• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Table of Contents
 Calendar
 Map of the campus
 University calendar, 1935-36
 Administrative officers
 Notice to prospective students
 Organization of the university
 The general college
 The upper division
 Expenses
 General extension division and...
 Division of athletics and physical...
 Division of military science and...
 Division of military science and...
 Bureau of vocational guidance and...
 Student organizations and...
 Honor system
 Appendix














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00367
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: June 1935
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00367
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 181
        Page 182
    Table of Contents
        Page 183
        Page 184
    Calendar
        Page 185
    Map of the campus
        Page 186
    University calendar, 1935-36
        Page 187
        Page 188
    Administrative officers
        Page 189
    Notice to prospective students
        Page 190
    Organization of the university
        Page 191
    The general college
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
    The upper division
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
    Expenses
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
    General extension division and summer session
        Page 214
    Division of athletics and physical education
        Page 215
    Division of military science and tactics, division of music, and library
        Page 216
    Division of military science and tactics, division of music, and library
        Page 217
    Bureau of vocational guidance and mental hygiene
        Page 218
    Student organizations and publications
        Page 219
        Page 220
    Honor system
        Page 221
        Page 222
    Appendix
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
Full Text








The University Record
of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of Information
for
The General College
1935-36


VoL XXX, Series 1


No. 6


June 1, 1935


Published Monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912.
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.

















The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the annual
announcements of the college of the University, announcements of special
courses of instruction, and reports of the University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them.
The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is
desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida.

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in
several series.

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institu-
tions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications
is under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual
copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida








TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE

Calendar .............. .. .............................................. 185

Map of the Campus ................ ....................................... 186

University Calendar ................ .................................. 187-188

Administrative Officers ..................... .... ................................ 189

Notice to Prospective Students ............................................... 190

Organization of the University ................................................ 191

The General College ................. .. .... .............................. 192-200
Administrative Officers and Administrative Board............................... 192
Admissions ....................................................... 193-195
Guidance ................ ............................................... 195
General Regulations ................................................... 196
Comprehensive Examinations .......... .......... ... ....................... 197
Graduation .............................. ............................. 197
Military Science and Physical Education ................................... 197
Maximum and Minimum Loads .............. ........................... 197
Women Students ................ ...................................... 197
Program of Studies ....................... ............................. 198
Descriptions of Comprehensive Courses .................................. 199-200

The Upper Division .................. ................................. 201-205
Admission to the Colleges and Professional Schools...........................201-205

Expenses ........................... .................................. 206-213
Tuition ............................... .............................. 206
Special Fees ............................. ............................ 207
Penalty Fees .......................... ............................... 207
Summary of Expenses ............... ............... ................. 208
Room and Board .................................................. 208-210
Dormitories ............................ .............................. 208
Rooming Houses .............. ........................................ 209
University Cafeteria ..................... .............................. 210
Self-Help ................ ............................................ 210
Scholarships and Loan Funds ........................................... 210-213








TABLE OF CONTENTS-Continued
PAGE

General Extension Division ..................................................... 214

Sum m er Session ............................................................... 214

Division of Athletics and Physical Education ..................................... 215

Division of Military Science and Tactics ......................................... 216

Division of Music .............................................................. 216

Library ....................................................................... 216

H health Service ................................................................. 217

Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene............................... 218

Student Organizations and Publications ......................................... 219

H onor System ................................................................. 221

Appendix .................... ..... ......... .... ...................... 223-228
Requisite Skills and Attainments in English................................ 223
Requisite Skills and Attainments in Mathematics .............................. 225














*1935 *

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*1936

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.4








UNIVERSITY CALENDAR


UNIVERSITY CALENDAR-1935-36

FIRST TERM

September 20, 21, Friday-Saturday ...Entrance Examinations.
September 23, Monday, 11 a.m. ...... 1935-36 session begins.
September 23-28, Monday-Saturday ... Freshman Week.
September 27, 28, Friday-Saturday,
12 noon ........... ............... Registration of upperclassmen.
September 30, Monday, 8 a.m ........ Classes for the 1935-36 session begin; late registra-
tion fee $5.
October 5, Saturday, 12 noon ......... Last day for registration for the first term 1935-36.
October 8, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m ........ October meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
October 12, Saturday, 2:30 p.m. ......Meeting of the General Assembly, P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School Auditorium.
October 15, Tuesday, 5 p.m. ......... Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be
designated as Honor Students.
October 19, Saturday, 12 noon .......Last day for making application for a degree at the
end of the first term.
October 24, Thursday, 2:10 p. m. .....October meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
October 26, Saturday ...............Homecoming.
November 1, Friday ................Last day for those beginning graduate work to file
with the Dean an application (Form 2) to be con-
sidered candidates for advanced degrees.
November 2, Saturday, 12 noon ......Last day for dropping courses without receiving
grade.
November 5, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. .....November meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
November 11, Monday ..............Armistice Day-special exercises.
November 21, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ....November meeting of the University Senate, 201
Law Building.
November 26, Tuesday, 5 p.m. .......Progress reports and delinquency reports due in the
Office of the Registrar.
November 27, Wednesday, 5 p.m .... Thanksgiving recess begins.
December 2, Monday, 8 a.m. .........Thanksgiving recess ends.
December 3, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m ....... December meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
December 12, Thursday, 2:10 p.m ....December meeting of the University Senate, 201
Law Building.
December 21, Saturday, 12 noon ...... Christmas recess begins.

1936

January 3, Friday, 8 a.m. ............ Christmas recess ends.
January 7, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ...... .January meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
January 23, Thursday, 8:30 a.m ....... Final examinations for the first term begin.
January 30, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ...... January meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
February 2, Sunday, 11 a.m. .........Baccalaureate Sermon.
February 3, Monday, 10 a.m. ........Commencement Convocation.
February 3, Monday, 12 noon ....... First term ends; at 5 p.m., all grades are due in the
Office of the Registrar.
February 4, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ...... February meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
February 4-5, Tuesday-Wednesday .... Inter-term days.










188 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

SECOND TERM

February 6, Thursday ............... Registration for second term.
February 7, Friday, 8 a.m. ........... Classes for second term begin; late registration
fee $5.
February 13, Thursday, 5 p.m. ....... Last day for registration for second term.
February 15, Saturday, 2:30 p.m. .....Meeting of the General Assembly, P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School Auditorium.
February 27, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ....February meeting of the University Senate, 201
Law Building.
February 29, Saturday, 12 noon ...... Last day for making application for a degree at the
end of the second term.
March 3, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ........March meeting of the University Council, 111
Language Hall.
March 12, Thursday, 5 p.m. ..........Last day for dropping a course without a grade.
March 16, Monday ................. Last day for those beginning graduate work in the
second term to file with the Dean an application
(Form 2) to be considered candidates for advanced
degrees.
Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be
designated as Honor Students.
March 26, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ......March meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
April 3, Friday, 5 p.m. ............. Progress reports and delinquency reports due in the
Office of the Registrar.
April 7, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. .........April meeting of the University Council, 111 Lan-
guage Hall.
April 15, Wednesday, 5 p.m. ........Spring recess begins.
April 20, Monday, 8 a.m. ............Spring recess ends.
April 30, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. .......April meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
May 1, Friday ...................... Last day for graduate students, graduating at the
end of the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
May 5, Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. ..........May meeting of the University Council, 111 Lan-
guage Hall.
May 27, Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. ....... Final examinations begin.
May 28, Thursday, 2:10 p.m. ........ May meeting of the University Senate, 201 Law
Building.
June 6-8, Saturday-Monday .......... Commencement Exercises.
June 6, Saturday, 7:30 p.m. ......... Annual Phi Kappa Phi Banquet.
June 7, Sunday, 11 a.m. ............Baccalaureate Sermon.
June 8, Monday, 10 a.m. ............ Commencement Convocation.
June 8, Monday, 5 p.m. ............All grades are due in the Office of the Registrar.
June 8, Monday .................... Boys' Club Week begins.

SUMMER TERM

June 15, Monday ................... 1936 First Summer Term begins.
July 24, Friday ...................... 1936 First Summer Term ends.
July 25, Saturday .................... 1936 Second Summer Term begins.
August 28, Friday................... 1936 Second Summer Term ends.

FIRST TERM

September 21, Monday, 11 a.m. ...... 1936-37 session begins.








ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
1935-36


BOARD OF CONTROL

GEORGE H. BALDWIN, Ph.B. (Yale) ..............Executive Vice-President, Bisbee-Baldwin
Corporation, Barnett National Bank Building, Jacksonville, Florida
Chairman of the Board
ALBERT H. BLANDING, Graduate, East Florida Seminary........................ Executive
Bartow, Florida
HARRY C. DUNCAN, LL.B. (Stetson) .Attorney-at-law, and President of the Bank of Tavares
Tavares, Florida
OLIVER J. SEMMES, B.S. (Alabama Polytechnic Institute) ...................... Merchant
601 North Tarragona Street, Pensacola, Florida
ALFRED H. WAGG, Ph.B., M.A. (Dickinson College) ................Real Estate Counsellor
163 Brazilian Avenue, Palm Beach, Florida
JOHN T. DIAMOND ................................. Secretary of the Board of Control
Tallahassee, Florida



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

DAVID SHOLTZ .............................................................. Governor
R. A. GRAY......................... ............... ................ Secretary of State
W V. KNOTT ........................... ............. .................. State Treasurer
CARY D. LANDIS................... ....... ............................ Attorney General
W. S. CAWTHON, Secretary .................... State Superintendent of Public Instruction

THE UNIVERSITY

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D.
President of the University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. ................. Acting Vice-President of the University
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S. ........................ ............... Registrar
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM ........................................... Business Manager
EDGAR CHARLES JONES, LL.B. .................................... Director of Athletics
CORA MILTIMORE, B.S. ................... ............................ Librarian
GEORGE CLARENCE TILLMAN, M.D., F.A.C.S. ..........................University Physician
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E. ...............................Dean of Students

BOARD OF UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS

HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Chairman ................................. Registrar
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D. ....................... Head, Department of Psychology
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A. ................. Associate Dean of the General College
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D. ...................Head, Department of Mathematics
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E ................................. Dean of Students
JOHN VREDENBURCH McQUITTY, M.A.......................Secretary






190 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE


NOTICE TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS
1. Applications for admission on regulation University blanks provided
for this purpose should be submitted to the Registrar immediately after
the end of the spring term, and in no case later than September 1, 1935.
These blanks may be secured from the high school principal or from the
Registrar of the University of Florida. The prospective student should
fill out the indicated part of the blank and then request his high school
principal to fill out the remainder, which includes the student's high
school record. The principal will then send the blank directly to the
Registrar.
2. All prospective students must take and pass the Placement Tests,
besides fulfilling the other requirements, before they will be eligible for
admission. Prospective students may take these tests in the Spring Test-
ing Program in the high schools of the State; on June 15th at the Univer-
sity; or on September 23-24 at the University, during Freshman Week.
Students are advised to take the tests at the earliest possible testing
period, so they may be advised as to their eligibility for admission. Ad-
mission permits will not be issued until the Placement Tests have been
passed.
3. Prospective students are advised to be vaccinated against smallpox
and to be inoculated against typhoid fever. Unless a certificate is present-
ed showing successful vaccination within five years, students will be vac-
cinated against smallpox at the time of registration.
4. Students entering the University as freshmen are required to par-
ticipate in the activities of Freshman Week, September 23-28. Prospec-
tive students should acquaint themselves with the information furnished
in the BULLETIN OF FRESHMAN WEEK.








ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY


ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY
The University is organized in schools, colleges, and divisions, as follows:


LOWER DIVISION

THE GENERAL COLLEGE




UPPER DIVISION

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, including
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, including
THE COLLEGE PROPER
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS
THE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, including
THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION
THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, including
THE LABORATORY SCHOOL
THE HIGH SCHOOL VISITATION
THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS


THE COLLEGE OF LAW
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


THE GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION
THE SUMMER SESSION
THE DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
THE DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
THE DIVISION OF MUSIC
THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
THE STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
THE BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUfIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE






192 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE


THE GENERAL COLLEGE

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

JOHN JAMES TiGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D.
President of the University
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head Professor of Economics, Dean of the College of
Business Administration, Acting Dean of the General College
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Professor of Secondary Education, Associate Dean of
the General College
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar, Chairman of the Board of University Examiners


ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD

WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Ex Officio Chairman
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Ex Efficio Secretary
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D..................Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-1
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D. ....................... Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-2
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, Ph.D. ....................... Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-5
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D...............Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-4b
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A.....................Associate Dean of the General College
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D....................... Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-6
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E................................... Dean of Students
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D................. Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-4a
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D........................ Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-3








ADMISSIONS


INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

The General College has been organized to administer the work of the freshman and
sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning students will register in
this College.
The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College in two
years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter time, and others may
find it necessary to remain in the General College for a longer period.
A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this program the
University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all students alike. On this
foundation that has meaning and significance to the student, he may add the special
training of the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, or drop out of the
University with something definite and helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen. The
purposes of the General College are:
1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the guidance
needed by all students. Thus the choice of professional work is postponed
until the student knows better his capacity and disposition to undertake work
that will be profitable to himself and society.
2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing for
advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division,
thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization.
3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give to
college training, and consequently should concern themselves with general
viewpoints and major understandings, instead of introductions to special subject
matter fields which they may never enter.
4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general
education incident to the changing conditions of modern life. The subject
matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation are to be con-
stantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the student, to stimulate his
intellectual curiosity, to encourage independent study, and to cultivate the
attitudes necessary for enlightened citizenship.

ADMISSIONS*

GENERAL STATEMENT
The University of Florida does not require any specific high school units for admission
to its General College. However, students must have certain skills and attainments in
English and mathematics, and a certain level of general ability in order to pursue with
profit the work that will be offered in the General College. As a guide to high school
teachers and students a statement of the requisite attainments in English and mathematics
is given on pages 223 to 228 of this bulletin.
Since specified high school credits or units are no longer required for admission to the
University, the high schools are free to teach just those subjects which offer the greatest
good for the greatest number. This is a most significant help to the many small high schools
of the State. The attainments now required for University admission are not guaranteed
by the acquisition of high school credits. On the other hand, the attainments are possible
without specific high school class attendance.

*Expenses and fees will be found on pages 206 to 210.








194 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

FLORIDA STUDENTS

The following items will be considered in admitting students to the General College of
the University of Florida:
1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required,
although no specific high school units are required. The Board of University
Examiners may in rare cases, when the principal of the high school the student
has attended recommends such action, permit an exceptional student, before
graduation, to take the Placement Tests; if the student passes these tests
satisfactorily, he will be admitted to the General College. Mature students,
lacking a formal high school education, but possessing because of some other
training the necessary admission requirements, may petition the Board of Uni-
versity Examiners for permission to take the Placement Tests, and the College
Aptitude Test; upon satisfactorily passing these tests, such students will be
admitted to the General College.
2. Consistency of the high school record of the student.
3. Achievement in high school.
4. Personal qualities.
5. Recommendation of high school principal.
6. Standing on Placement Tests.

NON-FLORIDA STUDENTS

In addition to the requirements listed for Florida students, non-Florida students are
required to file preliminary credentials satisfactory to the Board of University Examiners.
The Board then will determine the eligibility of such students to take the Placement Tests.
However, permission to come to Gainesville to take these tests does not guarantee admission,
and all such students will come to Gainesville at their own risk of being refused admission
if the results of the tests are not satisfactory.

SPECIAL STUDENTS

Special students may be admitted either to the General College or to the various colleges
of the University (except the College of Law, to which special students are never admitted)
only by approval of the Board of University Examiners. Applications for admission of
these students must include:
1. The filing of satisfactory preliminary credentials.
2. A statement as to the type of studies to be pursued.
3. Reason for desiring to take special courses.
4. Satisfactory evidence of ability to pursue these studies.

PREPARATION FOR UPPER DIVISION CURRICULA
Those pre-college students who have definitely made a choice of the occupations or
professions they will follow and who expect to enter a certain curriculum of the Upper
Division upon completion of the General College work, may profit by following the sug-
gestions given here.
Certain curricula of the Upper Division require a working knowledge of foreign language.
Students contemplating entering such curricula could with profit begin this study in the
high school.








ADMISSIONS


Students expecting to study engineering need a thorough training in mathematics. An
effort should be made by such students to obtain the broadest possible mathematical training
in the high school. These students should obtain, either in high school or by private
arrangement, or by correspondence study, knowledge of elementary mechanical drawing,
so as to be able to: (1) letter upper and lower case standard letters neatly and accurately;
(2) trace drawings neatly with India ink, using both ruling pens and compasses. The
student should obtain either in high school or in outside practice some knowledge of ele-
mentary woodworking, so that he will: (1) know the names and uses of all woodworking
tools; (2) be able to drive a nail straight; (3) be able to saw a straight line both with
the crosscut and ripsaw; (4) be able to square the end of a board.
Students expecting to pursue architecture should obtain a thorough foundation in
mathematics, and begin the study of drawing as early as possible.
For information concerning the prerequisites for admission to the colleges and pro-
fessional schools of the Upper Division, the prospective student should consult the Bulletin
of Information for the Colleges and Professional Schools of the Upper Division. This will
enable the student to make the proper pre-college preparation for the curriculum of his choice.

ADMISSION OF ADVANCED STANDING STUDENTS
During the 1935-36 session students with 15 acceptable semester hours credit of
advanced standing, and during the 1936-37 session students with 45 acceptable semester
hours credit of advanced standing may be admitted to one of the colleges of the University.
Students who cannot meet these standards will be admitted to the General College, provided
they meet the other standards for admission, as prescribed by the Board of University
Examiners. After a student has completed his first year in the General College the Board
will review his case and make such adjustments as may be necessary.
Beginning with the 1937 Summer Session all students admitted to the colleges will be
required to meet the requirements for admission to those colleges as provided by the
new plan.
The manner in which students transferring from other colleges to the University of
Florida will meet these requirements shall be determined by the Board of University Exam-
iners after due consideration of the training of the student before application for admission
to the University of Florida. In general, the policies of the Board of University Examiners
will be as follows:
1. The Board of University Examiners will always bear in mind the aims
of the curriculum of the General College. All students must present training
equivalent to the work of the General College, and must pass the prescribed
comprehensive examinations.
2. Students with poor or average records from other institutions will be
required to meet in toto the requirements for admission to the Upper Division
under the new plan.
3. The Board of University Examiners, in the case of transfer students
with high or superior records, may vary the requirements for admission to the
colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division to the best interest
of the student.
GUIDANCE
A complete program of guidance to help the student in the selection of his college and
life work is an integral part of the General College. Various agencies will aid the student
with his problems, and the student should make use of this service at any time he feels
he needs help.








196 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

GENERAL REGULATIONS

METHOD OF REGISTRATION
The requirements for admission are found in the first part of this Bulletin. Registration
procedure will be outlined in detail in the Bulletin of Freshman Week.
No student is properly registered until all fees have been paid.
To drop a course from his schedule, to add a course, or to change a section, a student
should report to the dean of the General College. Final dates for such changes will be
found in the University Calendar.
Students should notice carefully the registration dates listed in the University Calendar.
Late registration fees will be charged all students registering at any time after the regular
registration period.

ACADEMIC CREDITS ABOLISHED
The General College has dispensed with clock hours, class grades, and semester hours
credit as prerequisites to the completion of its curriculum.


PROGRESS REPORTS
Progress reports will be made by instructors at the middle and end of each term only
as an indication of the progress the student is making in his work toward the end of pre-
paring himself for the comprehensive examinations which he must successfully pass for
graduation from the General College. The student should understand that these reports
are only an indication of the progress he is making, and do not guarantee that he will or
will not pass the comprehensive examinations. The progress reports will also serve to acquaint
the parents and the dean of the General College with the student's progress.
The progress reports, for the purpose indicated above, will show the student's progress
by use of the words Excellent, Good, Average, Poor, and Failing, in order of excellence.
Grades for Military Science and Physical Education will be Complete (C), and Incomplete (I).

ATTENDANCE
Instructors will keep a record of the attendance of all students. In case a student's
progress is unsatisfactory, a detailed report of attendance will be made to the parents and
the dean of the General College, and the student will be warned. If, after warning, improve-
ment is not made, notice will be sent to the Committee on Student Progress. This Committee
will recommend to the Administrative Board whether the student should be allowed to
continue with his University work.


FAILURE IN STUDIES
The Committee on Student Progress will consider the record of each student in the
General College at the end of each session, and will report to the Administrative Board of
the General College the names of those students whom it recommends to be dropped from
the University. Failure to take the comprehensive examination at the end of a course
may be interpreted as evidence of unsatisfactory progress. The Committee will recommend
this action for those students whose records indicate that further attendance would be of
no benefit to them. A date will be set for a hearing of such cases, and the student concerned
may appear before the Committee at this time if he so desires.








