• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Table of Contents
 Calendar
 Map of campus
 University calendar, 1935-36
 Administrative officers
 Organization of the university
 Admission
 Expenses
 General information
 Athletics and physical educati...
 Student organizations and...
 Colleges and curricula
 Departments of instruction














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00368
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: July 1935
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00368
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 229
        Page 230
    Table of Contents
        Page 231
    Calendar
        Page 232
    Map of campus
        Page 233
    University calendar, 1935-36
        Page 234
        Page 235
    Administrative officers
        Page 236
        Page 237
    Organization of the university
        Page 238
    Admission
        Page 239
        Page 240
    Expenses
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
    General information
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
    Athletics and physical education
        Page 254
    Student organizations and publications
        Page 255
        Page 256
    Colleges and curricula
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
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        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
    Departments of instruction
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
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Full Text






The University Record
of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of Information
for
The Colleges and Professional Schools
of the Upper Division
1935-36


Vol. XXX, Series 1


No. 7


July 1, 1935


Published Monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912.
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.


















The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the annual an-
nouncements of the colleges of the University, announcements of special
courses of instruction, and reports of the University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them.
The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is
desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in
several series.

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institu-
tions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications
is under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual
copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.

The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida








TABLE OF CONTENTS


PAGE


Calendar .............. ................................... .............. 232

Map of Campus .......................................................... 233

University Calendar ......................... ............................. 234

Administrative Officers ..................................................... 236

Organization of the University ........ ...................................... 238

Admission ............... ................................. .............. 239

Expenses ................ ................................. .............. 241

Tuition and Fees .............. ....................................... 241

Room and Board .......................... ........................... 243

Self-Help .................. .............................................. 245

Scholarships and Loan Funds .............. ............................ 245

General Information .............. ......................................... 249

Athletics and Physical Education ............................................ 254

Student Organizations and Publications ....................................... 255

Colleges and Curricula ................................................. 257-298

College of Agriculture ................................................. 257

School of Architecture and Allied Arts.................................... 261

College of Arts and Sciences ........................................... 265

School of Pharmacy ....................... ............................ 274

College of Business Administration ........................................ 276

College of Education ............... ................................... 283

College of Engineering ................................................... 289

College of Law ........................ .............................. 296

Departments of Instruction ...................... ........................ 299-354













.1935 '

JULY.


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ENGIN7!NC

N







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


UNIVERSITY CALENDAR-1935-36


FIRST TERM
September 20-21, Friday-Saturday ... Entrance Examinations.
September 23, Monday, 11 a.m. ...... 1935-36 session begins.
September 23-28, Monday-Saturday ... Freshman Week.
September 27-28, Friday-Saturday,
12 noon ........................ Registration of upperclassmen.
September 30, Monday, 8 a.m. ........ Classes for the 1935-36 session begin; late registra-
tion fee $5.
October 5, Saturday, 12 noon ....... Last day for registration for the first term 1935-36.
October 8, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ........October meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
October 12, Saturday, 2:30 p.m. .....Meeting of the General Assembly, P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School Auditorium.
October 15, Tuesday, 5 p.m. ........ Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be
designated as Honor Students.
October 19, Saturday, 12 noon ....... Last day for making application for a degree at the
end of the first term.
October 24, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. .....October meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
October 26, Saturday ............... Homecoming.
November 1, Friday ................Last day for those beginning graduate work to file
with the Dean an application (Form 2) to be con-
sidered candidates for advanced degrees.
November 2, Saturday, 12 noon....... Last day for dropping courses without receiving
grade.
November 5, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. .....November meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
November 11, Monday .............. Armistice Day-special exercises.
November 21, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ....November meeting of the University Senate, 201
Law Building.
November 26, Tuesday, 5 p.m. ....... Progress reports and delinquency reports due in the
Office of the Registrar.
November 27, Wednesday, 5 p.m. ..... Thanksgiving recess begins.
December 2, Monday, 8 a.m. ........ Thanksgiving recess ends.
December 3, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ......December meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
December 12, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ...December meeting of the University Senate, 201
Law Building.
December 21, Saturday, 12 noon ..... Christmas recess begins.

1936

January 3, Friday, 8 a.m. ........... Christmas recess ends.
January 7, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ...... January meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
January 23, Thursday, 8:30 a.m. ...... Final examinations for the first term begin.
January 30, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ....January meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
February 2, Sunday, 11 a.m. ........ Baccalaureate Sermon.
February 3, Monday, 10 a.m. ........Commencement Convocation.
February 3, Monday, 12 noon ........ First term ends; at 5 p.m. all grades are due in the
Office of the Registrar.
February 4, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m.........February meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
February 4-5, Tuesday-Wednesday ... Inter-term days.









UNIVERSITY CALENDAR-1935-36


SECOND TERM
February 6, Thursday .............. Registration for second term.
February 7, Friday, 8 a.m. .......... Classes for second term begin; late registration
fee $5.
February 13, Thursday, 5 p.m. ....... Last day for registration for second term.
February 15, Saturday, 2:30 p.m. .....Meeting of the General Assembly, P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School Auditorium.
February 27, Thursday, 2:10 p.m ....February meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
February 29, Saturday, 12 noon ...... Last day for making application for a degree at the
end of the second term.
March 3, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ........March meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
March 12, Thursday, 5 p.m. ......... Last day for dropping a course without a grade.
March 16, Monday ................. Last day for those beginning graduate work in the
second term to file with the Dean an application
(Form 2) to be considered candidates for advanced
degrees.
Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be des-
ignated as Honor Students.
March 26, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ......March meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
April 3, Friday, 5 p.m. .............. Progress Reports and delinquency reports due in
the Office of the Registrar.
April 7, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ......... April meeting of the University Council, 111 Lan-
guage Hall.
April 15, Wednesday, 5 p.m. ........ Spring recess begins.
April 20, Monday, 8 a.m. ........... Spring recess ends.
April 30, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ........ April meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
May 1, Friday ..................... Last day for graduate students, graduating at the
end of the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
May 5, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ..........May meeting of the University Council, 111 Lan-
guage Hall.
May 27, Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. ......Final examinations begin.
May 28, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ........ May meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
June 6-8, Saturday-Monday ..........Commencement Exercises.
June 6, Saturday, 7:30 p.m. .........Annual Phi Kappa Phi Banquet.
June 7, Sunday, 11 a.m. ............ Baccalaureate Sermon.
June 8, Monday, 10 a.m. ............ Commencement Convocation.
June 8, Monday, 5 p.m. ............. All grades are due in the Office of the Registrar.
June 8, Monday .....................Boys' Club Week begins.


SUMMER TERM
June 15, Monday .................. 1936 First Summer Term begins.
July 24, Friday ...................... 1936 First Summer Term ends.
July 25, Saturday ................... 1936 Second Summer term begins.
August 28, Friday ................... 1936 Second Summer Term ends.


FIRST TERM
September 21, Monday, 11 a.m. ...... 1936-37 session begins.







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

1935-36

BOARD OF CONTROL
GEORGE H. BALDWIN, Ph.B. (Yale) ..............Executive Vice-President, Bisbee-Baldwin
Corporation, Barnett National Bank Building, Jacksonville, Florida
Chairman of the Board
ALBERT H. BLANDING, Graduate, East Florida Seminary........................ Executive
Bartow, Florida
HARRY C. DUNCAN, LL.B. (Stetson) ... .Attorney-at-law, and President of the Bank of Tavares,
Tavares, Florida
OLIVER J. SEMMES, B.S. (Alabama Polytechnic Institute) ........................ Merchant
601 North Tarragona Street, Pensacola, Florida
ALFRED H. WAGG, Ph.B., M.A. (Dickinson College) ................Real Estate Counsellor
163 Brazilian Avenue, Palm Beach, Florida
JOHN T. DIAMOND ...................................... Secretary of the Board of Control
Tallahassee, Florida


STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
DAVID SHOLTZ ............................. ............... .................. Governor
R. A. GRAY ...................... ..... ........ ..................... Secretary of State
W. V. KNOTT........................................................ State Treasurer
CARY D. LANDIS..................................................... Attorney General
W. S. CAWTHON, Secretary................... State Superintendent of Public Instruction



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D.
President of the University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D................... Acting Vice-President of the University;
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D. ........................... Dean of the Graduate School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S. ..................... Registrar, Secretary of the Council
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A. ...................... Dean of the College of Business
Administration; Acting Dean of the General College
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc...............................Dean of the College of Agriculture
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D. ........................ Dean of the College of Education
BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.A., B.S.A. .................... Dean of the General Extension Division
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E .................................. Dean of Students
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B. .......................Dean of the College of Law
BLAKE RAGSDALE VAN LEER, M.E., M.S. ..............Dean of the College of Engineering






ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS


OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D. .................... Acting Director of the Institute of
Inter-American Affairs
RICHARD DEWITT BROWN ............................................. Director of Music
BERNARD VICTOR CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D. .................. Director of the School of Pharmacy
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S. ...............Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM ............................................ Business Manager
H. HAROLD HUME, M.S. ..............Assistant Dean, Research, College of Agriculture and
Assistant Director, Research, Experiment Station
EDGAR CHARLES JONES, LL.B. ................................... Director of Athletics
JOHN VREDENBURGH MCQUITTY, M.A.............. Secretary, Board of University Examiners
CORA MILTIMORE, B.S. ...... .......... ............................. Librarian
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D. ...............Assistant Dean of the College of Education
ARTHUR PERCIVAL SPENCER, M.S. ...........Vice-Director, Agricultural Extension Service
GEORGE CLARENCE TILLMAN, M.D., F.A.C.S. .........................University Physician
THOMPSON VAN HYNING .......................... Director of the Florida State Museum
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., A.I.A. .....Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D. ........ Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
FRANK S. WRIGHT, B.S.J. ...................................... Director of Publicity


BOARD OF UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS

HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Chairman .................................. Registrar
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D. ........................Head, Department of Psychology
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A. ................... Associate Dean of the General College
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D. ................... Head, Department of Mathematics
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E. .................................. Dean of Students
JOHN VREDENBURGH McQUITTY, M.A.......................................... Secretary







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY

The University is organized in schools, colleges, and divisions, as follows:


LOWER DIVISION
THE GENERAL COLLEGE




UPPER DIVISION
THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, including
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, including
THE COLLEGE PROPER
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS
THE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, including
THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION
THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, including
THE LABORATORY SCHOOL
THE HIGH SCHOOL VISITATION
THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS




THE COLLEGE OF LAW
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL




THE GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION
THE SUMMER SESSION
THE DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
THE DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
THE DIVISION OF MUSIC
THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
THE STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
THE BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE







ADMISSION


ADMISSION

FROM THE GENERAL COLLEGE

After the student has completed the work of the General College and received a certificate
of graduation, he may enter one of the colleges or professional schools of the Upper division
by meeting the specific admission requirements of that college or school.
The Board of University Examiners administers the admission requirements of the Upper
Division. Besides the certificate of graduation from the General College, the student must
be certified by the Board as qualified to pursue the work of the college or school he wishes
to enter.
In addition to the general requirements stated above, the various colleges and schools
of the Upper Division have specific requirements for entrance. These requirements are
listed under the curricula of the several colleges and schools. Students in the General
College may prepare to meet these requirements by taking the courses indicated under the
various curricula presented, as electives.
The comprehensive examinations of the General College will cover the content of the
courses required for admission to any specific curriculum of the Upper Division selected by the
individual student.

OLD STUDENTS

Students who have registered at the University of Florida prior to the 1935 Summer
Session may continue in the curriculum they have elected to follow in one of the colleges
or professional schools of the Upper Division, without completing the prescribed require-
ments for graduation from the General College.


TRANSFER STUDENTS

During the 1935-36 session, students with 15 acceptable semester hours credit of ad-
vanced standing, and during the 1936-37 session, students with 45 acceptable semester hours
credit of advanced standing, may be admitted to one of the colleges of the University.
Students who cannot meet these standards will be admitted to the General College, provided
they meet the other standards for admission. After a student has completed his first
year in the General College, as prescribed by the Board of University Examiners, the
Board will review his case and make such adjustments as may be necessary.
Beginning with the 1937 Summer Session, all students admitted to the colleges and
professional schools of the Upper Division will be required to meet the requirements for
admission to those colleges as provided by the new plan.
The manner in which students transferring from other colleges to the University may
meet these requirements will be determined by the Board of University Examiners, after due
consideration of the training of the student before application for admission to the Univer-
sity of Florida. In general, the policy of the Board of University Examiners will be as fol-
lows:
1. The Board of University Examiners will always bear in mind the aims of the curric-
ulum of the General College. All students must present training equivalent to the
work of the General College, and must pass the prescribed comprehensive examinations.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


2. Students with poor or average records from other institutions will be required to
meet in toto the requirements for admission to the Upper Division.
3. The Board of University Examiners, in the case of transfer students with high or
superior records, may vary the requirements for admission to the colleges and pro-
fessional schools of the Upper Division, under the new plan, to the best interest of
the student.

Students attending other institutions who contemplate entering the University of Flor-
ida should communicate with the Registrar for information concerning the method of ad-
mission. Such students should, at the end of their last term or semester in another in-
stitution, request the registrar of that institution to send directly to the Registrar of the
University of Florida a complete official transcript of their work, and should also have such
transcripts sent from any other institutions previously attended.
Students who, because of failure in studies, are not allowed to return to the institution
they last attended, or who failed in half of their work during the last period they attended
that institution, will be denied admission to the University of Florida.


SPECIAL STUDENTS

Special students may be admitted either to the General College or to the various colleges
of the University (except the College of Law, to which special students are never admitted)
only by approval of the Board of University Examiners. Applications for admission of
these students must include:
1. The filing of satisfactory preliminary credentials.
2. A statement as to the type of studies to be pursued.
3. Reason for desiring to take special courses.
4. Satisfactory evidence of ability to pursue these studies.







EXPENSES


EXPENSES

TUITION
Fees: Classification of Students.-For the purpose of fees, students are classified as
Florida or non-Florida students.
A Florida student, if under twenty-one years of age, is one (1) whose parents have
been residents of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his
registration; or (2) is one whose parents were residents of Florida at the time of their death,
and who has not acquired residence in another state; or (3) is one whose parents were
not residents of Florida at the time of their death but whose natural guardian has been
a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration.
A Florida student, if over twenty-one years of age, is one (1) whose parents are residents of
Florida (or were at the time of their death) and who has not acquired residence in another
state; or (2) is one who while an adult has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve
consecutive months next preceding his registration; or (3) is the wife of a man who has
been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding her regis-
tration; or (4) is an alien who has taken out his first citizenship papers and who has been
a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration.
All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as non-Florida students.
If the status of a student changes from a non-Florida student to a Florida student, his
classification may be changed at the next registration thereafter.
No tuition is charged Florida students except in the College of Law and the College of
Business Administration.
In addition to the fees charged Florida students, non-Florida students, including those
pursuing graduate work, pay a fee of $200 per year, or $100 per term.
College of Business Administration.-A special fee of $10 per session, payable in ad-
vance, is charged all students regularly enrolled in the College of Business Administration.
One dollar per semester-hour is charged students registered in other colleges (except those in
the College of Education and those in Industrial Engineering, for whom the fee for courses
not marked "E" is fifty cents per semester-hour).
College of Law.-A tuition fee of $40 per session, or $20 per term, payable in advance, is
charged all students registering in the College of Law.

GENERAL FEES REQUIRED OF FLORIDA STUDENTS*
Registration and Contingent Fee ................................. $ 7.50
Infirmary Fee ................................................... 7.50
Student Activity Fee .......................................... 19.85
Swimming Pool Fee ................. .......................... 1.00

T otal ....................................................... $35.85

A description of these fees is given below:
Registration and Contingent Fee.-This fee of $7.50 is charged all students of the
University.
Infirmary Fee.-All students are charged an infirmary fee of $7.50 per year, which se-
cures for the student in case of illness the privilege of a bed in the Infirmary and the services

*Non-Florida students are charged S200 tuition in addition.







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


of the University Physician and professionally trained nurses, except in cases involving a
major operation. A student requiring an emergency operation, which is not covered by
the fee assessed, may employ the services of any accredited physician whom he may select,
and utilize the facilities of the Infirmary for the operation. To secure this medical service,
the student must report to the physician in charge of the Infirmary. A fee of $5 is charged
for the use of the operating room. Board in the Infirmary is charged at the rate of $1 a day.
Student Activity Fee.-An annual fee of $19.85, payable on entrance, is assessed to
maintain and foster athletic sports, student publications, and other student activities. Student
fees are passed by a vote of the Student Body and approved by the Board of Control before
they are adopted.
Swimming Pool Fee.-A fee of $1 is charged all students for use of the lockers and supplies
used at the swimming pool.
SPECIAL FEES
Breakage Fee.-Any student registering for a course requiring locker and laboratory ap-
paratus in one or more of the following departments is required to buy a breakage book:
Chemistry, Pharmacy, Biology, and Electrical Engineering. This book costs $5. A refund
will be allowed on any unused portion at the end of the year, when the student has checked in
his apparatus to the satisfaction of the departments concerned. No charge will be made
from this fee for materials used, nor for normal wear and tear on apparatus, as this is covered
by the regular laboratory fees.
Room Reservation Fee.-Students wishing to reserve rooms in the dormitories must pay
a room reservation fee of $10 at the time such reservation is made. The fee is retained as
a deposit against damage to the room and its furnishings. The fee, less charges for any
damage done to the room by the student, is refunded when he returns his key and gives up
his room.
Special Examination Fee.-A fee of $5 is charged for each examination taken at a time
other than that regularly scheduled.
Diploma Fee.-A diploma fee of $5, payable when application for a degree is made, is
charged all candidates for a degree.

PENALTY FEES
Late Registration Fee.-A fee of $5 is charged all students who do not complete their
registration on the dates set by the University Council and published in the Calendar.
Registration is not complete until all University bills are paid, and any who fail to meet
their obligations are not regarded as students of the University.
Non-resident Fee.-A fee of $10 in addition to the fee for non-Florida students will be
charged all students registering incorrectly. The burden of proof as to residence is with the
student.
Failure Fee.-A fee of $2.50 per semester hour is charged for courses in which the
student does not receive a passing grade. Once the student has failed a course, this fee
must be paid before he will be allowed to register again.

FEES FOR ADULT SPECIAL STUDENTS
Adult special students who carry 9 hours or less will be charged the registration and
contingent fee of $7.50 and a proportionate part of any tuition fee assessed on the basis of
a normal load of 15 semester hours. These students will not be entitled to any of the
privileges attached to any other University fee.
Adult special students who already hold a recognized undergraduate degree, and who







EXPENSES


register for the first term only in order to meet the special requirements in education,
medicine, etc., will pay the regular fees, but will be entitled to the usual refund (see below)
at the end of the term. During the registration period such students should mark clearly
on their personnel cards that they intend to register for the first term only.

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR
Minimum Maximum
General Fees............. ......................... $ 35.85* $ 35.85*
Books and Training Supplies for the Year............... 30.00 50.00
Laundry and Cleaning ............................. 25.00 35.00
Room and Board ..................... .............. 184.50 300.00

Estimated Total Expense ....................... $275.35* $420.85*

FEES FOR THE SECOND TERM
Students who register for the first time at the beginning of the second term are subject
to the following fees:
Registration Fee................................................ $ 7.50
Infirmary Fee ............... ............................... 3.75
Student Activity Fee ............. ........................... 10.50
Swimming Pool Fee................ ........................... .50

Total Fees................................................ 22.25

REFUNDS
Students resigning before they have attended classes for three days are entitled to a re-
fund of all fees except the registration and contingent fee of $7.50. This fee is never refunded.
Fees for the entire session are charged those students who register at the beginning of the
first term. If a student intends to register for the first term only and presents satisfactory
reasons to the Registrar on or before the date of registration, he will be entitled to a refund
at the end of the first term of $13 ($9.25 from his Student Activity Fee and $3.75 for one-
half of the Infirmary Fee). If the student desires a Seminole the refund will be only $9.50.

ROOM AND BOARD

DORMITORIES
The University operates three dormitories, the New Dormitory, Thomas Hall, and Buck-
man Hall, together accommodating about five hundred students. It is recommended that
freshmen room in one of the dormitories for at least the first year. Accordingly, preference
is given freshmen applying for rooms in the dormitories.
Rooms in the dormitories are partially furnished. Students must provide their own bed-
ding, towels, and toilet articles. Janitor and maid service is provided. Student monitors,
of whom the president of the student body is head monitor, supervise the conduct of students
in the dormitories. Students are not permitted to cook in the dormitories.

*Non-Florida students are charged $200 tuition in addition.
Students registering in the College of Business Administration must pay an additional fee of $10,
and students registering in the College of Law must pay a tuition fee of $40 a year. Students
registering in laboratory science courses must pay laboratory fees for those courses.







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


All dormitory rooms are furnished with beds, chifforobes, study tables, and chairs. Addi-
tional easy chairs may be secured at a rental charge of $1 per term. Different accommoda-
tions are provided in the three dormitories.
New Dormitory.-The New Dormitory is of strictly fireproof construction. Most of the
rooms are arranged in suites of two rooms, a study and bedroom, accommodating two students.
A limited number of single rooms and several suites for three students are available. All
rooms are equipped with lavatories, while adjacent bathrooms provide hot and cold showers.
Thomas Hall.-Sections C, D, and E have been remodeled throughout, making available
both single and double rooms. All rooms in these sections are equipped with lavatories.
In other sections the rooms are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom, ac-
commodating three students. Some rooms accommodate four students, and a few single
rooms are available.
Baths, with lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of each section,
thus providing a bathroom for each four rooms.
Buckman Hall.-Rooms in Buckman Hall are arranged in suites of study and bedrooms
accommodating three students. Some suites accommodate four students. Baths, with
lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of each section, thus providing
bathroom facilities for each four suites.
Room Rent.-Rooms in the dormitories are rented to the students at the following rates:

ROOM RENT PER STUDENT PER TERM
New Dormitory Thomas Hall Buckman Hall
Single rooms, 1st, 2nd, 3rd floors................ $42.00 $38.00 ....
Single rooms, 4th floor.......................... 40.00 .... ....
Two-room suites, 1st, 2nd, 3rd floors............... 40.00 ........
Two-room suites, 4th floor ........................ 34.00 .... ....
Three-room suites, 1st, 2nd, 3rd floors............. 36.00 ........
Double rooms, Section D ........................ ..... 30.00 ....
Double rooms, Sections C and F .................. .... 32.00 ....
All other rooms ............................ ... .... 24.50 24.50

Applications.-Applications should be made as early as possible, since accommodations
in the dormitories are limited to five hundred students. Applications must be accompanied
by the room reservation fee of $10. If a room has been assigned, no refund will be made
later than September 10. Students not assigned a room will be given a refund upon
request. Students signing contracts and being assigned rooms will not be granted a refund
if they withdraw from the dormitories during the period stipulated in the contract. Con-
tracts for dormitory rooms are for the scholastic year, and in the absence of exceedingly
important reasons, no student will be given permission to vacate a room during this time
unless he transfers his contract to some student not living on the campus.
Keys for dormitory rooms may be secured by student occupants from the Head Janitor at
the New Dormitory on presentation of a signed receipt secured by payment of a Room
Reservation Deposit.
ROOMING HOUSES
Board and rooms in off-campus boarding houses and private homes may be procured at
rates of $25 to $40 per student per month. Such houses are inspected periodically. Students
will be assisted by the Assistant Dean of Students in securing comfortable living quarters.
For further information, inquiry should be made of the Dean of Students.







EXPENSES


UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA
The University operates a cafeteria with modified service permitting a wide selection of
wholesome foods. Meal tickets may be secured at the Business Office, payable in advance,
as follows:
Three-meal-per-day tickets for 4 weeks ............................. $20.00
Two-meal-per-day tickets for 4 weeks................................ 16.50
Three-meal-per-day weekly tickets ............. .................. 5.50
Meals may be paid for in cash at the following rates:
Breakfast ........................... .......................... .25
Dinner ........................... ............................ .35
Supper .......................... ............................. .25
Students living in the dormitories and taking meals at the Cafeteria will receive a dis-
count of $4 per term on their room rent. When a student has received the discount and
does not comply with this regulation, he will be required to pay this account or permit a
charge against his room reservation fee for this amount.

SELF-HELP
Since there are comparatively few positions on the campus and in the city of Gainesville,
it is strongly urged that no freshman come to the University with the expectation of depending
very largely upon his earnings during his first college year.
The Committee on Self-Help, of which the Assistant Dean of Students is Chairman,
undertaken to award positions on the campus to deserving UPPERCLASSMEN. The
following conditions will govern assignments:
a. The scholastic record of the student will be considered. No student failing as much
as six hours will be considered. No student falling below an average of C will be
considered.
b. Preference will be given to those having experience.
c. The financial condition of the student will be considered.
d. No graduate students will be used except as graduate assistants in positions requiring
the training which the student has secured in college.
e. No student on probation of any kind will be given a position. If, while holding
one, he is placed on probation, he will be required to resign the position.
f. A student may not hold two University positions the combined salaries of which
exceed $100 per year.
Unskilled labor is paid for at the present time at the rate of thirty cents per hour; skilled
labor is proportionately compensated. Undergraduate laboratory assistants are paid by the
hour according to the following schedule:
Sophomores ...................... ............................ $ .30
Juniors ............................. ......................... .35
Seniors ................. ......................................... .40

A few students are employed as waiters, as janitors, and in other capacities. Such
employment, as a rule, is not given to a student otherwise financially able to attend the
University. Application for employment should be made to the Dean of Students.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS
The University of Florida is unfortunate in the fewness of scholarships and loans which
are open to students. Generally, the scholarships and loans which are available are
administered directly by the donors. However, the Committee on Scholarships, of which







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


the Dean of Students is chairman, collects all information relative to vacancies, basis of
award, value, and other pertinent facts, and supplies this information to interested students.
The Committee also collects information on applicants and supplies this information to the
donors. In some instances, the Committee has been given authority to make the awards
without consulting the donors.
While scholarship, as evidenced by scholastic attainment, is an important feature in
making awards, it is by no means the only thing considered. The student's potential capacity
to profit by college training and to make reasonable returns to society is a large factor in
making all awards.
Unless otherwise specified, applications for the scholarships and loans listed below
should be addressed to the Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loan Funds,
University of Florida.
County Agricultural Scholarships.-Provision has been made by a legislative act for a
scholarship from each county-to be offered and provided for at the discretion of the Board
of County Commissioners of each County. The recipient is to be selected by competitive
examination. The value of each scholarship is a sum sufficient to pay for board in the
dining hall and room in the dormitory. Whether such a scholarship has been provided for
by any county may be learned from the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, or
the County Agent of the county in question. Questions for the examination are provided
and papers graded by the University if desired.
Vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships.-The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation is
willing to aid any citizen of Florida who can give evidence of being prepared to enter
college, and who gives promise of being a successful student, provided that he has sustained,
by reason of physical impairment, a vocational handicap; and provided the course which
he selects can be reasonably expected to fit him to earn a livelihood. The sum spent on
recipients of this fund at the University of Florida during the present year will amount
to approximately one hundred dollars per student. Inquiries about these scholarships should
be addressed to Mr. Claude M. Andrews, State Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation,
Tallahassee, Florida.
Rotary Loan Fund.-The Rotarians of Florida have set aside a considerable sum of money
to be used in making loans to worthy boys who would not otherwise be able to attend college.
The maximum loan is $150 per year. These loans are not available to freshmen. Applications
for these loans should be made to the President of the Rotary Club of the city from which the
student registers, or to Mr. K. H. Graham, Secretary-Treasurer, Rotary Educational Loan
Fund, Inc., Language Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, before September 1st.
Knight Templar Scholarship Loans.-The Grand Lodge of Knight Templar in the State
of Florida has arranged a number of loans, in amount of $200 to each student, for students
pursuing a course at the University of Florida. These loans are made available through
application to the Knights Templar Lodge in the various cities in the state, and are handled
by the Grand Lodge officers.
Knights of Pythias.-Eight scholarship loans have been established by the Grand Lodge
of the Knights of Pythias. Applications for these loans should be made to Dr. J. H. Coffee,
Arcadia, Florida.
United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships.-Scholarships have been established
by various chapters of the Florida Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy. Appli-
cations should be made to Mr. David D. Bradford, Chairman of Education, 2109 Watrous
Avenue, Tampa.
Loring Memorial Scholarship.-A scholarship of approximately $250 per year is main-
tained by Mrs. William Loring Spencer in memory of her distinguished uncle, General Loring.
Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship.-Established in 1919 by Mrs. Elizabeth C. Ham,







EXPENSES


in accordance with the last will and in memory of her husband, Captain Arthur Ellis Ham,
a former student in the University, who fell in battle at St. Mihiel, France, on September 14,
1918. Value, the income from a fund of $5,000.
Albert W. Gilchrist Memorial Scholarship.-This scholarship is open to students of the
junior and senior classes. Two of these awards are made annually, each worth $200 per
year. Scholastic achievement is the principal basis of this award.
David Levy Yulee Memorial Scholarship.-This scholarship is awarded annually on the
basis of scholarship, and is open to the members of the sophomore, junior, and senior
classes. Value, about $200.
Duval High Memorial Scholarship.-An act creating the Memorial Duval High School
Scholarship and authorizing and appropriating annually $275 of the Duval County funds as
financial assistance for one worthy high school graduate is covered by House Bill No. 823,
approved May 20, 1927.
This scholarship, created to memorialize and assist in preserving the high standards and
traditions of the Duval High School, where many of Florida's worthy citizens were educated,
was established by the Board of County Commissioners of Duval County, Florida. Appli-
cation should be made to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, Jacksonville.
Jacksonville Rotary Club Scholarship.-The Jacksonville Rotary Club maintains a
scholarship of $250, which is given, at their discretion, to a student meeting such requirements
as they may make pertaining to the scholarship. Application should be made to the Pres-
ident of the Jacksonville Rotary Club.
William Wilson Finley Foundation.-As a memorial to the late President Finley, and in
recognition of his interest in agricultural education, The Southern Railway Company has
donated to the University of Florida $1,000, to be used as a loan fund. No loan from this
fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per year. Recipients are selected by the Dean of the
College of Agriculture, to whom applications should be directed.
Florida Bankers Association Scholarship.-The Florida Bankers Association awards
three scholarships annually; one for North and West Florida, one for Central Florida, and
one for South Florida. These scholarships are awarded on an examination given at the
Annual Boys' Short Course. The examination is given and the award made by the State
Boys' Club Agent.
Application for these scholarships should be made to the Dean of the College of
Agriculture.
Frank E. Dennis Scholarship.-Established by Frank E. Dennis, of Jacksonville, and
awarded to the club member showing the best pig-club pig at the State Pig Club exhibit.
One scholarship is awarded annually: value, $250.
Application should be made to the Dean of the College of Agriculture.
Congressman Yon Scholarship.-Awarded to the 4-H Club boy living in the Third Con-
gressional District, who has been outstanding in leadership in club work. Awarded
annually; value, $100.
Application should be made to the Dean of the College of Agriculture.
The American Bankers Association Foundation.-One loan scholarship to a student at
the University of Florida whose major course is in banking, economics, or related subjects in
classes of junior grade or above. Value, $250.
Application for loan should be made to the Chairman of the Committee on Awards, 110
E. 42nd Street, New York City.
Murphree Engineering Loan Fund.-On September 16, 1929, a friend of our late Presi-
dent, Dr. A. A. Murphree, gave to the Engineering College $500, to be used as a revolving
loan fund. This fund was to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


difficulties, worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they could receive some
assistance. Only in special cases are these loans made to members of the junior class.
Applications for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of the College of
Engineering.
Florida Association of Architects Loan Fund.-The Florida Association of Architects
has created a revolving loan fund of $500 for the purpose of aiding needy students in
Architecture who have proved themselves worthy.
Applications should be made to the Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts.
The Colonial Dames of America, Betty Wollman Scholarship.-Established by Mr. Wil.
liam J. Wollman in memory of his mother and awarded to a worthy student. Value, $250.
Application should be made to Mrs. Walter W. Price, 1 West 72nd Street, New York City.
The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida Scholar-
ship.-The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida has
established a loan scholarship for deserving students. This scholarship is administered by
the Directors of the Florida Educational Loan Association. Application should be made to
the Chairman of the Florida Educational Loan Association, University of Florida.
Lake Worth Woman's Club Scholarship.-The Lake Worth Woman's Club, of Lake
Worth, Florida, maintains a scholarship of $100 a year. Application should be made to
the Chairman of the Scholarship Committee, Lake Worth Woman's Club, Lake Worth, Florida.
Fairchild Scholarship.-Mr. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers annually a
scholarship amounting to $500. The award is made, by competitive examination, to a graduate
in pharmacy who will do post-graduate work in the year immediately following his graduation.
Examinations are held in June at the various colleges of pharmacy which are members of the
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.
Further information may be obtained from the Director of the School of Pharmacy.
The Ladies' Auxiliary Fund.-The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida State Pharmaceutical
Association has established a loan fund for deserving students of pharmacy in need of
assistance. Application should be made to Mrs. David W. Ramsaur, 1044 Park Street,
Jacksonville, Florida.







GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL INFORMATION

DEGREES
The Board of Control will confer the degree appropriate to the course pursued under the
following conditions:
1. Curriculum requirements.-Certification by the Registrar of completion of all require-
ments of the course of study as outlined in the college announcement, or its equivalent as
determined by the faculty of the college offering the course.
2. Recommendation of the faculty.
3. Residence requirements.-Advanced standing will be allowed on certification from
other recognized institutions and may be obtained also by examination held before a com-
mittee of the faculty appointed for that purpose provided that the following minimum
requirement for residence at the University of Florida has been met:
The student must earn at least one year's credit in residence in this University. If the
term of residence is only one year, that year must be the senior year. In addition, special
residence requirements must be met in several of the schools and colleges. See individual
announcements.
4. Attendance at commencement.-All candidates for degrees are required to be present
at commencement exercises. A student who fails to attend shall not receive his diploma
until he complies with this requirement.

BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE
A program of vocational guidance is carried on for the students through a series of tests,
through interviews, and through the application of scientific occupational information. In
addition, the Bureau offers a service to those encountering mental difficulties which interfere
with their scholastic work. Further information concerning these services may be obtained
from the Bulletin of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene.

DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS
The course in Military Science is required of all physically qualified General College
students except adult special students and students transferring from other universities or
colleges.
Students who complete the basic course and are selected by the Professor of Military
Science and Tactics and the President of the University may elect the advanced courses.
Students electing these courses must carry them to completion as a prerequisite to gradu-
ation. Upon the completion of these courses, those students recommended by the Professor
of Military Science and Tactics and the President of the University will, upon their own
application, he offered a commission in the Officers Reserve Corps, United States Army.
An advanced course in summer camp is compulsory, usually between the junior and senior
years. The War Department pays all expenses, including mileage, rations, medical attend-
ance, clothing, and laundry service, and in addition the pay of the seventh grade, United
States Army.
GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION
The General Extension Division of the University of Florida offers educational opportu-
nities to those who are removed from the campus, and assists in promoting the general
advancement of the people through service functions.







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


The Division represents the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Education, Engineering, Law,
Business Administration and the School of Pharmacy of the University, and the College of
Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Education and Music of the State College for Women.
The Extension Teaching Department offers courses by correspondence study and in
extension classes. Short courses, community institutes, and conferences are held to give
opportunity for discussion on problems confronting groups or communities. The Department
of Auditory Instruction offers cultural programs, instruction, information, and entertainment
by lectures and discussion for the benefit of special groups, schools, and individuals.
Training for naturalization, citizenship schools, and cooperation with the War Department
in enrolling young men for the Citizens' Military Training Camps because of their educa.
tional value, are some phases of the work of the Department of Citizenship Training.
Through the Department of Visual Instruction and General Information and Service, the
outside world of letters and arts and music is carried into the back country through the
traveling libraries and art exhibits which are sent out. A picture of the world and its work
is circulated in the slides and filmslides furnished for instruction and entertainment. The
best in recorded music is provided for work in music appreciation and for culture.

BY-LAWS
For information relative to grades, failure in studies, attendance, etc., the student should
consult the Bulletin of By-Laws. Each student is held responsible for observance of the
rules and regulations of the University in so far as they affect him.

HEALTH SERVICE
Through the Students' Health Service the University makes available to students physical
examinations, health consultations, and medical attention. General service is provided
free of charge, but special fees are charged for services which are individual in character,
such as dentistry, X-rays, board and laundry in the infirmary, special drugs and serums,
major surgery, special nurses, etc. No student, however, will be denied service because of
inability to pay these fees.
The University Infirmary and the offices of the Health Service are on the campus. The
Infirmary is open at all hours for the admission of patients. The Resident Physician lives
at the Infirmary and his services are available at all hours, in case of emergency. The
Dispensary, in the Infirmary building, is open from 7:30 to 9 A. M., from 12 noon to 1 p. M.
and from 4 to 7 p. M., during which time physicians are in attendance and may be consulted.
A nurse is constantly on duty from 7 A. M. to 9 P. M. for emergency treatments.
It is the aim of the Health Service not only to function as a Health Service and render
preventive measures, but to provide full hospital care in cases of illness. The Infirmary
is rated as a Fully Approved Hospital by the Examining Board of the American College
of Surgeons.
The facilities of the Dispensary are such that in a single day any number of students can
secure conferences with physicians, examinations, diagnosis and treatment of minor injuries
and illnesses which a student may suffer. The student is encouraged to use this service
freely, to avoid more serious illness. In the Dispensary, a modern, well-equipped drug room
furnishes drugs to the student without charge. A laboratory in connection with the Infirm-
ary and Dispensary is in charge of a trained nurse-technician. The normal capacity of the
Infirmary, 45 beds, can be increased in emergencies. Provisions are made for isolation of
communicable diseases. A completely equipped operating room provides facilities for major
surgical operations. A mobile unit X-ray is used for the examination of fractures, but the
equipment does not provide sufficient service for an extensive diagnostic X-ray study of the







GENERAL INFORMATION


intestinal tract, etc. This service is made available to the students at actual cost of the
materials used.
Students enrolling in the University for the first time are furnished a physical exam-
ination form by the Registrar's Office, which is to be completed by the family physician and
pinned to Registration papers. On admission, the student is given a careful physical exam-
ination by the University Physician. It is necessary that this physical examination by the
home physician be completed in order that parents may be aware of abnormalities which
should be corrected prior to the student's entrance in the University, as the correction of
these defects is necessary in order that he may be in proper physical condition to begin his
college work.
There are three principal phases of the activities of the University Health Service:
(1) personal attention, (2) sanitation, and (3) education.
1. Personal Division.-This division is concerned with the physical examination of
students. A complete record of the physical condition of each student is made and filed
when he is admitted to the University. From this record can be determined, in large
measure, what procedure is essential to keep the student in the best physical condition during
his academic life. The following are some of the phases of the work in the personal division:
a. Provision for maintaining the health of normal, physically sound students;
cooperation with the Department of Physical Education regarding physical exercise;
education concerning right living; safeguarding of environment.
b. Protection of the physically sound students from communicable diseases; early
detection and isolation of all cases of communicable diseases-tuberculosis, diph-
theria, scarlet fever, measles, typhoid fever, smallpox, mumps, etc.
c. Provision for the care and treatment of such cases of communicable diseases-isola-
tion hospital.
d. Treatment and professional care of all students who are ill or in need of medical
advice or treatment. For extended care by the Health Service it is necessary that
the student enter the Infirmary. Any student may be admitted to the Infirmary upon
the recommendation of the University Physician. To all patients in the Infirmary
the staff will furnish medical and nursing services.
e. Reconstruction and reclamation: corrections of defects, advice, and treatment of all
abnormalities.
2. Division of Sanitation.-The student's environment should be as hygienic as possible.
This division concerns itself with sanitary conditions both on and off the campus.
3. Education.-Every student in the University is made familiar with the fundamentals
of both personal and public hygiene. Through personal conferences education in hygiene
and right living is conducted.
VACCINATION
Prospective students are advised to be vaccinated against smallpox and to be inoculated
against typhoid fever. Unless a certificate is presented showing successful vaccination within
five years, students will be vaccinated against smallpox at the time of registration.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARY
The libraries of the University are: the General Library, the Experiment Station Library,
the General Extension Division Library, the Law Library, and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School Library. The libraries now contain over 115,000 volumes.
The General Library is housed in the Library Building, a modern fire-proof structure, with
a seating capacity of between 750 and 800, and a stack capacity of 200,000 volumes. There
are 48 carrels in the stacks for the use of faculty and graduate students. A collection of







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Floridiana, material concerning Florida and written by Floridians, is housed in the Florida
Room.
The Library contains general reference books, encyclopedias, dictionaries, yearbooks,
handbooks, standard encyclopedias and dictionaries in foreign languages, and files of bound
periodicals in both English and foreign languages. These are used by students and faculty.
The University Library is a depository for official publications of the United States Gov-
ernment. The Library receives valuable studies from universities, learned societies, and
other organizations on exchange. It receives regularly by subscription 448, and by gift and
exchange 492 periodicals of a general and scientific nature. Many daily and weekly state
newspapers send complimentary copies, which are filed.
The Library welcomes every opportunity to be of assistance to both faculty and students.
In addition to an open shelf browsing collection of over 1,400 volumes, recreational reading
is fostered by means of a book display on special subjects and a smaller display which
contains books of timely interest. Bibliographies are prepared and information is collected
for class work. Special attention is given to collecting material for debate activity. Lectures
on the use of the library, including the card catalog and the more used reference books, are
given to the freshmen during Freshman Week.
The Library is open from 7:45 A. M. to 10 P. M. every week day except Saturday, when
it closes at 5 P. M. During the first and second terms it is open on Sunday from 2 to 5 P. M.

PRIZES AND MEDALS

Board of Control Awards.-The Board of Control annually awards the following medals:
1. The Freshman-Sophomore Declamation Contest Medal, to the best declaimer of the
freshman and sophomore classes.
2. Junior Oratorical Contest Medal, to the best declaimer of the junior class.
3. Senior Oratorical Contest Medal, to the best declaimer of the senior class.
Corpus Juris-Cyc Prize.-A Corpus Juris-Cyc prize is offered by the American Law Book
Company for the best work in legal research in the College of Law.
Harrison Company Award.-A $25 credit, applicable to the purchase of any Florida law
books published by the Harrison Company of Atlanta, Georgia, is offered by this company
to the senior law student doing all his work in this institution, and making the highest record
during his law course.
Harrison Company First Year Award.-Redfearn on Wills and Administration of Estates
in Florida is offered by the Harrison Company to the first year law student making the highest
average in twenty-eight hours of law taken in this institution.
Groover-Stewart Drug Company Cup.-Mr. F. C. Groover, president of the Groover-
Stewart Drug Company, has given a large silver loving cup which is awarded to the graduating
class in the College of Pharmacy attaining the highest general average in scholarship and
is held by that class until this average is exceeded by a subsequent graduating class.
David W. Ramsaur Medal.-Mrs. D. W. Ramsaur of Jacksonville offers a gold medal
and an engraved certificate to that graduate of the College of Pharmacy making the highest
average in scholarship and evincing leadership in student activities.
Haisley Lynch Medal.-The University is grateful to Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Lynch of Gaines-
ville for their gift of the Haisley Lynch Medal for the best essay in American history. This
medal is awarded annually by them in loving memory of their son, Haisley Lynch, a former
student of the University, who was killed in action in France during the World War.
Gargoyle Key.-Gargoyle awards a gold key each year to the sophomore in the School of
Architecture and Allied Arts, who. in the opinion of the members, was outstanding in
scholarship, leadership, initiative, and general ability during his freshman year.


252






GENERAL INFORMATION


Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key.-Each year the Florida Chapter of Delta Sigma Pi,
international honorary professional business fraternity, awards a gold key to the senior
in dhe College of Business Administration who, in the opinion of the chapter and the Dean
of the College of Business Administration, has been the most outstanding in scholarship,
leadership, personality, and general endeavor during his four years in college.
Beta Gamma Sigma Scroll.-Each year Beta Gamma Sigma awards a scroll to the sopho-
more in the College of Business Administration who, during his freshman year, made the
highest scholastic average in that College.
Fine Arts Society Award.-The Fine Arts Society annually offers a gold medal and
citation to the outstanding student receiving the baccalaureate degree in the School of
Architecture and Allied Arts in recognition of his scholastic standing and leadership.
Sigma Tau Award.-The Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Tau awards annually a medal for
scholastic ability to the sophomore in the College of Engineering who, during his freshman
year, made the highest average in his scholastic work.
Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship Key Award.-Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic
fraternity, awards annually a key to ten percent of the students graduating in journalism who
have the highest scholastic average for the three years' academic work immediately preceding
the year in which the nominee is a candidate for a degree.
Dillon Achievement Cup.-Mr. Ralph M. Dillon, Tampa, has given a large silver loving
cup on which is engraved each year the name of that student graduating in journalism who,
in the opinion of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the faculty of the
Department of Journalism, possesses the highest qualifications for service to the press of
Florida.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


THE DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

In September 1933 the University of Florida joined twelve other southern institutions
in forming the new Southeastern Conference. This new conference represents colleges and
universities in the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee,
and Kentucky.
The type of athletic program undertaken by the Department of Physical Education at
the University of Florida compares with that in leading universities. A two-year course
of required Physical Education is included in the curriculum of the Lower Division.
Students who are exempt from Military Science are required to take this work, which is
designed to present participation, training, and instructional opportunities in sports included
in the intramural program. This course may also be taken as an elective.
The second major sub-division of this Department is that in which are included inter-
collegiate athletics. These sports are divided into two groups, generally known as major
and as minor sports. In the major group are football, basketball, boxing, baseball, and
track, and in the minor group, swimming, tennis, and golf. The equipment includes two
baseball diamonds, four athletic fields, six handball courts, two indoor basketball courts,
eight tennis courts, a large outdoor swimming pool, a concrete stadium with a seating
capacity of 23,000, and two quarter-mile running tracks, one providing permanent seats
for approximately 1,500. Six alumni coaches are assigned to these eight sports, all serving
on a full-time basis.
The function of the Intramural Department is to encourage the entire student body to
participate in organized athletic sports and wholesome recreation. The Department pro-
vides facilities for such competition and recreation; organizes and promotes competition
between students, groups, and individuals; and fosters a spirit of fair play and sportsman-
ship among participants and spectators.
The program of intramural activities includes the following sports: golf, swimming, horse-
shoes, touch football, basketball, boxing, wrestling, diamond ball, tennis, handball, water
basketball, track, shuffle board, foul shooting, ping pong, and Sigma Delta Psi (national
athletic fraternity) events.
The proper utilization of leisure time through recreation and play is splendidly expressed
in this program. It is estimated that more than 1,800 students (about seventy per cent of
the student body) take part in some sport sponsored by the Department. There is a
decided trend toward the expansion of recreational facilities to a large group of students
as opposed to intense competition for a few.
The rules of the Southeastern Conference do not permit member institutions to employ
athletes or to pay students for their services on athletic teams. However, this does not
mean that a student is ineligible to receive aid from his institution in the form of scholar-
ships, loan funds, or compensation for student labor merely because he may be proficient
in athletics. Athletes in the University of Florida are eligible to all forms of assistance
that may be available to other students. As a rule, awards are made only to those who are
unable financially to attend the University without assistance and whose standards of conduct
and scholarship are worthy of consideration. Awards are usually made in the form of
board, rent, books, and similar items rather than in the form of cash, and may be continued
from year to year throughout the college course to those students whose records prove
satisfactory. Administration of these funds is in the hands of the Committee on Scholarships.
Further information may be secured by writing to the Dean of Students, who is chairman
of that Committee.







STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS

Student Government.-Student government in the University of Florida is a cooperative
organization based on mutual confidence between the student body and the faculty. Con-
siderable authority has been granted the Student Body for the regulation and conduct of
student affairs. The criterion in granting authority to the Student Body has been the
disposition of the students to accept responsibility commensurate with the authority granted
them. Generally speaking, the fields of student activity include regulation of extra-cur-
ricular affairs and the administration of the Honor System.
Every enrolled student, having paid his activity fee, is a member of the Student Body
and has an equal vote in its government.
The University authorities feel that training in acceptance of responsibility for the
conduct of student affairs at the University is a valuable part of the educational growth
of the individual student. The Student Body is practically a body politic occupying its
franchise under grant from the Board of Control and subject to its continued approval.
Student government is patterned on the state and national form of government, adapted
to the local needs of the Student Body. Members of the legislative, Executive Council, the
judicial, Honor Court, the executive, President, and other officers are elected directly by
the Student Body once a year.
Student government, to carry out its purposes, enacts and enforces laws, promotes athletics,
debating, publications of the Student Body, entertainments of educational value, and such
other activities as the Student Body may adopt. The officers of the Student Body are the
President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, members of the Honor Court, Athletic Council,
Executive Council, Lyceum Council, editors and business managers of student publications,
and student members of the Board of Student Publications.
Debating.-Practice in debating is open to all students through the programs of the
varsity and freshman debate squads. This work, which is sponsored by the Debate Club, is
under direction of the Department of Speech, and culminates in an extensive schedule of
intercollegiate debates.
Dramatics.-Students have opportunity to participate in several plays which are presented
each year by the Florida Players, a dramatic group under direction of the Department of
Speech.
Executive Council.-The Executive Council is composed of representatives elected from
the colleges. It acts as administrator of Student Body affairs. The Athletic Council and the
Lyceum Council have jurisdiction over their respective fields.
Publications.-The Student Body publishes The Seminole, the year book; The Florida
Alligator, a weekly newspaper; and The "F" Book, the student's guide. The Florida Review
(the campus literary magazine) is published by its staff without student funds.
Y. M. C. A.-The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Association is to provide a
medium through which the highest ideals of education and religion may be expressed in
terms of service. The program is planned to meet needs as they become apparent. There
is no membership fee. Any student may become a member by subscribing to its purpose
and contributing to its support. A secretary having extensive experience with the problems
of students is available for counsel and help.
Social Fraternities.-Twenty-five national social fraternities have established chapters at
the University; most of them have already built chapter houses and the others have leased
homes. The general work of the fraternities is controlled by the Inter-fraternity Conference,
composed of two delegates from each of the national fraternities. The national fraternities
at Florida are Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Kappa, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi,
Delta Chi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Alpha, Phi Beta Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Delta Sigma, Pi Kappa Alpha,
Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma Iota, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon,
Tau Epsilon Phi, Theta Chi, and Theta Kappa Nu. There is one local fraternity: Omega
Upsilon Theta.
Honor Societies and Fraternities.-Various honor societies and fraternities have been
established at Florida. Phi Kappa Phi elects annually from the highest ten per cent,
scholastically, of the Senior Class. Blue Key is an honor group electing men to membership
on the basis of leadership and participation in campus activities.
Other honorary fraternities are Alpha Kappa Psi, professional business fraternity; Alpha
Zeta, agricultural; Beta Gamma Sigma, honorary commerce fraternity; Delta Epsilon, local
pre-medical; Gamma Sigma Epsilon, chemical; Gargoyle, architectural; Kappa Delta Pi,
educational; Kappa Gamma Delta, aeronautical; Kappa Phi Kappa, professional educa-
tional; Phi Alpha Delta and Phi Delta Phi, legal; Phi Sigma, biological; Pi Delta Epsilon
and Sigma Delta Chi, journalistic; Delta Sigma Pi, professional commerce; Pi Gamma Mu,
social science; Sabres, military; Sigma Delta Psi, athletic; Sigma Tau, engineering; Tau
Kappa Alpha, forensic; Phi Eta Sigma, freshman scholastic; Rho Chi, pharmacy; Kappa
Kappa Psi, honorary band; Thyrsus, horticultural.
Other professional fraternities and clubs are: Agricultural Club; Alpha Tau Alpha, edu-
cational fraternity for teachers of agriculture; Student Branch of the American Institute of
Electrical Engineers; Student Branch, American Pharmaceutical Association; Student
Chapter of the American Society of Chemical Engineers; Student Branch of the American
Society of Mechanical Engineers; Benton Engineering Society; Commerce Club; Fourth
Estate Club, journalistic society; Leigh Chemical Society; Mathematics Colloquium; Mortar
and Pestle; Order of the Palms, honorary cultural fraternity; Peabody Club, education club;
Society of Chemical Engineers.
HONOR SYSTEM
The Honor System.-One of the finest tributes to the character of the students at the
University of Florida is the fact that the Student Body is a self-governing group. The
details of the system by which this result is reached will be explained to all freshmen during
the first week of their enrollment in the University. However, each parent, as well as each
prospective student, is urged to read the following discussion of the Honor System, as this
phase of student government forms the keystone of the entire system.
In addition to permitting student legislation on questions of interest to the members of the
Student Body, execution of the laws passed and the expenditure of student funds, the gov-
erning system at the University gives to the students the privilege of disciplining themselves
through the Honor System.
Among the basic principles of an Honor System are the convictions that self-discipline
is the greatest builder of character, that responsibility is a prerequisite of self-respect, and
that these are essential to the highest type of education. Officials of the University and the
Board of Control feel that students in the University of Florida should be assumed to be
honest and worthy of implicit trust, and they display this confidence through the privilege
of an Honor System.
In order to protect against the character deficiencies of a few men who may violate the
Honor Code, it becomes the duty of each member of the Student Body not only to abide
by the Honor Code but to report to the Honor Court any violations he may observe. Many
men coming to the University for the first time may feel hesitant about assuming this
responsibility, inasmuch as early school training has created certain feelings of antipathy
toward one who "tattle-tales" on a fellow-student. The theory of an Honor System ade-
quately overcomes this natural reaction, however, when it is realized that this system is a







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


student institution itself, and not a faculty measure for student discipline, and that to be
worthy of the advantages of the Honor System each student must be strong enough to do
his duty in this regard. In this way the responsibility for each man's conduct is placed
where it must eventually rest-on himself.
The Honor Code of the Student Body is striking in its simplicity, yet it embodies the
fundamentals of sound character. Each man is pledged to refrain from (a) cheating; (b)
stealing; (c) passing worthless checks.
On the basis of this Code, students are extended all privileges conceived to be the basic
rights of men of honor. There are no proctors or spies in the examination rooms, each
student feeling free to do his work, or to leave the room as occasion arises. Secondly,
fruits and supplies are placed openly on the campus, with the confidence that each man
will pay for any he may take. This system makes each man the keeper of his own con-
science until he has proven to his fellow-students that he no longer deserves the trust
placed in him.
To enforce the System equitably and punish occasional infractions in every case, the
students have established the Honor Court. The Court is composed of twelve students and
a chancellor elected annually from the upper classes of the various colleges. Their jurisdic-
tion over all violations of the Honor Code is final, but with the privilege of appeal by a
student to the Faculty Discipline Committee, an appeal both as to procedure and as to the
merits of his case. It is significant of the care with which the Court works that since the
establishment of the Honor System in 1914, only one decision of the Honor Court has been
altered on appeal.
The parent of every prospective student should feel that it is his responsibility to stress
the importance of honorable conduct on the part of his son while the latter is in attendance
at the University of Florida.
Because University students have proved worthy of the responsibility involved in admin-
istering an Honor System, this feature of student government has become the greatest tradition
at the University of Florida. Inasmuch as it is primarily a student responsibility, the future
of the system rests with each new class of students who enter the University. The University
faculty and authorities pledge their support to the Honor System. Each student must
support it, or, in failing to support it, contribute to the loss of this tradition.

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
ADMINISTRATION
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc. (Iowa State College), Dean and Director
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Assistant Dean, Administration, College of Agriculture
H. HAROLD HUME, M.S., Assistant Dean and Director, Research
HAROLD MOWRY, M.S.A., Assistant Director, Administration, Experiment Station
ARTHUR PERCEVAL SPENCER, M.S., Vice-Director and County Agent Leader, Agricultural
Extension Service
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, Business Manager
JOHN FRANCIS COOPER, M.S.A., Editor
CLYDE BEALE, B.A.J., Assistant Editor
EDWIN F. STANTON, Supervisor, Egg-Laying Contest, Chipley
IDA KEELING CRESAP, Librarian
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Agricultural Chemistry







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
CLARENCE VERNON NOBLE, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Agricultural Economics
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Marketing
JULIUS WAYNE REITZ, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Professor of Agricultural Engineering
AGRONOMY
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Soils
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor of Farm Crops and Genetics
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING
CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, M.A., Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying
RAYMOND BROWN BECKER, Ph.D., (Minnesota), Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying
WILLIAM WALTER HENLEY, B.S.A., Instructor in Animal Husbandry and Dairying
BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY
MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Assistant Professor of Botany and
Bacteriology.
ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY
JOHN THOMAS CREIGHTON, M.S., Assistant Professor of Entomology and Plant Pathology
HORTICULTURE
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Professor of Ornamentals and Forestry
CHARLES ELLIOTT ABBOTT, M.S., Professor of Fruit and Vegetables
JOHN VERTREES WATKINS, M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist
POULTRY HUSBANDRY
NATHAN WILLARD SANBORN, M.D., Professor of Poultry Husbandry
VETERINARY SCIENCE
ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY, B.S., D.V.M., Professor of Veterinary Science (Part Time)
MARK WIRTH EMMEL, D.V.M. (Iowa State), Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science

GENERAL STATEMENT
The College of Agriculture is composed of three divisions:
1. Instruction Division (the College proper)
2. Research Division (Experiment Station)
3. Agricultural Extension Service

THE COLLEGE
AIM AND SCOPE
The College of Agriculture was established under the Act of Congress creating and
endowing institutions for the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes. Recog-
nition of agriculture as a branch of collegiate instruction is a distinctive feature of schools
thus founded.
The aim of the College is to afford young men the best possible opportunity for gaining
technical knowledge and training in the art and science of agriculture. About one-third of
the student's time is devoted to technical studies, the other two-thirds to cultural studies and
basic sciences. A foundation is thus laid which will enable graduates to become effective
producing agriculturists or leaders in educational work.
LIBRARIES
The University Library contains many works on agriculture and horticulture. Each
department has a small collection of well selected volumes which are always accessible. In







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


the Experiment Station Library are bulletins from the United States Department of Agricul-
ture and from the experiment stations of the world, all fully indexed.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

Effective September, 1935, all beginning students are required to enroll in
the General College. For information concerning the requirements for ad-
mission to the College of Agriculture see page 203, Bulletin of Information for
the General College. The curricula for students entering the College of Agri-
culture from the General College will be printed in the next edition of this
bulletin.
The curricula which follow apply only to students registered in the University
during or before the academic year 1934-35.

UPPER AND LOWER DIVISIONS
The work of the College of Agriculture is divided into a Lower and an Upper Division.
The Lower Division corresponds roughly to the work which the student will do during the
first two years in the University; the Upper Division corresponds roughly to the work which
the student will pursue during his junior and senior years.
Students in the Lower Division are under the guidance of the Dean or his appointee.
Students in the Upper Division are under the guidance of the head of the department in
which they major, or his appointee.
The student must select his major study before entering the Upper Division, the major
consisting of 15 to 30 hours of courses numbered 200 or above in one department.
All the electives except eighteen hours must be in technical agriculture, Agricultural
Education, or Agricultural Chemistry. The electives and options of the Upper Division must
be selected with the approval of the Dean and the professor of the major subject.
The passing of students from the Lower to the Upper Division is determined by the Dean
and the professor of the major subject.

THE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE
The curriculum in Agriculture extends over four years and contains both general and
specialized courses. The first two years are devoted almost wholly to required subjects in-
tended to provide the student with a broad agricultural foundation. The last two years
provide an opportunity for specialization in the chosen major field.
The student may major in Agricultural Education, Agricultural Chemistry, or in one of
the following departments of the College of Agriculture:
I. Agricultural Economics
II. Agricultural Engineering
III. Agronomy
IV. Animal Husbandry and Dairying
V. Botany and Bacteriology
VI. Entomology and Plant Pathology
VII. Horticulture
CREDIT FOR PRACTICAL WORK
By previous arrangement with the head of a department and the Dean, students, during
their course of study, may do practical work under competent supervision in any recognized
agricultural pursuit, and upon returning to the College and rendering a satisfactory written
report showing faithful service, will be entitled to one credit for each month of such work.
Such credits may not total more than six in the four-year course.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION--UPPER DIVISION


CURRICULUM FOR FOUR-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
Leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
First Term Second Term
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Cre
Freshman Year (Discontinued)
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1935)
As. 201-Agricultural Economics ......... 3 Ag. 202-Farm Machinery ................
Bty. 101 [or Option (1)]-General Botany.. 4 Bty. 102-General Botany .................
Cy. 0262 [or Option (2)]-Organic Chemistry 5 Cy. 0305 [or Elective]-Quantitative
M y. 201- Infantry ....................... 2 A analysis ...............................
Electives ................................. 3 Ms. 104-Mathematics for Agriculture ....
My. 202- Infantry .......................

