Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00384
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: September 8, 1934
Copyright Date: 1934
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00384
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Full Text




The University Record

of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of

W inter Short Courses
College of Agriculture
1934


Citrus Culture, October 1-6
Animal Husbandry, November 5-10
Floriculture, December 3-7
Vegetable Production, December 3-7


Vol. XXIX, Series I, No. 9, Extra No. 1 Sept. 8, 1934


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida












The Record comprises:
The Repor s of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual
colleges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruc-
tion, and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what informa-
tion is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in sev-
eral series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with in-
stitutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications
is under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for in-
dividual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges.
should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


[334]






SHORT COURSES IN AGRICULTURE

INTRODUCTION

Agriculture, like all other professions and industries, is facing new problems because
of present economic conditions. Efficiency of management and production are taking
precedence over all other factors. The practical phases of agriculture are being revaluated
and the inefficient eliminated.
The complexity of agriculture demands correlated facts with a sound practical back-
ground. Farming is essentially a practical pursuit and the individual who ignores this
fact usually meets with difficulties if not ultimate failure. This very complexity makes
it almost impossible for any one to keep abreast of all the improvements in the science
and practice of farming. This is particularly true for the farmer who does not always
have the time and opportunity to acquaint himself with the new developments that are
constantly taking place. This is true also of city, urban, or industrial persons who for
any reason migrate to the farm for a livelihood. These as well as the actual farmer need
study and self-improvement in order better to fit themselves for their undertaking.
The short courses in Agriculture are designed primarily to provide practical help and
assistance to the farmer. They are so planned as to give him the greatest possible amount
of practical information in a short period. These courses aim to summarize and bring
together the results and findings of research workers as applied to farm problems. Intensive
study of the modern and practical phases of agriculture are emphasized.

Meals and Rooms
Meals can be obtained in the University Cafeteria.
Breakfast ................................. ....... ............... 25c 7:00-8:30
D inner -........................................................ 30c 11:30-1:00
Supper ................. ........................................ 25c 5 :30-6 :30
Rooms can be secured in private homes or rooming houses near the Campus at reasonable
rates.
Assistance in locating rooms will be given at Headquarters, in College of Agriculture.

Mail
Address all mail in care of the College of Agriculture.

To Get the Most Out of the Week
Come Monday and stay through the entire course.
Get acquainted with everybody.
Don't hesitate to introduce yourself.

No Soliciting
In order to avoid annoyance to students in the short courses everyone should bear in
mind that soliciting orders or selling articles is not allowed on the campus of the
University.

Fees
No registration or other fees are charged.


[335]







BULLETIN OF WINTER SHORT COURSES


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., President of the University
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc., Dean of the College of Agriculture and Director of the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension Service.
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture

INSTRUCTORS

CHARLES ELLIOTT ABBOTT, M.S., Professor of Fruits and Vegetables
P. T. Dix ARNOLD, B.S., Assistant in Dairy Investigations, Experiment Station
ROBERT MARLIN BARNETTE, Ph.D., Chemist, Experiment Station
RAYMOND BROWN BECKER, Ph.D., Specialist in Dairy Husbandry, Experiment Station
EDWARD W. BERGER, Ph.D., Entomologist. State Plant Board
HOMER EELLS BRATLEY, M.S.A., Assistant Entomologist, Experiment Station
HAMLIN L. BROWN, B.S.A., Dairyman, Extension Service
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Professor of Soils
ARTHUR FORREST CAMP, Ph.D., Horticulturist, Experiment Station
JOHN THOMAS CREIGHTON, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology and Plant Pathology
IDA KEELING CRESAP. Librarian, Experiment Station
EZRA FRANKLIN DEBUSK, B.S., Citrus Pathologist, Agricultural Extension Service
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Marketing
WILLIAM WALTER HENLEY, B.S.A., Assistant Animal Husbandman, Experiment Station
H. HAROLD HUME, M.S., Assistant Dean (Research) and Director, Experiment Station
BRADFORD KNAPP, JR., M.S., Assistant Animal Husbandman, Experiment Station
HAROLD MOWRY, M.S.A., Assistant Director (Administration), Experiment Station
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Professor of Agricultural Engineering
DORSEY ADDREN SANDERS, D.V.M., Veterinarian, Experiment Station
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, Ph D., Assistant Professor, Farm Crops and Genetics
ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY, D.V.M., Animal Husbandman, Experiment Station, and Professor
of Veterinary Science
WALTER JEFFERSON SHEELY, B.S.. Animal Husbandman, Extension Service
WILLIAM EUGENE STOKES, M.S., Agronomist. Experiment Station
WILLIAM BURLEY TISDALE, Ph.D., Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station
ARCHIE NEWTON TISSOT, Ph.D., Associate Entomologist. Experiment Station
JOHN VERTREES WATKINS, M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist
JOSEPH RALPH WATSON, M.A., Entomologist, Experiment Station
GEORGE FREDERICK WEBER. Ph.D., Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station
ERDMAN WEST, B.S., Mycologist, Experiment Station
CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, M.A., Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying











CITRUS PROGRAM


CITRUS

PROGRAM
MONDAY, OCTOBER 1
8:00 Registration-Room 303, Agriculture Building
9:00 World Competition with Florida Citrus-Dr. Hamilton
10:00 The Influence of Soil Moisture on Yield, Size, and Quality of Fruit-
Professor DeBusk
11:00 Scale Insects and Rust Mites-Professor Watson
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Effect of Temperature on Tree and Fruit-Dr. Camp
2:00 Florida Soils and Their Adaptation to Citrus-Dr. Bryan
3:00 Helpful Fungi-Dr. Berger

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2
8:00 Soil Reaction and pH Control-Dr. Bryan
9:00 The Soil as a Household for Water-Dr. Barnette
10:00 Gummosis and Psorosis-Dr. Tisdale
11:00 Methods of Grove Heating-Dr. Camp
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Method. Time, and Rate of Applying Irrigation Water-Professor DeBusk
2:00 Nutritional Effects Brought About by Pruning-Professor Abbott
3:00 Distribution of the Florida Citrus Crop-Dr. Hamilton

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3
8:00 Common Carriers of Fertilizer Materials and Their Residual Effects on the Soils
-Dr. Bryan
9:00 Organic Matter in the Citrus Grove-Dr. Barnette
10:00 Diehack and Frenching-Professor DeBusk
11:00 Cold Storage of Citrus Fruits in Relation to Temperature-Dr. Camp
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Lime Diseases-Dr. Tisdale
2:00 The Citrus Marketing Agreement under the A.A.A.-Dr. Hamilton
3:00 Pumps and Pumping Equipment-Professor Rogers













BULLETIN OF WINTER SHORT COURSES


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
8:00 Nutrient Requirements for Citrus Trees-Dr. Bryan
9:00 The Turnover of Plant Materials-Dr. Barnette
10:00 Pumping Plant Installation-Professor Rogers
11:00 Blossom-Bud Formation and Fruiting Habits of Citrus Trees-Professor Abbott
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Relationship of Stocks to Soil and Climate-Dr. Camp
2:00 Storage Rots of Citrus Fruits-Dr. Tisdale
3:00 Cost of Marketing Florida Citrus-Dr. Hamilton

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5
8:00 Time and Methods of Applying Fertilizer to the Citrus Grove-Dr. Bryan
9:00 Factors Affecting the Cost of Marketing Florida Citrus-Dr. Hamilton
10:00 Relationship of Stocks to Varieties and Fruit Ouality-Dr. Camp
11:00 Cost of Pumping Plant Operations-Professor Rogers
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Citrus Aphis-Dr. Tissot
2:00 Oil Emulsions-Professor Creighton
3:00 Scab and Melanose-Dr. Tisdale

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6
8:00 Loss of Fertilizer Nutrients Through Leaching-Dr. Bryan
9:00 Marketing Agents Handling Florida Citrus Fruits-Dr. Hamilton
10:00 Fruit Setting-Professor Abbott
11:00 Plant Bugs-Professor Bratley


All lectures will be given in Room 303, Agriculture Building











"Iirrr

iii


STOCK JUDGING


YP I











BULLETIN OF WINTER SHORT COURSES


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

PROGRAM
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5
8:00 Registration-Room 104, Agriculture Building
9:00 The Present Situation in Livestock-Dr. Hamilton
10:00 Feeding Principles and Feeding Standards; visit to Nutrition Laboratories-
Dr. Becker
11:00 Soils of Florida and Their Relation to Livestock Production-Dr. Bryan
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Types and Classes of Livestock with Judging Methods-Professor Willoughby
2:00-5:00 Judging Dairy Cattle. Visit to University Dairy and nearby Dairy Farms.
Mr. Brown, Mr. Arnold

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
8:00 Principles of Breeding-Dr. Senn
9:00 Dairy Production, Feeding the Dairy Cow-Mr. Brown
10:00 Forage Crops, Pastures, and Silage; Visit to Test Plots-Mr. Stokes
11:00 Controlling Mineral Deficiencies in Florida-Dr. Becker
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Breeds of Beef and Dairy Cattle for Florida-Professor Willoughby
2:00-5:00 Judging Beef Cattle. Visit to University Herds, Campus; Camp and
Jackson Herds, Payne's Prairie-Mr. Knapp, Mr. W. J. Sheely

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7
8:00 Marketing Livestock in Florida-Dr. Hamilton
9:00 Management of a Beef Breeding Herd in Florida-Mr. W. J. Sheely
10:00 Fattening Steers for Market; visit to feed lot-Dr. A. L. Shealy
11:00 Pests of Livestock-Dr. Sanders
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Breeds of Sheep and Swine for Florida-Dr. A. L. Shealy
2:00-5:00 Judging sheep and hogs; visit to Copeland's sausage factory-Mr. Henley,
Mr. W. J. Sheely













ANIMAL HUSBANDRY PROGRAM


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
8:00 Laws of Florida Relating to Livestock-Dr. Hamilton
9:00 Feeding and Fattening Swine in Florida-Mr. Henley
10:00 Slaughtering and Curing Meat on the Farm; demonstration visit to storage
plant-Mr. W. J. Sheely
11:00 Saving Manure and Increasing Fertility with Livestock-Dr. Bryan
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Modern Machinery on Dairy Farms and in Dairy Plants-Mr. Brown
2:00-5:00 Judging Dairy Heifers and Calves; visit to Florida Farm Colony-
Mr. Brown, Mr. Arnold

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9
8:00 Shipping Livestock by Truck and Train-Mr. W. J. Sheely
9:00 Raising Calves for Breeding and for Veal-Dr. A. L. Shealy
10:00 Saving and Curing Legume Hays in Florida; visit to hay-drying plant-Mr. Stokes
11:00 Preparation and Use of Grain Feeds for Livestock-Mr. W. J. Sheely
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Research Work with Livestock at the Florida Experiment Station-
Professor Hume
2:00-5:00 Visit to Simonton Farm, Micanopy

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10
8:00 Value of State and County Exhibits of Livestock-Mr. W. J. Sheely
9:00 The Babcock Test for Butterfat, with demonstration-Mr. Brown
10:00 Breeding Records. Herd Testing in Florida-Professor Willoughby
11:00 Survey of the Week; suggestions for the future-Dr. A. L. Shealy

All lectures will be given in Room 104, Agriculture Building







BULLETIN OF WINTER SHORT COURSES


HORTICULTURAL GROUNDS






FLORICULTURE PROGRAM


FLORICULTURE

PROGRAM
MONDAY, DECEMBER 3
8:00 Registration-Room 205, Agriculture Building
9:00 Fall Annuals-Professor Floyd
10:00 Spring Annuals-Mr. Watkins
11:00 Laying Out the Garden-Professor Hume
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Garden Literature-Mrs. Cresap
2:00-4:00 Greenhouse and Gardens-Professor Floyd

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4
9:00 Perennials-Mr. Watkins
10:00 Narcissi, Gladioli, and Lilies-Professor Floyd
11:00 Other Bulbs and Tuberous-rooted Plants-Professor Hume
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Plant Names, Whence Derived and What They Mean-Professor West
2:00-4:00 Greenhouse and Gardens-Mr. Watkins

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5
9:00 Window Box and Pot Plants-Professor Floyd
10:00 The Development of Flowering Plants-Dr. Senn
11:00 Flower Arrangement and Exhibition-Mr. Watkins
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Soils, Natural and Prepared-Dr. Barnette
2:00-4:00 Greenhouse and Gardens-Professor Floyd

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6
9:00 Bush Roses-Professor Floyd
10:00 Climbing Roses-Mr. Watkins
11:00 Other Flowering Shrubs-Professor Mowry
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Insect Pests and How to Control Them-Professor Creighton
2:00-4:00 Greenhouse and Gardens-Mr. Watkins

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7
9:00 Palms and Cycads-Professor Mowry
10:00 Vines-Professor Floyd
11:00 Diseases and Remedies-Dr. Tisdale
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Ornamental Trees-Professor Floyd
2:00-4:00 Entomology and Plant Pathology Laboratories, Experiment Station-
Professor Watson and Dr. Tisdale

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8
9:00-12:00 Individual Conferences with Staff Members
All lectures will be given in Room 205. Agriculture Building
During spare time students will be given opportunity to consult references in
the Library on flowers and flower growing. Definite assignments in some of the
most important will be made.





















































BROODER AND POULTRY HOUSES






VEGETABLE PRODUCTION PROGRAM


VEGETABLE PRODUCTION

PROGRAM
MONDAY, DECEMBER 3
9:00 Registration-Room 303, Agriculture Building
10:00 Types of Vegetable Soils in Florida-Dr. Bryan
11:00 Marketing Potatoes-Dr. Hamilton
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Types and Kinds of Irrigating Systems Used for Vegetables-Professor Rogers
2:00 Seed and Soil Disinfection and Damping Off-Dr. Weber

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4
9:00 Marketing of Celery-Dr. Hamilton
10:00 Installation, Cost of Operating Irrigation Plants-Professor Rogers
11:00 Importance of Organic Matter in Vegetable Growing-Dr. Bryan
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Importance of Vegetables; Leading Areas, etc.-Professor Abbott
2:00 Bacterial Diseases of Truck Crop Plants-Dr. Weber

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5
9:00 Marketing of Strawberries-Dr. Hamilton
10:00 Soil Reaction and the Use of Lime and Other Materials-Dr. Brvan
11:00 Diseases of Truck Crops Caused by Parasitic Fungi-Dr. Weber
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Chewing Insects and Their Control-Professor Watson
2:00 Plant Growing and Plant Growing Structures-Professor Abbott

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6
9:00 Marketing of Tomatoes-Dr. Hamilton
10:00 Fertilizer Requirements for Vegetable Crops-Dr. Bryan
11:00 Why Some Vegetables Develop Seed Stalks Prematurely-Professor Abbott
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Plant Bugs-Professor Bratley
2:00 Various Diseases of Truck Crops-Dr. Weber

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7
9:00 Marketing of Watermelons-Dr. Hamilton
10:00 Lime: Method and Rate of Applying Fertilizers-Dr. Bryan
11:00 Fungicides and Their Application-Dr. Weber
12:00 Lunch
1:00 Red Spiders-Professor Creighton
2:00 Cultivation of Vegetable Crops-Professor Abbott

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8
9:00 Marketing Beans and Other Vegetables-Dr. Hamilton
10:00 Origin of Vegetable Crops-Professor Abbott
11:00 Aphids and Bean Leaf Hoppers-Dr. Tissot


All lectures will be given in Room 303, Agriculture Building























































LABORATORY CLASS IN SOILS




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs