• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Map of the campus
 Table of Contents
 Summer term calendar
 Officers of administration
 Faculty
 Admission
 General information
 Expenses
 Rooming facilities
 General regulations
 Colleges and curricula
 Departments of instruction
 Questionnaire














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00377
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1934
Copyright Date: 1934
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00377
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Map of the campus
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Table of Contents
        Page 53
    Summer term calendar
        Page 54
    Officers of administration
        Page 55
    Faculty
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Admission
        Page 59
    General information
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Expenses
        Page 65
    Rooming facilities
        Page 66
    General regulations
        Page 67
    Colleges and curricula
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Departments of instruction
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Questionnaire
        Page 91
        Page 92
Full Text






The University Record

of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of

%he VCLniversity Summer %erm

1934


Vol. XXIX, Series 1


No. 3


March 1, 1934


Published monthly by the University oj Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida


. I






















The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual
colleges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruc-
tion, and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them.
The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is
desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in sev-
eral series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with insti-
tutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is
under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual
copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to the University Library, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida










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IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO SUMMER TERM STUDENTS

All who expect to attend the 1934 Summer
Term at the University of Florida must fill
out the questionnaire on page 91 and mail
it to the Registrar, University of Florida,
Gainesville. Previous attendance at the
University of Florida does not waive this
requirement.
Upon receipt of this questionnaire, the
Registrar will send a registration permit for
the 1934 Summer Term if the applicant is
eligible for admission. In order to save time
and confusion during registration, each per-
son who expects to register should mail in
this questionnaire before June 1, 1934.
Upon request, blank questionnaires will be
supplied by the Registrar.









TABLE OF CONTENTS


Sum m er T erm C alendar .... ............. .. ... .......... .... ...... ...... ...... ...--....-....- .....
Officers of Administration.................. ....-.....- ...--- .....-..-.......... .--
Faculty ..........---.....-.. ..- ... .....-.....--- .. --- ------.....
Admission ...............-- ------.......... .--- .... ------
General Information ............................. ...... --. ... .-------- ....--
Societies and Clubs.................... -- ... .... ........ -----
Employment Bureau........................................................--------.....--
Demonstration School..................................-----......... ------
Short Course for Women's Organizations..................-------- -...--......---
Unit Course for Teachers of Trades and Industries................... ----
State Convention Future Farmers of America .................--------.......
Summer Term English Council ...................... ------- .. ............
Short Course on Parent-Teacher Associations ................. -----
Loan Funds.................................. ---........... --------- .. ..
Certificates and Extension of Certificates -.................--- .. ....... ....-- ....
Expenses ....................----- -- --- -------- ................... ----...
Rooming Facilities ................... --.. .... ------- ....
General Regulations --..................... .. ....--- ....... ... .. ................
Graduate School .................--- -- .. ----............. .......---- ...
College of Agriculture ........ ...........-- ......----- ... ..............----
College of Arts and Sciences............... ... ................
College of Business Administration....................... -------------
College of Education ....................... ..............---............----------
College of Engineering...................- ----....-- ...------.---
College of Law............................---...... .... ...... ...--
School of Architecture and Allied Arts................ -------------
School of Pharmacy ...................-----------....----
Departments of Instruction......--....... ------ ----------
Agronomy .................................... .........--- --------------
Architecture, Painting and Allied Arts ..................--------- --
Bacteriology ............... ------- ........------- ..... ----
Biology .......... ...... ..........----..... -- ........ ---- ....
B otany ........-- .. .............. .............................. ...........
Business Administration and Economics......................----------
Chemistry ................... ------..---...--- .. ------......--------
Civil Engineering ................ .....---------------
Drawing -_............ .... ... .....................-- ---
E conom ics ..... ... .... ..... ....... ... .................--. ........- ..- ......- ......- ........ ..
Education .............................. ------........ ---------
English ... -- ... __ .........................--.......... .......
French ............................... .....-------........ -------
General Natural Science............ --..............-------.......---.. ......--
Handwriting ...................... ......... -----........... -- ........-.. -----
Health and Physical Education ............-- -------....---
History ....................... ................ .. .. .............. ----
Horticulture ................... ... .... ---------....
Latin ..............-----.... ..... --...........--.----------..
Law .....---...--...-- ................ .....---------- ----- ..
Mathematics ................ .................... ------. -
Mechanic Arts ............ ..... ....------.. -------
Music ............- -..-. ...-...... -. ...... ...-- ......... ---
Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology............... ............. -----
Philosophy ........................................... --- --.............--
Physics ........... ........................... ------ --- ---------- ----
Political Science .................--....--... - ------------
Psychology .............. .... ...... ...... ..--
Public School Art ............-- ---..... -- ....----- -------
Sociology ......--..... ............----.... ......... ----
Spanish .........--......----......... .... ..... .... .. .................
Speech ..... .. .................... .................... ......... ..- .---
Questionnaire ..................... ..-... ....

[53]


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-.---..... 75
-.. ---- 75
...-...- 75
.. ... .- .- 76
---...- 76
- -..---.- 77
----- 77
---..- ..- 78
-..----. 78
----- 78
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..---..... 83
-----... 83
. ------... 83
.. ........ ... 84
-- ...--- 84
.... ... 84
-. ... ... 84
.-... .---- 85
.....----... 86
---. ..- 86
.-- ---... 86
-----.... 87
- -- ...... 87
----........ 87
....................... 88
.-- ........ 88
.... .....--... 88
.................. 89
. ................ 90
...................... 91






SUMMER TERM CALENDAR


June 4, 5, 6........................................

June 11-16..........................................
June 17, Sunday..............................

June 18, Monday ............................



June 19, Tuesday, 8:10 A.M..........
June 25, Monday, 12:00 noon.........

J une 25-30 ........................................

June'26, Tuesday, 12:00 noon.......


July 4, Wednesday........................
July 7, Saturday-....................... ..

July 14, Saturday-...............-...


July 16, M onday ...............................



July 21, Saturday...........................
August 1, Wednesday....................

August 4, Saturday...........................
August 5, Sunday, 8:00 P.M...........
August 9, Thursday, 8:00 P.M.........
August 10, Friday, 12:00 noon......

August 10, Friday, 7:00 P.M...........


.........-.....-....Sixth Annual State Convention of the Florida
Association, Future Farmers of America.
................Boys' Club Week.
......................Dormitories open. First meal served in cafe-
teria Sunday night.
...................Registration of students in Library: 8:00-
12:00 A.M.; 1:00-5:00 P.M.
A late registration fee of $5 will be charged
to those registering after this date.
....................Classes begin.
.....................Last date for registration in the Summer
Term, and for adding courses.
..................Short Courses for women's organizations.
Short course on Parent-Teachers Association.
.....................Last date for filing with Registrar application
for a degree or diploma to be conferred at
the end of the Summer Term.
..................Classes suspended for the day.
....-......... .Last day for making application to be desig-
nated as an honor student.
.....................Last day for those receiving master's degree
at the end of the Summer Term to submit
theses to Dean.
...................Last day for those beginning graduate work
to file with the Dean application (form 2)
to be considered candidates for advanced
degrees.
--.............-- ....Classes suspended for the day.
..................Last day for filing application for extension
of certificate.
............-......Classes suspended for the day.
....................- Baccalaureate Sermon in the Audi.orium.
................-...Graduation exercises in the Auditorium.
...--......-- ..........Summer Term ends. Lunch, last meal served
in the cafeteria.
....................Final faculty meeting for the purpose of
recommending students for extension of
certificates.


IMPORTANT DIRECTIONS
TO STUDENTS
After arriving at the University:
1. For room reservations in the dormitories, see Mrs. Margaret Peeler, south end of
Buckman Hall, Room No. 43.
2. For outside boarding accommodations, see Dean of Women, Language Hall, Room 105,
or New Dormitory, Room 144.
3. For arrangements for boarding in the University Cafeteria, see Cashier, first floor of
Language Hall.
4. For information concerning social activities among women students, or any matter of
interest to women, see Dean of Women, Language Hall, Room 105, or New Dormitory,
Room 144.







OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed. D., D.C.L., LL.D., President of the University
JAMES MARION FARR, Ph.D.. Vice-President of the University
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Director of the Summer Term
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture
KLEIN H. GRAHAM, Business Manager
ELIZABETH SKINNER JACKSON, B.A.. Dean of Women
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Dean of the College of Business Administration
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education
G. C. TILLMAN, M.D., Resident Physician
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E., Dean of Students
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Dean of the College of Law
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

LIBRARY STAFF
CORA MILTIMORE, B.S., Librarian
ALICE CUMMINS, B.A., B.S. in L.S.. Assistant in Catalog and Reference Department
ETHEL E. DONAHEY, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Assistant in Periodicals and Binding Department
HENRIE MAY EDDY, M.S., Head of Reference Department
MARY BEVERLY RUFFIN, B.A., B.S., Head of Catalog Depar:ment
ELIZABETH RUTH THORNE, B.A., Assistant in Catalog Depar:ment
VANNITA WESELY, B.A., Head of Circulation Department

ASSISTANTS IN, ADMINISTRATION
MADGE BAKER, Secretary, Office of the Business Manager
LEWIS F. BLALOCK, B.S.B.A., Assistant Registrar
FRONA GENTILE, Secretary, Office of the Registrar
J. B. GOODSON, Cashier
PENELOPE GRIFFIN, B.A., Secretary, Graduate School
ROSA GRIMES, R.N., Head Nurse
HELOISE B. HANDLEY, Secretary, Office of the Dean of Students
GARLAND HIATT, B.A., Auditor
R. S. JOHNSON, Chief Clerk, Office of Registrar
MARTHA ELIZABETH KNIGHT, Stenographer, Office of the Registrar
HELEN F. LANGSLOW, B.A., Secretary, College of Arts and Sciences
PRISCILLA MCCALL KENNEDY, Chief Clerk, College of Arts and Sciences
JOHN V. McQUITTY, M.A., Officer of Admissions
CLAUDE L. MURPHREE, B.A., University Organist
BURTON J. OTTE, M.S., Curator, Chemistry Department
MARY E. PARROTT, Secretary, Office of the President
MARGARET PEELER, Housekeeper
IRENE ERSKINE PERRY, B.S., Secretary, College of Education
ILA ROUNTREE PRIDGEN, Secretary, College of Law
ELEANOR GWYNNETH SHAW, Secretary. College of Agriculture
ELLEN E. TOPH, Acting Dietitian
NANNIE BELLE WHITAKER, B.A., Secretary, College of Business Administration
HOMER D. WINGATE, Auditor, Cus:odian Funds







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


FACULTY

JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Latin
LEONARD C. BAILEY, M.A., English
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, D.Sc., Chemistry
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D., General Natural Science
Lucius MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D., Sociology
JOHN A. BROXSON, Ph.D., Education
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D., French
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Agronomy
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D., Botany and Bacteriology
CLEVA J. CARSON, B.A., Public School Music
RAINEY CAWTHON, B.A.E., Health and Physical Education
BERNARD V. CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D., Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology
WALTER NICKOLSON CLEMONS, Health and Physical Education
ROBERT SPRATT COCKRELL, M.A., LL.B., Law
MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Botany and Bacteriology
CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B., Law
MANNING JULIAN DAUER, Ph.D., History
,JAMES WESTBAY DAY, M.A.. J.D., Law
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Economics
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D., Philosophy
SILAS KENDRICK ESHLEMAN, JR., M.E., M.S., Drawing and Mechanic Arts
JAMES MARION FARR, Ph.D., English
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Horticulture
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D., Agricultural Education
HALLETT HUNT GERMOND, Ph.D., Mathematics
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, Ph.D., History
WALLACE BARGER GOEBEL, M.A., History
WILLIAM LEWIS GOETTE, M.A.E.. Education
ROBERT LEE GOULDING, Ph.D., Education
ARTHUR SYLVESTER GREEN, M.A., History
ALAN DOUGLAS GRINSTED, M.A., Sociology
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, Ph.D., Spanish
CHESTER 0. HOLLEY, M.S., Trades and Industries
ARTHUR ARIEL HOPKINS, M.A., Speech
VESTS TWIGS JACKSON, Ph.D., General Natural Science
CHESTER HOWELL JANES, M.E., Drawing and Mechanic Arts
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Physics
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph D.. Mathematics
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D., Mathematics
JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D., History
WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, M.A., Education
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Education
CAROLYN B. MCCLURE, Handwriting
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Economics
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D.. Education
JEAN 0. MITCHELL, B.A.E., Public School Art
WILLIAM EDGAR MOORE, M.A., English







OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


LucY ANN NEBLETTS, B.A., Spanish
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Education
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D., Chemistry
JOSEPH EDWIN PRICE, B.A.E., English
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D., Biology
E. BENTON SALT, M.A., Health and Physical Education
WILLIAM LINCOLN SAWYER, B.S., Civil Engineering
PETER C. SCAGLIONE, B.S.B.A., Office Management and Accounting
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, Ph.D., Farm Crops and Genetics
FANNIE BELL SHAW, M.S., Health and Physical Education
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Education
KENNETH GORDON SKAGGS, M.A., English
BUNNIE OTHANEL SMITH, M.A., Education
HERMAN E. SPIVEY, M.A., English
0. C. R. STAGEBERG, B.S., Architecture, Painting and Allied Arts
THOMAS B. STROUP, Ph.D., English
B. A. TOLBERT, B.A.E., Education
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Law
BENJAMIN REMINGTON WELD, B.A., Sociology
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Psychology
ROBERT C. WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Physics
JOSEPH PORTER WILSON, M.B.A., Economics
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Education
J. HOOPER WISE, Ph.D., Education
HARRY EVINS WOOD, M.A.E., Agricultural Education

SUMMER DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL AND PLANNING PROGRAM
P. K. YONGE LABORATORY

JACK BOHANNON, M.A., Instructor in Industrial Arts Education
MARGARET BOUTELLE, M.A., Instructor in English Education
ADDIE BOYD, M.A., Instructor in Social Science Education (Geography)
EtLEEN F. BROWN, R.N., School Nurse
MAE KNIGHT CLARK, L.I., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to Third and Fourth
Grades
ELIZABETH MANEY CONE, A.B.E., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to Fifth and
Sixth Grades
CHARLOTTE DUNN, B.S.E., Instructor in Kindergarten Education
ALBERT JAMES GEIGER, Ph.D., Instructor in Education
Louis ALEXANDER GUESSAZ, JR., M.A., Instructor in Social Science Education
HELEN LYNCH, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education for Girls
CLARA McDONALD OLSON, M.A., Instructor in Foreign Language Education
RUTH BEATRICE PEELER, M.A., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to First and
Second Grades
EULAH MAE SNIDER, B.S. in L.S., Librarian
To BE APPOINTED, Instructor in Education
To BE APPOINTED, Assistant Professor of Business Education
To BE APPOINTED, Instructor in Mathematics Education
TO BE APPOINTED, Assistant to Kindergartner









58 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM

STUDENT ASSISTANTS
LAWRENCE H. AMUNDSEN, B.A., Chemistry
ALLEN THOMAS COLE, M.S., General Natural Science
ELDRIDGE RUTHVEN COLLINS, Education
ERBEN COOK, B.S.E., Education
WILLIAM BARNETT FEAGLE, Education
CHARLES B. FULTON, Night Librarian, Law Library
HAROLD JOHN LYNCH, M.S., General Natural Science
BESSIE NORTON, B.A.E., Education
HOWARD KEEFER WALLACE, M.S., Biology









ADMISSION


ADMISSION

The prospective student should refer to the Bulletin of General Information for regulations
concerning admission to the University.

ADMISSION BY COLLEGE APTITUDE TEST

Worthy adult students who expect to receive a degree (or diploma) from the University
and who, for any good reason, are unable to offer the necessary high school entrance units
may make a written application to the Committee on Admissions to take a College Aptitude
Test. This application must be submitted to the Registrar before June 18, 1934. The
application must set forth the applicant's reasons for wishing to take the test; a complete
statement of all high school units (statements of work done in high school must be sent
from the principal directly to the Registrar) ; the approximate amount of college work
already completed with the name of the college where it was taken; and the applicant's
plans for graduation from college. The Registrar will notify the applicant whether the
application is accepted or rejected.
The aptitude test will be given just once during the 1934 Summer Term, namely, on
Monday, June 25, at 2:00 P.M., in Room 205, Peabody Hall. Success on this test does
not give any specific high school units but the person who passes it is deemed worthy of
receiving a degree or diploma from the University of Florida without further concern about
high school units.

ADULT SPECIAL STUDENTS

No student will be admitted to any school or college of the University who has not fully
met the entrance requirements by one of the accepted methods, except applicants 21 years
of age or more, who may desire to pursue a special and limited course of study. Such
candidates for admission must secure the approval of the college concerned for the work
they wish to pursue.
COLLEGE OF LAW
Applicants for admission to the College of Law as candidates for degrees must be eighteen
years of age and must present, in addition to satisfactory college entrance credits, the com-
pletion of one-half of the work acceptable for a bachelor's degree on the basis of a four-
year period of study at this University. Evidence of this work must be presented to the
Registrar of the University on or before the date on which the candidate wishes to register.
The College requires a C average on credits offered for admission, and the credits must
meet the requirements of the Association of American Law Schools.
No specific course of studies is prescribed for the college work required for admission.
The combined academic and law courses offered in the College of Arts and Sciences, and
in the College of Business Administration, are recommended.
NOTICE.-Effective September 1, 1934, to be admitted to the College of Law the applicant
must:
(1) have received a degree in arts or science in a college or university of approved
standing; or
(2) have fully satisfied the academic requirements for a degree in a combined course
in the University of Florida.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


GENERAL INFORMATION
LECTURES AND ENTERTAINMENTS
Adequate facilities for entertainments and lectures are provided in the auditorium,
which has a seating capacity of eighteen hundred. Stress is placed upon performances by
the students, plays and musical entertainments being produced from time to time by students
of the Departments of Speech and Music.
RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The moral and religious atmosphere at the Summer Term is wholesome. The leading
religious denominations have attractive places of worship and students are welcomed at
every service. Transportation to and' from church is provided for those students who will
attend. Frequent devotional services are held in the University Auditorium in connection
with the Student Assembly.
THE Y. W.-Y. M. C. A.
The Y. M. C. A. Hall will be operated as a social center for the campus. An assistant
to the Dean of Women will be in charge and will take pleasure in doing everything possible
to make the student's stay pleasant so far as this department is concerned. A piano, reading
matter, committee rooms, kitchenette, ice water, various games and other things to enable
students to pass their leisure hours comfortably are in this building.
ATHLETICS
The gymnasium, basketball court, the baseball grounds, tennis courts and swimming
pool are at the disposition of the students, and instructors are at hand to direct athletic
activities. A well-kept golf course is near the University, and for a nominal fee students
of the Summer Term are permitted to play.
The brick gymnasium will be used for women students exclusively; the basketball
gymnasium will be for men students exclusively. Dressing rooms will be provided in each
of these buildings; students will not be permitted to wear swimming suits or gymnasium
suits on the campus.
The following schedule will be employed for the use of the swimming pool:
Men and Women: 2-6 P.M. T. W. Th. F. S. Sun.
Swimming pool fee: $1.
THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
All students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly, which
will be held in the University Auditorium at hours scheduled below. Important announce-
ments will be made at the General Assembly, for the observance of which students will be
held responsible.
First week 9 A.M. Tuesday
Third week 10 A.M. Wednesday
Fifth week 11 A.M. Wednesday
Seventh week 8 A.M. Wednesday

SOCIETIES AND CLUBS
PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University
during the spring of 1912. To be eligible for membership a student must have previously
attended the University for at least one year, or three summer sessions, have been guilty
of no serious breaches of discipline, and stand among the first tenth of the graduating class
of the University. Candidates for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor
point average of 2 on all scholastic work.







GENERAL INFORMATION


KAPPA DELTA PI
Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary fraternity, similar to Phi Kappa Phi, except that only
juniors and seniors in the College of Education are eligible for membership.

KAPPA PHI KAPPA
Kappa Phi Kappa is an honorary professional fraternity for men. Students enrolled in
the College of Education with an honor point average of 1.5 are eligible for membership.

PEABODY CLUB
All students of the College of Education are eligible for membership in Peabody Club.
This organization meets weekly in Peabody auditorium, where instructive programs are
rendered.
COUNTY CLUBS
During the Summer Term, clubs are formed from each county of the state and many
interesting and delightful associations are formed among the students and members of the
faculty.
ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN
A mimeographed sheet is issued each day during the session and appears on all bulletin
boards for the dissemination of information, changes in schedule, club meetings, lost and
found notices, etc. This is the medium used by faculty and students for making announce-
ments and each student should read the Orange and Blue Bulletin daily.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Peabody Hall and
Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are responsible for all an-
nouncements made in the General Assembly, on the bulletin boards, and in the Orange
and Blue Bulletin.

THE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

As the College of Education and the Summer Term wish to serve the whole state in
every possible way, a Teachers' Employment Bureau is maintained throughout the year.
Its duties are to assist students and graduates of the University to obtain positions in the
teaching profession. It keeps on file information both as to vacancies and as to available
teachers. When called upon, the Bureau tries to meet the needs of both teachers and
school officials.
The Director of the Bureau will be glad to be informed of present or prospective vacan-
cies in positions for which college-trained men or women are eligible. No charges are made
for services, though students are required to pay for all telegrams and telephone calls made
in their behalf.
Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the Director of
the Teachers' Employment Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville.

DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL

The new Laboratory School will conduct a few demonstration classes in the first six
grades and kindergarten. Provision will be made for four groups: a kindergarten, com-
bined first and second grades, combined third and fourth grades, and combined fifth and
sixth grades. Application for enrollment should be sent to the director of the Laboratory
School as soon as possible, since the number who may be accommodated is limited.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


SHORT COURSE FOR WOMEN'S ORGANIZATIONS

A short course on "college leadership" sponsored by the state organizations of women's
clubs will be held the week of June 25-30 in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Building.
The main topic for study will be "The Essentials of the New Era". Its purpose is to co-
ordinate the voluntary efforts of women's organizations with the events of the present time.
The Florida Federation of Women's Clubs, the Florida Federation of Business and Pro-
fessional Women's Clubs, the Florida organization of American Legion Auxiliaries, and
the Florida Parent-Teacher Association have expressed intentions to take part in the course.
Other organizations of similar nature are also expected to have representation in the dis-
cussion.
This course will be under the immediate direction of Mrs. Elizabeth Skinner Jackson,
Dean of Women. For information, address communications either to Mrs. Jackson, Hotel
Hillsboro, Tampa, Florida, or to Director of the Summer Term, University of Florida.

THE UNIT COURSE FOR TEACHERS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES

A special short unit course for teachers of trades and industries will be given during
the Summer Term. Exact dates will be announced later. The nature of the work will be
as follows:
1. Job analysis: discovering teaching content
2. Arrangement of teaching content:
(a) as to learning difficulty
(b) as to production difficulty
3. Lesson planning
4. Teaching the lesson
For further information write to Mr. C. 0. Holley, State Supervisor of Trade and
Industrial Education, Tallahassee, Florida, or to the Director of the Summer Term, Uni-
versity of Florida.

STATE CONVENTION FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA

The sixth annual State Convention of the Florida Association, Future Farmers of
America, will be held at the University of Florida on June 4, 5, and 6. The membership
of the Future Farmer organization is made up of boys who are studying vocational agri-
culture in our public schools.
The objectives of this organization as set up in the Constitution are:
1. To promote vocational education in agriculture in the public schools of the United States.
2. To create more interest in the intelligent choice of farming occupations.
3. To create and nurture a love of country life.
4. To encourage recreational and educational activities for students in vocational agriculture.
5. To promote thrift.
6. To encourage cooperative effort among students of vocational agriculture.
7. To strengthen the confidence of the farm boy in himself and his work.
8. To promote scholarship among students of vocation agriculture.
9. To develop rural leadership.
Since one of the objectives of the Future Farmer organization is to train for leadership,
a public speaking contest will be held in the auditorium of the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School on the night of June 6th and the speeches will be broadcast over Radio Station
WRUF from 7:00 to 8:30 E. S. T.
During the State Convention the Future Farmers will combine business with pleasure:
in addition to their business meetings and the educational features provided, they will
participate in such recreational activities as swimming, basketball, baseball, volley ball,
and other similar sports.







GENERAL INFORMATION


Programs will be printed and distributed at a later date giving detailed information
regarding events scheduled. The public is cordially invited to attend all contests as guests
of the Florida Association, Future Farmers of America.

THE SUMMER TERM ENGLISH COUNCIL

The Summer Term English Council meets every Tuesday evening after the first week
at 7:30 in Language 212. All teachers of English in junior and senior high schools are
invited to attend and take part in the discussions. In addition to informal exchange of
opinion, helpful talks are given by various members of the Summer Term faculty on
pertinent topics.