17


Ay. 301- Soils ...........................
Bcy. 301 [or Option (3) ]-General
Bacteriology ............................
English, Journalism, Speech, Language, Psy-
chology, Education, or History ............
Ps. 101 and 103 or Elective General Physics
E lective ................. ................


and Senior Years
5 Bty. 0301 (Plant Physiology) or
Vy. 306 (Animal Physiology) or
4 O ption (4) .............................
English, Speech, Language, Psychology,
3 Education or History ....................
5 Ey. 302-Economic Entomology ..........
15 E lectives .................................


dits


4
4

5
3
2

18



4

3
4
21


32 32
Option (1) General Economics, Mathematics, or Physics
Option (2) Chemistry, Engineering, Business Administration, Education Psychology, or
Education
Option (3) Chemistry, Engineering, Education, Business Administration, or Mathematics
Option (4) Agricultural Bacteriology, Plant Pathology, Agricultural Engineering, Poultry
Husbandr-y, Feeds and Feeding, or Agricultural Economics
COURSES FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS
Students over eighteen years of age who cannot meet the entrance requirements of the
University or who for other reasons cannot take the four-year course, may enter a four-
months or one-year course. Such students may take not less than fourteen nor more than
nineteen hours of work from the following list of courses. Those having a knowledge of the
common school branches only should first select courses numbered below 100; those with
high school or college training may select courses marked above 100. Each semester is as
nearly as possible complete in itself. For details concerning the admission of special students
see page 240.


First Term
Names of Subject Hrs. per
Courses Week
As. 201-Agricultural Economics ......... 3
As. 303-Farm Records .................. 3
Ag. 301-Drainage and Irrigation......... 3
Ag. 303-Farm Shop ..................... 3
Ag. 401-Farm Buildings ................. 3
Ay. 21-Elements of Agronomy .......... 2
Ay. 201-Farm Crops .................... 3
Al. 21-Elements of Animal Husbandry.. 3
Al. 203-Beef Production ................ 3
Cy. 101-General Chemistry .............. 4
Dy. 201-Farm Dairying ................. 3
Ey. 21-Farm, Garden, and Orchard Pests 3
Ey. 405-Insecticides and Fungicides ...... 3
He. 21-Introduction to Horticulture ..... 3
He. 101-Elements of Horticulture ........ 3
He. 303- Floriculture .................... 3
He. 307-Subtropical Fruits .............. 3
He. 0314-Principles of Fruit Production .... 3
Pt. 301-General Pathology .............. 4
Py. 201-Commercial Poultry ............. 3


Second Term
Names of Subject Hrs. per
Courses Week
As. 54-Farm Management .............. 3
As. 202-Agricultural Resources .......... 3
Ag. 202-Farm Machinery ................ 4
Ag. 302-Farm Motors ................... 3
Ag. 402-Farm Concrete ................. 2
Ay. 22-Elements of Agronomy .......... 2
Ay. 304-Forage Crops and Pastures...... 3
Al. 104-Types and Breeds of Animals ..... 4
Al. 204-Swine Production ............... 2
Cy. 102-General Chemistry .............. 4
Dy. 22-Elements of Dairying ........... 3
Dy. 202-Dairy Herd Management ........ 2
Ey. 302-Economic Entomology ........... 4
Ey. 406-Fungicides and Insecticides ...... 3
He. 22-Elements of Fruit Production .... 3
He. 204- Pruning ......................... 3
He. 206- Trucking ....................... 3
He. 304-Plant Materials ................. 3
He. 0305-Citrus Culture .................. 3
Py. 102-Farm Poultry .................. 3
Py. 202-Commercial Poultry ............ 3
Vy. 302-Elementary Veterinary Science... 2
Vy. 402-Poultry Diseases ................ 3


Students may also take courses numbered under 100 in other colleges of the University.







SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS


SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., F.A.I.A., Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
FACULTY
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., F.A.I.A., Director, Head Professor of Architecture
HENRY NORTON JUNE, B.S., A.I.A., Professor of Architecture
0. C. R. STAGEBERG, B.S.Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture
FREDERICK T. HANNAFORD, B.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture (Part Time)
CARL E. MITTELL, B.F.A., Instructor in Drawing and Painting
WILLIAM T. ARNETT, M.A.Arch., Instructor in Architecture (Part Time)
ARTHUR D. McVoY, B.S.Arch., Graduate Assistant

GENERAL INFORMATION
With the inauguration of the General College in 1935, the work of the School of Architec-
ture and Allied Arts was reorganized on the basis of an Upper and Lower Division. Five
professional courses are offered: Architecture, Building Construction, Landscape Architec-
ture, Painting, and Commercial Art.
The work in the School is conducted in a manner which will aid the student in form-
ing the habit of constructive thinking and develop the initiative necessary to apply his
thoughts. Full responsibility for his work and actions is placed upon him as is done in
the professional fields. Each curriculum is devised with the intention of giving thorough
training in the fundamentals of the profession chosen and the methods of instruction fully
carry out this intention.
ARCHITECTURAL REGISTRATION
The State of Florida is among 36 states which have prescribed by law the qualifications
for architectural practice and required the passing of examinations given by a state board.
Students who receive the degree in Architecture from the University of Florida will, by
action of the Florida State Board of Architecture, be exempt from examination in certain
subjects when applying for a certificate of registration.
SPECIAL LECTURES
Prominent men from related fields and from the various chapters of the American
Institute of Architects and the Florida Association of Architects are invited to give lectures
which are intended to acquaint the student with the best professional thought and with
the culture of our times.
The semi-annual business meeting of the Florida Association of Architects, which is held
in the rooms of the School, is open to the students. An opportunity is thus provided for
the students to become acquainted with the problems which confront the practicing archi-
lect, particularly in Florida, and to meet future employers.

SPECIAL INFORMATION
ADMISSION
Admission to the School of Architecture and Allied Arts is granted to students who
show definite aptitude and ability to pursue the work of the School and who pass compre-
hensive examinations in the subjects which are listed under "Admission" in each curriculum.







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


For more detailed information concerning admission, see the Bulletin of Information for
the General College.
ADULT REGISTRATION PRIVILEGE
Persons twenty-one or more years of age who are not candidates for a degree may, by
special vote of the Faculty and the approval of the Board of University Examiners, be permit-
ted to register in subjects for which they are adequately prepared. For information con-
cerning the Admission of Special Students see page 240.

GRADUATE STUDY
The degree of Master of Arts in Architecture is offered in the Graduate School. For
further information, see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION
The problem or project method of teaching is employed in every course in the School
of Architecture and Allied Arts, and instruction is given each student individually. Because
of the individual nature of the work, the student passes from one group of problems to the
next in varying lengths of time, according to his accomplishment, and irrespective of Uni-
versity time units and the progress of other students.

GENERAL REGULATIONS

ADVANCEMENT
Advancements in the Departments of Architecture and Painting are made by vote of
the faculty. To be advanced from one course to the succeeding one, a student must have
completed the problems or projects of the course successfully, and must give evidence of
satisfactory accomplishment in all the co-requisite courses of his curriculum.

ACADEMIC CREDIT
The School of Architecture and Allied Arts has dispensed with clock hours, class grades,
and semester hours credit as pre-requisites to the completion of its work. Understanding
and demonstrated proficiency are used as a test for granting a degree, rather than the
traditional accumulation of credits.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
The student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. The Faculty will assist and advise, but the
student must take the initiative and assume responsibility for managing his own affairs.

ELECTIVE COURSES
Any student in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts may by permission enroll in
courses in addition to those of his regular program to broaden his general or professional
education in any direction he may choose.

STUDENT WORK
The School reserves the right to retain for purposes of exhibition or instruction any
work or drawings submitted by students.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Students successfully completing the work of the School shall, according to the char-
acter of their work as determined by the Faculty, receive diploma of graduation, of gradua-
tion With Honors, or of graduation With High Honors.







SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS


DEGREES AND CURRICULA

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE
The Department of Architecture offers instructions in Architecture, Building Construc-
tion, and Landscape Architecture.
Architecture.-The work in Architecture is for students who desire to become architects
or to enter some related field in which beauty is combined with utility. It is the aim of this
course to prepare students to become draftsmen, designers, inspectors and superintendents
of construction, specification writers, teachers, etc., or ultimately to become practicing
architects or specialists in their chosen fields.
The course in Architecture, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require three
years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Architecture.
Building Construction.-The work in Building Construction is for students who are
interested in the construction and erection of buildings rather than in their planning, and
who wish to prepare themselves for the design of the structural parts of buildings, the busi-
ness of contracting, the manufacture or sale of building materials, or for other branches
of building construction.
The course in Building Construction, while not of fixed duration, will nominally re-
quire two years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Building Construction.
Landscape Architecture.-The course in Landscape Architecture is designed to fit students
for work in the arrangement and preservation of land areas for use and beauty. The aim
is not only to prepare a graduate for immediate usefulness as an assistant to an established
practitioner, but also to lay a foundation for his ultimate independent practice of the
profession.
The course in Landscape Architecture, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require
two years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Landscape Architecture.
CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE*
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission
to candidacy for the degree in Architecture will include the following subjects which are
offered in the General College:
The Humanities; Fundamentals of Architecture; Reading, Speaking and Writing;
Man and the Social World; Man and the Biological World; Man and the Physical
World (or General Chemistry) ; General Physics; Basic Mathematics; and Military
Science or Physical Education.

Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture
a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the Faculty and must
successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Architecture.
Ae. 21 A Architectural Design Ae. 51 A Materials and Methods of Construc-
Ae. 21 B Architectural Design tion
Ae. 31 A Freehand Drawing and Water Color Ae. 51 B Mechanical Equipment of Buildings
Ae. 31 B Freehand Drawing and Water Color Ae. 51 C Professional Relations and Methods
Ae. 41 A History of Architecture Ae. 61 A Structural Design of Buildings
Ae. 41 B History of Architecture Ae. 61 B Structural Design of Buildings
Ae. 41 C Decorative Arts Ae. 71 A Thesis

*Students regularly registered in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts on or before Febru-
ary, 1935, will be supplied with a statement of course equivalents as a guide for their subsequent
registrations.


263







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


CURRICULUM IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission
to candidacy for the degree in Building Construction will include the following subjects
which are offered in the General College:

The Humanities; Fundamentals of Architecture; Reading, Speaking and Writing;
Man and the Social World; Man and the Biological World; Man and the Physical
World (or General Chemistry) ; General Physics; Basic Mathematics; and Military
Science or Physical Education.

Requirements for the Degree.-To quality for the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Building Construction a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction
of the Faculty and must successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Building Con-
struction.
Ae. 22 A Architectural Design Ae. 51 B Mechanical Equipment of Buildings
Ae. 31 A Freehand Drawing and Water Color Ae. 61 A Structural Design of Buildings
Ae. 41 B History of Architecture Ae. 61 B Structural Design of Buildings
Ae. 51 A Materials and Methods of Construe- Bs. 201-202 Principles of Economics
tion Bs. 211-212 Principles of Accounting
Ae. 51 C Professional Relations and Methods

CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE*
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission to
candidacy for the degree in Landscape Architecture will include the following subjects
which are offered in the General College:

The Humanities; Fundamentals of Architecture; Reading, Speaking and Writing;
Man and the Social World; Man and the Physical World; Man and the Biological
World; General Botany; Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms (or Basic Mathematics) ;
and Military Science or Physical Education.

Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Landscape Architecture a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction
of the Faculty and must successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Landscape
Architecture.

Ae. 23 A Landscape Design He. 411 General Forestry
Ae. 23 B Landscape Design Ay. 301 Soils
Ae. 33 A Freehand Drawing and Water Color Cy. 101-102 General Chemistry
Ae. 33 B Freehand Drawing and Water Color Ey. 302 Economic Entomology
Ae. 41 B History of Architecture and Land- Ey. 405-406 Insecticides and Fungicides
scape Architecture He. 101 Elements of Horticulture
Cl. 0101 Surveying He. 304 Plant Materials

DEPARTMENT OF PAINTING
The Department of Painting offers instruction in Painting and in Commercial Art.
Painting.-The purpose of the work in Painting is to develop the student's technical
ability in pictorial art. Beginning with the fundamentals of drawing, design, and color,
the work expands into a highly specialized study of pictorial art, including mural decora-
tion, figure, landscape, and portrait painting.
The course in Painting, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require three years
beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts.

*Students regularly registered in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts on or before Febru-
ary, 1935, will be supplied with a statement of course equivalents as a guide for their subsequent
registrations.








COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


Commercial Art.-In all fields of commercial activity the product must possess, to a high
degree, the quality of beauty; in bringing the products of industry to the attention of the
public the best artistic talent is demanded. To prepare designers for this field of endeavor,
the work in Commercial Art is offered. In addition to work in drawing, design, and color,
a sound foundation is laid in the fundamentals of business practice.
The course in Commercial Art, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require two
years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Com-
mercial Art.
CURRICULUM IN PAINTING*
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission
to candidacy for the degree in Painting will include the following subjects which are offered
in the General College:
The Humanities; Fundamentals of Pictorial Art; Reading, Speaking and Writing;
Man and the Social World; Man and the Physical World; Man and the Biological
World; Appreciation of the Fine Arts; an Elective (or Man and His Thinking, and
General Mathematics) ; and Military Science or Physical Education.

Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts a student
must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the Faculty and must successfully
pass a comprehensive examination in Painting.
Pg. 21 A Pictorial Composition Ae. 41 B History of Architecture
Pg. 21 B Pictorial Composition Ae. 41 C Decorative Arts
Pg. 31 A Freehand Drawing Pg. 51 A Oil Painting
Pg. 31 B Freehand Drawing Pg. 51 B Oil Painting
Pg. 41 A History of Painting Pg. 61 A Thesis
CURRICULUM IN COMMERCIAL ART*
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission to
candidacy for the degree in Commercial Art will include the following subjects which are
offered in the General College:
The Humanities; Fundamentals of Pictorial Art; Reading, Speaking and Writing;
Man and the Social World; Man and the Physical World; Man and the Biological
World; Appreciation of the Fine Arts; an Elective (or Man and His Thinking, and
General Mathematics) ; and Military Science or Physical Education.
Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Com-
mercial Art a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the Faculty
and must successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Painting.
Pg. 22 A Commercial Design Pg. 52 B Water Color
Pg. 22 B Commercial Design Bs. 201-202 Principles of Economics
Pg. 32 A Freehand Drawing Bs. 211-212 Principles of Accounting
Pg. 32 B Freehand Drawing Bs. 433 Advertising
Pg. 52 A Oil Painting Bs. 434 Advertising Practice

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOHN JAMES TICERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago). Acting Vice-President. and Dean
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Dean
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar

*Students regularly registered in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts on or before Febru-
ary, 1935. will be supplied with a statement of course equivalents as a guide for their subsequent
registrations.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


ANCIENT LANGUAGES
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Head Professor
WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, M.A., Associate Professor (Part Time)
BIBLE
LUDWIG WILHELM BUCHHOLZ, M.A., Professor of Bible (Deceased April 23, 1935)
JOHN EVANDER JOHNSON, B.D., M.A., Professor of Bible

BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D. (Michigan), Head Professor
THEODORE HUNTINGTON HUBBELL, Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor
HARLEY BAKWELL SHERMAN, Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Professor
HOWARD KEEFER WALLACE, M.S., Part-time Instructor, and Curator
CHEMISTRY
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Head Professor
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, D.Sc. (Princeton), Professor (On Leave of Absence)
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor
ANTHONY MOULTRIE MUCKENFUSS, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Acting Professor
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D. (Purdue), Assistant Professor
BURTON J. H. OTTE, M.S., Assistant Professor and Curator
LINUS MARVIN ELLIS, JR., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Instructor
ENGLISH
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., Acting Head Professor and Director of Freshman
English
JAMES MARION FARR, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor (Part Time)
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., Associate Professor
WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, M.A., Associate Professor (Part Time)
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., Assistant Professor
CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, M.A., Instructor
ALTON CHESTER MORRIS, M.A., Instructor
WILLIAM EDGAR MOORE, M.A., Instructor
HERMAN E. SPIVEY, M.A., Instructor
WASHINGTON ALEXANDER CLARK, JR., M.A., Instructor
JOSEPH EDWIN PRICE, B.A.E., Instructor
ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, B.A., Instructor
FRENCH
ERNEST GEORGE ATKINS, Ph.D. (Harvard), Head Professor
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D. (Stanford), Assistant Professor
ROBERT WILLIAM HUSTON, M.A., Instructor
HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor of Americanism and Southern
History, Head Professor
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Professor
ANCIL NEWTON PAYNE, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor
MANNING JULIAN DAUER, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor
ARTHUR SYLVESTER GREEN, M.A., Instructor







COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


JOURNALISM
ELMER JACOB EMIG, M.A., Head Professor
WILLIAM LEONARD LOWRY, B.A., Assistant Professor
MATHEMATICS
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D. (Illinois), Professor
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor
CECIL GLENN PHIPPs, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor
HALLETT HUNT GERMOND, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor
BERNARD FRANCIS DOSTAL, M.A., Assistant Professor
ZAREH MEGUERDITCH PIRENIAN, M.S., Assistant Professor
URI PEARL DAVIS, M.A., Instructor
SAM W. MclINNIs, M.A., Instructor
PHILOSOPHY
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D. (Boston), Head Professor
PHYSICS
ROBERT C. WILLIAMSON, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S., Associate Professor
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, Ph.D. (Cornell), Associate Professor
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D. (Kansas), Instructor
DANIEL C. SWANSON, B.S., Instructor
HERBERT B. MESSEC, Curator
PSYCHOLOGY
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor and Head of Department
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D. (Chicago), Assistant Professor
CHARLES 1. MOSIER, B.A., Instructor
SOCIOLOGY
LucIus MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D. (Harvard), Head Professor
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A., Associate Professor (Part Time)
BENJAMIN REMINGTON WELD, B.A., Instructor (Part Time)
SPANISH AND GERMAN
CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, Ph.D. (Gottengen), Head Professor (Part Time)
WILLIAM BYRON HATHAWAY, M.A., Associate Professor
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Instructor
THOMAS JEFFERSON HIGGINS, M.A., Instructor
FRANCIS MARION DEGAETANI, B.A.E., Instructor
SPEECH
HENRY PHILIP CONSTANS, M.A., Associate Professor and Head of Department
ARTHUR ARIEL HOPKINS, M.A., Assistant Professor


GENERAL REGULATIONS

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the Dean of the
College regarding their choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to
this, juniors and seniors should confer with their advisory committee. Seniors must file, in







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a degree and must pay the diploma fee
very early in the term in which they expect to receive the degree; the official calendar shows
the latest date on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be
dropped or changed without penalty only through the office of the Dean of the College.
SPECIAL STUDENTS
Persons twenty-one or more years of age who cannot satisfy the entrance requirements,
but who give evidence of ability to profit by the courses they will take, may, under excep-
tional circumstances, be admitted as "Adult Special" students. They are required to comply
with the same regulations as the regular students. For information concerning the Ad-
mission of Special Students see page 240.
The College of Arts and Sciences strongly discourages the registration of "Adult Special"
students. It is felt that every student in the College ought to regularize himself if such is
at all possible.
CORRESPONDENCE STUDY
Students who are registered in the College of Arts and Sciences will not be allowed to
carry on correspondence study while in residence in the University. While in residence,
students may neither begin new correspondence studies nor complete studies already begun.
No part of the last thirty credits counted toward a degree may be earned by extension.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA
Effective September, 1935, all beginning students are required to enroll in the
General College. For information concerning the requirements for admission to
the College of Arts and Sciences see page 201, Bulletin of Information for the
General College. The curricula for students entering the College of Arts and
Sciences from the General College will be printed in the next edition of
this bulletin.
The curricula which follow apply only to students registered in the Uni-
versity during or before the academic year 1934-35.

UPPER AND LOWER DIVISION
The work of the College of Arts and Sciences is divided into a Lower Division and an
Upper Division. The Lower Division corresponds roughly to the work which the student
will pursue in his first two years in the University, while the Upper Division corresponds
roughly to the work which the student will pursue in his junior and senior years. Freshmen
and sophomores entering the College of Arts and Sciences become members of the Lower
Division, in which they remain until they have fulfilled the requirements listed below for
admission to the Upper Division.
Not later than his last term in the Lower Division each student should apply at the office
of the Dean of the College for the assignment of an advisory committee, composed of faculty
members who will help him arrange his program of studies throughout the remainder of his
undergraduate life.
This plan operates to enable the College of Arts and Sciences to meet the needs of students
as individuals. In particular those students who show unusual ability or unusual aptitude
may take advantage of the following provision:
Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division shall, according to the
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of
graduation With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors,
and Upper and Lower Division requirements, see the Bulletin of By-Laws.







COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


GROUPS OF STUDY

Group I Group II Group IlI Group IV
Military Science French Bible Bacteriology
Physical Education German Economics Biology
Greek Education Botany
Latin English Chemistry
Spanish History Geology
Journalism Mathematics
Philosophy Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Speech

The curricula of the College of Arts and Sciences are designed to give the student a
broad, basic knowledge of the humanities, the social sciences, and the physical sciences.
Opportunity is provided for concentration and for the development of special techniques.
Courses of study providing pre-law, pre-medical, and pre-dental training, and courses of
study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of
Arts in Journalism are offered. The various curricula are described below.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
The course of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts is a four-year course in which
the humanities and the social sciences are emphasized. The study of foreign language is
given some prominence, both ancient and modern languages being offered. College English,
foreign language, and mathematics are required of every student electing this curriculum,
and to insure some understanding of scientific fact and method, every student is required
to study a basic year-course in one of the natural sciences, in addition to which he may
elect a limited amount of work in natural science if he so desires.

CURRICULUM
A. College Credits Required for Admission to the Upper Division: Semester Hours
*Military Science and Physical Education.............................. 10
E english 101-102 ..................................................... 6
fM them atics ........................................................ 6
$In Group III (not including English or Education)..................... 12
Foreign L language ................................................... 12
Laboratory Science .................................................. 8 or m ore
E english 103-104 ..................................................... 6
A approved Electives .................................................. 7 or less
TOTAL-67 semester credit hours and 67 honor points.
B. Credit Requirements for Graduation from the Upper Division:
1. A total of at least 134 semester credit hours and 134 honor points.
2. At least 24 semester credit hours in foreign language in secondary school and
in college of which at least 12 must be in college and in courses numbered 100 or above.
Each year-course passed satisfactorily in secondary school will reduce the total language
requirement by 3 semester credit hours, provided, however, that the student presents
two entrance units in the language or that he continues the language successfully in the
University.

*Students exempt from Military Science, or from Physical Education, or from both, for any reason
whatever, must earn an equal number of credit hours in some other group or groups. Choice of these
subjects must in all cases be approved by the Dean.
tFor students who earned credit for trigonometry in secondary school the required mathematics
consists of courses 101 and 102. For those who did not earn credit for trigonometry in secondary
school the required mathematics consists of courses 85 and 101.
$See above for courses in Group III.







270


BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


3. A major in Group II, in Group III, or in pure Mathematics. The majors are
described on pages 272 to 274, inclusive.
4. Two minors (or a double minor), each consisting of at least 9 semester credit
hours above the elementary course. It is advisable that the minors be in subjects related
to the major.
5. Not more than 66 semester credit hours in the major and minor fields com-
bined will be counted toward graduation.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Students who are interested primarily in the sciences may hope to gain a thorough intro-
duction to the natural sciences and a working grasp of the scientific methods by pursuing
the four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. Each student must
select one science in which he is expected to gain a mastery. A limited amount of foreign
language is required in order that the student may read scientific works in at least one
foreign tongue. The candidate is expected also to acquire breadth of viewpoint and train-
ing by devoting some time to the study of mathematics, English, and kindred subjects.

CURRICULUM
A. College Credits Required for Admission to the Upper Division:
Semester Hours
*Military Science and Physical Education .............................. 10
E english 101-102 ..................................................... 6
Mathematics 101-102 ................................................. 6
+In Group III (not including English or Education) ..................... 6
Foreign Language ................................................... 6 or 12
Science (a one-year course in each of two laboratory sciences) .......... 16 or more
Electives (approved by the Dean) ..................... ................ 17 or less

TOTAL-67 semester credit hours and 67 honor points.
B. Credit Requirements for Graduation from the Upper Division:
1. A total of at least 134 semester credit hours and 134 honor points.
2. At least 18 semester credit hours in foreign language in secondary school and
in college of which at least 6 must be in college and in courses numbered 100 or above.
Each year-course passed satisfactorily in secondary school will reduce the total language
requirement by 3 semester credit hours, provided, however, that the student presents
two entrance units in the language or that he continues the language successfully in the
University.
3. A major in Group IV or in Psychology. The majors are described on pages 272
to 274, inclusive.
4. Two minors (or a double minor), each consisting of at least nine semester
credit hours above the elementary year-course. It is advisable that the minors be in
subjects related to the major.
5. Not more than 72 semester credit hours in the major and minor fields combined
will be counted toward graduation.
PRE-LAW COURSE
Students may meet the requirement for admission to the College of Law by pursuing
the combined academic and law course. In this course a fixed amount of law credit may
be substituted for free electives in the B.A., B.S., or B.A. in Journalism curricula. Thus it is
possible for the student to earn the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, together with the degree in Law, by three years of intensive
study in the College of Arts and Sciences, followed by three years of study in the College
of Law.
During his first three years the student pursues the regular curriculum in the College
of Arts and Sciences leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. When he has completed a minimum of 110 semester credit
hours of work in the College, including all of the requirements for his degree, he will be

*Students exempt from Military Science, or from Physical Education, or from both, for any reason
whatever, must earn an equal number of credit hours in some other group or groups. Choice of these
subjects must in all cases be approved by the Dean.
tSee page 269 for courses in Group III.









COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


admitted to the College of Law. However, the degree from the College of Arts and Sciences
will not be conferred until he has completed one full year of work (28 semester credit hours)
in the College of Law.
During the term, and preferably during the year in which he expects to receive his
academic degree, the student must be registered in the College of Arts and Sciences, even
though his courses of study may be confined to the College of Law.

THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE
Since a broad cultural and scientific training is of advantage in the profession of medi-
cine, and since it is becoming increasingly difficult to gain admission to the better medical
schools without a college degree, the student preparing himself for the study of medicine
is strongly urged to earn the degree of Bachelor of Science.
The student registered in the College of Arts and Sciences who cannot earn the degree
should correspond with the dean or the registrar of the medical school of his choice con-
cerning admission requirements. His courses will then be arranged as far as possible to
meet these requirements. He should keep in mind, however, that emphasis should be placed
upon cultural as well as upon scientific subjects.
THE PRE-DENTAL COURSE
Since all freshmen entering the University of Florida in September, 1935, and there-
after, must register in the General College, it is probable that more than one year will be
required in the General College to meet the requirements for admission to dental schools. It
is suggested that the student desiring pre-dental training correspond with the dean or registrar
of the dental school of his choice several weeks in advance of entering the University,
in order that the entrance requirements may be met as soon as possible.
THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM
Instruction in Journalism is intended to provide training in technical fundamentals as
well as cultural development. It does not profess to produce finished newspaper men, but it
does attempt to shorten the period of apprenticeship.
Students who are primarily interested in cultural and intellectual training which the
study of Journalism affords, rather than in the study of Journalism as a profession, may select
Journalism as a major for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, instead of pursuing the curriculum
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.
CURRICULA FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM
LOWER DIVISION
First Term Second Term
Names of Courses- Credits Names of Courses Credits
Freshman Year (Discontinued)
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)
Es. 201-Principles of Economics ......... 3 Es. 202-Principles of Economics ........ 3
Foreign Language* ........................ 3 Foreign Language* ........................ 3
Jm. 205-History of American Journalism.. 3 Jm. 206-Principles of Journalism ........ 3
Laboratory Sciencet .....................5 or 4 Laboratory Sciencet ..................... 5 or 4
My. 203- Artillery ....................... 2 My. 204- Artillery ....................... 2

16 16

*Must be a continuation of the language begun in the freshman year.
fCy. 101-102 ; Ps. 101-102, 103-104 ; Bly. 101-102 ; or Bty. 101-102. If the student takes eight hours
of laboratory science instead of ten, he must substitute two hours of approved electives for the two
extra hours of laboratory science.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Names of Courses


First Term


Jm. 301-Advanced News Writing ........
Jm 309-Newspaper Editing ..............
Jm. 317-Business and Mechanics of
Publishing ...................
Approved Electives .......................
(or more)


UPPER DIVISION
Second Term
Credits Names of Courses


Credits


Junior Year
3 Jm. 302-Advanced News Writing ........
3 Jm. 310-Newspaper Editing .............
Jm. 318-Newspaper Management ........
3 Approved Electives .......................
8 (or more)


17
(or more)


(or more)


Jm. 407-Editorial Writing and Manage-
m ent .........................
Jm. 409-Law of the Press ...............
Jm. 411-Public Relations ................
Approved Electives .......................
(or more)


Senior Year
Jm. 408-Advanced Public Opinion ........
3 Jm. 412-Contemporary Journalistic
3 Thought ......................
3 Approved Electives .......................
7 (or more)


16


(or more)


(or more)


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS
BIOLOGY
Either of the following groups of courses will form an acceptable major in Biology:
I. Bly. 101-102, 201, 210, 325, 330, 404, and 411 or 412; II. For Pre-medical students: 101-102,
203, 210, 315, 316, 325, and 404.
BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY
The basic course is Bty. 101-102. The additional courses should be determined by con-
sultation with the Head of the Department.
CHEMISTRY
Cy. 101-102, Cy. 201-202 (or Cy. 203 and Cy. 305), Cy. 301-302 (or Cy. 361-362), and
either the year course in Physical Chemistry or a half year course in Physical Chemistry,
depending on courses previously taken. Cy. 481-482 will also be required of students begin-
ning a major in chemistry after June 1, 1935.
ECONOMICS
Economics 101-102, 201-202, and 12 semester hours from other courses in the Department
of Economics. The selection of courses must be approved by the Head of the Department.
ENGLISH
English 101-102, 103-104, 201-202, 301-302, and one of the senior courses in the Depart-
ment of English.
FRENCH
The student must earn or have credit for French 101-102, and he must earn a total of
twenty-four semester hours of college credit in the Department of French. French 205-206
and French 207-208 must be included in the major. French 107-108 does not count toward
a major.
GEOLOGY
No major is offered in Geology. A minor, Geology 201, 202, and 204, is available.
GERMAN
The student must earn or have credit for German 101-102 and he must earn a total of 24
semester hours of college credit in the Department of German. The selection of courses must
meet the approval of the Head of the Department.