GENERAL REGULATIONS


COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
The student must successfully pass comprehensive course examinations-eight or more-
to complete the work of the General College. These examinations, administered by the
Board of University Examiners, will be given in June, 1936, and in August, 1936, just
before the close of the respective terms ending then. Subsequent examination dates will
be announced later. Students who are not enrolled in a course at the time the examination
is given and who wish to take any comprehensive examination, must apply for permission
at least one month before the announced date for the examination. A student must be
familiar with the work of the various courses and be able to think in the several fields in
a comprehensive way in order to pass these examinations. About six hours time, divided
into equal parts, will be required for each examination.
The student's standing on the comprehensive examinations will be marked: Passed
With Distinction, Passed, or Failed.
Should a student fail a comprehensive course examination, he may qualify to repeat
the examination by repeating the course, or by further study. Evidence of additional
preparation must be submitted to the Board of University Examiners with an application
to repeat the examination.
GRADUATION
When a student has mastered his program in the General College and has passed the
comprehensive examinations and met the other requirements of the General College curri-
culum, he will be granted the Associate of Arts Certificate. Students who pass three-fourths
of the comprehensive examinations with the standing "Passed With Distinction" will, on
graduation from the General College, receive the certificate of Associate of Arts, With
Distinction.

MILITARY SCIENCE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
All students will be required to take Military Science, unless exempted because of
physical disability, age, or for other reasons set forth in the University By-Laws. Exemptions
will be determined before registration, and only those students so exempt will be required
to take Physical Education. Either Military Science or Physical Education will be taken
for two years by the students who must take one or the other of the subjects.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOADS
The maximum load for all students will be four comprehensive courses and Military
Science or Physical Education. A smaller load may be permitted by the dean of the
General College.

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY
A student wishing to withdraw from the University during any term or at the end of
the first term should report to the Office of the Registrar and secure a blank to be executed
for this purpose. Should a student fail to do this, he will be liable for dismissal for non-
attendance or for failure in studies.

WOMEN STUDENTS
The University of Florida is an institution for men only, except during the summer term.
Under certain circumstances women students may be admitted to the professional schools
of the Upper Division. For information concerning the admission of women students, the
Registrar should be consulted.








198 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

PROGRAM OF STUDIES
All students admitted to the General College will follow a definite program of studies
for the first year, with certain elective subjects the second year.


FIRST YEAR
C-1: Man and the Social World
C-2: Man and the Physical World
C-3: Reading, Speaking, and Writing
f Man and His Thinking (one term)
C-4: I
[ General Mathematics (one term)
X: Military Science or Physical Edu-
cation


C-5:
C-6:
C-7:
C-8:
C-9:
Y:


SECOND YEAR
The Humanities
Man and the Biological World
(Elective)
(Elective)
(Elective)
Military Science or Physical
Education


Except as indicated below, all students must take four comprehensive courses the first
year and two the second year. For the remainder of his work the student elects additional
comprehensive courses or courses required by the colleges and professional schools of the
Upper Division (se pages 201 to 205). Comprehensive courses normally meet four times a
week.
Provisions for individual differences of students are as follows:
C-2: This course is elective for students of the superior group of the
entering class as determined by the Board of University Exam-
iners, if such students begin science programs which include
physics and chemistry. Other students, with permission, may
postpone C-2 until the second year and substitute elective C-7
in its place.
C-4: This course is elective for students of the superior group of the
entering class.
C-6: This course is elective for students of the superior group of the
entering class who are beginning programs which include two
or more of the biological sciences. C-6 may be taken during the
first year instead of C-2, but in this case C-2 must be taken the
second year.

ELECTIVE COURSES


Basic Mathematics
Our Social Heritage
Selected Literature of the World
Public Opinion
The Reading of French
The Reading of German
The Reading of Spanish
Appreciation of the Fine Arts


Occupations and Vocations
The Great Religions
Outlines of Philosophy
Economic Foundations of Modern
Life
Sanitation and Health
Citizenship in the American
Republic


In addition to these and the comprehensive courses which are offered, the student may
select (within his maximum load) any course required by the college and professional
schools of the Upper Division. The requirements of the various colleges and schools are
listed on pages 201 to 205 of this Bulletin.










DESCRIPTIONS OF COMPREHENSIVE COURSES 199


DESCRIPTIONS OF COMPREHENSIVE COURSES


1. C-1: Man and the Social World
The aim of this course is to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems of the
modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in education, in science,
and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective coordination of the factors
of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny is made of the changing functions of social organ-
izations as joint interdependent activities so that a consciousness of the significant relationships between the
individual and social institutions may be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment
may be achieved.

2. C-2: Man and the Physical World
This course attempts to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular reference to man's
immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to explain the more important prin-
ciples and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of them; and to review the present
status of man's dependence upon and ability to utilize physical materials, forces, and relations. The concepts
are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so
integrated as to demonstrate their essential unity. The practical significance and the cultural significance of
the physical sciences are emphasized.
3. C-3: Reading, Speaking, and Writing
The general aim of this course is to furnish the training in reading, speaking, and writing necessary for the
student's work in college and for his life thereafter. This training will be provided through practice and
counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking, in fundamentals of form and style, in extension of
vocabulary, and in control of the body and voice in speaking. Students will be encouraged to read widely as a
means of broadening their interests and increasing their appreciation of literature. It is felt that if the student
reads widely and well, much of the English work that is sometimes considered technical and formal, will have a
new and significant meaning to him.
4a. C-4: Man and His Thinking
This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the mental processes involved in meeting
the concrete problems of everyday life, together with individual differences in making these adjustments. It
attempts to answer the question "Why do we think as we do?" There will be a practical consideration of such
topics as: the association of ideas in logical and illogical thinking, peculiarities of associative activity, the devel-
opment of emotional attitudes and beliefs with their influences upon man's thinking, fallacies and pitfalls of
thought, superstition and prejudice, crooked thinking through rationalization, repression and projection, and the
nature of ideas and thought.
4b. C-4: General Mathematics
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the general nature of mathematics, the manner
in which the mathematical mode of thought is used in the world of today, and the role which it has occupied
in the development of that world. A survey is made of some of the fundamental principles and methods of
procedure in the main branches of elementary mathematics, with considerable attention being given to the
utilitarian and cultural importance of the subject and its relations to other branches of knowledge.
5. C-5: The Humanities
While this course has not yet been fully worked out, an attempt will be made to help the student lay a
broad foundation for cultured living. It is impossible in a brief course to provide an adequate survey of the
broad field, but immediate help will be given in attaining desirable understandings, attitudes, and dispositions.
Students react everyday to all culture; the course will present materials from this and past civilizations to con-
dition this reaction. In a sense the work is to be thought of as a guidebook to the wide field of human culture.
Even though we think of culture as timeless, ageless, and not belonging to any particular nation or people, the
course will concern itself largely with the culture of the Western World. The student will study the agencies
of modern culture and try to reach some basis of judgment. The material will be highly selected. Not an
academic survey of the past but a vital challenge to thinking and living today will form the central theme
of the course.
6. C-6: Man and the Biological World
This course is designed to give the student a general knowledge and appreciation of the world of living
things-of the life that goes on around and within him and of man's place in the organic world. General concepts
from the fields of botany, zoology, and psychology are brought together into an integrated treatment. Significant
principles, consideration of the methods by which such principles have been determined, and an account of
the application of biological principles to human problems all find proper places in the course.










200 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE


Basic Mathematics
In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession, this course
offers a completely new sequence of topics including much of the above plus a liberal amount of the calculus.
Thus the student will obtain early a working knowledge of such mathematics as is basic to the study of the
sciences and other subjects, and needed for the cultivation of habits productive of clear thinking, writing, and
speaking. Moreover, the choice of material is so made as to present mathematics as an integrated whole, and at
the same time to show its correlation with other subjects in the curriculum.
P1. 101-102.-Physical Education. 3 hours of instruction and activity.
The program is designed to present training and instructional opportunities in the following sports: ping
pong, shuffle board, field sports, tumbling and apparatus, wrestling, boxing, water sports, golf, tennis, horse
shoes. FEE: $4 a year.
My. 101-102.-First Year Infantry. 2 hours theory, and 2 hours practice.
First year basic course: Military fundamentals; military discipline, courtesies and customs of the service;
military sanitation and first aid; military organization, with special reference to infantry companies, map reading;
leadership; weapons; rifles and rifle marksmanship.
My. 103-104.-First Year Field Artillery. 2 hours theory, and 2 hours practice.
First year basic course: Military fundamentals; military discipline, courtesies and customs of the service;
military sanitation and first aid; military organization of the army and organization of field artillery; leadership;
feld artillery instruction.








THE UPPER DIVISION


THE UPPER DIVISION

After the student has completed the work of the General College and received a certificate
of graduation, he may enter one of the colleges or professional schools of the Upper Division
by meeting the specific admission requirements of that college or school.
The Board of University Examiners administers the admission requirements of the Upper
Division. Besides the certificate of graduation from the General College, the student must be
certified by the Board that he is qualified to pursue the work of the college or school he
wishes to enter.
In addition to the general requirements stated above, the various colleges and schools
of the Upper Division have specific requirements for entrance. These requirements are
listed under the curricula of the several colleges and schools. Students in the General
College may prepare to meet these requirements by taking the courses indicated under the
various curricula presented, as electives.
The comprehensive examinations of the General College will cover the content of the
courses required for admission to any specific curriculum of the Upper Division selected
by the individual student.

ADMISSION
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

BACHELOR OF ARTS
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts:
Specific requirements. A one-year course basic to the student's proposed field of major
concentration, the content of a foreign language course numbered 101-102, and a term course
in mathematics (either C-4 or Basic Mathematics). For the basic course and for suggestions
concerning the field of major concentration see page 202 of this Bulletin.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science:
Specific requirements. A one-year course basic to the student's proposed field of major
concentration, and the content of a one-year course basic to an approved minor. Fields of
major concentration open to students in this curriculum are Bacteriology, Biology, Botany,
Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology. For the basic course and for suggestions con-
cerning the field of major concentration see page 202 of this Bulletin.

COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAW CURRICULA
For admission to the Combined Academic and Law Curricula:
Specific requirements. The requirements are the same as for admission to the Arts and
Sciences curriculum for the degree expected in that college. The combinations offered are
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, which
will be received in addition to the degree of Bachelor of Laws.

PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL CURRICULA
For admission to the Pre-Medical and Pre-Dental Curricula:
Specific requirements. The requirements are the same as for admission to the Bachelor
of Science curriculum.
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism:
Specific requirements. Journalism 103-104, Journalism 205-206, and Journalism 207-208.