SHORT COURSE ON PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATIONS

During the week of June 25-30. a short course on the work and organization of parent-
teacher associations will be offered. Mrs. Florence V. Watkins, Secretary of the Education
Division of the National Parent-Teacher Association, will be the principal lecturer, assisted
by Mrs. Malcolm B. McClellan, President of the Florida Paren'-Teacher Association.

STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY

For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University,
funds may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of twenty-five cents is made
on each account.

LOAN FUNDS

By means of the Florida State Scholarship Fund, the College Girls' Club Scholarship
Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan Fund, and the R. A. Gray Loan Fund.
the Summer Term is able to make small loans to a limited number of women students
in order to help defray expenses in the current term. These loans are governed by the
following regulations:
(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for succeeding term of school.
(3) Applicant must be in need of aid.
(4) Applicant should apply for Scholarship Loan at least two weeks before opening of the
Summer Term.
(5) Application must be made directly to the Director of the Summer Term.
(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in which she is
teaching at the time of application.
(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at the University of Florida Summer Term.
(8) Loans will be for a period not to exceed nine months from the date on which Summer
Term begins.
(9) Loans will bear interest at the rate of 8%. which will be added to the main fund.
Blank forms for application for a scholarship loan will be furnished upon application
to the Director of the Summer Term.

TEXTBOOKS

The University Book Store carries a full line of all textbooks used in the Summer Term
sold at list prices. The Book Store also handles necessary stationery and other supplies.
Students may well bring English dictionaries and other useful books of reference. Students
in Education courses should bring with them professional books and textbooks related to
the courses they plan to take.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


CERTIFICATES

GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES
Graduates of the University are granted Graduate State Certificates without further
examination, provided that three-twen'ieths of their work has been devoted to professional
training and provided that they have satisfied the requirement of the law as to the Consti-
tution of the United S:ates. It is well for the student to note that a Graduate State Certifi-
cate permits him to teach only those subjects that are listed on such certificate, and that
only those subjects will be placed on his certificate in which he has specialized in his
college course. This will ordinarily mean that a subject must have been pursued at least
three years in college, in addition to credit for all high school courses offered in that
subject by a standard high school, before a certificate to teach that subject will be granted.
The student who expects to meet the requirements for specialization should familiarize
himself with the regulations regarding specialization as printed in the Handbook for Teach-
ers, Section 1, published by the State of Florida, Department of Public Instruction, 1933.
Applicants for the Graduate State Certificate must apply to Superintendent W. S. Cawthon,
Tallahassee, for application blanks and for further information.
Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by "presenting
satisfactory evidence of having taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under
a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of three holders of Life State,
Life Graduate State, or Life Professional Certificates." Application for a Life Graduate
State Certificate must be filed before the expiration of the Graduate State Certificate.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES

The following more important items regarding extension of certificates are based upon
the regulations printed on pages 13 and 14, Handbook for Teachers, Section 1, 1933:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term and at the
time formal application for extension is made.
2. The applicant must pass six semester hours in which no grade is below a
"C". At least one-third of this work must be in professional subjects.
3. Courses in Education and all other courses which definitely apply toward
meeting the requirements for a diploma or a degree are counted as profes-
sional subjects.
4. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply
for the same on the student Registration Card. In case the student fails to
apply on the Registration Card at time of registration, request may be made
to the Registrar, Room 110, Language Hail, to have his application for
extension properly recorded. A list of those who have applied will be
posted on the bulletin boards in Language Hall and Peabody Hall not later
than July 1st. In case of error in this list, students should report to the
Registrar. No student will be recommended for extension whose name does
not appear on this list by August 1. Students should register under
exactly the same name that appears on the certificate which they wish to
have extended.
(This is a University of Florida regulation.)
5. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to W. S.
Cawthon, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida,
within a year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension
will not be granted.







EXPENSES


EXPENSES

The cost of attending the Summer Term is very moderate compared with that at many
other institutions. The tuition is free and other fees are very low. For laundry, incidentals
and books, expenditures vary, but necessary expenditures are not very high. The estimate
of the cost to a student living on the campus follows:

GENERAL FEES
Tuition... ................. ......................... ..... .......------- ....-............. $ 0.00
Registration fee, residents of Florida.............-------........................... ....... 15.00
Registration fee, non-residents of Florida .................----... ..---.... .................... 25.00
R registration fee, College of Law ............ ....- .......................... -.. .....--................. 30.00
(or $6 per semester hour for less than five hours)
Registration fee, School of Pharmacy, residents of Florida .................. --... ....... ........ 15.00
Registration fee, School of Pharmacy, non-residents of Florida .................... .................. 25.00
Registration fee, Short Courses in Agricultural Education and Trades and Industries,
each....................... ................ .......... .................. ............ .. . - 7.50
Late Registration fee (Effective June 19) ......--- ------.....---...--... ................. 5.00
Room Reservation fee-.................--- ............-- ............- ......... .... .. ...... 5.00
(This fee, charged at the time of making a room reservation, is held as a breakage
fee, to be returned at the end of the Summer Term if no damage to the room has
been reported.)
Diploma fee........--............... -----------------...........----- ............... 5.00
Failure fee, per semester hour ................ ............... ..................... 2.50
(For any course failed during the last term of attendance, except that no fee will be
assessed for any course failed before the Summer Term, 1933.)

SPECIAL LABORATORY AND TUITION FEES

These fees will be found listed with the courses to which they apply.
Breakage Fee, Biology and Chemistry............. .............. ................... $5.'00
Swimming Pool Fee -- ............... .. -........-. --. .....----- ....... ..... ..... 1.00

PENALTY FEES
A fee of $5 is charged students registering after 5 P.er., Monday, June 18.

REFUND OF FEES
Fees paid in advance for room reservations will be refunded up to and including. but
not after, June 1.
If by Friday of the first week students for any reason wish to withdraw from the
University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded. No refunds will be made
after this date.
No refunds will be made of laboratory fees after the first two weeks of the Summer Term.
The instructor has the right to refuse any refund of laboratory fees when these funds have
been used in the purchase of supplies.

LIVING EXPENSES

The following is an estimate of personal expenses for the Summer Term. The cost of
board and incidentals is of course variable, depending upon the tastes and financial situation
of the individual.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


High Low
Lodging .-----------------.........................................----------------------------..............................$21.00 $12.00
Board ....... .......................... ... .....------........ ...... 60.00 35.00
B ooks ................... ................--- - ............... ............. 8.00 3.00
Incidentals ................................................. ............................... 16 00 8.00
Laundry .................... .. --- .... .. ..-- ............... 12.00 4.00


ROOMING FACILITIES

UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES

The University Dormitories are reserved for women students during the Summer Term.
Rooms are rented for the term of eight weeks, payable in advance. The dormitories will
be open from June 17 to August 10.
Rooms may be reserved at any time by application to the Business Manager. A deposit
of $5 is required with each reservation. This deposit is held as a breakage fee, which will
be returned at the close of the term if no damage to the room has been reported.
All bedrooms are furnished with single beds and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table,
washstand, and chairs. Students must furnish themselves with linen and other things they
may require for their own special comfort and convenience.
In view of the low prices in effect at the Cafeteria and its convenience, students are not
permitted to cook in the dormitories.

NEW DORMITORY

The New Dormitory is of strictly fireproof construction. Rooms are arranged in suites,
consisting of study and bedroom, and accommodating two students. A limited number of
single rooms and several suites accommodating three students are available. All rooms
are equipped with lavatories and built-in chifforobes, with adjacent bath rooms containing
lavatories and hot and cold showers. They are furnished wi.h two bedsteads and mattresses,
study tables, and chairs. Additional easy chairs may be secured at rental charge of 50c
for the term.
Rates:
Single Rooms, 1st, 2nd and 3rd floors.................... ............. ... $21.00 per student per term
Single Rooms, 4th floor .....................---....... ....... ................. 20.00 "
Two-room suites, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd floors ...................................... 20.00 "
Two-room suites. 4th floor ...................-- ......--.... ... ......... 17.00 "
Three-room suites, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd floors ................................... 18.00 "

THOMAS HALL

Sections "D" and "E" of Thomas Hall have been remodeled throughout. Both single
and double rooms are available. All rooms in Section "E" and the single rooms in Section
"D" are equipped with lavatories.
The rooms in other sections are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom,
accommodating three students. A number of rooms accommodating four students and a
few single rooms are available.
Baths, with lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of each section,
thus providing a bathroom for each four rooms. Rooms are furnished with beds, chifforobes,
study tables and chairs.







GENERAL REGULATIONS


Rates are as follows:
Single rooms, Sections "D" and "E"--.....-..-........------------.... .....................-- $19.00 per student per term
Double rooms, Section "E"...................--------................................... 16.00 "
Double rooms, Section "D"- ........................-- ....-....... ..................... 15.00 "
A ll other room s..................... ................................ .................... 12.00 "

BUCKMAN HALL
Rooms in Buckman Hall are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom, and
accommodating three students. A number of suites accommodating four students are
available. Baths, with lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of
each section, thus providing bathroom facilities for each four suites. Rooms are furnished
with beds, chifforobes, study tables, and chairs.
All rooms in Buckman Hall are rented at $12 per student per term.

UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA
Meals may be obtained at the University Cafeteria at the following rates:
Three meals a day, 4-weeks' ticket-.......................... .... ........-...-.............-----------------------------$17.00
Two meals a day, 4-weeks' ticket.....---...............----------...................................... 15.00
Three meals a day, weekly ticket .................................................................................... 4.75

Meals Without Tickets
Breakfast .................................. ........................... .... --- ---.......................... .20
Dinner .......................................................... ------- .......... ........................................... .30
Supper ...-- - --............................................................ ............. 25

OFF-CAMPUS ROOMING ACCOMMODATIONS
A number of comfortable rooming and boarding houses off the campus will be open
during the Summer Term. A list of approved rooming houses may be had by applying to
the Dean of Students. Living expenses off the campus will be somewhat higher than in
the dormitories and the Cafeteria.
In no case will men and women be permitted to room in the same house; special arrange-
ments will be made in the case of married couples.

GENERAL REGULATIONS
The student is advised to procure the University Bulletin entitled By-Laws and acquaint
himself with all general regulations. Particular attention is called to the following items:

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT
In order to receive a bachelor's degree from any college of the University, at least 30
semester hours must have been completed in residence on the campus. In all colleges except
the College of Education these 30 semester hours must be the last which one takes immedi-
ately prior to graduation. In the College of Education 12 of the last 36 may be taken by
extension. Even in this case, 30 semester hours must have been completed in residence.
In order to receive the Normal Diploma, the student is required to complete 27 semester
hours in residence on the campus. Extension work may not at any time be offered to satisfy
the residence requirement.
AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED
No person shall be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree
by correspondence study and extension class. No person shall be allowed to take more







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a Bachelor's Degree by correspondence study
or extension class. No person shall be allowed to take more than 9 credits of work by
correspondence during the summer vacation period. While in residence, a student shall
not be allowed to take work by correspondence without the consent of the dean. This will
be granted only in exceptional cases. In the case of candidates for the Normal Diploma,
the students may not take more than 16 credits by correspondence or extension.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
The minimum load of any student in the Summer Term shall be six hours.
The maximum load, including work by correspondence or extension, shall be regulated
according to the following schedule:
Maximum Load
Honor Point average for Previous Term Summer Term
L ess than 1 ................... .......... .....................................-..... ..................----- 9 hours
1 up to, but not including, 2 ........................ .. ........ ... ................. 10 "
2 up to, but not including, 3 .-..--. .-- .....- .... ..- ................-. ..-- .....- ...............- ... 11 "
3 ......... ................ ..... ............... .... ................. ...... ... .......................... 12 "
For persons who have not previously attended the University of Florida, the maximum
load is ten hours.
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dean of their
college regarding their choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to
this, juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which they expect
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest date on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be
dropped or changed only through the office of the dean of the College.