16








COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


GREEK
Twenty-four semester credit hours in courses approved by the Head of the Department.
Usually grammar and prose composition are required.
HISTORY
History 101-102 and 18 semester credit hours in other courses in history in the Department
of History and Political Science.
HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
History 101-102 and Political Science 101-102 and 18 semester credit hours of other work
in the Department of History and Political Science.
JOURNALISM
A major in Journalism consists of at least eighteen semester credit hours in courses in
Journalism above the elementary year-course.
LATIN
Twenty-four semester credit hours in courses approved by the Head of the Department.
Usually grammar and prose composition are required.
MATHEMATICS
Thirty semester hours, including Mathematics 101-102, or their equivalents, selected from
courses offered by the Department of Mathematics. The courses selected must include cal-
culus, and the selection must meet the approval of the Head of the Department.
PHILOSOPHY
Not less than 24 semester hours in the Department of Philosophy. Any two of the begin-
ning courses should be taken, after which the following courses should be taken in order, as
far as that can be arranged: Logic, Advanced Logic, Philosophy of Nature, and Ethics. For
the two beginning courses Philosophy 203 and 204 are recommended.
PHYSICS
The general introductory course in college physics, preferably Physics 211, 212, 213, 214,
followed by at least 18 hours in Physics approved by the Head of the Department.
In addition to the required courses in mathematics, calculus is either prerequisite or core-
quisite for the work above the introductory course, and the student is advised to take differ-
ential equations.
If the student is planning to take graduate work in Physics he should take at least two
years of German, and if possible, two years of French.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Political Science 101-102 and 18 semester credit hours in other courses in political science
in the Department of History and Political Science.
The major in political science and history is described above.
PSYCHOLOGY
Twenty-four semester hours in the Department of Psychology, including Psychology 201,
304, 309, 310, and 424.
SOCIOLOGY
Twenty-four semester credit hours in the Department of Sociology. The selection of
courses must be approved by the Head of the Department. The following courses are recom-
mended: Sociology 111, 112, 303-304, 441, 442. It is also recommended that the student
take the following courses, although they do not count in the above 24 semester credit hours:
Psychology 201 and Economics 201-202.







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


SPANISH
The student must earn or have credit for Spanish 101-102 and he must earn a total of 24
semester hours of college credit in the Department of Spanish; the selection of courses must
meet the approval of the Head of the Department.
SPEECH
The work in the Department of Speech is divided into two classes, as follows:
Class A. Speech 212, 214, 301, 303, 304, 405, 406.
Class B. Speech 307, 308, 403, 404.
All students majoring in Speech are required to complete Speech 201-202. If the student
majoring in Speech is primarily interested in original speaking, he should elect at least 12
semester hours from Class A and a minimum of 6 semester hours (preferably Speech 307 and
404) from Class B. If the student is primarily interested in the interpretative and dramatic
aspects of Speech, he should elect at least 12 hours from Class B and a minimum of 6
semester hours (preferably Speech 214, 301 and 303.)


SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
ADMINISTRATION
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D, D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President, Dean, College of Arts
and Sciences
BERNARD V. CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Director
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY
BERNARD V. CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Pharmacognosy and
Pharmacology
ROBERT S. JUSTICE, M.S. in Pharmacy, Instructor in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology

PHARMACY
WILLIAM J. HUSA, Ph.C., Ph.D. (Iowa), Head Professor of Pharmacy
PERRY A. FOOTE, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Pharmacy

GENERAL STATEMENT
All work offered in the School of Pharmacy meets the highest requirements of pharma-
ceutical instruction in this country. As a member of the American Association of Colleges
of Pharmacy, the School receives recognition for its courses from all state boards requiring
attendance in a school of pharmacy of membership standard as a prerequisite for examination
and registration.
The curriculum is designed to provide a broad scientific education, to train retail phar-
macists, and to provide an opportunity for specialization either in Commercial Pharmacy,
in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, or in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology. Specialization in
Commercial Pharmacy should qualify a man for a position as manager in a drug store, or as
a salesman of drugs and chemicals. The work in Pharmaceutical Chemistry is designed to
train men for positions in food and drug laboratories, or as manufacturing pharmacists. The
completion of the work in pharmacognosy or pharmacology should qualify one to act in
the capacity of pharmacognocist or inspector of crude drugs with a manufacturing concern,
or with the Federal Customs Service, or as pharmacologist for manufacturing houses or for







SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


hospitals. The foregoing are only a few of the many positions open to men who possess
training along any of the above lines. The demand for graduates of this school exceeds
the supply. This curriculum also provides opportunity, through selection of approved
electives, for the completion of minimum requirements for entrance into certain medical
colleges.
A ten-acre tract has been allotted to the School of Pharmacy for use as a medicinal plant
garden, which is used as a teaching adjunct and as a source of supply for fresh material for
study, investigation, and classroom illustration.
The General Edmund Kirby-Smith Memorial Herbarium, consisting of 5,600 specimens,
with those collected locally, provides a collection of approximately 6,000 plant specimens.
Some of these were collected as early as 1846. Specimens from nearly every state and many
foreign countries make up this collection. This herbarium provides actual specimens for
study of plant classification and for comparison and identification of new species.
The Chemistry-Pharmacy branch of the main library is housed in the Chemistry-Pharmacy
building. The library includes text and reference books and several of the American and
foreign periodicals on chemical and pharmaceutical subjects.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Students may receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of graduation
With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors, see the
Bulletin of By-Laws.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA
Effective September, 1935, all beginning students are required to enroll in
the General College. For information concerning the requirements for admis-
sion to the School of Pharmacy, see page 202, Bulletin of Information for the Gen-
eral College. The curricula for students entering the School of Pharmacy from
the General College will be printed in the next edition of this bulletin.
The curricula which follow apply only to students registered in the Univer-
sity during or before the academic year 1934-35.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY
The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy is awarded on completion of the cur-
riculum as outlined below. Opportunity for specialization in Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical
Chemistry, Pharmacognosy, or Pharmacology is provided through choice of electives in the
senior year. Electives are listed after curriculum.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY
Courses are offered leading to the degree of Master of Science in Pharmacy. Candidates
for that degree must possess the Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy from an institution
of recognized standing.
The student must spend at least one entire academic year in residence at the University
as a graduate student, devoting his full time to the pursuit of his studies.
For further requirements for the Master's Degree, see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Courses are offered leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy with specialization in
Chemistry, Pharmacy, Pharmacognosy, and Pharmacology. For further information consult
the Bulletin of the Graduate School.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


OLD CURRICULUM

Students already enrolled must continue with the old curriculum as outlined below:


Names of Courses


First Term


0262-Organic Cher
303-Quantitative
203-Artillery ...
221-Practical Pha
211-Inorganic Ph


Second Term


Credits Names of Courses
Freshman Year (Discontinued)
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)
nistry ............ 5 Bly. 0101-Principles o
Analysis .......... 2 My. 204-Artillery ..
................... 2 Pgy. 222-Practical P1
armacognosy ...... 3 Pgy. 242-Drug Plant
armacy ........... 56 Phy. 222-Galenical P]


Credits


f Animal Biology ....

harmacognosy ......
Histology ..........
pharmacy ...........


Junior Year
Bey. 301-General Bacteriology ........... 4 Pgy.
Ply. 351-Pharmacology ................. 3 Ply.
Phy. 353-Organic and Analytical Pharmacy 5 Phy.
Ps. 101-General Physics ............... 3 Ps.
Ps. 103-Physics Laboratory ............ 2 Ps.


Fh. or Gn.-French or German ............
Ply. 451-Principles of Biologicals .......
Phy. 361-Prescriptions and Dispensing ...
Phy. 381-Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence...
Approved Electives .......................


-Microscopy of Drugs............
-Pharmacological Standardization
-Organic and Analytical Pharmacy
-General Physics ...............
-Physics Laboratory ............


Senior Year
3 Fh. or Gn.-French or German ............
3 Phy. 362-Prescriptions and Dispensing ...
3 Phy. 372-Commercial Pharmacy .........
2 Phy. 402-Pharmaceutical Arithmetic .....
6 Approved Electives .......................


Whenever the term "approved elective" occurs in the curriculum it shall be understood
that the electives are to be recommended by the Head of the Department concerned and
approved by the Director.
Electives: Ply. 455-456; Ply. 452; Pgy. 425-426; Phy. 432; Phy 453.


THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

ADMINISTRATION
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D, D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head Professor of Economics, Acting Dean of the General
College, Dean of the College of Business Administration
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
NANNIE BELLE WHITAKER, B.A., Executive Secretary

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head of the Department and Professor of Economics
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D. (Robert Brookings), Professor of Business
Statistics and Economics
HOWARD WILLIAM GRAY, M.S., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting
ROLAND B. EUTSLER, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Professor of Economics and Insurance
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, Ph.D. (Stanford), Professor of Economics
HARWOOD BURROWS DOLBEARE, B.A., Associate Professor of Finance
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, M.A., LL.B., Associate Professor of Business Law and Economics







THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D. (Clark), Associate Professor of Economic Geography,
Acting Director of Institute of Inter-American Affairs
ARCHER STUART CAMPBELL, Ph.D. (Virginia), Associate Professor of Economics and Foreign
Trade, Director of the Bureau of Economic and Business Research
JOSEPH PORTER WILSON, M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Marketing
JAMES EDWARD CHACE, JR., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics and Realty Management
SIGISMOND DE RUDESHEIM DIETTRICH, Ph.D. (Clark), Instructor in Economic Geography
WILLIAM TROTTER HICKS, M.S., Instructor in Economics and Economic Geography
BEN COGBURN, B.S.B.A., Instructor in Accounting

GENERAL INFORMATION
Instruction in Business Administration is designed to provide analysis of the basic prin-
ciples of business. Its purpose is to prepare students (1) to become business executives;
(2) to assume the increasing responsibilities of business ownership; and (3) to act in the
capacity of business specialists.
Business education involves consideration of the following occupational levels: (1) upper
levels composed of proprietors and executives; (2) intermediate levels composed of depart-
ment heads and minor executives; and (3) lower levels composed of clerical and routine
workers. The scope of business education includes preparation for all of these levels. While
the College of Business Administration has organized its curricula in business administration
to prepare students primarily to occupy the upper and intermediate levels, it has not entirely
ignored the lower levels.
The College of Business Administration does not profess to turn out finished business
managers, executives, department heads, or minor executives. Its curricula provide instruc-
tion that will help to shorten the period of apprenticeship for those who expect to enter
business occupations.

SPECIAL INFORMATION

LECTURES BY BUSINESS EXECUTIVES
It is the policy of the College to invite from time to time prominent business executives
both from within and from without the state to address the students in business adminis-
tration.
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH
The College of Business Administration maintains a Bureau of Economic and Business
Research which provides faculty members and graduate students with an opportunity to
engage in specific types of research work. Its activities are coordinated with the research
activities of the College as a whole.

MEMBERSHIP IN NATIONAL AND REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
The College of Business Administration was admitted to membership in the American
Association of Collegiate Schools of Business in 1929. The College is also a member of the
Southern Economic Association.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

Effective September, 1935, all beginning students are required to enroll in
the General College. For information concerning the requirements for admis-
sion to the College of Business Administration see page 203, Bulletin of Informa-







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


tion for the General College. The curriculum for students entering the College
of Business Administration from the General College will be printed in the next
edition of this bulletin.
The curricula which follow apply only to students registered in the University
during or before the academic year 1934-35.
The College of Business Administration offers two types of curricula leading to the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration: the Curriculum in Business
Administration Proper and the Curriculum in Combination with Law.

THE CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER
Lower Division
The curriculum in Business Administration proper is divided into Upper and Lower
Divisions. The Lower Division consists of the freshman and sophomore years. It contains
basic courses devoted wholly to required subjects largely cultural in character and is
intended to provide students with a broad intellectual foundation. All students of freshman
and sophomore rank are registered in the Lower Division.
Students in the Lower Division preparing for Group VIII should, in the sophomore year,
substitute Ms. 253-254 for laboratory science, and Pcl. 101-102 for Bs. 211-212.

Upper Division
The Upper Division consists of the junior and senior years. The curriculum of the
Upper Division is divided into eight groups. Students in the Lower Division shall elect,
during the second semester of their sophomore year and in any event prior to the beginning
of their junior year, the group of studies in the Upper Division which they intend to pursue
and will thereupon be assigned to the student advisory committee of the selected group.
Unconditional admission to the Upper Division shall automatically entitle students to at least
junior rank. Students once admitted to the Upper Division shall be under the supervision
of their student advisory committee in the selection of courses in their curriculum and any
variation therefrom must be approved by this committee and by the Dean.
In most cases each group in the Upper Division contains six semester hours of approved
electives in the junior year, and six semester hours in the senior year. If the student so
desires, he may substitute foreign language in the first two years and postpone Political
Science 101-102, Psychology 201, and English 211 to his junior and senior years. If he
makes this choice, his approved electives must include the latter courses. If he does not
make this choice, he may be permitted, provided he shows cause therefore, to elect six semester
hours of approved electives in any department of the University. The remaining electives
must be taken in Business Administration.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division shall, according to the
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of
graduation With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors,
and Upper and Lower Division requirements, see the Bulletin of By-Laws.

THE CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
The College of Business Administration combines with the College of Law in offering a
six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately to enter the College of Law.
Students register during the first three years in the College of Business Administration; when
they have fully satisfied the academic requirements of these three years, they are eligible to










THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


register in the College of Law and may during their last three years complete the course in the
College of Law. When students have, after entering the College of Law, satisfactorily com-
pleted one year's work in law (28 semester hours), they may offer this year's work as a sub-
stitute for the fourth year in the College of Business Administration and receive the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. Regulations as to the Lower and Upper
Divisions apply in the main to this curriculum as well as to the curriculum in Business
Administration Proper.
Students may substitute two years of foreign language for Political Science 101-102 and
Psychology 201 and postpone these courses to the junior year as a part of the fourteen hours
of approved electives specified in the curriculum. If they do not elect foreign language they
must take their approved electives in Business Administration.

THE CURRICULUM PROPER
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


Names of Courses


First Term


201E -Principles
211 -Principles
Laboratory
203 -Artillery .
201 -General Ps
211 -Survey of


LOWER DIVISION


Second Term


Credits Names of Courses Cre

Freshman Year (Discontinued)

Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)

of Economics ...... 3 Bs. 202E -Principles of Economics .....
of Accounting ..... 3 Bs. 212 -Principles of Accounting .....
Science ......... 5 Laboratory Sciencet .........
................... 2 M y. 204 Artillery ....................
ychology or Psy. 0201 -General Psychology or
Modern Literature.. 3 Eh. 0211 -Survey of Modern Literature. .

16


dits




3
3
5
2

3

16


UPPER DIVISION

I. GENERAL BUSINESS


Junior Year
313 -Factory and Distribution Cost Bs.
Accounting ................ 3 Bs.
321E -Financial Organization of Bs.
Society .................... 3 Bs.
341 -Production Management ...... 2 Eh.
351E -Transportation Principles .... 3
355 -Business Writing ............ 3
Approved Elective ........... 3

17

Senior Year
401 -Business Law ............... 3 Bs.
409E-Applied Economics .......... 2 Bs.
429E -Principles of Government Bs.
Finance ................... 3 Bs.
469E -Business Forecasting ........ 3 Bs.
357 -Business Speaking ........... 3
Approved Elective ........... 3

17


302E -Elements of Statistics ........
0311 -Advanced Accounting ........
322 -Financial Management .......
372 -Labor Economics ............
356 -Business Writing ............
Approved Elective ...........


402
410E
422
0431E
454E


-Business Law ...............
-Applied Economics ..........
-Investments .................
-Principles of Marketing .....
-Principles of Public Utility
Economics .................
Approved Elective ...........


?Cy. 101-102; Ps. 101-102, 103-104; Bly. 101-102; or Bty. 101-102.









280 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


II. ACCOUNTING
First Term Second Term
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Junior Year
Bs. 313 -Factory and Distribution Cost Bs. 302E -Elements of Statistics ........ 3
Accounting ................ 3 Bs. 0311 -Advanced Accounting ........ 3
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Bs. 322 -Financial Management ....... 3
Society .................... 3 Bs. 372 -Labor Economics ............ 2
Bs. 351E -Transportation Principles .... 3 Eh. 356 -Business Writing ............ 3
Eh. 355 -Business Writing ............ 3 Approved Elective ........... 3
Sch. 357 -Business Speaking ........... 3
Approved Elective ........... 2

17 17

Senior Year
Bs. 0312 -Advanced Accounting ........ 3 Bs. 402 -Business Law ............... 3
Bs. 401 -Business Law ............... 3 Bs. 410E -Applied Economics .......... 2
Bs. 409E -Applied Economics ........... 2 Bs. 414 -Income Tax Procedure ...... 3
Bs. 415 -Auditing .................... 3 Bs. 416 -Advanced Accounting ........ 3
Bs. 423* -Commercial Banking ......... 3 Bs. 0431E -Principles of Marketing ..... 3
Approved Elective ........... 3 Approved Elective ........... 3

17 17


III. INSURANCE AND REALTY ADMINISTRATION

Junior Year
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Bs. 302E -Elements of Statistics ........ 3
Society .................... 3 Bs. 322 -Financial Management ........ 3
Bs. 329E -Elements of Personal Finance 3 Bs. 362 -Property Insurance .......... 3
Bs. 351E -Transportation Principles .... 3 Eh. 356 -Business Writing ............ 3
Bs. 361 -Property Insurance .......... 3 Sch. 0357 -Business Speaking ........... 3
Eh. 355 -Business Writing ............ 3 Approved Elective ........... 2
Approved Elective ........... 2

17 17

Senior Year
Bs. 401 -Business Law ............... 3 Bs. 402 -Business Law ............... 3
Bs. 409E -Applied Economics .......... 2 Bs. 410E -Applied Economics ........... 2
Bs. 429E -Principles of Government Bs. 422 -Investments ................. 3
Finance ................... 3 Bs. 0431E -Principles of Marketing ...... 3
Bs. 461 -Life Insurance .............. 3 Bs. 466 -Realty Management .......... 3
Bs. 465 -Realty Principles ............ 3 Approved Elective ........... 3
Approved Elective ........... 3

17 17


IV. MARKETING

Junior Year
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Bs. 302E -Elements of Statistics ........ 3
Society .................... 3 Bs. 322 -Financial Management ....... 3
Bs. 341 -Production Management ..... 2 Bs. 372 -Labor Economics ............ 2
Bs. 351E -Transportation Principles .... 3 Bs. 432 -Market Management ......... 3
Bs. 431E -Principles of Marketing ...... 3 Eh. 356 -Business Writing ............ 3
Eh. 355 -Business Writing ............ 3 Approved Elective ........... 3
Approved Elective ........... 3

17 17


*Bs. 341 or Bs. 329E may be substituted for Bs. 423.










THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 281


First Term Second Term
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits

Senior Year
Bs. 401 -Business Law ............... 3 Bs. 402 -Business Law ............... 3
Bs. 409E -Applied Economics .......... 2 Bs. 410E -Applied Economics .......... 2
Bs. 433 -Advertising ................. 3 Bs. 434 -Advertising Practice ......... 3
Bs. 435E -International Trade ......... 3 Bs. 436 -Foreign Trade Technique ..... 3
Sch. 357 -Business Speaking ........... 3 Bs. 470E -Business Forecasting ........ 3
Approved Elective ........... 3 Approved Elective ........... 3

17 17


V. BANKING AND FINANCE

Junior Year
Ba. 311 -Advanced Accounting ........ 3 Bs. 302E -Elements of Statistics ........ 3
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Bs. 312 -Advanced Accounting ........ 3
Society .................... 3 Bs. 322 -Financial Management ....... 3
Bs. 329E -Elements of Personal Finance. 3 Bs. 0431E -Principles of Marketing ..... 3
Bs. 351E -Transportation Principles .... 3 Eh. 356 -Business Writing ............ 3
Eh. 355 -Business Writing ............ 3 Approved Elective ........... 2
Approved Elective ......... 2

17 17

Senior Year
Bs. 401 -Business Law ............... 3 Bs. 402 -Business Law ............... 3
Bs. 409E -Applied Economics ........... 2 Bs. 410E -Applied Economics ........... 2
Bs. 415 -Auditing .................... 3 Bs. 422 -Investments ................. 3
Bs. 423 -Commercial Banking ........ 3 Bs. 426E -Banking Systems ............ 3
Bs. 469E -Business Forecasting ......... 3 Sch. 0357 -Business Speaking ........... 3
Approved Elective ........... 3 Approved Elective ........... 3

17 17


VI. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY AND FOREIGN TRADE

Junior Year
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Bs. 302E -Elements of Statistics ........ 3
Society .................... 3 Bs. 322 -Financial Management ....... 3
Bs. 351E -Transportation Principles .... 3 Bs. 440 -Trade Horizons in Caribbean
Bs. 381E -Economic Geography of America .................... 3
North America ............ 3 Eh. 356 -Business Writing ............ 3
Bs. 385E -Commercial Geography of Sch. 0357 -Business Speaking ........... 3
South America ............ 3 Approved Elective ........... 3
Eh. 355 -Business Writing ............ 3
Approved Elective ........... 3

18 18

Senior Year
Bs. 401 -Business Law ............... 3 Bs. 402 -Business Law ................ 3
Bs. 409E -Applied Economics .......... 2 Bs. 410E -Applied Economics .......... 2
Bs. 435E -International Trade .......... 3 Bs. 426E -Banking Systems ............ 3
Bs. 485E* -International Economic Bs. 436 -Foreign Trade Technique ..... 3
Relations .................. 3 Bs. 442 -Trade Horizons in the Far East 3
Bs. 487E -Economic Geography of Europe 3 Approved Elective ........... 2
Approved Elective ........... 2

16 16

*Bs. 468E may be substituted for Bs. 485E.












BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


VII. ECONOMICS


Credits Names of Courses

Junior Year


Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of
Society .................... 3
Bs. 351E -Transportation Principles .... 3
Bs. 381E -Economic Geography of
North America ............ 3
Bs. 429E -Principles of Government
Finance ................... 3
Bs. 435E -International Trade ......... 3
Approved Elective ........... 2


Second Term


Credits


Bs. 302E -Elements of Statistics .......
Bs. 322 -Financial Management ......
Bs. 404E -Government Control of
Business ..................
Bs. 0431E -Principles of Marketing......
Approved Elective ...........


Senior Year


Bs. 409E-Applied Economics .......... 2
Bs. 423 -Commercial Banking ........ 3
Bs. 0468E -Economic History in the
M making ................... 3
Bs. 469E -Business Forecasting ......... 3
Bs. 485E -International Economic Rela-
tions ...................... 3
Approved Elective ........... 2


Bs. 410E -Applied Economics ...........
Bs. 426E -Banking Systems ............
Bs. 454E -Principles of Public Utility
Economics ................
Bs. 470E -Business Forecasting ........
Sch. 0357 -Business Speaking ...........
Approved Elective ...........


VIII. STATISTICS AND ACTUARIAL SCIENCE*


Bs. 211 -Principles of Accounting .....
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of
Society ....................
Bs. 461 -Life Insurance ..............
Eh. 355 -Business Writing ...........
Ms. 311 -Advanced College Algebra** or
Ms. 0522 -Methods of Least Squares and
Statistics ..................
Approved Elective ...........


Junior Year
3 Bs. 212 -Principles of Accounting .....
Bs. 302E -Elements of Statistics ........
3 Bs. 322 -Financial Management .......
3 Eh. 356 -Business Writing ............
3 Ms. 320 -Theory of Equations or
Ms. 0521 -Empirical Analysis and
Curve Fitting .............
3 Approved Elective ...........


17

Senior Year


Bs. 361 -Property Insurance ..........
Bs. 401 -Business Law ...............
Bs. 409E -Applied Economics ..........
Bs. 469E -Business Forecasting ........
Ms. 0420 -Differential Equations ......
Approved Elective ...........


Bs. 402 -Business Law ...............
Bs. 410E-Applied Economics ...........
Bs. 422 -Investments .................
Bs. 470E -Business Forecasting .........
Ms. 508 -Project in Mathematics of
Finance ...................
Approved Elective ...........


*Students desiring to concentrate in the field of statistics may be permitted to substitute economic
and business courses for certain mathematics courses in the Upper Division.
**If not taken in junior year, it should be taken in senior year.


Names of Courses


First Term








COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


THE CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW*

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration


First Term
Names of Courses


Second Term
Credits Names of Courses


Freshman Year (Discontinued)
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)


Bs. 201E -Principles of Economics .....
Bs. 311 -Advanced Accounting .......
Eh. 207 -English Literature of
Nineteenth Century** .....
Laboratory Sciencet .........
My. 203 Artillery ....................
Psy. 201 -General Psychology ..........


0302E
321E

351E
409E
429E


Junior Year
-Elements of Statistics ....... 3 Bs.
-Financial Organization of Bs.
Society .................... 3
-Transportation Principles .... 3 Bs.
-Applied Economics ........... 2 Bs.
-Principles of Government
Finance ................... 3
Approved Electives .......... 4


Bs. 202E-Principles of Economics ......
Bs. 312 -Advanced Accounting ........
Eh. 208 -English Literature of
Nineteenth Century** ......
Laboratory Sciencet .........
My. 204 Artillery ....................
Approved Elective ...........


322 -Financial Management .......
404E -Government Control of
Business ..................
410E -Applied Economics ..........
454E -Principles of Public Utility
Economics .................

Approved Electives ..........


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D, D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Assistant Dean
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D. (Columbia), Director of Laboratory Schools
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D. (Peabody), Principal of Laboratory School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar

FACULTY
ALFRED CRAGO, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Educational Psychology and Tests and Measure-
ments, and School Psychologist
JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D. (Nebraska), Professor of Public School Administration
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor of Agricultural Education
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M. A., Professor of Secondary Education and High School Visitor
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor of Supervised Teaching and Director
of Laboratory Schools
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean, and Professor of Education
ELLIS BENTON SALT, M.A., Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education
GLENN BALLARD SIMsMONS, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Assistant Dean, and Professor of
Education

*For general statement regarding the combined curriculum see page 278.
**Any of the following English courses may be substituted for this course: Eh. 103-104, Eh. 201-202,
or Eh. 355-356.
tCy. 101-102; Ps. 101-102, 103-104; Bly. 101-102; or Bty. 101-102.


Credits







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


BUNNIE OTHANEL SMITH, M.A., Assistant Professor of Curriculum Revision
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor of Education and Principal of Laboratory
School
HARRY EvINS WOOD, M.A.E., Practice Teacher and Itinerant Teacher Trainer in Agricultural
Education
STAFF OF THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL
ELIZABETH BLANDING, B.A., Teaching Fellow in English
JACK BOHANNON, M.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts Education
MARGARET BOUTELLE, M.A., Instructor in English Education
ADDIE BOYD, M.A., Instructor in Social Science Education
EILEEN BROWN, R.N., School Nurse and Instructor in Health Education
CLEVA JOSEPHINE CARSON, B.A., Instructor in Music Education
JAMES DEWBERRY COPELAND, M.A., Assistant Professor of Business Education
CHARLOTTE DUNN, B.S., Instructor in Kindergarten Education
WILLIAM BARNETT FEAGLE, Teaching Fellow in Mathematics
WILLIAM LEWIS GOETTE, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Science Education
Louis ALEXANDER GUESSAZ, JR., M.A., Instructor in Social Science Education
JAMES DOUGLAS HAYGOOD, M.A., Instructor in Foreign Language Education
LILLIAN PAGE HOUGH, B.S.E., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to Second Grade
HOMER HOWARD, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics Education
KATHLEEN TENNILLE KING, B.S.E., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to Fourth
Grade
HELEN LYNCH, M.A., Instructor in Physical Education for Girls; Instructor in History
MINNIE S. McAULEY, M.A., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to Fifth Grade
LILLIAN MAGUIRE, M.A., Instructor in English Education
INGORIE VAUSE MIKELL, B.M., Assistant to Kindergartner
BEATRICE T. OLSON, M.S., Instructor in Home Economics
CLARA McDONALD OLSON, M.A.E., Instructor in Foreign Language Education
RUTH BEATRICE PEELER, M.A., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to First Grade
EULAH MAE SNIDER, B.S. in L.S., Librarian and Instructor in Education
ADAM WEBSTER TENNEY, B.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education
MAE ALENE TINDALL, M.A., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to Third Grade
(To Be Appointed), Instructor in Physical Education for Boys; Instructor in Science
(To Be Appointed), Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to Sixth Grade

GENERAL INFORMATION
Opportunities for educational investigation, student teaching, and observation are pro-
vided through the courtesy of the public school authorities of Gainesville and Alachua
County. More than a score of accredited elementary and secondary schools are within a
thirty-mile radius of the University. The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School many times increases
the facilities for the study of educational problems.
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES
Not more than one-fourth of the credits which are applied toward a degree, nor more
than 12 of the last 36 credits which are earned toward a bachelor's degree, may be taken by
correspondence study or extension class. Candidates for the Normal Diploma may not earn
more than 16 credits by correspondence study or extension class. While in residence, the
student will not be allowed to carry on correspondence work without the consent of the Dean;
this permission will be granted only in exceptional cases. Not more than nine credits may
be earned by correspondence study during the summer vacation period.







COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES
Graduates of the University are granted Graduate State Certificates without further
examination, provided that three-twentieths of their work has been devoted to professional
training and provided that they have satisfied the requirement of the law as to the Constitu-
tion of the United States. It is well for the student to note that a Graduate State Certificate
permits him to teach only those subjects that are listed on such certificate, and that only
those subjects will be placed on his certificate in which he has specialized in his college
course. This will ordinarily mean that a subject must have been pursued at least three
years in college, in addition to credit for all high school courses offered in that subject by
a standard high school, before a certificate to teach that subject will be granted. The
student who expects to meet the requirements for specialization should familiarize himself
with the regulations regarding specialization as printed in the Handbook for Teachers, Section
1, published by the State of Florida, Department of Public Instruction, 1932. Applicants
for the Graduate State Certificate must apply to Superintendent W. S. Cawthon, Tallahassee,
for application blanks and for further information.
Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by "presenting satis-
factory evidence of having taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under a
Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of three holders of Life State, Life
Graduate State, or Life Professional Certificates." Application for a Life Graduate State
Certificate must be filed before the expiration of the Graduate State Certificate.

EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATE
Students enrolled in the College of Education, upon recommendation of the faculty,
receive an extension of one year on any or all valid Florida certificates.


DEGREES AND CURRICULA

Effective September, 1935, all beginning students are required to enroll in
the General College. For information concerning the requirements for admis-
sion to the College of Education, see page 204, Bulletin of Information for the
General College. The curricula for students entering the College of Education
from the General College will be printed in the next edition of this bulletin.
The curricula which follow apply only to students registered in the Univer-
sity during or before the academic year 1934-35.
UPPER AND LOWER DIVISIONS
The College of Education is composed of a Lower and an Upper Division. The Lower
Division contains all students who have not satisfied the requirements for admission to the
Upper Division.
For detailed regulations concerning the Upper and Lower Division, see the Bulletin of
By-Laws.
GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division shall, according to the
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of
graduation With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors,
see the Bulletin of By-Laws.
DEGREES OFFERED
Students completing any of the prescribed four-year courses may obtain the respective
degrees: Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Education, Bachelor of









286 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION--UPPER DIVISION


Science in Agricultural Education, Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education,
or Bachelor of Arts in Health and Physical Education.
Students completing the prescribed course may obtain the Normal Diploma.

MAJORS AND MINORS

In the following discussion a major is defined to consist of 18 credit hours above the
elementary year-course in a subject other than Education. A minor is ordinarily defined
to consist of 9 credit hours above the elementary year-course in a subject other than Educa-
tion, but in case the number of hours thus specified is not sufficient to meet the requirements
necessary for certification, the student must take enough additional hours to meet these
requirements.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA AND TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

Lower Division (Discontinued after August, 1936)
Leading to the Normal Diploma
For Those Who Expect to Teach in the First Six Grades
Credits
fEn. 103 Health Education .......................................... 3
tEn. 121 Primary Methods ..........................................
or 3
tEn. 124 The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth ]
G rades .................................................. J
tEn. 122 Teaching Reading and Literature in the First Six Grades ..... 3
tEn. 201 The Teaching of the Social Sciences in the Fourth, Fifth and)
Sixth G rades ............................................ I
or 3
tEn. 221 Advanced Primary Methods ................................ J
En. 207 Educational Psychology .................................... 3
fEn. 209 The Teaching of Science in the First Six Grades ............. 2
tEn. 253 Supervised Teaching of the Elementary Subjects .............. I
or 3
En. 308 The Public School Curriculum............................... J
tGl. 101-102 General Natural Science ................................... 8
tSy. 111-112 Introduction to Social Studies .............................. 6
Eh. 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition .................................. 6
tPublic School Art .......................................... 4
tPublic School M usic ....................................... 4
tHandwriting (one course) .................................. 0
My. 103-104, 203-204- Field Artillery ........................................ 8
M ajor and M inors .......................................... 12

Total ....................................................... 68

Upper Division
Credits
En. 308* The Public School Curriculum .............................. 3
En. 319 Child and Adolescent Psychology ........................... 3
Approved Electives in Education ............................ 6
One major** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives
approved by the Dean ...................... ............. 52

T total ...................... ............................. 64
Total Credits and Honor Points ......................... 132


*Students who have taken En. 308 must elect three hours of Education in its place.
**For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the natural
sciences.
tOffered only in the Summer Session.





COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION OR
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
For Those Who Expect to Teach in the Junior and Senior High School

Lower Division (Discontinued after August, 1936)
Credits
Pl. 101-102 Physical Education ........................................ 2
En. 101 Introduction to Education .................................. 3
En. 207 Educational Psychology .................................... 3
Eh. 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition .................................. 6
Eh. 103-104 Introduction to Literature ................................. 6
Gl. 101-102 General Natural Science ................................... 8
Sy. 111-112 Introduction to Sociology .................................. 6
Sch. 201 Public Speaking ........................................... 3
Major and minors and electives approved by the Dean-(Mini-
m um ) ................................................... 24
My. 103-104, 203-204- Field Artillery ......................................... 8

Total .................................................... 69

Upper Division
En. 319 Child and Adolescent Psychology ........................... 3
En. 323 General Methods in the Secondary School ................... 3
*Supervised Student Teaching ............................... 6
En. 403 Problem-Project Method ................................... 3
tApproved Electives in Education ............................ 6
Completion of one major** and two minors (or a double minor)
and electives approved by the Dean........................ 42

T total ................................................... 63
Total Credits ............................................ 132

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA (Discontinued after August, 1936)
If, while the student is working on the curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree, he
desires to secure the Normal Diploma, he may do so when he has satisfactorily completed
the following work:
Credits
PI. 101-102 Physical Education ........................................ 2
En. 101 Introduction to Education .................................. 3
En. 207 Educational Psychology ..................................... 3
En. 323 General Methods in the Secondary School.................... 3
Supervised Student Teaching ............................... 3
Eh. 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition .................................. 6
Eh. 103-104 Introduction to Literature ................................. 6
Gl. 101-102t General Natural Science ................................... 8
Sy. 111-112 Introduction to Social Studies-Introduction to Sociology..... 6
M ajor and m inors ......................................... 24
My. 103-104 Freshman Field Artillery .................................. 4

Total ................................................... 68

*These courses carry three credits each and must be selected in accordance with the major and
two minors in which the student is working.
**For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the natural
sciences.
tStudents preparing to become principals must take En. 305, 317, and 401, 406, or 408.
$Students who major or minor in a natural science are not required to take GI. 101-102. It may be
taken as an elective.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education

Lower Division (Discontinued after August, 1936)


202
104
101-102
101-106
207
101-102
101
104
103-104
203-204
101-102
101-102
103-104
201


306
308
303
301
302
303-304
306
319
409-410
302

301
206
302


Credits
- Farm Machinery ...... ................................ ..... 4
- Types and Breeds of Animals .............................. 4
- General Botany ........................................... 8
- General Chemistry ........................................ 10
- Educational Psychology .................................... 3
- Rhetoric and Composition .................................. 6
- Elements of Horticulture .................................. 3
- Mathematics for Agricultural Students ..................... 3
- Freshman Field Artillery .................................. 4
- Sophomore Field Artillery ................................. 4
- Physical Education ....................................... 2
- Elementary Physics Lecture ............................... 6
- Elementary Physics Laboratory ............................ 4
- Public Speaking ........................................... 3
E lectives .................................................. 3

Total ..................................................... 67

Upper Division

- Farm Management ........................................ 3
- M marketing ................................................ 3
- Farm Shop ............................................... 3
- S oils ...................................................... 5
- Fertilizers and Manures ................................... 3
- Methods of Teaching Vocational Agriculture ................. 6
- Vocational Education ...................................... 3
- Child and Adolescent Psychology ........................... 3
- Supervised Teaching of Vocational Agriculture .............. 6
- Economic Entomology
or
- General Bacteriology ...................................... 4
- T rucking .................................................. 3
- Elementary Veterinary Science ............................ 2
Electives in Agriculture (above 300 courses) ................. 12
Electives, General ............. ........................... 9

T total ................................................... 65
Total credits ............................................ 132


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Lower Division


First Term


Second Term


Courses Credits Name3 of Courses Cre
Freshman Year (Discontinued)
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)
-Educational Psychology ...... 3 HP1. 214 -Theory and Practice of
-Fundamentals of Basketball... 2 Natural Activities .........
-Applied Anatomy and HPI. 216 -History and Principles of
Physiology ................ 2 Physical Education ........
-Theory and Practice of My. 204 -Field Artillery ...............
Natural Activities ......... 2 Sch. 0201 -Public Speaking .............
-Field Artillery .............. 2 Work in Minor...............
W ork in Minor............... 6


dits




2

3
2
3
7


Names of



En. 207
HPl. 111
HPI. 211

HPI. 213

My. 203


Total ...................... 17


Total ...................... 17








THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


First Term
Names of Courses


Upper Division
Second Term
Credits Names of Courses


Junior Year
-General Bacteriology ......... 4 En. 0323
-Child and Adolescent
Psychology ................ 3 HPI. 304
-Advanced Football ........... 2 HPI. 312
-Advanced Basketball ........ 2
-Administration of Physical HPI. 314
Education ................. 3
-Theory and Practice of HPI. 0353
Natural Activities ......... 2


Total ...................... 16
Senior Year
-School Administration ........ 3 En. 403
-Supervised Teaching in Health En.
and Physical Education .... 3 Eh.
-English Electives ............ 3 HPI. 344
Approved Electives .......... 7


Credits


-General Methods in the
Secondary School .......... 3
- Track ....................... 3
-Administration of Health
Education ................. 3
-Theory and Practice of
Natural Activities ......... 2
-Practice in Conducting an
Intramural Program ....... 1
Work in Minor ............... 5

Total ..................... 17


-Philosophy of Education...... 3
-Supervised Teaching in Minor. 3
-English Electives ............ 3
- Baseball ..................... 3
Approved Electives .......... 4


Total ..................... 16 Total ..................... 16
Total Credits ............................................................. 132

NOTE: In addition to the specific courses noted above the student in Health and Physical Educa-
tion must select and complete one minor from the following group:
1. Biology (in addition to Bly. 101-102) ..... 15 5. History ................................ 15
2. Botany and Bacterio'ogy (in addition to 6. Mathematics ........................... 15
Bey. 301) .......................... 15 7. Physics ................................ 15
3. Chemistry (in addition to Cy. 101-102)... 15 8. Political Science ....................... 15
4. Economics ............................. 15 9. Sociology (in addition to Sy. 111) ........ 15


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION

Lower Division
See the Bulletin of Information for the General College.

Upper Division
The curriculum for the upper division of this course will be announced in the next issue of
this Bulletin.

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
ADMINISTRATION
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D, D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
BLAKE RAGSDALE VAN LEER, B.S. in E.E., M.S. in M.E., M.E. (Purdue), Dean of the College
of Engineering and Professor of Engineering
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
ANTHONY MOULTRIE MUCKENFUSS, Ph.D., Acting Professor of Chemical Engineering
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, M.S., D.Sc. (Princeton), Professor of Chemical Engineering. (On
leave of absence)
CIVIL ENGINEERING
PERCY LAWRENCE REED, M.S., C.E., Head of the Department and Professor of Civil Engineering
THOMAS MARVELL LOWE, S.B., M.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
WILLIAM LINCOLN SAWYER, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Civil Engineering







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


DRAWING AND MECHANIC ARTS
ALBERT J. STRONG, B.S.M.E., Head of the Department and Professor of Drawing and
Mechanic Arts
SILAS KENDRICK ESHLEMAN, M.A., S.M., M.E., E.E., Assistant Professor of Drawing and
Mechanic Arts
EDGAR SMITH WALKER, Colonel, U. S. Army (Retired) Graduate, U. S. Military Academy,
West Point. Assistant Professor of Drawing. (Part Time)
CHESTERFIELD HOWELL JANES, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Drawing and Mechanic Arts
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
JOSEPH WEIL, B.S.E.E., M.S., Head of the Department and Professor of Electrical Engineering,
and Head of Engineering Division, State Radio Station WRUF
EDWARD FRANK SMITH, B.S.E.E., E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
STEPHEN PENCHEFF SASHOFF, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
JOHN WESLEY WILSON, B.S.E.E., M.S. in Eng., Instructor in Electrical Engineering
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
MELVIN PRICE, B.S.E.E., E.E., A.M., Head of the Department and Professor of Mechanical
Engineering
PHILIP OSBORNE YEATON, B.S., S.B., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
WILLIAM WARRICK FINEREN, M.E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
ROBERT ALDEN THOMPSON, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering and Operator in
Charge of Mechanical Engineering Laboratory.

GENERAL INFORMATION

HONOR STUDENTS AND GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division shall, according to the
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of
graduation With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning honors students, and
graduation with honors, see the Bulletin of By-Laws.
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES
A few regular courses of the College of Engineering are offered through the General
Extension Division. Generally, however, students are discouraged from taking by corre-
spondence, courses offered in the regular session.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

Effective September, 1935, all beginning students are required to enroll
in the General College. For information concerning the requirements for
admission to the College of Engineering, see page 204, Bulletin of Information for
the General College. The curricula for students entering the College of Engi-
neering from the General College will be printed in the next edition of this
bulletin.
The curricula and information which follow apply only to students registered
in the University during or before the academic year 1934-35.
UPPER AND LOWER DIVISIONS
All courses in the College of Engineering are divided into Upper and Lower Division
Groups. Those numbered 100 to 299 are Lower Division courses; those numbered 300 to 499
are Upper Division courses.







THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


For detailed regulations concerning Upper and Lower Division requirements, see the
Bulletin of By-Laws.
DEGREES AND REQUIREMENTS OF THE SEVERAL CURRICULA
The College of Engineering offers courses of study in the five fields of professional
engineering described below. The work of the freshman year is the same for all engineering
students so they will have an opportunity to choose the branch of engineering they wish to
follow before the beginning of the sophomore year.
BACHELORS DEGREES
The degrees given for the completion of the regular course of study are Bachelor of
Science in Chemical Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, Bachelor of
Science in Electrical Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering, and
Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering.
PROFESSIONAL DEGREES
The Professional Degrees of Civil Engineer (C.E.), Chemical Engineer (Ch.E.), Elec-
trical Engineer (E.E.), and Mechanical Engineer (M.E.), will be granted only to Bachelor
of Science Graduates of the University of Florida who have:
a. Shown evidence of having satisfactorily practiced their profession for a minimum
of five years following receipt of the bachelor's degree, during the last two years of which
they shall have been in responsible charge of important Engineering work. A graduate
who is a registered engineer in the state of Florida in at least two branches of his major sub-
jects will be accepted as satisfying this requirement.
b. Presented a thesis showing independence and originality and of such a quality as to
be acceptable for publication by the technical press or a professional society.
c. Satisfactorily passed an examination at the University upon the thesis and profes-
sional work.
PROCEDURE
A candidate for a professional degree shall make application to the Dean of the College
of Engineering prior to March 1 of the year in which he expects to have the degree con-
ferred. If the candidate appears to satisfy requirements listed in section (a) above, the
Dean will form a committee of which the head of the department by which the degree is
to be administered is chairman. This committee shall satisfy itself that the candidate has
fulfilled all requirements for the degree and report its recommendation to the faculty of
the College of Engineering which will have final authority to recommend to the President
and the Board of Control the conferring of the degree.
HONOR POINT REQUIREMENT
The College of Engineering requires that a student have at the end of his sophomore
year as many honor points as credit hours before he will be permitted to undertake upper
division work in the College of Engineering. In other words, a sophomore may not under-
take junior courses in the College of Engineering unless he has maintained a C average
for his freshman and sophomore work.
Students desiring to earn degrees in the College of Engineering must complete the courses
outlined in the curricula of the different departments and must do work of such quality
that the total number of honor points which they have earned in all of their courses will
equal the total number of semester credit hours required for the degree. For information
concerning the honor point system, see the Bulletin of By-Laws.
THESES
Theses are not required of candidates for the bachelor's degrees in the College of
Engineering. However, exceptional students, whom the head of a department believes









292


BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


would be benefited thereby, may be granted permission by the Dean of the College, upon
recommendation of the Head of the Department, to undertake a thesis in lieu of prescribed
or elective work in the department in which he is enrolled. Not more than four semester
credit hours will be allowed for such thesis work.

ENGLISH REQUIREMENT
The responsibility for the correct and effective use of his spoken and written English
rests primarily upon the student. Any instructor in the College of Engineering may, at any
time, with the approval of the head of his department and the Dean of the College of
Engineering, require a student who shows a deficiency in English to elect additional courses,
over and above the curriculum requirements, in the Department of English.


CURRICULA


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
The courses in Chemical Engineering are designed to familiarize the student with the
efficient construction and economic operation of chemical plants.


Names of Courses


Cy. 201
Gn. or Fh.
Ms. 253

My. 203
Ps. 205
Ps. 207


First Term


Second Term


Credits Names of Courses
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)


-Analytical Chemistry ........
-German or French ...........
-Differential and Integral
Calculus ..................
- Artillery ....................
-General Physics .............
-Physics Laboratory ..........


Cy. 202
Gn. or Fh.
Ms. 254

My. 204
Ps. 206
Ps. 208


Upper Division
Junior Year
-Organic Chemistry ........... 5 Cy. I
-Quantitative Analysis ........ 5 Cl. 0#
-Thermodynamics ............. 3 Es. 01
-Applied Mechanics ........... 5 Me. 2
MI. I

18
Senior Year
-Unit Processes .............. 3 Cy.
-Industrial Chemistry ......... 3 Cy.
-Metallurgy .................. 3 Cy. 4
- Fuels ....................... 3 Cy. 4
-Chemical Literature ......... 1.. Ml.
-Electrical Engineering ....... 3
-Dynamo Laboratory ......... 1

16


Credits


-Analytical Chemistry ........
-German or French ...........
-Differential and Integral
Calculus ...................
- Artillery ....................
-General Physics .............
-Physics Laboratory ..........


-Organic Chemistry ...........
- Hydraulics ..................
- Economics ...................
- Foundry .....................
-Applied Mechanics ...........




-Physical Chemistry ..........
-Chem. Engineering Laboratory
-Industrial Chemistry ........
-Chemical Literature .........
-Human Engineering .........
Approved Electives ..........


CIVIL ENGINEERING
The courses in Civil Engineering are designed to give the student a comprehensive grasp
of the principles underlying the practice of civil engineering, so that upon graduation he
will be prepared to fill such positions as are usually allotted to young engineers in general
engineering, or in special branches.






THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Names of Courses


First Term


-Surveying
-Railway an
ing ....
-Descriptive
-Differential
Calculus
-Artillery .
-General Ph
-Physics La


Second Term


Credits Names of Courses Cre
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)
................... 2 Cl. 212 Railway Engineering ........
id Highway Survey- Es. 0201 -Principles of Economics ......
................... 3 Ms. 254 -Differential and Integral
Geometry ........ 1 Calculus ..................
and Integral Me. 204 -Metalworking ................
................... 5 M y. 204 Artillery ....................
................... 2 Ps. 206 General Physics .............
physics ............. 3 Ps. 208 -Physics Laboratory ..........
boratory .......... 2


18 18
Cl. 209 -Surveying. Given during the summer terms following the sophomore year. Six
weeks-6 credits.

Upper Division


Junior Year
-Sanitary Laboratory Practice.. 3 Cl. 306
-Elements of Electrical Cl. 314
Engineering ............... 3 Cl. 0407
-Dynamo Laboratory .......... 1 Cy. 0215
-Physical Geology ............ 4 Ml. 316
-Applied Mechanics ........... 5
-Materials of Engineering..... 2

18
Senior Year
-Testing Laboratory .......... 2 Cl. 408
-Specifications and Engineering Cl. 410
Relations .................. 2 Cl. 412
-Water and Sewerage ......... 3 Cl. 414
- Hydrology .... ............... 2
-Structural Engineering ...... 4
Approved Electives .......... 5


-Theory of Structures .........
-Highway Engineering ........
- Hydraulics ..................
-Water and Sewage ...........
-Applied Mechanics ...........


-Hydraulic Engineering .......
-Water and Sewerage .........
-Concrete Design .............
-Structural Engineering ......
Approved Electives ..........


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
The courses in Electrical Engineering are designed to give the student instruction in the
fundamental principles of electrical theory, design, installation, and operation. Time is
devoted to many practical problems pertaining to the generation, transmission, distribution,
and utilization of electrical energy. Additional specialization can be had by the student in
power plants and industry, transmission and distribution, or communication.

Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)
Dg. 209 -Descriptive Geometry ........ 1 Es. 0201 -Economics ................... 3
Ms. 253 -Differential and Integral Ms. 254 -Differential and Integral
Calculus .................. 5 Calculus ................... 5
Me. 201 Forge ....................... 1 My. 204 Artillery .................... 2
Mc. 0206 -Machine Shop ............... 1 Ps. 206 -General Physics ............. 3
Ml. 0202 -Mechanism .................. 3 Ps. 208 -Physics Laboratory .......... 2
My. 203 -Artillery .................... 2 Approved Elective ........... 3
Ps. 205 -General Physics ............. 3
Ps. 207 -Physics Laboratory .......... 2


dits

2
3

5
1
2
3
2









BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


First Term
Names of Courses


Upper Division
Second Term
Credits Names of Courses


Junior Year
305 -Elementary Communication El.
Engineering ............... 3 El.
315 -D. C. Theory and Application.. 3 El.
317 -Problems in D. C. ............. 3 Ml.
319 -D. C. Laboratory ............ 1 Ml.
301 -Machine Elements ........... 1 Ml.
315 -Applied Mechanics .......... 5
*Approved Electives .......... 2

18
Senior Year
407 Hydraulics .................. 3 El. (
0410 -Elementary Transmission and El.
Distribution Systems ..... 3 El.
415 -A. C. Mach. and Design....... 3 Ml.
413 -Dynamo Laboratory .......... 2
421 -Power Engineering .......... 3
*Approved Electives ........... 4

18

The following subjects are suggested as electives:
Power Plant and Industry Option
430 -Instruments, Meters and Relays Cl.
424 -Internal Combustion Engines
Communication Option Ms.
306 -Radio Apparatus Ml.
423 -Communications Laboratory Mi.
424 -Communications Laboratory Psy.
425 -Radio Engineering
426 -High Frequency Circuits
431 -Radio Station Operation
432 -Radio Station Operation
Transmission Option
428 -Transmission Lines Theory
430 -Instruments, Meters and Relays


Credits


-A. C. Theory and Application..
- A. C. Circuits ...............
-A. C. Laboratory ............
-Machine Elements ...........
-Thermodynamics .............
-Applied Mechanics ...........


-Engineering Practice ........
-Dynamo Laboratory ..........
-A. C. Mach. and Design ......
-Mechanical Laboratory .......
*Approved Electives ..........


General
-Specifications and Engineering
Relations
-Differential Equations
-Human Engineering
-Aeronautics
-Psychology
Accounting
Economics
Literature
Military Science
Modern Languages
Public Speaking
Shop


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

A grouping of the essential and fundamental courses in both the College of Engineering
and the College of Business Administration is here offered. The purpose of this curriculum
is to give a student in four years as much as possible of the training of the Electrical and
Mechanical Engineer and in addition about fifty credits of work in Business Administration.

Lower Division


Name



Bs.
Bs.
Ms.
My.
Ps.
Ps.


First Term


Second Term


es of Courses Credits Names of Courses Cre
Freshman Year (Discontinued)
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)
103 -Prin. Economic Geography.... 3 Bs. 104 -Prin. Economic Geography....
201E -Prin. of Economics .......... 3 Bs. 202E -Prin. of Economics ..........
253 -Dif. and Integral Calculus .... 5 Ms. 254 -Dif. and Integral Calculus....
203 Artillery .................... 2 My. 204 Artillery ....................
205 -General Physics ............. 3 Ps. 206 -General Physics .............
207 -Physics Laboratory .......... 2 Ps. 208 -Physics Laboratory ..........

18


dits



3
3
5
2
3
2

18


*Half of the hours marked "Approved Electives" are to be taken in the Department of Electrical
Engineering.








THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 295


Upper Division
First Term Second Term
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits
Junior Year
Bs. 211 -Principles of Accounting ...... 3 Bs. 212 -Principles of Accounting ...... 3
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Bs. 322 -Financial Management ....... 3
Society .................... 3 El. 316 -A. C. Theory and Application.. 3
El. 315 -D. C. Theory and Application.. 3 El. 322 -Dynamo Laboratory .......... 1
El. 319 -Dynamo Laboratory .......... 1 MI. 310 -Thermodynamics ............. 3
Ml. 315 -Applied Mechanics ........... 5 Ml. 316 -Applied Mechanics ........... 5
Ml. 319 -Materials of Engineering ..... 2

17 18

Senior Year
Bs. 401 -Business Law ................ 3 Bs. 402 -Business Law ............... 3
Cl. 405 -Specifications and Engineering El. 0409 -Electric Power Plant ......... 3
Relations .................. 2 Ml. 420 -Mechanical Laboratory ....... 2
Ml. 421 -Power Engineering .......... 3 MI. 410 -Human Engineering ......... 2
Approved Electives (1) ....... 11 Approved Electives (1) ....... 8

19 18
(1) At least half of these units should be taken in the College of Business Administration from
the following courses:
Bs. 0302 -Elements of Statistics ........ 3 Bs. 0351 -Principles of Transportation.. 3
Bs. 313 -Factory and Dist. Cost Accounts 3 Bs. 372 -Labor Economics ............ 3
Bs. 341 -Production Management ..... 2 Bs. 410E* -Applied Economics .......... 2
Bs. 409E* -Applied Economics .......... 2 Bs. 454 -Prin. Public Utility Economics 3
Bs. 431 -Prin. of Marketing ........... 3
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Mechanical Engineering is a basic engineering course. Instruction in this department
is given in both theory and practice. It is the aim of the course to produce engineers of inde-
pendent thought and original power, who can give efficient service in the industries and
public utility companies.
First Term Second Term
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)
Dg. 201 and 0202-Machine Drawing...... 2 Ms. 254 -Differential and Integral
Dg. 207 -Descriptive Geometry ......... 2 Calculus ................... 5
Ms. 253 -Differential and Integral Me. 202 -Foundry ..................... 1
Calculus ................... 5 MI. 202 Mechanism .................. 3
Me. 201 Forge ....................... 1 MI. 208 Kinematics .................. 2
My. 203 Artillery .................... 2 My. 204 Artillery .................... 2
Ps. 205 -General Physics ............. 3 Ps. 206 -General Physics .............. 8
Ps. 207 -Physics Laboratory .......... 2 Ps. 208 -Physics Laboratory .......... 2

17 18

Upper Division
Junior Year
Es. 201 -Economics ................... 3 El. 312 -Alternating Currents ......... 3
El. 311 -Direct Currents .............. 3 El. 322 -Dynamo Laboratory .......... 1
El. 321 -D. C. Laboratory ............. 1 Me. 304 -Patternmaking ............... 2
Ms. 420 -Differential Equations (Part of Ml. 302 -Machine Elements ........... 2
Course) ................... 2 Ml. 310 Thermodynamics ............. 3
Me. 301 -Machine Shop ................ 2 MI. 316 -Applied Mechanics ........... 5
MI. 301 -Machine Elements ............ 1 Ml. 320 -Metallography ............... 2
Ml. 315 -Applied Mechanics ........... 5
MI. 319 -Materials of Engineering ..... 2

19 18

*If this course is elected it must be taken throughout the year.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


First Term Second Term
Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits
Senior Year
Cl. 405 -Specifications and Engineering Cl. 408 -Hydraulic Engineering or
Relations .................. 2 MI. 428 -Aeronautics ................ 2
Cl. 407 -Hydraulics ....................... 3 Ml. 410 -Human Engineering ......... 2
Ml. 411 -Mechanical Design ........... 3 MI. 412 -Mechanical Design ........... 3
Ml. 417 -Mechanical Laboratory ....... 1 Ml. 418 -Mechanical Laboratory ....... 2
Ml. 421 -Power Engineering ........... 3 Ml. 422 -Refrigeration or (
Ml. 427 -Aeronautics ................. 3 Ml. 430 -Aerodynamics .............. S 3
Approved Elective ........... 3 Ml. 424 -Power of Engineering ........ 3
Approved Elective ........... 3
18 18

COLLEGE OF LAW

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B. (Michigan), Dean and Professor of Law
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B. (Michigan), Professor of Law
ROBERT SPRATT COCKRELL, M.A., B.L. (Virginia), Professor of Law
DEAN SLAGLE, M.A., LL.B. (Yale), Professor of Law
CLARENCE JOHN TESELLE, M.A., LL.B. (Wisconsin), Professor of Law
JAMES WESTBAY DAY, M.A., J.D. (Florida), Professor of Law
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, M.A., LL.B. (Florida), Lecturer on Corporation Finance
ILA ROUNTREE PRIDGEN, Librarian and Secretary

GENERAL INFORMATION

PURPOSE
The aim of the College, which is a member of the Association of American Law Schools,
registered by the New York Board of Regents, and an approved school of the American Bar
Association, is to impart a thorough scientific and practical knowledge of the law. It aims to
develop keen, efficient lawyers, conversant with the ideals and traditions of the profession.
Its policy is characterized by the emphasis of practice as well as theory; pleading as well as
historical perspective; skill in brief making as well as legal information.
LIBRARY
The Law Library contains over 11,900 volumes. In it are included the published reports
of the courts of last resort in every state in the Union and of the Federal Courts, the full
English Reprints, the English Law Reports, Law Journal Reports, Dominion Law Reports,
and the Canadian Reports, together with a collection of digests, encyclopedias, series of
selected cases, and English and American treatises and textbooks.
ADMISSION TO THE BAR
Upon presenting their diplomas and satisfactory evidence that they are twenty-one years
of age and of good moral character, the graduates of the College are licensed, without
examination, to practice in the courts of Florida. They are also admitted without examina-
tion to the United States District Courts of Florida.
PLEADING AND PRACTICE
An intensive knowledge of pleading and practice should be secured by the student, since
legal rights cannot be well understood without a mastery of the rules of pleading whereby







COLLEGE OF LAW


they are enforced. The College offers thorough courses in criminal pleading and procedure,
common law pleading, equity pleading, Florida civil practice, trial practice, and Federal
procedure. Thus, the student on graduation is enabled to enter understandingly upon the
practice of law. The College endeavors to serve those who intend to practice elsewhere as
efficiently as those who expect to locate in this state.
Believing the students obtain in the Practice Court a better practical knowledge of
pleading and practice than can be acquired in any other way, aside from the trial of actual
cases, the faculty places special emphasis upon this work. Sessions of the Practice Court
are held throughout the year. Each student is required to participate in the trial of at least
one common law, one equity, and one criminal case, and is instructed in appellate procedure.

