboratory. 5 credits.
ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN or BYERS.
A species or group of local animals is studied from the standpoint of ecology
or life history under the direction of one of the members of the department, as an
illustration of the problems involved in a consideration of the relations of animals
to their environments.
Prerequisite: Bly. 503.
Laboratory fee: $5.












BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Bly. 519-520.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Hours to be
arranged. Thesis required. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN or BYERS.
All applicants for the Master's degree are required to undertake some approved
individual problem in biology, the results of which -will be embodied in a Master's
thesis. Such problems will be carried out under the direction of one of the mem-
bers of the staff. Problems may be chosen from one of the following fields: verte-
brate or invertebrate morphology or embryology; classification or taxonomy of cer-
tain approved groups; natural history or distribution of a selected group of local
animals; investigations of animal habitats in the Gainesville area.
Prerequisite: An approved major in biology.
Laboratory fee: $5.

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

BOTANY

Bty. 500-0500.-Seminar. 1 hour, 2 credits. CODY, CARROLL.
Review and discussion of current literature on problems of botany and bac-
teriology. Required of all students majoring in botany or bacteriology.
Bty. 501-502.-Problems in Taxonomy. 8 hours field or laboratory
work. 8 credits. CODY.
An assignment to a special problem, or a critical study of a specific plant fam-
ily or genus; plant surveys with special emphasis on predominating flora of a
community.
Prerequisite: Bty. 308, or its equivalent; desirable prerequisite: Bty. 401.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 503-504.-Problems in Plant Physiology. 2 hours and 4 hours
laboratory. 8 credits. CODY, CAMP, STAHL.
Special physiological processes of plants; principles and methods of nutrition,
respiration, etc.
Prerequisites: Bty. 302, Cy. 262, or equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 505.-Problems in Plant Histology. 1 hour and 6 hours labora-
tory. 4 credits. CODY.
Comparative methods in histological technique.
Prerequisite: Bty. 331, or its equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bty. 508.-Problems in Plant Anatomy. 1 hour and 6 hours labora-
tory. 4 credits. CODY.
Research or a critical study of certain plant tissues and organs.
Prerequisites: Bty. 331, 332.
Laboratory fee: $5.
BACTERIOLOGY

Bey. 500-0500.-Seminar. See Botany 500.
Bey. 501-502.-Problems in Soil Bacteriology. 8 hours of laboratory
or its equivalent. 8 credits. CARROLL.
Special problems on isolation, cultivation and identification of certain micro-
organisms of the soil.
Prerequisites: Bey. 301; desirable prerequisite: Cy. 262, or its equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $5.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bcy. 503-504.-Problems in Dairy Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours labora-
tory, or its equivalent. 6 or 8 credits. CARROLL.
Assignment to some special phase of research pertaining to dairy problems
involving activities of micro-organisms; sanitation of dairy products, etc.
Prerequisites: Bey. 301-302 or 304; desirable antecedent: Cy. 265, or its equiva-
lent.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bey. 505-506.-Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours
laboratory or its equivalent. 6 or 8 credits. CARROLL.
Research.
Prerequisites: Bey. 301, 304, or 401, or equivalents.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Bey. 507-508.-Problems in Water Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours lab-
oratory, or equivalent. 6 or 8 credits. CARROLL.
Research.
Prerequisite: Bey. 301, or its equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $5.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 501.-Organic Preparations. 9 hours laboratory or its equivalent.
3 credits. LEIGH.
The preparation of some typical compounds. Occasional discussions of prin-
ciples and theories. A reading knowledge of French and German is desirable.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations. 9 hours laboratory or its equiv-
alent. 3 credits. LEIGH.
Laboratory work involving the preparation of a number of typical inorganic
compounds in addition to collateral reading and discussions. A reading knowledge
of French and German is desirable.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 0505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds. 3 hours. 3 credits. ELLIS.
Special lectures and collateral reading relative to the electronic and other theo-
retical conceptions of organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives, pseudo
acids, certain dyes, alkaloids, proteins, etc.
Given alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.
Cy. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits.
POLLARD.
Lectures and collateral reading. In general, topics to be studied will be chosen
from the following list: stereochemistry, tautomerism, the configuration of the
sugars, acetoacetic ester syntheses, malonic ester syntheses, the Grignard reaction,
benzene theories, diazo compounds and dyes.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1932-1933.
Cy. 0508.-Synthesis and Structure of Organic Compounds. 3 hours.
3 credits. POLLARD.
A study of fundamental reactions for synthesizing organic compounds and prov-
ing their structures.
Given in alternate years. Not offered in 1933-1934.
Cy. 0509.-Electrochemistry. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
JACKSON.
A theoretical study of the applications of electrochemical principles.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1932-1933.
Cy. 510.-The Phase Rule. 3 hours. 3 credits. JACKSON.
A study of the applications of the phase rule to heterogeneous equilibria.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.










BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Cy. 512.-Applications of Physical Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits.
JACKSON.
Kinetic considerations of gases, liquids and solids; solutions ; photochemistry;
electrical theory of matter; radioactivity; introduction to quantum theory.
Cy. 0513.-Colloid Chemistry. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3
credits. BEISLER.
The theories, practice and applications of colloid chemistry.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.
Cy. 515.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. HEATH.
This course covers recent theories and progress in inorganic chemistry.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.
Cy. 0516.-Chemistry of the Rare Elements. 3 hours. 3 credits.
HEATH.
Deals with the mineral occurrences, preparation, properties, and uses of the
rarer elements and their compounds. Relations to the more common elements will be
clearly shown as well as methods for separation and purification.
Given in alternate years. Not offered in 1933-1934.
Cy. 519.-Atomic Structure. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
BLACK.
Special lectures and collateral reading dealing with modern theories of the
structure of the atom. The Journal literature is largely used as the basis of study.
Given in alternate years. Not offered in 1933-1934.
Cy. 525.-Chemistry of the Terpenes. 3 hours. 3 credits. ELLIS.
A study of hydroaromatic compounds, including the terpenes and their deriva-
tives.
Cy. 526.-Chemistry of the Terpenes. 3 hours. 3 credits. ELLIS.
A continuation of Cy. 525.
Cy. 0531.-Advanced Qualitative Analysis. 9 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. JACKSON.
Systematic laboratory study of the qualitative reactions for the detection and
confirmation of rare and precious elements.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.
Cy. 533.-Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 9 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. BLACK, MUCKENFUSS.
The application of physico-chemical methods to quantitative analysis. Electro-
metric titrations. Nephelometry. Colorimetry. Emphasis is placed upon instrumental
methods.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1932-1933.
Cy. 537.-Qualitative Organic Chemistry. 1 hour and 6 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Deals with the methods of identifying organic compounds.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 538.-Quantitative Organic Chemistry. 9 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Ultimate analysis of organic compounds, chiefly by combustion.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Cy. 542.-Catalysis. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEISLER.
The theories and applications of catalysis with special reference to the use of
catalytic agents in industries.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1932-1933.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cy. 545.-Chemical Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. JACKSON.
The fundamental principles of thermodynamics which are particularly appli-
cable to chemistry.
Given in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.
Cy. 581.-Chemical Technology. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
BEISLER.
Special topics and problems in industrial chemistry.
Cy. 586.-Chemical Engineering Processes. 3 hours or its equivalent.
3 credits. BEISLER.
An advanced course in certain of the unit processes of chemical engineering.
Not offered in 1932-1933.
Cy. 601-602.-Chemical Research. LEIGH, BLACK, MUCKENFUSS,
HEATH, JACKSON, POLLARD, and ELLIS.
Required of those majoring in chemistry.
Prerequisite or corequisite: Cy. 481 (Chemical Literature).
Cy. 621-622.-Research in Chemical Engineering. BEISLER.
Prerequisite or corequisite: Cy. 481 (Chemical Literature).
Required of Graduate Students majoring in Chemical Engineering.

ECONOMICS

Es. 505.-The Development of Economic Thought. 3 hours. 3 credits.
ELDRIDGE.
The development of economic thought; careful analysis of the theories of the
various schools of economic thought; study of the Physiocrats, Mercantilism, the
Classical Economist, the leading economists of the Austrian School, and a brief
survey of the beginnings of Socialism; the development of theoretical background
for research and graduate work of an advanced nature.
Required of all candidates for the master's degree in this department.
Es. 506.-The Development of Economic Thought, continued. 3 hours.
3 credits. ELDRIDGE.
Analysis of the thought of the followers and defenders on the one hand and of
the abler critics on the other of the Classical Economists; appraisals of recent con-
tributions of the various schools in formulating a system of economic analysis.
Required of all candidates for the master's degree in this department.
Es. 528.-International Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOLBEARE,
Discussion, reports, and lectures concerning the causes, nature, and significance
of financial relations among nations, and the evolution of the banking and finan-
cial institutions in selected foreign countries.
Es. 530.-Problems in State and Local Taxation. 3 hours. 3 credits.
BIGHAM.
An intensive study of the problems of state and local taxation primarily related
to the following taxes: general property, income business, inheritance, and com-
modity.
Es. 563-564.-Seminar in Statistics and Business Forecasting. 3
hours. 6 credits. ANDERSON.
Critical study of special problems in statistics and business forecasting.
Es. 568.-Special Studies in Risk and Risk-Bearing. 3 hours. 3
credits. DYKMAN.
A study of the theory of risks; special studies in the ways of dealing with risks
Through insurance, hedging, investment trusts, security markets; social aspects of
risk-bearing.
Open to selected seniors with approval of instructor and head of department.










BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Es. 589.-Geographic Factors Underlying World Economy. 3 hours.
3 credits. ATWOOD.
A lecture and research course stressing the geographic factors that affect the
industrial and commercial development of the leading countries of the world. Stu-
dents will be required to select subjects for intensive study and make formal reports.

EDUCATION

En. 501.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits.
COOPER.
An intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary
school curriculum, including the kindergarten; the selection and evaluation of mate-
rial.
En. 503.-Seminar in Educational Measurements. Fee, $1.50. 2
credits. CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of educational problems involving
measurement, diagnostic and remedial measures. The course is primarily for gradu-
ate students with experience in residence or in the field.
En. 504.-The School Survey. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK, CRAGO,
SIMMONS.
En. 506.-Methods of Teaching Farm-Shop Work. 2 hours. 2 credits.
GARRIS.
The selection and organization of subject matter, the selection of equipment,
and the methods of teaching farm-shop jobs. Offered as demands arise and during
the summer school.
En. 507.-Seminar in Educational Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems in directed learning,
individual differences, and adjustment of problem children. Primarily for graduate
students with experience in residence or in the field.
En. 508.-Democracy and Education Seminar. 3 hours. 3 credits.
NORMAN.
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the
individual, society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, educa-
tion its own end.
En. 509.-Problems in the Administration of a School System. 3
hours. 3 credits. FULK.
Given in summer session.
Problems selected to meet individual needs; each student selects some problem
for special study and presents the results of his study in the form of a thesis.
Prerequisite: En. 401 or its equivalent or administrative experience.
En. 510.-The History of Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-
the teacher, the student, the curriculum, the educational plant, the means of control
and support-back to their beginnings; and to point out present tendencies and pos-
sible developments.
En. 511.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours.
3 credits. GARRIS.
The selection and organization of subject matter from the vocational point of
view. Offered when demand arises and during the summer school.
En. 512.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours.
3 credits. GARRIS.
A continuation of Education 511.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 518.-Special Problems in High School Organization and Admin-
istration. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
This course will consist of an intensive study of specific problems in organizing
and administering the modern high school. Special reference will be made to Florida.
Prerequisite: En. 408.
En. 519.-High School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits. COOPER.
The problems of the curriculum of the high school in its organization; standards
for the selection of the curriculum; factors to be considered-age of pupils, social
standing, probable school life, probable vocation; traditional subjects and their pos-
sible variations; new subjects and their values, systems of organization, election
and prescription; problems of articulation with the elementary school, the college,
the vocational school, and the community.
En. 521.-Business Administration of a School System. 3 hours. 3
credits. FULK.
Problems concerned with the procuring and spending of revenue; a thesis on a
special problem.
Prerequisite: Wide administrative experience.
En. 527.-Research and Thesis Writing. 1 hour. No credit. FULK.
Designed primarily to help graduate students in education in writing their theses.
Required of all students majoring in education; open to all graduate students.
En. 528.-Supervision. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD.
A graduate course in the supervision of instruction.
En. 541.-Control and Support of Public Education. 3 hours. 3
credits. FULK.
State, federal and other agencies of control and support of education in the
United States; world-history background; present tendencies and possible develop-
ments. Saturday class; planned primarily for teachers in service.
En. 542.-The Curriculum and the Educational Plant. 3 hours. 3
credits. FULK.
Present status of curriculum and plant and their relation in all types of schools,
viewed in the light of their historical development; a world view with emphasis on
present tendencies in the United States.
En. 543.-The Teacher and the Learner. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
Some outstanding teachers, including educational theorists, philosophers, reform-
ers and statesmen and their students; the training and professionalizing of the
teacher; the spread, compulsion and extension of education and its relation to world
revolutions.
En. 544.-Constitutional and Legal Basis of Public School Admin-
istration. 2 hours. 2 credits. SIMMONS.
Special emphasis will be given to Florida conditions, school laws, constitutional
provisions, judicial decisions, Attorney General's rulings, and regulations of the
State Board of Education. Students will be required to prepare a semester report
dealing with some special field of school law. Only graduate students with experi-
ence in administration and supervision will be admitted.
Not offered in 1932-1933.
En. 562.-Guidance and Counseling. 2 credits. CRAGO.
The course will include a study of guidance and counseling of high school stu-
dents. Educational and vocational guidance and problems of personality adjustment
will be considered.
En. 565-566.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours.
6 credits. GARRIS.
Designed for graduate students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced
problems. Problems will be selected to suit individual needs and the results of the
study will be reported in the form of term papers. The class will meet for three
hours every other Saturday during both semesters.










BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


En. 567-568.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours.
6 credits. GARRIS.
Similar to En. 565-566 in organization and offered in alternate years with it.
En. 569.-Problems in Organizing Part-time and Evening Classes. 6
hours. 3 credits. GARRIS.
The class will organize and teach a part-time or evening class in vocational
agriculture in the Alachua community. Offered only in the summer school.
En. 603.-Foundations of Method. 3 hours. 3 credits. NORMAN.
The improvement of college and high school teaching. Open to graduate stu-
dents and members of the university faculty who care to enroll.
En. 605-606.-Seminar in Public School Administration. 3 hours. 6
credits. FULK.
Prerequisites: En. 504 or 521 and En. 509 or 518, or permission of instructor.


ENGINEERING

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Listed under that name.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
See Chemistry.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Cl. 501-502.-Advanced Work in Structural Engineering. 3 hours and
6 hours laboratory. 6 credits. REED.
This advanced course for graduate students will cover advanced work in the
theory, design, and drawing of structures, particularly in connection with bridges
and buildings.
Prerequisite: Cl. 413-414.
Cl. 507-508.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours and
3 hours laboratory. 6 credits. BROWN.
Study of action and operation of Imhoff sewage disposal plant of the university.
Physical, biological, bacteriological, and chemical observations to determine effi-
ciency and economy of various methods of operation and improvements in operation
to increase the same.
Prerequisite: Cl. 409.
CI. 509-510.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours and
6 hours laboratory. 6 credits. BROWN.
A course supplementing Cl. 507-508 covering similar investigations in connection
with septic tanks.
Cl. 511-512.-Similarity and Model Applications to Beach and Shore
Erosions Problems. 3 credits. VAN LEER.
A study of laws of similarity, use of Reynolds Number, effects of density, vis-
cosity, friction and actual model studies with practical applications.
Prerequisite: Cl. 407.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Radio courses in the Department of Electrical Engineering are
given in cooperation with State Radio Station WRUF. Students can
secure practical experience in radio station operation and should be
able to qualify as first-class radio telephone operators on completion
of the elementary courses available.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


El. 501-502.-Advanced Experimental Electrical Engineering. Vari-
able credit. WEIL and staff.
Experimental investigation on electrical apparatus.
Prerequisite: Not less than 9 credits in electrical engineering theory and elec-
trical engineering laboratory work.
El. 503.-Advanced Electrical Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL.
Laws of the electric and magnetic circuit; transient phenomena.
Prerequisite: El. 317-318.
El. 504.-Electric Measurements. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3
credits. WEIL and staff.
Theory and practice of the measurements of electrical quantities with partic-
ular attention to measurements in alternating current circuits.
Prerequisite: El. 401.
El. 505-506.-Advanced Course in Communication Engineering. 3
hours. 6 credits. WEIL.
High frequency circuits and apparatus.
Text: Everitt, Communication Engineering, and assigned reading.
Prerequisite: El. 305.
El. 507-508.-Radio Engineering Laboratory. 4 laboratory hours. 4
credits. WEIL and staff.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 505-506.
El. 509.-Electric Power Plant Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL.
The relation of various machines in the power plant to one another, switchgear,
control apparatus, selection of types of units, construction problems. A part of
this course includes the design of the electrical end of a power plant.
Prerequisite: El. 411.
Text: Tarboux, Electric Power Equipment, and outside reading.
El. 510.-Electric Transmission Line Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits.
SASHOFF.
A study of the theory of transmission line circuits.
Prerequisite: El. 401.
Text: Loew, Electric Power Transmission.
El. 511.-Electronic Devices. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF.
A study of vacuum, gas filled, and photoelectric tubes and their applications.
Prerequisites: El. 305-306, 318.
Text: Zworykin and Wilson, Photocells and Their Applications and assigned
reading.
El. 512.-Symmetrical Components. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF.
The theory of Symmetrical Components as applied to the solution of unbalanced
alternating current circuits.
Prerequisite: El. 317-318.
Text: Symmetrical Components, and assigned reading. (Westinghouse Mono-
graph.)
El. 513-514.-Electrical Engineering Seminar. 2 credits. WEIL and
staff.
Lectures and discussions upon current engineering problems with summaries of
articles appearing in the current technical publications.
El. 515-516.-Meters and Relays. 2 hours. 3 hours laboratory. 3
credits. SASHOFF.
The fundamentals of design of electricity meters and relays, their types, prin-
ciples of operation, construction and care.
Prerequisite: El. 317-318.
Text: Nela, Meterman's Handbook; Nela, Relay Handbook; Drysdale and Jolley,
Instruments and Meters. Assigned reading.










BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Ml. 501-502.-Advanced Mechanical Design. 6 hours laboratory. 6
credits. PRICE.
The design of some machine with critical attention to some phase thereof, usu-
ally accompanied by laboratory work illustrative of the application of theory or be-
havior of materials under assumed special working conditions.
MI. 503-504.-Mechanical Research. 6 hours laboratory. 6 credits.
YEATON.
An experimental study of a mechanical engineering project, acceptable to the
Department. Design and construction of apparatus. Operation of tests. Collection
of data and presentation of results in a report.
Prerequisites: MI. 320; Ml. 411.
Laboratory fee: $5 and cost of materials.

ENGLISH

Eh. 501-502.-American Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. FARRIS.
A study of the prose and poetry of America as influenced by the historical back-
ground, and of the English and continental literary movement. Extensive reading,
report and discussion.
Eh. 503-504.-The Novel. 3 hours. 6 credits. FARR.
This course centers in the study of both the historical development and the tech-
nique of the English and American novel, but with attention directed to the Euro-
pean movements.
Eh. 505-506.-Contemporary Drama, Novel and Poetry. 3 hours. 6
credits. ROBERTSON.
A survey of the English and American fields and their connection with Euro-
pean movements.
Eh. 507-508.-The Renaissance in England. 3 hours. 6 credits. CALD-
WELL.
A study of sixteenth and seventeenth century literature as directly and indi-
rectly influenced by the Renaissance.
Eh. 509-510.-Middle English. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON.
Extensive study of the Chaucerian and earlier texts, from both the linguistic
and literary points of view.
Eh. 511-512.-Anglo-Saxon. 3 hours. 6 credits. FARR.
Anglo-Saxon grammar; reading of selections in Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader;
the Beowulf.
NOTE: For those majoring in English, the foreign language requirement is
either French or German.

ENTOMOLOGY

Ey. 501-502.-Research. Course in special laboratory, insectary, and
field methods. 3 hours. 6 credits. CREIGHTON.
A survey of the leading problems and methods in certain laboratories; practice
in the more complicated methods of research will be undertaken.
Ey. 503-504.-Problems in Entomology. 3 hours. 6 credits. CREIGHTON.
Problems in the various phases of entomology, as shall be selected on approval
of the instructor in charge. Required of graduate students registered for degrees
in the department.










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ey. 505-506.-Advanced Insect Histology. 3 hours. 6 credits.
CREIGHTON.
A course in the outstanding histological methods used in the handling of insect
tissues.
Ey. 507-508.-Advanced Insect Taxonomy. 3 hours. 6 credits.
CREIGHTON.
The collection, study, and classification of local economic insects down to fami-
lies. In some one group the individuals will be traced down to the genus and species.
Ey. 509-510.-Advanced Insect Embryology. 3 hours. 6 credits.
CREIGHTON.
Ey. 511-512.-Thesis Research. No credit in hours.
Required of all students majoring in Entomology.

FRENCH

Fh. 505-506.-The French Novel. 3 hours. 3 credits each semester.
ATKIN.
Evolution of the novel from the seventeenth century to the present, with special
emphasis on the nineteenth century; reading of representative novels; reports.
Fh. 507-508.-Special Study in French. 3 hours. 3 credits each se-
mester. ATKIN, BRUNET.
Individual reading and reports under supervision of the instructor, on selected
topics in the field of French literature and language.

GERMAN

Gn. 501.-Gothic. 6 credits. CROW.
An introduction to the scientific study of the Germanic languages. Textbooks:
J. Wright, Grammar of the Gothic Language; W. Streitberg, Gotisches Elementar-
buch.
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of German. Some knowledge of Latin or
Greek highly desirable.
Gn. 502.-Old High German. 6 credits. CROW.
An introductory course. Intensive study of grammar. Reading of selections.
Textbooks: W. Braune, Althochdeutschegrammatik and Althochdeutsches Lesebuch.
Prerequisite: Some knowledge of Gothic, not indispensable, but very helpful
Gn. 503-504.-Middle High German. 6 credits. CROW.
Grammar. Readings.
Gn. 505-506.-Special Studies in German Literature. 6 credits. CROW.

GREEK

Gk. 501-502.-Homer. 3 hours. 6 credits. ANDERSON.
All the Iliad and Odyssey, and selections from allied Poets.
Gk. 503-504.-Historians, Herodotus and Thucydides. 3 hours. 6
credits. ANDERSON.

HISTORY

Hy. 501-502.-American History, 1492-1830. 3 hours. 6 credits. LEAKE.
Given in 1933-1934.
Hy. 503-504.-American History, 1830 to the Present. 3 hours. 6
.credits. LEAKE.
Given in 1934-1935.












BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Hy. 505-506.-English History. 3 hours. 6 credits. PAYNE.
Given in 1933-1934.
Hy. 507-508.-The Renaissance and the Reformation. 3 hours. 6
credits. LEAKE.
Given in 1933-1934.
Hy. 509-510.-Seminar in American History. 6 credits. LEAKE.
Given in 1933-1934.

HORTICULTURE

He. 503-504. Horticulture Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. FLOYD,
ABBOTT.
A study of current horticultural literature and practice; assigned topics and
discussion.
He. 505-506.-Horticultural Problems. 2 hours. 4 credits. LORD.
A critical study of advanced problems in horticulture as given in recent litera-
ture; methods used in experimental horticulture; results of experiments and their
application.
He. 507-508.-Research Work. 3 hours. 6 credits. FLOYD, CAMP,
LORD and ABBOTT.
Specific problems in horticulture.
He. 509-510.-Problems in Refrigeration. Hours and credits to be
arranged. CAMP and STAHL.

JOURNALISM

Jm. 503-504.-Special Studies in Newspaper Production. 3 hours. 6
credits. No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire
6 credits are earned. LOWRY.
Jm. 505-506.-Special Studies in Public Opinion. 3 hours. 6 credits.
No credit toward a degree will be allowed until the entire 6 credits
are earned. EMIG.

LATIN

Ln. 501-502.-Cicero and the Ciceronian Age. 3 hours. 6 credits.
ANDERSON.
Based mainly on the Ciceronian Correspondence.
Ln. 505.-Virgil. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Mainly the Bucolics and Georgics.
Ln. 506.-Poetry of the Silver Age. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMONDS.
Selections from Manilius, Lucan, Valerius Flaccus, Statius, Silius Italicus and
Claudian. Study of the technique of these poets and their influence on modern
literature.
Ln. 507.-Ovid. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Mainly Heroides and Fasti.
Ln. 508.-The Roman Satire. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Mainly Horace and Juvenal.












DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


MATHEMATICS

Not all of the courses are given each year. The textbooks listed are
subject to change without notice. Prerequisites to the courses should be
determined by consultation with the instructor.
Ms. 511-512.-Introduction to Higher Algebra. 3 hours. 6 credits.
SIMPSON.
A more advanced course in the subject, based upon the work of Bocher, whose
Introduction to Higher Algebra is used as a textbook.
Ms. 518.-Theory of Groups of Finite Order. 3 hours. 3 credits.
SIMPSON.
An introduction to the group concept, a treatment of the pure group-theory,
and numerous examples and applications. Textbook: Hilton, Finite Groups.
Ms. 521.-Empirical Analysis and Curve Fitting. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GERMOND.
Derivation of equation to suit data. "Best fit" under given conditions. Use of
various graphical methods of analysis. Illustrated with problems from fields of
botany, physics, chemistry.
Ms. 522.-Method of Least Squares, and Statistics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GERMOND.
Probability. Method of least squares. Application. Normal frequency curves.
Correlation factors. Handling of data.
Ms. 531-532.-The Theory of Approximation. 3 hours. 6 credits.
PHIPPS.
A study of the practical methods of obtaining approximate solutions of prob-
lems which are difficult, or impossible to solve completely, together with the under-
lying theory.
Main text: Scarborough, Numerical Mathematical Analysis.
Ms. 534-535.--General Projective Geometry. 3 hours. 6 credits.
KUSNER.
Development, from a simple set of very general postulates, of the properties of
geometric configurations which remain invariant under the transformations of pro-
jection and suction. The treatment is abstract, and serves as an introduction both
to modern geometry and to the postulational methods of modern mathematics.
Text: Veblen and Young, Projective Geometry.
Ms. 536.-Foundations of Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
An investigation of the assumptions of geometry; the parallel postulate; steps
leading to non-Euclidean geometries; consequent development of modern branches
of the subject; elements of non-Euclidean plane geometry.
Text: Carslaw, Non-Euclidean Plane Geometry and Trigonometry.
Ms. 540.-Fourier Series and Harmonic Analysis. 3 hours. 3 credits.
DOSTAL.
The use of series of terms involving sines and cosines in the solution of physical
problems such as those relating to the flow of heat, conduction of electricity, and
vibrating strings. Textbook: Carslaw, Introduction to the Theory of Fourier's Series
and Integrals.
Ms. 542.-Heaviside Operational Calculus. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOSTAL.
Introduced by an elementary exposition of the solution of differential equations
by classical operational methods, followed by treatment of the Heaviside Operational
Theory, with applications mainly to electrical circuit theory. Textbook: Berg, Heavi-
side's Operational Calculus.










BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Ms. 551-552.-Advanced Topics in Calculus. 3 hours. 6 credits.
KOKOMOOR.
Topics of advanced nature selected from the calculus, including partial differ-
entiation, Taylor's theorem, infinite series, continuation of simple multiple inte-
grals, line and surface integrals, Green's theorem, etc. Textbook: Osgood, Advanced
Calculus.
Ms. 555-556.-Functions of a Complex Variable. 3 hours. 6 credits.
SIMPSON.
Fundamental operations with complex numbers; differentiation and integration
theorems ; mapping; transformations ; series.
Text: Townsend, Functions of a Complex Variable.
Ms. 559-560.-Functions of Real Variables. Numbered 500-501 in
1929-30. 3 hours. 6 credits. SIMPSON.
The real number system; theory of point sets; rigorous investigation of many
questions arising in the calculus; Lebesque integral; infinite series. Textbook: Town-
send, Functions of Real Variables.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
KOKOMOOR.
A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special
emphasis upon the changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching.
No specific text is followed, but numerous works are used as references.
Ms. 575.-Fundamental Concepts of Modern Mathematics. 3 hours. 3
credits. SIMPSON.
An introduction to such topics as the number system of algebra, sets of points,
group theory, theories of integration, postulational systems, and non-Euclidean
geometry. No textbook is used, but many references are assigned.

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY

PHARMACOGNOSY

Pgy. 501.-Advanced Histology and Microscopy of Vegetable Drugs.
2 hours and 4 hours laboratory and field work. 4 credits. CHRIS-
TENSEN.
Plant tissues and cell inclusions of importance as diagnostic characters. Detec-
tion of adulterations and substitutions and pharmacognostical description of new
plants.
Laboratory fee: To be arranged.
Pgy. 521-522.-Special Problems in Pharmacognosy. 2 to 3 hours and
4 to 14 hours laboratory. 4 to 10 credits. Either semester may be
taken for credit without the other. CHRISTENSEN.
Identification, classification, and qualitative determination of constituents and
properties of drug plants; special experiments in the propagation, cultivation, har-
vesting and curing of native and exotic plants; field work in the collecting of drug
plants native to Florida.
Pgy. 525-526.-Drug Plant Analysis. 2 to 3 hours and 4 to 14 hours
laboratory and field work. 6 to 10 credits. Either semester may
be taken for credit without the other. CHRISTENSEN.
Special problems in drug culture and in the isolation and identification of plant
constituents. The effect of climatic and soil features on plant constituents. Pharma-
cognostical characteristics of new plants.
Laboratory fee: To be arranged.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Pgy. 533-534.-Seminar in Pharmacognosy. 4 credits. Either semes-
ter may be taken for credit without the other. CHRISTENSEN.
Sources of information on crude drugs and a study of current plant literature.
Special written and oral reports.
Pgy. 551-552.-Pharmacognosy Research. CHRISTENSEN.
Required of those majoring in Pharmacognosy.

PHARMACOLOGY

Ply. 512.-Advanced Pharmacology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. CHRISTENSEN.
Theories of drug action. A comparison of methods of physiological assaying
with applications to evaluation of drugs and medicines.
Laboratory fee: To be arranged.
Ply. 551-552.-Special Problems in Pharmacology. 2 to 3 hours and
4 to 14 hours laboratory. 4 to 10 credits. Either semester may be
taken for credit without the other. CHRISTENSEN.
A comparison of methods of biological assaying. Special lectures and col-
lateral reading, laboratory experiments, oral and written reports.
Ply. 555-556.-Pharmocological Testing. 1 to 3 hours and 2 to 10
hours laboratory. 2 to 8 credits. CHRISTENSEN.
Determination of the therapeutic properties of drugs by means of animal ex-
perimentation, using special types of recording apparatus.
Ply. 571-572.-Pharmacology Research. CHRISTENSEN.
Required of those majoring in pharmacology.

PHARMACY

Phy. 502.-Selected Topics in Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A general study of the newer types of pharmaceuticals, such as vitamin prepa-
rations, newer solvents, etc., with assigned readings on selected problems of current
interest.
Phy. 503.-Advanced Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
Lectures and assigned readings on important pharmaceutical preparations, par-
ticularly those involving chemical changes.
Phy. 504.-Advanced Galenical Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A detailed study of the fundamental research work on which formulas for vari-
ous galenicals are based.
Phy. 541.-Manufacturing Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A general study of the apparatus and processes used in the manufacture of
pharmaceuticals on a factory scale. A detailed study of selected technical problems
of current interest to those engaged in pharmaceutical manufacturing.
Phy. 553.-Synthetic Pharmaceuticals. 2 hours. 2 credits. FOOTE.
The preparation and chemotherapy of the more complex synthetic remedies.
Prerequisite: Phy. 354.
Phy. 554.-Advanced Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. FOOTE.
Lectures and assigned reading on the pharmacy and chemistry of vegetable
drugs.










BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


PHILOSOPHY

Ppy. 501-502.-Advanced Logic, Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. No
credit will be given toward a degree until credit is earned in both
semesters' work. ENWALL.
Theories of Thought and Knowledge.
Readings from the original sources. Papers for discussion.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 303, 304.
Given with Ppy. 505 and 506 in alternate years.
Offered in 1933-1934.
Ppy. 503-504.-Advanced History of Philosophy. 3 hours. 6 credits.
No credit will be allowed toward a degree until credit is earned in
both semesters' work. ENWALL.
The problems of philosophy in their historical development.
Textbook: Windelband, History of Philosophy; supplemented by special readings
from the original sources.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 301, 302.
Ppy. 505-506.-Philosophy of Nature, Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits.
No credit will be allowed toward a degree until credit is earned in
both semesters' work. ENWALL.
Readings from the original sources. Papers for discussion. Man's relation to
nature; the various philosophical doctrines; animism, pantheism, materialism, real-
ism, agnosticism, humanism, idealism, etc.
Prerequisites: Ppy,. 205, 303, 304.
Given with Ppy. 501-502 in alternate years.
Not offered in 1933-1934.
Ppy. 507-508.-Hume and Kant, Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. No
credit will be allowed toward a degree until credit is earned in
both semesters' work. ENWALL.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 301, 302, 303, 304.


PHYSICS

A knowledge of the Differential and Integral Calculus is pre-
requisite for all the following courses, together with Physics 321-
322 or the equivalent.
In connection with the foreign language requirement, it is recom-
mended that the student present German, or German and French.
Ps. 503.-Kinetic Theory of Gases. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON.
The elements of the kinetic theory, the application of the theory to gases and
liquids, the electrical and magnetic properties of the molecules from the standpoint
of the theory.
Ps. 505.-Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
Statics of systems of rigid bodies. Motions of particles and of rigid bodies under
constant and variable forces. Assigned reading, problems, and reports.
Ps. 506.-Advanced Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
A continuation of Ps. 405. Introduction to vector analysis and generalized co-
ordinates.
Ps. 508.-Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
The laws of Thermodynamics, chemical reactions from the thermodynamical
standpoint, Electrochemistry, and the Nernst Heat Theorem.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ps. 510.-Physical Optics and Spectroscopy. 3 hours. 3 credits.
WILLIAMSON.
The electro-magnetic theory of light, interference, refraction, and polarization,
and the theory of optical instruments and spectroscopy.
Prerequisite: Ps. 309 or equivalent.
Ps. 513-514.-Advanced Experimental Physics. 6 or 8 laboratory
hours. 6 or 8 credits. WILLIAMSON, PERRY, BLESS.
A series of experiments on a particular topic of physics, a review of classical
experiments, or the development of an assigned experimental problem. The work
will be assigned to meet the needs and interests of the particular student.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Ps. 517-518.-Modern Physics. 3 hours. 6 credits. WILLIAMSON.
The electronic theory of atomic structure, and the interpretation of the prop-
erties of matter and radiation from the standpoint of this theory.
Ps. 520.-X-ray Laboratory. 6 laboratory hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
Refraction and diffraction of X-rays, crystal analysis, X-ray spectroscopy.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Ps. 522.-Electron Physics. 6 laboratory hours. 1 recitation. 3 cred-
its. KNOWLES.
The theory and actual performance of a number of fundamental experiments
of "Modern Physics."
Prerequisite: Ps. 311 or its equivalent.
Laboratory fee: $5.
Ps. 523-524.-Seminar in Modern Theory. 2 or 3 hours. 4 or 6
credits. WILLIAMSON.
Some particular phase of the most recent developments in theoretical physics is
taken up in detail, "Statistical Mechanics" being the topics in 1932-1933.
Ps. 527-528.-Colloquium. /% hour. 1 credit. WILLIAMSON.
The most interesting papers are selected from the current literature in physics,
and these papers are reported upon by the students.
Ps. 551-552.-Thesis. WILLIAMSON, PERRY, BLESS.

PLANT PATHOLOGY

Pt. 501-502.-Methods of Research in Plant Pathology. 6 hours lab-
oratory. 6 credits. DICKEY.
A course in the study of the methods of research employed in the field of plant
pathology.
Pt. 503-504.-Problems in Plant Pathology. 6 hours laboratory. 6
credits. DICKEY.
Problems in the various phases of plant pathology, as shall be selected on ap-
proval of the instructor in charge.
Required of graduate students registered for degree in department.
Pt. 505-506.-Advanced Mycology. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
6 credits. DICKEY.
An advanced course designed for students who wish to specialize in mycology
or plant pathology. An intensive study of the morphology, taxonomy, cytology,
and phylogeny of the fungi.
Prerequisite: Pt. 301.
Pt. 507-508.-Thesis Research. No credit in hours. DICKEY.
Required of all students majoring in Plant Pathology.










BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


POLITICAL SCIENCE

Pel. 501-502.-American Constitutional Law. 3 hours. 6 credits.
LEAKE.
Not given in 1933-1934.
Pcl. 503-504.-International Law. 3 hours. 6 credits. TRIBOLET.
Given in 1933-1934.
Pcl. 505-506.-Political Theories. 3 hours. 6 credits. TRIBOLET.
Given in 1933-1934.
Pcl. 507-508.-Political Science Seminar. 6 credits. TRIBOLET.
Given in 1933-1934.
Pel. 509-510.-International Relations. 6 credits. TRIBOLET.
Not given in 1933-1934.

PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 501-502.-Readings in Experimental Psychology. 3 hours. 6
credits. HINCKLEY.
Lectures and assigned readings in some of the more important fields of psycho-
logical research.
Prerequisites: Psy. 201, 304.
Psy. 505.-Advanced Statistical Methods. 3 hours. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Studies in correlation, regression, and prediction, as applied to psychological
measurement.
Prerequisites: Pay. 201, 405.
Psy. 506.-Psycho-physical Theory in the Construction of Tests. 3
hours. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
The application of psycho-physical theory in the measurement of psychological
and social values. Critical discussion of Weber's Law, Fechner's Law, and the Law
of Comparative Judgment. Special attention is given to the problems of psychologi-
cal scale construction and attitude measurement.
Prerequisites: Psy. 201, 405, 406.
Psy. 508.-Advanced Comparative Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
WILLIAMS.
A study of the intelligent and learning capacity of animals, with an attempt to
formulate and explain the psychological concepts of reflex, conditioned reflex, in-
stinct, learning, memory, intelligence, thinking, and motivation as problems pri-
marily in nerve physiology.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201.
Psy. 509.-Studies in Personality. 3 hours. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Lectures and readings in experimental studies of personality. Special attention
will be given to the clinical work of the personnel bureau.
Prerequisites: Psy. 201, 405, 406, Ppy. 303, 304.
Psy. 510.-Readings in Abnormal Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
HINCKLEY.
Lectures and readings on the various forms of mental disease, with special
attention to diagnosis and treatment.
Prerequisites: Psy. 201, 309, 310.
Psy. 512.-History and Systems of Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
WILLIAMS.
A critical survey of the historical development of psychology, with special em-
phasis on representative writers and the more recent systems and programs.
Prerequisite: Psy. 201. 1










DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


SANSKRIT

St. 501-502.-Elementary Sanskrit. 3 hours. 6 credits. SIMONDS.
Open only to graduate students. Acceptable as a minor for those majoring in
Latin or Greek.

SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 0501.-Early Culture History. 2% hour seminar. 3 credits.
BRISTOL.
Early cultures of Egypt, Tigris-Euphrates Valley and the Aegean. Hellenistic
culture. Culture of Rome. Emphasis on culture changes and causes.
Sy. 503-504.-Cultural Development of the United States. 3 hours. 3
credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 303-304.
Sy. 541-542.-Development of Social Thought. 2'2 hour seminar. 6
credits. BRISTOL.
Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1933-1934.
Sy. 551-552.-Social Progress. 2% hour seminar. 6 credits. BRISTOL.
Theories of social progress. Evaluation of proposed goals and of programs
looking to the attainment of these goals. Special consideration of welfare condi-
tions and institutions in Florida, with suggested changes.
Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1933-1934.
Sy. 571-572.-Social Research and Investigation. 2% hour seminar.
6 credits. BRISTOL.
Social surveys, scoring, investigation of special conditions connected with hous-
ing, sanitation, etc. Practical use of data in the interest of improvement of condi-
tions involved.
Not offered in 1933-1934.

SPANISH

Sh. 501-502.-Old Spanish. 6 credits. CROW.
Spanish Historical Grammar. Readings from XII, XIII and XIV centuries.
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of Latin.
Sh. 503-504.-Golden Age. 12 credits. HAUPTMANN.
Lectures, readings, reports.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Sh. 505-506.-Seminar in Spanish-American Literature. 12 credits.
HIGGINS.
A study of the main currents in Argentine literature with special emphasis on
Ruben Dario and the Modernista Movement.
Lectures, readings, reports.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Sh. 507-508.-Contemporary Spanish Literature. 12 credits. HAUPT-
MANN.
A study of the generation of '98 and their predecessors.
Lectures, readings, reports.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

VETERINARY SCIENCE

Vy. 501-502.-Poultry Disease Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. SHEALY
and THOMAS.
A study of literature pertaining to diseases of poultry; discussion of important
phases of poultry disease problems.








38 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Vy. 503-504.-Problems in Poultry Pathology. 3 to 10 credits.
SHEALY and THOMAS.
Special problems in poultry diseases.
Vy. 505-506.-Problems in Animal Parasitology. 3 hours. 6 credits.
SHEALY and THOMAS.
A study of some of the important parasites infecting domestic animals.
Vy. 507-508.-Research in Veterinary Science. 3 hours. 6 credits.
SHEALY and THOMAS.
Specific problems.









GRADUATE ASSISTANTS


GRADUATE ASSISTANTS, 1932-1933

Amundsen. Lawrence H.. B.S., College of the Ozarks, 1931.
Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
Blanchard. Albert C.. B.S. in Commerce. University of Kentucky, 1930.
Research Assistant in the Bureau of Economics and Business Re
Bogart, John A. C.. B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida,
Graduate Assistant in Civil Engineering
Cole, Allen T., B.S., Hamline University, 1930,
Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
Copeland. J. Dewherry, B.S. in Business Administration, Universi'y of F
1929.
Graduate Assistant in Business Administration and Economics
David. James B.. B.S. in Chem;cal Engineering. University of Florida,
Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
Fehder. Paul. B.S.. Columbia University, 1932,
Graduate Assistant in Pharmacy
Forsee. William T. Jr., M.S.. University of Florida, 1932,
Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
Freeman. H. Dwight, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida. 1931.
Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Engineering
Grinsted, Alan Douglas. A.B., Bucknell University, 1931.
Graduate Assistant in Sociology
Henderson. Joseph R.. B.S. in Agriculture. University of Florida. 1931
Graduate Assistant in Agronomy
Hocking. George M.. M.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida. 1932,
Graduate Assistant in Pharmacognosy
Lear. C. Aerritt, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of North Ca
1930,
Graduate Assistant in Physics
Lindstrom. Evan T.. B.S., University of Miami, 1930,
Graduate Assistant in Physics
Lynch, Harold J., M.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1932,
Graduate Assistant in Pharmacology
Morrow. John A.. M.A.. University of Virginia, 1921,
Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
Pasne. .1. Fred. Jr.. B.S. The North Dakota Agricultural College. 1932.
Graduate Assistant in Physics
Pinsker. Jeannette R.. M.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1932,
Graduate Assistant in Pharmacy
Rowell. John Orian. B.S.. Clemson College, 1931,
Graduate Assis:ant in En:omology and Plant Pa hology
Snoevenbos. Willard. Jr.. Ph.B.. University of Wisconsin. 1932.
Graduate Assistant in Business Administration and Economics
Spurlbck. Alvin H.. B.S. in Agricultural Education. University of Florida,
Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Economics











BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Tod, Carrel I., A.B., University of Virginia, 1927,
Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Economics
Trogdon, Richard P., B.S., University of Florida, 1929,
Graduate Assistant in Biology
Unkrich, Robert C., B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida,
1932,
Research Assistant in the Bureau of Economics and Business Research
Webb, Thomas R., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
Graduate Assistant in Physics
Young, Thomas W., B.S. in Forestry, Purdue University, 1930,
Graduate Assistant in Horticulture

GRADUATE SCHOLARS, 1932-1933

Baker, George L., B.S. in Pharmacy, Colorado University, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in Pharmacy
Cutler, Ronald J., A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in English
Earle, Huber D., B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in Economics
Emanuel, Laurence M., B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida,
1932,
Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
Huyck, Clement L., B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Buffalo, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in Pharmacy
Jones, Vernon, A.B., Texas Technological College, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
Klotz, Lyell J., B.S. in Pharmacy, 1928; M.S. in Pharmacy, University of
Nebraska, 1929,
Graduate Scholar in Pharmacy
Manucy, Albert Clement, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in English
Miller, William Gilbert, A.B., Birmingham-Southern College, 1931,
Graduate Scholar in Mathematics
Pinney, Charles B., A.B., University of Florida, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in Economics
Riley, Donald E., B.S. in Pharmacy, Valparaiso University, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in Pharmacy
Rosser, Harwood, Jr., A.B., University of Florida, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in Mathematics
Rosenberg, Mitchell M., A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
Graduate Scholar in Mathematics
Wilson, Henry Y., B.S. in Education, Ohio University, 1929,
Graduate Scholar in Spanish









RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES 41

RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES
February 1, 1932

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
Paul Douglas Camp, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1919,
Animal H usbandry................................-.... ............ ....................-- W white Springs
Thesis: Methods of Managing Range Cattle in Alachua County, Florida.

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
Burton Weber Ames, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1923,
Education .......................................... ...- .. ................. ................ G ainesville
Thesis: A Study of Correspondence Instruction Based on Eleven Years of
University Extension at the University of Florida.
Albert James Geiger, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1923,
Education ...................................... .... ......... .......... .....-- ............ Penney Farm s
Thesis: A Study of the Farm Shop Instruction in the Vocational Agricul-
ture Schools of Florida.

RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES
June 6, 1932
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY
Louis Magid, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1931,
P harm acy ...... ..... ....... ........- ............ ... .. .. ...... ...... ......... ..-......................T am pa
Thesis: The Effect of Various Compounds Upon the Stability of Hydri-
odic Acid.
Jeannette Mary Radin, Ph.G., 1930; Ph.C., 1931, Medical College of South
Carolina,
Pharm acy ............................. .... ............. -... .............................. Sejny, Poland
Thesis: The Antiseptic Value of Phenol Ointments.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING
Carl Jackson Guard, B.S. in Civil Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
M municipal Engineering ..................................- .................................. .....- Orlando
Thesis: Some Problems in the Control of Sewage Treatment.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
Policarpo Gonzalez Rios, B.S. in Agriculture, College of Agriculture and
Mechanical Arts, University of Porto Rico, 1915,
Horticulture .................................... ................ --..... ............... M ayaques, P. R.
Thesis: Studies on the Histology and Cause of Storage Pitting of Citrus
Fruits.
George Carl Roberts, B.S. in Agricultural Education, University of Florida,
1920,
A agricultural Econom ics ......................................... ....- ...... ............. ...W eirsdale
Thesis: The Production, Receipts, Costs and Profits on Ten Citrus Groves
in Polk County, Florida, Over a Period of Ten Years.









BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Royal James Wilmot, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Tennessee. 1922,
H orticulture -.. ..... ........ ............. ..... ... ....... .... .......... ...................... Loughli an
Thesis: The Effect of Hydrocyanic Acid Gas Fumigation on the Subse-
quent Growth of Pecan Nursery Stock.

MASTER OF SCIENCE

Willard Merwvin Fifield, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1930.
H orticulture .-.......... ........... ...-- .......--- ......-......... ............. Jacksonville
Thesis: The Effect of Various Wrappers and Temperatures on the Pre-
servation of Oranges in Cold Storage.
William Raymond Lyle, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1930,
H orticulture .... ..........-.. ........ ...--.. ........... ....-........... .. .. .................... ar 'w
Thesis: Studies on the Cold Storage of Avcoados.
Edward S. Quade, B.S., University of Florida, 1930.
M them atics .......... ...................................................................... ... Jacksonville
Thesis: The Development of the Idea of Integration.
Felix Anthony Reiber, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1930,
M them atics ....................- ..- .........- ............ .- ..-. .. ...........................JacksonvNille
Thesis: The Application of Integration to Generalized Addition Th.'ormins.
John Ballard Tower, Jr., B.S.. University of Florida, 1931,
B iology ...... ..... ........... ................... .......... ..... ....... ............................ H om estead
Thesis: A Comparison of Various Types of Animal Habitats in the Gaines-
ville Regions with Special Reference to Evaporation Rates.

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION

Kenneth Rast Williams, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1929.
E education ..-........ ................-..-.. -.... ----.................... .....- ....- ... ..... .....M onticello
Thesis: Classroom Supervision in the Accredited Secondary Public Schools
of Florida.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ARCHITECTURE

William Tobias Arnett, B.S. in Architecture, University of Florida. 1929.
Architecture -................. ...... --............. ...... ....................... Clermont
Thesis: A Study of the Campus Planning Problem at the University of
Florida.

MASTER OF ARTS

Joe Bass, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida. 1930.
E conom ics ............................. .............................. ................... ................ Jacksonville
Thesis: The Development of Manufacturing in Florida: 1899-1929--A Sta-
tistical Analysis.
Velma Shands Bonacker, B.S., Florida State College for Women. 1921.
S ociology ..................................................................... .................. ...........C itra
Thesis: A Study of Mothers' Assistance, with Special Reference to Alachua
County, Florida.










RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES 43

Loris Rood Bristol, B.S.. University of Florida. 1929.
S ociology ....................... ............. ......... ...... ...... ......... ........ G aines'vil'e
Thesis: A Study of Pardoning Systems, with Special Reference to Florida.
Samuel Todd Fleming, A.B., Florida Agricultural College, 1901.
Econom ics .......... ........... ......... ............. ..... ........... ......... G ainesville
Thesis: Agricultural ( ...' .. Organization in Land-Grant Institutions.
Charles Roy Hughes, A.B., University of Florida, 1931.
H history ....-............... . ............ .. ...... ........ Lake H am ilhi n
Thesis: The Foreign Policy of Woodroiw Wilson.
Joseph Clyde Stock, B.S. in Education. University of Florida. 1931.
Sociology ..l ............. ... ..... ...... .... ....... ....... ............. Interlachen
Thesis: "Cultural Recapitulation" In Theory and Practice.
Rogers W. Young, A.B. in Education. University of Florida. 1931.
H history ........................ .......... .... ... ... ... ....................... ......... ...... .T allahassee
Thesis: Our Relations IWith Venezuela-A Study in American Diplomacy.

RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES

August 4, 1932

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY

George William Birmingham. B.S. in Pharmacy. North Dak, a \gr cultinal
College, 1930,
P harm acy .................................... ..... .......... .... .... ....... Stu sm an. N D ak.
Thesis: The Stability of Solution of Iron and Anmmoniumn Acetate.
U.S.P.X.
George Macdonald Hocking. B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Washingtni. 1931,
P harm acognosy ..... . .................................................................P or:land. O re.
Thesis: The Pharmacognosy, Chemistry, and Therapeutics of Lacinaria
spicata (L.) Kuntze and oi Lacinaria tenuiufolia (Nutt.) Kuntze
(Compositae).
Harold J. Lynch, B.S. in Pharmacy, South Dakota State College. 1931.
P harm acology ............ ..------ ..... .... ...--- .... .--........... ........ Faribault. M inn.
Thesis: The Effect of Anthelmintics ont the Host.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING

Dow Gary Beck, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Tennessee, 1915,
Electrical Engineering .................... .................. ..... ......................... O cala
Thesis: An Analysis of the Magnetic Circuits of Alternating Current In-
duction Type Watt-Hour Meters.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Fred Stephen Jahn. B.S. in Business Administration. University of Florida.
1931.
Business Adm inistration .................................................. .... ...... N ew Port Richev
Thesis: Some Statistical Contributions to the Aeo-Classical Theory of









BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE

Lawrence John Larson, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1928,
Agricultural Economics ............................................. ......... W inter Haven
Thesis: The Cost of Producing Strawberries in the Plant City Area for
the Season 1927-28.
John Levi Wann, B.S. in Agriculture, Purdue University, 1921,
Agricultural Economics ..............................-........ ----......................... Gainesville
Thesis: Florida Truck Crop Competition, Intra-State.

MASTER OF SCIENCE

John Melton Coleman, B.S., Mississippi A. and M. College, 1915,
C hem istry ............... .. .... ... ... ......... ...... .... ....-.. ....... ...- .. .............. ....... G ainesville
Thesis: The Effect of Fertilizers and Soil Types on the Mineral Content
of Plants.
William Thomas Forsee, Jr., A.B., Georgetown College, 1931,
Chem istry ....................................................... ...... .... ..... ... ........... ..O w enton, K y.
Thesis: Acyl Derivatives of Ortho-Aminophenol, III.
Seibert Clinton Pearson, B.S., University of Florida, 1931,
Biology ......... ...... .................. ..................-- ...... ...... .. ...... .... Alachua
Thesis: Myology of Tadarida Cynocephala (Le Conte).
Owen Rice, II, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
Chem istry ........................... ..... .... ................... ........... ....... ......... ............... O rlando
Thesis: The Effect of Certain Anions on the Formation of Alum Floc and
on Color Removal.

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION

John L. Butts, B.S., Mississippi A. and M. College, 1916,
Education .............................. ....... ---........... --.....................M iam i
Thesis: A Program for Agricultural Education in Dade County.
Ralph Cary Carlisle, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1910,
Education ......................... ......... ............ ... -.. --........ ..... ................ Sneads
Thesis: Making a Long Time Program in Vocational Agriculture for
Sneads Community.
Carl Clinton Carnes, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1926,
E education ............... .............................................................................G ainesville
Thesis: A Study of the Natural Science Laboratories in the High Schools
of Florida.
Guy Cox, B.S., Clemson College, 1919,
Education ...................................... ... .............. ............. .. ... .............. Lake City
Thesis: A Study of the Newspaper Articles Relating to Vocational Agri-
culture in Florida.
Watson Perry Davidson, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1929,
E education ................................... ................ .............................................. B aker
Thesis: A Study of the Official Relations of the Supervising Principals
of Sumter County, Florida.








RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES 45

Charles Lewis Dodson, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1927,
E education ...............-......-.......-.......- ..- ..- ......- ......------ ---------- ------. ...... G ainesville
Thesis: Analysis of the Factors in Florida High School Science Teaching
and Some Resulting Effects on Freshman Grades at the Univer-
sity of Florida.
Vernice Law Hearn, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
E education ................ ........ ......... ....... .......................... .............. ............. M iam i
Thesis: A Study of the High Schools in Alachua County, Florida, for the
Purpose of Consolidation.
Alex Ralph Johnson, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1925,
E education .............................. ........ ....................... ....... ...... -....- --S anford
Thesis: The Organization, Instruction and Results of Evening Classes in
Poultry Production.
Fred Key Knight, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1925,
E education ...-- --....... ...... .... ..... .............................. ....-. ... .... ........C recent C ity
Thesis: How to Organize and Conduct an Evening Class in Citrus Culture.
Eldridge F. McLane, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1922,
E education ...- ... -- ... ........ ...... .......................... .................... B randon
Thesis: Vocational Practices in the Junior and Senior High Schools of
Florida: Present Status and Probable Trend.
Horace O'Bryant, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1922,
E education .......................--. .. ........ ..... ............ ...... .......... ...--.. .... ......... O xford
Thesis: The Cuban Child in Division Street School, Key IWest, Florida.
George N. Wakefield, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1925,
E education ................... ..................- ...............- ......- ........................... H om estead
Thesis: Training for Leadership Through Future Farmers of America.
Charles M. Williams, B.S., Valparaiso University, 1914.
E education ...... .... ... ..... ..... .. ..........- ....- .......... ...-... ........-............ T renton
Thesis: Care and Maintenance Practices in Certain Accredited Florida
Schools.
MASTER OF ARTS

Howard L. Hoag, A.B., Kalamazoo College, 1927,
Economy ics .......................... ......................................... ... ...... K alam azoo, M ich.
Thesis: Highwiay Finance in Florida.
Ernest M. McCracken, A.B., Georgetown College (Ky.), 1930,
Economics ...... ..............................................Erlanger, Ky.
Thesis: Real Estate Assessment in Marion County, Florida.
Maude McEwen, A.B. in Education, Florida State College for Women, 1926,
French ............................................... .....--.. .... ..... .................................Zellwood
Thesis: A Comparison of Chateaubriand and Byron, Romanticists.











BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


REGISTER OF STUDENTS, GRADUATE SCHOOL

SUMMER, 1932

Abbott, Beulah W. (Mrs. C. W.), Bachelor of Philosophy, University of Chicago, 1906,
F rench ................-.... --...... .S.. ................-..- ...........S...................................... St. P etersburg
Allen, Vivienne Grace, B.S. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1924,
E n g lish ..... .... .... ........-.... ---.. .......-..................- ..... ..... ...-........-.. ................. ... M iam i
Arnold, Elva, A.B., Rollins College, 1931,
E education ................ .......................... .............. ... ............................................ ........ G roveland
Arnold, Laurie James, Jr., B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
E education .....................-- ..... ............. ................... ................. ....... .. L ake C ity
Arnold, John S., A.B., Rollins College, 1932,
Econom ics ............ ...... ... ------- ------..--.--...... .......-......... -- Grovelan.l
Babich, Peter, A.B., Rollins College, 1928,
H history ................ .... ........... .................. .... ..... ......................................................... Greensboro
Baer, Allan Oliver, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1931,
Business Administration ...... ...... .... ........................................ Omaha, Nebraska
Baker, Roxie, A.B., Florida State College For Women, 1927,
E english ............ .... .... ............. ............ .............. ....... .. ........ .... T am pa
Barshell, Frederick Herbert, B.S. in Education, University of lori:la, 1931,
E education ....... .. --................. ......... ........ ...... .............................. ............. .. A von P ark
Beadle, Melissa Louise, A.B., Stetson University, 1930,
E english ........................ .................... ..- .... ................ .... .... ...... ......... .................. D eL and
Beck, Dow Gary, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Tennessee, 1915,
Electrical Engineering .................... ..................................................... ... ................. Ocala
Bilderbeck, James Lorin, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
E education ............................. ..........----- ................. ...-- .....-- ......... ............................ N ew berry
Birmingham, George William, B.S. in Pharmacy, North Dakota Agricultural College,
1930,
Pharm acy ................-- ... ....... ........ ........... .............. --......... Stutsm an, N D ak.
Bowling, Alice Portner (Mrs. R. E.), B.S., Rollins College, 1927,
E education ...... .-- .....- ..- ............................ ......................-..... -....... .... ..... ...- ......... N aples
Bowman, Marion F., B.S., St. Vincent College, 1928,
M them atics ...... --.........................----..... ... ...................................... St. Leo
Bracuto, Peter, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
E education ........ ........- ................. ......... ...-......-- ....... .................... ....... G ainesville
Brendan, Sister Mary, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
E education .................................... .............. ............ ....... .............. ... .. ... ..... Jacksonville
Bridges, Mary Kathleen, A.B. in Education, Florida State College for Women, 1927,
English ......... .................. ............................ ............... .. ..... .................. Blountstow n
Buchholz, Frederick W., A.B., Florida State College, 1905,
E n g lish ................................ ............. ------.-.. ...-...- ...... -------.................................... G ainesville
Butts, John L., B.S., Mississippi A. & M. College, 1916,
E education ............-- ...............-- .....................------- ........... ............................... M iam i
Calhoun, Paul White, B.S., University of Florida, 1930,
Chem istry .......................................................-- ..----.... ........---.......... -.. ........... M adison
Campbell, Monroe, Jr., A.B., University of Florida, 1928,
E english ---............................................. ..... .... ................................ P ensacola
Carlisle, Ralph Cary, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1910,
E education ........................ ..-- .............. ....- ............................. .... ............... ..................... Sneads
Carnes, Carl Clinton, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1926,
E education ....... ---..-----..--.-------.... .... --------- ................. ..... ..---........................... G ainesville
Carter, Edgar White, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1926,
E du cation ............. .. .........-- ..... .................. ..... .... .............. ......... .................. O x fo r.I
Che-ey, Virginia Margaret. A.B., Stetson University, 1930,
E education ...... ........ ........ ........ ........... ... ..... ......... ..... ......... .............. G ainesville
Clark, Vernon Wilmot, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
E education -.... .------.. --. -- ------------------------ ...... .... ........................ B radenton











REGISTER OF STUDENTS


Clay. Irby Elizabeth, B.S., Florida State College For Women, 1931,
E education ........-...... --. .. . ...--.. .... ....- ...... --- ....-- .... A lva
Clubbs, Occie, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1929,
History ................................. --------------.......... -------....... .. Pensacola
Cole, Allen T., B.S., Hamline University, 1930,
Chem istry ..... ........... -.. .--- -- ---------- ..- .. .. ................ Gainesville
Coleman, John Melton, B.S., Mississippi A. & M. College, 1915,
Chem istry ..... .. ........ ...... .... ... ..... .... .. Gainesville
Cook, Frederick Edward, A.B., University of Florida, 1930,
Psychology .. .. .. .. ...... ...... ---. --...- .... .- O cala
Copeland, J. Dewberry, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 192),
E conom ics ......... ... .. .... ... ...------------- ... ............ .. .... ..... G ainesville
Cox, Guy, B.S., Clemson College, 1919,
E du cation ...... ... ....... .... ........... .. ... ... .. .................. .. L ak e C ity
Crowell, John Melvin, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1927,
Education --..........----. .- -- -----...---...------.... --------- ..........----.... W auchula
Dauer, Martha Fitts (Mrs.1, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
E english .. ... .... .. .... ...... ........ ........ .... .. T am pa
David, James B., B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
Chem istry ... .. .. ......... ....... .. Jacksonville
Davidson. Watson Perry, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1929,
E education ... .. .... .. .... .. -- ---- ... .. .... .. .. Baker
Day, Verna Emma, A.B., Florida State College For Women, 192.),
E english .. .. ....... .. .. ....... ............. Pensacola
Degtoff, Walter A., B.S. in Architecture, University of Florida, 1931,
E education .. ....... ........ .... ... .. ..--- -- .. .... . M iam i
Delavan, Paul Tuttle, Bachelor of Civil Engineering, University of Michigan, 1912,
Education ... ........ .. .. ....... .. Da 'e City
Dodson, Charles Lewis, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1927,
E education ............ ... .. .... -- --..... ...... .................. ....... ................. G ainesville
Donnelly, Wallace Oliver, A.B., University of Florida, 1931,
F rench ................................ ......... .....-..- .............................. .. ......... G ainesville
Driggers, Vaughan Wendall, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1925,
E education . .......... E... .............. ............. ... ...... .... ......... .. . E ustis
Dugger, Lonnie Lee, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1928,
E education ....................... ----. -.. .. . ... ----- --............ ... --..-.. M acclenny
Duncan, William C., A.B., Wofford College, 1910,
E education .. ... .. ...... ... .. ........... ......................... ........ ... ... ... T am pa
Durrance, Augusta Winn (Mrs. H. G.), A.B., University of Kentucky, 1923,
English .. . . ..................................... .......... .... ..................... .......................... Kissim m ee
Eff, Samuel, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1929,
Education ............................................................... ...... ................................ St. A ugustine
Farun, Fred N., B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
Ag. Economics .. ........... ..- .. ............ .......... ... Jerusalem, Palestine
Farabe, T. N., A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
E education ........... .......................... ............... ..... ... ............. .. W auchula
Forsee, William Thomas, Jr., A.B., Georgetown College, 1931,
Chemistry .- .. ......- -......- ..... ... ........... .- .... ...... . ....................... Owenton, Ky.
Frison, C. Gerard, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
E education .... ........ ...... .......... .. T itusville
Goodrich, Mary Jane, A.B., Agnes Scott College, 1930,
Education ....... City Point
Greene, Ellis Park, A.B., Southern College, 1927,
Education .........-- .... . .. .. Boca Grande
Greenman, John Roosevelt, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
Agricultural Econom ics ...... .... .. ... ....................... Gainesville
Grinsted, Alan Douglas, A.B., Bucknell University, 1931,
P psychology .- ....... ........................... ....... ..... ... ... .. .. .. O range, N J.
Groover, Mary, A.B. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1929,
English .. .................. ... .. -........ ........ Lake City