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The major courses are regularly numbered above 500 and the minors between 300 and
500, but there is no objection to counting a course above 500 in one department as a minor
in another.
As a usual thing, undergraduate students are not permitted to register for courses that
are numbered above 500.
A number of courses have already been arranged that may count as majors. Efforts
will be made to arrange still others upon request. If the major work wished is not listed,
requests for it should be made at an early date.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE
A candidate for the Master's Degree must be in residence for at least one scholastic year,
or four summer terms, devoting his entire time during this period to study and research.
In addition to registration for the courses which a graduate student wishes to take, he
must have an application blank (Form 2) properly filled out and presented to the Dean of
the Graduate School not later than July 16th. These blanks may be secured at the time of
registration from the Dean of the Graduate School.
The candidate must complete one major and two minors. A major consists of twelve







THE COLLEGES


semester-hours of rank above the senior class. A minor consists of six semester-hours of
rank above the sophomore class.
In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em-
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to be able to answer.
A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely allied to the major
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. The
thesis itself should be completed and submitted by the end of the fourth week of the
Summer Term in which the student expects to receive his degree.
A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language is required.
All students majoring in Education are required to take Education 500. All others
taking Education are advised to take this course.
Passing grade for graduate students is B.
The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from the time
of first registering for graduate work.
For requirements for the Ph.D. degree and other information in regard to graduate work
see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

Courses offered by the College of Agriculture are so rotated that all courses of major
interest are offered during the course of three or more Summer Terms.
Mature students who have not completed entrance requirements may, with the approval
of the Dean and the Director of the Summer Term, enroll as "Adult Specials" for the
practical information gained in the courses desired, provided all other requirements of the
Summer Term are met.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

At the center of every institution of collegiate rank is the College of Arts and Sciences.
In the University of Florida approximately one-half the teaching, as measured in terms of
student-credit-hours, is done within the College of Arts and Sciences. With the exception
of a few departments, the College functions in the Summer Term much as it does in the
regular terms. The subject matter offered by or allowed for credit in the College of Arts
and Sciences is arranged according to four groups as follows:

GROUP I GROUP II GROUP III GROUP IV
Military Science French Bible Bacteriology
Physical Education German Economics Biology
Greek Education Botany
Latin English Chemistry
Spanish His.ory Geology
Journalism Mathematics
Philosophy Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Speech
The aims and objectives of the College of Arts and Sciences are many. However, it
may be stated that underlying all else is that fundamental aim of giving to students a basis
for broad and substantial mental, social, and spiritual development which is acclaimed by







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


many of our leading thinkers as the only means by which we may bring about a solution
of the many grave problems which confront us.
Specifically, the College offers eight curricula, each of which is designed to meet the
needs and the wishes of a large group of students. The purposes, general requirements,
and provisions of these curricula may be described briefly as follows. For additional details
see the Bulletin of Courses.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
In this curriculum special emphasis is placed upon the subjects offered in Groups II
and III. For the specific requirements for this degree, the student is referred to the
Bulletin of Courses. For the degree of Bachelor of Arts the student must earn at least
134 semester credit hours and 134 honor points acceptable to the faculty of the College
of Arts and Sciences.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
In this curriculum special emphasis is placed upon the sciences. For the specific
requirements for this degree, the student is referred to the Bulletin of Courses. For the
degree of Bachelor of Science the student must earn at least 134 semester credit hours and
134 honor points acceptable to the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences.

COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAW COURSES
The College of Arts and Sciences offers pre-law training in curricula leading to the
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws, and Bachelor of Science and Bachelor
of Laws. For students who make sufficiently good scholastic progress it is possible to earn
the academic and law degrees in six years, of which three are devoted to study in the
College of Arts and Sciences and three are devoted to study in the College of Law. In order
to earn the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws the student must follow the
curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts as described above, in which, however,
24 semester credit hours of law will be counted in partial fulfillment of the total require-
ment of 134 semester hours for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The degree of Bachelor
of Arts will then be conferred on the successful completion of one full year of study in
the College of Law; the degree of Bachelor of Laws will not be conferred, of course, until
the student has successfully completed the curriculum prescribed for that degree by the
College of Law. In order to earn the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws
the same procedure is followed with respect to the curriculum leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Science as described above.

PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM
The College of Arts and Sciences offers courses by which students may prepare to meet
the requirements for admission to the medical schools. Only the first year of this curriculum
is prescribed. During the remaining years of his pre-medical work the student should
select his courses in accordance with the requirements of the particular school of medicine
to which he wishes to apply for admission. He is strongly urged to correspond with the
registrar or dean of the medical school for advice and direction. Due to the fact that under
present conditions only the better prepared students succeed in gaining admission to
medical schools, we cannot too strongly urge the completion of the curriculum leading
to the degree of Bachelor of Science by all those who wish to enter upon the study of
medicine. The academic courses prescribed for the first year of the pre-medical curriculum
are: General Chemistry 101 and 102, General Biology 101 and 102, English (rhetoric and
composition) 101 and 102, and one year of college mathematics. Students entering this








THE COLLEGES


curriculum should keep in mind constantly that emphasis should be placed on cultural
subjects as well as on scientific subjects.

PRE-DENTAL CURRICULUM
Students who expect to enter the study of dentistry should enroll for the first year of
the pre-medical curriculum. Every student who expects to enter the pre-dental curriculum
should correspond with the registrar or dean of the dental school of his choice for informa-
tion and advice. Every effort will he made to meet the needs of pre-dental students as
rapidly and as effectively as possible.

CURRICULA LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM
Two such curricula are offered in the College of Arts and Sciences, one with major in
newspaper writing, the other with major in newspaper management. For the requirements
of these curricula see the Bulletin of Courses.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The College of Business Administration will operate during the Summer Term as during
the regular terms. The courses offered will appeal to two different types of students: First,
to students attending the regular terms who wish to return during the summer term; and
second, to teachers and others who wish to take courses to prepare for the teaching of
commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare for the teaching of the social sciences.
The attention of undergraduates preparing for commercial teacher-training is called
especially to the following courses: Bs. 83-Office Management and Typing; and Bs. 85-86
-Shorthand.
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

UPPER AND LOWER DIVISIONS
The College of Education is composed of a Lower and an Upper Division. The Lower
Division contains all students who have not satisfied the requirements for admission to the
Upper Division. For details regarding the regulations of the Upper and Lower Division,
Honor Students, and Honors Graduation, the student is referred to the Bulletin of By-Laws.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

DEGREES OFFERED
Students completing any of the prescribed four-year courses may obtain the respective
degree: i.e., Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Education, Bachelor of
Science in Agricultural Education, Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education,
or Bacelor of Arts in Health and Physical Education.
Students completing the prescribed course may obtain the Normal Diploma.

MAJORS AND MINORS
In the following discussion a major is defined to consist of 18 credit hours above the
elementary year-course in a subject other than Education. A minor is ordinarily defined
to consist of 9 credit hours above the elementary year-course in a subject other than
Education, but in case the number of hours thus specified is not sufficient to meet the
requirements necessary for certification, the student must take enough additional hours
to meet these requirements.















72 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA AND TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

Lower Division

Leading to the Normal Diploma

For Those Who Expect to Teach in First Six Grades
CREDITS


En. 103- H health E education .............- ..........- .......... ...- ....... ... .... ...... .... ..... ....-
En. 121- Primary Methods .......... .... ............................ ... ------ --......... ..........
or
En. 124-The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades..- .........
En. 122-Teaching Reading and Literature in the First Six Grades-...-- -----
En. 201-The Teaching of the Social Sciences in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades
or
En. 221- Advanced Primary M ethods .......................................... .... ............... ...
En. 207-Educational Psychology ................----- ------ ---.. ------
En. 209- The Teaching of Science in the First Six Grades.------..-......--...----..-..-- .......
En. 253-Supervised Teaching of the Elementary Subjects .........---- ..--.. ..................
or
En. 200-The Elementary School Curriculum ................. --------------..................
Gl. 101-102-General Natural Science ..-----------------------
Sy. 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies ..----...... ............. ------.............
Eh. 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition .............. -------------- ----- .
Public School Art .----------... ................... ..................
Public School M usic ................ ----. .. ---- -...... ..... .... .................
Handwriting (one course) ................... .. ----- ---- - ..............
Major and Minors .....-.---------- ---------................----


Total-


Upper Division


4
0
18


................. 66


CREDITS


En. 308*-The Public School Curriculum ................. ------------................ 3
En. 319-Child and Adolescent Psychology ...........----- ---- .. ................... 3
Approved electives in Education .........---............................ ------- -------........................ .............. 6
Complete one major** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives approved
by the Dean ....................... ................. ... .............. .... ..... ................. 54

Total. .. ...................... .. ..... .................................... 66
Total Credits and Honor Points............... .. .................... ......... ........ ..........- 132

Students who have taken En. 200 will not be permitted to take En. 308 but must elect three
hours in Education in its place.
** For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the natural
science.








THE COLLEGES 73

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION OR
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

For Those Who Expect to Teach in the Junior and Senior High School

Lower Division
CREDITS
P1. 101-102-Elementary Gymnastics .......---------........------ ............. 2
En. 101-Introduction to Education ..................... ..... .............---.... 3
En. 207- Educational Psychology ................--.. ..............-- 3
Eh. 101-102- Rhetoric and Composition .................. --....-.- ......- ..-- ..-- ..-- ................... 6
Eh. 103-104-History of Literature .---.........-- ......... ...............................---- 6
Gl. 101-102-General Natural Science ............----..... -------- ............... ............-----. 8
Sy. 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies ......... ............................. 6
Sch. 201--Public Speaking ...........- -...... ................................-- 3
Major and minors and electives approved by the Dean...................................................... 29

T total .. ...... .......... ..-- .-- .--.- ....-- ....- ..-.-.-.- ........... .- ....-..- ..- .....- 66

Upper Division
En. 319-Child and Adolescent Psychology -...........3--....... ------- ................. 3
En. 323- General M ethods -- ............ ...... ......... ............-- .............---- 3
*Supervised Student Teaching ......--- .......... ----.... ------........................... 6
En. 403- Problem-Project Method ..................... ............................ 3
Approved electives in Education ................................................--- --------- ......... ...................... 6
Complete one major** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives approved
by the Dean .....-- ......-- ..... .. .. .. .. .............................. ..--------....... 45


Total..................-----...........
Total Credits and Honor Points-.........


--. ---.... ........... ......... ....... ....... 66
.......................- --- -----................. 132


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA
If, while the student is working on the curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree, he
desires to secure the Normal Diploma, he may do so when he has satisfactorily completed
the following work:
CREDITS
PI. 101-102-Elementary Gymnastics .......................................... 2
En. 101-Introduction to Education -----------.... -------................. 3
En. 207- Educational Psychology --......---- -----....... ..........-------............ ...........-- ... ................ 3
En. 323- General M ethods .............................-- ..................-- ......................... ----.. ............. 3
Supervised Student Teaching ......................................................................... 3
Eh. 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition -------...................---.............--..--. 6
Eh. 103-104-Introduction to Literature ... ----........... ......---- .. ................. 6
4Gl. 101-102-General Natural Science ...................----------- .......................... 8
Sy. 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies .....-----------......................................... 6
M ajor and m inors ......................-....--------............... ..... ....................................------- -----...... 26

T otal......... ............. ---...... ............... ...... ..- -... .............................................. 66
For the curriculum in Health and Physical Education, the student is referred to the
Bulletin of Courses.

These courses carry three credits each and must be selected in accordance with the major
and two minors in which the student is working.
** For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the natural
sciences.
t Students preparing to become principals must take En. 305, 317, and 401, or 406 or 408.
t Students who major or minor in natural science are not required to take Gl. 101-102. It may
be taken as an elective.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

The courses offered by the College of Engineering in the Summer Term of 1934 are
limited to one course each in Drawing. Wood Shop, and Surveying. These courses are
the same in content and will be given the same credit as courses of the same designation
and number given in the regular terms. They will be administered by the same personnel
as offer these courses in the regular terms.
Those interested in enrolling in any of the courses should communicate directly with
the Dean of the College of Engineering. Attention is called to the fact that because these
are all laboratory courses, and must be supported entirely from the fees obtained, special
laboratory fees are charged in addition to the Summer Term registration fee. If less than
ten students should enroll for any one course, the right to omit the course is reserved. The
courses offered are: Dg. 101-102-104-Mechanical Drawing, Cl. 101-Surveying, and Me.
101-Woodshop.
Summer Camp Surveying.-For the Summer Term of 1935 a summer surveying camp
is to be held under the auspices of the Civil Engineering Department, for all sophomore
civil engineers. This is a required course but will be open to all other qualified students
who have had Surveying 101 or its equivalent. The course will offer excellent practical
experience in the use of surveying instruments and various field methods.

COLLEGE OF LAW

Since 1909, when established, the purpose of the College of Law has been to impart a
thorough, scientific, and practical knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take
advantage of the opportunities in this field. Since 1927, the College has operated during
the Summer Term, the requirements and standards of the regular terms being maintained.
Courses offered during the regular terms are rotated. Courses not given during the regular
terms are taught in the Summer Term, thus extending and enriching the field of law
instruction. The variety of courses is sufficient to enable students of different types to
carry a full load.
The courses offered, all counting towards a degree, appeal to a wide range of students,
saving them time and money. Those who have never studied law are given suitable instruc-
tion. Advanced students may hasten the time of their graduation. Practicing attorneys
may review basic subjects and familiarize themselves with new ones. Students in other
fields who desire a knowledge of the law applicable thereto may carry one or more law
courses in conjunction with their other studies.

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

The School of Architecture and Allied Arts is a division of the University offering
curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Bachelor of
Fine Arts. Courses in this division will be offered in the Summer Term for the benefit
of students who wish to make up deficiencies in their regular work and for those who are
interested in increasing their knowledge of architecture, painting, drawing, and the various
allied arts and crafts. By special arrangement, these courses may be taken without university
credit by qualified individuals who do not desire to matriculate in the University.

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

For the first time in the Summer Term courses in Pharmacology and Pharmacognosy
will be offered. Those interested in these courses should write to the Director of the School
of Pharmacy for information.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

All classes meet for fifty minutes beginning at ten minutes past the hour.

AGRONOMY
Ay. 301.-Soils. 10 daily. A-205. Laboratory 1-5 T. Th. A-203. 5 credits.
BRYAN. Prerequisite: Cy. 101-102.
The nature and properties of soils as related to fertility and crop production. LABORATORY
FEE: $2.
Ay. 309.-Principles of Genetics. 9 daily. A-304. 3 credits. SENN.
An elementary course dealing with the basic principles of heredity, variation and selection,
and the application of these principles to plant and animal improvement.
Ay. 311.-Laboratory Problems in Genetics. To be arranged. A-304. 1 credit.
SENN.
Laboratory methods of applying genetic principles, with breeding experiments illustrating the
laws of inheritance. Designed to be taken in conjunction with Ay. 309. LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Ay. 505.-Special Problems in Soils and Crops. To be arranged. 2 to 5 credits.
BRYAN and SENN.

ARCHITECTURE, PAINTING, AND ALLIED ARTS
In addition to the University registration fee, in the following courses there is a fee of
$5 for each semester hour of credit. Students who desire to take these courses without
credit are not required to pay the University registration fee. Courses in Architecture other
than those listed below, as described in the Bulletin of Courses, may be offered by special
arrangement with the Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts.
Ae. 101.-Architectural Design. 1-5 M. T. W. Th. F. P-301. 3 credits.
STAGEBERG.
The beginning course in architecture. Small problems in design using only the wall, roof,
pier and beam as structural elements. Simple decorative elements. Lectures on composition.
Ae. 121.-Freehand Drawing. 8-12 T. Th. P-300. 2 credits. STAGEBERG.
Freehand perspective, outdoor sketching in pencil, and charcoal drawing from casts.
Ae. 225.-Elementary Water Color. 8-12 T. Th. P-300. 2 credits. STAGEBERG.
Color theory and methods of applying water color. Still life and simple landscapes.
Pg. 203.-Poster Design. 2 T. Th. P-300. 2 credits. STAGEBERG. Prerequi-
site: Pg. 102.
Posters and advertising material. Technique of different media.

BACTERIOLOGY
Bcy. 301.-General Bacteriology. 8 M. T. W. F. S-111. Laboratory 9-11
M. T. W. F. S-2. 4 credits. CARROLL.
Morphology, physiology, and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms and their
relation to disease and other human problems. LABORATORY FEE: $10.
*Bcy. 306.-Bacteriology of Foods. 4 hours and 8 hours laboratory, to be
arranged. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Micro-organisms in relation to food processing and food spoilage. LABORATORY FEE: $10.

BIOLOGY
Bly. 101.-Principles of Animal Biology. 8 M. T. W. Th. S-101. Quiz 8 F.
S-101. Laboratory 1-5 T. Th. S-106. 5 credits. ROGERS.
An introduction to the subject matter, methods, and general principles of biology with special
reference to animals. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

Bey. 401, Clinical Bacteriology, may be offered instead of Bcy. 306, if desired by a greater
number of students.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


Bly. 102.-Principles of Animal Biology. 9 M. T. W. Th. S-111. Quiz 9 F.
S-111. Laboratory 1-5 T. Th. S-106. 5 credits. ROGERS.
A continuation of Bly. 101. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 305.-Genetics. 11 M. T. W. Th. F. S-101. Quiz 1 W. S-101. 3 credits.
ROGERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 101-102.
An introduction to the subject matter, methods and data of genetics, with special reference
to animals.
BOTANY

Bty. 101.-General Botany. 10 M. T. Th. S. S-111. Laboratory 2-4 M. T.
Th. F. S-2. 4 credits. CARROLL or CODY.
Structure and life history of important algae, fungi, mosses, and ferns. Attention will be
given to their environment. FEE: $10.
Bty. 102.-General Botany. 11 M. T. Th. S. S-111. Laboratory 4-6 M. T.
Th. F. S-2. 4 credits. CARROLL or CODY.
Structure, environment, and principles in classification of seed plants. Excursions will be
made about the campus in studying the more common plants. FEE: $10.
Note: Students may take Bty. 101 and Bty. 102 simultaneously, in order to receive a year's credit
in Botany, which is a prerequisite to all advanced courses in this Department.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS*

Bs. 83.-Office Management and Typing. Two lecture hours to be arranged.
Laboratory 2-4 M. T. W. Th. B-207. 2 credits. SCAGLIONE.
Instruction in office organization and office function ; practical use of modern office appliances;
filing. Instruction in typing. LABORATORY FEE: $15.
Bs. 85.-Shorthand. 9 daily. L-201. 2 credits. SCAGLIONE.
Proficiency in the practical use of shorthand. FEE: $5.
Bs. 86.-Bs. 85 continued. 9 daily. L-201. 2 credits. SCAGLIONE.
FEE: $5.
Bs. 101E.-Economic History of England. 11 daily. L-201. 3 credits. J. P.
WILSON.
A survey of economic history; the evolution of capitalistic economy in England; the origin
and development of the wage system; the Industrial Revolution; the growth of British trade; the
relation of economic development to political policy; the effect of England's industrial progress
on the United States.
Bs. 102E.-Economic History of the United States. 8 daily. L-204. 3 credits.
MATHERLY.
The industrial development of America; the exploitation of natural resources; the history of
manufacturing, banking, trade, transportation, etc.; the evolution of industrial centers; the
historical factors contributing to the growth of the United States.
Bs. 201E.-Principles of Economics. 11 daily. L-10. 3 credits. ELDRIDGE.
A general understanding of present day economic organization; brief analysis of production,
distribution, and consumption.
Bs. 202E.-Principles of Economics. 9 daily. L-10. 3 credits. ELDRIDGE.
Continuation of Bs. 201E. With permission of the instructor, students may take this course
together with Bs. 201E.
Bs. 211.-Principles of Accounting. 8 daily. L-201. 3 credits. SCAGLIONE.
Lectures, problems, and laboratory practice. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
Bs. 329E.-Elements of Personal Finance. 9 daily. L-204. 3 credits. MATHERLY.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
A study of the legal, economic, and social aspects of personal as contrasted with corporation
finance; relation of personal finance to the financial organization of society; the basis of personal
credit; types of institutions and systems serving the individual as lending and as saving agencies,
such as building and loan associations, Morris Plan banks, savings banks, mortgage companies, etc.

Courses marked E are courses in Economics.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bs. 431E.-Principles of Marketing. 8 daily. L-10. 3 credits. J. P. WILSON.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
A survey of the marketing structure of industrial society; fundamental functions performed
in the marketing process and the various methods, agencies, and factors responsible for the devel-
opment and execution of these functions; marketing problems of the manufacturer, wholesaler,
and different types of retailers; the marketing functions in business management.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 9 daily. C-212. Laboratory and recitation
1-5 T. Th. C-230. 5 credits. POLLARD.
The fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and the preparation and properties of the
common non-metallic elements and their compounds. No credit toward a degree will be allowed
until credit in Cy. 102 or Cy. 104 is earned. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 102.-General Chemistry, continued. 9 daily. C-110. Laboratory and
recitation 1-5 T. Th. C-130. 5 credits. BEISLER.
Most of the class time is devoted to a study of the metallic elements and their compounds.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
*Cy. 203.-Qualitative Analysis. 11 M. T. Th. F. C-110. Laboratory 1-4 M.
T. Th. F. C-230. 4 credits. BEISLER. Prerequisite: Cy. 232.
A systematic study of the metals and their chemical reactions, and theoretical considerations
of qualitative analysis. Practice in the separation and identification of the common metals and
acid radicals. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 232.-Elementary Physical Chemistry. 10 daily. C-110. Laboratory 1-4
M. T. C-114. 4 credits. BEISLER. Prerequisite: Cy. 101-102.
A study of the gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter, the properties of solutions, and
colloids. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 262.-Organic Chemistry. 11 daily. C-212. Laboratory 1-4 M. T. Th. F.
C-230. 5 credits. POLLARD. Prerequisite: Cy. 101-102.
A brief course embracing the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds, designed
chiefly for students in applied biological fields. Suitable for those premedical students who desire
only 5 hours of organic chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
*Cy. 305.-Quantitative Analysis. 11 M. T. Th. F. C-110. Laboratory hours
to be arranged. 5 credits. BEISLER. Prerequisite: Cy. 104, 106, or 203.
The fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. The laboratory work may
be varied somewhat to fit the needs of individual students. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 508.-Synthesis and Structure of Organic Compounds. 10 daily. C-212.
3 credits. POLLARD.
A study of fundamental reactions for synthesizing organic compounds and proving their
structures.
Cy. 601.-Chemical Research. Required of graduate students majoring in
Chemistry. No credit. BEISLER and POLLARD.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Note: In addition to the above courses listed in Chemistry, other courses may be given upon
petition of the required number of students.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Cl. 101.-Surveying. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory to be arranged. 2
credits. SAWYER. Prerequisite: Trigonometry.
Recitations on the use of chain, compass, transit, and level; determination of areas, and
instrumental adjustments. Field work in chaining, leveling, compass and transit surveys. Drawing-
room work in calculations from field notes, and map-drawing. Textbook: Breed anl Hosmer,
Vol. I, The Principles and Practice of Surveying. FEE: $5.
Note: The right to withdraw this course is reserved in the event the enrollment falls below ten
students.

Only one of these courses will be offered, depending upon demand.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


DRAWING
Dg. 101-102-104.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours for each course to be ar-
ranged. 1 credit each. ESHLEMAN or JANES.
Geometrical problems, lettering and dimensioning. FEE: $3 for each course.
Note: The right to withdraw this course is reserved in the event the enrollment falls below ten
students.
ECONOMICS
Courses in Economics are scheduled under Business Administration and are marked E.

EDUCATION
En. 101.-How to Teach. 3 credits.
Section 1. For those who have never taught. 8 daily. A-106. GOETTE.
Section 2. For experienced teachers. 12 daily. P-201. W. A. LITTLE.
Section 3. For experienced teachers. 10 daily. A-106. GEIGER.
Introduction to the study of classroom teaching.
En. 103.-Health Education. 10 daily. P-208. 3 credits. SHAW.
Conditions and forces that affect the physical and mental vigor of children, youth and teachers,
and relate the school to the health of the home and community.
En. 121.-Primary Methods. 9 daily. B-210. 3 credits. -- Prerequi-
site or parallel courses: En. 101, En. 207, or any methods course.
Arithmetic, language, writing and spelling in the first three grades.
En. 122.-The Teaching of Reading and Literature in the First Six Grades.
11 daily. E-209. 3 credits. Prerequisite or parallel courses: En.
101 or En. 207.
The basic importance of reading in the elementary school; reading as a tool study; the various
methods of teaching, reading, etc.
En. 124.-The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades.
10 daily. E-209. 3 credits. -
En. 200.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 1 daily. A-106. 3 credits.
GOULDING.
This course is designed for teachers of the first six grades. Its purpose is to enable the teacher
to use more effectively the new Florida elementary course of study.
Note: This course or En. 253 is required for certification in the elementary school subjects.
En. 201.-The Teaching of the Social Studies in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth
Grades. 9 daily. E-209. 3 credits.
A course in methods of teaching geography, history and civics from the standpoint of human
relationships.
En. 207.-Educational Psychology. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. P-208. WISE.
Section 2. 11 daily. L-209. TOLBERT.
Psychology applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc.
En. 209.-The Teaching of the Sciences in the First Six Grades. 2 M. T. Th. F.
A-106. 2 credits. SMITH.
Note: Required for certification in elementary school subjects.
En. 221.-Advanced Primary Methods. 12 daily. B-210. 3 credits.
En. 253.-Supervised Teaching in the Elementary Subjects. 9 or 10 or 11
daily. Two conference hours in afternoon to be arranged. 3 credits. GOULDING.
Note: This course or En. 200 is required for certification in elementary school subjects.
En. 305-Development and Organization of Education. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. P-201. W. A. LITTLE.
Section 2. 10 daily. P-201. W. A. LITTLE.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 308.-The Public School Curriculum. 8 daily. P-209. 3 credits. GEIGER.
An attempt to formulate curriculum principles based on social conditions and social needs.
Demands made on the curriculum by the social-economic outlook will be emphasized.
Note: Required for certification in Elementary School subjects.
En. 317.-Tests and Measurements. 11 daily. Law-202. 3 credits. BROXSON.
An elementary course designed to aid the teacher in the use of tests in the improvement of
instruction and in the solution of school problems. One hour of laboratory work per week is
required. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
En. 319.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. 3 credits.
Section 1. 9 daily. Law-202. BROXSON.
Section 2. 12 daily. Law-202. BROXSON.
The nature, growth and development of the child from birth to adolescence with reference to
Education.
En. 323.-General Methods in the Secondary School. 12 daily. A-106. 3
credits. SMITH.
En. 401.-Public School Administration. 8 daily. L-109. 3 credits. SIMMONS.
Problems peculiar to Florida schools stressed in a practical way.
En. 403.-The Problem-Project Method. 9 daily. P-201. 3 credits. NORMAN.
The laws of learning, lesson-planning, thinking, questioning, the problem-project method, the
socialized recitation, democracy in the classroom as a preparation for democracy in life.
En. 406.-The Elementary School Principal. 3 M. T. W. Th. and 3-5 F. P-201.
3 credits.
En. 408.-High School Administration. 11 daily. E-202. 3 credits. W. W.
LITTLE.
Practical management and administration of the modern high school.
Supervised Student Teaching in High School Subjects
Prerequisite for all courses in Supervised Student Teaching: A general honor point
average of at least 1; an honor point average in the subject to be taught of at least 1.5;
and an honor point average in courses in Education of at least 1. Twelve semester hours of
work must have been completed in the subject to be taught, and in some subjects more will
be required; educational psychology and a materials and methods course in the subject in
which the student is to do the teaching must have been completed satisfactorily. Students
now in residence must file application with the Director in charge before the end of the
second term of this year; others may file application by mail or during the registration
period for the Summer Term. The College of Education reserves the right to reject appli-
cations for marked defects in character or personality or physical traits. Direct letters of
inquiry to A. R. Mead, Yonge Building, University of Florida.
En. 415.-Supervised Teaching in English. Hours to be arranged. High
School Building. 3 credits. MEAD and Supervising Teacher.
En. 425.-Supervised Teaching in Foreign Languages. Hours to be arranged.
High School Building. 3 credits. MEAD and Supervising Teacher.
En. 435.-Supervised Teaching in Social Studies. Hours to be arranged. High
School Building. 3 credits. MEAD and Supervising Teacher.
En. 455.-Supervised Teaching in the Sciences. Hours to be arranged. High
School Building. 3 credits. MEAD and Supervising Teacher.
En. 465.-Supervised Teaching in Mathematics. Hours to be arranged. High
School Building. 3 credits. MEAD and Supervising Teacher.
NOTE: All student teachers will meet at 4 P.M., Wednesday, June 20, in Y-138.
En. 484.-Organization and Teaching Methods in Vocational Education. (June
18 to July 6). 8-10 M. T. W. Th. F. Laboratory 2-5 M. T. W. Th. F. Y-222-24-26.
3 credits. HOLLEY.
This course is designed especially for teachers of trade and industrial subjects.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


En. 500.-An Introduction to Educational Research. 12 M. T. Th. F. E-202.
2 credits. W. W. LITTLE.
Designed primarily to help graduate students in Education in writing their theses. Required
of all students majoring in Education; open to all graduate students.
En. 501.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 8 daily. P-10. 3 credits.
SMITH.
An intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary school curriculum,
including the kindergarten; the selection and evaluation of material.
*En. 503.-Educational Tests and Measurements. 2 credits.
This is an intensive study of intelligence and educational tests. It is recommended that this
course be preceded by En. 317. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
*En. 505.-The Organization and Administration of Extracurricular Activities
in Junior and Senior High Schools. 2 credits.
An attempt will be made to work out constructive school policies having to do with the
developing of the pupil's initiative, leadership, cooperation, etc.
*En. 507.-Seminar in Educational Psychology. 3 credits.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems in directed learning, individual
differences, and adjustment of problem children. Primarily for graduate students with experience
in residence or in the field.
*En. 508.-Democracy and Education Seminar. 3 credits.
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual,
society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, education its own end.
*En. 509.-Problems in School Administration. 3 credits.
Open to graduate students who are qualified by experience and training to pursue advanced
study on selected problems in administration. Special attention is given to school house planning.
*En. 512.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. 3 credits.
A continuation of En. 511.
*En. 514.-Pre-Adolescent Psychology. 2 credits.
En. 517.-Educational Statistics. 10 M. T. W. Th. A-104. 2 credits. W. H.
WILSON.
LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
En. 518.-Special Problems in High School Organization and Administration.
10 daily. E-202. 3 credits. W. W. LITTLE. Prerequisite: En. 408.
En. 519.-High School Curriculum. 8 daily. P-10. 3 credits. SMITH.
A comprehensive view of the basic principles in curriculum construction.
*En. 521.-The Business Administration of a School System. 3 credits.
Open to graduate students qualified by training and experience to pursue advanced work in
this field. Each student selects some problem for special study and presents the results of this
study in the form of a thesis.
En. 528.-Educational Supervision. 8 daily. P-9. 3 credits. MEAD.
A graduate course open to students who have had not less than 12 hours in Education and
others by permission of instructor.
En. 544.-Constitutional and Legal Basis of Public School Administration.
2 M. T. W. Th. Y-128. 2 credits. SIMMONS.
Special emphasis will be given to Florida conditions, school laws, constitutional provisions,
judicial decisions, Attorney General's rulings, and regulations of the State Board of Education.
Students will be required to prepare a semester report dealing with some special field of school
law. Only graduate students with experience in administration and supervision will be admitted.
En. 562.-Guidance and Counselling. 11 M. T. W. F. Y-150. 2 credits. GARRIS.
The course will include a study of guidance and counselling of high school students. Educa-
tional and vocational guidance and problems of personality adjustment will be considered.

Not offered in the Summer Term, 1934.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 570.-Teaching Part-Time Classes in Vocational Agriculture. (June 18 to
July 7). 8-10 daily. Laboratory 2-5 M. T. W. Th. F. Y-150. 3 credits. GARRIS.
Problems peculiar to the organization and teaching of part-time classes in vocational agriculture
will be considered. The laboratory work will consist in preparing teaching materials and actual
participation in the organization and teaching of part-time classes in rural communities.
En. 571.-Teaching Evening Classes in Vocational Agriculture. (July 16 to
August 4). 8-10 daily. Laboratory 2-5 M. T. W. Th. F. Y-150. 3 credits.
GARRIS.
Problems of adult learning, class organization, and the conference procedure in teaching will
form the basis for the course. Evening classes will be organized and taught as a part of the
laboratory work.
En. 572.-The Teaching of High School Mathematics. 11 M. T. W. Th. A-104.
2 credits. W. H. WILSON.
En. 580.-The Teaching of Literature in the Secondary School. 9 M. T. W. Th.
P-208. 2 credits. WISE. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
A study and an evaluation of objectives, materials, methods, and devices in teaching secondary
school literature, with special emphasis upon teaching the major American and English classics.
Each student will make an independent and thorough study of one literary selection.
*En. 581.-The Teaching of Composition in the Secondary School. 2 credits.
A study and an evaluation of objectives, materials, methods, and devices in English composition
teaching. Each student will make an independent and thorough study of some problem underlying
composition work.
**En. 603.-Seminar in Educational Methods. 9 daily. P-201. 3 M. W. Y-128.
3 credits. NORMAN.
Designed primarily for teachers but administrative officers may be admitted by permission of
the instructor.
ENGLISH

Eh. 21.-Minimum Essentials of English. 8 daily. L-211. No credit. CLARK.
An elementary course in the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, and sentence construction,
designed to meet the needs of freshmen deficient in preparatory English. For such deficient students
this course is prerequisite to Eh. 101. Entry to the course will be determined by examinations to
be given during the registration period.
Note: Required of all freshmen who. upon entering the University, are found deficient in minimum
essentials of high school English.
Eh. 101.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. L-212. BAILEY.
Section 2. 10 daily. L-109. SKAGGS.
Section 3. 9 daily. L-109. PRICE.
Section 4. 9 daily. L-211. CLARK.
Section 5. 11 daily. L-212. SPIVEY.
Designed to train students in methods of clear and forceful expression. Instruction is carried
on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in theme writing, and in corrective studies and exercises
adapted to the needs of the individual student. In addition, all students are encouraged to read
extensively for extra credit.
Note: All students expecting to take Eh. 101 must report at Language Hall, Room 210, at nine
o'clock on the first morning of registration, Monday, June 18, to take the required Freshman
English Placement Test. No student will be registered for Eh. 101 who has not taken the Placement
Test.
Eh. 102.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 credits.
Section 1. 9 daily. L-311. STROUP.
Section 2. 11 daily. L-109. SKAGGS.
Section 3. 10 daily. L-212. BAILEY.
A continuation of Eh. 101, supplemented by the study and rhetorical analysis of models of
good writing.

Not offered in the Summer Term, 1934.
** Offered in alternate summers.





82 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM

Eh. 103.-Introduction to Literature. 9 daily. L-212. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
A survey of the literature of the western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance.
Eh. 104.-Introduction to Literature. 11 daily. L-311. 3 credits. STROUP.
A continuation of Eh. 103.
Eh. 201.-History of Literature. 11 daily. L-211. 3 credits. MOORE.
An outline course in the historical development of the English literature and language. Selec-
tions from important prose writers and poets ; lectures on the history of the language and literature;
a manual for reference; frequent reports from the individual students ; constant use of the
University Library.
Eh. 202.-History of Literature. 10 daily. L-211. 3 credits. MOORE.
A continuation of Eh. 201. completing the study of English literary history to the end of the
eighteenth century.
Eh. 301.-Shakespeare. 11 daily. L-210. 3 credits. FARR.
The life and earlier work, including the history, plays, romantic comedies and non-dramatic
poetry. Three plays will be read in class. Written reviews on plays read outside the class will
alternate with essays from the students and lectures by the instructor. This course is open to
Ihose who have had Eh. 201 and 202 or equivalent work in English literature.
Eh. 302.-Shakespeare. 10 daily. L-210. 3 credits. FARR.
A continuation of Eh. 301 in which the later tragedies will be emphasized.
Eh. 305-Historical English Grammar. 9 daily. L-210. 3 credits. FARR.
A course based on Lounsbury's English Language, designed to give the student some knowledge
of the historical development of the English language, with a view especially of giving insight
into modern English grammar. (Not open to students who in former years took Eh. 206.)
*Eh. 306.-Modern English Grammar. 3 credits.
Eh. 511.-Anglo-Saxon. To be arranged. L-210. 3 credits. FARR.
Anglo-Saxon grammar; reading of Alfredian prose.
Eh. 512.-Anglo-Saxon. To be arranged. L-210. 3 credits. FARR.
A continuation of Eh. 501. The Beowulf.

FRENCH

*Fh. 21.-Elementary French. 3 credits. The first semester of the course
in beginning French.
Fh. 22.-Elementary French. 8 daily. L-307. 3 credits. BRUNET. Pre-
requisite: One semester of college French, or one year of high school French.
The second semester of the course in beginning French.
*Fh. 101.-Third Semester French. 3 credits.
Fh. 102.-Fourth Semester French. 9 daily. L-307. 3 credits. BRUNET.
Prerequisite: One and one-half years of college French, or three years of high
school French.
The second semester of second-year college French. Reading; oral and written practice.
**Fh. 303.-Nineteenth-Century French Literature (First Half). 10 daily.
L-307. 3 credits. BRUNET. Prerequisite: Three years of college French, or the
equivalent in high school and college combined.
Leading authors of the period 1800-1850 studied in representative selections; literary move-
ments and tendencies.
*Fh. 304.-Nineteenth-Century French Literature (Second Half). 3 credits.
**Fh. 509.-French Classicism. 10 daily. L-307. 3 credits. BRUNET.
Reading and interpretative criticism of representative seventeenth-century works. Presupposes
some acquaintance with the history of French literature, and the ability to read French easily.
*Fh. 511.-Teachers' Course in French. 3 credits.

Not offered in the Summer Term, 1934.
** Of the two courses Fh. 303 and Fh. 509, only that one having the larger enrollment will be
given in the Summer Term, 1934.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


GENERAL NATURAL SCIENCE

GI. 101.-General Natural Science. 4 credits.
Section 1. 9 daily. C-112. Conference hours to be arranged. JACKSON.
Section 2. 11 daily. C-112. Conference hours to be arranged. BLACK.
Laboratory Section A. 2-4 M. W. C-130.
Laboratory Section B. 4-6 M. W. C-130.
A survey course in the physical sciences, emphasizing the relationships between the various
sciences and the importance of the scientific method. LABORATORY FEE: $8.
Gl. 102.-General Natural Science. 9 daily. S-101. Conference hours to be
arranged. 4 credits. BLACK.
Laboratory Section A. 2-4 T. Th. C-316.
Laboratory Section B. 4-6 T. Th. C-316.
A survey course in the biological sciences. LABORATORY FEE: $3.

HANDWRITING
Hg. 101.-Handwriting. No credit. MCCLURE.
Section 1. 10 daily. L-204.
Section 2. 4 daily. L-204.
Section 3. 7 P.M. daily. L-204.
Students enrolling for this course will have an opportunity not only to improve their own
handwriting, but to learn by instruction and demonstration the correct presentation of handwriting
in all grades of the elementary schools. The value of measuring diagnostic and remedial teaching
will be emphasized. The State-adopted text, Progressive Handwriting, will be used. FEE: $2.
Note: A course in penmanship is required for a certificate in Subjects of the Elementary School
Course.
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
HPI. 213.-Theory and Practice of Natural Activities. 2 credits.
Section 1. Men. 7:30-9 A.M. M. W. F. Yonge Gymnasium. SALT.
Section 2. Women. 7:30-9 A.M. T. Th. S. Yonge Gymnasium. SHAW.
This course will consider the physical education program of activities. It will include stunts,
plays, and games of low organization, and activities of higher organization, such as volley ball,
handball, diamondball, ricket, touch football, gator ball, and field hockey. FEE: $1.50.
HP1. 301.-Advanced Football. 2 M. T. W. Th. F. Basketball Court. 2 credits.
CAWTHON.
A course in advanced theory, dealing with the science and generalship of the game from the
point of view of the coach. An intensive study of the strength and weakness of various systems
of play as they are related to one another.
HPI. 303.-Advanced Basketball. 7:30 P.M. M. T. W. Th. F. Basketball Court.
2 credits. CLEMONS. Open to men.
The game from the viewpoint of a high school coach, and his problems. The student is expected
to show by demonstration his ability to coach a basketball team.
HPI. 311.-Administration of Physical Education. 10 daily. Y-138. 3 credits.
SALT. Open to men and women.
This course will cover the following phases of physical education in the public schools: personnel,
playgrounds, gymnasium, swimming pool, service unit, program of activities, physical education
class, intramural program, and interscholastic athletics.
HPI. 312.-Administration of Health Education. 11 daily. P-208. 3 credits.
SHAW. Open to men and women.
The public school health education program; health examinations, follow-up and correction
of defects, immunization, daily health inspection, first aid, hygiene of the environment and instruc-
tion, health of school teachers; principles, methods, and materials in health instruction.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


HPI. 341.-Principles of Physical Education. 9 daily. Y-138. 3 credits. SALT.
Open to men and women.
A consideration of the fundamental principles upon which the natural program of physical
education is based. A study of the history, aims, objectives, and contemporary trends in this field.
This course should be completed as soon as possible by those students majoring or teaching in this
field. Not open to those having credit for HPI. 215-216 or En. 471.
HPI. 353.-Practice in Conducting an Intramural Program. To be arranged.
Intramural office. 1 credit. CAWTHON. Open to men.
A laboratory course in which the student is assigned weekly duties by the instructor, varying
all the way from work in the intramural office itself to officiating in regularly scheduled games
of the department. The student must be free to carry on the work of the department.
The intramural program will probably be conducted in the afternoons between the hours of
four and six.
HISTORY
Hy. 101.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. P-206. GOEBEL.
Section 2. 11 daily. P-4. GOEBEL.
The development of Western Europe from the Teutonic Migrations to the First Crusade.
Hy. 102.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 credits.
Section 1. 11 daily. P-206. GLUNT.
Section 2. 12 daily. P-206. GOEBEL.
Western Europe from the Crusades to the Reformation. A continuation of Hy. 101.
Note: Hy. 101-102 are prerequisite to all advanced work in history.
Hy. 204.-Latin-American History. 10 daily. P-206. 3 credits. GLUNT.
Hy. 301.-American History, 1492 to 1776. 8 daily. P-112. 3 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. 303.-American History, 1830 to 1876. 9 daily. P-112. 3 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. 305.-English History. 9 daily. P-206. 3 credits. GLUNT.
Hy. 510.-Seminar in American History. 11 M. T. Th. F. P-112. 3 credits.
LEAKE.
Note: Courses in history are year courses and both semesters must be completed before final credit
is given.
HORTICULTURE

He. 303.-Floriculture. 2 M. T. W. Th. A-205. Laboratory 3-5 T. Th. A-205.
3 credits. FLOYD.
Varieties and cultural requirements of flowers grown in the open, in pots, under lath and
greenhouses, and under Florida conditions.
He. 411.-General Forestry. 11 daily. A-205. 3 credits. FLOYD.
The principles of forestry; identification of Florida timber trees; their perpetuation and uses.
Forest protection, finance, and influences.

LATIN

Ln. 307.-Ovid's Heroides and Fasti. 11 daily. L-111. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Prerequisite: Two years of college Latin.
Ln. 507.-Ovid. 11 daily. L-111. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
A graduate course including the work in Ln. 307, amplified to meet the needs of graduate
students.
LAW

Lw. 308.-Common Law Pleading. 8 daily. Law-105. 3 credits. COCKRELL.
History and development of the personal actions at common law; theory of pleading and its
peculiar features as developed by the jury trial; demurrers, general and special; pleas in discharge,
in excuse, and by way of traverse; replication de injuria; duplicity; departure; new assignment;
motions based on pleadings; general rules of pleadings. Textbook: Keigwin's Cases on Common
Law Pleading.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Lw. 309S.-Property I. 11 T. F. Law-204. 1 credit. CRANDALL.
Personal property; possession and rights based thereon; acquisition of title; liens and pledges;
conversion. Textbook: Warren's Cases on Property.
Lw. 311.-School Law. 9 M. T. Th. F. Law-105. 2 credits. TRUSLER.
Authority and responsibility of teachers; rights and duties of students; reasonableness of rules
and regulations and their extramural operation; incidental fees; contracts of teachers; pensions;
private schools; illegal expenditures of school money; illegal uses of school property; school con-
tracts and torts; diplomas and degrees; exemption of school property from taxation. Textbook:
Trusler's Essentials of School Law.
Lw. 314.-The Federalist. 10 W. S. Law-105. 1 credit. COCKRELL.
Open letters of Hamilton, Madison, and Jay explaining the provisions of the Federal Constitution
and urging its adoption. Textbook: The Federalist.
Lw. 413.-Florida Civil Practice. 8 daily. Law-204. 3 credits. CRANDALL.
Organization of courts; parties; joinder and consolidation of actions; issuance, service, and
return of process; appearance; trial; verdict; proceedings after verdict; appellate proceedings;
peculiar characteristics of the common law actions; special proceedings including certiorari, man-
damus, prohibition, quo warrant, habeas corpus, attachment, garnishment, statutory liens, forcible
entry and detainer, landlord and tenant. Textbook: Crandall's Florida Common Law Practice.
Lw. 415.-Abstracts. 10 M. T. Th. F. Law-204. 2 credits. DAY.
Practical problems covering the interpretation of maps and the plotting of lots described by
metes and bounds; the formal requisites of the different conveyances in use in Florida; deeds
executed by public and judicial officers; liens and contracts for the sale of lands. Textbook:
Thompson's Examination of Titles; Florida Statutes and selected Florida cases.
Lw. 505.-Federal Procedure. 10 M. T. Th. F. Law-105. 2 credits. COCKRELL.
System of courts created under the authority of the United States, jurisdiction of the several
courts and procedure therein ; removal of cases from the state courts; substantive law applied by
federal courts ; appellate jurisdiction. Textbook: Rose on Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure, third
student's edition, and selected cases.
Lw. 521.-Trusts. 9 W. S. and 11 T. F. Law-105. 2 credits. DAY.
The Anglo-American system of uses and trusts; creation, transfer, extinguishment of trust
interests ; priorities between competing equities; construction of trust dispositions ; charitable
trusts. Textbook: Bogart on Trusts: selected cases.
Lw. 524.-Corporation Finance. 11 M. W. Th. S. Law-204. 2 credits. CRANDALL.
The corporate contract; the corporate management; corporate securities; evidence of claims
on the corporate assets; the law applicable to financial processes. Textbook : Berle's Cases. and
Materials on Corporation Finance.

MATHEMATICS

For students who contemplate completing their work for the master's degree by attend-
ance at summer schools only, the department has arranged an alternation of courses which
makes this possible provided they attend four summers in succession.
Before registering in any course, the student should ascertain the prerequisites.
Ms. 85.-Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms. 11 daily. P-2. 3 credits.
KUSNER.
Functions of angles; solution of triangles; logarithms and their applications; trigonometric
analysis. Textbook: Simpson, Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms.
Ms. 101.-College Algebra. 9 daily. P-102. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
The quadratic equation, proportion, progressions, the binomial theorem, functions, graphs,
theory of equations, permutations, combinations, probability and determinants. Textbook: Hart,
Brief College Algebra.
Ms. 102.-Plane Analytic Geometry. 8 daily. P-102. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
The algebraic study of the figures of geometry and the plane sections of a cone. Systems
and transformation of coordinates. Textbook: Curtiss and Moulton, Analytic Geometry.
Ms. 251.-Differential Calculus. 9 daily. P-2. 3 credits. KUSNER.
The study of differentiation, which, with its numerous and widely different applications, con-
stitutes one of the most important practical and theoretical fields of mathematics. No credit toward
a degree is allowed in this until Ms. 252 is completed. Textbook: Granville, Smith, Longley,
Elements of the Differential and Integral Calculus.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


'Ms. 252.-Integral Calculus. 8 daily. P-1. 3 credits. GERMOND.
The integral considered as the inverse of the derivative and as the limit of a sum; rules of
integration; application. Textbook: Granville, Smith, Longley, Elements of the Differential and
Integral Calculus.
Ms. 320.-Theory of Equations. 11 daily. P-1. 3 credits. GERMOND.
A continuation of the work begun in College Algebra pertaining to the solution of algebraic
equations. A few additional topics growing out of this subject are also considered. Textbook:
Dickson, Elementary Theory of Equations.
*Ms. 331.-College Geometry. 3 credits.
**Ms. 351.-Advanced Calculus. 9 daily. P-1. 3 credits. GERMOND.
A further study of the calculus; treatment of more advanced topics. Textbook: Granville,
Smith, Longley, Elements of the Differential and Integral Calculus.
***Ms. 534.-General Projective Geometry. 8 daily. P-2. 3 credits. KUSNER.
Pure geometry dealing primarily with properties unaltered by the processes of projection and
section; principal theorems involved; theory of poles, polars, involution and kindred topics.
Textbook: Holgate, Projective Pure Geometry.
Note: May be substituted for Ms. 331 in the mathematics group in the College of Education.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 10 daily. P-102. 3 credits.
KOKOMOOR.
A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special emphasis upon
the changes of the processes of operation and methods of teaching. No specific text is followed,
but numerous works are used as reference.
Note: Required in the mathematics group in the College of Education.

MECHANIC ARTS

Me. 101.-Woodworking. 6 hours shop to be arranged. 1 credit. ESHLEMAN
or JANES.
Lectures, shop work, and joinery. FEE: $5.
Note: The right to withdraw this course is reserved in the event the enrollment falls below ten
stu lents.

MUSIC

Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades I, II, and III. 2 credits.
Section 1. 9 M. T. W. Th. F. Aud. CARSON.
Section 2. 4 M. T. W. Th. F. Aud. CARSON.
Study of the child voice; rote songs, the toy symphony, art and rhythm songs ; sight singing
from rote to note; oral and written dictation; appreciation.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades IV, V, and VI. 8 M. T. W. Th.
Aud. 2 credits. CARSON.
Development of sight singing; ear training, oral and written dictation, part singing;
appreciation.
Msc. 105.-Materials and Methods for Junior and Senior High Schools. 10
M. T. W. Th. F. Aud. 2 credits. CARSON.
Sight singing; study of the changing voice; beginning harmony; appreciation.