LEGAL RESEARCH
To enable students to specialize in legal problems of particular interest to them, to
acquire a grasp of the technique of legal investigation, and to do more creative work than
ordinary courses in law permit, a course in legal research (Lw. 601 or Lw. 0601) is offered.
Each student taking the course is required to make an original study of the subject he
selects under the guidance of the member of the faculty in whose field it falls. Suitable
studies will be submitted by the College to law journals for publication.
Applications for the course should be filed with the Secretary of the College at least
one week prior to the first day of registration. Students who register for two or three
hours will not be permitted to drop the course for the number of hours for which they have
registered and continue it for a lesser number of hours, unless they do so within the first
two weeks of the term. No more than three credits may be earned by a student in this
course in one term, but the faculty may admit a student to the course (Lw. 602 or Lw. 0602)
for a second term.
STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION
The Council on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar of the American Bar Asso-
ciation, of which this College is a member, requests that attention be called to the Standards
of the American Bar Association adopted in 1921 and by it recommended for enactment by
all states. These Standards provide in effect that every candidate for admission to the bar,
in addition to taking a public examination, shall give evidence of graduation from a law school
which shall require at least two years of study in a college as a condition of admission, and
three years of law study (or longer if not a full-time course), which shall have an adequate
library and a sufficient number of teachers giving their entire time to the school to ensure
actual personal acquaintance and influence with the whole student body, and which shall
not be operated as a commercial enterprise.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA
BACHELOR OF LAWS
The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) is conferred upon those students who satisfac-
torily complete eighty-five semester hours of law, which must include all of the first-year
subjects. Students who have an honor point average of 2 for all the law work offered for
graduation will be eligible for the degree of LL.B. With Honors. Those who have an honor
point average of 2.5 for all the law work offered for graduation, which work must include
Legal Research, will be eligible for the degree of LL.B. With High Honors.
Students admitted to advanced standing may receive the degree after one year's residence,
but in no case will the degree be granted unless the candidate is in actual residence during
all of the third year and passes in this College at least twenty-eight semester hours of law.
All students are required to complete the last twenty-eight credit hours applied towards










BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


the degree during regular residence. This may be varied only upon written petition approved
by the faculty of the College of Law.

COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAW COURSE
By pursuing an approved course of collegiate and law studies a student may earn both
the academic and the legal degree in six years. Both the College of Arts and Sciences
and the College of Business Administration offer such a combined course. For further
particulars, see pages 278 to 279.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS
Students completing the first year as outlined below and a total of 85 semester hours of
law credit will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Laws.
First Term Second Term


Names of Courses


Credits Names of Courses


Credits


First Year
301 Torts ........................ 5 Lw.
303 -Contracts ................... 3 Lw.
305 -Criminal Law ............... 2 Lw.
307 -Criminal Procedure .......... 2 Lw.
309 -Property .................... 2 Lw.

Second Year
401 -U. S. Constitutional Law ...... 4 Lw.
0404 -Quasi Contracts ............. 2 Lw.
405 -Equity Pleading ............. 3 Lw.
409 -Property .................... 3 Lw.
411 -Florida Constitutional Law .... 2 Lw.
413 -Florida Civil Practice ........ 3 Lw.
415* -Abstracts ................... 2 Lw.
417* Sales ........................ 2

Third Year
503 -Public Service Corporations.. 2 Lw.
0504 -Municipal Corporations ...... 2 Lw.
505 -Federal Procedure ........... 2 Lw.
509 -Partnership ................. 2 Lw.
513 -Property .................... 3 Lw.
517 -Practice Court ................ 1 Lw.
519 -Trial Practice ............... 3 Lw.
521 Trusts ...................... .. 2 Lw.
601 -Legal Research .............1 to3 Lw.


-Equity Jurisprudence ........ 5
- Contracts .................... 3
-Marriage and Divorce ........ 1
-Common Law Pleading ....... 3
- Property .................... 2


- Evidence .................... 4
- Agency ...................... 2
-Private Corporations ......... 4
-Legal Ethics and Bibliography 2
- Property .................... 3
- Insurance ................... 2
- Taxation .................... 3



- Damages .................... 2
-Negotiable Instruments ...... 3
-Conflict of Laws .............. 3
- Mortgages ................... 2
-Practice Court .............. 1
-Creditors' Rights ............ 3
- Admiralty ................... 2
-Corporation Finance ......... 3
-Legal Research ............. 1 to 3


*To be offered in alternate years; Lw. 415 offered in 1935-36.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Courses with odd numbers are regularly offered in the first term; courses with even
numbers are regularly offered in the second term. However, in case the number begins
with 0, the reverse is true. In many cases courses are offered both terms. To determine
which courses come in this category the reader should consult the Schedule of Courses.
The number of hours listed is the number of hours which the class meets per week.
The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours earned by each student who
receives a passing grade (A, B, C, or D) when the course is completed.
A course designated by a double number (for example, Eh. 101-102) is continued through
both the first and the second terms. Except as otherwise noted, the student must take both
terms of the course in order to receive credit.
Courses numbered 200 or above are not open to freshmen; courses numbered 300 or above
are not open to sophomores; courses numbered 400 or above are not open to juniors; courses
numbered 500 or above are for graduate students. For a description of courses numbered
500 or above, see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.
The abbreviations used are wherever possible the first and last letter of the first word of
the department name. Occasionally, a third central letter is inserted to distinguish between
departments.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
As. 54.-Farm Management. 3 hours. No credit.
An elementary course in the organization of the farm business, laying out of fields, location of buildings,
farm accounting, and important factors affecting profits.
As. 201.-Agricultural Economics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. REITZ.
The fundamental principles of economics in their relation to agriculture.
As. 202.-Agricultural Resources. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
HAMILTON.
Potentialities and limitations of agricultural production in the various regions of the United States and the
world. Development of surplus and deficient agricultural areas.
As. 303.-Farm Records. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. REITZ. Pre-
requisite: As. 201.
Methods and practice of making and keeping farm inventories, feed records, and crop records. LABORATORY
FEE: $2.
As. 304.-Farm Finance and Appraisal. 2 hours. 2 credits. REITZ.
Problems peculiar to financing farmers and farmers' associations. Special attention is given to the Farm
Credit Administration.
As. 306.-Farm Management. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. REITZ.
Prerequisite: As. 201.
The factors of production; systems of farming, their distribution and adaptation; problems of labor,
machinery, layout of farms, and rotation systems. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
As. 308.-Marketing. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. HAMILTON. Pre-
requisite: As. 201.
Marketing and distributing farm products; marketing organizations and laws governing them; the relation of
foreign trade and general business conditions to the farmers' market. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
As. 311.-Rural Law. 2 hours. 2 credits. HAMILTON.
Classification of farm property; study of farm boundaries, fences, stock laws, rents, contracts, deeds, abstracts,
mortgages, taxes, and laws governing shipping of farm products. Green, Law for the American Farm.
As. 403.-Advanced Farm Management. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
REITZ. Prerequisite: As. 306.
Laying out and locating buildings, lots, fields, and crops, cropping systems, farm surveys; study of successful
Florida farms. Two-day field trip, at an estimated cost of $10, paid at time trip is made. LABORATORY FFE: $1.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


As. 405.-Agricultural Prices. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAMILTON. Prerequisite: As. 201.
Prices of farm products and the factors affecting them. FEE: $1.
As. 408.-Marketing Fruits and Vegetables. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3
credits. HAMILTON. Prerequisite: As. 201.
Marketing of citrus, tomatoes, beans, potatoes, and other Florida products. Two-day field trip, at an
estimated cost of $10, paid at time trip is made. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
As. 409.-Cooperative Marketing. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
HAMILTON. Prerequisite: As. 201.
Cooperative buying and selling organizations, their successes and failures; methods of organization, financing,
and business management. Two-day field trip, at an estimated cost of $10, paid at time trip is made. LABORA-
TORY FEE: $2.
As. 410.-Agricultural Statistics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. REITZ.
Prerequisite: As. 201.
The principles involved in the collection, tabulation, and interpretation of agricultural statistics.
As. 412.-Land Economics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. HAMILTON.
Prerequisite: As. 201.
History of public land policies; land utilization; land reclamation; marginal and submarginal lands; rural
land reclamation; and land credit. Particular attention is given to the Land Section of the National Resources
Board.

GRADUATE COURSES

As. 501-502.-Agricultural Economic Seminar
As. 505.-Research Problems
As. 506.-Farm Management
As. 508.-Land Economics
As. 509.-Citrus Grove Organization and Management
As. 510.-Organization and Management of Truck Farms
As. 511-512.-Research Problems-Marketing Agricultural Products
As. 514.-Advanced Marketing of Agricultural Products


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Ag. 104.-Wood Work. 3 or 6 hours laboratory. 1 or 2 credits. ESHLEMAN.
Practice in adjustment, care and use of wood working tools; exercises in bench work and farm equipment.
LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Ag. 202.-Farm Machinery. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. ROGERS.
Construction, operation, and selection of harvesting, seeding, spraying, and tilling machinery. Smith, Form
Machinery and Equipment; Davidson, Agricultural Machinery. LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Ag. 301.-Drainage and Irrigation. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS.
Farm surveying, drainage and irrigation systems; field practice. Surface and subsurface drainage systems
used in clearing lands and preventing soil erosion; types of irrigation systems used in Florida. Scoates and Ayres,
Land Drainage and Reclamation.
Ag. 302.-Farm Motors. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS.
The sources of power on the farm. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Ag. 303.-Farm Shop. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS.
Belt lacing, carpentry, concrete construction, soldering, and other farm shop operations. Especially useful
for students intending to teach agricultural engineering in vocational schools.
Ag. 401.-Farm Buildings. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS.
Construction, cost, management, sanitation, and ventilation of farm buildings; laboratory exercises in design.
ing and estimating costs. Foster and Carter, Farm Buildings; Ekblaw, Form Structures.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ag. 402.-Farm Concrete. 1 hour, and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits. ROGERS.
Selection of materials; curing, mixing, placing, reinforcing, testing and waterproofing concrete. Seaton,
Concrete Construction for Rural Communities.
**Ag. 403-404.-Agricultural Engineering Investigations. 2 hours. 4 credits.
ROGERS. Prerequisite: A minimum of seven hours in Agricultural Engineering.
Reports on investigational work as found in recent literature.
Ag. 405.-Horticultural Machinery. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
ROGERS.
The machinery used in the cultivation, harvesting, marketing and refrigeration of fruits and vegetables.

GRADUATE COURSES

Ag. 501-502.-Agricultural Engineering Seminar
Ag. 503-504.-Research Work

AGRONOMY

Ay. 21-22.-Elements of Agronomy. 2 hours. No credit. BRYAN.
A practical course in farm crops and soils, designed to meet the needs of special students.
Ay. 201.-Farm Crops. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. SENN.
A survey of the leading farm crops. Emphasis on varieties adapted to Florida. Hughes and Hensen, Crop Pro-
duction; Hutcheson and Wolfe, Production of Field Crops. LAORATORY FEE: $1.
Ay. 301.-Soils. 3 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 5 credits. BRYAN. Prerequisites:
Cy. 101, Cy. 102.
An introductory course dealing with the nature and properties of soils as related to plant growth. Lyon and
Buckman, Soils. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Ay. 302.-Fertilizers and Manures. 2 hours, and 0, 2 or 4 hours laboratory. 2, 3, or
4 credits. BRYAN. Prerequisite: Ay. 301.
The composition, nature, and source of fertilizer materials; their influence on crops and soils; calculating
fertilizer formulas. Van Slyke, Fertilizers and Crop Production; Bear, Theory and Practice in the Use of Fer-
tilizers. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Ay. 304.-Forage Crops and Pastures. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
SENN.
Plants that produce feed for livestock, their characteristics, composition, adaptations, and cultural practices.
Methods of establishing and maintaining pastures. Laboratory consists of survey work, topic development, and
field trips. Piper, Forage Plants; Hughes and Hensen, Crop Production.
Ay. 305.-Crop Judging. 2 hours. 2 credits. SENN. Prerequisite: Ay. 201.
Designed to fit one to judge competitive farm crop displays. Especially adapted to students preparing for
teaching agriculture in high schools and county agent work. Arrangement of exhibits, assimilation of materials,
and preparation of premium lists for fairs are considered. LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Ay. 309.-Principles of Genetics. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. Prerequisite: Bty. 101-
102 or Bly. 101-102.
A basic course dealing with the fundamental principles of heredity, variation, and selection, and the appli.
cation of genetic principles to plant and animal improvement. Jones, Genetics in Plant and Animal Improvement;
Babcock and Clausen, Genetics in Relation to Agriculture.
Ay. 311.-Laboratory Problems in Genetics. 2 or 4 hours laboratory. 1 or 2 credits.
SENN. Corequisite: Ay. 309.
Laboratory methods in applying genetic principles, with breeding experiments illustrating the laws of inheri-
tance. Designed to be taken in conjunction with Ay. 309. LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Ay. 402.-Plant Breeding. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. Prerequisite: Ay. 309.
The fundamental principles of crop improvement. Field practice in artificial pollination and hybridization.
Hayes and Garber, Breeding Crop Plants; Hunter and Leake, Recent Advances in Agricultural Plant Breeding.

**Credit may be received for either half of this course.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Ay. 405.-Soil Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRYAN. Prerequisite: Ay. 302.
The factors involved in crop production; nutrient cycles in the soil; source and function of soil organic
matter and manures; soil reaction and plant response; lime and soil amendment. Bear, Soil Management.
LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Ay. 407.-Special and Cover Crops. 2 hours. 2 credits. SENN.
A study of cotton, tobacco, sweet potato, peanut, green corn, and sugar crops. Consideration given to plants
suited for cover crops in rotation systems of the South.

GRADUATE COURSES

Ay. 501-502.-Seminar
Ay. 504.-Soil Development and Classification
Ay. 505-506.-Special Problems in Soils and Crops
Ay. 508.-Methods of Crop Investigation
Ay. 511.-Soil Analysis
Ay. 513.-Soil Utilization
Ay. 514.-Advanced Soils


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

Al. 21.-Elements of Animal Husbandry. 3 hours. No credit. WILLOUGHBY.
Breeds of farm animals; principles of feeding, breeding and management. For students in four months
course. Plumb, Beginnings in Animal Husbandry.
Al. 104.-Types and Breeds of Animals. 3 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
WILLOUGHBY.
Types, breeds, and market classes of horses, cattle, sheep and swine; score card and comparative judging.
Al. 201.-Animal Feeding. 3 hours. 3 credits. BECKER. Prerequisites: Al. 104,
Freshman Chemistry.
Composition of plants and animals; feeding standards and rations for farm animals.
Al. 203.-Beef Production. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLOUGHBY. Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Selection, feeding, and management of beef cattle; finishing and marketing. Brief study of mutton produc-
tion.
Al. 204.-Swine Production. 2 hours. 2 credits. HENLEY. Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Selection, feeding and management of hogs; forage crops and grazing; disease and parasite control; slaugh-
tering; marketing.
Al. 207.-Animal Breeding. 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY. Prerequisites: Al.
104, Bly. 101.
Principles of breeding applied to animals; pedigree and record work; foundation and management of a
breeding enterprise.
Al. 301.-Breed History. 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY. Prerequisite: Al. 104.
History of live stock breeds; pedigree studies and registration methods.
Al. 302.-Breed History. Continuation of Al. 301. 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Al. 303.-Meat Products. 2 hours. 2 credits. SHEALY. Prerequisites: Al. 104,
203, 204.
Farm slaughtering and packing house methods; curing, processing, and marketing of meats and special
products.
Al. 306.-Elementary Animal Nutrition. 2 hours. 2 credits. BECKER. Prerequi-
sites: Cy. 101, 102, 0262.
Elements and compounds, metabolic processes in animal nutrition.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 303


*Al. 307.-Advanced Stock Judging. 1 hour, and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits.
WILLOUGHBY. Prerequisite: Al. 104.
Special training in live stock judging, show ring methods, and contests at fairs. FEE: TRAVEL EXPENSE ON
JUDGING TRIPS AS NEEDED.
Al. 401.-Seminar-Comparative Animal Industry. 2 or 3 hours. 2 or 3 credits.
WILLOUGHBY. Prerequisite: Ten Animal Husbandry credits.
History of live stock industry in America; special dairy and live stock topics; reviews of recent research.
Al. 402.-Seminar-Comparative Animal Industry. Continuation of Al. 401. 2 or 3
hours. 2 or 3 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
GRADUATE COURSES

Al. 501-502.-Animal Production
Al. 503-504.-Animal Nutrition
Al. 505-506.-Live Stock Records
Al. 508. -Methods in Animal Research


ARCHITECTURE

Courses in the Department of Architecture are carried on by means of the problem or
project method, and accomplishment is the sole criterion for advancement. Consequently, the
courses are of indeterminate duration, and the time listed for each course represents merely the
nominal time which the average student will need to complete the work.

Lower Division

Ae. 11 A.-Fundamentals of Architecture. WEAVER, ARNETT.
A comprehensive introductory course to the field of architecture carried on by means of a coordinated series
of beginning problems involving the design of simple buildings. Only fundamental architectural elements such
as walls, openings, floors, and roofs are used, and the solutions are presented as plan arrangements interpreted
in three dimensions by plastic models. Freehand drawing, descriptive geometry, shades and shadows, and
perspective are introduced successively, not as abstract and unrelated subjects, but as means whereby the build-
ing in process of design may be visualized, studied, or presented more readily or completely. A work book
showing the results of the student's research and study will be part of the required work of the course. Nominal
time, 540 hours. LABORATORY FEE: $4.

Upper Division

DESIGN

Ae. 21 A.-Architectural Design. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 11 A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11 A. The design of minor buildings. Library research
and some emphasis on presentation. Nominal time, 15 hours a week, 2 terms. LABORATORY FEE: $2 EACH TrEM.
Ae. 21 B.-Architectural Design. JUNE, WEAVER. Prerequisite: Ae. 21 A.
A continuation of Ae. 21 A. The design of more complex buildings and of groups of buildings. Conferences
on the theory of composition. Nominal time, 15 hours a week, 3 terms. LABORATORY FEE: $2 EACH TERM.
Ae. 22 A.-Architectural Design. JUNE. Prerequisite: Ae. 11 A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11 A. A course similar to Ae. 21 A for students in Building
Construction. Nominal time, 15 hours a week, 2 terms. LABORATORY FEE: $2 EACH TErM.
Ae. 23 A.-Landscape Design. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 11 A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11 A. The design of minor properties. Nominal time,
15 hours a week, 2 terms. LABORATORY FEE: $2 EACH TERM.
Ae. 23 B.-Landscape Design. JUNE. Prerequisite: Ae. 23 A.
A continuation of Ae. 23 A. The design of public and private properties. Nominal time, 15 hours a week,
2 terms. LABORATORY FEE: $2 EACH TERM.

*Not offered in 1935-36.









BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


DELINEATION
Prerequisites listed for courses in delineation apply only to students in the Department of
Architecture. Beginning students from other departments may, with the consent of the
instructor, enroll in Ae. 31 A or Ae. 33 A.

Ae. 31 A.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 11 A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11 A. Drawing in pencil and charcoal from architectural
subjects. Color theory and methods of applying water color. Nominal time, 6 hours a week, 2 terms. LABORA-
TORY FEE: $2 EACH TERM.
Ae. 31 B.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite Ae. 31 A.
A continuation of Ae. 31 A. Drawing from casts and outdoor sketching in various media. Still life and
simple landscapes in water color. Nominal time, 6 hours a week, 3 terms. LABORATORY FEE: $2 EACH TERM.
Ae. 33 A.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae 11 A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11 A. For students in Landscape Architecture. Drawing
in pencil, charcoal, and water color. Nominal time, 6 hours a week, 2 terms. LAORATORY FEE: $2 EACH TeaM.
Ae. 33 B.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 33 A.
A continuation of Ae. 33 A. Outdoor sketching in various media. Nominal time, 6 hours a week, 2 terms.
LABORATORY FEE: $2 EACH TERM.
HISTORY
The work in history consists of a series of projects carried on by means of individual research, conferences,
and illustrated reports. The work is outlined as a study of the development of the art of building with
emphasis on historical and other influences, materials and methods of construction, and principles of composition
and planning.
Ae. 41 A.-History of Architecture. STAGEBERG.
For students in Architecture. A study of Ancient and Medieval architecture. Nominal time, 6 hours a
week, 2 terms.
Ae. 41 B.-History of Architecture. JUNE. Prerequisite for students in Architecture:
Ae. 41 A.
For students in Architecture, Building Construction, Landscape Architecture, and Painting. A study of
Gothic, Renaissance, and Modern architecture. Students in the various curricula will, in their individual research,
place major emphasis on their particular field. Nominal time, 6 hours a week, 2 terms.
Ae. 41 C.-Decorative Arts. JUNE. Prerequisite or corequisite: Ae. 41 B.
For students in Architecture and Painting. A brief study of the decorative arts allied with architecture.
Nominal time, 6 hours a week, 1 term.

CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT
Ae. 51 A.-Materials and Methods of Construction. HANNAFORD.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11 A. Nature and properties of building materials, and
methods of building construction. Elementary surveying. Nominal time, 9 hours a week, 3 terms.
Ae. 51 B.-Mechanical Equipment of Buildings. YEATON, WILSON, JUNE. Pre-
requisite: Ps. 211-212.
Heating, ventilation, electric lighting, and plumbing in buildings. Nominal time, 9 hours a week, second
term only.
PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS
Ae. 51 C.-Professional Relations and Methods. WEAVER.
Conferences on professional relations and on methods of modem practice. Ethics, law, specifications, and
estimates. Nominal time, 9 hours a week, first term only.

STRUCTURES
The courses in structures presuppose a satisfactory knowledge of physics, trigonometry, algebra,
analytic geometry, and elementary calculus. The work consists of a series of problems designed
to give the student proficiency in solving the structural problems of buildings.
Ae. 61 A.-Structural Design of Buildings. HANNAFORD. Prerequisites: Basic
Mathematics and Ps. 211-212.
The investigation of forces and stresses by graphic and algebraic methods, and a study of the strength of
building materials. Nominal time, 12 hours a week, 2 terms.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ae. 61 B.-Structural Design of Buildings. HANNAFORD. Prerequisite: Ae. 61 A.
A continuation of Ae. 61 A. The structural design of buildings in wood, steel, and reinforced concrete.
Nominal time for students in Architecture, 12 hours a week, 3 terms; for students in Building Construction,
15 hours a week, 1 term, and 21 hours a week, 1 term.

THESIS IN ARCHITECTURE
Ae. 71 A.-Thesis. WEAVER and staff. Prerequisite: Completion of all other require-
ments for the degree.
A comprehensive final problem in architecture based on a program submitted by the student and approved
by the Faculty. A thesis may be submitted only at the end of a term, and the program must be- approved in
time to permit not less than 12 weeks for the study of the problem. The presentation will include the archi-
tectural, structural, and mechanical equipment drawings, and portions of the specifications. Models and written
descriptions may accompany the solution. Nominal time, 48 hours a week, 1 term. LABORATORY FEE: $2.

GRADUATE COURSES
Ae. 501-502.-Architectural Design
Ae. 521-522.-Advanced Freehand Drawing
Ae. 525-526.-Advanced Water Color
Ae. 531-532.-Historical Research
Ae. 551-552.-Building Construction
Ae. 553-554.-Structural Design of Buildings


ASTRONOMY

Aty. 201.-Elementary Descriptive Astronomy. 3 hours, and 2 hours observation
and laboratory. 4 credits. KUSNER.
A non-mathematical introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the general structure of
the universe. A brief summary of present knowledge of the earth as an astronomical body; the moon, sun, planets,
comets and meteors, stars and nebulae. Identification of the principal constellations.
Aty. 302.-Navigation. 3 hours. 3 credits. KUSNER. Prerequisite: Plane Trigonom-
etry. Recommended: Advanced trigonometry and elementary descriptive astronomy.
The geographical and astronomical principles and practices involved in determination of position at sea
and in the air. Instruments of navigation and their use.


BACTERIOLOGY

fBcy. 301.-General Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CARROLL.
Prerequisites: Bty. 101 or Bly. 101, and Cy. 101.
Morphology, physiology and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms. Tanner, Bacteriology.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
ttBcy. 302.-Agricultural Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bcy. 301.
Bacteria and associated micro-organisms in relation to water, milk, soil, silage and farm problems. LABORA-
TORY FEE: $5.
Bey. 304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Recognition, culture, and special laboratory technique of handling pathogens and viruses; theories and prin-
ciples of immunity and infection. Stitt, Practical Bacteriology, Parasitology, and Blood Work. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

fGraduate credit is not allowed. Should be elected in junior or senior year by students contemplating a
minor in bacteriology.
ttEither Bey. 302 or 306 will be given, depending upon the demand.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


ttBcy. 306.-Bacteriology of Foods. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Relation of bacteria, yeast, molds, and other micro-organisms commonly found in foods. Tanner, Microbi-
ology of Foods. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bey. 0308.-Sanitary Laboratory Practice. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
CARROLL. Prerequisite: Cy. 215.
Problems in sewage and public sanitation, designed primarily for sanitary engineers. American Public Health
Association and American Water Works Association, Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Sewage.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bcy. 411.-Principles and Practices of Immunology. 2 hours, and 4 hours labor-
atory. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bcy. 301.
Consideration of preparations and therapeutic uses of biologicals from a bacteriological standpoint. Zinsser,
Resistance to Infectious Diseases. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

GRADUATE COURSES
Bcey. 501-502.-Problems in Soil Bacteriology
Bey. 503-504.-Problems in Dairy Bacteriology
Bey. 505-506.-Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology
Bey. 507-508.-Problems in Bacteriology of Water and Sewage
Bcey. 509-510.-Problems in Industrial Bacteriology

BIBLE

Be. 103.-Biblical History and Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON.
An introductory course to a more intensive study of Biblical literature. Emphasis on the geography of
Palestine and its relations to Assyria, Babylonia, and Egypt. Growth of Old Testament literature as affected by
these civilizations.
Be. 104.-Biblical History and Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON.
The influence of Greek and Roman cultures on Jewish religion and the rise of Christianity as illustrated by
New Testament literature.
*Be. 201.-Old Testament Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON. Prerequisite:
Be. 103-104.
A survey of Old Testament writings dealing with histories, laws and legends of Israel, authorship and com-
position of books, the united and divided kingdoms and the dominating leaders. Bewer, The Literature of the
Old Testament.
*Be. 202.-The Prophets of Israel. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON. Prerequisite: Be.
103-104.
A study of the background, message, and significance of the creative personalities in the Hebrew religious life.
*Be. 205.-Old and New Testament Greek. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. See
Gk. 203.
Be. 211.-New Testament Writings. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON. Prerequisite:
Be. 103-104.
A study of the New Testament writings dealing with their authorship, occasion, content and purpose. Scott,
The Literature of the New Testament.
Be. 212.-The Life of Jesus. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON. Prerequisite: Be. 103-104.
A study of the Gospels to introduce the student to the main facts in the life of Jesus. Burton and Mathews,
The Life of Jesus.
*Be. 401-402.-The World's Great Religions. 2 hours. 4 credits. JOHNSON. Pre-
requisite: Consent of Instructor.
A study of the world's great religions in their historical development. Students must secure the consent
of the instructor before registering for the course.

*Not offered in 1935-36.
ftEither Bry. 302 or 306 will be given, depending upon the demand.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


BIOLOGY

Bly. 101.-Invertebrate Zoology. 2 hours and 2 three-hour laboratory periods. 4
credits. ROGERS AND BYERS.
The biology, morphology, and classification of the invertebrate animals. Hegner, College Zoology. LARORu-
TOnY FEE: $5.
Bly. 102.-Vertebrate Zoology. 2 hours and 2 three-hour laboratory periods. 4 credits.
SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly. 101.
An introduction to the morphology, classification, and natural history of the chordate animals. Hegner,
College Zoology. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 201.-Entomology. 2 hours and 2 three-hour laboratory periods. 4 credits.
HUBBELL. Prerequisite: Bly. 101-102.
The comparative morphology, classification, and natural history of insects with special emphasis on field
work on the local insect fauna. Comstock, Introduction to Entomology. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 203.-Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology. 2 hours and 2 three-hour labora-
tory periods. 4 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly. 101-102.
Lectures on the physiology and anatomy of the mammalian body supplemented by individual dissections of
the cat. Zoethout, A Textbook of Physiology, 4th Edition. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 210.-Vertebrate Embryology. 2 hours and 2 three-hour laboratory periods. 4
credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite. Bly. 101-102.
The principles of general embryology, early development of chordate animals, and the special development
of vertebrates. Wieman, An Introduction to Vertebrate Embryology. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 315.-Histology. 2 hours and 2 three-hour laboratory periods. 4 credits. WALLACE.
Prerequisite: Bly. 210.
The classification and structure of animal tissues. Maximow, Textbook of Histology. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 316.-Animal Parasitology. 2 hours and 2 three-hour laboratory periods. 4
credits. BYERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 315.
The animal organisms, especially the protozoa, and worms producing disease in man and the higher verte-
brates. Blacklock and Southwell, A Guide to Human Parasitology. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 325.-Genetics. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROGERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 210.
An introduction to the subject matter, data and methods of genetics with special reference to animals.
Sinnott and Dunn, Principles of Genetics.
Bly. 330.-Animal Ecology. 2 hours and two laboratory or field periods. 4 credits.
ROGERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 201.
Studies on the local fauna with special attention to the aquatic invertebrates, as an introduction to the
viewpoint and methods of animal ecology. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 404.-Pro-Seminar in Animal Biology. 2 hours. 2 credits. STAFF. Pre-
requisite: 20 hours of Biology, including Bly. 325. Required of all majors in Biology.
An attempt to correlate the data and viewpoints of the various undergraduate courses and to give an in-
troduction to the current literature of biology.
Bly. 411-412.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. 3 credits per term. May
he taken either or both terms. STAFF. Prerequisite: Bly. 315 or 330.
Qualified students may choose a topic or problem for study. Possible topics or problems: the morphology,
development, or life history of a selected animal; the taxonomy of an approved natural group of animals; the
fauna of a local animal habitat; natural history of a vertebrate or invertebrate group.

GRADUATE COURSES
Bly. 503.-Advanced General Biology
Bly. 0505.-History of Biology
Bly. 507-508-Zoological Classification and Nomenclature
Bly. 513-514.-Vertebrate Morphology
Bly. 515-516.-Invertebrate Morphology








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Bly. 517-518.-Bionomics
Bly. 519-520.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology


BOTANY

Bty. 101.-General Botany. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY,
CARROLL.
Structure and life histories of important algae, fungi, mosses, and ferns. Holman and Robbins, Textbook of
General Botany; Mimeographed Outlines of General Botany Experiments and Exercises. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bty. 102.-General Botany. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY,
CARROLL. Corequisites: Natural sciences desirable.
Structure, environment, and principles of identification of seed plants. Holman and Robbins, Textbook of
General Botany; Mimeographed Outlines on Experiments and Exercises in General Botany. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bty. 301.-Plant Physiology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY.
Desired prerequisites: Cy. 232 or 262; Ay. 301 and Ps. 211.
Physiological processes of plants with respect to absorption, assimilation, transpiration, metabolism, respira-
tion, and growth. Mimeographed Outlines on Plant Physiology. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bty. 308.-Taxonomy. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY. Prerequi-
sites: Bty. 101, Bty. 102. Desirable prerequisites: Bty. 301, Ay. 301.
Identification of common seed plants and ferns of the Gainesville region. Gray, New Manual of Plants.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
*Bty. 310.-Advanced Taxonomy. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 or 5 credits.
CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 308 or equivalent. Desirable prerequisites: He. 301, Pt. 301. Co-
requisites: Bty. 331, Bty. 332.
A critical study of a plant family or genus. Field work. Library assignments. Gray, Manual of Botany;
Small, Flora of Southeastern States. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bty. 331.-Plant Histology. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY. De-
sirable prerequisites: Bty. 302, Cy. 262. Corequisite: Bty. 301.
Methods, and practice in killing, fixing, sectioning and staining of plant tissues and organs. Chamberlain,
Methods in Plant Histology (5th ed.) ; Mimeographed Outlines in Plant Histology. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bty. 332.-Plant Anatomy. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY. De-
sirable prerequisites: Bty. 331, Cy. 262, and Ps. 211.
Origin, structure, and function of principal tissues and organs of plants. Stevens, Plant Anatomy (4th ed.);
Mimeographed Exercises. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bty. 401.-Plant Ecology. I hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY. Pre-
requisites: Bty. 301, Bty. 308, Ay. 301. Desirable corequisites: Ay. 405, Ay. 504.
The relation of plants to their environment; plant survey. MacDougal, Introduction to Plant Ecology;
Mimeographed Outlines. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
*Bty. 403.-Advanced Plant Physiology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CODY. Prerequisites or corequisites: Bty. 301, Bcy. 301, Cy. 201, Cy. 202, Cy. 0262, Ps. 211,
Ps. 212.
Special attention will be given to the processes of absorption and relation of the plant cell to water and
the soil; transpiration and photosynthesis. Miller, Plant Physiology; Mimeographed Exercises. LAORA-
TORY FEE: $5.
*Bty. 404.-Advanced Plant Physiology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 403.
Principles of syntheses of carbohydrates, proteins, oils and fats; digestion; respiration and growth. A
continuation of Bty. 403. Miller, Plant Physiology; Mimeographed Exercises. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
GRADUATE COURSES
Bty. 500.-Seminar
Bty. 501-502.-Problems in Taxonomy

*Net offered in 1935-36.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bty. 503-504.-Problems in Plant Physiology
Bty. 505-506.-Problems in Plant Histology
*Bty. 507.-Advanced Plant Anatomy
*Bty. 508.-Problems in Plant Anatomy
Bty. 509-510.-Research


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses in Business Administration are offered by the Department of Economics and Business
Administration. The courses in Business Administration marked "E" are the same courses as
those in Economics. For example, Business Administration 101E is the same as Economics 101.
Bs. 101E.-Economic History of England. 3 hours. 3 credits. CHACE.
Survey and interpretation, with brief reference to France and Germany. The origin and development of
economic institutions; effects on social and political development and on development in the United States.
Bs. 102E.-Economic History of the United States. 3 hours. 3 credits. HURST.
Interpretative survey of industrial development; the influence of economic development on political and
social development, and of foreign economic development on the United States.
Bs. 103.-Principles of Economic Geography. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3
credits. ATWOOD, DIETTRICH, HICKS.
The relations of physical and economic conditions to the production and trade in selected important agricul-
tural, forest, mineral, and manufactured products of the world. No credit is allowed until Bs. 104 is com-
pleted. LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Bs. 104.-Principles of Economic Geography. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory.
3 credits. ATWOOD, DIETTRICH, HICKS. Prerequisite: Bs. 103.
A continuation of the work in Bs. 103, special emphasis being given to the adjustments that man has made
to the natural economic and social factors, and to the industrial and commercial development of the United States
in relation to the rest of the world. LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Bs. 201E-202E.-Principles of Economics. 3 hours. 6 credits. ELDRIDGE, BIGHAM,
CAMPBELL, HICKS.
Analysis of production, distribution, and consumption.
Bs. 211-212.-Principles of Accounting. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 6 credits.
GRAY, COGBURN, CAMPBELL.
Introductory study of the underlying principles of accounting, accounting procedure, and technique. LABORA-
TORY FEE: $1 EACH TERM.
Bs. 302E.-Elements of Statistics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. AN-
DERSON. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
An introduction to statistics. Each student is required to complete one or more projects in statistical
investigation. LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Bs. 311.-Advanced Accounting. 3 hours. 3 credits. GRAY. Prerequisite: Bs. 211-
212.
Lectures and problems. An advanced study in accounting theory and practice. Special types of problems
invohing partnerships, corporations, valuation of various types of assets, analysis of financial statements.
Bs. 312.-Advanced Accounting. 3 hours. 3 credits. GRAY. Prerequisite: Bs. 311.
A continuation of Bs. 311. Lectures and problems involving installment sales, agencies and branches, con-
signments, insolvency and bankruptcy, receiverships.
Bs. 313.-Factory and Distribution Cost Accounting. 3 hours. 3 credits. GRAY.
Prerequisite: Bs. 211-212.
Lectures and problems. A study of the methods of collection, compilation, and interpretation of cost data;
preparation of records and reports; uses of cost data in business control.

*Not offered in 1935-36.








310 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Bs. 321E.-Financial Organization of Society. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOLBEARE. Pre-
requisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
An introduction to the field of finance; monetary systems; banks and institutions connected with short-term
and long-term financing.
Bs. 322.-Financial Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER. Prerequisite:
Bs. 321E.
The financial manager's task in an operating business enterprise; financial ratio analysis; the financial policies,
methods, and practices in raising both fixed and working capital.
Bs. 329E.-Elements of Personal Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits. HURST. Prerequisite:
Bs. 201E-202E.
A study of the legal, economic, and social aspects of personal as contrasted with corporation finance; the
basis of personal credit; types of institutions and systems serving the individual as lending and as saving
agencies.
Bs. 332.-Retail Store Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. Prerequisite:
Bs. 201E-202E.
Retail store problems; types of stores; executive control; purchasing; accounts; location; service; organiza-
tion; management of employees and price policies.
Bs. 341.-Production Management. 2 hours. 2 credits. WILSON. Prerequisite:
Bs. 201E-202E.
The problems involved in the construction, equipment, and administration of a manufacturing enterprise.
Bs. 351E.-Transportation Principles. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM. Prerequisite:
Bs. 201E-202E.
The development of transportation; the place of transportation in the economic order; types of transpor-
tation agencies; railway transportation; rate making; government regulation of railroads.
Bs. 361.-Property Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-
202E.
Fire and marine. Introduction to property insurance.
Bs. 362.-Property Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER. Prerequisite: Bs.
201E-202E.
Bond, title and casualty. Continuation of property insurance; the nature of bonding, premiums charged and
companies underwriting; the principles of title and casualty insurance.
Bs. 372.-Labor Economics. 2 hours. 2 credits. CHACE. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-
202E.
The problems of labor adjustment and various methods of dealing with them; an examination of the func-
tions of a personnel department, and various methods of maintaining industrial good will.
*Bs. 381E.-Economic Geography of North America. 3 hours. 3 credits. DIET-
TRICH. Prerequisites: Bs. 103, Bs. 104, Bs. 201E-202E.
The principal economic activities in each of the major geographic regions of North America, involving
analysis of these activities from the standpoint of their relation to the natural environmental complex.
Bs. 385E.-Economic Geography of South America. 3 hours. 3 credits. DIET-
TRICL. Prerequisites: Bs. 103, Bs. 104, Bs. 201E-202E.
A geographic survey of the continent of South America, organized around the growth of trade, exports and
imports, trade by countries, and general business trend.
Bs. 401.-Business Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. HURST. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
Contracts and agency; rights and obligations of the agent, principal, and third party; termination of the
relationship of agency. No credit is allowed until Bs. 402 is completed.
Bs. 402.-Advanced Business Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. HURST. Prerequisite: Bs. 401.
Conveyances and mortgages of real property; sales and mortgages of personal property; the law of negotiable
instruments; partnership.

*Not offered in 1935-36.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 311


Bs. 404E.-Government Control of Business. 3 hours. 3 credits. HURST. Pre-
requisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
General survey of the field of government control.
Bs. 409E-410E.-Applied Economics. 2 hours. 4 credits. ANDERSON.
A restatement of the principles of economics previously presented in more elementary form to sophomores,
pitched on a plane which rests on a previous knowledge of the elementary principles of economics, elementary
accounting, elementary statistics, financial organization and financial management, general mathematics, and
elementary psychology.
Bs. 414.-Income Tax Procedure. 3 hours. 3 credits. GRAY. Prerequisites: Bs. 311,
Bs. 312.
The Federal Income Tax Law and related accounting problems. Preparation of tax returns for individuals
and corporations.
Bs. 415.-Auditing. 3 hours. 3 credits. GRAY. Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in
Accounting.
Lectures and problems. A study of auditing theory and practice; principal kinds of audits; solution of
illustrative problems.
Bs. 416.-Advanced Accounting. 3 hours. 3 credits. GRAY. Prerequisites: Bs. 311,
Bs. 312.
A continuation of Bs. 311 and Bs. 312. Lectures and problems. Problems involving actuarial science,
consolidated statements of holding companies and subsidiaries, foreign exchange, etc.
Bs. 422.-Investments. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOLBEARE. Prerequisite: Bs. 321E.
The nature of investment; investment policies and types of securities; analysis of securities; the mechanics
and mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements of security prices.

Bs. 423.-Commercial Banking. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOLBEARE. Prerequisite: Bs.
321E.
Banking policies, practices, and problems; the relations of the individual bank with other banks, the money
market, and other classes of financial institutions.
Bs. 426E.-Banking Systems. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOLBEARE. Prerequisite: Bs.
321E.
An analytical history of the evolution of the banking system of the United States, and a critical study of
the banking systems of Canada, England, France, Germany, etc.

Bs. 429E.-Principles of Government Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM. Pre-
tequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
Principles governing expenditures of modern governments; sources of revenue; public credit; principles and
methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems of leading countries.
Bs. 431E.-Principles of Marketing. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. Prerequisite:
Bs. 201E-202E.
A survey of the marketing structure of industrial society.
Bs. 432.-Market Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. Prerequisite: Bs. 431E.
Marketing in business from the point of view of the sales manager and the purchasing agent. An introduc-
tion to market analysis, research, and policies.

Bs. 433.-Advertising. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
A study of the history and economics of advertising; types of advertising; psychological principles under-
lying advertising; administrative control of advertising expenditures.
Bs. 434.-Advertising Practice. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. Prerequisite: Bs. 433.
The technique and practice of advertising.
Bs. 435E.-International Trade. 3 hours. 3 credits. CAMPBELL. Prerequisite: Bs.
201E-202E.
Economic principles underlying international trade; historical background and evolution of such commerce
in Europe and the United States.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Bs. 436.-Foreign Trade Technique. 3 hours. 3 credits. CAMPBELL. Prerequisite:
Bs. 201E-202E.
Methods of selling, shipping, and financing foreign sales; customs tariffs, commercial laws, and trade
practices in foreign countries; business problems encountered by United States exporters and importers.
Bs. 0440.-Trade Horizons in Caribbean America. 3 hours. 3 credits. HICKS. Pre-
requisites: Bs. 103, Bs. 104, Bs. 201E-202E.
Economic and commercial geography of Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and the countries of
South America bordering the Caribbean Sea.
*Bs. 442.-Trade Horizons in the Far East. 3 hours. 3 credits. DIETTRICH. Pre-
requisites: Bs. 103, Bs. 104, Bs. 201E-202E.
A study of human relationships to natural environment as presented in the economic adjustments in the
Far East and in its commercial connections with the Western World, especially with the United States.
*Bs. 453.-Problems in Transportation. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM. Prerequi-
sites: Bs. 201E-202E, Bs. 351E.
An intensive study of special outstanding problems in transportation, such as rate structures and relationships,
combination, reorganization, taxation, and coordination.
Bs. 454E.-Principles of Public Utility Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
The nature, place and development of public service corporations; types of public control; valuation and rate
making; regulation of service, accounts, reports, and securities; combinations; public relations; public ownership.
Bs. 461.-Life Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
The functions of life insurance; the science of life insurance and the computation of premiums; types of life
companies; life insurance law; the selling of life insurance.
Bs. 465.-Realty Principles. 3 hours. 3 credits. CHACE. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-
202E.
Fundamentals of realty economics.
Bs. 466.-Realty Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. CHACE. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-
202E.
The organization of realty enterprises; management of real property; handling of rentals; administration
of real estate development.
Bs. 468E.-Economic History in the Making. 3 hours. 3 credits. DIETTRICH. Pre-
requisite: Permission of instructor.
The era of industrialism; contemporary economic organization in the leading European countries; types of
economic reform; capitalism, socialism, communism; special consideration of current social and economic prob-
lems in England, Germany, Soviet Russia, and the United States.
Bs. 469E.-Business Forecasting. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. Prerequisite: Bs.
302E.
A survey of the problem of the reduction of business risk by forecasting general business conditions;
statistical methods used by leading commercial agencies in forecasting.
Bs. 470E.-Business Forecasting, Continued. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. Pre-
requisite: Bs. 302E.
Techniques employed to forecast the production and price of specific commodities; intensive examination
of the more important contributions to the subject in scientific journals during recent years.
Bs. 485E.-International Economic Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATWOOD. Pre-
requisite: Permission of instructor.
Development of international economic policies; geographic, economic, social, and political factors under-
lying contemporary international problems.
*Bs. 487E.-Economic Geography of Europe. 3 hours. 3 credits. DIETTRICH. Pre-
requisites: Bs. 103, Bs. 104.
A study of human relationships to natural environment as presented in the economic adjustments in Europe
and in its commercial connections with the other continents, especially with North America.

*Not offered in 1935-36.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bs. 0491E.-Geographic Foundations of the British Empire. 3 hours. 3 credits.
DIETTRICH. Prerequisites: Bs. 101E, Bs. 103, Bs. 104.
The economic and commercial problems of the world's largest empire; geographic and economic interrela-
tionships influencing its present position in world economy.

GRADUATE COURSES
Bs. 505E.-The Development of Economic Thought
Bs. 506E.-The Development of Economic Thought, Continued
Bs. 522.-Law of Corporation Finance
Bs. 528E.-International Finance
Bs. 530E.-Problems in State and Local Taxation
Bs. 563E-564E.-Seminar in Statistics and Business Forecasting
*Bs. 568E.-Special Studies in Risk and Risk-Bearing
Bs. 589E.-Geographic Factors Underlying World Economy


CHEMISTRY

Cy. 101-102.-General Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 8 credits. HEATH,
MUCKENFUSS, POLLARD, OTTE, ELLIS.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Non-metallic elements and their compounds; metals and their
compounds and some of their industrial uses. LABORATORY FEE: $5 EACH TERM.
NOTE: Special sections of General Chemistry will be open only to students intending to pursue work in
Agriculture or Pharmacy in the Upper Division, the lecture and laboratory work of which will include the
elements of qualitative analysis.
Cy. 201-202.-Analytical Chemistry. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 8 credits.
BLACK. Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection and quantitative deter-
mination of the common metals and acid radicals. LABORATORY FEE: $5 EACH TERM.
Cy. 0215.-Water and Sewage. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. BLACK.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
A theoretical and practical study of the examination and treatment of water and sewage. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 262.-Organic Chemistry. 3 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 5 credits. POLLARD.
Prerequisite: General Chemistry.
A brief elementary course embracing the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds. LABORATORY
FEE: $5.
Cy. 282.-Glassblowing. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory. No credit. THOMPSON.
A course intended to acquaint the student with the essentials of glassblowing and the construction of
simple laboratory apparatus. Frary, Edwards, and Taylor, Laboratory Glassblowing. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
Cy. 301-302.-Organic Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 8 credits.
LEIGH. Prerequisites: Cy. 202, or Cy. 0203, or Cy. 0232.
Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Reid, College Organic Chem-
istry; Adams and Johnson, Laboratory Experiments in Organic Chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5 EACH TERM.
Cy. 303.-Quantitative Analysis. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory. 2 credits. SHAW.
Prerequisite: Cy. 104. Not offered after 1935-36.
An introduction to quantitative technique. Laboratory work selected especially for students of Pharmacy.
Jenkins and DuMez, Quantitative Pharmaceutical Chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 305.-Quantitative Analysis. 2 hours, and 9 hours laboratory. 5 credits. BLACK,
SHAW. Prerequisite: Cy. 0203. Not offered after 1935-36.
The fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Willard and Furman, Elementary Quan-
titative Analysis. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

*Not offered in 1935-36.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Cy. 335.-Unit Processes of Chemical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. MUCKEN-
FUSS. Prerequisites: Cy. 0232 or Cy. 202, College Physics, Calculus.
Fundamental chemical engineering processes, such as filtration, evaporation, and drying. Badger and
McCabe, Elements of Chemical Engineering.
Cy. 343.-Industrial Chemistry, Inorganic. 3 hours. 3 credits. MUCKENFUSS. Pre-
requisites: Cy. 0232 or Cy. 202 or College Physics.
Chemical principles involved in manufacturing and refining inorganic products of commercial importance.
Riegel, Industrial Chemistry.
Cy. 351.-Metallurgy. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. HEATH, YEATON.
Prerequisites: General Chemistry and College Physics.
Ores of the more important metals, their preparation, properties and uses. Alloys are also considered.
Stoughton and Butts, Engineering Metallurgy. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 401-402.-Physical Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 8 credits.
JACKSON. Prerequisite: Cy. 302. Not offered until 1937-38.
Theoretical consideration of physico-chemical phenomena. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 403.-Water Analysis. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. BLACK. Pre-
requisite: Cy. 305.
Analysis of waters to determine their potability and fitness for steam raising and other purposes. Standard
Methods of Water Analysis of the A. P. H. A. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 422.-Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
JACKSON. Prerequisite: Cy. 0203, Cy. 0232, Cy. 361-362. Not offered after 1936-37.
Matter in the three states; relation between physical properties and chemical constitution. Getman and
Daniels, Outlines of Theoretical Chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 432.-Agricultural Analysis. 2 hours, and 9 hours laboratory. 5 credits. BLACK,
SHAW. Prerequisite: Cy. 305.
Quantitative analysis of agricultural products. Mahin and Carr, Quantitative Agricultural Analysis. LABORA-
TORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 444.-Chemical Engineering Laboratory. 9 hours laboratory, or its equivalent.
3 credits. MUCKENFUSS. Prerequisites: Cy. 335, Cy. 343.
Processes used in the manufacture and purification of chemicals. Experiments on heat transfer, flow of
fluids, crushing and grinding, fractional distillation, drying, and the production of soap, di- and trisodium
phosphate and paint. Badger and McCabe, Elements of Chemical Engineering. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 446.-Industrial Chemistry, Organic. 3 hours. 3 credits. MUCKENFUSS. Pre-
requisite: Cy. 302.
Chemical principles involved in manufacturing and refining organic products of commercial importance.
Visits are made to accessible chemical plants. Riegel, Industrial Chemistry.
Cy. 451.-Fuels Laboratory. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. MUCKENFUSS.
Prerequisites: Cy. 305 or Cy. 202.
Analysis and calorimetry of gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels; the physical constants of animal and vege-
table oils and testing of lubricating oils. Parr, Fuel, Gas, Water and Lubricants. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 462.-Photographic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. HEATH. Prerequisites: Cy.
0262 or Cy. 362 or Cy. 302 and College Physics or Cy. 0232 or Cy. 202.
Theory and practice of photographic processes and materials, and their uses.
Cy. 481-482.-Chemical Literature. Half hour or its equivalent. 1 credit. POLLARD.
Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry. A reading knowledge of French and German is de-
sirable.
A general study of the present sources of published chemical information.

GRADUATE COURSES

Cy. 501.-Organic Preparations
Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cy. 0505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds
*Cy. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry
*Cy. 0508.-Synthesis and Structures of Organic Compounds
*Cy. 0509.-Electrochemistry
Cy. 510.-The Phase Rule
Cy. 0512.-Applications of Physical Chemistry
Cy. 0513.-Colloid Chemistry
Cy. 515.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
*Cy. 0516.-Chemistry of the Rare Elements
Cy. 525.-Chemistry of the Terpenes
Cy. 526.-Chemistry of the Terpenes
Cy. 0531.-Advanced Qualitative Analysis
*Cy. 533.-Advanced Quantitative Analysis
Cy. 537.-Qualitative Organic Chemistry
Cy. 538.-Quantitative Organic Chemistry
*Cy. 542.-Catalysis
Cy. 545.-Chemical Thermodynamics
Cy. 581.-Chemical Technology
Cy. 586.-Chemical Engineering Processes
Cy. 601.-Chemical Research
Cy. 602.-Chemical Research

CIVIL ENGINEERING
**Cl. 101.-Surveying. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory. 2 credits. REED. Prerequisite:
Trigonometry.
The use of chain, compass, transit, and level; contour work, simple curves, and other surveying problems.
Breed and Hosmer, The Principles and Practice of Surveying, Volume I. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
CI. 207.-Surveying. 2 hours. 2 credits. SAWYER. Prerequisite: Cl. 101.
Balancing of surveys and calculating of areas; methods of making topographical surveys and of solving
other problems in land, topographical and city surveying. Breed and Hosmer, The Principles and Practice of
Surveying, Volume II.
CI. 209.-Surveying. Summer Term. 2 hours, and 30 hours laboratory. 6 credits.
SAWYER. Prerequisite: Cl. 207.
Field astronomy; field work. Breed and Hosmer, The Principles and Practice of Surveying, Volume II.
LABORATORY FEE: $6.
Cl. 211.-Railway and Highway Surveying. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3
credits. REED. Prerequisite: Cl. 101.
Simple, compound, reversed, and vertical curves, and railway and highway location. Data obtained for the
work to be covered in Cl. 212 and Cl. 314. Pickels and Wiley, Route Surveying. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Cl. 212.-Railway Engineering. 6 hours laboratory. 2 credits. REED. Prerequisite:
Cl. 211.
Transition curves, turnouts, and earthwork. Field and drawing-room work in final location of a railroad.
Pickels and Wiley, Route Surveying. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Cl. 306.-Theory of Structures. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. SAWYER.
Prerequisite: Ml. 315. Corequisite: MI. 316.
The resolution of forces and computation of internal stresses in statically determined structures, and the
design of simple structures. Shedd and Vawter, Theory of Simple Structures.

*Not offered in 1935-36.
**Offered only if demand warrants.








316 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Cl. 308.-Graphic Statics and Elementary Design. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory.
2 credits. REED. Prerequisite: Ml. 315.
Lectures, recitations, and drawing-room exercises in the computation of forces; the plotting of diagrams in
elementary graphics and roof trusses; design of roof truss. Kidder-Parker, Architects' and Builders' Handbook.
Cl. 0310.-Testing Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 2 credits. LOWE. Prerequisite:
Ml. 315.
Laboratory work in the testing of stone, brick, asphalt and other road materials; cement, sand, concrete,
timber, steel, and other materials used in construction. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
Cl. 314.-Highway Engineering. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. LOWE.
Prerequisite: Cl. 211.
Principles of highway engineering. A location is run in the field, and a complete design is made in the
drafting room. Wiley, Principles of Highway Engineering. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Cl. 403.-Structural Design. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. SAWYER.
Prerequisite: Cl. 308.
Recitations, lectures, and drawing-room work in the design of structural elements of small buildings in wood
and steel. Kidder-Parker, Architects' and Builders' Handbook.
Cl. 404.-Structural Design. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. SAWYER.
Prerequisite: Cl. 403.
Recitations, lectures and drawing-room work in the design of structural elements of large buildings, including
foundations, columns, continuous frames, and connections. Kidder-Parker, Architects' and Builders' Handbook.
Cl. 405.-Specifications and Engineering Relations. 2 hours. 2 credits. VAN LEER.
Prerequisite: Senior rating, College of Engineering.
Specifications for materials and construction of engineering projects; advertising and letting contracts; agree-
ments and contractual relations. Mead, Contracts, Specifications and Engineering Relations.
Cl. 407.-Hydraulics. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. LOWE. Prerequisite:
Ml. 315-316.
Principles underlying the behavior of fluids at rest and in motion. Schoder and Dawson, Hydraulics.
LABORATORY FEE: $3.
Cl. 408.-Hydraulic Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits. VAN LEER. Prerequisite:
Cl. 407.
Lectures and recitations on water power engineering; the design and testing of hydraulic machinery; pumps and
turbines. Mead, Hydraulic Machinery.
Cl. 409.-Water and Sewerage. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. LOWE.
Prerequisite: Cl. 407, Cy. 0215, Bcy. 0308.
Sewerage and sewage treatment works. The design of collection system and small treatment plant. Metcalf
and Eddy, Sewerage and Sewage Disposal.
Cl. 410.-Water and Sewerage. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. LOWE.
Prerequisite: Cl. 409.
Lectures and recitations on water supply systems. Sources of supply. Methods of treatment. The design
of a small water-supply system from source to spigot. Rabbit and Doland, Water Supply Engineering.
Cl. 411.-Hydrology. 2 hours, 2 credits. VAN LEER. Prerequisite: Junior rating.
The principles of hydrology, their relations and applications to engineering design. Meyer, Elements of
Hydrology.
Cl. 412.-Concrete Design. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. LOWE. Pre-
requisite: Cl. 306.
Recitations and drawing-room work on the theory and design of reinforced concrete structures. Turneaure
and Maurer, Principles of Reinforced Concrete Construction.
Cl. 413.-Structural Engineering. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
SAWYER. Prerequisite: Cl. 306.
Recitations, lectures, and drawing-room work in the analysis of stresses due to moving loads, design of rail-
way and highway bridges, and mill buildings in wood and steel. Shedd and Vawter, Theory of Simple Structures.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cl. 414.-Structural Engineering. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
SAWYER. 'Prerequisite: Cl. 413.
Recitations, lectures and drawing-roont work in the design of foundations, and of bridges and buildings
requiring statically indeterminate methods of stress analysis. Shedd and Vawler, Theory of Simple Structures.
Cl. 415.-Estimating Quantities and Costs. 2 hours. 2 credits. SAWYER. Pre-
requisite: Cl. 306 or Cl. 308.
Estimating material quantities and costs; valuation, cost keeping, time schedules and progress charts for
engineering work. V alker, Building Estimator's Reference Handbook.
Cl. 418.-Hydraulic Laboratory. 2 hours laboratory. 1 credit. LOWE. Prerequisite:
Cl. 407. Corequisite: Cl. 408.
Students taking this course will be permitted to choose one or more of the following topics: water power
study, flow duration curves, reservoir depletion curves, backwater curve, tests and reports on deep well centri-
fugal pump, pelton and reaction turbines. The design of long pipe lines for transporting oils, gasoline, and
natural gas. Mead, Hydraulic Machinery. LABORATORY FEE: $2.

GRADUATE COURSES
**Cl. 501-502.-Advanced Work in Structural Engineering
**Cl. 507-508.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering
**Cl. 509-510.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering
**Cl. 511-512.-Similarity and Model Applications to Beach and Shore Erosions


DAIRYING

Dy. 22.-Elements of Dairying. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. No credit to-
ward degree. WILLOUGHBY.
The composition and handling of milk and milk products; composition and testing of dairy products.
LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Dy. 201.-Farm Dairying. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
The secretion and composition of milk; testing dairy products; farm butter making; ice cream and soft
cheese making. LAnoRAORnY FEE: $1.
Dy. 202.-Dairy Herd Management. 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY. Prerequisites:
Al. 104, Dy. 201.
Feeding and management of the dairy herd; herd improvement; barns; equipment.
Dy. 301.-Dairy Manufactures. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. WIL-
LOUGHBY. Prerequisite: Al. 104, Dy. 201.
Management and operation of creamery, cheese factory, condenser., ice cream plant. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Dy. 302.-Market Milk. 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY. Prerequisites: Al. 104;
Dy. 201 or Dy. 202.
Methods of producing clean milk; operation of milk plants; sanitary supervision of milk supply.
Dy. 308.-Dairy Practice. 2 hours laboratory. I credit. ARNOLD. Prerequisites: Dy.
201, Dy. 202.
Practical work at University dairy barn.


DRAWING

Dg. 101-102.-Mechanical Drawing and Descriptive Geometry. 1 hour, and 5
hours drafting. 4 credits. ESHLEMAN, JANES, WALKER, STRONG.
Methods of projection, dimensioning, conventional symbols, working details. Analysis and construction of
problems in Descriptive Geometry. LABORATORY FEE: $0.25.

**Offered only if demand warrants.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


*Dg. 104.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours. 1 credit. ESHLEMAN, JANES, WALKER,
STRONG.
Projections, machine parts, and tracing. French, Engineering Drawing. FEE: $0.25.
*Dg. 107.-Descriptive Geometry. 2 hours. 2 credits. ESHLEMAN, JANES, WALKER.
Prerequisites: Trigonometry and Solid Geometry.
Methods of representing points, lines, surfaces, and projections. Church and Bartlett, Elements of Descrip-
tive Geometry.
Dg. 201-202.-Machine Drawing. 1% hour, and 21/2 hours drawing. 2 credits. STRONG.
Prerequisite: Dg. 104.
Detail and assembly drawings and tracings of machines and machine parts. French, Engineering Drawing.
Dg. 207.-Descriptive Geometry. 4 hours drawing. 2 credits. ESHLEMAN. Pre-
requisite: Dg. 107.
Solids, intersections, developments, and solution of many original problems on the drawing-board. Church
and Bartlett, Elements of Descriptive Geometry. FEE: $0.25.
Dg. 209.-Descriptive Geometry. 2 hours drawing. 1 credit. JANES, WALKER. Pre-
requisite: Dg. 107.
Solids, intersections, and developments. Church and Bartlett, Elements of Descriptive Geometry. FEE: $0.25.


ECONOMICS

Courses in Economics are offered by the Department of Economics and Business Administra-
tion in the College of Business Administration. Courses in Business Administration marked
"E" are courses in Economics. See Business Administration.

EDUCATION

En. 101.-Introduction to Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMMONS.
An attempt is made to foreshadow the field of Education so that the student may see the whole field before
he studies its detailed and technical parts. Butterwick and Seegers, An Orientation Course in Education.
**En. 103.-Health Education. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Conditions that affect the physical and mental vigor of children, youth, and teachers, and relate the school
to the health of the home and community; the teacher's health; sanitation of school buildings.
En. 207.-Educational Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. WISE. Prerequisite: En 101.
Psychology applied to education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc. Pressey, Psychology and the
New Education.
En. 209.-The Teaching of Science in the First Six Grades. 2 hours. 2 credits.
SMITH.
Organization and presentation of the science materials of the elementary grades.
En. 303-304.-Methods of Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 2 hours, and 2 hours
laboratory. 6 credits. GARRIS. Prerequisite: En 207.
Organization of a long-time teaching program; selection of proper equipment, and the arrangement of the
classroom and farm shop; organization of all-day, day-unit, part-time, and evening classes; and methods of
teaching. Garris, Special Methods in Teaching Vocational Agriculture.
En. 305.-Development and Organization of Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
An attempt to interpret and evaluate present-day education, and to point out possible developments. Agenda
Committee, Citizens' Conference on the Crisis in Education.
En. 306.-Vocational Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. GARRIS. Prerequisite: En. 207.
Development, function, and scope of vocational, agricultural, home economics, trade and industrial, and
commercial education as provided for by the National Vocational Education Act of Congress. Hill, Introduction
to Vocational Education.

*Offered for the last time in 1935-36.
**Not offered in 1935-36. Students are advised to take HPI. 107 instead.









DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 319


En. 308.-The Public School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH. Prerequisite:
En. 207.
The curriculum as a group of related problems and projects of vital interest to children. An attempt to
formulate a curriculum based on social conditions and social needs.
En. 317.-Tests and Measurements. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
CRAGO. Prerequisite: En. 207.
An elementary course designeJ to aid the teacher in the use of tests in the improvement of instruction and
in the solution of school problems. Boynton, Intelligence-Its Manifestations and Measurement; Greene and
Jorgenson, The Use and Interpretation of Educational Tests. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
En. 319.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO. Pre-
requisite: En. 207.
The nature, growth and development of the child from birth through adolescence, with reference to Educa-
tion. Morgan, Child Psychology; Brooks, Psychology of Adolescence.
En. 323.-General Methods in the Secondary School. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH.
Prerequisite: En. 207. Corequisite: En. 319.
Current conceptions of secondary school procedures.
*En. 329.-Personality Adjustment. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO. Prerequisite: En.
319.
Problems of adjustment of children and adolescents. A study of methods of properly conditioning children,
of the development of wholesome attitudes and normal behavior. Sherman, Mental Hygiene.
*En. 339.-Exceptional Children. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO. Prerequisites: En. 317,
En. 319.
Methods of finding, diagnosing and dealing with children of subnormal intelligence, superior intelligence,
and behavior difficulties. Hildreth, Psychological Service for School Problems.
En. 401.-Administration and Supervision of Village and Consolidated Schools.
3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
Problems peculiar to schools in Florida; the supervising principal, qualifications, relation to superintendent,
boards, teachers, pupils, patrons, and community; adapting the school to the child's needs; business practices.
Reeder, Fundamentals of Public School Administration; Hunkins, The Superintendent at Work in Smaller Schools.
En. 402.-Administration Practice. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMMONS. Prerequisite:
En. 401.
The supervision of instruction; visits to schools for the study of administrative and supervising practice;
a survey of one school system.
En. 403.-The Problem-Project Method. 3 hours. 3 credits. NORMAN. Prerequisite:
En. 323.
Educational objectives, methods, and organization; the nature of the individual and society. Includes course
formerly listed as En. 404. Kilpatrick, Foundations of Methods; Horne, Democracy in Education.

En. 404.-Philosophy of Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH.
An attempt to present the educational theories that influence modern educational practice. Designed for ad-
vanced students.
En. 0406.-Elementary School Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK. Pre-
requisites: En. 305 and the required Junior courses.
The problems that usually confront the elementary school principal will be stressed in this course. Reavis,
Pierce and Stulken, The Elementary School.
En. 0408.-High School Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMMONS. Prerequi-
sites: En. 323 and one supervised teaching course.
Practical management and administration of the modern high school.

*Not offered in 1935-36.








320


BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


tEn. 409-410.-Supervised Teaching in Vocational Agriculture. 9 hours laboratory.
6 credits. GARRIS. Prerequisites: En. 303-304, En. 306.
Under supervision, students observe the teaching and other duties of the agricultural instructor at Alachua
during the first term; during the second term each student participates in these activities, taking the place of the
regular instructor. Wrinkle and Armentrout, Directed Observation and Teaching in Secondary Schools.
tEn. 415.-Supervised Teaching in English. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD AND STAFF.
Observation, participation, actual teaching under supervision and study of methods in teaching high school
English. Wrinkle and Armentrout, Directed Observation and Teaching in Secondary Schools.
fEn. 425.-Supervised Teaching in Foreign Languages. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD
AND STAFF.
Observation, participation, actual teaching under supervision and study of methods in teaching foreign languages
in high school. Wrinkle and Armentrout, Directed Observation and Teaching in Secondary Schools.
tEn. 435.-Supervised Teaching in History. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD AND STAFF.
Observation, participation, actual teaching under supervision and study of methods in teaching history in
high school. Wrinkle and Armentrout, Directed Observation and Teaching in Secondary Schools.
tEn. 455.-Supervised Teaching in the Sciences. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD AND,
STAFF.
Observation, participation, actual teaching under supervision and study of methods in teaching sciences in
high school. Wrinkle and Armentrout, Directed Observation and Teaching in Secondary Schools.
t*En. 465.-Supervised Teaching in Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD AND
STAFF.
Observation, participation, actual teaching under supervision and study of methods in teaching mathematics
in high school. Wrinkle and Armentrout, Directed Observation and Teaching in Secondary Schools.
tEn. 475.-Supervised Teaching in Health and Physical Education. 3 hours. 3
credits. MEAD AND STAFF.
Observations, participation, actual teaching under supervision and study of methods in teaching physical
education in high school. Wrinkle and Armentroul, Directed Observation and Teaching in Secondary Schools.
tEn. 477.-Supervised Teaching in Manual Arts. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD AND
STAFF.
Observation, participation, actual teaching under supervision and study of methods in teaching manual arts
in high school. Wrinkle and Armentrout, Directed Observation and Teaching in Secondary Schools.

GRADUATE COURSES
En. 0500.-An Introduction to Educational Research
*En. 501.-The Elementary School Curriculum
*En. 503.-Seminar in Educational Measurements
*En. 504.-The School Survey
*En. 0505.-The Organization and Administration of Extra-Curricular Activities
in Junior and Senior High Schools
*En. 506.-Methods of Teaching Farm-Shop Work
En. 507.-Seminar in Educational Psychology
*En. 508.-Democracy and Education Seminar

tPREREQUISITES FOR SUPERVISED STUDENT-TEACHING: Senior rank; preparation in the subject-matter to be
taught; completion of En. 101, 207, 319 and 323; passing of comprehensive examinations in Education and in the
subject-matter field to be taught; a general honor point average of 1: an honor point average of 1.5 in the
subject to be taught; a general honor point average of 1 in courses in Education. Application for this work
must be filed with the director in charge before the beginning of the term in which the student-teaching is to be
done. The right is reserved to reject any, or all, applications from students with marked defects in character,
personality, or physical condition. The right is also reserved to drop the student from the course without
credit if his work is not satisfactory.
*Not offered in 1935-36.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 509.-Problems in the Administration of a School System
En. 510.-The History of Education
En. 511-512.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture
En. 514.-Pre-Adolescent Psychology
*En. 516.-Character and Personality Development
*En. 517.-Educational Statistics
En. 518.-Special Problems in High School Organization and Administration
*En. 519.-High School Curriculum
En. 521.-Business Administration of a School System
En. 528.-Educational Supervision
*En. 541.-Control and Support of Public Education
*En. 542.-The Curriculum and the Educational Plant
*En. 543.-The Teacher and the Learner
En. 544.-Constitutional and Legal Basis of Public School Administration
*En. 562.-Guidance and Counseling
*En. 565-566.-Problems in Agricultural Education Seminar
*En. 567-568.-Problems in Agricultural Education Seminar
*En. 569.-Problems in Organizing Part-Time and Evening Classes
En. 603.-Foundations of Method


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Courses in Electrical Engineering are cpen only to students registered in the Upper Division.
Radio courses in the Department of Electrical Engineering are given in cooperation uith State
Radio Station WRUF. Students can secure practical experience in station operation.
El. 305.-Elementary Communication Engineering. 2 hours, and 3 hours labor-
atory. 3 credits. WEIL. Prerequisite: One year of college physics, including electricity and
magnetism.
Telephony, telegraphy, amplifiers, elementary tube theory, radio receivers, and transmitters. LABORATORY
FEE: $3.
El. 306.-Radio Apparatus. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. SMITH. Pre-
requisite: El. 305.
Theory. construction, and operation of modern receiving and transmitting sets, public address systems, and
electronic devices. Sterling, Radio Manual. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
El. 307.-Principles of Electrical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. Pre-
requisite: One year of college physics, including electricity and magnetism. Corequisite:
El. 309.
A short course covering the general field of electrical engineering.
El. 309.-Dynamo Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. WILSON. Corequisite:
El. 307.
Laboratory tests intended to give some familiarity with electric circuits, the use of instruments, and the
operation of generators and motors. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
El. 311.-Direct Currents. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH. Prerequisite: One year of
college physics.
Theory of direct current circuits, characteristics, design and operation of direct current apparatus. Adapted
for mechanical engineers. Dawes, Electrical Engineering (Volume I-Direct Currents).

*Not offered in 1935-36.








322 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION--UPPER DIVISION


El. 312.-Alternating Currents. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH. Prerequisite: El. 311.
Theory of alternating current circuits; characteristics, design, and operation of alternating current apparatus.
Adapted for mechanical engineers. Dawes, Electrical Engineering (Volume II-Alternating Currents).
El. 315.-Direct Current Theory and Application. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF.
Prerequisites: One year of college physics, differential and integral calculus. Corequisite:
El. 317.
Laws of the electric and magnetic circuits; theory, design and application of direct current apparatus and
motors; control equipment; armature windings. Gilbert, Electricity and Magnetism.
El. 316.-Alternating Current Theory and Application. 3 hours. 3 credits. WIL-
SON. Prerequisite: El. 315.
Theory of alternating current circuits; characteristics, design, and operation of alternating current apparatus.
El. 317.-Problems in Direct Currents. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF. Prerequi-
sites: One year of college physics, differential and integral calculus. Corequisite: El. 315.
Electric and magnetic circuits, electrostatics, electromagnetic, transients. Lyon, Problems in Direct Currents.
El. 318.-Alternating Current Circuits. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL. Prerequisites:
El. 315 or equivalent; Calculus.
Representation of alternating currents by vectors and complex quantities, wave form, measurement of power,
Kirchoff's laws, unbalanced circuits. Lawrence, Principles of Alternating Currents.
El. 319.-Direct Current Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. SMITH, WILSON.
Corequisite: El. 315.
Operation and characteristic curves; heat runs; testing of direct current machinery, control apparatus, and
other appliances. Karapetoff, Experimental Electrical Engineering (Volume I). LABORATORY FEE: $5.
El. 320.-Alternating Current Laboratory. 6 hours laboratory. 2 credits. WILSON.
Corequisite: El. 316.
Measurements of electrical quantities in alternating current circuits; operation and characteristic curves of
alternating current machinery. Karapetoff, Experimental Electrical Engineering (Volume I). LABORATORY FEE: $5.
El. 321.-Dynamo Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. SMITH. Corequisite:
El. 311.
Not as extensive as El. 319, with special emphasis on application and operation of direct current equipment.
Adapted to mechanical engineers. Karapetoff, Experimental Electrical Engineering (Volume I). LABORATORY
FEE: $3.
El. 322.-Dynamo Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. SMITH, WILSON. Co-
requisite: El. 312.
Not as extensive as El. 320, but with added emphasis on application and operation of alternating current
apparatus. Karapetoff, Experimental Electrical Engineering (Volume I). LABORATORY FEE: $3.
El. 0409.-Engineering Practice. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL. Prerequisite: 8 credits
in electrical engineering.
Selection and coordination of equipment for power plants and electrical systems; the engineer and his client.
El. 0410.-Electrical Transmission and Distribution Systems. 3 hours. 3 credits.
SMITH. Prerequisite: 8 credits in electrical engineering.
Networks, properties of conductors, switchgear, protective appliances, overhead and underground construction,
transmission line calculations.
El. 411.-Direct Current Machinery and Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF.
Prerequisite: 12 credits in electrical engineering.
Construction, design, characteristics, operation and application of direct current machinery. Langsdorf,
Principles of Direct Current Machines.
El. 413.-Dynamo Laboratory. 6 hours laboratory. 2 credits. SMITH. Prerequisites:
El. 315, El. 316. Corequisite: El. 415.
Testing of transformers, rectifiers, generators, and motors. Karapetoff, Experimental Electrical Engineering
(Volume I) ; Ricker and Tucker, Electrical Engineering Laboratory Experiments. LABORATORY FEE: $5.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 323


El. 414.-Dynamo Laboratory. 6 hours laboratory. 2 credits. SMITH. Prerequisite:
El. 413. Corequisite: El. 416.
Testing of transformers, rectifiers, generators, and motors. Karapetoff. Experimental Electrical Engineering
(Volume I); Ricker and Tucker, Electrical Engineering Laboratory Experiments. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
El. 415.-Alternating Current Machinery and Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL.
Prerequisites: El. 316, El. 318.
Characteristics, operation and design of alternating current apparatus, particularly motors and rotary con-
verters. Lawrence, Alternating Current Machinery; Lyon, Problems in Alternating Current Machinery.
El. 416.-Alternating Current Machinery and Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL.
Prerequisites: El. 316, El. 318.
Characteristics, operation and design of alternating current apparatus, particularly transformers and gen-
erators. Lawrence, Alternating Current Machinery; Lyon, Problems in Alternating Current Machinery.
El. 423.-Communications Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. SASHOFF.
Prerequisites: El. 305, El. 306. Corequisite: El. 425.
High frequency measurements, vacuum tube characteristics, transmitter and receiving set measurements.
LABORATORY FEE: $3.
El. 424.-Communications Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. SASHOFF.
Prerequisites: El. 305, El. 306, El. 425. Corequisite: El. 426.
High frequency measurements, vacuum tube characteristics, transmitter and receiving set measurements.
LABORATORY FEE: $3.
El. 425.-Radio Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL. Prerequisites: El. 305,
El. 306.
Radio frequency circuits; vacuum tube amplifiers; oscillators; detectors; modulation; transmission and recep-
tion. Terman, Radio Engineering.
El. 426.-High Frequency Circuits. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF. Prerequisites: El.
305, El. 306.
Mathematical theory of vacuum tube circuits and networks; proportion of waves; antenna design. Terman,
Radio Engineering.
El. 428.-Transmission Line Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF. Prerequisite:
El. 410.
Electric and magnetic field distribution; inductive interference; corona. Calculations; performance; electric
and mechanical design of short and long lines. Loew, Electrical Power Transmission.
El. 430.-Instruments, Meters, and Relays. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3
credits. WEIL. Prerequisite: 12 credits in electrical engineering.
Design, construction, application, and testing of instruments, meters, and relays, with particular emphasis
on their application in alternating current circuits. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
El. 431-432.-Radio Station Operation. 3 hours laboratory. 2 credits. WEIL. Pre-
requisites: El. 305, El. 306.
Operation, maintenance, and testing of a broadcasting station, under actual operating conditions and under
the direction of licensed operators.
El. 456.-Essentials of Electricity for Architects. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory.
1 credit. WILSON. Prerequisite: One year of college physics.
Wiring methods, illumination, and miscellaneous applications of electricity. National Electric Safety Code;
Lighting Bulletins.
GRADUATE COURSES

El. 501-502.-Advanced Experimental Electrical Engineering
*El. 503. -Advanced Electrical Theory
*EI. 504. -Electrical Measurements
El. 505-506.-Advanced Course in Communication Engineering

*Not offered in 1935-36.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


El. 507-508.-Radio Engineering Laboratory
El. 509. -Electric Power Plant Design
El. 510. -Electric Transmission Line Theory
El. 511. -Electronic Devices
El. 512. -Symmetrical Components
El. 513-514.-Electrical Engineering Seminar
El. 515-516.-Meters and Relays



ENGLISH

Eh. 101-102.-Rhetoric and Composition. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON AND) STAFF.
Designed to train students in methods of clear and forceful expression. All students are encouraged to read
extensively for extra credit. Foerster and Steadman, Sentences and Thinking; Bachelor and Henry, Challeng ng
Essays in Modern Thought.
NOTE: Elh. 101-102 will be continued in 1935-36 for those students who may need this course in order to
fulfill the requirements of curricula begun before the establishment of the General College. After 1935-36 the
course will be discontinued.
Eh. 103-104.-Introduction to Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. CALDWELL, FARRIS,
MOUNTS. Corequisite or prerequisite: Eh. 101-102, or C-3: Reading, Speaking, and Wliting.
A survey of the literature of the Western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance. Farr, Robertson and
Caldwell, Syllabus of European Literature.
Eh. 201-202.-History of English Literature to 1800. 3 hours. 6 credits. CALD-
WELL, MORRIS, STROUP. Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102, or C-3: Reading, Speaking, and Writing.
A basic course in the historical development of English literature. Moody and Lovett, English Literature.
Eh. 203.-The Short Story. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS. Prerequisite: Eh. 10]-102,
or C-3: Reading, Speaking, and Writing.
Study and practice in the art of short-story creation. Uzzell, Narrative Technique; inage and Incident.
Eh. 204.-Exposition. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS. Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102, or C-3:
Reading, Speaking, and Writing.
Fundamental principles involved in expository thought-organization and expression, working toward the
student's production of such types as the criticism, the essay, the biography, etc. Farris, A Study of Exposition.
Eh. 207-208.-English Literature, 1800 to the Present. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERT-
SON. Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102, or C-3: Reading, Speaking, and Writing.
The first term covers English poetry and prose of the first half of the nineteenth century. The second term
is a continuation to the present day. Lieder, Lovett, and Root, British Prose and Poetry; Cunliffe, Leaders of
the Victorian Revolution.
Eh. 211.-Types of Modern Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. CALDWELL, CLARK.
Types of literature-prose and poetry. The attempt will be made to stimulate reading and to establish
criteria of literary excellence as a bass of intelligent appreciation. McCollum, A College Omnibus.
Eh. 301-302.-Shakespeare and the Drama. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON. Pre-
requisite: Eh. 201-202.
The English drama from its beginning through Shakespeare. In the first term the comedy will be stressed;
in the second, the tragedy.
Eh. 303-304.-English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. 3 hours. 6 credits.
FARRIS. Prerequisite: Eh. 201-202.
The roots of the Romantic Revival; the work of Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. The second term
includes an interpretative survey of the poetry of the Victorian Era. First term : Woods, English Poetry and Prose
of the Romantic Movement. Second term: Woods, English Poetry of the Victorian Period.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Eh. 305.-Historical English Grammar. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. Preiequi-
site: Eh. 201-202.
Historical development of the English language, with a view especially of giving insight into modern English
grammar. Lounsbury, English Language.
Eh. 306.-Modern English Grammar. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROBERTSON, CALDWELL.
Modern English inflection and syntax. The course is designed to be of practical value to teachers of English,
and is intended especially for students in the College of Education majoring in English.
*Eh. 307.-The English Ballad. 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Eh. 201-202.
The English and Scotch Ballads; a brief survey of American ballads; and an introduction to comparative
European Balladry. Gumnmere, English Ballad.
Eh. 355-356.-Business Writing. 3 hours. 6 credits. MOUNTS, SPIVEY, CLARK,
STROUP. Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102, or C-3: Reading, Speaking, and Writing.
A practical study of the principal types of business letters and reports for students in Business Administration.
Babenroth, Modern Business English; Saunders and Creek, Business Reports.
Eh. 401.-American Poetry. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS. Prerequisite: Eh. 201-202.
A rapid interpretative survey of the development of poetry in the United States.
Eh. 402.-Southern Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS. Prerequisite: Eh.
201-202.
A detailed study; examination of th- claims if Florida authors.
Eh. 403-404.-The English Novel. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON. Prerequisite:
Eh. 301-302.
The historical development and technique of the English novel.
*Eh. 405-406.-Modern Drama. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON. Prerequisite: Eh.
201-202, or equivalent work in English or Speech.
Recent and contemporary dramatists, from Ibsen to O'Neill. In the first term English and Irish drama will
be stressed; in the second, Continental and American drama since the World War.
Eh. 407.-The Modern Novel. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS. Prerequisite: Eh. 201-202.
Eh. 408.-Contemporary Poetry. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS, ROBERTSON. Pre-
requisite: Eh. 201-202.
*Eh. 413-414.-Renaissance Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. CALDWELL. Prerequi-
site: Eh. 301-302.
GRADUATE COURSES
Eh. 501-502.-American Literature
Eh. 503-504.-The Novel
Eh. 505-506.-Modern Drama
Eh. 507-508.-Modern Novel and Modern American Poetry
Eh. 509-510.-Chaucer
tEh. 511-512.-Anglo-Saxon
*Eh. 513-514.-The Renaissance in Italy and England
Eh. 515.-Milton

ENTOMOLOGY

*Ey. 21.-Farm, Garden and Orchard Pests. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. No
credit. CREIGHTON.
A general survey of some of the economic insects of Florida, with reference to their distribution, life history,
injury, and control on the principal agricultural crops of the state. LABORATORY FEE: $1.

*Not offered in 1935-36.
tOffered only if demand warrants.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Ey. 101.-Introduction to the Study of Economic Entomology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
CREIGHTON.
The principles of economic entomology that will prepare students for Ey. 302. A study of the structure, life
histories, and control of the more important insects will be made. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
Ey. 302.-Economic Entomology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CREIGHTON.
Introduction to applied entomology, based on the structure, classification, life histories; recognition, and
control of the injurious insects of Florida. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Ey. 303-304.-Advanced Economic Entomology. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory.
8 credits. CREIGHTON. Prerequisite: Ey. 302.
Field and laboratory problem work and insectary work in the rearing of common Florida insects; natural
parasites and the special technique required by professional work in this line. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
*Ey. 305.-Problems in Economic Entomology. 2 hours. 2 credits. CREIGHTON.
Problems encountered in the field of Economic Entomology.
Ey. 311-312.-Entomology Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. CREIGHTON.
*Ey. 401.-Taxonomy. Hours and credits to be arranged. CREIGHTON. Prerequisite:
Ey. 302.
The collection, study and classification of local economic insects, with special emphasis on some one group.
*Ey. 402.-Fruit Insects. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. CREIGHTON.
Prerequisite: Ey. 302.
Pests encountered in deciduous, tropical, and citrus fruits, with detailed study of representative life histories
and measures adapted to their control. LAORATORY FEE: $1.
*Ey. 403.-Garden and Greenhouse Pests. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
CREIGHTON. Prerequisite: Ey. 302.
Insects encountered in the home, commercial garden, and greenhouse. A detailed study of life history and
specific control measures adapted to these conditions. LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Ey. 405.-Insecticides and Fungicides. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
CREIGHTON.
Origin and history of insecticides and fungicides; systematic survey of mixtures now used and their chemical
and physical reactions. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Ey. 406.-Insecticides and Fungicides. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
CREIGHTON.
Lime sulphur, arsenates, dusts, etc. Practical problems that apply to Florida and the southeast. Class,
laboratory, and field work. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
*Ey. 407-408.-Insect Morphology. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 6 credits.
CREIGHTON.
GRADUATE COURSES
*Ey. 501-502.-Methods of Research in Entomology
*503-504.-Problems in Entomology
Ey. 505-506.-Advanced Insect Histology
*Ey. 507-508.-Advanced Insect Taxonomy
*Ey. 509-510.-Advanced Insect Embryology
Ey. 511-512.-Thesis Research

FRENCH

Fh. 21-22.-Elementary French. 3 hours. 6 credits. BRUNET, HUSTON. Prerequisite
or corequisite: Eh. 101.
Elements of pronunciation and grammar; reading of simple prose. For beginners.

*Not offered in 1935-36.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Fh. 101-102.-Third and Fourth Term French. 3 hours. 6 credits. BRUNET,
HUSTON. Prerequisite: Fh. 21-22 or the equivalent, such as two years of high school French.
Second-year college French; reading of modern texts; grammar review; translation of simple English into
French.
Fh. 107-108.-Scientific French. 3 hours. 6 credits. No credit allowed if Fh. 101-
102 is taken. BRUNET. Prerequisite: Fh. 21-22 or the equivalent, such as two years of high
school French.
Same as Fh. 101-102 except that the reading material is scientific French. For science students, who may
substitute it for Fh. 101-102. May not be counted toward a major in French.
Fh. 205-206.-Conversation and Composition. 3 hours. 6 credits. ATKIN. Prere-
quisite: Fh. 101-102 or permission of instructor.
Current vocabulary and phraseology of spoken French; French life and institutions.
Fh. 207-208.-Survey of French Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. ATKIN. Pre-
requisite: Fh. 101-102 or permission of instructor.
Historical outline-reading of representative selections from important prose writers and poets.
Fh. 303-304.-Nineteenth-Century French Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. ATKIN.
Prerequisite: Fh. 207-208 or permission of instructor.
Leading authors of the period studied in representative works; literary movements and tendencies.
**Fh. 409-410.-Contemporary French Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. ATKIN.
Prerequisite: Fh. 303-304 or permission of instructor.
Modern tendencies as revealed in outstanding authors. Lectures, readings and reports.
tFh. 417.-French Phonetics. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN. Prerequisite: Fh. 205-
206, or permission of instructor.
Descriptive of French speech sounds; pronunciation. Designed especially for teachers of foreign language.
tFh. 418.-Analysis of Texts. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN. Prerequisite: Fh. 205-206
or permission of instructor.
Literary and colloquial French studied with particular attention to development of meanings of words and
comparison of related words in French and English.

GRADUATE COURSES

**Fh. 505-506.-The French Novel
**Fh. 507-508.-Special Study in French
Fh. 517-518.-Old French

GEOLOGY

Gy. 201.-Physical Geology. 3 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 4 credits. HUBBELL.
An introduction to geology. Longwell, Knopf and Flint, Textbook of Geology, Part I-Physical Geology.
LABORATORY FEE: $3.
*Gy. 202.-Historical Geology. 3 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 4 credits. HUBBELL.
Prerequisite: Gy. 201.
Introduction to the history of the earth and its inhabitants. Schuchert and Dunbar, Textbook of Geology,
Part II-Historical Geology. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
Gy. 204.-Physiography of North America. 3 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 4
credits. HUBBELL. Prerequisite: Gy. 201.
Surface features and physiographic regions of the North American continent; their structure, the processes
which have formed them, and their stage of geographic development. Fenneman, Physiography of Western
North America; Fenneman, Physiographic Divisions of North America. LABORATORY FEE: $3.

**One, or two of these courses will be offered, depending upon the demand.
tOffered in 1935-36 and in alternate years.
*Not offered in 1935-36.








BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


GERMAN

Gn. 21-22.-Elementary German. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPTMANN, HIGGINS.
Gn. 101-102.-Second-Year German. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPTMANN, HIGGINS.
Prerequisite: Gn. 21-22.
Continuation of Gn. 21-22. Review of grammar, reading of modern texts. First term: Baerg, Short German
Grammar Review; Storm, Immensee. Second term: Gerstacker, Germelshausen; Freitag, Die Journalisten.
Gn. 201-202.-Third-Year German. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite:
Gn. 101-102.
Syntax, word-study, reading, conversation. Clarke and Murray, A Grammar of the German Language; read-
ings from classics.
*Gn. 225-226.-Scientific German. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite:
Gn. 101-102 or permission of instructor.
Reading of selections in chosen science field. Wait, German Science Reader.
Gn. 325-326.-Scientific German. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite:
Gn. 201-202 or permission of instructor.
Reading of selections in chosen science. More advanced course to take the place of Gn. 225-226. Wait,
German Science Reader; selections from scientific treatises.

GREEK

Gk. 21-22.-Beginners Greek. 3 hours. 6 credits. ANDERSON.
Based on a book for beginners. Anabasis Book I with grammar and prose composition. Benner and Smyth,
Beginner's Greek Book; Murray, Xenophon's Anabasis.
*Gk. 101-102.-Xenophon and Plato. 3 hours. 6 credits. ANDERSON.
Xenophon's Anabasis, Books II, III, and IV. Plato's Apology and other Dialogues. Murray, Xenophon's
Anabasis; Seymour, Plato's Apology and Creto.
*Gk. 103-104.-Grammar and Prose Composition. 2 hours. 4 credits. ANDERSON.
Prerequisite: Gk. 21-22. Corequisite: Gk. 101-102.
An intermediate course in prose composition. A systematic study of Greek grammar.
*Gk. 201.-Lysias. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. Prerequisite: Gk. 101-102.
Selected orations of Lysias or other Attic orators.
*Gk. 202.-Homer. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. Prerequisite: Gk. 201.
Selections from the Iliad and the Odyssey.
*Gk. 203.-Biblical Greek. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. Prerequisite: Gk. 101.
Selections from the Septuagint and New Testament. Conybeare and Stock, Selections from the Septuagint;
Hort, St. Mark.
*Gk. 301.-Herodotus and Thucydides. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. Prere-
quisite: Gk. 201-202.
Selections from the Greek historians.
*Gk. 302.-Euripides and Sophocles. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. Prerequisite:
Gk. 301.
Selections from the Greek dramatists.
GRADUATE COURSES
Gk. 501-502.-Homer-Iliad and Odyssey
Gk. 503-504.-Historians (Herodotus and Thucydides)

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HPI. 101.-Football. 2 hours. 2 credits. BOWYER.
A discussion of the fundamental skills; the technique of playing the various positions. Oakes, Football
Line Play.

*Not offered in 1935-36.




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