48 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Harris, Nina McAllister (Mrs. E. W.), A.B., Indiana University, 1925,
Sociology ....... ........ ..... .... ....... ...........--- ---........... ....- St. Petersburg
Harris, Robert Ennis, A.B., Ogden College, 1923,
E education ......................---- .... ......-- ........................ .... ........ ............................... O rlando
Harris, Sarah Satterwhite (Mrs. C. H.), A.B. in Education, University of Florida,
1928,
E education ........................................... ........................................... ..................... Jacksonville
Harris, Carl H., A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1928,
E english ................. ... ... . ......... .--.... -.... -.............. ................................. Jacksonville
Hawkins, George A., B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1929,
Chem istry .... ---.... -...- ..- ............. ........... ...........--..... ......................... .... Bay H arbor
Itearn, Vernice Law, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
Education ........................ .. ........... ............ .................................................... ....... M iam i
Hill, Maoma Frances, B.S. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1922,
Agronom y ......................... .... ...... -------..- -.............. ........................... Dade City
Hiner, Lovell David, B.S., South Dakota State College, 1929; M.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Florida, 1931,
Pharm acognosy ....-- .......--.....-............ .... ..----. .. ......... .. .... ......... W agner, S. D ak.
Hocking, George Macdonald, B.S. in Pharmacy, Universit atf Washington, 1931.
Pharm acognosy .......... ........................ ... ...... ................... Portland, Ore.
Horne, Sidney L., A.B. in Education, University of Floria, 1:131,
E education ....................... ................ .. ....- .... ............................. ..................... M onticello
Hudson, Margaret, A.B. in Education, University of Georgia, 1l31,
H history ...................................................---- ---...... ..... ....................... W est Palm Beach
Hudson, Iola, A.B., Winthrop College, 1928,
M them atics ................................ .................................................. .... W est Palm Beach
Jahn, Fred Stephen, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida. 1931,
Business Adm inistration ........................ ........ .---............ .......--............ New Port Richey
Jelks, Marie, B.S. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1929,
Education .................... -- --- .... .------ ------ ......... ................. Pom pano
Jennings, Francis Cornwall, B.S., Clemson College, 1925,
E education .................................................... .............. ..... ....... ..... .. .......... . O rtega
Johnson, Clifton Drew, A.B., University of Florida, 1921,
E education .................................................. ...... ................ ................................. Clearw after
Johnson, Henrietta Bird, B.S., Florida State College For Women, 1925,
Psychology ..................... .... --------........ --- .. .................... ........... ... ... ..... T am pa
Johnson, Alex Ralph, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1925,
E du cation .. ........... .... ....... ....... ................................................................. .... .. San ford
Jones, Elise Cecile, A.B., Agnes Scott College, 1931,
Psychology ........................-........-.. .............. ... ................ Gainesville
Jones, Emily Capers, A.B., Agnes Scott College, 1926,
M them atics .......................... ..... ... .. .... ....... ... .......................... ... DeLand
Jones. Patricia Niles, A.B., Southern College, 1930,
Education .............................. .. .-..-...--.--.......... ......... ............................... D eLand
Knight, Fred Key, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1925,
Education ............................ .......... ...... .... .... ................................... Crescent City
Laney, Harrison Jaen, A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 1925,
Sociology ..................... ............ .................................................. .. ........... ........... O viedo
Larson, Lawrence John, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1928,
Agricultural Econom ics .......................................... ........................... W inter H aven
Lawson, Lois Mae, A.B., State University of Iowa, 1927,
E education .............................................................................. ... .................... Lake W ales
Loften, William T., B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1931,
E education ................... ....... -- --- ........................ .... ..............----.............................. A lachua
Lord, Mills Minton, Jr., A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
H history ... ................. .................... ............................................... ......................... .. Sanford
Ludwig, Gerald Edward, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1930,
Business A dm inistration ..................................................................................... Sarasota
Lynch, Harold John, B.S. in Pharmacy, South Dakota State College, 1931,
Pharmacology ...... ................. ............................. Faribault, Minn.











REGISTER OF STUDENTS 49


McAdam, Charles B., B.S. in Civil Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
G eology ................................................. ................................ ............ ... ........ ... P ensacola
McAllister, Elizabeth Jane, A.B., Indiana University, 1920,
Education ........................................................------- ..................... St. Petersburg
McCracken, Ernest M., A.B., Georgetown College (Kentucky), 1930,
E conom ics ................................--- ... .................... ........................................---- ... E ranger, K y.
McEwen, Maude, A.B. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1926,
French ............... .............. ....................................... ....... ....... ............. .............. Zellw ood
McIntire, James Edgar, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1929,
E education ....................... .... .................................................................................. ....... T renton
McLane, Eldridge F., A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1922,
Education ................................................................ ......................... Brandon
Mann, Don T., B.S., Vanderbilt University, 1920,
M them atics ............................ .. .......... .......... ...--... ........... .............................. N ew berry
Manning, Janie Stroud (Mrs. E. M.), A.B., The Texas State College For Women,
1923,
Chem istry ........................-- .. ................................ ........... ........................ L akeland
Martin, Roe, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
H history .................................... ................................................. .......................... G ainesville
Meadows, Carolyn Harris (Mrs.), A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1928,
Sociology .. ......... ...........- .... .-- .....- .......... ...... ...... ..................................... ........ U m atilla
Melton, Myrtle Carter (Mrs. H. J.), A.B., Winthrop College, 1927,
H history .................................... ....... .. .............- ..-- ................ ........ .... ...... .......---- T am pa
Miller, Clara Pearl, A.B., Woman's College of Alabama, 1928,
M them atics ............................. .. ..... .. ...... ................................ Bay H arbor
Mitchell, Horace Franklin, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
E education ......................... ....... ........... ....... . .... .. .. ..... ..... .... H igh Springs
Mollett, Charles Edwin, M.S., University of Kansas, 1927,
Pharm acology ..... .......... ........................ ... ..... ...... .... .... M issoula, M ont.
Monica, Sister Mary, A.B. in. Education, University of Florida, 1925,
Education ....... ......... -.-. ...---- .. ----- ...... ............ ...... ............. ..... Coral Gables
Moon, Robert Cary, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
E education ..................- ....- ......... ..... .... .. -.. ....---- .. ... .............. Gainesville
Moorman, John Haynes, B.S. in Commerce, Northwestern University, 1923,
Education ..... -- --- ..- ......--....... ...... ... .. .. .... ..... W infield, Iowa
Morrow, John Albert. M.A., University of Virginia, 1921,
Chem istry .....- .. ...-- ..... ..... ----...... ....... ... .. .... ........ .......... G ainesville
Mott, Thelma Peggy, A.B., Bessie Tift College, 1928,
E english ... .. ...... .. .......-- .. ...... .. ....----... ----- -----.... ....... ......... ..-- G ainesville
Northrop, Floyd Lorrain, B.S., Cornell University, 1920,
A agricultural E education .- ........ ........ ...... ... ................ ...... ... .. --... .................... M iam i
Norton, Bessie Amanda, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
Education ................... ............ ....--.............. -............... .. . ....................... ....... Panam a City
Norton, Elizabeth, A.B., Florida State College For Women, 1912,
M them atics ..............-...- .. .... ................ ...... ........... ............ W inter H aven
O'Bryant, Horace, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1922,
Education ....................... ... .................... ........----.... --......-............ .. .................... Oxford
Orr, Reuben Bennett, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
E education ....................- ...-..-- .....-.-......-- .- ...... ---.. . ... ...... ....... ................... G ainesville
Pearson, Seibert Clinton, B.S., University of Florida, 1931,
B biology ......................................... .......... ... ... ........ ..................... .................................... A lachua
Peeples, Lorace Helen, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1925,
Sociology ............--- ............. .... ..... .. .. -...... ............. .................. Bow ling Green
Peterson, Frank Lon, A.B., University of Florida, 1930,
F rench ......................... .. ................................... ...... ...... ...... .............................. M iam i
Plank, Christine Olivia (Mrs. F. M.), A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
Education ... ....... .-- ---- ... .....-.... ---.... ---... .......................------.................. Jacksonville
Radin, Mary Jeannette, Ph.G., 1930; Ph.C., 1931, Medical College of South Carolina;
M.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1932,
P harm acy ............. .......... .... ........... .................. .. .......... ............... Sejny, P land











BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Rhodes, Francis Arlie, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
H history ..................... ..........- .................. ....... ---........ ............--------...... ..............----- W oodville
Rice, Owen, II, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
C hem istry ................ .... ...... .-- ...--- .- . ----- .--.......... -.. .. ...................... O rlando
Rippey, Andrew, B.S., University of Florida, 1932,
E education .... .. ...... . .. ............. ........... ................. .......-....................... G ainesville
Roberts, George Carl, B.S. in Agricultural Education, 1920; M.S. in Agriculture,
1932, University of Florida,
Agricultural Econom ics .... .....-. --... ... .- ............... .-......................... Trenton
Roberts, William Harold, A.B., 1930; B.S. in Agriculture, 1931, University of Florida,
Education ............. .... ...... ..................... ......--- .-..--- .........-- H om estead
Rochester, Morgan Columbus, B.S., Clemson College, 1931,
Agricultural Economics .... ............ ..... --...-..-....- ..--- . ... ... Salem, S. C.
Rowell, John Orian, B.S., Clemson College, 1931,
Entom ology ............. -------................ ............. ...---. .. .. M arion, S. C.
Rowell, John Theron, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
E education .......................... ..... ................. .... ......------------ ------ ....... ..... .. ................. Perry
Sansbury, Walter Ewing, B.S., University of Florida, 1931,
Chem istry ................ ..------- .... ......---- -- ----.......... -----........... W est Palm Beach
Savage, Zach, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1923; M.S. in Agriculture, Uni-
versity of Florida, 1931,
Agricultural Econom ics ........... ................- ............. ......... .. .................. ......... Gainesville
Schell, Hannah Rebecca, B.S. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1927,
Education ........ --- -...... -....... ......... ......- .. ..... ..... . -..- Fort M years
Settle, Lucy Belle, B.S. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1927,
Sociology ....... ..... ..-- ---------..... .... --...-..- .. --.... Gainesville
Sewell, Robert Oliver, B.S., University of Florida, 1929,
Psychology .............. .......---. ...............-------- ........... ....... ....... .... ... Gainesville
Shaw, Margaret Jeannette, A.B., Agnes Scott College, 1931,
Psychology ...... ........ .. ...----- -.............. .......... ... .. ... ......... G ainesville
Shaw, William Henry, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1929,
E education ........ ............... ......... ...... .... ....... ...-- ................ .............. ..... R aiford
Shepard, Katharine Prime (Mrs. W. G.), A.B., Florida State College For Women, 1925,
P sychology ...........-... ...........- ........- ---.. ...............-..................... ........ ..........- -- Sarasota
Sherard, Hoyt, M.S. in Agriculture, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1932,
A gronom y ....- ..................- ...- .... ...... .... .. ..... ....-......... .. ..... ..- G raham A la.
Skaggs, Kenneth Gordon, A.B., University of Florida, 1932,
E english ..............- ..... ........ .. ..-.-..-.... ..-- ..-.....-.. ... ...-........... .. ....-. Sarasota
Smith, Foster Shi, A.B.S.S., 1924; LL.B., 1928, University of Florida,
H history .................. ...--- .... .....-- ..... ..... .....--- .. .. ... ..... ........ .....----. ...... ........... .. .... H aw thorne
Smith, Heyburn Dale, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1927,
E education ................. ........------ ............ ....... ......... ..... ...... ..------ ........ ....... .....--............ O neco
Thalgott, Alberta Florence, B.S., Florida State College For Women, 1927,
E education ........ ....... ........ --- ............. -------... .. -.. --.......... ................... D unnellon
Thomas, J. Harry Preston, A.B., Mercer University, 1927,
E education ................ ............ .... .. .......... ........... .. .. .............. P alatka
Thompson, Donald Chester, A.B., Washington and Lee University, 1932,
E education ... .. ............-..-... ..- .....--. ....- ............ ...- ....- ....---- .. -....- ...- Jacksonville
Thompson, Laudious Lawrence, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1923,
Education ---.... --................-- .... -- ... .......----- ... ....... -..---- .... .... Panam a City
Vaughn, Margaret M., A.B., Georgia State College For Women, 1928,
E english ............. ..... ... ...--------..----------------- ---. .-- ----.. ..----.... ........ .. .. W illiam son, G a.
Wakefield, George N., B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1925,
E education ...... ...... .....-----. .. . ... -----... ------............................................. H om estead
Wann, John Levi, B.S. in Agriculture, Purdue University, 1921,
Agricultural Econom ics -..................... ......... ............... ...- ..... ... .. ..-- Gainesville
Wasdin, Gladys (Mrs. J. A.), B.S. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1932,
B otany ...............- .................................-..-................ ..-- ...... ................. ..............-- G raham
Webb, Mahlon Roy, B.Sc. in Educaton, Toledo University, 1926,
E education .................................................... .................... ................... L akeland











REGISTER OF STUDENTS 51


Welborn, Elizabeth Charles, A.B., Greenville Woman's College, 1923,
Education .................. ... ......----- .... .... - --- ... Jacksonville
Westbury, D. Smith, A.B. in Education, South Carolina University, 1925,
Education ..... ........ ---......- .----- ---- ----- ..........----- .--- .... Gainesville
White, Ruth, A.B., Wesleyan College, 1916,
E english ......................... .... ........ ...--. .... .--- .................... Gainesville
Williams, Charles M., B.S., Valparaiso University, 1914,
E education ...................... ---.. .......... ....... ...... .. ---------------............. ................ T renton
Williams, Edwin Lacy, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1930,
H history .............. .. .. .... ....... ........ ...... F ort M eade
Young, Catharine Montine, A B., Rollins College, 1926,
Sociology ............... ... - --- ............ .. ..... O viedo


REGISTER OF STUDENTS, GRADUATE SCHOOL

FIRST SEMESTER. 1932-33

Abbott, Ouida Davis, B.S., 1921; M.A., 1922; Ph.D., 1925; University of Missouri,
Pharam acology .........-- ...........-........... ---..--............. ......... ..... .. Gainesville
Adelson, Dave E., B.S., University of Florida, 1932,
Chem istry ..........- ... ......... ................. ... Tam pa
Ames, Burton Weber, B.S. in Agriculture, 1923; M.A. in Education, 1932;
University of Florida,
E education ................... .....- ... .. ...... ..- ....- ..... ...- .............. ---.-- ..... Gainesville
Amundsen, Lawrence Hardin, B.S., College of the Ozarks, 1931,
Chem istry ... ............. .. ...........------..............--- -- -------. -------- Clarksville, Ark.
Andrews, Byron Knight, Advanced Senior,
Education .-............r --------- ----.. .--.....--- .. ....... ... Green Cove Springs
Arnold, Frances Lee, A.B., Rollins College, 1932,
English ................. - - ----- -.. ---...---..------- -.... .. .... Groveland
Arnold, John S., A.B., Rollins College, 1932,
Econom ics ..... ............... .... .... Groveland
Arnold, Lillian E., B.S., Stetson University, 1918,
B otany ....... -----------......... .... .. ...... ..... .... ..... .... .... ........... G ainesville
Arnold, P. T. Dix, B.S., Cornell University, 1924,
Anim al Husbandry .-............ ....- ..... ...---------.. ........--- ......... Bradenton
Babich, Peter, A.B., Rollins College, 1928,
H history ........-....... .. ---.. ----........... ------...-- .....-... ---- ..-.-...-...... M canopy
Baer, Allan Oliver, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1931,
Business Administration .. --------.................... ...........---..... ....... Galveston, Texas
Bailey, Leonard Campbell, A.B., University of Florida, 1932,
English ..- ........ ......... ...-- .... .--- -.. -- .. ... --- --. --.. --... ............ O cala
Baker, Roxie, A.B., Florida State College For Women, 1927,
English ...-..... ... .... ... ........ ...... ... _.. -- -----------. .. ----............. Tam pa
Baker, George LeRoy, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1932, University of Colorado,
Pharm acy ........... ....-...- .. --...... ......--........... .....----- --.... A dam s City, Colo.
Baker, Robert Britton, Jr., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
Electrical Engineering .. ............................ .................. ... .. Hawthorne
Batchelor, Alex R., A.B., Presbyterian College of South Carolina, 1924; M.A., Uni-
versity of South Carolina, 1926,
E ng lish ................ ..... .. ...------- ............. .. ............ . ---------- ------ .... ..... .... .. ------------ ..-- G ain esv ille
Bell, Stuart Craig, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
Plant P athology ... .... .......---- ...---- ................. .................-- ---- ... ....... .. Barberville
Blanchard, Albert Claude, B.S. in Commerce, University of Kentucky, 1930,
Economy ics .... ..-- ---... .................... ............ -----........... ........... A shville, N Y .
Blanchard, L. Paul, B.S. in Commerce, University of Kentucky, 1930,
E conom ics .-. .... .............. ............-- ..... ... ....- ..... ........... .... .. ....... ...... ...... A shville, N Y .
Bogart, John Alleyne Calhoun, B.S. in Civil Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
M municipal Engineering .............................. ............................................... Gainesville











52 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Booth, Clyde Vliet, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
Electrical Engineering ...................................................... ................................ Daytona Beach
Briggs, Wynfred Roscoe, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1917,
Agricultural Economics .................... ............ ................................ Gainesville
Brinkley, Harry John, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
H horticulture ....................- ... ..............................--............ ........ ........................ Jacksonville
Brooks, Richard Lee, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
H orticulture .........-.............-. .......---.. ..-......-....... ...............-- .... .................. B ashore
Buchholz, Frederick W., A.B., Florida State College, 1905,
E ng lish .....-.....--.................. ........ ........................................................................ G ainesville
Butt, Thomas Cecil, B.S., University of Florida, 1932,
B iology ..................... ..... ... ......----.. .................. ......... ................................. O rlando
Calhoun, Paul White, B.S., University of Florida, 1930,
Chemistry .................... .. .... ..................................... ......................... Madison
Carr, Archie Fairly, Advanced Senior,
B iolog y .............. ..... ... .......... ................................................................... ...... U m a tilla
Cole, Allen Thomas, B.S., Hamline University, 1930,
Chem istry ....................--- ... ......--- ... --.... ... ....... ...-..... .... M innesota Lake, M inn.
Constans, Henry Philip, A.B., Carleton College, 1931; LL.B., University of Wyo-
ming, 1927; M.A., University of Iowa, 1928,
P sychology ............................................................................................................... G ainesville
Copeland, J. Dewberry, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1929,
E conom ics ....-................. .... .... ........ ........................... .... .. ................... ..... Gainesville
Cutler, Ronald John, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
English ...................... ..--................... ........... . .. .... .................... DeLand
Dalalian, Harry Peter, B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1929,
C hem istry ................ .....- ....... ........-...... ......- ..-.. ..........- ........................ G ainesville
Daniel, William Russell, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
E education ........ .. .................. .. ................................ .. ...... Sarasota
David, James Bernard, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
C hem istry ................................................ ............................................................... Jacksonville
Degtoff, Walter Alexander, B.S. in Architecture, University of Florida, 1931,
E education .................... .... ... .................. ....... .... ............ ........... ....... .......... M iam i
DeLoach, Judson Bennett, B.S. in Journalism, University of Florida, 1932,
Journalism ................ .................. .... ....... .... ..... ... .. ...................................... L akeland
DeMasters, Clarence Ulysses, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1931,
Chem istry .................. .......... ............. ..... .................... .............................. Biggs, Calif.
Donnelly, Wallace Oliver, A.B., University of Florida, 1931,
French ........................---- .............................................-----................................... Gainesville
Dreblow, Charles Julius, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1932,
E conom ics ................... ........ ..... ... .....--- ..-- .... ............. .............. ........ M onticello
Dunn, William Tillman, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
Animal Husbandry .... ---................................................. Gainesville
Earle, Huber Dale, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1932,
E conom ics .................... ........ .... .. ....... ....................... ............... Burbank
Emanuel, Laurence Martin, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
C hem istry ...................................... ...... ...................... .................................. ............. O cala
Farun, Fred N., B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
Agricultural Economics ................................ ... ........... ............ Jerusalem, Palestine
Fehder, Paul, B.S., Columbia University, 1932,
Pharm acy ........................... ...... .................... ...................... Jam aica, N Y .
Forsee, William Thomas, A.B., Georgetown College, 1931; M.S., University of Florida,
1932,
Chem istry ......................................... .. ................... .......................................... O w enton, K y.
Freeman, H. Dwight, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1931,
A agricultural Engineering .............................................................. ........................... Tam pa
Fulghum, Ralph Morris, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Georgia, 1929,
Journalism .. ....................... ..... ......................................... .. ....... ........ Gainesville
Gaylord, Herbert Russell, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
Electrical Engineering ....................................................... .........-. Tam pa











REGISTER OF STUDENTS 53


Gordon, Ulysses Short, A.B., Southwestern College, 1916; B.D., Theological Semi-
nary (Louisville),
P philosophy ......... ........... ...... ... ... ...- -...... .... ..... ............. .. ......................... G ainesville
Greenman, John Roosevelt, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
Agricultural Econom ics ... ..... ...... ....... ........ ...... Gainesville
Grinsted, Alan Douglas, A.B., Bucknell University, 1931,
Psychology ................. .. ............ ....................... Gainesville
Gulick, Harold Marion, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
Chem istry ................--- .. .... ..... .--- ._ ----.----........... .. .......... ........ ... T am pa
Hall, Joseph Tilden, Jr., B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
C hem istry ............... .............. ...........-- .---. ........ .... .. .......... .................. .. ... H ollyw ood
Harris, Nina McAllister (Mrs. E. W.), A.B., Indiana University, 1925,
Sociology .....................--- .. .. .. . .... --- --...--- ................ ..- ... St. Petersburg
Haug, George Walter, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
Electrical Engineering .--- ........ .... ...... .... ...................................... Tam pa
Hawkins, George A., B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1929,
Chem istry ....... ........... ... ..........................................- ................... Bay H arbor
Henderson, Joseph Russell, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1931,
A gronom y ..........- .......--------................................. ............... ...... .. ............................... Lee
Henley, William Walter, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
Anim al Husbandry ..--.........--- ...... .... ......... .......... .. .......................... Gainesville
Hiatt, Lyle Steven, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1932,
E conom ics ...................... ... ...--- ............. .. .........------ ............. ..... ...... . Jacksonville
Hill, Maoma Frances, B.S. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1922,
A gronom y .................................... ........----- .. ......................... ................... ..... D ade City
Hiner, Lovell David, B.S., South Dakota State College, 1929; M.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Florida, 1931,
Pharm acognosy ........... .........................................---- ............................ W agner, S. Dak.
Hocking, George Macdonald, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Washington, 1931;
M.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1932,
Pharm acognosy .......................................... .................. ... ..................... Portland, Oregon
Holt, Esther Creamer (Mrs. Jack), A.B. in Commerce, Florida State College For
Women, 1926,
Sociology .............. .. -------. ---.....-- ..----. -------- .... ----.. -.. .. .. ..... G ainesville
Huffaker, Mary Bryan, A.B., Florida State College For Women, 1928,
Journalism ......... ........................ .. ............ .....-- ........... ... ........ . B artow
IIuffer, Craig, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
Electrical Engineering ........-..... ...... ...... ---.......... ....... .. Gainesville
Hussey, Thomas Goldsmith, B.S., University of Florida, 1931,
Chemistry .............................. ..................... West Palm Beach
Huyck, Clement Lee, B.S. in Pharmacy, The University of Buffalo, 1932,
Pharm acy ...... ..-- ....... ..... ..- .. ..... .. ... ........ ..... . ..... R ichfield, N Y .
Jefferson, Wayne 0., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
E electrical E engineering ........... ... ......................... .. ........ .......... ..... Gainesville
Jernigan, Claude Hagen, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
Electrical Engineering ............................................... ..........-.................. ........... M arianna
Johansen, Hans Rolff, B.S. in Journalism, University of Florida, 1932,
Journalism .......- ......-- ......--- .. .. ---................ --.. ..- ..............--- ...-........ .. ..... Clearw after
Johnson, Leonard Emanuel, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
Electrical Engineering .................. ..........-- ............................... Orlando
Johnson, Richard Sadler, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1932,
Pharm acognosy ................. ......... ....... .... --- --------- --............ ................ Gainesville
Jones, Vernon, A.B., Texas Technological College, 1932,
Chem istry .................... ........-................ ........ ............... .... ..... ................... M ullins, T exas
Jones, Hastings Wyman, B.S., Clemson College, 1929; M.S., University of Florida, 1931,
Chem istry .................................. .... .............. .. . . ............................................... Aiken, S. C.
Keeler, Emerson Martin, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
Electrical E engineering ............. ...... ...... ........... .. .. ........... ....... M iam i
Killinger, Clarence Eugene, Advanced Senior,
M echanical Engineering ....... .......... ............................. .... ..................... .... Gainesville











BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Klotz, Lyell Joseph, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1928; M.S. in Pharmacy, 1929, University of
Nebraska,
P harm acy .................................... ................ ..................... .. ..... .................... E xeter, N eb.
Lear. Charles Merritt, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of North Carolina,
1930,
P hysics ........................ .................... ................... ...................................... C hapel H ill, N C .
Lindstrom, Evan Theodore, B.S., University of Miami, 1930,
P hysics ........................................................................................................ ........................... M iam i
Little, Thomas Morton, A.B., Bucknell University, 1931,
B otany ......................... ........... .............................. .............................. .................... G ainesville
Lynch, Harold John, B.S. in Pharmacy, South Dakota State College, 1931; M.S. in
Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1932,
Pharm acology .................................................................... ........................ Faribault, M inn.
McCaughan, J. Russell, A.B., University of Florida, 1932,
E conom ics ............ -- ..-.. ....... ............---.. ...-. ...... .. ... .......................... P ensacola
McQuitty, John V., A.B., University of Florida, 1929; M.A., University of Kentucky,
1932,
P sychology ....... ......- .....---....-.-.- ............... ..... ..... ..-- .................. ....... G ainesville
Magid, Louis, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1931; M.S. in Pharmacy, 1932; University of
Florida,
P harm acy ......................................................................................................... ............... T am pa
Malphurs, Ojus, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, 1924; B.S. in Civil Engineering, 1932,
University of Florida,
C ivil E engineering .......... .. ---........ ..--....... ....... ..- ................ ................................ C itra
Manucy, Albert Clement, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
E english ........ --... ....-- ....... ..........................- ...- ....................................... St. A ugustine
Mehrhof, Norman Ripley, B.S., Rutgers University, 1921 ; M.S. in Agriculture,
North Carolina State College of Agriculture and Engineering, 1925,
A agricultural E conom ics .... ....................................... ........ ....... .... ............. Gainesville
Menendez, Ernest M., B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
E electrical E engineering ............................................................. ................................ Tam pa
Miller, William Gilbert, A.B., Birmingham Southern College, 1931,
Mathematics .................... ... ..................-------------............................ Birmingham, Ala.
Mitchell, Horace Franklin, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
E education ........................-.... .... ... ... ............... ............................................ H igh Springs
Moon, Leland Wills, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1928,
E education ...... ..... .....---- ... .. ... .... ................. ..... ............ ....... ................. L ake B u tler
Moon, Robert Cary, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
E education ............... ............................ ........ ................... ...... ......... .. ... ..... .... G ainesville
Morrow, John Albert, A.B., Emory and Henry College, 1916; M.A., University of
Virginia, 1921,
Chem istry ......................................... .................- .. ... ................. ....................... Gainesville
Mowry, Harold, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1929,
Bacteriology .................. --...................-- .......... .............. ................ Gainesville
Oberdorfer, Douglas Wallace, Advanced Senior,
Sociology ................... ................ ......... ..... .................. ......... Jacksonville
Olson, Clara McDonald (Mrs.), A.B., Florida State College For Women, 1914,
E education ................................ ............................................. ..................... ........ G ainesville
Otte, Burton J. H., A.B., Carleton College, 1918; M.S., University of Florida, 1930,
C hem istry ................................................................... ........................ ................... G ainesville
Payne, James Frederick, B.S., The North Dakota Agricultural College, 1932,
P hysics ................................... ............................................................. ........ . . Fargo, N D ak.
Pinney, Charles Bartlett, A.B., University of Florida, 1932,
E conom ics .................. ....--- .. ..... ....-------- -- ..----..... --.... ... ........... .... .......... .................. A lva
Pinsker, Jeannette Radin (Mrs.), Ph.C.; Medical College of South Carolina, 1931,
M.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1932,
P harm acy .......---........... .- .... .... ............ .................. . .. -. --- -... ............ Sejny, P land
Platt, William J., Jr., Advanced Senior,
A nim al H usbandry ...................................... ... ............................................ Sum m erfield











REGISTER OF STUDENTS 55


Potts, Joseph Dascomb, A.B., University of Florida, 1932,
E ng lish .................... ........................................... ... .. ....... .. G a inesv ille
Prince, Thomas Chafer, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1929,
E education ............ ............. -----.. .................. ........ .. .... .... Jacksonville
Reiber. Felix Anthony. B.S. in Agriculture, 1930; M.S., 1932; University of Florida,
M them atics .......- ..... . ............ .. ..... .. ........... ..................... Jacksonville
Riley, Donald Edwin, B.S. in Pharmacy, Valparaiso University, 1932,
Pharm acy ...... ....... .... --.. ...... ... .... V alparaiso, Ind.
Rochester, Morgan Columbus, B.S., Clemson College, 1931,
Agricultural Econom ics -... .. ..................................... .... ..... ..... ....Salem S. C.
Roesel, Tillie Augusta, B.S. in Home Economics, Florida State College For Women,
1927,
Agricultural Econom ics ............... .. ........... ...................... Bushnell
Rogers, Lewis H., B S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1932,
Chemistry .. .. ...... . .. ... DeFuniak Springs
Rogers, Nathan Jewett, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1929,
Electrical Engineering ... ....... ........... DeFuniak Springs
Rosser, Harwood, Jr., A.B., University of Florida, 1932,
Mathematics ........ .. Jacksonville
Rosenberg, Mitchell Milton, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
M them atics .... ..... ...... ................ .. Daytona Beach
Rowell, John Orian, B.S., Clemson College, 1931,
Entom ology .......... .. .. .... ..-- .. ....................------... ..... .. .. .......... M arion, S. C.
Rusoff, Louis Leon, B.S., Rutgers University, 1931; M.S., Pennsylvania State Col-
lege, 1932,
Chem istry ........ ... .. ..... .... .. .. .............. Gainesville
Sansbury, Walter Ewing, B.S., University of Florida, 1931,
Chem istry .. .... .... .. ............ ... ......... .... ... ............ W est Palm Beach
Savage, Zach, B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1923; M.S. in Agriculture, Uni-
versity of Florida, 1931,
A agricultural Econom ics ............. ....... ......... .. ........ .... ..... Gainesville
Sawyer, William Lincoln, B.S., University of Illinois, 1928,
Civil E engineering ................. .. .. .. ............. --- -- ..... ... ...... D ecatur, Ill.
Scaglione, Peter C., B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1929,
Business Adm inistration ....... .... .. ....... .... ... .......... Gainesville
Settle, Lucy Belle, B.S. in Education, Florida State College For Women, 1927,
Sociology ... .... . ...... .. ... ........ G ainesville
Shahinian, Manoug H, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
M them atics .. ........ -.. ....... -.. ......... Gainesville
Shannon, Louis Piper, Bachelor of Education, Southern Illinois State Normal Uni-
versity, 1929,
Education .. . .. .... ..... Gainesville
Shaw, Hubert De Grofeur, A.B., Harvard University, 1893 ; Ph.D., Ohio University, 1894,
Chem istry ................ ..------ ... ....... . .. .. .... .... ........ .... Gainesville
Sherard, Hoyt, M.S. in Agriculture, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1932,
Agronom y .............. .. ....... ......... .. ...... Graham Ala.
Shirley, John J., B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
Education ............ .. .. .... ... ... Bradenton
Skaggs, Kenneth Gordon, A.B., University of Florida, 1932,
E ng lish .................... .. ....... .. .. ... ........... ...... .. Sarasota
Smith, Marshall Everett, B.S., University of Florida, 1932,
Chem istry ............ ......... --.--- ... .... .. Tam pa
Snoeyenbos, Willard Johnson, Ph.B., University of Wisconsin, 1932,
E conom ics ........ ...................... ........ ............. ... --- ----.... Baldw in, W is.
Spurlock, Alvin Harold, B.S. in Agricultural Education, Univeristy of Florida, 1931,
Agricultural Economics .. .. .......... .. ... ..............------ ............M ilton
Swanson, Daniel Cramer, B.S., Hobart College, 1923; S.B., Massachusetts Institute
of Technology, 1929,
Physics ..................................... ............. .........Pratts H follow N Y.












56 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Thomas, Gustav A., A.B., University of Dubuque, 1932,
G erm an ............................... ....... .. ...... ................ ........... ............ .......... G ainesville
Thomas, Tyre Shepard, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1932,
Education ................................ .. .... .... ........ .......... ............... ........... Lake Buller
Thompson, Robert Alden, B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Florida. 1932,
M echanical E engineering ------.................... .... ..... .............................. .............. .. ............ M iam i
Thronson, Silas Melvin, A.B., St. Olaf College, 1927 ; M.S., University of Florida, 1931.
Chem istry ................................................. ......................--........-- ........... .....H ouston, M inn.
Tod, Carrel Ingersoll, A.B., University of Virginia, 1927,
Agricultural Economics .............-- .. ......---- ............ ............ .......... Orlando
Trogdon, Richard Page, B.S., University of Florida, 1929,
B iology ....................................................... ..... .................. ............. G reensboro, N C.
Unkrich, Robert Clinton, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1932,
E conom ics ...................------- ....----......................-- ...................................... D aytona Beach
Wallace, Howard Keefer, B.S., University of Florida, 1929; M.S., University of Pitts-
burgh, 1932,
Biology ............... ....................................... .......................... W ilkinsburg, Pa.
Warren, Richard, A.B. in Education, University of Florida, 1931,
E education ......................-.. ......................... ... .... .......... ....-... ..... .........................-- L ake B utler
Webb, Thomas Roba, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
Physics ..................................................... ..... ..................................................W inter Garden
Weld, Benjamin Remington, A.B., Princeton University, 1898,
E english .............................. ..--..... .....................-------- .... ......................... --. K keystone H eights
Wells, Sidney Wilson, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932,
Chem istry .................... -- --........................... --.... ... .. .. .... ... Florence V illa
Wilkins, Colbert William, Advanced Senior,
Chemistry .................................................................... ........... ............ ... .. Hawthorne
Wilkinson, Robert William, Jr., Advanced Senior,
E education ..................---- .................... ...... ........ ........ ........... ... ...... ................. Jasper
Wilson, Henry Y., B.S. in Education, Ohio University, 1929,
Spanish ............................ ... ....... .... ...... ..... ........... ...... .... ....... .. W ashington, P a.
Wilson, John Wesley, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
E electrical E engineering ........................................... ..... ............................................. Sanford
Winsor, Herbert Williams, B.S. in Agriculture, Rutgers University, 1930,
C hem istry .................... ..................... ............................................... .......... ... G ainesville
Wolff, George Raymond, B.S., University of Florida, 1931,
C hem istry .......................... .......... ............ ...... ................. . ......... O rlando
Wolcott, John Lucien, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931,
E electrical E engineering ............................................. ..................... .................... O rlando
Young, Thomas Wilbur, B.S. in Forestry, Purdue University, 1930,
H orticulture .......--.......--- ..... ...... ........ ......... .... W ashington, Ind.

SUMMARY

Number of Master's degrees granted in regular session 1931-32.................. 23
Number of Master's degrees granted in summer session 1932 ........................ 27
Total for the year ....................... ........... ...............-. 50


Number of students registered in the Graduate School, summer session
1932 ............... ......... ...... .....- ........... .. - ....... ........ ....... ... ............ 150
Number of students registered in the Graduate School, first semester,
1932-33 .............. - -... .--.- ....-.....- ..- ........ -- ...-.. .... 149


S.. ............... 299


Gross total -- --------......... -




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs