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 Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Report of the president of the...
 Reports of the deans, etc.
 Index














Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00389
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: December 1934
Copyright Date: 1934
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00389
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
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        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
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    Report of the president of the university
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    Reports of the deans, etc.
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Full Text






BIENNIAL REPORT
OF THE PRESIDENT

of the

UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA

to the

BOARD OF CONTROL


FOR THE BIENNIUM
ENDING JUNE 30
1934
























The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin of
General Information, the annual announcements of the individual colleges
of the University, announcements of special courses of instruction, and
reports of the University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The
applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired.
Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of research
work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in several series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions
are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges
should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the
Committee on Publications. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies
not included in institutional exchanges, should be addressed to the University
Library, University of Florida, Gainesvile, Florida.

The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida








TABLE OF CONTENTS


PAGE
The President's Report, University of Florida........................................................ 7

Physical Plant ........... ..------..... ------- ................-- 7

Reorganization of the Curriculum ........................... ............. 9

Graduate School ... ......... ...... .. ... ........... ...... ............... 10

Institute of Inter-American Affairs .................................... 10

T he B budget .................................................................. .................. 10

Reports of the Deans, etc.:
The Dean of Students .......... ........................ ................. 13

The Business Manager (Including the Report of the Electrical Main-
tenance Department) ................................... 19

The Registrar ............................. ...................................... 31

The Dean of the Graduate School ......................... ............. 62

The Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences .............................................. 63

The Dean of the College of Agriculture (Teaching Division) ........................ 81

The Dean of the College of Business Administration ........................................ 83

The Dean of the College of Engineering ........ ............................... 89

The Dean of the College of Law .... ................. .................... 105

The Dean of the College of Education ............ ........ .................... 110

The Director of the Summer Term ....... ........... ...... .......... ................... 119

The Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts ........................... 131

The Dean of the General Extension Division ................ .................... 133

The University Librarian ............................................... . ............ ................. 144

The Professor of Military Science and Tactics .............................................. 152

The Acting Director of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs................ 153

The Director of the Florida State Museum ................................. ..................... 154

The Director of the Division of Athletics and Physical Education................ 155

The Director of the Division of Social and Religious Service.......................... 157

The Director of Publicity ........ ---............................. .......... 159

The University Physician ........................................... ..................... 160

The Dean of the College of Agriculture (The Experiment Stations and
the Agricultural Extension Service) ......................................... 168

The Director of Radio Station WRUF ....-----...................................................... 231







REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY
(Biennium ending June 30th, 1934)
To the Honorable Board of Control of the
State Institutions of Higher Learning:

GENTLEMEN: I shall not undertake to present a report in detail concerning the
colleges and other departments of the University but respectfully call attention
to the very complete reports of the Deans and other officers of the University who
are directly in charge and suggest that the Board of Control study carefully their
recommendations. It is my purpose to touch only upon certain significant features
and highlights which it appears to me should be especially emphasized.

PHYSICAL PLANT

The physical plant of the University has been maintained during the last biennium
and some important additions made to it notwithstanding a lack of funds for this
purpose. The appropriation for maintenance has been excessively low during the
biennium. Only $150,000 was appropriated for building purposes. An acute prob-
lem is now developing in connection with the plant of the University because of
the increased enrollment. Most of the class rooms are adapted for small groups.
usually not exceeding forty. Many classes now greatly exceed this small number.
In fact, there are numerous classes with enrollments of a hundred or more. There
are only a few class rooms on the campus which will accommodate more than forty
or fifty students. The provision of additional large class rooms is imperative for
the immediate future. The alternative is additional personnel so that the larger
classes may be taught in sections. The latter solution will be more expensive than
the former.

During the biennium the new plant for the College of Education and the Labora-
tory School has been completed. Funds for this were made available by appropria-
tions of $150,000 by the General Education Board, matched with a similar sum
by the Legislature for the building, and $50,000 appropriated by the Legislature
for equipment. This plant includes a large building sufficient to accommodate
the College of Education and a school operating on all levels from a kindergarten
to a senior high school, inclusive, a well equipped gymnasium, and a general shop
building. These buildings were erected on a site of some twelve acres immediately
adjoining the University campus. This site was provided partly by the City of
Gainesville on a long term lease and partly by the State of Florida. I think that
this school, at the present time, represents the best thing of its kind in the United
States. It will not only make possible a higher type of training and preparation
of the students of the College of Education, who are going out into the State to
occupy administrative and supervisory relations with the schools of the State, but
it will also carry on an exhaustive research in education, with a view to assisting
in the solution of many difficult school problems. Problems of organization, cur-
riculum-making, administration, class-room instruction, and similar matters will
be studied, and I confidently predict large economies will be suggested and more
efficient methods of operation will be discovered. In a few years, the original out-
lay for this plant will be returned to the State many-fold through the savings that
can be effected by the discoveries made and the demonstration offered through the
facilities of the P. K. Yonge School.








Several minor buildings were erected during the biennium from funds which
were carefully saved. Among these are several for research work being carried on
by the College of Agriculture and an Armory for storing rifles used by the Military
Department. For many years, students have been required to carry their rifles
about the campus and to and from their places of residence. This considerable
inconvenience has been corrected.

The last Legislature provided for construction of a mile and a half of roadway
on the campus of the University. The State Road Department put in these roads
during the biennium and, at the same time, constructed a drainage system. This
constitutes one of the most striking improvements which has taken place in some
years. I wish to commend highly the officials of the Road Department who gave
very careful thought to this work. During the past year, considerable improve-
ment on the plant has been effected through Federal Emergency Funds, first through
the CWA and later through the FERA. A vigorous attempt was made to secure an
appropriation for dormitories through the PWA, but the Constitutional limitation
on indebtedness thwarted any possibility of success in this direction. CWA funds
made it possible to construct concrete seats, a new running track, and a building
for equipment and lavatories immediately south of Florida Field. This involved
an outlay of approximately $40,000 and gives the University of Florida adequate
facilities for accommodating a large crowd, both for football and other collegiate
athletic events, including track athletics. When an adequate gymnasium building
is provided, the University will have a comparatively complete and modern athletic
plant.

Another important improvement, made possible through CWA funds, is the putting
of all electric wiring on the campus underground. This serves a dual purpose,
making the service more efficient and eliminating unsightly poles. Through the
cooperation of the City, the poles on University Avenue and Ninth Street, adjoining
the campus of the University, were taken down and white ways have been erected.
All but an insignificant part of the cost of this work came from Federal funds.
These improvements cost approximately $30,000.

In the spring of this year, the CWA made available approximately $140,000 for
purchase of material and employment of labor toward erection of a Student Union
Building. To this amount the University is adding $40,000, most of which is to
come from a fund raised for this purpose in a campaign conducted some years ago.
The consummation of this enterprise is a striking example of cooperative effort
among the alumni, students, and friends of the University in general. The alumni,
through the president of their council, took the lead in putting this project into
effect at this time. This building is now under construction and will answer a long
felt need. It will provide a center for student religious and social activities.
Quarters will be provided in the building for all student body officers.
Before leaving the discussion of the plant, let me invite attention to the fact that
some rather important additions will have to be made in the next few years. With
the exception of the appropriation for the building for the new College of Education
and Laboratory School, already mentioned, practically no building appropriation
has been made available for the University by the State since 1930. In 1930, en-
rollment during the regular session was 2,388. During the present session, enrollment
will reach approximately 3,000. Every college and department of the University is

8








badly over-crowded. Some of the largest colleges have never had buildings. The
College of Business Administration, second in enrollment only to the College of
Arts and Sciences, has carried on in a number of rooms hastily devised for the
purpose in one of the dormitories. The Agricultural Experiment Station building,
condemned some years ago, has reached the point at which rehabilitation is neces-
sary or the building can not be used. The College of Arts and Sciences is in a
critical situation as regards space. A careful survey and report is available show-
ing that this college must have relief in building requirements very soon. For
example, we now have more than a thousand students in Chemistry who are
attempting to do laboratory work in quarters originally intended for about one-
third of that number. The situation with reference to buildings of the Engineering
College is equally acute. The congestion there has compelled us to do things for
the past few years which are possibly unsanitary and not conducive to the best
physical and social welfare of the students. The Library facilities in the Law
School are entirely inadequate and an addition to the Law building should be
made as quickly as possible to relieve this difficulty. An immediate and pressing
need is the remodeling of the University kitchen, now a temporary structure. For
this purpose, funds were allotted and plans approved by the FERA, but a ruling of
the Comptroller-General of the United States held up the funds. If funds can not
be made available from Federal Emergency sources, we shall have to find other
funds to meet this situation. The incomplete central heating plant is another
problem. Three boilers have been set up under a temporary roof. Dean Van Leer
informs me that they are deteriorating. This building could be completed at a cost
not exceeding $50,000. It would be an economy to do it immediately.

Two sections of the old dormitory, known as Thomas Hall, have been modernized
and made fireproof in recent years. Other sections of this dormitory can and
should be remodeled as early as practicable.

REORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM
During the biennium, the Board of Control and the Administration of the Uni-
versity, in an attempt to comply with the necessity of economy and the request
of the Budget Commission, reduced the budget from $725,000 per annum to $561,600
per annum, exclusive of the Radio Station, and this program was accepted by the
Legislature. In order to make these large reductions without hopelessly injuring
many activities of the University and lowering the standard of its work, consider-
able reorganization of the curriculum was necessary. Many classes were eliminated
and over a hundred persons dropped from the pay roll. The most far-reaching
change was effected by merging the former College of Pharmacy and Chemistry
into the College of Arts and Sciences thus reducing the number of colleges.
Pharmacy is now a school in the College of Arts and Sciences. Journalism, which
was set up as a part of the College of Commerce, was changed to a department in
the College of Arts and Sciences. The Deans and Heads of Departments cooperated
with the Administration in bringing about the drastic changes necessary to meet
this crisis.

A further reorganization of the curriculum in the first two years, or the lower
division of the University, will be brought about in the next year or two. This
reorganization will provide a more desirable educational offering for our freshmen
and sophomores and will further eliminate duplication in the University. The

9








Board of Control has authorized this reorganization and the President of the
University, through the cooperation of the University Council, is actively at work
on this problem.
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The Graduate School was established by special authority of the Legislature in
1930 and a small appropriation of $30,000 was allowed for it. The Graduate School
has been built up during the biennium without additional funds. Notwithstanding
the difficulties under which this department has been compelled to labor, its growth
and the quality of its work have been most gratifying. I invite particular attention
to the report of the Dean of the Graduate School which shows the remarkable
progress which has been made. During the past year, the Ph. D. degree, the highest
of all earned degrees, has been won by three students of the Graduate School of
the University of Florida. I am glad to report that two of the recipients of these
degrees were immediately offered flattering positions, which they have accepted.

INSTITUTE OF INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS

In 1930, the Institute of Inter-American Affairs was founded at the University
of Florida by the President of the University with the approval of the Board of
Control. While the scope of its activities has been greatly limited due to the
depression and insufficiency of funds, recognition of its work has been reassuring.
The Carnegie Institution, of Washington, D. C., has cooperated with the Institute
of Inter-American Affairs of the University of Florida during the last biennium and
has made available, each year, $1,000 for the purpose of subsidizing research in
Central America. The Acting Director of the Institute has spent a part of each
year in Guatemala and is now preparing a two-volume report of his findings. Other
universities engaged in this project are the University of California at Berkeley,
Harvard, and Cornell. The University of Florida was given sole responsibility for
the studies in geography.

A most unexpected but highly gratifying recognition of the Institute came in the
award of the Fidac Medal. Fidac is the world organization of veterans in the
several allied countries. It numbers some eight million members. The award
by the Fidac Congress, at Lisbon in 1932, of the medal for distinguished services
in Latin American relations constitutes an honor which has been coveted by many
institutions. Fidac medals have been previously awarded to Columbia, Chicago,
and California.
THE BUDGET

For the biennium 1931-33, the annual appropriation for the University of Florida
proper was $725,000, excluding the appropriation for the Radio Station. During
the biennium 1933-35, the appropriation for the University was $561,600, a reduction
of approximately 22 per cent. There was no reduction in the Federal appropriation
of $25,000 available to the University. For the biennium 1931-33, the annual appro-
priation by the State for the Agricultural Experiment Stations, including branch
and field stations, was $325,233. For the biennium 1933-35, this annual appropria-
tion was $296,321.50, making a reduction of 9 per cent. There was no cut in the
Federal appropriation of $90,000 for the Agricultural Experiment Stations. In the
Agricultural Extension Division, the annual State appropriation for the biennium
1931-33 was $83,282. This amount was cut, for the biennium 1933-35, to $68,546, a

10









reduction of 18 per cent. The annual Federal appropriation of $132,046.99 for the
Agricultural Extension Service was reduced very slightly for the biennium 1933-35,
the annual sum available being $131,992.46.
Combining appropriations from State and Federal sources, the percentage of
reduction for the biennium 1933-35 over the preceding biennium was:

U university of F lorida (instruction ) .......................................................... ..................... ........ 21%
Experiment Stations (including branch and field stations) ..................... 7%
Agricultural Extension Division ...................................... .. .............. 7 %

These reductions have necessitated considerable reorganization in the instruc-
tional work of the University and have made it exceedingly difficult to maintain
adequate facilities for accommodation of our students. Fortunately, there was a
slight reduction in enrollment last year which afforded some relief in an acute
situation. Furthermore. two successive general cuts were made on the salaries of
faculty members and other employees of the University, one amounting to approxi-
mately 6 per cent and another to approximately 10 per cent. At the time that these
decreases were put into effect, wages and costs of living were falling. For some
time past, the cost of living has been steadily rising and wages have been increased
through the operation of the NRA and other agencies. Furthermore, restorations
and increases in salaries and appropriations are steadily being made in industry
as well as in other colleges and universities. In this situation, the University of
Florida is faced with the loss of some of its best personnel unless there can be some
increases in salaries during the approaching biennium. Already, we have lost a
considerable number of our most desirable personnel through better financial op-
portunities which have come to them elsewhere. Both the staff of the Agricultural
Experiment Stations and the faculty of the University have suffered in this way
during the year just closed.

Accordingly, in thlie budget which is being proposed for the biennium 1935-37, an
increase of approximately 10 per cent is being asked in the appropriation for the
University of Florida. There has been no general restoration of salaries but those
persons who have been exceptionally valuable because of good teaching, research,
additional training, or other reasons, have been recommended by the Deans and
other officers for minimum increases. At the recent opening of the University, there
was an unprecedented increase in enrollment. The number in the freshman class
was 50 per cent greater than in the preceding freshman class. It appears that
the enrollment for the year in all classes will be nearly 30 per cent greater than
last year. No provision is being made in the present budget for taking care of these
increases in enrollment. Should this increase continue through the next biennium,
the budget which is proposed would be insufficient.
The budgets for the Agricultural Experiment Stations and Agricultural Extension
Division for the biennium 1933-35 are practically the same as for the present bien-
nium except that several thousand dollars additional money is being asked for the
Everglades Experiment Station which will be used in carrying on investigations
relating to the growing of sugar cane. This industry has now become a positive
asset to the State and the addition of a few thousand dollars for this purpose will
undoubtedly be returned to the State many fold.

In concluding this report. I wish to thank the Board of Control for its continued
confidence and its painstaking consideration of the many problems which have been

11







engendered by the unusual conditions existing during the biennium. I am keenly
aware of the many personal sacrifices which the members of the Board of Control
are compelled to make in order to render such large service to the University and
State. I wish, also, to acknowledge the helpful cooperation of the Governor and
the members of the Board of Education, who have given of their time and support
in many ways, particularly in making possible the completion of the P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School when the finances of the State were in such difficult circum-
stances. May I also tender my appreciation of the support of the alumni, the
faculty, the student body, and people of the State in general who have worked to-
gether for the advancement and improvement of the University during the biennium.

Respectfully submitted,
JNo. J. TIGERT, President.









REPORT OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS

To the President of the University:

SIR: During the past biennium, activities in the office of the Dean of Students
have continued with the same objectives as outlined to you in our previous reports.
This may be briefly stated as securing cooperation of students and faculty in im-
proving conditions under which education may continue. These conditions have to
do with material affairs and the esprit de corps of both faculty members and
students. Among the most important material affairs are rooming house conditions
and jobs for students.

Probably the most objective measure we have of the success of university work
is in terms of the grades given by the faculty to the students on academic work.
This is not by any means a complete measure since questions of attitude are but
imperfectly measured in this way. The student body accomplishment for the past
six years, as measured by grades, is as follows:

1 9 2 8 -2 9 ................. ..................................................... .................... .......................... . .. .8 0 1
1 9 2 9 -3 0 .............. .... ..8 47.................................................. ................................................................................ 8 4 7
1 9 3 0 -3 1 .............. ................... ................... ................................ ............... ..... ............ .... ....... ............. 1 .0 8 1
1 9 3 1 -3 2 ............................................................................. ............................. .............. ............................ 1 .1 2 2
1 9 3 2 -3 3 .................................... ................................................. ...................... .. ....... .................. 1 .1 6 4
1 9 3 3 3 4 ............................................................. ..................................................... .............. ..................... 1 .1 0 7

You will observe that since the session of 1930-31 the student body average has
varied pretty closely about 1.00; this is a "C" average. Since the average work
done in a class is supposed to be given a grade of "C," the student body average
should, under ideal conditions, remain pretty close to 1.00. A slight decrease will
be noted for the past year. Whether this is a normal variation, or whether it may
be due to other causes, can be told only in terms of grades for the next few years.

The other and more important result of a young man's stay in the University, his
attitude towards life, is not susceptible to objective measurement. We can judge
that only by his attitude toward university life while he is a citizen of the uni-
versity community. A large part of our activities have been devoted to giving
students training which we think is designed to develop a correct attitude toward
life after they leave the University.

Since less than one-fourth of our student body can be accommodated in the
dormitories, we have felt it our duty to keep in close touch with the rooming house
situation. A recent survey indicates that there is a large surplus of rooms available
for students in the neighborhood of the University. This means, of course, that
a large number of these rooms will be vacant. Our inspections are pretty thorough,
and only those places measuring up to high standards are carried on our approved
list. There is no legal way, however, by which we can prevent students living in
places which are not approved unless these places are so bad that the Health
Officer orders them closed. There are ample rooms in approved places to take care
of the demand. We hope that as time goes by we can gradually eliminate undesir-
able places. The great majority of our students desire to live in good homes, and in
practically all instances in which students live in unapproved homes it is due to
the fact that the rental is much lower. Parents are furnished with a list of ap-
proved homes and are urged to patronize only those conforming to our standards.

13








The most important material thing connected with our activities is that of helping
students find the money on which to live while here. More than fifty per cent of
our students are dependent, partially or wholly, on themselves for support. Our
decrease in enrollment last fall was undoubtedly due almost entirely to lack of
funds on the part of the students. Of course, the scarcity of money in the Uni-
versity treasury has made it necessary to do away with a good many jobs which
have supported students. Thus, you will see that our condition during the first
term of the last college year was unusually bad for students finding it necessary
to get a job in order to stay in school. Where we had employed as many as 400
students on University jobs in past years, we had reached the place where we could
employ only about 225. This condition was aggravated by the fact that the business
houses in town and the boarding houses near the campus had also been forced to
reduce the number of student employees. The NRA Codes further decreased the
number of student jobs in that they made it almost impossible to employ part-
time workers.

During the latter part of last January, the FERA put into operation a plan
for employing students on part-time jobs about the campus. We were permitted
to employ 224 students and were allotted sufficient money to pay these students
an average of $15 per month for the remainder of the school term. We believe that
in practically all cases the young men selected for these jobs would have had to
drop out of school without this help. Every effort was made to see to it that the
work done was worth while and that the student did an honest day's work for a
day's pay. The question of supervision we consider very important because it is
felt that securing money for work poorly done is exceedingly poor educational
training.

Further help of this kind has been given during the summer months to forty-seven
selected students. These students were employed by the FERA in various parts
of the state with the understanding that the greater part of their earnings would
be held in trust by the Government and paid out on their university expenses next
fall.

We have just received notice from the FERA Headquarters that we will be
permitted to employ 269 students for the 1934-35 session of the University. The
terms of employment will be practically the same as those under which the students
worked last spring.

Since the University will be able to employ approximately 225 students out of
its own budget next year, we will have jobs for a little more than 500 students. The
boarding houses and other business places in Gainesville will give work to approxi-
mately 200. With all these sources of employment, we feel that the most needy
students will be taken care of. In no case, however, will a student be able to earn
all of his expenses from a job which either the University or the FERA is able
to give him.

Since we hope to train our students to be responsible citizens, we believe that
the activities which possess training value in this field should be encouraged. To
this end we have carefully nourished our student government. As in past years. our
student body has been willing to accept responsibility commensurate with any
authority given it. An unusually high type of man is elected to office in practically

14








all cases. It is very unusual to find a student body officer who shows a disposition
to use his office for rewarding his friends or punishing his enemies. With very
little pressure or guidance, these young men think in terms of general University
welfare. Numberless instances of this disposition could be cited; probably the
most important during the last year has had to do with a movement on the part
of student body officers to remove slot machines and other gambling devices from
the neighborhood of the University. I am pleased to say that at this time the most
respectable places near the University have, of their own accord, removed these
objectionable devices.
Probably the student body government promotes ideals more definitely through its
Honor Court than through any other device. Members of the court have taken the
position that while punitive measures are sometimes necessary, their most important
duty is that of educating the student body in honorable conduct. While definite
efforts are made only with respect to a student's conduct on examination and other
academic work, the influence of this kind of teaching has affected student ideals in
other fields. This may be illustrated by the Lost and Found Department operated
in this office. During the last year more than 300 articles lost on the campus have
been turned in to this department. Among the articles found most frequently are
such things as money, fountain pens, pocket knives, etc., which could not be easily
identified and which offer the most temptation to a person who does not have a
high sense of honesty. In addition to these, there are large numbers of rain coats,
books, and others things which do not present the same type of temptation.
A very interesting illustration of the student body's desire to further its ideals
is found in the campaign which is made every year among the high schools of the
state. From seventy-five to one hundred of our leading students go to high schools
throughout the state during the spring and make talks to the graduating seniors.
The subject matter of these talks is usually the honor system and student govern-
ment at the University. These trips are made by the students at their own expense.
We believe that a continuation of this program will inevitably result in a very
healthy attitude on the part of prospective college students toward college life.
Another phase of our student responsibility is the handling of our dormitories.
Monitors are appointed for each section. These monitors must be seniors on the
campus and must have an unusually fine record. Each one is paid $6 a month.
We find, however, a greater demand for these jobs than for any others on the
campus, since the appointment of a monitor is regarded as one of the highest non-
academic honors which can come to a student. These young men are responsible
for conduct in the dormitories as well as for protection of University property. A
report from the office of the Business Manager indicates that less than $50 damage,
other than the usual wear and tear, was done to these buildings last year. Since
they house approximately 500 students, this amount is almost negligible.
Fraternities, societies, and clubs on the campus afford excellent opportunities for
students' development of attitudes and ideals. They also furnish excellent experi-
ence in self-government. Forty-three per cent of the students belong to national
social fraternities. These are found in twenty-three national and two local fraterni-
ties. We are pleased to report that the cooperation given by these organizations has
been all that could be desired. The activities of the social fraternities center in the
Interfraternity Conference. This organization directs most of the social activity
on the campus. The social affairs for the past two years have been remarkably free
from abuses which frequently go with the affairs of this kind in college life.

15








An indication of the attitude of the social fraternities toward general University
welfare is found in the fact that the Interfraternity Conference has, during the last
year, contributed $250 to a scholarship fund designed to help needy students. We
consider this a very public spirited act, and we trust the amount will be increased
from year to year.
The professional and honorary societies on the campus have different objectives
from those of the social fraternities. These organizations provide for recognition
of students attaining high scholastic rank and, also, they provide for activities de-
signed to further the training and education of the students. A careful survey is
made each year of these organizations, and we are pleased to report that in practi-
cally all cases good work is done. We do feel that in some instances they are top-
heavy with national organizations which seem to be dominated by commercial
motives; but, in spite of this, the local groups are functioning along desirable lines.
In attempting to attain the objectives set out in the foregoing, we depend prin-
cipally on the following:
1. Interviews with individual students.
2. Contact with organized groups.
3. Co-operation with the homes from which the students come.
Probably the greater part of our time is taken up with student interviews. There
is a constant stream of students in and out of the office each day, and everyone
connected with the office endeavors to give each man careful attention and to help
him with his problem. We believe that this attitude is fundamental to an office
of this kind, and no effort is spared to make the students feel that they are privi-
leged to bring their problems to us. A record is always made of any serious prob-
lem, hence our records on practically all students now in school are unusually com-
plete. We frequently find an answer to the immediate problem in past experiences
of the student.
The presence of a large number of student organizations on the campus gives us
an excellent opportunity to contact groups of students. We find this is a very
effective way of directing student opinion. As was said above, these groups generally
have at heart the welfare of the University and all they need is a few suggestions
relative to what will be best for all concerned. Representatives of this office meet
with practically all such groups on invitation several times each year. It sometimes
happens that we invite several organizations to send in representatives to discuss
problems. We are generally able to work out satisfactory solutions for these with
representatives from the groups interested.

In maintaining contact with the students' homes, four times a year we send out
reports on students who are falling behind in their college work. We also send out
a report on a student when he does something especially meritorious. The type of
cooperation which we almost invariably receive from the students' homes is very
gratifying. I am quite sure that the attitude of the homes toward the University
is improving from year to year. During last year approximately 7,000 letters were
mailed from this office to parents and guardians of students relative to their sons'
progress with us.
In spite of the fact that our offices were moved to new and larger quarters last
summer, we are still crowded. The volume of the work is much greater and sev-
eral new activities have been undertaken.








Our activities leading to and during Freshman Week give us an excellent oppor-
tunity to make satisfactory contact with the members of the incoming Freshman
Class each fall. We receive letters from practically all homes from which students
are coming as well as full reports from the principals of the high schools from
which the young men were graduated. The organization of faculty members and
upperclassmen during Freshman Week makes provision for at least one interview
with each entering freshman. The results of these interviews are tabulated and
made available for future study. Special note is made of matters demanding im-
mediate attention. Young men with problems of this kind are called in for further
conferences at once. It is safe to say that a large percentage of our entering
students are satisfactorily adjusted at the very beginning of their university work
by means of the activities of Freshman Week. The cooperation of the University
officials and faculty members in this work has been most gratifying.

Many persons think of the office of the Dean of Students as chiefly a disciplinary
organization. While matters of student discipline are handled in this office, this
has ceased to be one of our major problems. Contact with individual students and
the homes of students has created a situation in which the punitive side of dis-
cipline is almost non-existent. When it seems that the conduct of a student is ap-
proaching the trouble-making stage, a personal interview with him or with the
officers of some organization to which he belongs will almost invariably secure his
cooperation with efforts to bring him in line with University policies. The Dis-
cipline Committee of the University is one of the strongest committees in our organ-
ization, and I feel sure that the firm stand taken by this committee has had a great
deal to do with reducing infractions of University regulations.

A tabulation of the activities and responsibilities of the Office of the Dean of
Students as discussed above might be made as follows:
Work with Individual Students in Need of Guidance
Work with Faculty Members in Selling the Personnel Viewpoint

Student Government Honorary Societies
Dormitories Discipline
Rooming Houses Freshman Week
Fraternities By-Laws
Social Activities Placement of Graduates
Scholarships and Loans Scholarship
Self-Help Automobiles

RECOMMENDATIONS

We moved our offices last year from Peabody Hall to Language Hall. Our new
quarters are far more suitable both as to location and as to interior arrangement
for the work which we are trying to do. The increased volume of work and new
activities, however, have overcrowded us again. We are now suffering very defi-
nitely from lack of space. Work for the next biennium will be very seriously im-
paired unless we can secure more space.

In our last report attention was invited to the need of a full-time campus police-
man and rooming house inspector. The present officer in charge of the work is
very satisfactory, but in addition to this work he has duties connected with the
stock room of the Cafeteria and with the custodianship of military property. We
consider it imperative that a full-time man be placed on the campus work and
rooming house inspection.








A recent action of the University Senate has placed on this office the duty of
correlating all campus jobs held by students. This will involve a considerable in-
crease in clerical work. The Senate has also placed the clerical work needed for en-
forcement of automobile registration in this office. This will necessitate additional
clerical help.

The appropriation for the Placement Bureau has been reduced to $250 a year.
This provides for a part-time man who can collect and tabulate pertinent informa-
tion regarding our graduating students. This is the type of information which em-
ployers generally request. It does not, however, provide for the necessary activity
if we are going to make any effort to locate jobs for our graduates. Whether this
activity should be centered in this office or whether it should be distributed through
the colleges, we feel that adequate appropriation should be made for its improve-
ment and continuance.

Clerical help for some of our activities has been furnished by the FERA. Should
the Federal government continue to make this aid possible, we can carry on. If,
however, for any reason Federal aid should be discontinued, we shall find it neces-
sary to call on the University budget for additional clerical assistance.

In closing, we wish to thank you for your cordial interest in and support of our
activities. We feel sure that the support which you have given us has made pos-
sible the degree of success which we have attained. We trust that our efforts and
achievements will meet with your approval.

Respectfully submitted,
B. A. TOLBERT, Dean of Students.








REPORT OF THE BUSINESS MANAGER

INCLUDING THE REPORT OF THE ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT
To the President of the University:
Sir: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the Business Office and
its subsidiary activities for the biennial period ending June 30, 1934. This report
includes a financial statement of receipts and disbursements for all departments
of the University, including the Agricultural Experiment Stations and Agricultural
Extension Service as well as financial statements and balance sheets of such
Auxiliary Activities as Bookstore, Cafeteria, Dormitories, et cetera, as taken from
the report of Auditor of Custodian Funds. These reports will be available in
printed form.
Budget recommendations for the biennial period ending June 30, 1937, have been
submitted to you with explanations as to certain increases made to adjust in-
equalities in salaries of workers and also the addition of several employees re-
quired in the Maintenance Departments to take care of the increasing needs of
plant upkeep and heretofore provided out of labor item, also an additional watch-
man, combination fireman and mechanic, and three janitors necessary for the
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School. The need of this additional help is explained in the
outline of the activities of the office as will be set out herein.

BUSINESS OFFICE
In this biennial period much additional work has been necessary in the Business
Office to take care of the system recommended by Mr. L. W. Morey whereby the
office records have been changed somewhat in keeping with the accounting pro-
cedure standardized by the National Committee on Reports for Institutions of
Higher Learning. I am pleased to advise that all the recommendations made by
Mr. Morey have been put into effect so that our printed financial reports will be
comparable with those issued by the larger institutions. I feel this is a forward
step in our office procedure and provides a smoother working system for securing
an internal audit of all University funds as well as providing records that will be
readily analyzed by the State Auditing Department.
While the purchasing for the University and Experiment Stations has been cen-
tralized in the Business Office that we may better co-operate with the State Pur-
chasing Department, we have found that it has taxed the capacity of the workers
provided in our last biennial budget efficiently and effectively to take care of
requisitions and purchase orders necessary to effect this cooperative buying. Over
50 per cent of the requisitions are for the Experiment Stations and Extension
Service and I suggest that we should be allowed not less than $50 per month payable
from their funds for a part-time worker to help in this department. In addition
to the help of the State Purchasing Department we have been fortunate in main-
taining our contact with the Southern Educational Buyers and Business Officers'
Association and the Educational Buyers' Association, through which agencies we
have been able to secure low prices on many items of classroom equipment and
scientific apparatus.
MAINTENANCE AND UPKEEP
It is needless for me to mention the splendid work of this department, which
occupies several buildings, with office, storeroom, and shop, at the junction of the
spur track near Central Heating Plant.









The installation of the spur track, which was noted in my previous report, has
effected a great saving in expense for drayage and has proved a great convenience
as well as an economy in securing delivery of carload lot shipments of construction
materials for use on FERA projects and other supplies for the University. Approxi-
mately 160 carload shipments were delivered over this track from the time of its
completion, April 29, 1932, to December 31, 1933, and 118 carload shipments from
January 1, 1934, to June 30, 1934.
One of the greatest improvements to our campus was the installation of concrete
pavements with curbs, gutters, and storm sewers by the State Road Department.
This has made it possible to improve and beautify the campus with a greater degree
of permanency. Much planting has been carried on around the buildings and espe-
cially has improvement been shown around the dormitories.
The drainage problem, which was a serious consideration on the campus, has
been wonderfully improved.
With the help from the CWA and FERA we have been enabled to build an addi-
tional field and track at the south end of the Stadium with concrete seats erected
against the road running around the south side of this field with a seating capacity
of 1,500.
While most of the labor for these projects was furnished by FERA, our campus
crew rendered valuable service in planting grass and placing sod to beautify the
surrounding area.
Much work has been done around the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School.

GROUNDS

More detailed information concerning this division of Maintenance is secured
from report made by Superintendent of Grounds, from which I quote the following*
Oak trees and shrubbery have been planted on west side of Engineering Building.
Five thousand feet of cement and five thousand feet of gravel walks have been laid on
the campus.
A wire fence has been placed around the Stadium. We have assisted in replanting grass,
mowing grass, keeping weeds cut around Stadium walks, planting shrubbery around
north end of Stadium wall and fences, and sodding banks of Stadium.
A complete rainwater drainage system has been laid around the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School at a cost of approximately $500.
The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School grounds were graded. Several thousand tons of clay
and soil were hauled for this project.
New drains and catch basins were installed around the campus.
The Artillery practice field has been improved and 24-inch drains have been installed on
west side of Artillery barns.
Dirt road on north side of Cafeteria has been resurfaced with lime rock.
Many tons of clay have been hauled and several carloads of cinders have been added to
the road bed of the spur track. Much time and work is required to keep the sides of the
track clear, especially after heavy rains. Also the weeds must be cut to keep the road open
for heavy freight.
Many young pine trees have been planted on the campus in cooperation with the Forestry
Department. They are growing and doing well.
The radio station grounds have been kept mowed; sod has been laid at the main
entrance and suitable shrubs planted around the building.
Because the new concrete road was cut through the old running track, it was necessary
to make the track shorter. This required a great deal of time with truck and men, for many
tons of earth were necessary to fill the excavations. The banks were sodded and the fence was
put up in its new location.









Various kinds of plants and shrubs which were donated by the Horticultural Department
have been planted on the campus. Two hundred and fifty azaleas have been planted in front
of the Experiment Station where the old dirt road used to be. This soon will be a campus
beauty spot.
The New Horticulture Building has been landscaped with suitable shrubs and a border
of day lilies has been planted.
The ground at the north end of the Infirmary has been filled in and crepe myrtle planted.
A hedge of plumbago has been planted along either side of the walk leading from the
entrance at University Avenue and Ninth Street to the Law Building.
Red cannas have been planted in the center of the Masonic Street entrance.
The placing of markers on the George Washington Memorial near the Auditorium is an-
other development in the beautification of the campus. Trees, shrubs, and grass have been
planted around the Auditorium.
This department has taken care of the diseased and infected shrubs and trees on the
campus. This work is carried on continuously throughout the year by the spray crew.
BUILDINGS
With funds made available in the last biennial budget for this work, I feel that
much has been accomplished by the department of Buildings Maintenance. In
addition to such major improvements as the new tile roof on the Mechanical En-
gineering Building and the composition roof on the New Gymnasium, the following
are noted:
UNIVERSITY
1. Installation of ventilating system in Benton Hall.
2. Installation of press box and seats in Stadium.
3. Erection of temporary building for Chemical Engineering.
4. Closing west side of Central Heating plant.
5. Installation of stone work in Old Dormitory.
6. Alterations in Cafeteria.
7. Installation of metal louvers in Thomas Hall.
8. Waterproofing Old Dormitory and Instructional Buildings.
9. Alterations in rooms 105, 106, 203, and 204, College of Agriculture.
EXPERIMENT STATION
1. Building a bulletin store house and rat house.
2. Building a rabbit house.
3. Installation of awnings for Horticulture Building.
ELECTRICAL
The Electrical Maintenance Department has rendered excellent service during
this period, as will be noted in official report of Professor Joseph Weil, electrician
in charge. Some of its outstanding accomplishments are (1) installation of numer-
ous street lights about the campus and a whiteway along University Avenue and
Ninth Street, and (2) the changing of all overhead wiring to underground installa-
tion.
MILITARY PROPERTY
In connection with the responsibility of the University for Government property
on the campus, it was deemed advisable to construct a rifle shed for handling arms
and ordnance efficiently. Since October, 1932, when the brick building was erected
for this purpose, the Military Custodian has effected a considerable saving in loss
of Government property and improvement in handling of rifles and ordnance.
We have also made improvements to the Artillery training field adjoining the
rifle shed. This field is used for polo and intramural sports.
CAFETERIA
Taking up the Auxiliary Activities, I am pleased to report that the Cafeteria
continues popular with the students. This type of service has proved most satis-
factory, rendering benefit to the students in giving them high quality board at a









low cost, and also has played a material part in regulating cost of board charged by
off-the-campus boarding houses.
During this biennial period we have added the following equipment to the Cafe-
teria: Electric dishwasher at a cost of $1,225, and three hundred aluminum chairs
at a cost of $1,770. We have recently installed three electric heavy duty ranges,
which were donated by the Florida Power Corporation. Walls and woodwork
throughout the Cafeteria have been redecorated.
The price of board, which during the past year was $17 per month, has been
increased to $18 to take care of an increase of 33 per cent in cost of foodstuffs.
It will be difficult to operate without a loss, notwithstanding the fact that we have
reduced overhead by eliminating two assistant dietitians.
Since students who live in the dormitories are not required to take their meals in
the Cafeteria, with your approval a discount is allowed on room rent for students
who board in the Cafeteria. This may encourage more students to take advantage
of the Cafeteria service.
Fifty or sixty students are employed as waiters and bus boys, for which service
they are allowed board.
All grocery supplies are purchased through requisition to the State Purchasing
Department, where we are able to secure the lowest prices from state packers and
jobbers.
Milk is supplied by the Agricultural Experiment Station Dairy at market price.
This is the highest grade of Jersey milk and is handled in the most sanitary way.
We are greatly in need of a new kitchen to replace the temporary, unsatisfactory
wooden structure now used to house this activity. It is highly important that the
project submitted to the FERA for this additional building be approved without
delay.
DORMITORIES
With remodelling of Sections D and E, Thomas Hall, and completion of the New
Dormitory, we have available some of the most up-to-date fire-proof dormitory
space to be found at any institution. We have no trouble renting these rooms.
We still have a number of rooms in Thomas and Buckman Halls which should be
remodelled as soon as funds are available as originally provided in your plans for
improvement of a section of one of these Halls every summer with the surplus from
the rent of dormitory rooms. In previous reports I have stressed the need of addi-
tional dormitory space sufficient to take care of incoming freshmen. This year
the demand for dormitory rooms has been unusually great and all rooms were
reserved weeks in advance of the fall opening. This construction, I believe, should
be considered one of the most necessary improvements on our campus.
All the halls and rooms in Thomas and Buckman Dormitories not rehabilitated
have been redecorated each year. Battleship linoleum and new furniture have been
installed in some sections. The bathrooms have been improved with sanitary fix-
tures and new electrical equipment has been added.
Each section of the dormitory is in charge of a monitor under administration of
a head monitor, who is president of the Student Body, and he is directly responsible
to the Dean of Students. These monitors are selected from outstanding seniors.
Supervision of the dormitories is in charge of a housekeeper, assistant house-
keeper, and head janitor, who see that the rooms are maintained in sanitary
condition.








Progress is being made ill construction of a Student Union Building with FERA
labor and materials and funds from the YMCA, Student Body, and Dormitory.
This building will provide recreational facilities and offices for the Student Body.
At present the wooden structure adjoining the Cafeteria is used as a recreational
center. This building has recently been redecorated and new furniture, including
pool and billiard tables, has been installed.
BOOKSTORE
The Bookstore, under direct management of the Business Office, supplies text
books and stationery to students at the lowest possible cost, figuring only such
profit as is necessary to take care of the manager's salary, clerk hire, replacements
of equipment, and loss on books that have become obsolete.
An up-to-date soda fountain and lunch room adds to the service of this activity,
which employs a number of students whose earnings enable them to attend the
University.
DUPLICATING DEPARTMENT
This department provides service for the University as a whole, centralizing the
work of multigraphing, duplicating, and dittoing for all Colleges and Departments,
as well as eliminating the expense of purchasing equipment for the several de-
partments.
In addition to multigraph, mimeograph, and ditto equipment, we now have a
Multilith, which is essentially a photographic type of reproducing machine. Plates
for the Multilith are made by the photostat equipment which the University has
owned for several years.











REPORT OF INCOME AND DISBURSEMENTS-UNIVERSITY PROPER


FUND

STATE APPROPRIATIONS:
University of Florida- Salaries......................
University of Florida-Necessary and Regular Expense.
General Extension Division .........................
Radio Station W RUF ..............................
Chair of Americanism ..............................
Cam pus Police ....................................
Total .................. ..................
Permanent Building Fund, Chapter 145.73 ...........
Permanent Building Fund, Chapter 15719 ............
General Education Board Building Fund..............

Total.......................................
FEDERAL SOURCES:
r M orrill-N elson Fund ...............................
S Smith-Hughes Fund................................

Total ......................................

ENDOWMENT FUNDS:
Agricultural College Fund...........................
American Legion Interest Fund......................
Seminary Interest Fund............................
Total .................... ........... ........
INCIDENTAL INCOME:
University ........................................
General Extension Division .........................
Radio Station W RUF ..............................
Department of Architecture.........................
Total ......................................


INCOME
1932-33


DISBURSEMENTS
1932-33


REVERTED
6-30-33


INCOME
1933-34


DISBURSEMENTS
1933-34


BALANCE
FORWARD
7-1-34


$547,267.14 $547,267.14 ................ $434,981.00 $434,981.00
128,371.30 123,214.14 $5,157.16 100,933.00 96,060.67 $4,872.33
38,410.00 38,410.00 ................ 25,086.00 25,081.00 5.00
35,951.56 35,799.25 152.31 25,000.00 25,000,00
2,923.00 2,717.46 205.54 2,500.00 2,500,00 .......
............. .. ................ ................ 600.00 416.63 183.37
752,923.00 747,407.99 5,515.01 589,100.00 584,039.30 5,060.70

36,910.26 35,000.00x ................ 4,277.61 4,277.61xxx ................
199,350.00 106,408.09 ................ 92,941.91 90,240.58 2,701.33
69,139.88 68,507.72 ................ 81,492.28 78,876.30 2,615.98
305,400.14 209,915.81 ................ 178,711.80 173,394.49 5,317.31

25,000.00 25,000.00 ................ 25,000.00 25,000.00 ...............
3,384.00 3,384.00 ................ 6,264.00 6,264.00 ................
28,384.00 28,384.00 ........ ....... 31,264.00 31,264.00 ................

5,759.50 5,759.50 ................ 2,884.34 2,884.34
2,247.00 2,247.00 ................ 2,200.00 2,200.00 ...............
4,103.92 4,103.92 ................ 1,150.51 1,150.51 ................
12,110.42 12,110.42 ................ 6,234.85 6,234.85 ................

146,289.52 118,852.72 ................ 133,195.44 93,793.22 39,402.22
50,227.90 50,227.90 ................ 43,549.41 42,567.84 981.57
2,452.72 2,452.72 ....... ......... 2,495.91 2,494.63 1.28
12,055.80 12,055.80xx ....... ........ ................ ...... .......... ............. ...


$211,025.94


$183,589.14


................. $179,240.76


$138,855.69


$40,385.07


x Transfer to General Revenue Fund.
xx Additional vouchers in amount of $2,815.66 for this year, was paid after account taken over by the Board of Control.
Note: Balances not reverting June 30, 1933, are carried forward as income in 1933-34.
xxx Expended for roof on Engineering and Gymnasium Buildings.












REPORT OF INCOME AND DISBURSEMENTS-EXPERIMENT STATION AND AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION
1932-1934


FUND


STATE APPROPRIATIONS:
Main Experiment Station Fund......................
Tomato Disease Investigations ......................
Strawberry Disease Investigations...................
Citrus Disease Investigations........................
Potato Disease Investigations.......................
Pecan Insect Investigations .........................
Celery Disease Investigations ........................
Fumigation Research ...............................
Grape Pest Investigations...........................
Citrus Experiment Station Fund.....................
North Florida Experiment Station Fund..............
Everglades Experiment Station Fund x ...............
Sub-tropical Experiment Station Fund................
Watermelon Disease Investigations...................

Total ........................... ...........

Agricultural Extension Division ....................

Total.............. ............ ..........

FEDERAL FUNDS:
Experiment Station........... .................
Agricultural Extension Division .....................

Total ......................................

INCIDENTAL INCOME:
Experim ent Station................................
Everglades Station.................................
Interest Earned on Federal Agricultural Extension Funds


INCOME DISBURSEMENTS REVERTED
1932-33 1932-33 6-30-33


$218,296.61







13,102.00
20,995.00
57,036.00
12,158.00
8,558.00


$204,231.63







11,623.86
20,784.90
55,393.49
11,304.77
8,431.78


S14,064.98







1,478.14
210.10
1,642.51
853.23
126.22


INCOME
1933-34

$170,243.00
2,900.00
6,300.00
3,500.00
5,250.00
1,750.00
5,250.00
3,062.50
3,500.00
11,451.00
20,968.00
50,399.00
10,579.00
6,229.00


DISBURSEMENTS
1933-34

$158,152.43
2,859.51
6,194.86
3,499.07
5,140.11
584.84
3,819.48
2,350.75
3,428.10
11,353.10
20,949.68
50,301.64
10,561.29
6,211.37


$330,145.61 $311,770.43 $18,375.18 $301,321.50 $285,406.23 $15,915.27


83,280.02 72,054.14

$413,425.63 $383,824.57


90,000.00
131,739.98

$221,739.98

25,053.62
3,455.60
994.30


Total....................... ............... .. $29,503.52


90,000.00
131,739.98

$221,739.98

14,517.67
548.89
310.46

$15,377.02


11,225.88

$29,601.06


68,546.00

$369,867.50

90,000.00
131,739.98

$221,739.98

23,318.03
2,906.71
936.32


66,919.81

$352,326.04

90,000.00
131,739.98

$221,739.98

11,808.96

449.82


__________________________________________________________ i'


$27,161.06


$12,258.78


x Income includes $5,000.00 continuing Fund for each year.
Note: Balances not reverting June 30, 1933, are carried forward as income in 1933-34.


BALANCE
FORWARD
7-1-34

$12,090.57
40.49
105.14
.93
109.89
1,165.16
1,430.52
711.75
71.90
97.90
18.32
37.36
17.71
17.63


1,626.19

$17,541.46


11,509.07
2,906.71
486.50


$14,902.28









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA CUSTODIAN AND AUXILIARY FUNDS
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1933

BALANCES RECEIPTS DISBURSE- BALANCES
NAME OF ACCOUNTS July 1, 1932 MRNTS June 30, 1933

University Cafeteria.................... $2,441.55 $52,271.23 $50,117.74 $4,595.04
Room Rent-Old Dormitories ........... 9,261.47 18,223.43 11,085.33 16,399.57
Room Rent-New Dormitory........... 12,398.06 15,678.64 6,693.98 21,382.72
BookStore............................ 3,493.14 59,566.41 57,903.37 5,156.18
Student Organization Funds............. 8,602.30 56,050.07 61,905.37 2,747.00
Student Activity Bond Account.......... .............. 1,600.00 .............. 1,600.00
National Academy of Research Fund ..... 77.96 .............. 75.22 2.74
Reserve Officers Training Corps.......... 540.00 15,473.79 15,581.17 432.62
Returned Check Account-Gen'l Ext. Div. 144.82 Dr 1,315.28 1,174.05 3.59 Dr
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
(Hatch, Adams, and Purnell Funds).... 11,574.46 90,010.20 97,554.40 4,030.26
Parsons Museum Funds................. 236.75 847.38 2,381.50 1,297.37 Dr
Parsons Trust Funds................... 8,561.45 .............. 361.45 8,200.00
Drug Research Fund................... ............... 1,000.00 671.65 328.35
Students Cash Deposits................. 4,730.86 86,119.54 86,878.19 3,972.21
Scholarship Funds..................... 114.91 47,457.60 46,886.88 685.63
Southern Railway Loan Fund........... 63.26 212.60 234.00 41.86
University Incidentals.................. .............. 173,090.80 173,090.80 ..............
Station Incidentals..................... .............. 14,909.03 14,909.03 ..............
Room Reservation and Damage Fund ... 6,612.18 4,609.50 6,286.80 4,934.88
Locker Service Fund ................... 14.00 6,960.07 6,948.57 25.50
Educational Fund...................... ............ 4,244.25 4,244.25 .............
Chemistry Breakage Fund .. .......... 2,309.92 .. ......... .. 2,309.92 ..............
Pharmacy Breakage Fund............... 93.57 .............. 93.57 ..............
Engineering Breakage Fund ............. 18.05 .............. 18.05 ..............
Biology Breakage Fund................. 1,003.90 1.65 1,005.55 ..............
General Breakage Fund................. ............... 6,170.00 5,668.81 501.19

Totals........................... $72,002.97 $655,811.47 $654,079.65 $73.734.79









UNIVERSITY, OF FLORIDA CUSTODIAN AND AUXILIARY FUNDS
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1934

BALANCES RECEIPTS DISBURSE- BALANCES
NAME OF ACCOUNTS July 1, 1933 MENTS June 30, 1934

Cafeteria.............................. $4,595.04 $52,698.87 $57,096.31 $197.60
Old Dormitories ....................... 16,399.57 17,753.57 21,384.47 12,768.81
New Dormitory Bonds.................. ............... 8,100.00 .............. 8,100.00
New Dormitory........................ 21,382.72 16,104.40 17,764.05 19,723.07
BookStore............................ 5,156.18 54,732.97 54,807.00 5,082.15
Duplicating Department ............... .............. 1,567.52 1,522.75 44.77
Infirmary............... ............ .............. 18,901.96 16,710.49 2,191.47
StudentActivity Funds................. 2,747.00 59,378.39 59,615.12 2,510.27
National Academy of Research.......... 2.74 ............. 2.74 .............
R. O. T. C.-Student Account............ 432.62 11,309.95 11,314.54 428.03
Returned Ck.-General Ext. Division.... 3.59 Dr 529.94 544.60 18.25 Dr
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.. 4,030.26 90,000.00 84,648.62 9,381.64
Parson's Museum Fund................. 1,297.37 Dr 2,439.58 1,387.70 245.49 Dr
Parson's Museum Trust Fund Bonds..... 8,200.00 .............. 2,100.00 6,100.00
Drug Research Fund ................... 328.35 1,000.00 1,035.29 293.06
Cash Deposits......................... 3,972.21 97,669.71 95,430.77 6,211.15
Scholarships........................... 685.63 39,154.35 38,972.18 867.80
Southern RailwaylLoan Fund ........... 41.86 33.00 25.00 49.86
University Incidentals.................. .............. 153,701.22 153,701.22 ..............
Station Incidentals..................... .............. 12,782.08 12,782.08 ..............
Laboratory Breakage................... 501.19 5,465.00 5,310.84 655.35
Room Reservation Fund................ 4,934.88 5,218.08 5,239.25 4,913.71
Locker Service Fund................... 25.50 6,694.40 6,719.90 ..............
Smith-Hughes Agricultural Education.... ............... 3,252.00 6,004.50 2,752.50 Dr
F. E. R. A. Student W workers ............ .............. 11,957.92 11,957.92 .............
Student Union Building Fund........... .............. 18,500.00 1,715.51 16,784.49
Totals.......................... $72,134.79 $688,945.05 $667,792.85 $93,286.99









I present here the report of the Department of Electrical Maintenance as sub-
mitted to me by Professor Joseph Weil, Department Head:
I submit herewith a report of activities of the Department of Electrical Maintenance for
the biennial period ending June 30, 1934.
The Electrical Maintenance Department has been engaged primarily in the activities de-
scribed below :

(A) Careful and continuous supervision of the use of electricity on the Campus, in a
definite attempt to hold down the cost of electric current to a minimum.
Figure I shows the use of electric energy from 1926 to date. On this graph are shown
additions which have resulted in an increase in the use of current. This curve also shows the
cost of electrical energy from 1926 to date. It is interesting to note that the amount paid
for electricity today is less than it was in 1929, although loads which have been added since
then now use as much electricity as the entire Campus did at that time. Some of the largest
of these loads are separately indicated on the graph. There are also many small additions
which in their aggregate also are considerable, but these have not been separated from the total.

(B) Adequate and systematic maintenance of apparatus and a service policy whereby It
is kept lubricated and adjusted so that repairs are held to a minimum and, when necessary,
economically and speedily made.
All apparatus on the Campus is carefully inspected and lubricated at scheduled intervals.
This policy results in a minimum of repairs ; although the electrical apparatus on the Campus
has materially increased during the past five years, repair bills are exceptionally low. It
necessarily follows that an increase in the use of electricity means added use of electrical
equipment, though our repair costs are probably no more than they were several years ago.

(C) The rebuilding of the entire Campus distribution system not only to take care of
added loads but to form practically a complete underground system.
Probably the most oLvious work of the Department has been the rebuilding of the entire
electric distribution system. Because of assistance made available by the CWA and FERA
it was possible to take down practically all existing overhead lines on the main part of the
Campus and place them underground. Besides beautifying the grounds, this has enabled us
to make many changes wlich have been worth while from an economic, service, and safety
standpoint. While all the work originally contemplated by the CWA was not done, the result-
ing improvements have been of real value. The present system is designed not only for
present needs but for the future as well, and additions can be made systematically. The esti-
mated cost of this work was approximately $34,000. Of this amount the University furnished
about $2,000.
All telephone lines on the Campus now are the property of the University, and in conse-
quence future service will be at a lower cost. A saving due to this item alone at the present
time amounts to approximately $600 per year. An added advantage in owning these telephone
lines it that it will enable us in the future to rebuild our electric class bell system, utilizing
the same cables. When it is recalled that some of the wires now utilized for this signal
system have been In the ground for about twenty years, the importance of this change can
readily be seen.
(D) The securing of an adequate,. safe. and economical Campus lighting system.
Five years ago there were but eight street lights on the entire Campus, roads were not
paved, and the Alligator, the Campus newspaper, frequently commented on the dark and
muddy Campus through which students were forced to walk. Today, well lighted paved
streets provide a marked contrast to the conditions of a few years ago.
The posts were gifts to the University and most of the cable and installation were secured
from the CWA and FERA. Particular mention should be made of the White Way on Univer-
sity Avenue, on Ninth Street, and in front of the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School. The co-
operation which the City of Gainesville and the Southern Bell Telephone Company gave should
also be acknowledged. The improvements could not have been made without their cooperation.
(E) Supervision and assistance in construction of the electrical equipment of new
buildings.
The Department works in close cooperation with the State Architect and has provided
assistance in construction of the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, the new Student Union build-
ing, and the proposed Cafeteria addition.
Through the facilities of this Department, much equipment was installed in the P. K.
Tonge Laboratory School which otherwise could not have been secured.
Careful inspection of new apparatus on the Campus has been of real value, from both
economy and service standpoints.









RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE NEXT BIENNIAL PERIOD
During the coming biennial period, the work outlined in parts A and B above should be
continued. With more and more electric apparatus in use, the importance of careful super-
vision and systematic maintenance becomes increasingly important from the standpoint of
economy and safety.
Many of the old buildings on the Campus are equipped with inadequate and unsafe cir-
cuits. As fast as possible, with the funds available, changes are being made to remedy these
conditions. It is only by constant inspections that we have been able to avoid several break-
downs which might have caused serious fire hazard.
Illumination in many class rooms and offices is extremely poor, and as soon as possible
steps should be taken to Improve this lighting.
The present force of electricians is not adequate. At least one full time electrician should
be added. In addition, our salary scale is less than the prevailing scale for skilled electricians.
During the last year funds have been secured from various sources for the clerical assist-
ance which is necessarily a part of this Department. Since we expect these funds to cease,
an item should be placed in the budget to provide such assistance.










KILOWATT HOUR THOUSANDS


YEARLY COST DOLLAR
YEARLY COST- -DOLLAR5


0 I








In conclusion, I wish to direct attention to the fact that during the last biennium,
in spite of increased enrollments and decreased appropriations, by careful manage-
ment and splendid cooperation of Department heads, it has been possible to close
the year with a small unexpended balance.

1Every effort has been made to carry out your instructions as to economy of
operation and all expenditures have been weighed carefully.

I am not making any recommendation for buildings, although we are carrying
on the work of my department in cramped and inadequate quarters. However, I
wish to repeat that some provision should be made to secure a new dormitory and
a new kitchen for the Cafeteria during the next biennial period.

Respectfully submitted,

K. H. GRAHAM, Business Manager.








REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR
To the President of the University:

Sir: As Registrar of the University of Florida, I have the honor to submit the
following report for the regular terms of 1932-33 and 1933-34 and the summer terms
of 1933 and 1934. In compiling this report I have attempted to make available
pertinent information which has not been presented in other publications. I have
tried as far as possible to eliminate duplications between this report and other
University publications without sacrificing valuable information which should prop-
erly appear in a biennial report.
Effective July 1, 1933, the College of Pharmacy was made a school under the
College of Arts and Sciences. The Department of Journalism was transferred to
the College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Commerce and Journalism was
designated as the College of Business Administration. The Department of Land-
scape Design was discontinued. These administrative changes must be borne in
mind in making any comparisons between the two years of the biennium covered
by this report.
EMPLOYEE AND FACULTY STATISTICS

CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES

In 1932-33 the Board of Control requested complete information regarding the
number and classification of all employees of the University of Florida. A Com-
mittee on the Classification of Employees was appointed. It made a report to the
University Council on January 10, 1933. and a plan providing for classification of
all employees was approved. The classification of employees according to the
approved plan is given in Table I.













TABLE I. CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES
1. Regular Session 1932-33.
UNIVERSITY PROPER


CLASSIFICATION


00 .-.)~
4)~ 4)
0.0
.04)


Administrative Proper.........................
Deans of Colleges and Divisions ........... 1
Directors of Schools...........................
Directors and Heads of Divisions ...............
Assistant Deans......................... 1
Professors ............................... 7
t1 Associate Professors...................... 2
Assistant Professors...................... 4
Instructors.............................. 4
Superintendents, Foremen and Technicians.. 2
Secretaries, Chief Clerks, Etc.............. 1
Stenographers, Clerks, Etc......................
Laborers................................ 1


TOTAL FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES .....


23 4


PART-TIME

Professors............................... 1 .... 1 ............ ..... ... ........... ..... ..... ..... ...... ................. ..... ..... ..... 2
A associate P rofessors...................... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... I ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
A assistant Professors ...................... .... ..... .... ..... ..... ..... ... .... 1 ... .. ..... ... .. ... .. ... .. ... .. .... ... .. ..... .... 2
Instructors ............................... ..... 3 2 ..... ... .. ..... ..... .... .... 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... 7
Secretaries, Chief C lerks, Etc .............. ..... ..... ........... ...... 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
Stenographers, Clerks, Etc............................................. .............................2 1 ... 3
Graduate Assistants and Scholars .......... 6 1 11 .. ..... 4 ..... ..... 2 14 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 10 ... ..... ..... 48
Student Assistants....................... 15 .... 5 3 3 4 3 1 8 .... 22 2 ... 20 10 .......... 7 104

TOTAL PART-TIME................... 22 4 19 3 3 9 4 2 12 14 1 22 2 0 21 20 2 1 7 168















TABLE I. CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES
1. Regular Session 1932-33.
ALLIED ACTIVITIES


CLASSIFICATION




Deans of Colleges and Divisions .....
Directors and Heads of Divisions. .
Assistant Deans and Directors......
Professors .. ............
Associate Professors .. .... ..
Assistant Professors .. ......
Instructors ............ . .
Superintendents, Foremen and Technicians
Secretaries, Chief Clerks, Etc. .
Stenographers, Clerks, Etc..
Laborers......... ...- ..... ...

TOTAL FULL-TIME EMPLOYEIES .




Professors .. . ..... .
Instructors......... .................
Stenographers, Clerks, Etc ...... ...
Student Assistants ...........

TOTAL PART-TIMIE...............


:3


3
..







-- J -


s 0
IA C





20 93 3
9- o 1 6 2 .--
ii .- a *



.... ..*1.. .. i . . ; . . . : 1



. .. ... I .. .. . . . .




206 29 8 1 3 10 1


PART-TIME


........ .... .. 3 ....... .... .... ........ ...........
-. . . ..-. . . . .

0 0 0 1 31 0 2 ) 11 0














TABLE I. CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES

2. Regular Session 1933-34.

UNIVERSITY PROPER


CLASSIFICATION


Administration Proper. ........................
Deans of Colleges and Divisions.................
Directors of Schools...........................
Directors and Heads of Divisions................
Assistant Deans...............................
4 Professors ....................................
Associate Professors...........................
Assistant Professors ............................
Instructors...................................
Superintendents, Foremen and Technicians .......
Secretaries, Chief Clerks, Etc....................
Stenographers, Clerks, Etc......................
Laborers.....................................

TOTAL FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES...........


0





1 ... .
. . .
. ...

6 1
1 .. ..
3 1
2 .....

1 1
15..... .....


15 4


69 7


)5-





1 . . . .
4 .....

5 .....
2 .....
3 1
. . . 2
1 1
..... 71


16 12


.2 1 10


be







1 1 1
. . i . . . . . .




5 ... . .. .. .
2 . .. . . .

1 . . . . ..

... . . . .

16 2 7


S ..... ... ..
i . . . . ..




. .. .. .. .. 2
3 ..... 8
4 ..... 6
. . . 2 .. ..
. . . . . . . .
..... 2 1
..... 22 16

8 26 34


1 .
.. .. 1




. .





2 2


I 2 1 7 241


PART-TIME


Professors.................................... 2 .... .......... ...... .... ..... ... ....... .... ...... .... ......... .... ...... .... 3
A associate P professors .... ....................... ..... ..... ... ..... ..... ..... I ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... .. .. .. . .... .. ......
A assistant Professors............................ ..... ..... .... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... I ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... I
In stru actors .. ................................. ..... 3 1 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 2 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... 6
Stenographers, C lerks, E tc...................... ..... ..... ... . .... .. .. 1 1 ..... ... .... .... .... .... .... .. .. I ..... ..... 3
Graduate Assistants and Scholars................. 4 1 17 ..... 2 1 ... 1 10 ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ..... ........... 36
StudentAssistants............................. 6 ..... 11 1 ..... 4 2 ... 4 .... 1 20 2 ..... 20 ..... ..... 5 76

TOTAL PART-TIME.......................... 12 4 30 1 2 5 5 0 8 10 1 20 2 0 20 1 0 5 126


I














TABLE I. CLASSIFICATION OF EMPLOYEES
2. Regular Session 1933-34.
ALLIED ACTIVITIES.





CLASSIFICATION "


o 3 S5

D eans of Colleges and Divisions........................... .......... ............................ 1.
Directors and Heads of Divisions.......................... ......... ......... ......... ....... .. .... ..... .. ... .. . .... i ... 1 4
Assistant Deans and Directors ............................... ......... ......... ......... 3 ........... .......... ............ ............... 3
P rofessors. ............................................. .......... ......... ......... 46 ......... ......... ......... ......... ........ 46
1 A associate Professors....................................... ......... ......... ......... 20 3 ........ ......... ......... ......... 23
A assistant Professors ...................................... ......... ......... ......... ... 101 2 1 ......... ......... ........... 104
In stru ctors . ........................................... .................. ......... 2 12 ......... ......... ......... ..... .... 14
Superintendents, Foremen and Technicians................. ........... 1 1 2 ......... 1 ......... .... .... ......... 5
Secretaries, C chief C lerks, E tc.............................. ......... ......... ..... 5 1 1 ... ....... 9
Stenographers, Clerks, Etc................................ 3 1 23 7 4 1 2 ......... 41
L laborers ............................................... ......... 10 3 3 ......... ......... .......... 2 ......... 18
TOTAL FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES ..................... 3 11 5 205 26 7 3 7 1 268


PART-TIME

Instructors ............................................. .. ....... ............ . ...... .. 24 ......... .... ..... .... .. ......... 24
Stenographers, Clerks, Etc................................ ......... ......... .......... 2 ......... ......... ......... 2 ......... 4
Student Assistants............................................... ............................ ......... ......... ......... 9 ......... 9
Laborers................................................ ..... ......................I ......... ......... ......... ......... ......... I

TOTAL PART-TIME................................... 0 0 0 3 24 0 0 11 0 38








TEACHING LOADS


The teaching loads for the regular sessions of 1932-33 and 1933-34 are given in
Table II. Teacher-units are computed in terms of time allotted to teaching; hence,
assignments other than teaching reduce the teacher-unit. The student-credit-hour
is the measure of the teaching load. Teaching loads for the summer terms of 1933
and 1934 are not included, because reports for these have already been made
directly to the Board of Control.






TABLE II. TEACHING LOADS FOR THE REGULAR SESSIONS
I OF 1932-33 AND 1933-34.
(Based on Enrollment at the End of Five Weeks.)


DEPARTMENT







Ancient Languages ............
B ible.........................
Biology and Geology ...........
Chem istry ....................
English .......................
F rench .......................
History and Political Science...
Journalism ....................
M them atics..................
Philosophy....................
Physics.......................
Psychology....................
Sociology .....................
Spanish and German...........
Speech .......................

TOTAL ARTS AND SCIENCES.

Civil Engineering..............
Drawing and Mechanic Arts....
Electrical Engineering ..........
Mechanical Engineering ........

TOTAL ENGINEERING........

Agricultural Economics.........
Agricultural Engineering.. ...
Agronom y....................
Animal Husbandry and Dairying
Botany and Bacteriology. ......
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Horticulture ..................
Landscape Design..............
Poultry Husbandry...... .....
Veterinary Science .............


**Number of
Teacher-Units
in
Department


1932-33

1.1
0.2
4.3

10.2
4.0
5.0

.9.5
1.0
5.9
2.1
1.8
5.0
2.4


1933-34

0.8
0.2
5.0
7.6
10.4
3.0
5.0
2.0
9.3
1.0
5.7
2.3
1.5
4.0
2.0


Number of
Student-Credit-
Hours Taught
by Department





1932-33 1933-34

360 114
102 42
3045 2210
*** 6820
7503 6582
1488 1119
3765 3240
*** 748
6250 5161
453 678
2225 1892
1740 1704
1014 939
1929 1704
1028 1085


Cs
o U






1932-33

0.8
0.2
3.3

7.8
3.1
3.8

7.3
0.8
4.5
1.6
1.4
3.8
1.8


52.5 59.8 30,902 34,038Y 40.2


4.0
3.2
3.4
3.6

14.2

2.0
1.0
2.4
2.2
2.0
2.0
2.2
1.1
1.0
0.4


TOTAL AGRICULTURE........ 16.3


3.5
3.4
3.2
3.4

13.5


1.6
1.1
2.1
1.0
2.0
1.0
1.4

0.5
0.3


11.0


1205
944%
1090%
2126

5365 5/6

480
444
547
724
1146
406
526
192
206
80

4751


1055
1060
1138
1594

4847

403
330
562
394
1266
336
462

106
80

3939


3.1
2.4
2.6
2.8

10.9

1.5
0.8
1.8
1.7
1.5
1.5
1.7
0.8
0.8
0.3

12.4


0
-0

oii
*b 1?

,.|i^'


1932-33

0.5
0.1
4.3

10.6
2.1
5.3
8.8
0.6
3.1
2.5
1.4
2.7
1.4

43.6

1.7
1.3
1.6
3.0

7.6

0.7
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.6
0.6
0.7
0.3
0.3
0.1

6.7


no
.-i,
I.,l


1933-34

0.7
0.2
4.2
6.4
8.7
2.5
4.2
1.7
7.8
0.8
4.8
1.9
1.3
3.4
1.7

50.2

2.9
2.8
2.7
2.9

11.3

1.3
0.9
1.7
0.8
1.7
0.8
1.2

0.4
0.3

9.2


Business Administration and
Economics.................. 14.3 13.8 9936 9112 10.9 14.0 11.6 14.5
Journalism .................... 2.0 )*** 660 *** 1.5 0.9 ..............

TOTAL BUSINESS ADMINIS-
TRATION .................... 16.3 13.8- 10596 9112 12.4 14.9 11.6 14.5

Chemistry .................... 7.7 *** 7438 *** 5.9 10.5 ..............
Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology 1.5 1.6 308 471 1.2 0.4 1.3 0.7
Pharmacy... ................. 2.0 2.0 382 674 1.5 0.5 1.7 1.1

TOTAL PHARMACY........... 11.2 3.6 8128 1145 8.6 11.4 3.0 1.8

Law.... ..................... 7.0 6.0 5948 6078 5.4 8.4 5.0 9.7

TOTAL LAW... ................ 7.0 6.0 5948 6078 5.4 8.4 5.0 9.7

Education ................... 7.2 6.1 3033 1961 5.5 4.3 5.1 3.1
Health and Physical Education.. 2.1 1.4 986 656 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0

TOTAL EDUCATION .......... 9.3 7.5 4019 2617 7.1 5.7 6.3 4.1

Archetecture and Painting ...... 3.8 4.1 1218 1174 2.9 1.7 3.4 1.9

TOTAL ARCHITECTURE AND
ALLIED ARTS............... 3.8 4.1 1218 1174 2.9 1.7 3.4 1.9

TOTAL FOR THE UNIVERSITY 130.6 119.3 70,927 5/662,9503 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0

*Percentages are computed to the nearest tenth.
**Teacher-units are computed in terms of time allotted to teaching and assignments other than teaching
reduce the teacher-unit.
***Chemistry and Journalism were transferred to the College of Arts and Sciences in 1933-34; Chemistry from
Pharmacy; Journalism from Business Administration. Landscape Design was discontinued.


0









1933-34

0.2
0.1
3.5
10.8
10.5
1.8
5.1
1.2
8.2
1.2
3.0
2.7
1.5
2.7
1.7

54.1

1.7
1.7
1.8
2.5

7.7

0.6
0.5
0.9
0.6
2.0
0.5
0.7

0.2
0.1

6.2


-1








Table II shows that 70,927 5/6 student-credit-hours were taught in 1932-33 and
62,9501/2 in 1933-34. The decline in the number of student-credit-hours for 1933-34
is due to the decrease in enrollment for that period.

The most important information in Table II is revealed in the columns headed
"Per Cent of Total University Teacher-Units" and "Per Cent of Total University
Student-Credit-Hours." The differences between the per cents in these two columns
indicate the extent to which a department is under- or over-staffed. If the per-
centage of teacher units exceeds the percentage of student-credit-hours, it tends to
indicate that the department is over-staffed, based on the University average, and
vice versa. Of course, it is well recognized that there are many reasons which
justify a discrepancy between these two percentages. In fact, it would be im-
possible to plan the teaching loads of the University so that there would be an exact
balance between the two.

The very nature of a university makes it necessary that certain departments
teach students from almost all divisions of the University, while other departments
tend to teach their own students almost exclusively. The extent to which these
conditions prevail at the University of Florida is shown in Table III.








Table III contains so much information that a very detailed discussion of the
statistics revealed is impossible in this report. As might be expected, the College
of Arts and Sciences is the outstanding service division in its teaching assignments.
Less than 50 per cent of its instruction is devoted to its own students. The other
colleges all show larger percentages, and the College of Law teaches its own stu-
dents excusively. Unquestionably it is the nature of the work offered which de-
termines the distribution of the teaching assignments among the various students
in the University. In making administrative adjustments, however, it is some-
times very beneficial to have at hand information which shows the extent to which
a department serves the University as a whole.


STUDENT STATISTICS

ENROLLMENT

Again it should be mentioned that any attempt to make comparisons between en-
rollment statistics for the two regular sessions of the hiennium must give con-
sideration to the administrative adjustments which made the College of Pharmacy
a school under the College of Arts and Sciences and which removed the Department
of Journalism from the College of Commerce and Journalism to the College of
Arts and Sciences.

Table IV shows the enrollment figures for the biennium. For the summer terms
the figures for men and women are given separately.


TABLE IV. ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS BY SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES

1. Regular Session Resident Students

1932-33 1933-34
College of Agriculture .......-........ --.--.-..... ..- ....-- .- .... 218 183
School of Architecture and Allied Arts ..-....................... 69 67
College of Arts and Sciences ........ .................. ........... 625 679*
College of Business Administration ........- .........- ...-- -.... 544
College of Commerce and Journalism ............ ...... 624 -..
College of Education .......................... .............- ..--- ......- .. 345 232
College of Engineering .... .. .--.--- ... ..--.-- ...- ....... 391 373
Graduate School .............. ............................................... 165 141
College of Law .................... .................... ... 232 244
College of Pharmacy ..... --..-- ---. --..- .....- ....--.. ..... 57 ......

Grand Total ....-- ..... ...- . --.-----.----- --..- ..............- 2,726 2,463
Less Duplicates .....--.................. ........ .... 98 92

N ET TOTAL .......... ............................................................... 2,628 2,371

*Includes 73 students in the School of Pharmacy.
39








2. Summer Session Students


College of Agriculture-............................
School of Architecture and Allied Arts
College of Arts and Sciences .............-
College of Business Administration -....
College of Education ............................-
College of Engineering .............-- .......
Graduate School ..............-..................
College of Law .......................---------- .........

Grand Total ............----.......
Less Duplicates ....................------

NET TOTAL ........................................--------------


1933
Men Women Total
27 ...... 27
2 ...... 2
104 45 149
55 9 64
169 504 673
31 ...... 31
47 29 76
64 1 65

499 588 1,087
1 0 1

498 588 1,086


t Includes 15 men in the School of Pharmacy.
* Includes the following Short Course Students:

College of Education .....................- .....
Graduate School .........---------....................--


Men Wom(
11 9
15 0


TOTAL .........................------------ 26


3. Enrollment by Classes

REGULAR SESSION RESIDENT STUDENTS

Freshmen ..........----..... -- ---..................................
Sophomores ---............... .....-------------------------........----------..--.---
Juniors .............................---------------------------......---------------
Seniors ... ....................-----........................
Law Students ...............------------------------ -- ...-- ...----- ..-.-..--
Graduate Students ...............---------------------------.............
Special Students ........ ..----.... ---....................

Grand Total ------.......-------.... ----... --------- ...........-------------
Less Duplicates .......--..........--... .........

NET TOTAL .....................-----------------..............--


1934*
Men Women Total
43 ...... 43
4 ...... 4
124 55 179Y
63 9 72
154 617 771
30 ...... 30
81 32 113
98 2 100

597 715 1,312
2 0 2

595 715 1,310



en Total
20
15


9 35


1932-33
843
695
401
309
232
165
81

2,726
98

2,628


1933-34
692
613
416
314
244
141
43

2,46:
02

2,371


In the regular session of 1932-33 the enrollment of the University reached its all-
time peak with 2,628. For 1933-34 the regular session enrollment showed a de-
crease of 9.7 per cent, with an enrollment of 2,371. Part 3 of the table shows that
the decrease came principally in the freshman and sophomore classes. The num-
ber of freshmen decreased 17.9 per cent and fell from 843 to 692. The number
of sophomores decreased 11.8 per cent and dropped from 695 to 613. However, the
enrollment decreases failed to keep pace with the decreases in appropriations, and
the University was fully taxed to handle its students.

40









The summer term enrollment for 1933 was 1,086, the lowest figure since 1926.
In the summer term of 1934 the enrollment rose to 1,310. The summer term enroll-
ment is principally made up of in-service teachers. The deplorable financial condi-
tion of many of the schools readily accounts for the decrease in the summer term
enrollment. When the entire period is reviewed it is remarkable that the enroll-
ment held up as well as it did.

A tabular picture of the enrollment of the University of F'lorida since 1905 is
shown in Table V.

TABLE V. ENROLLMENT IN THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

FROM 1905 TO 1934

Number Summer Number
Regular Session Enrolled Term Enrolled Total
1905-06 ..............--------------.......... 135 ---..... .. .... 135
1906-07........... ....... -----........ 102 102
1907-08 ....................... .................... 103 ...--- ... 103
1908-09 ----...---- ......... 103 --- - 103
1909-10 ......... ....-- ......- 186 .... 186
1910-11 ---.....---- ...... 241 .... ....... 241
1911-12 .... ... ....-- ........- ........ 302 ........ ..... 302
1912-13 ...- --..-- ...... 321 1913 140 461
1913-14 ....-- -- ....- ... 361 1914 269 630
1914-15 .... ----........ 395 1915 402 797
1915-16 ----.... .-- ...... 447 1916 539 986
1916-17 --- .............................. ...... 460 1917 434 894
1917-1 .. ... --.................---- 421 1918 434 855
1918-19 -- ..-------..........---..... 554 1919 612 1,166
1919-20 ..----..-..-------.. ----------........ 664 1920 743 1.407
1920-21 ----.....----- ........- 823 1921 783 1.606
1921-22-..--.... -------....... ...... ----...... 1,002 1922 895 1,897
1922-23 ......----......-----........... 1,183 1923 1,028 2,211
1923-24---------...... --...--- ...................... 1,347 1924 944 2.291
1924-25 ............------------- 1,488 1925 987 2.475
1925-26 .......... ............- -------- 1,860 1926 908 2,768
1926-27 ....... -... ...... ... 1,968 1927 1,269 3,237
1927-28..... .......-- ------............ 2,073 1928 1,686 3.759
1928-29-....-...-- ....... .. ....... .... 2,270 1929 1,613 3.883
1929-30....................................... .. 2,257 1930 1,480 3,737
1930-31 ........--------------............. 2,388 1931 1,530 3,918
1931-32 ........ .-----......-------- 2,558 1932 1,746 4,304
1932-33- -.......--...--...................-- 2,628 1933 1,086 3,714
1!)33-34--- .. .....-------- ... 2,371 1934 1,310 3.681

t These figures include the enrollment in the demonstration school. except for the
Summer Sessions of 1933 and 1934.


STUDENTS DROPPED FOR FAILURE

A student is dropped for failure in studies if he fails to pass more than half of
his work for any term. The first time a student is dropped he cannot re-register
until one term has elapsed. In case a student is dropped for failure a second time
his dismissal becomes permanent. The number of students dropped for failure,
with their classifications, is shown in Table VI.








TABLE VI. NUMBER OF STUDENTS DROPPED FOR FAILURE IN STUDIES

ACCORDING TO CLASSIFICATION

1. Regular Session 1932-33


College

AGRICULTURE
Freshmen .................
Sophomores .............
Juniors .....................
Seniors .........-.......
Specials .................
Entire College ...
ARCHITECTURE AN
ALLIED ARTS
Freshmen .................
Sophomores ---....
Juniors ...................
Seniors .....................
Specials .......... .......
Entire College .....
ARTS AND SCIENCE
Freshmen ...............
Sophomores ....-
Juniors ................-----
Seniors ...............---
Specials .........--......
Entire College .....
COMMERCE AND
JOURNALISM
Freshmen ...............
Sophomores .............
Juniors ................
Seniors ..... ......
Specials ........--.......
Entire College .....


Number of Number
Students Dropped
Enrolled First Time

... 49 6
... 63 3
... 42 0
... 38 1
... 26 3
... 218 13


Number
Dropped
Permanently

0
1
0
0
0I
1



1
0
0
0
1

5
0
0
0
1
6



3
3
0
0

6


Total
Number
Dropped

6
4
0
1
3
14



5
4
0
0
0
9

45
9
1
0
2
57


27
12
2
2
1
44


Per
Cent
Dropped

12.24
6.35
0.00
2.63
11.54
6.42



19.23
19.05
0.00
0.00
0.00
13.04

16.85
4.69
0.96
0.00
14.29
9.12



11.20
6.12
2.08
2.44
11.11
7.05








TABLE VI. NUMBER OF STUDENTS DROPPED FOR FAILURE IN STUDIES

ACCORDING TO CLASSIFICATION-(Continued)

1. Regular Session 1932-33--(Continued)
Number of Number Number Total Per
College Students Dropped Dropped Number Cent
Enrolled First Time Permanently Dropped Dropped
EDUCATION
Freshmen ................. 91 11 3 14 15.38
Sophomores .....---........... 93 4 0 4 4.30
Juniors ........................ 75 1 2 3 4.00
Seniors ....................... 65 3 0 3 4.62
Specials ..................... 21 2 1 3 14.29
Entire College .......... 345 21 6 27 7.83
ENGINEERING
Freshmen .................... 145 16 2 18 12.41
Sophomores ................ 114 14 1 15 13.16
Juniors ....................... 63 2 0 2 3.17
Seniors ....................... 61 2 0 2 3.28
Specials ...................... 8 2 0 2 25.00
Entire College ...... 391 36 3 39 9.97
LAW
First Year .......-........... 102 5 0 5 4.90
Second Year .-............. 66 2 0 2 3.03
Third Year ................ 64 1 0 1 1.56
Entire College ...... 232 8 0 8 3.45
PHARMACY
Freshmen ..........--.........--------- 24 2 0 2 8.33
Sophomores ................ 16 3 0 3 18.75
Juniors .........-..........----------.... 9 0 0 0 0.00
Seniors ..------.......------........ 6 0 0 0 0.00
Specials ...................... 2 0 0 0 0.00
Entire College ........ 57 5 0 5 8.77
* ALL COLLEGES
All Freshmen ....... 843 103 14 117 13.88
All Sophomores ........ 695 46 5 51 7.34
All Juniors ..---............-.. 401 6 2 8 2.00
All Seniors .........--....... 309 8 0 8 2.59
All Specials ................ 81 9 2 11 13.58
All Law .--..-.................. 232 8 0 8 3.45
* Entire University ...... 2,561 t 180 23 203 7.93








TABLE VI. NUMBER OF STUDENTS DROPPED FOR FAILURE IN STUDIES

ACCORDING TO CLASSIFICATION-(Continued)

2. Summer Session 1933


Number of
College Students
Enrolled
Agriculture .................... 27
Architecture and Allied
A rts .............................. 2
Arts and Sciences ........ 149
Commerce and Jour-
nalism .......................... 64
Education ..............------........ 673
Engineering .................... 31
Law ................................ 65
* All Colleges ......... ...... 1,011 $
Graduate School not included.
t Includes 98 duplicates.
t Includes 1 duplicate.
3. Reg
AGRICULTURE
Freshmen ........--.......-------....-. 50
Sophomores ................ 36
Juniors ..........--............. 45
Seniors ........................ 38
One Year Specials .... 1
Specials ...................... 13
Entire College ..... 183


Number Number
Dropped Dropped
First Time Permanently
1 0


Total
Number
Dropped
1

0
4

2
14
0
1
22


Per
Cent
Dropped
3.71

0.00
2.68

3.13
2.08
0.00
1.54
2.18


;ular Session 1933-34


20.00
0.00
2.22
2.63
0.00
7.69
7.10








TABLE VI. NUMBER OF STUDENTS DROPPED FOR FAILURE IN STUDIES

ACCORDING TO CLASSIFICATION-(Continued)
3. Regular Session 1933-34-(Continued)

Number of Number Number Total Per
College Students Dropped Dropped Number Cent
Enrolled First Time Permanently Dropped Dropped
ARCHITECTURE AND
ALLIED ARTS
Freshmen ......... ........ 14 2 1 3 21.42
Sophomores .... 21 4 0 4 19.04
Juniors .......... ......... 17 2 0 2 11.76
Seniors ....... .... .. 13 0 0 0 0.00
Specials ...... ..... 2 0 0 0 0.00
Entire College ........ 67 8 1 9 13.43
ARTS AND SCIENCES
Freshmen ......... 221 26 4 30 13.57
Sophomores ..... 187 23 2 25 13.37
Juniors ............ .. 124 6 1 7 5.65
Seniors ............... 64 1 0 1 1.56
Specials ... ... .. 10 1 0 1 10.00
Total ............... ... 606 57 7 64 10.56
PHARMACY
Freshmen ........... 20 4 0 4 20.00
Sophomores ......... 29 0 0 0 0.00
Juniors .............. ...... 14 1 0 1 7.14
Seniors ........ ........... 9 0 0 0 0.00
Specials ......... ... .. 1 0 0 0 0.00
Total ............ ... 73 5 0 5 6.84
All Freshmen ....... 241 30 4 34 14.11
All Sophomores ....... 216 23 2 25 11.57
All Juniors .... .. 138 7 1 8 5.79
All Seniors ........... 73 1 0 1 1.37
All Specials ..-.- -..... 11 1 0 1 9.09
Entire College ... 679 62 7 69 10.16
BUSINESS ADMINIS-
TRATION
Freshmen .. ...... .. 216 36 7 143 19.90
Sophomores ....... 160 19 6 25 15.63
Juniors ...................... 106 13 5 1s 16.98
Seniors ...... ...... 55 2 0 2 3.64
Specials ..... .............. 7 0 1 1 1.43
Entire College 544 70 19 S9 16.36
EDUCATION
Freshmen ................... 36 7 2 9 25.00
Sophomores ................ 74 4 1 5 6.76
Juniors .. .................... 50 0 1 1 2.00
Seniors ........ ............. 66 2 0 2 3.03
Specials ...................... 6 0 0 0 0.00
Entire College ...... 232 13 4 17 7.33
ENGINEERING
Freshmen ........... ...... 135 217 0 17 12.59
Sophomores ............ 106 18 3 21 19.81
Juniors ........ ......... .. 60 5 1 6 10.00
Seniors ...................... 69 6 1 7 10.14
Specials ...................... 3 1 0 1 3.3.
Entire College ...... 373 47 5 52 13.94
45






TABLE VI. NUMBER OF STUDENTS DROPPED FOR FAILURE
ACCORDING TO CLASSIFICATION-(Continued)
3. Regular Session 1933-34-(Continued)


College

LAW


Number of Number Number
Students Dropped Dropped
Enrolled First Time Permanently


First Year .................. 120 15 0
Second Year .............. 64 1 0
Third Year ................ 60 0 1
Entire College ........ 244 16 1
* ALL COLLEGES
All Freshmen ............ 692 102 14
All Sophomores ........ 613 68 12
All Juniors ................ 416 28 8
All Seniors ................ 314 12 1
All Specials ................ 43 3 1
All Law Students .... 244 16 1
Entire University.... 2,322 t 229 37
Graduate School not included.
t Includes 92 duplicates.
4. Summer Session 1934


Agriculture ............ 43 4
Architecture and Allied
Arts ....................... 4 0
Arts and Sciences ........ 164 3
Pharmacy .................... 15 0
Entire College ...... 179 3
Business Administra-
tion ------.............................. 72 1
Education ...................... 771 10
Engineering .................... 30 1
Law .................................. 100 3
* All Colleges ................ 1,199 t 22
Graduate School not included.
t Includes 2 duplicates.
Table VI shows that 7.93 per cent of the


0


Total
Number
Dropped

15
1
1
17

116
80
36
13
4
17
266



4

0
3
0
3

1
11
1
5
25


Per
Cent
Dropped

12.50
1.56
1.67
6.97

16.76
13.05
8.65
4.14
9.30
6.97
11.46



9.30

0.00
1.82
0.00
1.67

1.38
1.42
3.33
5.00
2.08


undergraduate students enrolled in the


regular session of 1932-33 were dropped for failure in studies. In the regular session
of 1933-34 the figure rose to 11.46 per cent. The percentage of undergraduate students
dropped for failure in studies over the past four regular sessions is shown below:
1 9 3 0 -3 1 .............................................................................................. ................................................................. 1 1 .3 7
19 3 1 -3 2 ................................................................................................................................................................ 8 .8 1
19 3 2 -3 3 ........................... .................................. ............................................... ...................................... 7 .9 3
1933-34 ............. -11.4................................................................................................................................................. 11.4
It will be noted that the lowest percentage of students dropped for failure in
studies occurred in the year 1932-33. The figure was 7.93 per cent. In 1933-34
the percentage rose to 11.46. It is rather hard to find a satisfactory explanation of
this increase. It has been suggested it might be due to inferior preparation on the
part of our incoming students. This reason seems to be exploded, however, because
all classes of students except specials show higher percentages of students dropped
for failure for 1933-34 than for 1932-33. If the reason were due solely to inferior
preparation, we would expect the higher percentages to come in the freshman and
sophomore classes only. It will be noted that the three years previous to 1933-34
showed decreases in the percentages of students dropped for failure. Probably the
increase for 1933-34 may be explained as a reactionary tendency.
STUDENT HOUR LOADS
About four years ago the University deans took steps to bring the number of
hours required for degrees in the various colleges more nearly to the same number.
At the time this action was initiated some colleges were requiring almost 20 per
cent more hours for a four-year degree than others. The extent to which a certain
amount of uniformity of load has been attained is given in Table VII.


IN STUDIES













TABLE VII. DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENT HOUR LOAD*
1. First Semester 1932-33


Load in
Semester Hours

Agriculture.........

Cumulative ... .....

Architecture ........

Cumulative.........

A. and S............

Cumulative.........

C. and J.............

irf Cumulative.........
-4
Education ..........

Cumulative.........

Engineering ........

Cumulative.........

Law ...............

Cumulative ..... ...

Pharmacy..........

Cumulative.........

Total ..............

Cumulative.........


0 4 0 2


4 4 6

1 0 0


5 6

0 1

1 2

0 0

0 0


0 1


6 7

3 0


14 15

11 22

22 44
4 7


16 17

34 50

78 128

14 11


0 0 0 1 5 12 26 37 50 57 61

0 3 9 9 39 68 77 106 103 121 11


9 12 21 30 69 137 214 320 423 544 555 56C

0 0 3 8 30 57 120 47 194 74 7 3


560 560

0 0


0 1 1 1 4 4 5 6 6 6 9 17 47104224 271 465 539 546 549 549 549 549

0 1 0 2 1 0 1 2 0 0 6 8 12 38 53 67 45 35 6 4 0 0 0

0 1 1 3 4 4 5 7 7 7 13 21 33 71 124 191 236 271 277 281 281 281 281

0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 6 5 11 22 52 40 141 53 9 12 1 1 1

0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 3 5 11 16 27 49101 141 282 335 344 356 357 358 359

1 10 0 1 0 0 1 2 2 5 10 70 43 44 16 2 2 0 0 0 0 0
1 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 6 8 13 23 93 136 180 196 198 200 200 200 200 200 200

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 11 20 13 3 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 15 35 48 51 51 51 51 51 51 51

1 7 1 4 2 3 6 3 9 30 46180268414 350 534 319 38 25 1 1 1
So n 21 2 26 32 35 44. 74 120 900 568 982 1 332 1 866 2.185 2.223 2.248 2.249 2.250 2,251


Total
Students

190


61 1,032


560 9,383


51 815


2,251 37,415


* Duplicate Registrations are counted in the college in which the students are taking the majority of their work.


Total
Hours

3,137


Average
Hours

16.5


16.9


16.8


9,273 16.9


4,625 16.5


6,223 17.3


2,927


14.6


16.0


16.6


01 1


1 8 ,
,













TABLE VII. DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENT HOUR LOAD*
2. Second Semester 1932-33


Load in
Semester Hours

Agriculture ............

Cumulative...........

Architecture ...........

Cumulative...........

A and S..............

Cumulative...........

C and J........ . . .

- Cumulative... .......

Education.............

Cumulative...........

Engineering ...........

Cumulative .........

L aw ................

Cumulative . . .

Pharmacy .............

Cumulative...........

T otal ........ .......

Cumulative ...........


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 3


14 15 16 17

21 23 55 26


20 21 22 23 24

3 4 1 0 0


I 1 1 1 2 2 3 4 4 6 9 30 53 108 134 166 188 191 195 196 196 196

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 2 2 7 14 13 10 3 5 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 4 6 8 15 29 42 52 55 60 60 60 61 61

1 1 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 7 8 62 75 103 62 68 77 17 13 0 1 1

1 2 2 4 4 5 6 8 8 15 23 85 160 263 325 393 470 487 500 500 501 502

1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 3 7 14 30 123 121 33 101 59 20 8 1 1 0

1 1 1 3 3 3 4 4 7 14 28 58 181 302 335 436 495 515 523 524 525 525

1 0 0 2 0 2 5 0 3 5 6 15 48 39 52 65 37 12 7 1 0 0


1 1 1

0 0 0


3 3 5 10 10 13 18 24 39 87

0 0 0 1 0 1 1 8 7 21


126 178 243 280

69 23 100 52


292 299 300 300 300

13 15 6 2 3


0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 3 11 18 39 108 131 231 283 296 311 317 319 322

1 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 2 11 9 68 26 63 19 3 1 0 0 0 0 0

1 2 3 3 3 3 6 6 8 19 28 96 122 185 204 207 208 208 208 208 208 208

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 7 20 9 4 4 1 0 2 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 10 30 39 43 47 48 48 50 50 50

5 2 1 6 2 3 12 3 9 36 51207330 484 237 383 255 71 47 11 5 4


5 7 8


Total Total Average
Students Hours Hours

196 3,213 16.4


1,007 16.5


8,286


16.5


16.5


525 8,637


4,967 16.6


5,657 17.6


3,056 14.7


50 831 16.6


2,164 35,654 16 5


* Duplicate registrations are counted in the college in which the students are taking the majority of their work.


14 16 19 31 134 43 79 130 3371667 1.151 1.388 1.771 2.02612.097 2.144 2.155 2.160 2.164












TABLE VII. DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENT HOUR LOAD*

3. First Semester 1933-34


Load in
Semester Hours

Agriculture .... ...

Cumulative .......

Architecture

Cumulative.....

A. and S.** ....

Cumulative . . .

Bus. Admin... .

Cumulative......

Education........

Cumulative. .....

Engineering ......

Cumulative ...

Law ... ... ......

Cumulative .......

Pharmacy .....

Cumulative .....

T otal.............

Cumulative.......


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 26

0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 2 5 12 16 40 24 15 33 3 2 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 3 3 5 10 22 38 78 102 117 150 153 155 155 155 155 155

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 0 5 19 6 10 4 2 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 4 7 7 12 31 37 47 51 53 53 53 53 53 53

1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 0 3 10 14 35 77 71 89 97 102 13 6 0 0 0 1

1 1 1 2 2 2 2 6 6 9 19 33 68 145 216 305 402 504 517 523 523 523 523 524

1 1 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 1 4 7 30 51 88 48 165 56 12 3 0 0 0 0

1 2 2 2 6 6 7 7 7 8 12 19 49 100 188 236 401 457 469 472 472 472 472 472

0 1 0 1 2 0 0 2 1 1 7 2 11 29 20 50 44 28 9 2 0 1 1 0

0 1 1 2 4 4 4 6 7 8 15 17 28 57 77 127 171 199 208 210 210 211 212 212

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 5 7 9 21 54 42 117 40 19 11 3 2 1 0

0 0 0 1 1 1 1 3 4 4 9 16 25 46 100 142 259 299 318 329 332 334 335 335

1 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 0 8 11 61 52 46 22 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 11 11 19 30 91 143 189 211 214 215 215 215 215 215 215 215

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 13 21 12 7 5 1 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 19 40 52 59 64 65 65 65 65 65 65

3 2 1 5 8 3 2 11 5 6 38 49 163 264 359 293 458 269 59 24 3 3 2 1
3 5 6 11 19 22 24 35 40 46 84133 296 560 619 1212 1,670 1.939 1,998 2,022 2,025 2,028 2,030 2,031


* Duplicate registrations are counted in the college in which the students are taking the majority of their work.
** Pharmacy not included.


Total
Students

155


Total
Hours

2,567


Average
Hours

16.6


16.2


16.7


16.8


16.6


17.4


14.6


16.2


16.6


53 856


524 8,768


472 7,933


212 3,521


335 5,816


215 3,136


65 1,052


2,031 33,649












TABLE VII. DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENT HOUR LOAD*
4. Second Semester 1933-34
Toa Toa vrg


Load in
Semester Hours
Agriculture.....
Cumulative.....
Architecture.....
Cumulative.....
A. and S. **.....
Cumulative.....
Business Admin..
Om Cumulative .....

Education ......
Cumulative.....
Engineering .. .

Cumulative.....
Law ............
Cumulative ....

Pharmacy.......
Cumulative.....
Total..........
Cumulative.....


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 12 7 27 38 12 3C


Total
23 24 26 Students
0 1 0 150


0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 2 3 15 22 49 87 99 129 145 147 149 149 149 150 150
0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 4 6 11 7 10 9 2 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 8 14 25 32 42 51 53 53 53 53 53 53
1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 20 14 55 60 96 59 78 66 17 5 4 0 2 1
1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 5 25 39 94 154 250 309 387 453 470 475 479 479 481 482

0 1 0 0 1 0 3 3 0 1 10 15 35 101 80 34 79 49 12 6 4 0 0 C

0 1 1 1 2 2 5 8 8 9 19 34 69 170 250 284 363 412 424 430 434 434 434 434
1 1 0 0 3 0 1 2 0 2 7 6 15 23 35 34 29 15 9 9 4 1 1 C

1 2 2 2 5 5 6 8 810 17 23 38 61 96 130 159 174 183 192 196 197 198 198
0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 3 11 15 30 74 16 91 31 19 6 2 4 2 C
-~~~~~~~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1


0 0 0 0 1 1 2 3

1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1


9 20 35 65


8 22 52 33


139 155 246 277 296 302 304 308


53 9 71 2 1 0 0 0


- I. I I, I I, I I, 'I - 'I. - J 'I 'I - I' I I I I 'I -
21)4 205 21)5 21)5 205


1 1 2 2 3 3 3 4 6 18 26 48 100 133 186 195 202
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 14 22 8 8


204 205 205 205 205
3 0 1 1 0


-- -I -'------- -I-
65


482 7,930


434 7,056


65


1,897


* Duplicate registrations are counted in the college in which the students are taking the majority of their work.
** Pharmacy not included.


Total Average
Hours Hours

2,449 16.3


873


16.5


16.5


16.3


16.3


17.0


14.5


16.2


16.2


0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 8 22 44 52 60 63 63 64 65 65 65 65
3 3 1 1 6 2 5 8 3 20 50 85 187 294 409 179 332 191 62 29 15 5 6 1
S 7 a i 7 a SI T20 T 52 102 187 374 668 1.077 1.256 1.588 1.779 1,841 1.870 1,885 1,890 1,896 1,897


2,963


1,050


30,825


I I - -I- - - - -1 I I I I


^








Table VII shows that the average load in semester hours credit varied from 14.5
to 17.6 throughout the sessions of 1932-33 and 1933-34. The College of Law con-
sistently shows the smallest average load, whereas the College of Engineering shows
the largest. If these two extremes be eliminated, the other colleges show but little
variation.

Table VII shows that the University of Florida needs a classification which will
provide for part-time students. According to the By-Laws a full-time student is
required to carry at least 12 hours to remain in school. Each term the University
has some 50 students who carry less than this minimum load. It has been cus-
tomary to designate these students as specials. The classification of special should
be reserved, however, for those persons who do not meet the entrance requirements.
Persons who meet the entrance requirements but carry less than the minimum load
should be classified as part-time students.

DEGREES GRANTED
A brief summary of the diplomas, certificates, and degrees granted during the
biennium is shown in Table VIII. More detailed information regarding these items
may be found in the University Register.

TABLE VIII. DIPLOMAS, CERTIFICATES, AND DEGREES GRANTED
Regular Sessions Summer Terms Totals
1932-33 1933-34 1933 1934
Normal Diplomas.-................................. 20 6 102 69 197
Certificate in Library Science--... ... .. .... 1 1
Graduate in Pharmacy.....................---... 7 7 1 .... 15
Bachelors Degrees ---........-------.................... ---- 271 263 77 80 691
Professional Engineers ...................... 5 2 .... .... 7
Masters Degrees .......................----...... 11 25 18 11 65
Doctor of Philosophy ............... .... 2 .... 1 3
Honorary Degrees ------........................... 1 .... 1 .... 2
TOTALS ...-.......---.......------.................. 315 305 199 162 981

Table VIII shows that a total of 981 diplomas, certificates, and degrees were
granted during the biennium. During the previous biennium ending with the sum-
mer term of 1932, 929 degrees were granted. Thus, during the last four years the
University has granted a total of 1,910.
The 1933 Summer Term was unusual in that almost one-fifth of the students
registered received diplomas or degrees. Although the 1934 Summer Term had a
larger enrollment than that of 1933. about one-sixth less diplomas and degrees were
granted.
OTHER STUDENT STATISTICS

The Office of the Registrar regularly tabulates certain other student statistics.
However, it seems unnecessary to burden this particular publication by repeating
them all here. Hence, they are herewith listed and reference is made stating where
they may be found:

1. Geographical Distribution ...... ............. ....... ......... ......... ni crsity Register
2. Classification of Parents' Occuplitions ..............Apply at Registrar's Office
3. D distribution of A ges ........... ...................... .......
4. Religious Affiliation of Students ......................... "
5. Size of C lasses ...................................








STUDIES AND SPECIAL REPORTS


GRADE DISTRIBUTIONS

Each year accurate statistical studies have been made showing the distribution
of grades in the various undergraduate courses for all undergraduates. Graduate
courses and grades received by graduate students in undergraduate courses have
been excluded. These studies show the distribution of grades for each instructor,
each department, and each college, and reveal valuable information. It has been
the policy of the Registrar's Office to make these available to persons qualified to
use them. In this report it is impossible to show more than the trend for the
University as a whole. The University grade distributions for each year beginning
with 1928-29 are shown in Table IX.

TABLE IX. PERCENTAGE AND NUMBER OF GRADES GIVEN TO
UNDERGRADUATES IN UNDERGRADUATE COURSES, 1928 TO 1934

Grade 1928-29 1929-30 1930-31 1931-32 1932-33 1933-34 1928-34

A Per Cent 7.3 9.3 12.2 12.8 13.8 11.6 11.3
Number 1,400 1,804 2,562 2,774 3,058 2,270 13,868

B PerCent 24.0 24.5 28.4 29.2 30.0 29.1 27.6
Number 4,614 4,757 5,959 6,314 6,664 5,688 33,946

C PerCent 31.5 31.9 32.7 33.5 33.1 34.6 32.9
Number 6,062 6,185 6,869 7,246 7,354 6,762 40,478

D PerCent 18.7 18.2 15.4 13.7 13.9 15.1 15.7
Number 3,585 3,527 3,235 2,972 3,097 2,954 19,370

E PerCent 10.8 12.0 8.6 8.0 7.6 8.0 9.1
Number 2,082 2,321 1,815 1,734 1,687 1,571 11,210

R PerCent 4.7 1.8 1.2 0.9 0.7 0.5 1.6
Number 897 345 257 191 159 104 1,945

I Per Cent 1.7 0.6 1.0 1.3 0.6 0.7 1.2
Number 326 111 215 276 125 134 1,421

X PerCent 1.4 1.7 0.5 0.6 0.4 0.3 0.6
Number 259 337 106 118 82 67 743

TotalPer Cent 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
Number 19,225 19,387 21,018 21,625 22,226 19,550 123,031


Table IX shows that from 1928-29 through 1932-33 there was a constant but small
increase in the percentage of A's and B's. This was accompanied by a decrease in
the percentage of D's and E's. The C's remained fairly constant. For 1933-34 the
distribution shows a decrease in the percentage of A's and B's and an increase in
the percentage of D's.








The University of Florida first used the letter grading system in 1928-29. The
few succeeding years represent a period of orientation and adjustment to the new
system. It is probably safe now to assume that a fairly constant distribution may
be expected. This assumption is fairly well borne out by the fact that the distribu-
tion for 1933-34 corresponds quite closely to the composite for the years 1928 through
1934.
In connection with the grade distribution it is apropos to say a word regarding
the failure fee. Critics of the failure fee advanced the argument that its operation
would tend to increase the D grades and to decrease the E grades. However, the
distribution for 1933-34, the first year the failure fee was assessed, apparently
shows this argument to be fallacious, since there was a slight increase in the per-
centage of E's.
RELATIVE SCHOLARSHIP OF GRADUATES ACCORDING TO ACCREDITATION OF HIGH SCHOOLS
The purpose of this study is to determine the differences existing between the
scholastic records for the freshman year for graduates of Florida High Schools
accredited by the Southern Association, and for those accredited by the State only.
Some of the more important findings of the study are revealed here with the hope
that they may point out how woefully weak some of our high schools are, particu-
larly in their English and mathematics departments. The study seems to indi-
cate that the University of Florida might be justified in giving entrance examina-
tions to graduates of certain State only accredited high schools, particularly in
English and mathematics. See Table X.
The scholastic records of the work of the freshman year during 1930-31, 1931-32,
and 1932-33 for the graduates of the high schools concerned form the basis of the
study.
Analysis of the freshman year scholastic records for the period showed that fifty-
three Florida High Schools, accredited by the State only, had sent one or more of
their graduates to the University. In only one case was the number of graduates
from a single school larger than ten. Hence, this group of schools has been desig-
nated as "Fifty-three Small Florida High Schools Accredited by State Only".
In order to have the two groups of schools as nearly alike as possible except for
accreditation, only small schools were used in this group to be compared with the
schools accredited by the State only. This second group is designated as "Fifty-
three Small Florida High Schools Accredited by the Southern Association." This
included all the Southern Association High Schools which sent fewer than ten
graduates to the University of Florida during the period considered.
The measure of scholarship was obtained by dividing honor points by semester
hours credit, with honor points assigned as follows:
IHonor Points
per
Semester Hour
Grade
A ..............----- ..................................................................................................... 3
B ...................... ----......... --- --....--------- -------.................... ....................... 2
C --------- --................. ----- -----------------------....................... 1
D ........... .............................. .. ... .. .... ................... ................ 0
E (and any other failing grade) ........... -.-................................................ -2
Using the above scheme, average scholarship for each high school was obtained
for the following seven divisions of college courses: (1) all academic work, (2)
English, (3) language, (4) mathematics, (5) science, (6) social science, (7) other
academic subjects.








A comparison of the average scholarships for the State only and the Southern
Association High Schools is shown in Table X.

TABLE X. SCHOLARSHIP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA OF

GRADUATES OF SOUTHERN ASSOCIATION AND STATE ONLY

ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS, 1930-1933


Number of Scholarship Averages* at University of Florida



Schools
Accredited
By |



Southern Assn...... 53 188 .66 .65 .76 .54 .44 .73 .92
State only............ 53 170 .63 .27 .44 .18 .51 .86 1.39

*These averages are the means of the averages for the high schools under consideration. Each
high school has been given equal weight.
Table X shows some large differences in the quality of the work done by gradu-
ates of Southern Association High Schools and of State only accredited High
Schools. The graduates of the Southern Association High Schools made far better
scholastic records in English and mathematics than did the graduates of the State
only accredited group (.65 and .54 compared to .27 and .18). The Southern Asso-
ciation group of graduates was decidedly superior in languages (.76 as compared
with .44).

In the case of the average scholarships in social science and "other academic
work," which includes most of the electives, the reverse is true and the graduates
from the State only accredited group showed the higher average scholarships
(.86 and 1.39 as compared with .73 and .92). This definitely bears out the conten-
tion of certain educators that students who are unable to handle English and
mathematics can do good work in social sciences and "other academic subjects,"
which includes mainly courses in agriculture, descriptive geometry, drawing, eco-
nomic geography, education, shop, and woodwork.

Differences are rather meaningless unless some statement of the reliability is
given. Hence the reliability of the differences between the scholarship averages
in this study are given in Table XI.









TABLE XI. RELIABILITY OF THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE


SCHOLARSHIPS GIVEN IN TABLE X

1. Averages, Sigmas, and Standard Errors


Southern Association Florida Only Accredited
High Schools High Schools
Sigma Standard Sigma Standard
Variable Average Distri- Error Average Distri- Error
bution Average bution Average
1. All Work ........... .66 .85 .12 .63 .84 .12
2. English ............. .65 1.15 .16 .27 1.07 .15
3. Languages ............ .76 1.04 .14 .44 1.58 .22
4. Mathematics ........ .54 1.28 .18 .18 1.17 .16
5. Science ............... .44 1.15 .16 .51 1.04 .14
6. Social Sciences.... .73 .82 .11 .86 1.21 .17
7. Other Academic..
Subjects ........-.... .92 1.03 .14 1.39 .74 .10


2. Differences in Averages and Reliability

Differences Standard Ratio Difference Chances in 100 of
Variable In Averages Error to Standard True Difference
Averages Error Difference Greater Than Zero
1. All W ork ............................. .03 .17 .18 58
2. English ................................ .38 .22 1.73 96
3. Languages .......................... .32 .26 1.23 89
4. Mathematics ...-.................... .36 .24 1.50 93
5. Science ............ ...... ..... .07 .21 .33 63
6. Social Sciences .........-....... -.13 .20 .65 74
7. Other Academic Subjects.... -.47 .14 3.36 100

Table XI shows that, for the college records of graduates of the two groups of
high schools, there were reliable differences in the scholastic averages for English,
languages, mathematics, and "other academic subjects." In these three differences,
the chances are 89 or more in 100 that the true difference was greater than zero.
The differences in the averages for all work and for science were not reliable, the
chances being 58 and 63, respectively, in 100 of a true difference greater than zero.
The difference for the averages in social science was fairly reliable, tile chances
being 70 in 100 of a true difference greater than zero. In this connection, it should
be mentioned that absolutely no reliability is indicated by the chances being 50 in
100 of a true difference greater than zero, because 50 in 100 would be caused by
chance alone.








CONCLUSIONS

1. The graduates from small Southern Association high schools in Florida make
scholastic records at the University of Florida decidedly superior to those made by
graduates of State only accredited high schools (which are small also). Particu-
larly is this true for English, language, and mathematics. Public school officials
should take steps to improve the training offered in English, mathematics, and
languages by the State only accredited high schools.

2. The graduates from the State only accredited high schools made superior
records in social sciences and such other subjects as agriculture, descriptive geom-
etry, drawing, education, economic geography, woodwork, and shop. This shows
that students unable to carry English, mathematics, and languages successfully can
do well in the subjects just mentioned.

3. The University of Florida would appear to be justified in giving entrance
examinations to graduates of certain State only accredited high schools to deter-
mine their fitness to carry college English and mathematics.

A STUDY OF THE GRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

A SUMMARY

This study of graduates of the University of Florida from 1905 through January,
1932, is based on information received from questionnaires filled out during the
fall of 1931 and early winter of 1932 by 1,181 graduates themselves. The tabula-
tions were made by Mr. Benjamin Weld. The study was edited and written by the
Office of the Registrar. However, the part dealing with the records made in
graduate and professional schools by our graduates was made by the Office of the
Registrar in the spring of 1934 and added to the entire report.

During the period 1905 through January, 1932, the University of Florida con-
ferred 2,858 degrees. The 1,181 persons in this study received 1,365 degrees from
the University.

Out of the 1,181 graduates considered, 885 or 74.9 per cent were living in Florida.
Gainesville had the largest number with 112. Tampa, Miami, and Jacksonville
came next with 70, 64, and 52 respectively.

Two hundred and seventy-five or 23.3 per cent of the graduates were living in
the United States outside of Florida. In all, 41 states and the District of Columbia
were represented. New York State had the largest representation with 32; Georgia
and Pennsylvania came next with 24 and 20, respectively. Twenty-one of the
graduates were living outside of the United States.

The statement was once made that graduates of the University of Florida did not
attend the best graduate and professional schools for advanced work. Table XII
shows the graduate or professional schools attended by 276 graduates of tihe
University of Florida.










TABLE XII. GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS ATTENDED BY

GRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Graduate or Professional Scliool

1. Alabama, University of ........................
2. Alabama Polytechnic Institute ..............
3. Baltimore, University of ...................
4. Brown University -..-..... ..... ...........-... ....
5. California. University of .........................
6. Chicago, University of .. .. ....................
7. Cincinnati. University of ..........................
8. Clark University .......... .... .................
9. Colorado, University of ...........................
10. Columbia University ............................
11. Cornell University .......... ........-... . ..
12. Detroit College of Medicine & Surgery .
13. Duke University ................. ....... ......
14. Emory University ................ -
15. Fordham University ................ .....
16. George Washington University ...............
17. Georgia, University of ..................--- -
18. H arvard University ... ...............................
19. Illinois. University of .. .......................
20. Iowa. University of .. ... .........................
21. Iowa State Collere .......... ....................
22. Johns Hopkins University ........... ....
23. Kansas. University of ....................
24. Kentucky. University of .............. .......
25. Louisville, University of ..--.......... .........
26. Louisville Presbyterian Theo. Seminary
27. Maine, University of ................ ..........
28. Maryland, University of.........................
29. Massachusetts Institute of Technology .
30. Michigan, University of .......................
31. Michigan State College .... .........................
32. Minnesota. University of .........................
33. Missouri. University of ... .....................
34. New York University ...........................
35. North Carolina. University of ..............
36. Northwestern University -..........-....-......
37. Ohio State University .........-.............
38. Oklahoma A. & M. College ..................
39. Oregon, University of .............................
40. Oxford University ................. ............
41. George Peabody College for Teachers ...
42. Pennsylvania, University of .................-
43. Pennsylvania State College ...................
44. Phillips University ....................... ..... ...
45. Pittsburgh, University of .........................
46. Princeton University ..........-............ ...
47. Purdue University .............. ................
48. Rutgers University ................ .... .............
49. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
50. Southern California, University of .........
51. Syracuse University ..................................
52. Tennessee, University of ......................
53. Texas. University of ..................................
54. Toronto, University of ............................
55. The Tulane University of Louisiana ....


Number

............................. 1
-.......... ........... ...... 3

.................. . 1


.. .......... ........... .. 1 2
................. ....... .. 1
........................... 12

.................... ........ 1
............................ 2
............ .............. 12

....--... ............... 22

...--.-.-..-....---..--........--

.............................
........................... 1
......................... 6
.......... ....... ...... ...

........................ 5
......- -......- .- ..-. 1




.... .- ..- .-.-. ... 13




-.-.--.-....-.............- -




-----.-... ------------------- 7
2








2

9

............................. 2





...................... 11
.. -.......-........ ....... 1
--------.....--.-.-.---.-- --- 2









1





... 1
........... .... .. ......
- - - - - - - - - -










56. Union Theological Sem inary ..... ......... ....................................... 4
57. Vanderbilt University -- -------..... --- -- ---.....................--.......... .. .................. 6
58. Virginia, U university of ..............................................--...--............ ........... ........... .......... 4
59. W ashington & Lee University ........----............. ...............----------........-.......--.-------. 1
60. W western Ontario, University of ..--......... ....... ..... ........... ........................ 2
61. W western Reserve University ........ ...... .......................... .... ................. ................ 1
62. W isconsin, University of ..........................................................---- ------ -----............. 6
63. Yale University ...........-......... ............. -----. -- -- -.....-.. ..-....-- .......----------. 5

GRAND TOTAL ................................ ....-------- -- : ...................... .. ........ ............... 276
Table XII shows that 276 graduates of the University of Florida attended 63
graduate and professional schools, including the most outstanding ones in the
United States.

When it was learned that the University of Florida graduates attended acceptable
graduate and professional schools, the question was raised regarding the quality
of work they did at those institutions. This information is shown in Table XIII.

TABLE XIII. DENOTATION OF THE RANKING OF UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
GRADUATES IN THEIR WORK AT GRADUATE AND
PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS

How 189 University of Florida Graduates Ranked in Their Graduate and Pro-
fessional Work.
Rank Number Per Cent
1. Upper third 117 61.9
2. Middle third 48 25.4
3. Lower third 24 12.7
How 99 Graduates Ranking in the "Upper Third" at the University of Florida
Ranked in Their Graduate and Professional Work.
Rank Number Per Cent
1. Upper third 77 77.8
2. Middle third 18 18.2
3. Lower third 4 4.0
How 74 Graduates Ranking in the "Middle Third" at the University of Florida
Ranked in Their Graduate and Professional Work.
Rank Number Per Cent
1. Upper third 36 48.6
2. Middle third 24 32.4
3. Lower third 14 18.9
How 16 Graduates Ranking in the "Lower Third'' at the University of Florida
Ranked in Their Graduate and Professional Work.
Rank Number Per Cent
1. Upper third 4 25.0
2. Middle third 6 37.5
3. Lower third 6 37.5
Table XIII shows that the University of Florida graduates made enviable records
in their graduate and professional work. For instance, 117 out of 189 stood in the
upper third; 48 stood in the middle third, and 24 in the lower third. It was im-
possible to rank 87 students in their graduate and professional work.
A further question was raised as to the quality of work done by University of
Florida graduates in graduate and professional schools which are members of the
Association of American Universities. This information is shown in Table XIV.

58


Graduate Or Professional School


Number








TABLE XIV. GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS OF THE ASSOCIA-
TION OF AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES ATTENDED BY GRADUATES
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


I
Gra
Graduate or Professional School Upper
Third
1. California, University of ................ 1
2. Chicago. University of......................... 5
3. Clark University ................................ 1
4. Cornell University .-........................... 5
5. Harvard University .......................... 7
6. Illinois, University of ........................ 5
7. Iowa, State University of ................ 3
8. Kansas, University of .................... ....
9. Michigan, University of ................. 5
10. Minnesota, University of ............. 1
11. Missouri, University of .................... 2
12. North Carolina, University of ...... 7
13. Northwestern University ................ 5
14. Ohio State University ...................... 5
15. Pennsylvania. University of ........... 3
16. Princeton University ....................... 2
17. Syracuse University .......................... 1
18. Texas, University of .............--.... ..
19. Toronto, University of .................... 1
20. Virginia, University of ................ ....
21. Yale University ............................ 3


lank in
duate Work
Middle Lower
Third Third
0
2 ----

2 1
4 ....


1
1 ....


2
2 1
1
5 3


1

1 2
1 1


Rank at
University of Florida
Upper Middle Lower
Third Third Third
-- ....
3 4
1
5 3
8 2 1
3 2
3 --
I 1
2 4
1
2 .
4 5
6 2
4 1 1
4 6 1
2
1
1

1 -.-- 2
3 2


Totals ...... --............. .................. 62 19 12 54 34 5
NoTE: In the absence of a statement of an exact rank. graduates whose records
were marked "Cum Laude," "Honors," "Excellent," "Good," "High." and all with an
average above B were considered in the upper third; those marked "Average,"
"Satisfactory," "Fairly Good," and all with an average of B or B minus were
ranked in the middle third; and those marked "Fair," "Below Average," "Poor,"
"Unsatisfactory," and all with an average of C plus or lower were ranked in the
lower third.
Because this deals exclusively with quality, only those graduates whose graduate
or professional school reported some estimate of quality are included. A previous
report shows those whose quality was not reported.
Membership in the Association of American Universities is according to the
1933-34 College Blue Book.
Table XIV shows that graduates of the University of Florida made just as
enviable records in schools which are members of the Association of American
Universities as they did in the other schools.

Considering only the 921 graduates who answered the question regarding amount
of self-support while attending the University, the study reveals that 20 per cent
did not contribute to their support, whereas 18 per cent were entirely self-support-
ing. As a whole, 80 per cent of these 921 graduates helped to support themselves
while attending the University of Florida.








After graduation the following numbers were engaged in the occupations listed:


Occupation
Agriculture ..........................
Commerce and Business ......
E education ..................................
Engineering ............-....--....-
Law ......- ...... ...- .. ... ..- ...
M medicine ............ ..... ...
Miscellaneous ......................
N one ...... .........- ..- .. ...- .. .......

T otal .................. ...............


Number Engaged
.... ...- ...... 111
. .. ......... 184
-.-........ ...... 351
......... ....-...... 160
...- ....-.... ...... 292
... .... ...I .- 44
-.---- .......- ..... 25
................... 14

.................... 1,181


Education and Law claimed the largest numbers of the graduates. Only fourteen
indicated they had been unable to secure any employment at all when the ques-
tionnaires were filled out in the fall of 1931. However, 125 said they were out of
their regular line of work due to existing economic conditions. All the doctors, 96
per cent of the lawyers, 92 per cent of the teachers, and 89 per cent of the agri-
culturists were prepared in college for their respective occupations Three-fourths
of the engineers and one-half of those in Commerce and Business were prepared
in college for their respective fields. The lawyers and doctors thought their posi-
tions were permanent in about 90 per cent of the cases, whereas the teachers and
engineers thought their positions permanent in about 50 per cent of the cases.
Because of the widespread interest in salaries earned by college graduates the
table giving this information is reproduced below:

AVERAGE ANNUAL INCOMES OF 1055 GRADUATES OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA ACCORDING TO OCCUPATIONS
Average Annual Income According to Year After Graduation.
Total No.
Occupation Engaged First Second Third Fifth Tenth Fifteenth Twentieth
Agriculture 99 $1700 $1925 $2298 $2446 $3315 $4234 $3750
Commerce and
Business 176 1410 1935 2300 3061 5025 5554 6333
Education 336 1599 1842 2033 2584 3506 3804 3250
Engineering 153 1490 1898 2325 2728 3602 4313 4450
Law 272 1564 2498 3084 5384 8211 9845 9100
Medicine 19 625 1583 2167 2875 7557 10000 14583

ALL 1055 $1462 $2042 $2423 $3358 $5476 $6875 $7343
The average incomes of those engaged in all the occupations showed a steady
increase with the passing of time, except for those in the twentieth year in agri-
culture and education. Law appeared as the most remunerative occupation, al-
though those engaged in medicine reported slightly larger incomes in the fifteenth
and twentieth years. Agriculture and education were the least remunerative pro-
fessions. After the first two years engineering appeared slightly more remunerative
than agriculture or education. Beginning with the fifth year, commerce and busi-
ness appeared decidedly more remunerative than agriculture, education and
engineering.
All occupations except medicine showed large enough numbers to make the aver-
age income fairly representative except for the twentieth year after graduation.
The preceding discussion constitutes a very brief summary. The complete study
on graduates is on file in the Office of the Registrar and may be seen upon request.

60








GENERAL SUMMARY


REGULAR SESSION ENROLLMENTS
In the regular session of 1932-33 the all-time peak for enrollment was reached,
with a total of 2,628. For 1933-34 the enrollment dropped 9.7 per cent, to 2,371.
SUMMER TERM ENROLLMENT
The summer term enrollment for 1933 was 1,086, the lowest figure since 1926.
In 1934 the enrollment rose to 1,310.
Undoubtedly the enrollment decreases may be attributed in the main to economic
conditions. Even then the enrollment decreases failed to keep pace with the de-
creases in appropriations and the University was fully taxed to handle the students.
DEGREES
During the biennium covered by this report 981 diplomas, certificates, and de-
grees were granted. During the preceding biennium 929 were granted, making a
total of 1910 for the last four years. Since the establishment of the University
of Florida in 1905 the institution has granted 4,221 diplomas, certificates, and
degrees.
The University has granted almost as many degrees during the last four years
as it did during the first twenty-five years of its existence. This gives a good
index of the increasing service which the University is rendering the state. This
evidence of service is enhanced by the fact that 75 per cent of the University's
graduates remain in the state after graduation.
SCHOLARSHIP BY HIGH SCHOOLS
Graduates of Southern Association accredited high schools make decidedly su-
perior scholastic records in college when compared with graduates of State only
accredited high schools. Particularly is this true of work in English and mathe-
matics. The University of Florida might be justified in giving entrance examina-
tions in these subjects to graduates of certain State only accredited high schools.
It should be remembered that our present placement tests in English and mathe-
matics do not serve as entrance examinations, because no student is excluded from
the University because of his showing on placement tests. The matter of entrance
examinations should be referred to the Committee on Admissions.
RECORDS IN GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS
University of Florida graduates attend recognized professional and graduate
schools. A study involving 276 graduates showed that they went to 63 institu-
tions, including the most outstanding in the United States and some foreign coun-
tries. The study further revealed that these graduates made enviable records at
these institutions, because out of 189 who were ranked in their graduate and pro-
fessional work, 117 stood in the upper third.
INCOMES OF GRADUATES
Law and medicine were the most remunerative professions in which University
of Florida graduates engaged. After ten years in practice the lawyers showed an
average income of $8,211 and the doctors $7,557. For the same period after gradu-
ation those in commerce and business showed an average of $5,025, engineering
$3,602, education $3,506, and agriculture $3,315. These salaries are based on in-
formation furnished by the graduates themselves.
Respectfully submitted,
HARLEY W. CHANDLER, Registrar.








REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

To the President of the University:

Sir: Despite the depression the Graduate School, during the last biennium, has
in most respects held its own or even made some progress. Since most of our
graduate students are either actual or prospective teachers, the school situation
has affected the attendance, especially in the summer term, for in this term a large
proportion of our students come directly from the ranks of active teachers.

ATTENDANCE
In the summer of 1932, we had 150 students enrolled in the Graduate School.
In the summer of 1933, there were only 76. However, the pendulum has already
swung back, and for the summer of 1934 we have enrolled 113 students. The at-
tendance in the winter term has not been affected so seriously. The number dropped
from 165 for the session of 1932-33 to 141 for the session of 1933-34.

DEGREES CONFERRED
There has been a slight drop in the number of degrees conferred. Counting
winter and summer terms together, during the year 1931-32 we conferred 50 Mas-
ter's degrees, while in the year 1932-33, we conferred only 29 Master's degrees.
However, in the year 1933-34, we have conferred 36 Master's degrees and 3 Doctor
of Philosophy degrees. We began to admit students as candidates for the Doctor
of Philosophy degree in 1930. Now, after four years, we are beginning to turn
out our graduates. We have conferred in all, up to the present time, 332 Master's
degrees and 3 Doctor's degrees.

GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
Doubtless our attendance was affected slightly by the fact that our graduate
scholars were cut down in number from 20 to 10. This was unfortunate and I
trust that the time will soon come when we can have more graduate scholarships.

RESEARCH FUND
We regard ourselves fortunate in that we have been able to retain a small gradu-
ate research fund. I trust that for the next biennium we shall be able to increase
that fund a little. With a sufficient research fund, we could enlarge the scope of
our Doctor of Philosophy work.

I should like to say that we have never been tempted to let down the bars or
lower our standards in order to attract greater numbers and have more graduates.
We have tried to build a firm foundation that will be able to hold any superstruc-
ture that may later be erected upon it.
Since conditions are still uncertain, it seems to me the part of wisdom not to
ask for any large increase anywhere in the Graduate School budget. There is
proposed a small increase in the salaries and in the very valuable item of the
Research Fund, but the scholarships remain the same.

Respectfully submitted,

JAMES N. ANDERSON, Dean of the Graduate School.








REPORT OF THE DEAN

OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
To the Presidcnt of the University:

SIR: I respectfully submit the following report on the progress of the College
of Arts and Sciences during the period beginning July 1, 1932. and ending June 30,
1934, together with tile recommendations and the budget for the biennium beginning
July 1, 1935.

GENERAL STATEMENT

A reorganization effective July 1. 1933, resulted in the transfer of the Depart-
ment of Journalism from the College known up to that time as the College of
Commerce and Journalism to the College of Arts and Sciences. The Department
of Chemistry, formerly in the College of Pharmacy, also was placed in the College
of Arts and Sciences. The College of Pharmacy became the School of Pharmacy,
which was likewise made a unit under the administration of the College of Arts
and Sciences. The writer was appointed Dean of the College, Dr. W, H. Wilson.
previously Acting )Dean, became Assistant Dean. and Dr. B. V. Christensen assumed
the position of Director of the School of Pharmacy. We shall first present the
activities, status, and needs of the College of Arts and Sciences proper, and append
the report on the School of Pharmacy, except where the relationship of the one
merges with the other.

SCOPE OF SERVICE

The College of Arts and Sciences attempts not only to impart learning itself but
the spirit of learning, that is, culture. Thomas Huxley has reminded us, "Culture
certainly means something quite different from learning and technical skill. It
implies the possession of an ideal, and the habit of critically estimating the value
of things by comparison with a theoretical standard. Perfect culture should sup-
ply a complete theory of life, based upon a clear knowledge alike of its responsi-
bilities and of its limitations." While we frankly admit that the combined efforts
of the faculty have often failed to impart Huxley's "perfect culture" to the student,
we do feel that we have made some progress during the past biennium. We are
certain that the three types of instruction which the College of Arts and Sciences
renders the University have improved. The first type of service is the obvious one
of training men for all that is implied by the degrees Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor
of Science; the second type is characterized as the instruction of students regis-
tered in other colleges of the University and having no direct interest in the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences; while the third is described as pre-professional training.

Table I. showing distribution of degrees conferred in the College of Arts and
Sciences from August, 1932, to June, 1934, inclusive, gives information concerning
the first type of service. In order to afford a better comparative study the degrees
in journalism and pharmacy are also reported for the two years although they did
not become a part of the College of Arts and Sciences until July 1, 1933.









TABLE I.
DISTRIBUTION OF DEGREES, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
1932-33 1933-34
Aug. Jan. June Aug. Jan. June Total
Number B. A. Degrees ....................... ... .. .... 4 2 16 5 1 16 44
Number of B. S. Degrees ... ............................... 5 2 13 7 2 15 44
Number Degrees ........................... 9 4 29 12 3 31 88
Number B. S. in Journalism .................................. 1 1 12 1 0 0 15
Number B. A. in Journalism.......................... 0 0 0 0 1 8 9
Num ber Degrees ................................................... ...... 1 1 12 1 1 8 24
Number Graduate in Pharmacy .................. 0 0 7 1 0 7 15
Number B. S. in Pharmacy .................................. 0 0 3 1 0 6 10
N um ber D degrees ...... ...................... ........................... 0 0 10 2 0 13 25
Total Number Degrees .................. .. ..... 10 5 51 15 4 52 137
The enrollment of students in the College has steadily increased, the figures for
the last four academic years being 549, 605, 625, 679 respectively, and for the
School of Pharmacy, 52, 53, 57, and 73. The enrollment in the summer term also
has increased, being 149 and 164 respectively for the first and second years of the
biennium.
Table II shows distribution of the major fields of study completed by recipients
of the B.A. and B.S. degrees.
TABLE II.
DISTRIBUTION, MAJOR FIELDS OF STUDY, B.A. AND B.S. DEGREES
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
1932-33 1933-34
Aug. Jan. June Aug. Jan. June Total
1. Chem istry ................... ........... .. ..... ........... 3 1 13 5 1 9 32
2. B iology ......................... ...... ...... 2 1 3 1 1 3 11
3. History and Political Science ...................... 0 1 6 2 0 1 10
4. English ............................ ............. 4 0 1 1 0 0 6
5. M them atics ........ .......... ..........0....... ......... ...... 0 0 0 1 1 4 6
6. Philosophy and Psychology ...................... 0 0 0 1 0 5 6
7. S pan ish ............... .......... ................................................ 0 1 0 0 0 5 6
8. E conom ics .................. .... .. ............................ .. 0 0 4 0 0 2 6
9. S peech ................................................... ......... 0 0 1 1 0 1 3
10. F rench .......... ... ....... .................. ... .............. 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
11. Sociology ......... ................... .. ..... ... ...... 0 0 1 0 0 0 I
T'\BLET III.
The extent of the second type of service rendered by the College is shown in
Table III of the Report of the Registrar (See page 138, Report of the Registrar).
This table gives the distribution of student credit-hours for which grades were sub
mitted by the several departments of the College of Arts and Sciences according to
the colleges in which the students earning the grades were registered.
Table IV shows the frequency with which students registered in the College
during the last two years selected the professions or vocations listed. This table
gives some idea of the third type of service which the College renders. While
studying the table it should be recalled that Journalism ad Pharmacy were not
administered by the I .!l._I.,. of Arts and Sciences until July 1. 1933.


TABLE IV
FREQUENCY OF CHOICE OF LIFE WORK
Life Work 1932 33 1933 34 Life Work
Medicine ............... 204 177 Aviation ........
Law ..................... ............. .... 144 102 Bacteriology
Undecided .............................. 43 100 Agriculture ..........
Chemistry .55 35 Banking ..... ...........
Journalism ........................... 6 75 Manufacturing
Pharmacy ..................................... 1 74 Marine Biology
D entistry ......................................... 34 28 M music ............ ...........
Business ...................................... 21 10 Scout Executive
Teaching in Pub. Schools 19 12 Radio ...............
Teaching in College .............. 7 14 Advertising ..
Ministry ............... .......... ............... 1 l reh Ic gy .
Engineering ............... .......... 7 5 Architectur ........
Actuary ........................................ 3 4 Curator ........ .......
Physics ............... ........................... 3 3 Geology ............
Government Service ............ 3 3 Personnel ..............
Forestry ............... ...................... 1 3 West Point ..........
Biology ................................. 6 1 No Report ..
(14


1932 32
.... .... . 2
.... .... .. 0
2
0
2
0



0


.......... 0
0
24


1933-:11
2
2
2
2
0
21


0


0
0
1


15
1








STUDIES FOR IMPROVEMENT


Since our last report a number of studies have been made by the Dean with the
help of the Assistant Dean and the faculty to obtain facts about many things that
relate to the College of Arts and Sciences and its progress. These investigations
have led, in several cases, to improvement in our educational policy and to a better
understanding of college-student relationships. In certain instances the President
suggested the study, and the staff members of other colleges of the University
participated. The results obtained from five of the studies (four of which were
initiated by the Dean) will now be given:

1. Lower Division, Honors, Etc.:

Beginning in September, 1933, students entering the College of Arts and Sci-
ences were enrolled in the Lower Division for orientation, preparation for major
and minor studies, and elimination of the unfit. Those who satisfy specific re-
quirements while in the Lower Division are admitted to the Upper Division, from
which the better students are graduated with Honors or with High Honors. Inde-
pendent study and comprehensive examinations are provided for the better students
and are required of those who graduate with High Honors. An advisory committee
is appointed for each student in the Upper Division to aid him with his selection of
courses and with any other matter which he may wish to bring to it.
2. Selection of Appointees:
Several years ago the University adopted a policy for promotion of staff mem-
bers, based upon nine educational fundamentals. This year the heads of the de-
partments of the College endorsed a set of principles to be used in determining
whether a candidate possesses the characteristics desirable in an appointee to the
faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences, and devised an extended list of desir-
able qualifications. Among other qualifications approved by the heads of the de-
partments is that of the Ph.D. degree as the standard for appointees above the
rank of instructor, and the Master's degree for instructors with the further quali-
fication that they be of Ph.D. caliber. It was understood that these policies or
principles should not be construed as set requirements, but should be employed
for guidance. We feel sure that in time this study will elevate the general level
of our faculty. A detailed report of this subject, including conclusions reached,
has been filed with the President.
3. Information from Graduates:
For more than a year we have been making a study of the graduates of the
College of Arts and Sciences. How do they fare after leaving college? What are
the points of strength and weakness of the college training, as conceived by them,
after they have met the world on its own ground? These things and many others
we wished to know in order better to serve present and future alumni. Informa-
tion was procured from questionnaires mailed to the graduates. Limitation of
space here prevents even a partial discussion of the principal features and their
usefulness. Suffice it to say that a large percentage of our graduates are either
gainfully employed, or pursuing graduate studies. Indeed, sixty-nine of every hun-
dred who replied have at one time or another taken graduate work. The replies,
taken as a whole, show the graduates of the College are making splendid contribu-
tions to society. An outline of this material has been filed with the President.

65








4. Astronomy, A Neglected Subject:
Lack of effective work in astronomy has been a weakness in the curriculum
of the College of Arts and Sciences. During some years, in fact, no course in as-
tronomy has been given. During the last year, Dr. J. H. Kusner, of the Depart-
ment of Mathematics spent considerable time voluntarily and without compensation
in the attempt to develop an interest in astronomy. He fostered formation of the
Astronomy Club and became its faculty advisor.
Dr. Kusner has also conducted research on meteors in cooperation with the
American Meteor Society, of the work of which in Florida lie has become director.
In addition to the supervision of the local observations, in which about fifty per-
sons have participated during the last two years, he has organized and trained
more than twenty groups of observers over the State. This work has included
preparation of maps, record sheets, complete direction for observation, and exten-
sive correspondence. The results have been listed regularly in the reports of the
American Meteor Society.
During this period Dr. Kusner has carried on work in variable star observation
under supervision of the Harvard Observatory. On the basis of this work he was
elected to membership in the American Association of Variable Star Observers.
He delivered twenty-three radio addresses on astronomy during the last year be-
sides giving talks before organizations.
These and many other activities verify Dr. Kusner's enthusiasm for astronomy.
The success of his voluntary service is evidence that he will develop our work in
astronomy, if placed in charge.
Neglect of astronomy in the University should be remedied. I have conferred
separately and jointly with the Head of the Department of Mathematics under
whose direction Dr. Kusner now is, and with the Head of the Physics Department,
under whose supervision the work in astronomy is now listed but quiescent. We
have agreed that our educational program will be greatly improved by removing
astronomy from the Department of Physics to the Department of Mathematics and
placing Dr. Kusner in charge of it. This would mean that an extra man for Mathe-
matics would be needed. I heartily recommend that this be done.
5. Physical Condition and Building Needs:
A committee composed of eight instructors representing as many departments
was appointed in November, 1933, to study the physical condition of the College of
Arts and Sciences and to make recommendations for its building program. The
Committee during eight months carried on its survey and recently presented its
report and recommendations. Some of the more important excerpts from the re-
port, and at times a summary, will now be given:
It is admitted that in the life of every university the college of arts and sciences
is the heart of the institution. This fact has been recognized at the University of
Florida since its founding in 1905. for every college on the campus is dependent
upon the College of Arts and Sciences for basic courses. The important part the
College plays in furnishing basic training for all other colleges is indicated by the
fact that 60 per cent of the students taught by instructors in the departments of
the College of Arts and Sciences are registered in other colleges of the University.
The College, when we consider the number of student-credit hours taught for
the first semester of 1933-34, instructs 56.56 per cent of those taught in the entire
University. In the number of students enrolled, the College again leads the others.

66








The largest single teaching staff of any college in the University is found in the
College of Arts and Sciences and the majority of the entire teaching staff of the
University is affiliated with the College. The exact percentage is 51.22.

Since the College teaches 56.56 per cent of the student-credit hours in the Univer-
sity, has a greater enrollment than any other college on the campus, and has a
teaching staff larger than all other colleges combined, one would naturally expect
to find this College well cared for in physical facilities. However, such is not the
case, for the College of Arts and Sciences has never been provided with a new
building for its exclusive use. Even Language Hall, which was built partially and
primarily for Arts and Sciences, has also been used for other purposes as well.
Even now more than one-half of the facilities and space in that building is being
used by units other than the College of Arts and Sciences. Our only modern and
exclusive building has been acquired by the inclusion of the former College of
Pharmacy as a School in the College of Arts and Sciences. This is used only by
some of the science departments, and it is now over-crowded.

Figures obtained from the Registrar on enrollment and student-credit hours lead
to the conclusion that more students are using the facilities of the College of Arts
and Sciences, distributed as they are in ten different buildings, than are using any
other unit of the University. The only possible unit that might be used to as great
an extent by the students of the University is the Library. Consequently, in order
to ascertain the facts, a Library survey was conducted for two representative weeks
in order to determine two things: (1) How many students used the Library during
the given period: and (2) How many student hours were spent in the Library.
During the first week. 8.430 individuals entered the Library: during the second
week. 8.087. When these figures are interpreted in terms of student hours spent
in the Library, they become 7,304 and 5.872 respectively, which gives an average
of 5.588. This average use of the Library per week in terms of student hours is
in marked contrast with the use per week of the College of Arts and Sciences,
namely, 16,334. This latter figure does not take into consideration the fact that
when the Library survey was conducted every individual entering the Library was
counted, whereas only students actually using the Arts and Sciences facilities
on a credit-hour basis were considered in the Registrar's report. If the use of the
facilities by the faculty together with student conferences, committee meetings, and
additional hours for laboratory work had been added to the figures compiled by the
Registrar, the total would have exceeded greatly the figures of 16,334 which is
already more than twice that of the Library. A conservative conclusion is that
students use the facilities of the College three times as much as they use the Library.
An additional conclusion from these figures is that the buildings of the College of
Arts and Sciences should be centrally located.

It is common practice for two or more members of the teaching staff to be
assigned to a single office. This is in marked contrast to the unanimous opinion
of the heads of the departments, that in no case should more than one instructor
occupy an office.
Sixty-seven members of the staff and three secretaries are crowded into fifty-one
offices, some of which are crudely partitioned from classrooms and are unsuited to
office use. Of the sixty-seven staff members, only thirty-one have offices that are








supposed to be for their sole use, and even some of these are shared with students
or graduate assistants doing research. Of the fifty-one available offices, thirteen
are poor as to size, lighting, and ventilation. Eighteen are usable and the re-
mainder are regarded as good.
The classroom situation of the College is comparable with the office condition:
The classrooms that are used by our teaching staff are found in nine different
buildings. Nineteen of these classrooms are distinctly undesirable because of size,
makeshift nature, and location in basements and attics. Many have beams running
perpendicularly through the center of them, obstructing vision. Nine classrooms
should not be given the title classroom, since four are in reality laboratories which
have been forced into service as classrooms. Five classes are held in offices.
Of the twenty-five laboratories now used by the College, only five are considered
large enough. Nine are desirable, four good, one fair, and the majority undesirable.
Six are sufficiently equipped; equipment in nineteen is so inadequate that work is
greatly handicapped. The Departments of Physics, Biology, and Psychology report
their laboratories unsatisfactory in many respects. The Departments of Chemistry,
Pharmacy, Pharmacology, and Pharmacognosy report crowded conditions although
present laboratories are reasonably well equipped and satisfactory in all respects
except size and number.
As a remedy for the situation, the committee recommends that the College of Arts
and Sciences be given additional facilities in the physical plant of the University.
This can be accomplished (1) by the erection of one new building for the College of
Arts and Sciences, (2) the addition to one other, and (3) the taking over entirely of
one of the buildings now partially used by the College. Each of the existing colleges
would have more space for its departments in its own building if our departments
were removed to their own buildings.
(1) It seems desirable to care for our needs in units rather than in one single
building on account of the advisability of separating the laboratory sciences from
the departments which confine their activities to classrooms. Consequently one
of the units in question should be a lecture hall. In order to accommodate the
needs of the College, this should contain approximately thirty classrooms and fifty
offices for present use. Thirty-six classrooms, sixty offices, and two laboratories
should be included if it is desirable to plan for expansion.
(2) Another unit should be the completion of the present Chemistry Building,
thus providing for the needs of the Departments of Chemistry, Pharmacy, Pharma-
cology, Pharmacognosy, and Physics. This addition should contain at least eight
classrooms, ten offices, four combination offices and research laboratories, fourteen
laboratories, and the enlargement of two present laboratories, ten research labora-
tories, and twelve miscellaneous rooms. While, if expansion is considered,
the numbers above should be increased to eleven classrooms, fourteen offices, seven
combination offices and research laboratories, sixteen laboratories and the enlarge-
ment of two, sixteen research laboratories, and fourteen miscellaneous rooms.
(3) Biology and Geology could be cared for in their present quarters in Science
Hall if the other departments were removed.
The Committee strongly recommends that the buildings for the College of Arts
and Sciences be centrally located so that they can more conveniently serve the other
colleges whose basic courses are taught by this College.

68









THE FACULTY
The faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences, while smaller, is stronger in
scholarship and experience than it was at the time of our last report. The present
staff, exclusive of Pharmacy, has sixty-seven members, of whom thirty-five hold
the Ph.D. degree; twenty-two appear in American Men of Science; seven in Leaders
in Education; eight in Who's Who in America; twenty are members of Sigma Xi.
It may be said parenthetically that all of the teachers of pharmacy hold the doctor's
degree, are Sigma Xi's and are listed in American Men of Science.

Educational Advancement:
During this biennium most of the members of the faculty have engaged in activi-
ties looking toward their professional improvement. The names of the most con-
spicuous who have studied elsewhere and who deserve special mention follow:
Assistant Professor IR. C. Beaty, Department of Sociology, is studying this summer at
the University of North Carolina. Professor A. P. Black, Department of Chemistry, obtained
a leave of absence for study and was awarded the Ph.D. degree from the University of Iowa
in January, 1933. Associate Professor A.A. Bless, Department of Physics, visited a number
of universities in Germany, Russia, and France in the summer of 1932 and is working in the
X-ray laboratories of Cornell during the summer of 1934. Professor C. L. Crow, Department
of German and Spanish, spent one summer of the biennium in Spain studying at Centro de
Estudios IIistoricos in Madrid. Instructor F. M. DeGaetani, Department of German and
Spanish, has studied in the summers at the Alliance Francaise in Paris and at Columbia.
Instructor A. S. Green, Department of History and Political Science, was granted a leave of
absence for study toward the doctorate at the University of Illinois during 1933-34.
Associate Professor W. B. Hathaway. Department of German and Spanish, attended the
School of Spanish at Middlebury College during the summer of 1934. Instructor 0. H. Haupt-
mann, Department of German and Spanish, was awarded the Ph.D. degree in 1933 by the
University of Wisconsin. Instructor T. J. Higgins, Department of German and Spanish, has
won credit for a full year of work beyond the Master's degree and is continuing his study
during the summer of 1934 at the University of Iowa. Associate Professor T. H. Hubbell,
Department of Biology and Geology, was awarded the Ph.D. degree by the University of
Michigan in February, 1924, and is working at the Museum of Zoology there this summer.
Instructor R. W. Huston, Department of French, has continued his work toward the doctorate
by attending summer sessions at Columbia. Instructor S. W. Mclnnis, Department of Mathe-
matics, has been pursuing work toward the doctorate during the summer sessions at Duke.
Instructor W. E. Moore, Department of English, has had leave of absence for study toward
the doctorate at Columbia during 1933-34.
Instructor C. I. Mosier. Department of Psychology, has been continuing his study toward
the doctorate at Chicago during the summers. Instructor C. E. Mounts, Department of English,
has spent two summers at Duke University pursuing work toward the Ph.D). degree. Assistant
Professor Z. M. Pirenian, Department of Mathematics, has been continuing work toward the
doctorate at the University of Chicago during the summers. Professor C. A. Robertson, De-
partment of English, was granted leave of absence, 1933-34, for study toward the doctor's
degree at Harvard. During the same year Instructor H. E. Spivey, Department of English,
obtained an exchange instructorship and studied toward the doctor's degree at the University
of North Carolina. Instructor D. C. Swanson, Department of Physics, spent the last four
summers at Cornell studying for the doctorate. Professor R. C. Williamson, Department of
Physics, spent the summer of 1933 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Investigating
the Raman Effect.
In addition to the members of the faculty who have been improving their scholar-
ship by studying in other universities, many have reported individual studies upon
which they are engaged; others have traveled with the purpose of strengthening
their professional relationships and understanding. Many members of the faculty
have given papers before state and national organizations claiming their respective
interests. An unknown number of addresses on divers subjects have been delivered
before educational and professional bodies. Radio addresses alone to the number
of 137 were given last year by the College staff.
Members of the staff have held important positions in a number of national bodies.
They have served faithfully on many local and extended committees. The spirit
of cooperation and cordiality among the faculty is splendid.

Changes in Personnel:
Dr. L. B. Tribolet, Assistant Professor of History and Political Science, resigned in
September, 1933. M. J. Dauer, Ph.D., University of Illinois, was appointed an Instructor in
the Department and promoted to Assistant Professor in 1934.
69









Instructor V. E. Wilson, Department of Psychology, was granted a leave of absence in
1933-34, and resigned July 1, 1034. C. I. Mosier, B.A., University of Florida, was appointed
Acting-Instructor in September, 1933, and Instructor on July 1, 1934. A. M. Muckenfuss,
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, served as Acting Professor of Agricultural Chemistry during the first
semester of 1932-33 in the absence of Professor A. P. Black.

The budgetary reduction for the present biennium caused a loss to the College of
Arts and Sciences of five teachers and a stenographer-librarian, besides graduate
and student assistants.
RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

Many members of the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences have been
active in creative work during the present biennium and in addition to their regular
schedules of teaching have carried out programs of research, some of it inde-
pendently, some with the aid of graduate students. The more important of these
studies which have been reported to the Dean follow, with exception of those con-
cerning the staff of the School of Pharmacy, which will be given in the report on
that School:

Department of Bible:
Professor L. W. Buchholz-The Progress of Florida's Public Schools Through Teacher-
Training (a special assignment in progress).
Department of Biology and Geology:
Assistant Professor C. F. Byers has published three papers in the Florida Naturalist and
l as had papers published in Entomological News. Associate Professor T. II. Hubbell has pub-
lished three papers through the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan, has had papers
published in the Annals of the American Entomological Society. He has published monographs
of the Rhaphidiphorinae, and various groups of Orthoptera ; and has The Orthoptera of Florida
in progress. Professor J. S. Rogers has published three papers in Ecological Monographs and
has in progress papers on Ecology and Geographic Affiliation of Crane-flies of Southern Appa-
lachians; Physiological Li',fe-Histories of Several Species of Crane-flies: Monographic Revisions
of Genera Nephrotoma, Dicranoptycha, and Certain Groups of Tipula. Associate Professor
H. B. Sherman has published papers in the Journal of Mamnmalogy, and has nearly completed
a paper on The Reproductive Cycle in the Bat. Tadarida Culno.ephala, and Ecological Distribu-
tion of Mammals of the Gainesville Region. Curator II. K. Wallace has published papers on
The Spiders of Florida.
Department of Chemistry:
Professor W. H. Beisler has carried on research on tung oil, peanut oil, the drying of
phosphate rock, and the preservation of Florida cane juice in collaboration with Professor
J. P. Wilson. Professor Beisler and Professor F. H. Heath have been revising their General
Chemistry Laboratory Manual and Quiz Book, publication of which is expected soon. Professor
A. P. Black has published papers on the Formation of Floe by A luminum Sulfate, Formation
of Floe by Ferric Coagulants (two articles), Oleoresin from Individual Trees of Slash anld
Longleaf Pine. He has ready for publication papers on Coagulation with Ferric Comnounds,
Determination of Hydrogenion Activity and Buffer Capacity of Natural and Treated Waters,
Determination of Physical and Chemical Constants of Gunm Rosin. Associate Professor V. T.
Jackson has devised modifications of the Victor Meyer apparatus and the Cottrell apparatus.
and has continued investigations on rosin and turpentine. Professor T. R. Leigh has published
A Study of the Graduates of the College of Arts and Sciences, I ,........r,, ,, Florida, and'
reports on The Establishment of a Pharmacy Corps ',n the United 'n l. 1... and The New
World Calendar. Assistant Professor C. B. Pollard has published papers on Derivatives of
Piperazine I, II, III; and Value of Research. Cooperative projects in progress.
Department of French:
Professor E'. G. Atkin has published four book reviews.
Department of Journalism :
Professor E. J. Emig has published an article listing dates, titles, and locations of
Florida files of newspapers. 1845-1876. He is now directing, as Florida Chairman, compilation
of the bibliography of all Florida newspapers from colonial times to the present.
Department of Mathematics:
Assistant Professor B. F. Dostal has published papers on Dynamical and Statistical
Foundation for Weather Forecasting in Florida, Quantum Mechanics, etc. Assistant Professor
H. H. Germond has written a paper on A Graphical Technique in Methods of -Least Squares,
etc. Professor F. W. Kokomoor is completing his study of seventeenth century geometries
begun several years ago, three articles of which have been published, and has submitted for
publication a paper on The Status of Mathematics in the Dark Ages. Assistant Professor
J. H. Kusner has conducted research on meteors and has in preparation a textbook of mathe-
matics. Professor W. H. Wilson has a research paper on a certain general functional equa-
tion practically ready for submission for publication, and has three or four papers in prepara-
tion on the subject of vocational and educational intent.
70








Department of Physics:
Associate Professor A. A. Bless has been carrying on research on effects of X-rays on
organisms and also upon dielectrics. He has published papers on The Aim of a Course in
Science; Physics and Mathematics Preparation: and Cookbook Laboratory Work. Instructor
H. L. Knowles is investigating the Allison Method of Magneto-optic chemical analysis. Pro-
fessor R. C. Williamson has carried on research on the determination of minute traces of
metals by means of spectrochemical analysis (a collaborative project with the Exeriment
Station), to be continued; and on photo-electric cells (collaborating with Instructor H. L.
Knowles), which is still in progress.
Department of Psychology:
Associate Professor E. D. Hinckley has published papers on the Validity of Attitude
Measurements. For the research projects completed by the Bureau of Vocational Guidance
and Mental Hygiene see Bulletin, University Record, Vol. XXIX, Series I, No. 6 Instructor
C. I. Mosier has a paper accepted for publication on the Factor Analysis of Neurotic Symptoms.
Assistant Professor 0. Williams has under investigation studies relative to the phenomenon
of reminiscence.
Department of Sociology:
Professor L. M. Bristol is continuing his work on social legislation in Florida.
Department of Spanish and German:
Professor C. L. Crow-A History of the University of Florida (special assignment in
progress). Instructor F. M. DeGaetani is engaged in editing the plays of Calderon, and is
collecting Spanish ballads and folklore. Instructor 0. H. Hauptmann is editing Escorial
Biblical Ms. IJ 4, and collecting Spanish ballads and folklore.
Department of Speech:
Associate Professor H. P. Constans has published A Study of Speech Work in Southern
Colleges and Universities (collaborating with Assistant Professor A. A. Hopkins). Professor
Constans has in preparation a survey of library facilities for study in Speech in 150 Southern
colleges and universities.
DEPARTMENTS
DEPARTMENT OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES
Only one half-time professor is listed for Ancient Languages in the budget of
the College, the remainder of the course being taught by the Dean of the Graduate
School, who is also Head of this Department. From a quantitative viewpoint the
condition of the classical studies is not encouraging. The tendency against the
study of the ancient languages and literature seems still strong, however regret-
table to some of us.
DEPARTMENT OF BIBLE
The courses in this Department have been improved and enlarged. Department
heads of the University of Chicago and Yale and other divinity schools and the
Missionary Research Library have been consulted in regard to texts and bibliogra-
phies for these courses. Maps and charts have been secured. The library of bibli-
cal literature is very limited and should be supplemented. A careful study is now
being made in the selection of books. Only those recommended by the ablest Ameri-
can and British authorities have been purchased during the present biennium.
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY
This Department has four fundamental plans and objectives; namely, (1) pres-
entation of biology as one of the scientific disciplines that constitutes a part of a
liberal education; (2) presentation of adequate pre-medical work in biology; (3)
training of students looking toward biology as a profession; (4) research contribu-
tions toward a knowledge of the biology of Florida.
The effectiveness of the Department is hampered for lack of space and equip-
ment. Its quarters have been inadequate for years. The enrollment has more than
doubled since additions have been made to the room available for departmental
use. At present the Department has approximately four square feet of floor space
per student enrolled. It should have three times this amount per student. The
equipment is less adequate than at any time within the last five years. Rigid
economy has prohibited replacements and purchase of additional apparatus in
keeping with increased enrollment.








DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY
General:
The Department reached its peak in enrollment in 1932-33. Although there was a
slight loss in the number of students taking chemistry last year, the laboratories
are still over-crowded. More research students are now enrolled than at any previ-
ous time. Space and facilities are greatly needed for them.
A few important changes have been made in the list of courses, all of a progres-
sive nature. The work in physical chemistry has been strengthened and new gradu-
ate courses have been added.
Our stock of supplies has increased slightly and of chemicals considerably. The
increase in the value of chemicals is due partly to the manufacture of fine chemicals
by the students at a cost of about one-third of their regular price. Mastic tile
flooring has been placed in some of the classrooms and advanced laboratories. A
limited amount of new equipment has been added during the biennium, an inventory
of which along with our other supplies was filed with the Business Manager in
the summer of 1934.

Agricultural Chemistry:
No changes were made in the undergraduate work of Agricultural Chemistry
during the biennium. One new graduate course, Advanced Quantitative Analysis,
was added. A considerable amount of new equipment was added.
Attention is again directed to the fact that there is no laboratory space provided
for the special requirements of agricultural chemistry. There is acute need of
Kjeldahl distillation apparatus, extractors, vacuum oven, and the like. The pres-
ent temporary installation of this equipment is not satisfactory.
The third Short Course in Water Treatment was held in 1933. The Professor of
Agricultural Chemistry was in charge. He has made valuable contributions in
research and has procured a grant of $750 for one of the graduate students whose
thesis he directed.
Chemical Engineering:
The present objective in Chemical Engineering is to have the University of
Florida accredited by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. It is not
likely that the Institute would consider one full-time faculty member as an "ade-
quate and competent faculty for teaching chemical engineering." We should have
another member rigorously trained and possessed of industrial experience.
The enrollment in Chemical Engineering (first year of the biennium, 48; second,
56) has shown a steady growth during the last several years, and it is exceeded in
the College of Engineering only by that in electrical engineering. The graduates
in Chemical Engineering have made a gratifying record in both educational and
commercial work.
The students in Chemical Engineering design and build some of the laboratory
equipment. This gives excellent training to the students and results in substantial
saving to the University. These students also do some small-scale manufacturing
of commodities used in the building.
The immediate needs in Chemical Engineering are adequate space for laboratory
instruction, some additional equipment, and an Assistant Professor. To provide
adequate space for laboratory instruction will require construction of a new wing
on the building.








DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
The Head of this Department reports: "The work of the Department of English
has been carried on as usual during the present biennium. The slight reduction in
number of students enrolled has allowed some advantageous reduction in size of
sections in the lower classes. The number of students majoring in English has
been normal.
"During the year 1933-34 three members of the staff have been on leave of absence
doing advanced work for the doctor's degree.
"The work of the Department has been satisfactory and the cooperation of the
members of the staff commendable. The reduction in salaries has worked a hard-
ship and should be remedied."
DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH
There has been a decline in student enrollment in French. The cause of the de-
crease is partly evident and partly intangible. One of the contributing factors was
a change in educational policy beyond departmental control; another was the De-
partment's initiative toward improvement in instruction, which resulted in some
sacrifice of numbers. Adjustments in the teaching staff and in the courses offered
have been made to correspond to the reduced enrollment. For the coming biennium
some additional courses are contemplated for the benefit of prospective teachers
and graduate students.
The library facilities in French, while improved, are yet inadequate, especially
for research. First consideration has been given to students' needs in the purchase
of books.
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
This Department is well established. All members of its staff hold the Ph.D.
degree except one, who is now fulfilling most of the requirements of that degree.
The number of students enrolled in the Department and the courses taught show
all the members of the staff, like most others of the College, are carrying heavy
teaching loads.
This Department is also in great need of funds for the purchase of books.
DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM
Transfer of the Department of Journalism to the College of Arts and Sciences
at the beginning of the last fiscal year constitutes a progressive step. Journalism
is essentially related to the branches taught by the College.
The courses in this Department have been so organized that a student in Arts
and Sciences may major in Journalism or may pursue the more professional cur-
riculum in Journalism.
A study shows that the enrollment in Journalism in this University compares
favorably with that of other universities whose total enrollment approximates that
of the University of Florida. On the basis of facts obtained from another study,
the University is supplying the State with approximately one-third the number of
journalistic workers it normally absorbs. We may, therefore, expect the enroll-
ment in the Department to increase at a greater rate than in the University as a
whole.
The Department needs a laboratory. It needs newspapers on file, dictionaries,
almanacs, and other sources of information at arms' length. It needs type, type
cabinets, filing cabinets, etc. Its quarters are bad and over-crowded-one class-

73








room and two offices in a basement, electric lights being required in the day time.
In spite of such handicaps, the Department has made remarkable progress.
The recommendation that the Department of Journalism operate during the
Summer Term has been transmitted to the Director of the Summer Term. There
is a real and sufficient demand for the course in journalism in the summer. Many
universities are now offering courses in journalism during the summer.

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS
This is another of our strong and large departments. The Head realizes that
"mathematics exists for a definite purpose, that it is a living organism and as such
must change and grow. . The direction and measure of growth are partly
governed by circumstances, but must also be guided by intelligent planning." The
Department has consistently pressed in two directions: (1) to strengthen the under-
graduate work, and (2) to develop graduate work.
Although the Department is using a considerable amount of equipment borrowed
from other departments, no direct request will be made at present for its own
furniture, etc.
DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY
Although courses in this Department are entirely elective, there has been a grati-
fying increase in the number of students taking them during the past two years.
There have been some rearrangement and improvement in the courses, especially
in those that are offered for graduate work. The- Department is making praise-
worthy progress.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
The personnel of this Department was reduced by one graduate assistant last
year. There was a decrease of about 7 per cent in enrollment in 1933-34. Changes
have been made in course work and method of instruction which improved them
for undergraduate major or minor subjects. Improvements have been made in the
ventilation of the lecture room and in the wiring of the laboratories. The Head
of the Department requests promotions, salary adjustments, allotment of sufficient
funds for physics literature and needed apparatus. The desirability of a modern
building for the Department is well-known, a detailed report of which has been
filed with the President.
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
INCLUDING BUREAU, VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE, AND MENTAL HYGIENE
A course in the psychology of study has been organized. The purpose of this is
to improve study methods and reading comprehension of students and to render
educational guidance. Most students who register for the course do so on the
advice of their deans. A course in legal psychology has been added to meet the
needs of pre-law students. It includes discussions of motive, bias, intention, testi-
mony, suggestibility, perjury, evidence, etc. Business Psychology, formerly a re-
quired course in the College of Business Administration, has been dropped. General
Psychology is still required of students in that College. This course has been im-
proved by the introduction of laboratory work. One section of this course has
been set aside for freshman "repeaters" and backward students so that students of
different levels of ability may be better trained and cared for.
The Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene, established in 1931,
is under direction of the Department of Psychology. Its activities have been greatly

74








extended during the last two years. A description of the work of the Bureau, with
a report of its activities, was published in a bulletin of the University Record in
June, 1934. These activities include administration of tests, scoring and interpreta-
tion of test results, interview, vocational information, mental hygiene service, and
investigations covering ability of Florida freshmen, prediction of success in college.
curriculum guidance, neurotic symptoms, aptitude test. norms, etc.

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY
There has been some increase in the number of students registering in Sociology.
as might be expected owing to the increase in practical social work throughout the
State and nation. Moreover, Sociology is now required of all students in the Col-
lege of Education and in the Department of Journalism. A valuable list of biogra-
phies has been prepared for vocational guidance and a number of articles have
been mimeographed as supplementary readings in Sociology.
The primary needs of the Department for the coming biennium are (1) an addi-
tional part-time instructor and (2) the development of training courses for social
workers.
DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH AND GERMAN
This Department shows an increased number of students doing advanced work.
Worthy of mention is the founding of a Spanish Club. known as Los Pfcaros which
has greatly increased interest in things Spanish. Courses have been revised and
new ones offered. Instructor T. J. Higgins has been placed in charge of beginning
German. The Department desires better library appropriation and feels the need
of some scholarships and fellowships.

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
The enrollment in the Department has shown a steady growth and more colleges
are urging their students to take work in this Department. This increase has
resulted in almost all sections being over-crowded and has made almost impossible
the satisfactory handling of the work by the present staff. Certain desirable
courses can not be offered even in alternate years. The result has been a too heavy
teaching load, besides the increase in extra-curricular activities. The extra-curricu-
lar work has brought the University recognition in the fields of debate, oratory.
and dramatics. The varsity intercollegiate debate accomplishments for the last
two years deserve the following enlargement:
There have been about fifty men on the squad each year; contests entered, 85;
Florida won, 37; lost, 10; non-decisions. 38. Opponents: Alabama, Boston, Buffalo,
Clark. Colgate. Dickinson. Dublin. Emory. Hopkins. Indiana. Kentucky. Louisiana.
Maine. Princeton. Tennessee. Yale, etc.
The Department, like certain others mentioned above, greatly needs the services
of an additional staff member. As soon as finances will allow a well-equipped and
properly staffed Department. ai speech correction clinic should be established under
its direction.
CHEMISTRY-PHARVMACY LIBRARY
The Chemistry-Pharmacy Library is a unit of the Main Library. Therefore, the
report on it has been made to the University Librarian.
It has been the custom, however, to include the salary of the departmental
librarian in our budget: a few remarks on that subject are required here. During
the present biennium no funds have been available for that purpose. This has

75








caused a great hardship. The Library has been kept open by employing graduate
assistants. Dividing the responsibility for the Library with its thousands of dollars
worth of technical books among ten or twelve student assistants was an emergency
measure, and one that should be discontinued at the earliest possible moment. We
urgently recommend the restoration of the salary of the departmental librarian-
stenographer.
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
GENERAL STATEMENT
The report on the School of Pharmacy has been prepared after several confer-
ences with the Director to whom, in fact, the chief credit should be given for the
form in which it is now presented. It is made in accordance with the Constitution
of the University which sets forth the organization of the School of Pharmacy as
follows:
I. The Department of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology
II. The Department of Pharmacy
III. The Pharmacy Library
IV. The Medicinal Plant Garden
Certain information concerning the School as a whole will be presented before
taking up its divisions.
As a result of reorganization during the spring of 1933, which became effective
on July 1 of that summer, the College of Pharmacy, as previously stated, was
changed to a School and was made a unit of the College of Arts and Sciences. With
this change one full-time instructor was eliminated, the stenographer-librarian was
eliminated, the Dean was appointed Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences-
thus, in part, reducing his services to Pharmacy-and the School of Pharmacy left
without stenographic and clerical service. The School was placed under administra-
tion of a Director and the Professor of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology was
appointed Director of the School of Pharmacy and Professor of Pharmacognosy
and Pharmacology.
As a result of reorganization during the spring of 1933, which became effective
duties of the former Dean, and at the same time, due to elimination of one full-
time instructor, had to assume direct responsibility for all classroom and laboratory
instruction of the Department (except one course which was assigned to a pro-
fessor of pharmacy), direct the research work of six graduate students, direct the
operation of the Medicinal Plant Garden, and assume responsibility for all office
work of the Director and Professor of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology. In
October a part-time stenographer was provided to help with office and clerical
work. The Department of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology offers as a minimum
19 clock hours of class and laboratory instruction during the first term and 29
clock hours during the second term. By assigning laboratory work to graduate
assistants the teaching load for the Director and Professor of Pharmacognosy and
Pharmacology was reduced to 14 hours actually spent in the classroom every week.
This is considered a full teaching load without the additional duties, as outlined
above. Furthermore, to reduce the teaching load, all students were induced to select
the same elective. This cannot continue with justice to students, nor with an in-
creased enrollment in upper classes such as we will have in the next biennium.
Furthermore, in order to keep the Chemistry-Pharmacy Library open, graduate
assistants were assigned to library duty 61 hours per week. which, with the labora-

76








tory duties above mentioned and duties in connection with the Medicinal Plant
Garden, means an overload for graduate assistants.
From the above, it is evident that all members of the Department of Pharma-
cognosy and Pharmacology are carrying overloads. This is not conducive to effi-
cient and effective instruction. The Director should not spend more than 10 hours
a week in the classroom if he is to give reasonable attention to other important
duties. In order to relieve this condition the full-time instructor should be restored
at the earliest opportunity. A full-time secretary should be provided to handle the
stenographic and clerical work in the office of the Director.
The full-time instructor would have 10 to 12 hours of class and laboratory teach-
ing plus direction of the Medicinal Plant Garden during the first term and 19 hours
plus direction of the Garden during the second term, which would be a heavy load.
This could be reduced somewhat with the aid of graduate assistants. This is assum-
ing that the Director should not spend more than 10 hours in the classroom and
that a professor of pharmacy continue to handle the course in pharmacology
assigned to him in 1933-34.
In addition to the above, there are two other essential needs that should be given
earnest consideration: namely. (1) additional classroom, laboratory, and office
space; (2) dispensing of medicines to university students in cooperation with the
Student Health Service Department.
Inasmuch as our needs pertaining to classrooms, laboratories, and offices have
been referred to a general committee, this matter will not be discussed herein.
A plan for dispensing medicines to university students by the School of Pharmacy
would be of distinct value to the Student Health Service, the university students,
and the School of Pharmacy. It would relieve the Student Health Department of
the necessity of preparing medicinal preparations and thus permit physicians and
nurses to devote more time to patients. Preparations which are now purchased in
prepared form could be made in pharmacy laboratories at reduced cost. It would
insure to students pure and dependable medicines prepared and dispensed under
direction and supervision of experts. It would provide an opportunity to give
students of pharmacy practical instruction in the art and science of pharmacy and
thus prepare them to render a higher type of health service after graduation.
Enrollment for the year 1932-33 was 57 and for 1933-34 it was 73, the largest in
the history of the School. In addition, there were thirteen graduate students pur-
suing majors in the School of Pharmacy in 1932-33 and twelve in 1933-34.
During the biennium thirty-four degrees were awarded. Fifteen students were
granted the diploma of Graduate in Pharmacy, ten the degree of Bachelor of Sci-
ence in Pharmacy, eight the degree of Master of Science in Pharmacy, and one the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. The Doctor's, like the Master's degree, is prop-
erly awarded under the jurisdiction of the Graduate School.
The members of the faculty, in addition to faithful attention to teaching duties.
are continuing to do some research and also maintaining activity in state and na-
tional associations and pharmaceutical problems. All members of the faculty have
attended the meetings of the American Pharmaceutical Association, where they took
part in programs and served on committees. One member of our faculty is spending
the summer of 1934 in Europe in study at one of the leading universities and also
visiting other educational institutions and chemical and pharmaceutical manufac-
turing concerns.








Summer courses in the School of Pharmacy were given for the first time during
the summer term of 1934. Both undergraduate and graduate courses were given.
Drug clerks and apprentices who are interested in improving their knowledge of
pharmacy have the opportunity to do so by enrolling in summer courses. Founda-
tion courses such as chemistry, botany, and bacteriology as well as professional
courses such as pharmacognosy and pharmacology are offered during the summer
term.
DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY
Improvements in instruction during the biennium: (1) The use of the stere-
opticon and reflectoscope in projection of slides and pictures of medicinal plants
under discussion has been extended. Fifty additional slides were secured during
the biennium, making a total of 150 slides of medicinal plants, many of which are
colored. (2) The use of the Simple Projector has been extended in the micro-
scopic study of plants and plant tissues. A student assigned to this department
under the FERA prepared 750 slides. These slides were prepared in sets of about
20. The use of stereopticon and microscopic slides has aroused keen interest on
the part of students and produced a noticeable scholastic improvement. (3) More
emphasis has been placed on First Aid and classroom demonstrations on First Aid
have been introduced. (4) The scope of the course in New Remedies has been
extended and approximately 500 samples of newer remedies were obtained gratis
from manufacturing concerns for study and illustration. (5) The course in Prin-
ciples of Biologicals has been made a required course in the four-year curriculum.
This course has been commended by druggists who have employed students who
have taken it as very practical and essential to the well-informed druggist.
Nine research projects of significance in the field of plant products and pharma-
ceutics have been completed during the biennium.
Kirby-Smith Herbarium: The General Edmund Kirby-Smith Memorial Herbarium
was donated to the School of Pharmacy, University of Florida, by the heirs of
General Edmund Kirby-Smith, and was received by the School of Pharmacy in
February, 1933 The collection was inspected by the Professor of the Department
of Pharmacognosy, and a list was compiled of all species. The number of speci-
mens was counted and these were arranged in groups in special catalog binders.
This herbarium is stored in special dust-proof and moth-proof metal cases which
are located in the Pharmacognosy Laboratory of the School of Pharmacy. Across
the top of each is the inscription-"The General Edmund Kirby-Smith Herbarium."
The need of additional equipment is acute. Among such needs are-extraction
apparatus; a good balance; vacuum distilling equipment; drug mills; fanning mill;
drying ovens, and display and storage cases. As stated above, we have received
about 500 samples of new remedies for study and illustration, but because of lack
of display cases we are compelled to store wherever we can find space, thus tem-
porarily nullifying the educational value of these display sets.
DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY
Improvements in Instruction: (1) Prescription practice and dispensing-25,000
prescriptions obtained from drug stores and hospitals in several states were studied
and conferences held with retail and hospital pharmacists. From this was learned
the frequency of different types of prescriptions and this information utilized in
class and laboratory instruction. (2) A student assigned to this department under
the FERA prepared a bibliography and abstracts of material dealing with pre-








scriptions and dispensing. (3) A second student assigned under the FERA pre-
pared a file of 2,000 references on current literature on Pharmacy. Materials
needed for 60 experiments in Organic Pharmacy were itemized and the cost was
determined. (4) The Professor of Pharmacy is spending the summer of 1934 in
Europe studying at pharmaceutical centers and universities.
For each of the two years of this biennium $1,000 was awarded by the Ameri-
can Pharmaceutical Association to this department to carry on a study of Drug
Extraction. Louis Magid, a graduate of the School of Pharmacy of this University
was assigned to carry out this work. Several other graduate students were assigned
related problems on Drug Extraction, in accordance with the terms of the grant.
The reports on this work have been highly commended by the Research Committee
of the American Pharmaceutical Association.
Research: A summary of the research work of this department during, the bi-
ennium follows: (1) The Antiseptic Value of Phenol Ointments; (2) Enteric Coat-
i:y of Capsules; (3) The Effect of Various Compounds Upon the Stability of Hydri-
odic Acid; (4) The Stability of Solution of Iron and Ammonium Acetate; (5) A
1933 Model of Donovan's Solution ; (6) Recent Advances in Prescription Work;
(7) The Accuracy of Medicine Droppers with Flared Tips; (8) The Protection of
Prescription Labels with Lacquer; (9) A Phytochemical Investigation of the Oleo-
resin of Pinus Monticola; (10) The Methane Series of Hydrocarbons (cooperative).
Supplies needed:
The funds provided for current supplies should be increased. During the past
year there has been a greater demand on these supplies due to larger enrollment.
(The enrollment in the department was 84 in 1931-32 and 117 during the first
term and 103 during the second term of 1933-34.) The annual expense 'vas esti-
mated at $500, but actually was $640 for 1933-34, a loss to the department. Further,
the inventory of drugs, chemicals, and miscellaneous supplies was $1,630 in 1933
and $1,150 in 1934, a loss of $480 during the year. It is obvious that this can not
continue.
THE PHARMACY LIBRARY
The Pharmacy Library is a part of the Chemistry-Pharmacy Library, a unit of
the University Library, and is used regularly by students of Pharmacy and Chem-
istry and occasionally by others.
The report on this unit of the Main Library has been presented previously under
the title of The Chemistry-Pharmacy Library.
MEDICINAL PLANT GARDEN
The Medicinal Plant Garden is maintained for purposes set forth in previous
reports.
During the biennium improvements have been made as follows: (1) Driveway-
the garden entrance has been greatly improved by leveling the roadway, planting
grass, planting hedges of cardamon and lavender; (2) relocating trees and shrubs
to more suitable areas and groupings; (3) planting of demonstration beds of plants,
such as ginger, cardamon, curcuma, and lavender; (4) moving of barn and animal
pens to a less conspicuous location; (5) digging drainage ditches and construction
of dikes to prevent flooding; (6) introduction of 16 new species of plants; (7)
seeds for seven new species of plants were secured from India and planted.
Answering of inquiries which call for information regarding medicinal plants has
been continued. Garden records have made it possible to furnish information con-

79








cerning-(1) culture of medicinal plants; (2) marketing and market values: (3)
plant identification; (4) sources of seed and propagating stock. These inquiries
averaged one a day throughout the biennium.

The garden catalog has been kept up-to-date by adding to it each year the plants
that are introduced, and removing those that have died.

The garden map is revised each year. Constant changing of plants and improve-
ments make this necessary.

Considerable research was carried out during the first year of the biennium,
covering largely cultural methods and analysis of products grown in the garden.
Due to elimination of one full-time instructor and other economies it was absolutely
impossible to continue this as before.

SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS
The recommendations of the School of Pharmacy may be summarized as follows:
(1) that a full-time stenographer be provided for the office of the Director; (2)
that the instructor in pharmacognosy and pharamcology, dropped July 1, 1933, be
restored for the ensuing biennium; (3) that an increase in salaries be granted;
(4) that an increase be allowed for current expenses for the Department of Phar-
macy; (5) that funds be provided for additional equipment.

BUDGET
Careful study has been exercised in the preparation of the budget of the College
of Arts and Sciences, including the School of Pharmacy, which follows. The recom-
mendations of the heads of the departments have been reviewed and numerous con-
ferences have been held. In considering the merits of the individual members of
the faculty, the four suggestions made by the President as worthy of consideration
have been given careful attention.

Many of our teachers deserve restoration of their salary to the former level;
however, increases to that degree have not been recommended by the Dean. Most
increases which have been made are very small. In certain outstanding cases, an
increase at least partially commensurate with the merit of the particular teacher
has been made in the budget. A very few additional but greatly needed employees
have been added for reasons set forth in this report, but the total budget remains
much less than that of the previous biennium, 1931-33.

Respectfully submitted,
TOWNES R. LEIGH, Dean.








REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

TEACHING DIVISION
To the President of the University.

SIR: I respectfully submit the following report of the Teaching Division of the
College of Agriculture for the biennium ending June 30, 1934.
There has been a reduction of nearly 20 per cent in attendance during the bi-
ennium July 1, 1932, to July 1, 1934, from the preceding one, due doubtless to the
seriousness of the economic depression on agriculture. A larger number than usual
entered for the second term of 1933-34, reflecting the improved conditions of the
rural sections.
The teaching staff was reduced by budget economies this biennium by one assist-
ant professor, four instructors, and one herdsman. Of the fourteen now employed,
including the Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, who is on the budget of the
Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, and two who are employed
each one-half time, six hold Ph.D. degrees, one M.D., one D.V.M., five M.S. One
remains to be selected before next session begins.
Dr. John E. Turlington, who for eighteen years has been a professor in the col-
lege and who since organization of the Department of Agricultural Economics in
1926 has served as its efficient head, has been forced by ill health to take a leave
of absence for the next academic year. Dr. C. V. Noble has been selected as head
of the department for the year, while retaining his position and duties in the
corresponding department in the Extension Service and Experiment Station. Dr.
Noble has been closely associated with Dr. Turlington since coming to Florida and
can plan and administer the work more easily and smoothly than any other. A
new assistant professor is now being sought to do the necessary teaching in the
absence of Dr. Turlington.
ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS
The College Farm, essential to practical instruction, is being kept equipped and
maintained in as good condition as funds available will permit. The farm build-
ings are all of wood, some of them more than twenty-five years old, so repairs,
painting, and other upkeep expenses are large.
FERA labor during the last winter and spring has aided in improving the pas-
turage on the wooded area by additional thinning out of small and undesirable
trees, and deepening and extending ditches.
Last year the gift of a young Brahmin bull was received from Lykes Brothers,
stockmen, and this year a heifer of the same breed was given by Pat Johnston,
another cattle man. These are valuable for breeding and judging purposes.

ADDITIONS TO CURRICULUM
One-week short courses are being offered during the session of 1934-35: in Citrus
Culture in October, Animal Husbandry and Dairying in November, Floriculture
and Vegetable Growing in December. These courses have been arranged with a
view to making the facilities of the college available to growers and stockmen who
cannot come for longer periods.
NEEDS
The importance of training for agricultural leadership in a State where develop-
ing and maintaining its rural resources are as important as they are in Florida,

81









prompts the request for an increase of $5,000 a year for the next biennium, to be
distributed as indicated in the budget submitted.
These items are mainly moderate increases in salary to workers who have at
considerable sacrifice attended University summer terms studying for advanced
degrees, that they may better qualify themselves for the efficient performance of
their duties, and for those who have given themselves untiringly to meeting the
demands for information through special studies and investigation outside of their
regularly assigned duties while faithfully teaching their classes.
Some other needs for reasonable growth and development when conditions are
more favorable for their attainment are:

Additional Instructors
A assistant P professor of F forestry ...................................................................................................... ............... $ 2,500
In stru ctor in D a iry in g ...................................................................................................................................................... 1,8 00
Instructor in Botany and Bacteriology ....................................... ......................................... ............... 1,800
Additional Equipment
600 sq. ft.. cold storage unit for dairy products and meats ............................................... 40.000
Equipm ent for dairy m manufacturing laboratory ......................................... ........................ ................... 10,000
Additional equipment for horticulture, including laboratory equipment, new
plantings and modern machinery for cultivation ................................................................ 4,000
Additional equipment in Agricultural Engineering ............ .. .................................. 5,000
Equipment for Entomology and Plant Pathology, modern sprayer and other
m a ch in ery ............................................ ........ ......................................... ............................. ....... ...................... 2 ,0 0 0
Equipment for Soils Laboratory ................ ..... ................ ...... ................. 2,000
Equipment for Botany and Bacteriology laboratories ........................................................... 2.000
E eight purebred G uernsey cow s ................ ............................................................................................................. 2,000
E eight purebred H olstein-F riesian cow s ........................................................ ................................................ 2,000
T w o b ro o d m a re s .................................................................................................................................................................. 5 5 0
2,000 sq. ft., Judging Pavilion ................... .. ...... ........ ............. 15,000
One hundred acres additional land to be used for pasture purposes, growing of
field crops, providing adequate fields for instructional work in vegetable
grow ing and grove plantings .. ............................................................................................................ 5,000
Fencing and preparing land for utilization ................................................................................................... 3.000
Respectfully submitted,

WILMON NEWELL, Dean.









REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

To the Prcsident of the University.

SIR: I beg to submit herewith the following report on the activities of the College
of Business Administration for the biennium ending June 30, 1934, together with
the needs for the biennium beginning July 1, 1935.
The College of Business Administration has made satisfactory progress during the
biennium beginning July 1, 1932, and ending June 30, 1934. Table 'I shows the
TABLE I
THE NUMBER OF STUDENTS BY CLASSES, THE TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS, AND THE NUMBER
OF GRADUATES IN THE COLLEGE O1' BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FROM 1926-27 TO 1933-34
Adult
Years Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors Specials Total Graduates
1926-27 164 112 42 8 17 343 8
1927-28 160 81 50 26 6 323 22
1928-29 145 110 65 29 10 359 26
1929-30 178 120 87 48 9 442 35
1930-31 211 142 81 58 5 497 52
1931-32 215 156 87 53 12 528 51
1932-33 217 182 84 66 9 559 55
1933-34 216 160 106 55 7 544 49
number of students by classes, the total number -of students, and the number of
graduates in the College of Business Administration from 1926-27-the date on
which it began to operate as a separate instructional'unit-to 1933-34. It will be
observed from this table that while student registrations increased from 528 in
1931-32 to 559 in 1932-33, an increase of 5.9 per cent, they decreased from 559 in
1932-33 to 544 in 1933-34, a decrease of 2.7 per cent. But this percentage of decrease
is far less than that of the University as a whole. While the number of students
in the University decreased 9.8 per cent from 1932-33 to 1933-34, the number of
students in the College of Business Administration decreased only 2.7 per cent.

The number of graduates in the College of Business Administration increased
from 51 in 1931-32 to 55 in 1932-33, but dropped from 55 in 1932-33 to 49 in 1933-34.
The number in the latter year was even lower than in 1931-32. This decrease is
undoubtedly temporary and is probably due to seniors dropping out on account of
lack of funds. While the number of freshmen, sophomores, seniors, and adult
specials decreased from 1932-33 to 1933-34, the number of juniors increased from
84 to 106, or 26.2 per cent. This probably means that the number of graduates in
1934-35 will be the largest in the history of the College.

The increased registration of students in the College of Business Administration
during the past biennium has occurred in spite of higher standards of scholarship.
During the past two years this College has continued to elevate its standards of
scholarly requirements. Students unfit for business occupations, as exhibited either
by lack of mental ability or by improper performance of tasks, are not tolerated.
While no attempt has been made to limit specifically the number of students regis-
tering, every effort has been put forth to improve the quality of the student body
and to exact of each registrant the highest rate of individual performance.
The College of Business Administration offers all courses in general economics
and business administration in the University. It serves not only its own students
but also students in other instructional divisions of the University. Table II shows

83









TABLE II
AGGREGATE NUMBER OF STUDENTS ENROLLED IN ALL COURSES OFFERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF
ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FROM 1926-27 TO 1933-34
Years Aggregate Number of Students
19 2 6-2 7 .................................................. ............................... 1,10 4
19 2 7 -2 8 ...................................................... ................................ 1 ,9 2 1
192 8-29 ......................................................... ...................... ... 1,63 4
1 9 2 9 -3 0 ...................................................... ................................ 2 ,5 2 5
19 30 -3 1 .................................................................................. ... 2 ,88 1
1931-32 ..................................................................................... 3,0 19
1932-33 ...................................................... ............................ 3,454
1933 -34 .................................................................................... 3,12 2
the aggregate number of students enrolled in all courses offered by the line faculty
of the College of Business Administration from 1926-27 to 1933-34. Scrutiny of
this table will again exhibit the continuous progress of this College. It will be
observed from the table that while the aggregate number of students enrolled in
all courses offered by the College increased from 3,019 in 1931-32 to 3,454 in 1932-33,
it decreased from 3,454 in 1932-33 to 3,122 in 1933-34. Even though the aggregate
number of students decreased 9.6 per cent from 1932-33 to 1933-34, it was still 3.4
per cent greater in the latter year than in 1931-32.

Registration in the College of Business Administration will probably not increase
as rapidly in the future as it has in the past. The work of the College has become
stabilized. During the last two years there have been many evidences of balanced
progress.
In spite of decreased salaries and reduced budgets, the College of Business Ad-
ministration has functioned effectively during the last two years. Students and
faculty members have adjusted themselves to conditions and have worked together
admirably. While only two or three new courses have been added, an attempt has
been made to tie up the courses offered with recent economic changes and with
changed economic environments into which our graduates will be compelled to go.
The impact of the depression has been largely offset by the increased earnestness
of both faculty and students. The College has, I think, operated more efficiently
during the last biennium than during any other biennium since its establishment
in 1926-27.
Only one permanent change has been made in the faculty of the College of Busi-
ness Administration during the last biennium. Due to reduced budgets, the posi-
tion of instructor in office management, held by Mr. P. C. Scaglione, was eliminated.
No other eliminations or resignations have occurred. Professor H. W. Gray was
given a leave of absence for the second semester of 1933-34. In his place Paul M.
Green was appointed Acting Professor of Accounting.
During the last biennium many members of the faculty of the College of Business
Administration have engaged in activities looking toward their professional im-
provement.

Instructor W. T. Hicks has continued graduate study at Northwestern University. During
summers and holidays he has been engaged in writing his doctor's thesis on "The Interna-
tional Economic Policies of Mexico since 1917." This has taken him on one trip to Mexico
and on two or three trips to the Congressional Library at Washington, D. C. Associate Pro-
fessor H. C. Hurst has spent the last three summers at Ohio State University. He plans to
enter the second half of the summer session of 1934 and will secure his master's degree at
the end of that term. Professor Howard Dykman and Assistant Professor James E. Chace,
Jr.. are attending the University of Chicago during the summer of 1934. Professor Dykman
has improved his usefulness during the past biennium by his travels abroad. He spent the
summer of 1932 in Europe and the summer of 1933 in a trip around the world. Professor
Chace spent one summer during the biennium at Ohio State University. He is working to-
ward hils doctor's degree. Instructor Fred C. Ward continued his graduate work at the Uni-
versity of Florida and received his master's degree in June, 1934.
84









Many members of the faculty have been engaged in research projects. The Dean of the
College has continued as a member of the Southern Regional Committee of the Social Science
Research Council. He has been working on a comprehensive study of business education in
the South. This study is a part of a larger regional study which is being made by Dr. H. W.
Odum of the University of North Carolina under auspices of the Southern Regional Commit-
tee of the Social Science Research Council. This larger study, which concerns the capacity
of the South for educational and social development, is being financed by funds secured from
the foundations. He hopes to have his manuscript on results of this investigation ready
for publication in the form of a monograph by the University of North Carolina Press in the
fall of 1934. The Dean has completed four articles during the biennium which are scheduled
for publication in three periodicals. The first two articles are entitled "The South's Place
in Higher Business Education," Part I and Part II, and will be published in the Journal of
Business Education. The third article is entitled "The Culture of Agriculture" and will be
published in the 8outh Atlantic Quarterly.* The fourth article is entitled "The Changing
Culture of the City" and will be published in The Journal of Social Forces.
Dr. T. C. Bigham, who is joint author with Dr. Elliot Jones of StaLford University of
The Principles of Public Utilities, has continued his research interests. With a grant of $500
from the Southern Regional Committee of the Social Science Research Council in the summer
of 1933, he completed an investigation of the taxation of railroads in the Southeast. This
study will be published in a series of three articles by the Journal of Public Utility and Land
Economics. Dr. Bigham has made a study of the economic development of the Florida East
Coast Railroad. During the summer of 1934. he is serving as economic consultant of the
Florida Employment Relief Administration. He is supervising a comprehensive investigation
of public expenditures and revenues of the State of Florida.
Dr. M. D. Anderson during the last biennium has completed and published his book
entitled Capital and Interest. This book is concerned with the field of economic theory. It is
predicted that the book will be widely read by economists and that it will place Dr. Anderson
in a high position among American economic thinkers.
The Bureau of Economic and Business Research has been reduced to a paper organiza-
tion because reduced budgets took away two research assistants assigned to the Bureau. In
spite of these reductions, however, Dr. A. S. Campbell, Director of the Bureau, has continued
his research program. He his completed during the biennium the third part of his studies
in the forestry resources of Florida. Recently published by the University, this study com-
pletes the Studies in the Forestry Resources of Florida, begun in 1930: I. Timber Conserva-
tion: II. Lumber Industry; and III. Naval Stores Industry. These studies cover compre-
hensively the field of forestry resources in this State. Dr. Campbell has completed a study
of Business Taxation in Florida. The University did not have sufficient funds to publish
this study. Consequently, Dr. Campbell has divided it into three articles and they are being
published by the Tax Magazine, a publication under the auspices of the Commerce Clearing
House. Inc. Two of the articles have already appeared and the third will appear shortly.
Dr. R. S. Atwood. Acting Director of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs, has con-
tinued to cooperate with the Carnegie Institution in Washington in his research project in
Guatemala. He was given a leave of absence during the second semester of 1931-32 to go
to Guatemala. The Carnegie Institution furnished sufficient funds to pay for the expense
of his trir, and his research. During the second semester of 1933-34, he was given another
leave of absence, and is at present in Guatemala finishing up his work. He hopes to complete
his field work by August. 1934. He will then write up his results in the form of a monograph
to be published by the Carnegie Institution.
Other members of the staff have been engaged in research projects of one kind or another,
but have not yet published any of their results. This is particularly true of two men. Associ-
ate Professor John G. Eldridge has continued his study of taxation and fiscal policies of
Florida. Dr. Sigismond De R. Diettrich has continued his studies in economic geography.
The College of Business Administration reorganized its work into Upper and
Lower divisions in September, 1933. Through this plan a sharp division is made
between the first two years and the last two years. Students are required to com-
plete all the courses required in the lower division with an average of C before
tney are permitted to register in the upper division. Both the upper and lower
divisions have already begun to function. When a student enters the upper division,
he may plan to graduate in one of three ways: first, to graduate; second, to gradu-
ate with honor; third, to graduate with high honor. The lower and upper divisions
were applied to all students entering on or after September, 19i:, and optionally
to all students who were already registered. Three out of our graduating class of
49 in 1934 were grauniuted with honor.

*This article appeared in the July, 1934, issue of The South Atlantic Quarterly.








This reorganization was designed primarily to be of assistance to the superior
student. The student in the upper division who has been accepted as a candidate
for graduation is placed under a special committee and is allowed to deviate from
the regular curriculum provided such deviation is approved by his committee. He
is encouraged to do independent work and is given a comprehensive examination
prior to graduation.
For four or five years we have been offering a course in business administration
in combination with law. The course has proved highly successful. During the
past biennium an increased number of students have remained for their third
year in the College of Business Administration prior to their entry to the College
of Law. Already a number of these students have completed their work in law
and have graduated under the curriculum in combination with law. From now
on an increasing number of men will be coming up for graduation under this
curriculum, since students who enter the College of Law after September 1, 1934,
must have completed either an undergraduate degree or the requirements for a com-
bination degree. It is felt that the College of Business Administration has devised
an excellent curriculum for law students and that those who pursue this curricu-
lum are not only trained in the field of business administration, but also mor',
thoroughly trained in the field of law.
The College of Business Administration has continued its policy of following up
its graduates. The total number of graduates of this College to date is 320. In
the spring of 1934, we sent out the usual questionnaire to all graduates. Replies
are still coming in. Consequently, we are unable to give recent data regarding the
progress of graduates, their earnings, and the effectiveness with which they have
become adjusted to the business world. A summary of these questionnaires will be
sent to you at a later date.
The needs of the College of Business Administration, as I indicated in my last
biennial report, are of two varieties: first, needs pertaining, to personnel; second,
needs pertaining to quarters. The needs pertaining to personnel concern primarily
salaries and promotions. Certain faculty members of this College, as has already
been indicated, have continued to advance themselves professionally during the
past biennium by further graduate study and by productive research. While it is
realized that the present trying economic era through which we are passing makes
it difficult to secure funds for the promotion of staff members, the University
should, I feel, face this problem in a vigorous way. It has been necessary to de-
crease salaries sixteen per cent during the past two years. In spite of this decrease
faculty members in general have reacted to their work in a favorable way and a
large number have proceeded to improve themselves at great personal sacrifice.
The University of Florida cannot continue to progress and retain its best and most
productive scholars unless provisions, even in times of depression, are made for
merited salary increases and for merited promotions in rank. This is especially
true since, according to the Florida Emergency Relief Administration as indicated
by press reports, the prices of retail goods in Florida, making up the bulk of living
costs, have increased 27 per cent from March, 1933, to June, 1934.
Salary scales in the South have always been lower than salary scales in other
sections of the United States. When we have good research men or good teachers,
we should make financial provisions for keeping them. While economic motives
are not the chief urges actuating most college professors, economic motives play

86








a large part and cannot be ignored. Staff members feel that they cannot afford
to stand still as earners of income. This is especially true of young men. They are
willing to give the best they have, but they expect the University to make reason-
able provisions for an environment in which they may advance economically as
well as professionally.
When the College of Business Administration was organized in 1926-27, the Dean
adopted the policy of building a faculty out of young men. Instead of bringing
high-salaried mature scholars here and ranking them as full professors, he brought
in young men at moderate or lower salaries and gave them moderate or lower
ranks. He attempted to give them opportunity not only to make themselves, but
in turn to make the College. The entire faculty of this College, with the exception
of the Dean, is made up of men under forty years of age. They came to us because
they wanted a young and growing institution in which to start and to achieve
success. Several of them have already attracted more than passing notice. They
have done good teaching and at the same time have begun to make reputations in
the field of research. It is highly desirable that provisions be made for keeping
these men in the University. Unless we are in a position to raise their ranks and
increase their salaries during the next two or three years, this College is going to
be seriously crippled, if not permanently set back, in the pursuance of its policies
to serve effectively the State of Florida and to make a high record in the field of
American collegiate business education.
While length of service should have some weight in promoting faculty members,
I feel that promotion should depend largely on merit. When faculty members do
a good job of teaching, when they engage in productive research, or when they
otherwise serve the University in a distinctive fashion, their promotion should be
adequately provided for. Those who merely do what is required of them and
achieve little or no distinction in any way should be left at their present salaries
and ranks. Even in these trying times I feel that the policy of promotion and
salary increases should not be entirely abandoned. I am fully aware of the serious-
ness of the present economic depression. I realize the difficulty of securing
funds for any sort of expansion, but a university must take a long-run point of
view. Its greatness depends entirely upon its personnel. It has been frequently
pointed out that buildings and grounds do not make a university. Our success or
our failure is going to depend upon the types of faculty members we secure and the
effectiveness they exhibit both in research and in teaching. During the next two
or three years, I feel that we should put forth every effort to retain the faculty
members who have achieved distinction and to make provisions for their promotion.
The College of Business Administration should have additional funds for re-
search. This is especially true of the Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
This Bureau not only should have its two research assistants restored to it, which
it lost due to reduced budgets in the past two years, but it also should have separate
funds of its own to carry on a comprehensive research program of direct interest
to the State as a whole. This State does not know with any degree of exactness
what either its actual or potential wealth is; it does not know either its actual or
potential income. No scientific studies have been made of the balance of trade,
if any, that runs against it. No adequate economic investigations of either existing
agriculture or future agricultural possibilities have been made. No comprehensive
study has been made of fundamental natural resources, manufacturing, taxation,

87








transportation, trade, both domestic and foreign, finance, and tourist facilities. The
studies that the Bureau of Economic and Business Research have made since its
beginning are of great value to the State and funds should be made available just
as soon as possible for the continuance of its activities on a greatly enlarged scale.
I wish to renew the recommendations, made in each of my last four biennial re-
ports, concerning our needs for new quarters. We have never had a building of
our own. The Dean's offices and certain classrooms and offices for certain
faculty members are in Language Hall, whereas the remainder of our quarters
are in Buckman Hall. This separation of quarters interferes greatly with our
efficiency both in instruction and in administration. We should have a building
where we could concentrate all our activities. I can do no better than to refer
you to my two previous biennial reports. In these reports you will find a discus-
sion of our building needs in detail. I shall not reiterate them here. Suffice it
to say that a building of our own would not only meet the urgent expanding needs
of the College of Business Administration, but it would also relieve the pressure
upon existing buildings. Language Hall could be released to other colleges and
Buckman Hall could be reconverted to dormitory use. New quarters for us would
mean larger quarters for other divisions and departments. A building for the
College of Business Administration would yield double returns to the University
as a whole.
Respectfully submitted,

WALTER J. MATHERLY, Dean.









REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

To the President of the Univerrsity :

SIR: The following report of the College of Engineering for the biennium ending
June 30, 1934, is herewith respectfully submitted.

GENERAL STATEMENT
The enrollment and growth of the College of Engineering is shown on the accom-
panying charts, Numbers 1, 2, and 3. Chart No. 1 shows the population of Florida
from 1920 to 1934. The chart also shows the total enrollment of the College of
Engineering for the period 1924-34. In general, this curve has paralleled the popu-
lation increase in the State of Florida. The experience of other states indicates
that as the population increases and the state becomes more and more industrial-
ized there will be a tendency toward an increased interest in engineering education.
Hence, we may assume that the total enrollment in the College of Engineering will
continue to increase at a slightly faster rate than the population of the state. The
tendency toward this is shown in the curve. Chart No. 1 also shows the total num-
ber of graduates from the College of Engineering each year from 1921 to 1934. This
represents a total number of bachelors' degrees which have been awarded in any
one year from the various curricula in the College of Engineering. Although the
number of graduates has slightly and steadily increased each year, at no time
have we graduated in any one year more than fifty students from the College of
Engineering. The slope of this curve is not as steep as the population curve of
Florida, nor is it as steep as the total enrollment curve. This indicates that it
has become increasingly difficult for students who enroll in the College of Engi-
neering to graduate.
Chart No. 2 shows the enrollment in the College of Engineering over the years
1922-34, inclusive, by departments. This chart indicates that the enrollments in
electrical engineering and mechanical engineering have been more or less steady
and have consistently increased. The enrollment in chemical engineering has pre-
cipitously increased since 1930, until today it has the second largest enrollment
of all departments in the College.
Enrollment in civil engineering increased steadily until 1928, then dropped until
1932 when it was almost as low as in 1921. At about this time the curriculum was
revised, and since then there has been a steady increase in the enrollment in this
course of study.
Chart No. 3 gives the graduates by departments as well as the total graduates
in the College of Engineering. These curves have followed no consistent pattern.
For the last four years more students have been graduated as Bachelors of Science
in Electrical Engineering than from any other curriculum. The number graduat-
ing in Mechanical Engineering has shown the most consistent increase. During
the past biennium the College of Engineering has conferred eighty-eight Bachelor
of Science degrees and seven professional degrees as follows:

Undergraduate Degrees Professional Degrees
B .S.E .E ............................................... 34 C h.E .... .......... ........................... 2
B .S.C h .E ................................... 20 E .E ....... ............................................. 2
B .S.M .E ........ ................. ........... ........... C.E.............. .......... 3
B .S .C .E ............................................... 16
T otals ....................................... 88 7

































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CHANGES IN PERSONNEL
During the last biennium the personnel of the College of Engineering has been
decreased through the loss of an associate professor of civil engineering, a mech-
anician, and a mechanic. The faculty has been augmented by the addition of Mr.
S. P. Sashoff, B.S.E.E., Purdue, 1925, M.S.E.E., University of Pittsburgh, 1929,
Assistant Professor in electrical engineering, who is an expert in the field of
electronics and has considerably strengthened the courses of instruction in elec-
trical communication.
Mr R. A. Thompson, B.S.M.E., University of Florida, 1932, has been added to the
faculty as a part time instructor in mechanical engineering. Mr. Thompson also
acts as custodian of the mechanical engineering laboratory.

ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION
The Engineering Experiment Station, which was created to organize and promote
the prosecution of research projects, with special reference to such of these prob-
lems as are important to the industries of Florida, has produced and published its
first bulletin during the past biennium. This bulletin, entitled The Mapping Situa-
tion of Florida, was prepared by Mr. W. L. Sawyer, instructor in civil engineering.
It has received wide circulation throughout the United States and has done much
to stimulate interest in and demand for the early completion of a topographic map
of the State of Florida. The bulletin was prepared at no additional cost to the
State of Florida, Mr. Sawyer having prepared it in addition to his regular uni-
versity duties.
It is highly desirable that more work of this character be done in the College
of Engineering; however, it is extremely difficult to produce work of this char-
acter while members of the teaching faculty carry such heavy loads as those which
are of necessity imposed upon them at present.
A research project is being fostered in cooperation with the University of Puerto
Rico and State Radio Station WRUF. This project pertains to location of hurri-
canes and other tropical storms as well as a study of static problems in general.

UPPER AND LOWER DIVISIONS
The College of Engineering is now divided into an upper and lower division, and
rules and regulations have been adopted which prevent a student from taking upper
division studies until he has completed his lower division work.
HONOR STUDENTS AND GRADUATES WITH HONORS
The College of Engineering has adopted the plan of recommending students for
graduation "With Honors" and "With High Honors". The details of the procedure
by which a student may acquire the distinction of graduating with honors and
with high honors are set forth in the Bulletin of By-Laws for 1934.

DEGREES
During the last beinnium the faculty of the College of Engineering, with the
consent of the faculty of the College of Business Administration, abandoned the
combined course of Engineering and Business Administration and substituted there-
for a course of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial
Engineering. The year 1933-34 was the first year this course was offered and
the total enrollment was eight students. In time this curriculum will undoubtedly
attract a much larger proportion of engineering students.

93








PROFESSIONAL DEGREES
The requirements and the entire procedure for conferring the professional de-
grees, Electrical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Chemical Engineer, and Mechanical En-
gineer, were completely revised. These degrees may now be granted only to Bache-
lor of Science graduates of the University of Florida who have:
a. Shown evidence of having satisfactorily practiced their profession for a mini-
mum period of five years following receipt of the bachelor's degree, during the
last two years of which they shall have been in responsible charge of important
engineering work. A graduate who is a registered engineer in the State of Florida
in at least two branches of his major subjects will be accepted as satisfying this
requirement.
b. Presented a thesis showing independence and originality and of such a quality
as to be acceptable for publication by the technical press or professional society,
and
c. Satisfactorily passed an examination at the University upon his thesis and
professional work.

THESES
Theses are not required of candidates for the Bachelors' degrees in the College
of Engineering. However, exceptional students who, in the belief of the head of
a department, would be benefited thereby, may be granted permission by the Dean
of the College, upon recommendation of the Head of the Department, to under-
take a thesis in lieu of prescribed or elective work in the department in which he
is enrolled. Not more than four semester credit hours will be allowed for such
thesis work.
WOODSHOP
The faculty of the College of Engineering, in an effort to relieve congested con-
ditions in the engineering shops, have adopted the following policy relative to
woodshop:
Freshmen who have had a course in Woodshop, the equivalent of Mc. 101. either
in high school or in industry and who present satisfactory evidence of having per-
formed such work, may be given an examination and, upon the successful passage
of this examination, will be exempted from Mc. 101. Such students will, however,
be required to substitute for this unit some other unit of university work.
It is highly desirable that the character of instruction given in the shop of the
College of Engineering be changed as rapidly as conditions in the State will permit.
It is essential that undergraduates of the College of Engineering have considerable
shop training and experience. This should be obtained either in the high schools
or in industry. At present, very few high schools in the State are adequately
equipped to give this instruction and very few freshmen entering the College of
Engineering have had an opportunity to secure much experience in this field prior
to their enrollment in the University. Hence, it may be necessary to continue our
present shop policy for a number of years.
ENGLISH
The faculty of the College of Engineering, in an effort to improve the quality of
English used by students in the College, has adopted the following policy:
Responsibility for the correct and effective use of his spoken and written English
rests primarily upon the student. Any instructor in the College of Engineering

94








may, at any time, with the approval of the head of his department and the Dean
of the College of Engineering, require a student who shows a deficiency in English
to elect additional courses, over and above the curriculum requirements, in the De-
partment of English.
VISITING COMMITTEE
During the last biennium a Visiting Committee for the College of Engineering
has been formed with the approval and consent of the President and the Board of
Control. The purposes of this committee are to visit and inspect the physical con-
dition of the College of Engineering and to advise with the faculty on means of
improving the usefulness of the College to the University, to the students, and to the
State of Florida. The committee is composed of the following prominent citizens
of the State:
H. I). Mendenhall, Secretary, Florida State Board of Engineering Exam-
iners, Tallahassee, Florida, Chairman.
George B. Hills, Consulting Engineer, Jacksonville. Florida, Vice-Chair-
nman.
liRoger W. Babson, Esq., Statistician, Winter Park, Florida.
Ernest Kreher. President, Tampa Shipbuilding and Engineering Com-
pany, Tampa, Florida.
Burdett Loomis. Jr., Manager, American Agricultural Chemical Com-
pany. Pierce, Florida.
It. F. Magnire, Attorney at Law, Orlando, Florida.
This committee has visited the College of Engineering on two occasions and has
rendered a report to the President. making, among others, the following recom-
mendations :
"Your Committee concludes that this first report with the recommendation .
for, (a) the completion of the Engineering Building; (b) the beginning of an En-
gineering Experiment Station building; (c) additional equipment for these build-
ings and those now in use."
The gratitude of the faculty, of the students, and of the citizens of the State of
Florida is due the members of this committee for the time, thought, and money
they have expended in this service which has been performed at no expense to the
University or the tax payers.

SURVEY OF THE PHYSICAL NEEDS OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
A survey of the physical needs of the College of Engineering indicates immedi-
ate need for the following:
(1) The beginning of an engineering experiment station building through con-
struction in the vicinity of the present University central heating plant of four
laboratory units at a cost of approximately $40,000 per unit, or a total cost of
$160,000 for all four units.
(2) Completion of the east wing of the Engineering Building. This would now
cost, with the necessary equipment, approximately $90,000.
The College of Engineering is therefore in immediate need of new construction
costing $250,000.
In addition to supplying more class rooms and lecture rooms (at present the
College of Engineering does not have a single lecture room in which the entire
freshman class can be assembled and all seated), these buildings would supply
chiefly room for laboratory work. It is doubtful if there is a single professional

95








engineering educational institution of higher learning which has the standing which
the University of Florida endeavors to maintain, which also has as small and as
inadequate laboratory facilities as the College of Engineering, University of Flor-
ida. These are so inadequate at present that it is not feasible to accept gifts of
any magnitude because there is no space which is available in which to, use and
install such gifts.
JUSTIFICATION FOR THESE BUILDINGS
Enrollment in the College of Engineering has steadily increased in spite of higher
standards and elimination of freshmen through advice, persuasion, and the engi-
neering qualifying examination.
Today the drafting rooms for freshmen and sophomores are used to their capa-
city, both as to space and schedule. More drafting rooms are absolutely impera-
tive unless enrollment is to be further restricted. The mechanical and electrical
engineering departments have no drafting rooms for instruction in design. All
departments are in need of additional laboratory space. It is difficult to say which
department has the most pressing need.
(a) SHOPS.-The wood and machine shops are crowded and unsafe. The stu-
dents have no place where they can change clothes and clean up. The machine
shop can handle only sixteen men at one time. This capacity forms the bottle
neck in all scheduling activities. The capacity of this shop should be increased to
twenty-four. By moving out the civil engineering laboratory and securing some
modern equipment this bad situation could be improved.
(b) HYDRAULIC LABORATORY.-The hydraulic laboratory does not ade-
quately care for its present load and it has no space for experiments in beach and
shore erosion work or any other hydraulic research of direct value to the State.
This laboratory should be moved to the vicinity of the central heating plant where
it will have a natural fall because of the topography of the ground and where it
will be near the University water supply. There would be some reduction in the
water taken from that supplied by the city if this laboratory were moved.
(c) MATERIALS TESTING LABORATORY.-Compared with other technical
institutions of higher learning, the College of Engineering has no materials testing
laboratories worthy of the name. Besides furnishing adequate and modern instruc-
tion to the students in the College of Engineering, a materials testing laboratory
could render a distinct service to the State, not only through standardization tests,
but through other research work which it is now necessary to send out of the
State.
(d) AERONAUTICS LABORATORY.-There has been a pressing need at the
University of Florida for a number of years for laboratory space devoted to aero-
nautical machines and equipment. At present, what work we have in this field
is carried on in the mechanical engineering laboratory. Tests which are run on
aeronautical motors in their present location produce noise which disturbs instruc-
tion in the vicinity of the Engineering Building, and this disturbance extends as
far north as the University Library and renders lecturing in Peabody Hall all but
impossible. A laboratory for this work should be established in the vicinity of
the heating plant where it will be near the source of power, the source of water,
and the rail spur. Almost weekly the Dean of the College interviews students,
citizens, air transport officials, and airplane equipment manufacturers who request

96









that we increase our facilities for this work. Florida is missing a golden opportunity
in not endeavoring to serve the needs of this young but growing industry.
(e) ELECTRICAL MEASUREMENTS LABORATORY.-The Department of
Electrical Engineering, although handling quite efficiently the facilities which it
has and doing outstanding work in the field of electrical communications, finds
itself considerably handicapped for lack of space for research work and laboratory
classes. More space should be secured immediately for electrical measurements,
high tension work, communications, and electrical design.
(f) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING.-The space devoted to chemical laboratories
is entirely unsatisfactory. Dr. W. H. Beisler, who has been in charge of this work
for the past biennium, says: "The space allotted to chemical engineering is negli-
gible in comparison with that allotted to the other branches of engineering. In
fact, there is no laboratory available that is suitable for instruction in the unit
processes of chemical engineering, which is the most important course in that field.
We have some unit process machinery set up in the fuels laboratory, some in the
attic, and two machines which have not been set up on account of lack of space
where it would be safe to use large quantities of water, steam, and inflammable
liquids. A building 40x60 feet and two stories high is necessary for the usual
professional laboratory work in chemical engineering."
Other reasons, which would require elaboration and explanation from a techni-
cal standpoint, would amply justify this request for additional laboratory facili-
ties for the College of Engineering. These can be presented very quickly, should
they be needed. The Dean and faculty of the College of Engineering recommend
investigation of the technical and laboratory facilities by any technically qualified
group. The Visiting Committee of the College of Engineering has gone into these
matters and has recommended that the laboratories and buildings mentioned above
be constructed at the earliest possible date.

SURVEY OF INSTRUCTIONAL FACILITIES
During the last biennium a survey of the instructional facilities of the College of
Engineering was made. All the matters listed below were carefully compared with
standard requirements in other institutions of higher learning with the following
results:
(a) Entrance requirements of the i.'.lI .*.... of Engineering are satisfactory; in
fact, they are higher than those in a majority of technical institutions.
(b) Graduation requirements for the bachelor's degree are satisfactory. This
is evidenced by the fact that graduates of our College are accredited by the Florida
State Board of Engineering Examiners and the National Council of State Boards
of Engineering Examiners. Recently, the State Education Department of the Uni-
versity of the State of New York accredited the curricula leading to the Bachelor
of Science in Civil Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, and
Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degrees.

(c) The curricula of the College of Engineering compare favorably with those
of other institutions, both as to breadth and technical sufficiency.
(d) The titles of degrees granted through the College of Engineering by the
University of Florida follow standards used by a majority of institutions of higher
learning. However, the Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education has








recently recommended a minor change in this regard which will be formally dis-
cussed and adopted at the next annual meeting of this organization, to be held
next June in Atlanta, Georgia; and since it is highly desirable that all reputable
technical institutions of higher learning recognize these standards, and since these
changes are of minor consequence as far as the College of Engineering is con-
cerned, it is highly probable that during the coming year the faculty will make
some recommendations to conform with these changes.
(e) The number of various grades of teachers on the faculty of the College of
Engineering meets the minimum requirements for registration and recognition by
other institutions of higher learning in all departments except that of chemical
engineering. However, it is desirable that the College of Engineering do a little
more than meet the bare minimum requirements in this respect. Hence, recom-
mendations are being submitted with the biennial budget for a slight increase in
the personnel of the faculty of the College of Engineering.
(f) The teaching schedules of the faculty meet the minimum requirements and
are as satisfactory as existing conditions will permit.
(g) The teaching loads of the faculty members are crowded in chemical, civil
and mechanical engineering. These can not be relieved without additional per-
sonnel.
(h) The size of classes in the College of Engineering has been kept at the pre-
scribed minimums and maximums by rigidly limiting enrollment in the freshman
class.
(i) As previously indicated, the laboratories in all departments of the College
of Engineering are entirely inadequate.
(j) ,The work in field surveying as carried on in the College of Engineering has
not, in the past, met the standards maintained by other institutions of higher
learning. Means have been taken partially to correct this by holding summer sur-
veying camps at the University. It is highly probable that shop work should also
be required in the summer term.
(k) Library facilities for the College of Engineering are entirely inadequate.
There is no department or college library, as such, and the number of volumes
available in this field at the University at this time hardly justifies it. The main
library of the University has been efficiently placed at the disposal of the students
and faculty of the College of Engineering up to the limit of its facilities. The
amount of money available for the purchase of engineering periodicals and new
engineering books is entirely inadequate.
(1) The financial support given the College of Engineering, when compared with
that given to technical institutions of other states, is far below the standard. At
present the College of Engineering receives an allotment of approximately $132 per
student per year. To maintain an engineering college of grade "A" standing would
require approximately $250 per student per year.
SURVEY OF ALUMNI OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
During the last biennium a survey of the alumni of the College of Engineering
disclosed the following interesting and, in some cases, startling facts:
(a) 66.7 per cent of the alumni of the College of Engineering are now
living in the State of Florida.
(b) In the bad depression year of 1932 (the data was collected as of
January, 1932), only 18.6 per cent of the alumni of the College of Engineer-
ing were unemployed.








(c) The average cost to the student of four years of training in the
College of Engineering for the last twenty-five years was only $1,920.
(d) The earning power of the alumni was found to compare favorably
with that of the alumni of other engineering institutions.
(e) The alumni of the College believe that the curricula of the College
of Engineering should be revised to include more non-engineering subjects.
Steps had already been taken to correct this prior to collection of this
data.
PHYSICAL CHANGES
The physical condition of Benton Hall and Engineering Building has been ma-
terially improved. Walls have been re-tinted, the lighting system has been im-
proved, walks have been put around the buildings, drainage has been improved, and
a long needed permanent roof has been placed on the Engineering Building. Offices
and class rooms have been rearranged to provide for more economical use of space.

MORAL AND MENTAL TONE
The moral and mental quality of the students of the College of Engineering con-
tinues at a high level. This has been especially noticeable during the last two
years of the depression. The faculty of the college deserves no particular credit
for this. We believe it due chiefly to the following factors: First, the College of
Engineering has been consistently receiving a high type of young man. Second, the
curricula which students pursue in the College of Engineering are so rigorous and
require so much time that little of the students' time and energies are left for
extra-curricular activities, much less mischief and dissipation. Third, the students,
like all others in the University of Florida, operate under the honor system and
take considerable pride in voluntarily maintaining high moral and mental standards.

TRADITIONS
The students and faculty of the College of Engineering maintain a number of
worthwhile traditions such as the commencement oath, the alumni breakfast, En-
gineers' Day, radio and meterman's short courses, etc. These have been in opera-
tion for a number of years and all seem to be functioning in a healthy manner and
performing the purposes for which they were established. The last biennium a
new group undertaking was installed which was carried on so successfully that it
will probably become an annual event in the College of Engineering. The students.
with very little guidance and assistance from the faculty, arranged an "Engineers'
Fair" which was an open house for all the engineering laboratories and depart-
ments. More than one hundred demonstrations of machines and equipment were
made available for inspection by visitors to the College of Engineering on this
occasion. This "Fair" attracted between five and six thousand persons to the
campus of the University of Florida, and all reports received concerning the event
were most favorable. It is particularly noteworthy that many stunts and demon-
strations were given by students of their ages without resorting to the use of
fright, humiliation, or vulgarity to entertain their guests.

PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
The College of Engineering has been barely able to maintain the necessary pro-
fessional contacts during the last two years due to curtailment of funds. It is
extremely important, because of Florida's isolated geographical position, that pro-
fessional contacts be maintained with the following organizations: Association of
Land Grant Colleges and Universities, the Society for the Promotion of Engineer-
ing Education, the State Board of Engineering Examiners, the Florida Engineering
Society, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Society of Mechani-

99









cal Engineers, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, and the American In-
stitute of Electrical Engineers. Due to the activity of our faculty members and the
respect with which they are held throughout the state and nation, we have had
a most liberal representation in the governing bodies of most of these state and
national organizations. This valuable work cannot be continued on the limited
budget allowed for travel expenses in attending annual meetings and the like. It
is recommended that more funds be allowed for this purpose.
A partial and incomplete list showing faculty professional activities during the
past two years follows:
The Dean of the College: Member of Council, Society for the Promotion of Engineering
Education; member of Council, American Engineering Council; Secretary and member of the
Executive Committee, Florida Section, American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
Civil Engineering :
Professor P. L. Reed: Past President. Florida Engineering Society. Mr. W. L.. Sawyer:
Honorary Chairman, Student Branch, American Society of Civil Engineers.
Mechanical Engineering :
Professor Melvin Price: President, State Board of Engineering Examiners. Professor
W. W. Fineren: Secretary, Florida Engineering Society. Professor P. 0. Yeaton: Chairman
and member of the Executive Committee, Florida Section, American Society of Mechanical
Engineers.
Electrical Engineering :
Professor Joseph Well: Chairman and Secretary of Florida Section, American Institute
of Electrical Engineers.
Drawing & Mechanic Arts:
Mr. C. H. Janes: Honorary Chairman, Student Branch, American Society of Mechanical
Engineers.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES RENDERED
The members of the faculty have given generously of their time and energies to
university, state, and local engineering projects. Members have served with the
consent and approval of the President and Board of Control in connection with the
Civil Works Administration, the Florida Emergency Relief Administration, the
1. S. Coast and Geodetic Local Control Surveys, etc.
The faculty has from time to time given advice, counsel, and guidance to engi-
neering projects on the campus. The most notable of these are the underground
wiring and removal of overhead poles and lights on University Avenue and Ninth
Street; the running track stadium; the new Student Union Building ; the drainage
around the artillery stables, and the roads and walks around the new Demonstra-
tion School. Maps of the lighting layouts, the sewer, gas, and water lines have
been prepared for the first time.

EMPLOYMENT
Although the employment of college graduates for the last two years has been
at its lowest ebb in the history of the institution, records now indicate that all
members of the 1933 class in the College of Engineering are employed at jobs of
some character, and at present an estimate of sixty per cent of the June, 1934,
class are employed (as of September 1, 1934). A syllabus on employment for use
by the graduating class of the College of Engineering has been started. It is be-
lieved that this will grow into a very useful document for the seniors in the Col-
lege of Engineering.

DEPARTMENTS
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering is responsible for the curriculum which leads to the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering and for students enrolled
in that curriculum. The staff and equipment used by the Department of Chemical

100




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