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY

Pgy. 242.-Drug Plant Histology. 10-12 M. T. W. Th. C-316. 2 credits.
CHRISTENSEN.
Internal structure of medicinal plants. Cellular elements and types of tissues used as diagnostic
characters in identification and detection of adulterations. LABORATORY FEE: $3.

Offered in alternate years. Not offered in the Summer Term, 1934.
** May not be offered.
*** Offered in alterate years.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ply. 351.-Pharmacology. 2 M. T. W. Th. F. 10 S. C-400. 3 credits.
CHRISTENSEN.
The manner of action, dosage, therapeutic uses and toxicology of official and non-official Crugs
and poisons.
Pgy. 533.-Seminar in Pharmacognosy. 9 F. S. C-316. 2 credits. CHRISTENSEN.
Sources of information on crude drugs and a study of current plant literature. Special oral
and written reports.
Ply. 551.-Special Problems in Pharmacology. 9 M. T. W. Th. C-316. Lab-
oratory 1-5 T. Th. C-400. 4 credits. CHRISTENSEN.
A comparison of methods of biological assaying. Special lectures and collateral reading;
laboratory experiments; oral and written reports. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

PHILOSOPHY

Ppy. 208.-Introduction to Philosophy. 11 daily. P-209. 3 credits. ENWALL.
An introductory survey of philosophical principles.
Ppy. 304.-History of Modern Philosophy. 12 daily. P-209. 3 credits. ENWALL.
A continuation of Ppy. 303. Special attention will be given to the works of Descartes, Spinoza,
Leibnitz, Hume, Kant. and Hegel.
Ppy. 408.-The Philosophic Conceptions of the Great English Poets. Seminar.
Hours to be arranged. P-209. 3 credits. ENWALL. Prerequisite: Any one
course in philosophy.

PHYSICS

Students in the College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in physics may enroll in
the courses outlined below. Substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher is made.
Ps. 211.-Elementary Theory of Mechanics, Heat, and Sound. 11 daily. B-203.
3 credits. KNOWLES. Prerequisite: One year of college mathematics.
Ps. 213.-Elementary Laboratory to accompany Ps. 211. 2-5 M. W. B-306.
2 credits. KNOWLES.
Ps. 212.-Elementary Theory of Electricity and Light. 9 daily. B-203. 3
credits. WILLIAMSON. Prerequisite: One year of college mathematics.
Ps. 214.-Elementary Laboratory to accompany Ps. 212. 2-5 T. Th. B-306.
2 credits. WILLIAMSON and Assistant
Ps. 317.-Modern Theories of Physics. 11 daily. B-205. 3 credits. WILLIAM-
SON. Prerequisite: Ps. 211-212 or equivalent. Corequisite: Calculus.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Political Science courses are year courses and both semesters must be completed for
final credit.
Pcl. 10l.-American Government and Politics. 3 credits.
Section 1. 12 daily. P-4. DAUER.
Section 2. 10 daily. P-11. GREEN.
A study of the structure and function of the federal government.
Pcl. 102.-American Government and Politics. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. P-11. GREEN.
Section 2. 9 daily. P-11. GREEN.
A study of state, county and municipal government. A continuation of Pel. 101.
Pcl. 305.-Political Theories. 9 daily. P-4. 3 credits. DAUER. Prerequisite:
Pel. 101-102.
Pcl. 309.-International Relations. 11 daily. P-10. 3 credits. DAUER. Pre-
requisite: Pcl. 101-102.










BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM


PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 201.-General Psychology. 3 credits.
Section 1. 9 daily. P-10. WILLIAMS.
Section 2. 10 daily. P-10.
Facts and theories current in general psychological discussions: The sensations, the sense
organs, and the functions of the brain; the higher mental functions-attention, perception, memory,
feeling, emotion, volition, the self, and like topics.
*Psy. 305.-Social Psychology. 10 daily. P-114. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Influence of the social environment upon the mental and moral development of the individual.
Advanced credit can be arranged with the instructor.
Psy. 312.-Psychology of Problem Children. 11 daily. P-114. 3 credits.
WILLIAMS.
This course deals with psychopathic, maladjusted, and mentally and socially defective children;
causes, types, characteristics and treatment.
Psy. 512.-Advanced Psychology of Problem Children. 11 daily. P-114. 3
credits. WILLIAMS.
This course includes and extends Psy. 312.

PUBLIC SCHOOL ART

Pc. 101.-Elementary Art. 1 credit. Two sections:
Section 1. 2-5 Th. P-302. MITCHELL.
Section 2. 2-5 S. P-302. MITCHELL.
Practice in school art work; lettering, poster making, booklets, construction, design and picture
study. FEE: $1.
Pc. 102.-Frieze Development. 2-5 T. P-302. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
Color, trees, landscapes, perspective, costumes, figures, combined in simple school friezes
correlating other school subjects. FEE: $1.
Pc. 123.-Handwork in the Elementary Grades. 3-5 M. W. F. P-302. 2
credits. MITCHELL.
FEE: $1.
Pc. 201.-Creative Drawing and Composition. 1 M. W. F. P-302. 1 credit.
MITCHELL.
Flowers, birds, animals, figures and landscapes adapted to grade work. FEE: $1.
[Pc. 209.-Arts and Crafts. Not offered in 1934.]

SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 111.-Introduction to Social Studies. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. Law-201. GRINSTED.
Section 2. 8 M. W. Th. S. Law-201, and 8 T. F. P-4. GRINSTED.
Section 3. 8 M. W. Th. S. Law-201, and 10 T. F. P-4. GRINSTED.
Section 4. 9 daily. Law-201. GRINSTED.
Section 5. 9 M. W. Th. S. Law-201, and 12 T. F. P-2. GRINSTED.
A study of early man and his increasing power over his environment; of culture history and
the development of certain selected social institutions ; of certain selected problems, especially those
connected with population.
Note: Required of all freshmen in the College of Education and of all students majoring in
Journalism. A prerequisite for practically all other courses offered in the department.

Note: The offering of this course will depend upon registration.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Sy. 112.-Introduction to Sociology. 3 credits.
Section 1. 10 daily. Law-201. WELD.
Section 2. 10 M. T. Th. F. in Law-201 and 8 W. S. P-4. WELD.
Section 3. 10 M. T. Th. F. in Law-201 and 10 W. S. P-4. WELD.
Section 4. 10 M. T. Th. F. in Law-201 and 12 W. S. P-2. WELD.
The contemporary community, rural and urban, and its most typical institutions; the basis
of community life; family life; making a living; acquiring an education; play and recreation;
moral and religious life; community planning; community maladjustments. Part two of the course
will be devoted to a study of social processes and values and sociological principles.
Sy. 281.-Cultural Development of Europe and Asia. 2 M. T. W. Th. F. and
7 P.M. P-1. 3 credits. WELD and special lecturers.
A study of the development of civilization from earliest days to the present. Special emphasis
on the basic factors in culture building and change, and on the contributions of the cultures of
the past to western civilization today. The course will end with the collapse of Roman civilization
in the 5th Century A. D.
Sy. 311.-Problems of Child Welfare. 2 M. T. Th. F. P-11. 2 credits. BRISTOL.
A consideration of problems growing out of the physical and social maladjustments of the
child, with methods of correction and prevention; institutions dealing with dependent, defective
and delinquent children. The class will visit the State Industrial School at Ocala and the Child
Caring agencies in Duval County.
Sy. 313.-Laws of Florida Affecting Child Welfare. 2-4 W. P-11. 1 credit.
BRISTOL.
Sy. 332.-Public Health. 11 M. T. Th. F. P-11. 2 credits. BRISTOL and
special lecturers.
A general introduction to the field of public health with special emphasis on the sociological
and economic aspects. Historical approach; bacteriological and biological foundations; community
hygiene and sanitation; communicable diseases and their control; nostrums and quackery; school,
industrial and community health programs; public health administration.
Note: Required of students majoring in physical and health education and may be substituted for
Sy. 116.
Sy. 441.-Principles of Sociology. 10 M. T. Th. S. and 7-9 P.M. T. P-1. 3 credits.
BRISTOL, WELD.
Sy. 531.-Development of Social Theory. 9 daily. P-8. 3 credits. BRISTOL.

SPANISH

Sh. 21.-Elementary Spanish. 11 daily. L-203. NEBLETT.
Pronunciation, grammar, written and oral exercises, memorizing of vocabularies, dictation,
translation.
Sh. 22.-Elementary Spanish. 8 daily. L-203. 3 credits. NEBLETT.
A continuation of Sh. 21.
Sh. 102.-Second Year Spanish. 11 daily. L-207. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN.
Prerequisite: Sh. 101 or permission of instructor.
Review of grammar, written and oral exercises, reading of modern texts.
Sh. 303.-Survey of Spanish Literature. 8 daily. L-207. 3 credits. HAUPT-
MANN. Prerequisite: Sh. 102 or permission of instructor.
*Sh. 501.-Old Spanish. 9 daily. L-207. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequi-
site: A reading knowledge of Latin.
Spanish historical grammar. Readings from XII, XIII and XIV centuries.
*Sh. 511.-Phonetics. 9 daily. L-207. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
Principles and practice.

Only one will be given, choice depending upon demand.






90 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER TERM

SPEECH

Prerequisite: All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have com-
pleted Eh. 101-102.
Sch. 201.-Public Speaking. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. P-205. HOPKINS.
Section 2. 10 daily. P-205. HOPKINS.
A presentation of the principles of correctness, clearness and effectiveness in speaking, with
considerable practice in the delivery of original speeches. Individual improvement is emphasized
and encouraged by constructive criticism. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
*Sch. 202.-Persuasive Speaking. 9 daily. P-205. 3 credits. HOPKINS.
Prerequisite: Sch. 201.
The subject and purpose of the speech and the occasion on which it is to be delivered considered
with the aim of influencing the specific audience. Much practice in speaking. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
"Sch. 207.-Interpretation of Literature. 9 daily. P-205. 3 credits. HOPKINS.
Oral reading of the lyric, ballad, narrative, short story, and drama. Readings from novels and
plays.

Either Sch. 202 or 207 will be given, depending upon which has the larger enrollment.





QUESTIONNAIRE CONCERNING ADMISSION
Return to the Registrar.
To BE FILLED OUT BY EACH PERSON WHO EXPECTS TO ATTEND THE UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA 1934 SUMMER TERM.

Last name First name in full Middle name Husband's
initials
Age....... ........
When you have answered ALL the questions below mail this sheet to the Registrar.
1. I desire to register in the course checked below:
College of Arts and Sciences College of Engineering....................
Bachelor of Arts............................ College of Education..... ............
Bachelor of Science...................... College of Agriculture..... ................
Pre-M medical .................--..- ..--------... .. College of Law......... .......................
Pre-Dental .....................---............ Graduate School ..................
Journalism ................................... School of Architecture and Allied
College of Business Administration Arts ............. .............................
HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS
2. Did you graduate from high school? .......... What high school? ..............................
----..-..-.-.-...-.-.-. --- --......... Are these credits on file at this university? .................
3. Indicate the number of your high school credits in each of the following subjects:
English ........................... Foreign Language.......... Science ........ ..............
A lgebra .......................... ............................................ .........................................
Plane Geom etry...... ........................................... ............
Solid Geometry............ ............................................ Other Subjects .........
Trigonometry ............--... History and Civics.......... Total Credits ...................
COLLEGE CREDITS
4. Do you expect to work for a degree or diploma at the University of Florida? .........
5. List below all institutions of higher learning you have attended and supply the
information.

Name of Institution Address Would you be allowed to re-
register there at any time?




"I---I *- --------I
... .. ....................... - ........... ---.. .......... ... ....... .--. ....--- .-- .--


6. Are official transcripts from all of the above schools on file in the Registrar's
office at the University of Florida? .....--........-------
7. Give last date of attendance at the University of Florida ..... -- ................
8. Have you attended any other college since attending the University of Florida?..........
9. If the answer to 8 is "yes," have you filed with the Registrar, a transcript or its
equivalent, from the institution last attended? ..................... ..............................
10. I affirm that the above questions have been answered correctly. If I am admitted
upon incorrect information I understand that my registration will be automatically
cancelled.
Signed .... .. .................. ... ...........................
Present Address:

Street and Number

City

State
[91]




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