202 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy:
Specific requirements. Biology 101 and Botany 102 as C-6; General Chemistry as C-7;
Pharmacy 223-224 as C-8; Pharmacognosy 221-222 as C-9.
NOTE: Students of the superior group are advised to offer General Chemistry as C-2
and General Physics as C-7.
SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDENTS WHO INTEND TO ENTER THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Since the College of Arts and Sciences requires that every student concentrate in some
field as a major, students who during their registration in the General College decide upon
their majors may begin work in the field selected as a part of the elective work allowed in
the General College curriculum.
Students who have the C-2 or C-4 privilege (see page 198) may begin this work in the
first year of the General College. All others must take the basic course of the proposed
major as C-7 in the second year. The majors are listed below, followed by the basic course
in the field. After this appear the suggested minors and electives, which may be taken as
the electives C-8 and C-9 of the second year.
MAJORS IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
BIBLE-Be. 103-104. Suggested electives: Be. 201, Be. 211, Gk. 21-22.
BIOLOGY-Bly. 101-102. Suggested minor: Bty., Cy., Gy., Ps., or Psy. Suggested
electives: Gn., Fh., Ms., or Advanced Bly.
BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY-Bty. 101-102. Suggested minor: Bly., Cy., Ms.,
or Ps.
CHEMISTRY-Cy. 101-102. Suggested minor: Ps., Bly., Ms., Bty., or Bcy. Suggested
electives: Cy. 201-202, Ms., Gn., Fh.
ECONOMICS-Bs. 201E-202E. Suggested elective: course in an approved minor.
ENGLISH-Eh. 103-104 or Eh. 201-202. Suggested elective: course in an approved
minor.
FRENCH-Fh. 101-102. Suggested electives: course in an approved minor; additional
courses in Fh.
GERMAN-Gn. 101-102. Suggested electives: course in an approved minor; additional
courses in Gn.
GREEK-Gk. 101-102. Suggested minor: Ln.
HISTORY-Hy. 101-102. Suggested elective: course in an approved minor.
HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE-Hy. 101-102 and Pcl. 101-102. Either
course may be used as basic to the major. The other course should be elected if possible.
JOURNALISM-Jm. 103-104. Suggested electives: Jm. 205-206; course in an approved
minor.
LATIN-Ln. 101-102. Suggested minor: Gk.
MATHEMATICS-Ms. 101-102. Suggested electives: course in an approved minor;
Ms. 251-252, Gn., Fh.
PHILOSOPHY-Ppy. 203-204. Suggested elective: course in an approved minor.
PHYSICS-Ps. 211-212. Suggested minor: Ms., Cy., or Bly. Suggested electives: Ms.
251-252, Gn., Fh.
POLITICAL SCIENCE-Pel. 101-102. Suggested elective: course in an approved minor.
PSYCHOLOGY-Psy. 201, Psy. 304. Suggested elective: course in an approved minor.
SOCIOLOGY-C-1. Suggested electives: course in an approved minor; a year in Sy.
SPANISH-Sh. 101-102. Suggested electives: course in an approved minor; additional
courses in Sh.
SPEECH-Sch. 201-202. Suggested elective: course in an approved minor.








THE UPPER DIVISION


THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Agriculture:
Specific requirements. Courses selected from the following list amounting to not less
than sixteen nor more than eighteen semester hours credit according to the former credit plan:
Agricultural Economics 201-202 Horticulture 101-204
Agronomy 201, 304 Botany 101-102
Biology 101-102 Business Administration 211-212
Bacteriology 301-302 Animal Husbandry 104-201
Education 207 Entomology 302, Plant Pathology 301
Chemistry 101-102 Physics 211-212
Agricultural Engineering 301-202


THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Archi-
tecture:
Specific requirements. Basic Mathematics, C-2 (or Chemistry 101-102), Physics 211-212,
and Architecture 11A.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Building
Construction:
Specific requirements. Basic Mathematics, C-2 (or Chemistry 101-102), Physics 211-212,
and Architecture 11A.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Land-
scape Architecture:
Specific requirements. Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms (or Basic Mathematics),
Botany 101-102, and Architecture 11A.
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts:
Specific requirements. Appreciation of the Fine Arts, Painting 11A.
BACHELOR OF COMMERCIAL ART
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Commercial Art:
Specific requirements. Appreciation of the Fine Arts, Painting 11A.


THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration:
Specific requirements. Business Administration 103-104, 201-202, and 211-212.
IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration, in combination with Law:









204 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

Specific requirements. Business Administration 211-212 in place of C-2 in the first year.
C-2 in the second year as C-7. Business Administration 201-202 and 311-312 as C-8 and C-9
respectively.

THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
All students entering the College of Education must have the approval of the Admission
Committee of that College as well as certification by the Board of University Examiners.

BACHELOR OF ARTS OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor
of Science in Education:
Specific requirements. Education in the American Democracy as C-7.
The first year's work of a subject matter major as C-8. Any elective approved by the
Dean as C-9.

BACHELOR OF ARTS OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor
of Science in Health and Physical Education:
Specific requirements. Education in the American Democracy as C-7. Theory and
Practice of Natural Activities as C-8. Fundamentals of Football and Basketball and Personal
Hygiene as C-9.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agri-
cultural Education:
Specific requirements. General Chemistry as C-7. Horticulture, Animal Husbandry,
Agricultural Economics, and Agricultural Engineering from the group from which students
must elect C-8 and C-9 with approval of the department head.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ARTS
For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial
Arts:
Specific requirements. Education in the American Democracy as C-7. Industrial Arts
Drawing Units as C-8. Home Mechanics Shop Work as C-9.


THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
ANY CURRICULA
For admission to any of the curricula of the College of Engineering:
Specific requirements. Basic Mathematics, General Chemistry, and General Physics,
Differential and Integral Calculus, Drawing and Descriptive Geometry.
The various curricula have different additional requirements. The time and content of
the courses listed as prerequisites to admission vary for different curricula.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Specific requirements. Surveying, Analytical Chemistry, *Summer Shop Course.

CIVIL ENGINEERING
Specific requirements. Surveying, Water and Sewage, Shop Laboratory, Summer Sur-
veying Camp.
*In lieu of the Summer Shop Course, students may work for twelve weeks as student helpers
in an approved shop, power plant, or industrial plant.







THE UPPER DIVISION 205

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Specific requirements. Surveying, Mechanism, Shop Laboratory, *Summer Shop Course.

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Specific requirements. Principles of Economics, Surveying, *Summer Shop Course.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Specific requirements. Principles of Economics, Surveying, *Summer Shop Course.

THE SUPERIOR GROUP
Only students of the superior group can finish any complete program above in two years'
registration in the General College.
The first year's work in the General College as recommended for students of the superior
group who plan to enter the College of Engineering is as follows:
C-1: Man and the Social World X: Military Science or Physical
C-2: General Chemistry Education
C-3: Reading, Speaking, Writing : Mechanical Drawing and De-
C-4: Basic Mathematics scriptive Geometry

Students not of the superior group will enroll in the regular program of the General
College without substitutions for C-2 and C-4 permitted above.

*In lieu of the Summer Shop Course, students may work for twelve weeks as student helpers in
an approved shop, power plant, or industrial plant.








206 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

EXPENSES

TUITION
Classification of Students.-For the purpose of assessing tuition, students are classified as
Florida and non-Florida students.
A Florida student, if under twenty-one years of age, is one (1) whose parents have
been residents of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registra-
tion; or (2) whose parents were residents of Florida at the time of their death, and who
has not acquired residence in another state; or (3) whose parents were not residents of
Florida at the time of their death but whose natural guardian has been a resident of Florida
for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration. A Florida student, if
over twenty-one years of age, is one (1) whose parents are residents of Florida (or were
at the time of their death) and who has not acquired residence in another state; or (2)
who, while an adult, has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months
next preceding his registration; or (3) who is the wife of a man who has been a resident
of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding her registration; or (4) is
an alien who has taken out his first citizenship papers and who has been a resident of
Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration.
All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as non-Florida students.
If the status of a student changes from a non-Florida student to a Florida student, his
classification may be changed at the next registration thereafter.
No tuition is charged Florida students except in the College of Law and the College of
Business Administration.
In addition to the fees charged Florida students, non-Florida students, including those
pursuing graduate work, pay a fee of $200 per year, or $100 per term.

GENERAL FEES AND COURSE EXPENSES REQUIRED OF FLORIDA STUDENTS*
Registration and Contingent Fee..................................... $ 7.50
Infirmary Fee ................................. ............... 7.50
Military Fee $1.50, Equipment $6.50**............................
or 8.00
Physical Education Fee $4.00, Equipment $4.00* *....................
General College Fee........................................... 16.00
Student Activity Fee .............................................. 19.85
Swimming Pool Fee .......................... ............... 1.00

Total ..................................................... $59.85

Registration and Contingent Fee.-This fee of $7.50 is charged all students of the
University.
Infirmary Fee.-All students are charged an infirmary fee of $7.50 per year, which secures
for the student in case of illness the privilege of a bed in the Infirmary and the services of
the University Physician and professionally trained nurses, except in cases involving a major
operation. A student requiring an emergency operation, which is not covered by the fee
assessed, may employ the services of any accredited physician whom he may select, and
utilize the facilities of the Infirmary for the operation. To secure this medical service, the
*Non-Florida students are charged $200 tuition in addition.
**Equipment costs are estimated and should not be remitted to the University. The equipment
must be bought shortly after registration.








EXPENSES


student must report to the physician in charge of the Infirmary. A fee of $5 is charged
for the use of the operating room. Board in the Infirmary is charged at the rate of $1 a day.
Military Fee.-A fee of $1.50 is charged all first and second-year men registered for
Military Science, to protect against loss of government ordnance.
Uniforms, except shoes and belts, are issued without charge to all students taking military
training. Shoes and belts are furnished at the cost price, varying from $5.50 to $6.50. At
the end of the year, or sooner if the student leaves the University, all property except shoes
and belts must be returned to the supply room. Any willful damage to the uniform or
equipment must be paid for by the individual student.
Physical Education Fee.-All first and second-year men exempt from Military Science are
required to take Physical Education. There is a fee of $4 for this course. In addition, stu-
dents must buy gymnasium suits and shoes which are furnished for approximately $4.
General College Fee.-A fee of $16 is charged all students registered in the General Col-
lege. This fee replaces the former laboratory and individual college fees.
Student Activity Fee.-An annual fee of $19.85, payable on entrance, is assessed to
maintain and foster athletic sports, student publications, and other student activities. Stu-
dent fees are passed by a vote of the Student Body and approved by the Board of Control
before they are adopted.
Swimming Pool Fee.-A fee of $1 is charged all students for use of the lockers and
supplies used at the swimming pool.
SPECIAL FEES
Breakage Fee.-Any student registering for a course requiring locker and laboratory
apparatus in one or more of the following departments is required to buy a breakage book:
Chemistry, Pharmacy, Biology, and Electrical Engineering. This book costs $5. A refund
will be allowed on any unused portion at the end of the year, when the student has checked
in his apparatus to the satisfaction of the departments concerned. No charge will be made
from this fee for materials used, or for normal wear and tear on apparatus, as this is covered
by the General College Fee.
Room Reservation Fee.-Students wishing to reserve rooms in the dormitories must pay a
room reservation fee of $10 at the time such reservation is made. The fee is retained as a
deposit against damage to the room and its furnishings. The fee, less charges for any
damage done to the room by the student, is refunded when he returns his key and gives
up his room.
Special Examination Fee.-A fee of $5 is charged for each examination taken at a time
other than that regularly scheduled.
PENALTY FEES
Late Registration Fee.-A fee of $5 is charged all students who do not complete their
registration on the dates set by the University Council and published in the Calendar.
Registration is not complete until all University bills are paid, and any who fail to meet
their obligations are not regarded as students of the University.
Non-resident.-A fee of $10 in addition to the fee for non-Florida students will be
charged all students registering incorrectly. The burden of proof as to residence is with
the student.
Library Fines.-A fine of 2 cents a day is charged for each book in general circulation
which is not returned within the limit of two weeks. "Reserve" books may be checked
out overnight, and if they are not returned on time the fine is 5 cents an hour or fraction
of an hour until they are returned. No book may be checked out if the fine due is more
than 25 cents.








208 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR

Minimum Maximum
General Fees and Course Expenses...................... $ 59.85* $ 59.85*
Books and Training Supplies for the Year................ 30.00 50.00
Laundry and Cleaning.................................. 25.00 35.00
Room and Board ........... ...................... 184.50 300.00

Estimated total expense......................... $299.35* $444.85*

FEES FOR THE SECOND TERM
Students who register for the first time at the beginning of the second term are subject
to the following fees:
Registration Fee ................................................. 7.50
Infirmary Fee ........................ ......................... 3.75
Student Activity Fee........................................... 10.50
Swimming Pool Fee............................................ .50
General College Fee .............................................. 8.00
Physical Education Fee ......................................... 2.00

Total Fees ............................................... $32.25

REFUNDS
Students resigning before they have attended classes for three days are entitled to a
refund of all fees except the registration and contingent fee of $7.50. This fee is never
refunded.
Fees for the entire session are charged those students who register at the beginning of
the first term. If a student intends to register for the first term only and presents satisfactory
reasons to the Registrar on or before the date of registration, he will be entitled to a refund
at the end of the first term of $13 ($9.25 from his Student Activity Fee and $3.75 for one-
half of the Infirmary Fee). If the student desires a Seminole the refund will be only $9.50.

ROOM AND BOARD

DORMITORIES
The University operates three dormitories, the New Dormitory, Thomas Hall, and Buck-
man Hall, together accommodating about five hundred students. It is recommended that
freshmen room in one of the dormitories for at least the first year. Accordingly, preference
is given freshmen applying for rooms in the dormitories.
Rooms in the dormitories are partially furnished. Students must provide their own
bedding, towels, and toilet articles. Janitor and maid service is provided. Student monitors,
of whom the president of the student body is head monitor, supervise the conduct of students
in the dormitories. Students are not permitted to cook in the dormitories.
All dormitory rooms are furnished with beds, chifforobes, study tables, and chairs.
Additional easy chairs may be secured at a rental charge of $1 per term. Different accom-
modations are provided in the three dormitories.
New Dormitory.-The New Dormitory is of strictly fireproof construction. Most of the
rooms are arranged in suites of two rooms, a study and a bedroom, accommodating two
*Non-Florida students are charged $200 tuition in addition.










EXPENSES


students. A limited number of single rooms and several suites for three students are
available. All rooms are equipped with lavatories, while adjacent bathrooms provide hot
and cold showers.
Thomas Hall.-Sections C, D, and E have been remodeled throughout, making available
both single and double rooms. All rooms in these sections are equipped with lavatories.
In other sections the rooms are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom, accom-
modating three students. Some rooms accommodate four students, and a few single rooms
are available.
Baths, with lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of each section,
thus providing a bathroom for each four rooms.
Buckman Hall.-Rooms in Buckman Hall are arranged in suites of study and bedrooms
accommodating three students. Some suites accommodate four students. Baths, with lava-
tories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of each section, thus providing
bathroom facilities for each four suites.
Room Rent.-Rooms in the dormitories are rented to students at the following rates.

ROOM RENT PER STUDENT PER TERM

New Dormitory Thomas Hall Buckman Hall
Single rooms, 1st, 2nd, 3d floors................... $42.00 $38.00 ....
Single rooms, 4th floor.......................... 40.00 .... ....
Two-room suites, 1st, 2nd, 3d floors................ 40.00 ........
Two-room suites, 4th floor ........................ 34.00 ........
Three-room suites, 1st, 2nd, 3d floors.............. 36.00 .... ....
Double rooms, Section D ............... ....... .. ... 30.00 ....
Double rooms, Sections C and E ................. .... 32.00 ....
All other rooms ............................ .. ... 24.50 24.50

Applications.-Applications should be made as early as possible, since accommodations
in the dormitories are limited to five hundred students. Applications must be accompanied
by the room reservation fee of $10. If a room has been assigned, no refund will be made
later than September 10. Students not assigned a room will be given a refund upon request.
Students signing contracts and being assigned rooms will not be granted a refund if they
withdraw from the dormitories during the period stipulated in the contract. Contracts for
dormitory rooms are for the scholastic year, and in the absence of exceedingly important
reasons, no student will be given permission to vacate a room during this time unless he
transfers his contract to some student not living on the campus.
Keys for dormitory rooms may be secured by student occupants from the Head Janitor
at the New Dormitory on presentation of a signed receipt secured by payment of a Room
Reservation Deposit.

ROOMING HOUSES

Board and rooms in off-campus boarding houses and private homes may be procured at
rates of $25 to $40 per student per month. Such houses are inspected periodically. Students
will be assisted in securing comfortable living quarters by the Assistant Dean of Students.
For further information, inquiry should be made of the Dean of Students.








210 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA
The University operates a cafeteria with modified service, permitting a wide selection of
wholesome foods. Meal tickets may be secured at the Business Office, payable in advance, as
follows:
Three-meal-per-day tickets for 4 weeks............................... $20.00
Two-meal-per-day tickets for 4 weeks................................ 17.00
Three-meal-per-day weekly tickets .................................. 5.50
Meals may be paid for in cash at the following rates:
Breakfast ......................................................... .25
D inner ........................................................... .35
Supper ........................................................... .25
Students living in the dormitories and taking meals at the Cafeteria will receive a dis-
count of $4 per term on their room rent. When a student has received the discount and
does not comply with this regulation, he will be required to pay this account or permit a
charge against his room reservation fee for this amount.

SELF-HELP
Since there are comparatively few positions on the campus and in the city of Gainesville,
it is strongly urged that no freshman come to the University with the expectation of depend-
ing very largely upon his earnings during his first college year.
The Committee on Self-Help, of which the Assistant Dean of Students is Chairman,
undertakes to award positions on the campus to deserving UPPERCLASSMEN. The fol-
lowing conditions will govern it in making assignments:
a. The scholastic record of the student will be taken into consideration. No student
failing as much as six hours will be considered. No student falling below an average
of C will be considered.
b. Preference will be given to those having experience.
c. The financial condition of the student will be taken into consideration.
d. No graduate students will be used except as graduate assistants in positions requiring
the training which the student has secured in college.
e. No student on probation of any kind will be given a position. If, while holding one,
he is placed on probation, he will be required to resign the position.
f. A student may not hold two University positions the combined salaries of which
exceed $100 per year.
Unskilled labor is paid for at the present time at the rate of thirty cents per hour; skilled
labor is proportionately compensated. Undergraduate laboratory assistants are paid by the
hour according to the following schedule:
Sophom ores .............. ................ ... .................... $ .30
Juniors ...................... ................................ .35
Seniors ........................................................ .40
A few students are employed as waiters, as janitors, and in other capacities. Such
employment, as a rule, is not given to a student otherwise financially able to attend the
University. Application for employment should be made to the Dean of Students.

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS
The University of Florida is unfortunate in the fewness of scholarships and loans which
are open to students. Generally, the scholarships and loans which are available are admin-
istered directly by the donors. However, the Committee on Scholarships, of which the Dean








EXPENSES


of Students is chairman, collects all information relative to vacancies, basis of award, value,
and other pertinent facts and supplies this information to interested students. The Com-
mittee also collects information on applicants and supplies this information to the donors.
In some instances, the Committee has been given authority to make the awards without
consulting the donors.
While scholarship, as evidenced by scholastic attainment, is an important feature in
making awards, it is by no means the only thing taken into consideration. The student's
potential capacity to profit by college training and to make reasonable returns to society is
a large factor in making all awards.
Unless otherwise specified, applications for the scholarships and loans listed below should
be addressed to the Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loan Funds, University
of Florida.
County Agricultural Scholarships.-Provision has been made by a legislative act for a
scholarship from each county-to be offered and provided for at the discretion of the Board
of County Commissioners of each county. The recipient is to be selected by competitive
examination. The value of each scholarship is a sum sufficient to pay for board in the dining
hall and room in the dormitory. Whether such a scholarship has been provided for by any
county may be learned from the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, or the
County Agent of the county in question. Questions for the examination are provided and
papers graded by the University if desired.
Vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships.-The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation
is willing to aid any citizen of Florida who can give evidence of being prepared to enter
college, and who gives promise of being a successful student, provided that he has sustained,
by reason of physical impairment, a vocational handicap; and provided the course which he
selects can be reasonably expected to fit him to earn a livelihood. The sum spent on
recipients of this fund at the University of Florida during the present year will amount to
approximately one hundred dollars per student. Inquiries for these scholarships should be
addressed to Mr. Claude M. Andrews, State Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation, Talla-
hassee, Florida.
Rotary Loan Fund.-The Rotarians of Florida have set aside a considerable sum of
money to be used in making loans to worthy boys who would not otherwise be able to attend
college. The maximum loan is $150 per year. These loans are not available to freshmen.
Applications for these loans should be made to the President of the Rotary Club of the city
from which the student registers, or to Mr. K. H. Graham, Secretary-Treasurer, Rotary
Educational Loan Fund, Inc., Language Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Knight Templar Scholarship Loans.-The Grand Lodge of Knight Templar in the State
of Florida has arranged a number of loans, in amount of $200 to each student, for students
pursuing a course at the University of Florida. These loans are made available through
application to the Knights Templar Lodge in the various cities in the state, and are handled
by the Grand Lodge officers. Approximately thirty students receive aid from these scholar-
ships each year.
Knights of Pythias.-Eight scholarship loans have been established by the Grand Lodge
of the Knights of Pythias. Applications for these loans should be made to Dr. J. H. Coffee,
Arcadia, Florida.
United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships.-Scholarships have been established
by various chapters of the Florida Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy. Appli-
cations should be made to Mrs. David D. Bradford, Chairman of Education, 2109 Watrous
Ave., Tampa, Fla.
Loring Memorial Scholarship.-A scholarship of approximately $250 per year is main-








212 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

trained by Mrs. William Loring Spencer in memory of her distinguished uncle, General Loring.
Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship.-Established in 1919 by Mrs. Elizabeth C. Ham,
in accordance with the last will and in memory of her husband, Captain Arthur Ellis Ham,
a former student of the University, who fell in battle at St. Mihiel, France, on September 14,
1918. Value, the income from a fund of $5,000.
Albert W. Gilchrist Memorial Scholarship.-This scholarship is open to students of the
junior and senior classes. Two of these awards are made annually, each one being worth
$200 per year. Scholastic achievement is the principal basis of this award.
David Levy Yulee Memorial Scholarship.-This scholarship is awarded annually on the
basis of scholarship, and is open to the members of the sophomore, junior, and senior classes.
Value, about $200.
Duval High Memorial Scholarship.-An act creating the Memorial Duval High School
Scholarship and authorizing and appropriating annually $275 of the Duval County funds as
financial assistance for one worthy high school graduate is covered by House Bill No. 823,
and was approved May 20, 1927.
This scholarship, created to memorialize and assist in preserving the high standards and
traditions of the Duval High School, where many of Florida's worthy citizens were educated,
was established by the Board' of County Commissioners of Duval County, Florida. Appli-
cation should be made to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, Jacksonville.
Jacksonville Rotary Club Scholarship.-The Jacksonville Rotary Club maintains a
scholarship of $250, which is given, at their discretion, to a student meeting such require-
ments as they may make pertaining to the scholarship. Application should be made to the
President of the Jacksonville Rotary Club.
William Wilson Finley Foundation.-As a memorial to the late President Finley, and in
recognition of his interest in agricultural education, the Southern Railway Company has
donated to the University of Florida the sum of $1,000, to be used as a loan fund. No loan
from this fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per year. Recipients are selected by the
Dean of the College of Agriculture, to whom applications should be directed.
Florida Bankers Association Scholarship.-The Florida Bankers Association awards
three scholarships annually; one for North and West Florida, one for Central Florida, and
one for South Florida. These scholarships are awarded on an examination given at the
Annual Boys' Short Course. The examination is given and the award made by the State
Boys' Club Agent. Application for these scholarships should be made to the Dean of the
College of Agriculture.
Frank E. Dennis Scholarship.-Established by Frank E. Dennis, of Jacksonville, and
awarded to the club member showing the best pig-club pig at the State Pig Club exhibit.
One scholarship is awarded annually: value, $250. Application should be made to the Dean
of the College of Agriculture.
Congressman Yon Scholarship.-Awarded to the 4-H Club boy living in the Third Con-
gressional District, who has been outstanding in leadership in club work. Awarded annually;
value, $100. Application should be made to the Dean of the College of Agriculture.
The American Bankers Association Foundation.-One loan scholarship to a student at
the University of Florida whose major course is in banking, economics, or related subjects
in classes of junior grade or above. Value, $250. Application for loan should be made
to the Chairman of the Committee on Awards, 110 E. 42nd Street, New York City.
Murphree Engineering Loan Fund.-On September 16, 1929, a friend of our late Pres-
ident, Dr. A. A. Murphree, gave to the Engineering College $500, to be used as a revolving
loan fund. This fund was to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial






EXPENSES


difficulties, worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they could receive some
assistance. Only in special cases are these loans made to members of the junior class.
Applications for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of the College of Engineer-
ing.
Florida Association of Architects Loan Fund.-The Florida Association of Architects has
created a revolving loan fund of $500 for the purpose of aiding needy students in Architecture
who have proved themselves worthy. Applications should be made to the Director of the
School of Architecture and Allied Arts.
The Colonial Dames of America, Betty Wollman Scholarship.-Established by Mr.
William J. Wollman in memory of his mother and awarded to a worthy student. Value, $250.
Application should be made to Mrs. Walter W. Price, 1 West 72nd Street, New York City.
The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida Scholar-
ship.-The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida has
established a loan scholarship for deserving students. This scholarship is administered
by the Directors of the Florida Educational Loan Association. Application should be made
to the Chairman of the Florida Educational Loan Association, University of Florida.
Lake Worth Woman's Club Scholarship.-The Lake Worth Woman's Club, of Lake
Worth, Florida, maintains a scholarship of $100 a year. Application should be made to
the Chairman of the Scholarship Committee, Lake Worth Woman's Club, Lake Worth, Florida.
Fairchild Scholarship National.-Mr. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers
annually a scholarship amounting to $500. The award is made, by competitive examination,
to a graduate in pharmacy who will do post-graduate work in the year immediately following
his graduation. Examinations are held in June at the various colleges of pharmacy which
are members of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Further information
may be obtained from the Director of the School of Pharmacy.
The Ladies Auxiliary Fund.-The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida State Pharmaceutical
Association has established a loan fund for deserving students of pharmacy in need ot
assistance. Application should be made to Mrs. David W. Ramsaur, 1044 Park Street, Jack-
sonville, Florida.





214 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION
The General Extension Division of the University of Florida offers educational oppor-
tunities to those who are removed from the campus and numerous service functions.
The Division represents the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Education, Engineering, Law,
Business Administration, and the School of Pharmacy of the University, and the College
of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Education and Music of the State College for
Women.
The work is carried on through departments. The Extension Teaching Department
offers courses by correspondence study and in extension classes. Short courses, community
institutes, and conferences are held to give opportunity for discussion on problems con-
fronting groups or communities. The Department of Auditory Instruction offers cultural
programs, instruction, information, and entertainment by lectures and discussion for the
benefit of special groups, schools, and individuals.
Training for naturalization, citizenship schools, and cooperation with the War Depart-
ment in enrolling young men for the Citizens' Military Training Camps because of their
educational value, are some phases of the work of the Department of Citizenship Training.
Through the Departments of Visual Instruction and General Information and Service, the
world of letters and arts and music is carried to thousands in the back country through the
traveling libraries and art exhibits which are sent out. A picture of the world and its
work is circulated in the slides and filmslides furnished for instruction and entertainment.
The best in recorded music is provided for work in music appreciation and for culture.
These and the various service functions of the Division establish contacts which enable
the University to aid individuals, organizations, and communities, and contribute to adult
education.



SUMMER SESSION
The University Summer Session is an integral part of the University. The College of
Education, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Law, the College of Business
Administration, the College of Agriculture, and the Graduate School remain open during
the summer. Emphasis is placed upon college and graduate work, no work of high school
rank being offered.
Since women are admitted to the Summer Session many professional courses for primary
and elementary school teachers are offered in addition to those usually given in the winter
session.









DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION


DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
In September 1933 the University of Florida joined twelve other southern institutions
in forming the new Southeastern Conference. This new conference represents colleges
and universities in the States of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Ten-
nessee, and Kentucky.
The type of athletic program undertaken by the Department of Physical Education at
the University of Florida compares with that in leading universities. A two-year course
of required Physical Education is included in the curriculum of the Lower Division. Students
who are exempt from Military Science are required to take this work, which is designed to
present participation, training, and instructional opportunities in sports included in the
intra-mural program. This course may also be taken as an elective.
The second major sub-division of this Department is that in which are included inter-
collegiate athletics. These sports are divided into two groups, generally known as major
and as minor sports. In the major group are football, basketball, boxing, baseball, and
track; and in the minor group, swimming, tennis, and golf. The equipment includes two
baseball diamonds, four athletic fields, six handball courts, two indoor basketball courts,
eight tennis courts, a large outdoor swimming pool, a concrete stadium with a seating
capacity of 23,000, and two quarter-mile running tracks, one providing permanent seats for
approximately 1,500. Six alumni coaches are assigned to these eight sports, all serving on
a full-time basis.
The function of the Intramural Department is to encourage the entire student body to
participate in organized athletic sports and wholesome recreation. The Department pro-
vides facilities for such competition and recreation; organizes and promotes competition
between students, groups, and individuals; and fosters a spirit of fair play and sportsman-
ship among participants and spectators.
The program of intramural activities includes the following sports: golf, swimming,
horseshoes, touch football, basketball, boxing, wrestling, diamond ball, tennis, handball,
water basketball, track, shuffle board, foul shooting, ping pong, and Sigma Delta Psi
(national athletic fraternity) events.
The proper utilization of leisure time through recreation and play is splendidly expressed
in this program. It is estimated that more than 1,800 students (about seventy per cent of
the student body) take part in some sport sponsored by the Department. There is a decided
trend toward the expansion of recreational facilities to a large group of students as opposed
to intense competition for a few.
The rules of the Southeastern Conference do not permit member institutions to employ
athletes or to pay students for their services on athletic teams. However, this does not
mean that a student is ineligible to receive aid from his institution in the form of scholar-
ships, loan funds, or compensation for student labor merely because he may be proficient
in athletics. Athletes in the University of Florida are eligible to all forms of assistance
that may be available to other students. As a rule, awards are made only to those who are
unable financially to attend the University without assistance and whose standards of con-
duct and scholarship are worthy of consideration. Awards are usually made in the form
of board, rent, books, and similar items rather than in the form of cash, and may be
continued from year to year throughout the college course to those students whose records
prove satisfactory. Administration of these funds is in the hands of the Committee on
Scholarships. Further information may be secured by writing to the Dean of Students,
who is chairman of that Committee.






216 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
The course in Military Science is required of all physically qualified General College
students except adult special students and students transferring from other universities or
colleges.
Students who complete the basic course and are selected by the Professor of Military
Science and Tactics and the President of the University may elect the advanced courses.
Students electing these courses must carry them to completion as a prerequisite to graduation.
Upon the completion of these courses, those students recommended by the Professor of
Military Science and Tactics and the President of the University will, upon their own
application, be offered a commission in the Officers Reserve Corps, United States Army.
An advanced course in summer camp is compulsory, usually between the junior and senior
years. The War Department pays all expenses, including mileage, rations, medical attend-
ance, clothing, and laundry service, and in addition the pay of the seventh grade, United
States Army.



DIVISION OF MUSIC
The Division of Music offers opportunity for membership in three musical organizations:
The Military Band, the Orchestra, and the Glee Club.
The Band is made up in part of students in the freshman and sophomore years who
take military training. The Band frequently plays at athletic contests and takes several
trips a year.
The Orchestra plays at the regular Convocations.
The Glee Club makes several trips a year throughout the state.
Opportunities are afforded qualified students to broadcast as soloists, instrumentally or
vocally, over radio station WRUF.
Private lessons in violin, orchestra instruments, band instruments, voice, organ, and
piano may be arranged. Tuition will be required of all students taking private lessons.



LIBRARY
The University Library is well equipped to take care of the needs of students. It
houses a very extensive collection of general reference books, periodicals, fiction and non-
fiction works.
Students will find much use for the reserved section, in which are placed collateral
readings used in connection with the texts in various courses. Students should get ac-
quainted with the facilities of the Library as early as possible.








HEALTH SERVICE


HEALTH SERVICE
Through the Students' Health Service the University makes available to any student
physical examinations, health consultations, and medical attention. General service is
provided free of charge, but special fees are charged for services which are individual in
character, such as dentistry, X-rays, board and laundry in the Infirmary, special drugs and
serums, major surgery, special nurses, etc. No student, however, will be denied service
because of inability to pay these fees.
The University Infirmary and the offices of the Health Service are on the campus. The
Infirmary is open day and night for the admission of patients. The Resident Physician
lives at the Infirmary and his services are available at all hours, in case of emergency. The
Dispensary in the Infirmary building is open from 7:30 to 9 A. M., from 12 noon to 1 P. M.
and from 4 to 7 p. M., during which time physicians are in attendance and may be con-
sulted. A nurse is constantly on duty from 7 A. M. to 9 P. M. for emergency treatment.
It is the aim of the Health Service not only to function as a Health Service and render
preventive measures, but to provide full hospital care in cases of illness. The Infirmary
is rated as a Fully Approved Hospital by the Examining Board of the American College
of Surgeons.
The facilities of the Dispensary are such that any number of students can be given
attention in a day. The Dispensary is maintained to offer conferences with physicians, exam-
inations, diagnosis, and treatment of minor injuries and illnesses which a student may suffer.
The student is encouraged to use this service freely in order that he may avoid more serious
illnesses by the lack of treatment or from improper treatment. In the Dispensary, a
modern, well equipped drug room furnishes drugs to the student without charge. A labora-
tory in connection with the Infirmary and Dispensary is in charge of a trained nurse-
technician, rendering efficient service in prompt diagnosis. The normal capacity of the
Infirmary, 45 beds, in emergencies can be increased. Ample provisions are made for the
isolation of communicable diseases. A completely equipped operating room is maintained
to provide facilities for major surgical operations. The Infirmary is equipped with a mobile
unit X-ray, which is used for the examination of fractures, but the equipment does not
provide sufficient service for an extensive diagnostic X-ray study of the intestinal tract, etc.
This service is made available to the students at actual cost of the materials used.
Students enrolling in the University for the first time are furnished by the Registrar's
Office a physical examination form which is to be completed by the family physician and
pinned to Registration papers. On admission, the student is given a careful physical
examination by the University Physician. It is necessary that this physical examination
by the home physician be completed in order that parents may be aware of abnormalities,
which should be corrected prior to the student's entrance in the University, for the correc-
tion of these defects is necessary in order that he may be in proper physical condition to begin
his college work.
There are three principal phases of the activities of the University Health Service:
(1) personal attention, (2) sanitation, and (3) education.
1. Personal Division.-This division is concerned with the physical examination of
students. A complete record of the physical condition of each student is made and filed
when he is admitted to the University. From this record can be determined, in large
measure, what procedure is essential to keep the student in the best physical condition
during his academic life. The following are some of the phases of the work in the
personal division:
a. Provision for maintaining the health of normal, physically sound students; cooper-







218 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

ation with the Department of Physical Education regarding physical exercise; edu-
cation concerning right living; safeguarding of environment.
b. Protection of the physically sound students from communicable diseases; early
detection and isolation of all cases of communicable diseases-tuberculosis, diphtheria,
scarlet fever, measles, typhoid fever, smallpox, mumps, etc.
c. Provision for the care and treatment of such cases of communicable diseases-isola-
tion hospital.
d. Treatment and professional care of all students who are ill or in need of medical
advice or treatment. For extended care by the Health Service it is necessary that
the student enter the Infirmary. Any student may be admitted to the Infirmary upon
the recommendation of the University Physician. To all patients in the Infirmary
the staff will furnish medical and nursing services.
e. Reconstruction and reclamation: correction of defects, advice, and treatment of
all abnormalities.
2. Division of Sanitation.-The student's environment should be made as hygienic
as possible. Hence, this division concerns itself with the sanitary conditions both on and
off the campus.
3. Education.-Every student in the University is made familiar with the fundamentals
of both personal and public hygiene. Through personal conferences education in hygiene
and right living is conducted.




BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE
A program of vocational guidance is carried on for the students through a series of
tests, interviews, and the application of scientific occupational information. The Bureau
offers a service to those encountering mental difficulties which interfere with their scholastic
work. Further information concerning these services may be obtained from the Bulletin
of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene.








STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS
Student Government.-Student government in the University of Florida is a cooperative
organization based on mutual confidence between the student body and the faculty. Con-
siderable authority has been granted the Student Body for the regulation and conduct of
student affairs. The criterion in granting authority to the Student Body has been the
disposition of the students to accept responsibility commensurate with the authority granted
them. Generally speaking, the fields of student activity include regulation of extra-curricular
affairs and the administration of the Honor System.
Every enrolled student, having paid his activity fee, is a member of the Student Body
and has an equal vote in its government.
The University authorities feel that training in acceptance of responsibility for the
conduct of student affairs at the University is a valuable part of the educational growth of
the individual student. The Student Body is practically a body politic, occupying its fran-
chise under grant from the Board of Control and subject to its continued approval.
Student government is patterned on the state and national form of government, but
adapted to the local needs of the Student Body. Powers are distributed into the three
branches: (1) legislative, which is embodied in the Executive Council; (2) judicial, which
is embodied in the Honor Court with penal and civil jurisdiction of all judicial matters;
(3) Executive, embodied in the President and shared with the Vice-President and the
Secretary-Treasurer of the Student Body. Members of all three branches are elected directly
by the Student Body once a year.
Student government enacts and enforces suitable laws, promotes athletics, debating,
publications of the Student Body, entertainments of a general educational value, and such
other activities as the Student Body may adopt. The officers of the Student Body are the
President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, members of the Honor Court, Athletic
Council, Executive Council, Lyceum Council, editors and business managers of student
publications, and student members of the Board of Student Publications.
Debating.-Practice in debating is open to all students through the programs of the
varsity and freshman debate squads. This work, which is sponsored by the Debate Club,
is under direction of the Department of Speech, and culminates in an extensive schedule
of intercollegiate debates.
Dramatics.-Any student has an opportunity to participate in several plays which are
presented each year by the Florida Players, a dramatic group under direction of the Depart-
ment of Speech.
Executive Council.-The Executive Council is composed of representatives elected from
the colleges on the campus and in general acts as administrator of Student Body affairs.
The Athletic Council and the Lyceum Council have jurisdiction over their respective fields.
Publications.-The Student Body publishes The Seminole, the year book; The Florida
Alligator, a weekly newspaper; and The "F" Book, the student's guide. The Florida Review
(the campus literary magazine) is published by its staff without student funds.
Y. M. C. A.-The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Association is to provide a
medium through which the highest ideals of education and religion may be expressed in
terms of service. The program of the Association is planned to meet definite needs as they
become apparent. There is no membership fee. Any student may become a member by
subscribing to its purpose and contributing to its support. A secretary having extensive
experience with the problems of students is available for counsel and help.
Social Fraternities.-Twenty-five national social fraternities have established chapters at
the University; most of them have already built chapter houses and the others have leased
homes. The general work of the fraternities is controlled by the Interfraternity Conference,





220 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

composed of two delegates from each of the national fraternities. The national fraternities
at Florida are Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Kappa, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi,
Delta Chi, Delta Tau Delta, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi
Alpha, Phi Beta Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Delta Sigma, Pi Kappa Alpha,
Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma Iota, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon,
Tau Epsilon Phi, Theta Chi, and Theta Kappa Nu. There is one local fraternity: Omega
Upsilon Theta.
Honor Societies and Fraternities.-Various honor societies and fraternities have been
established at Florida. Phi Kappa Phi elects annually from the highest ten per cent,
scholastically, of the Senior Class. Blue Key is an honor group electing men to membership
on the basis of leadership and participation in campus activities.
Other honorary fraternities are Alpha Kappa Psi, professional business fraternity; Alpha
Zeta, agricultural; Beta Gamma Sigma, honorary commerce fraternity; Delta Epsilon, local
pre-medical; Gamma Sigma Epsilon, chemical; Gargoyle, architectural; Kappa Delta Pi,
educational; Kappa Gamma Delta, aeronautical; Kappa Phi Kappa, professional educa-
tional; Phi Alpha Delta and Phi Delta Phi, legal; Phi Sigma, biological; Pi Delta Epsilon
and Sigma Delta Chi, journalistic; Delta Sigma Pi, professional commerce; Pi Gamma Mu,
social science; Sabres, military; Sigma Delta Psi, athletic; Sigma Tau, engineering: Tau
Kappa Alpha, forensic; Phi Eta Sigma, freshman scholastic; Rho Chi, pharmacy; Kappa
Psi, honorary band; Thyrsus, horticultural.
Other professional fraternities and clubs are: Agricultural Club; Alpha Tau Alpha,
educational fraternity for teachers of agriculture; Student Branch of the American Institute
of Electrical Engineers; Student Branch, American Pharmaceutical Association; Student
Chapter of the American Society of Chemical Engineers; Student Branch of the American
Society of Mechanical Engineers; Benton Engineering Society; Commerce Club; Fourth
Estate Club, journalistic society; Leigh Chemical Society; Mathematics Colloquium; Mortar
and Pestle; Order of the Palms, honorary cultural fraternity; Peabody Club, education club;
Society of Chemical Engineers.








HONOR SYSTEM


HONOR SYSTEM
The Honor System.-One of the finest tributes to the character of the students at the
University of Florida is the fact that the Student Body is a self-governing group. The
details of the system by which this result is reached will be explained to all freshmen
during the first week of their enrollment in the University. However, each parent, as well
as each prospective student, is urged to read the following discussion of the Honor System,
as this phase of student government forms the keystone of the entire system.
In addition to permitting student legislation on questions of interest to the members of
the Student Body, execution of the laws passed, and the expenditure of student funds, the
governing system at the University gives to the students the privilege of disciplining them-
selves through the means of the Honor System. Inaugurated by some of our greatest edu-
cators in higher institutions of the nation, and early adopted in some departments of the
University of Florida, the Honor System was finally established in the entire University in
1914 as the result of student initiative. This plan, having met with the approval of all
officials of the University, was given the sanction of the Board of Control, and student repre-
sentatives were selected by the students to administer the system.
Among the basic principles of an Honor System are the convictions that self-discipline
is the greatest builder of character, that responsibility is a prerequisite of self-respect, and
that these are essential to the highest type of education. Officials of the University and the
Board of Control feel that students in the University of Florida should be assumed to be
honest and worthy of implicit trust, and they display this confidence through the privilege
of an Honor System.
In order to protect against the character deficiencies of a few men who may violate the
Honor Code, it becomes the duty of each member of the Student Body not only to abide
by the Honor Code but to report to the Honor Court any violations he may observe. Many
men coming to the University for the first time may feel hesitant about assuming this
responsibility, inasmuch as early school training has created feelings of antipathy toward
one who "tattle-tales" on a fellow-student. The theory of an Honor System adequately
overcomes this natural reaction, however, when it is realized that this system is a student
institution itself, and not a faculty measure for student discipline, and that to be worthy of
the advantages of the Honor System each student must be strong enough to do his duty
in this regard. In this way the responsibility for each man's conduct is placed where it must
eventually rest-on himself.
The Honor Code of the Student Body is striking in its simplicity, yet it embodies the
fundamentals of sound character. Each man is pledged to refrain from:
(a) cheating, (b) stealing, (c) passing worthless checks.
On the basis of this Code, students are extended all privileges conceived to be the
basic rights of men of Honor. There are no proctors or spies in the examination rooms, each
student feeling free to do his work, or to leave the room as occasion arises. Secondly,
fruits and supplies are placed openly on the campus, with the confidence that each man will
pay for any he may take. This system makes each man the keeper of his own conscience
until he has proven to his fellow-students that he no longer deserves the trust placed in him.
A breach of the System may be flagrant and serious, or it may be extenuated by cir-
cumstances. It may need only mild corrective measures to help the violator obtain a finer
conception of right and wrong; it may need strong measures. To enforce the System
equitably and punish occasional infractions in every case, the students have established
the Honor Court. The Court is composed of twelve students and a chancellor elected
annually from the upper classes of the various colleges on the campus. Their jurisdiction
of all violations of the Honor Code is final, but with the privilege of appeal by a student






222 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

to the Faculty Discipline Committee, an appeal both as to procedure and as to the merits
of the case. It is significant of the care with which the Court works that since the estab-
lishment of the Honor System in 1914, only one decision of the Honor Court has been
altered on appeal.
The penal purpose of the Honor Court should receive less stress, perhaps, than its
educational purpose, which is its most important function. The responsibility of acquaint-
ing every member of the Student Body with the purpose, advantages, and principles of
the Honor System is placed upon members of the Court. In line with this work, members
of the Honor Court participate in the orientation program each year during Freshman Week.
In addition to a series of explanatory talks at that time, special chapel programs are con-
ducted by the Honor Court during the school year. Honor System talks are delivered in
the high schools of the State upon request and at regularly scheduled times each spring,
and radio programs are broadcast especially for the high schools from Station WRUF in
Gainesville. In this way the Honor Court has endeavored to fulfill its responsibility to
the men who undertake the problem of self-government and self-discipline at the University
of Florida.
The parent of every prospective student should feel that it is his responsibility to stress
the paramount importance of honorable conduct on the part of his son while the latter is
in attendance at the University of Florida. Dishonest action brings sorrow to parent and
student alike.
Because University students have proved worthy of the trust and responsibility involved
in administering an Honor System, this feature of student government has become the
greatest tradition at the University of Florida. It must be remembered that inasmuch as
it is primarily a student responsibility, the future of the system rests with each new class
of students who enter the University. The University faculty and authorities pledge their
support to the Honor System. Each student must support it, or, in failing to support it,
contributes to the loss of this tradition.








APPENDIX


APPENDIX



REQUISITE SKILLS AND ATTAINMENTS IN ENGLISH

The candidate for admission into the General College of the University of Florida
should have certain reasonable attainments in reading, in composition (oral and written),
and in acquaintance with literature. It is not expected that every candidate will possess
all the skills and abilities listed below, but each candidate should assure himself of a
reasonable proficiency in a large majority of these. The summary here provided is intended
to be of service as a general guide both to the prospective college student and to the
high-school teacher.
Aside from particular skills, the candidate's general attitude toward language is of the
greatest importance. Every entrant should have secured some understanding of the function
of language as a means of communicating ideas to others, and he should have acquired
the habit of using an adequate dictionary.
I. Reading Ability. The candidate should have acquired
A. the ability to get meaning from the printed page at a reasonable rate of speed,
as measured by a standardized test;
B. the habit of reading for recreation and aesthetic satisfaction as well as for the
purpose of securing information;
C. the ability to read ordinary prose and verse orally with comprehension of the
author's thought and with sufficient clearness and expressiveness to interpret it
to others.
II. Oral Composition. The candidate should be able
A. to use idiomatic, reasonably correct English and correct habits of posture,
enunciation and pronunciation when speaking on such informal or semi-formal
occasions as the following: making an explanation, presenting a topical recita-
tion or report, relating a sequence of events, and taking part in group discus-
sion of a topic;
B. to employ accepted usages of social courtesy in such situations as the following:
conversations and interviews with others, giving directions to an individual or
a group, discussing topics in the classroom, et cetera;
C. to organize material correctly and to speak to the point on a topic.
III. Written Composition. The candidate should possess sufficient skill in the use of English
to enable him to write a brief composition (three or more paragraphs) concerning
which the following questions can be answered in the affirmative:
A. Is the subject suitable and properly limited?
B. Does the writer display adequate familiarity with the subject?
C. Does the writer hold firmly to his subject?
D. Is there an orderly development of the thought?
E. Are the various topics presented in clear and well-defined paragraphs?
F. Are the transitions from one idea to another, and from one topic to another, clear
and easily followed?

Various specific attainments needed by the high school graduate have been well stated
recently in the "General Objectives in English for Junior and Senior High Schools" pub-








224 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

lished with the English Course of Study for Florida High Schools. Those most needful
include the ability
A. to write a neat and legible manuscript;
B. to use literate grammatical forms;
C. to spell properly the most common words;
D. to take notes on lectures, articles, or books;
E. to select material and organize it in outline form in preparation for an oral
discussion or written composition;
F. to expand a topic sentence into an orderly and unified paragraph;
G. to write business and social letters of the most ordinary types;
H. to plan and write brief compositions, formal or informal, of an expository nature;
I. to write a summary or a paraphrase of any given passage;
J. to select a topic for research, discover and list sources of information, and collect
and organize material for the paper giving the results of the study;
K. to use exact and expressive words.
The attainments named above should be regarded as minimum requirements. Students
of superior ability should have made some progress also in attaining the standards involved
in such matters as the following: originality and vitality of thought; variety in diction, in
sentence structure, and in paragraph structure; ease, sincerity, and restraint of style. It
is anticipated that reasonable attainment of such standards by the high school graduate
will secure for him special and rapid advancement in his English courses in the General
College.
IV. Grammar. The candidate should have a knowledge of grammar which embraces
A. the agreement of subject and verb, pronoun and antecedent;
B. the correct case forms of pronouns;
C. the number of nouns and pronouns;
D. the comparison and usage of adjectives and adverbs;
E. the idiomatic use of conjunctions and prepositions;
F. the verb:
1. principal parts of irregular verbs;
2. correct use of subjunctive mood;
3. correct use of auxiliary verbs;
4. correct use of the various tenses.
V. Sentence Structure. The candidate should have a knowledge of sentence which embraces
A. the correct subordination of phrases and clauses;
B. the effective securing of emphasis, variety, and unity in the sentence;
C. the avoidance of such errors as (1) the "sentence fragrant" or "sentence fault,"
(2) the "comma splice" or "comma fault," (3) dangling and misplaced elements,
(4) shift in number, person, or tense, (5) split construction, (6) incomplete
construction, (7) uncompleted idea, (8) faulty parallelism, (9) misuse of is
when and is where clauses, (10) faulty reference of pronouns, (11) double
negative.
VI. Forms. The candidate should have a knowledge of
A. proper use of capital letters;
B. correct punctuation of sentences;
C. the following forms:
1. manuscript and letter forms;
2. outline forms;
3. forms used in listing materials and making subject-matter references.








APPENDIX


VII. Literature. Before entering college, the candidate should have secured familiarity
with a reasonable amount of significant American and English literature. His knowl-
edge should include
A. at least an elementary understanding of the development and continuity of
English and American literature;
B. an acquaintance with the historical backgrounds of English and American
literature;
C. an acquaintance with the characteristics of such major literary forms as lyric,
epic, drama, essay, novel, and short-story;
D. familiarity with notable works selected from the writings of standard English
and American authors, both classical and modern.






REQUISITE SKILLS AND ATTAINMENTS IN MATHEMATICS

The following is an outline of the minimum requirements and does not represent the
training necessary for students expecting to enter engineering or scientific courses.
I. Fundamentals of Arithmetic
A. General methods of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
1. Of whole numbers
2. Of common fractions
3. Of mixed expressions
4. Of decimal fractions
B. Special short methods for multiplication and division, such as:
Multiplying or dividing by 10, its multiples or powers. (Thus, to multiply
any number by 750, multiply it first by 1000 and deduct from the result one-
fourth of itself.)
C. How to extract square root
D. Some notion of significant figures, as for example:
If Pi = 3.14 to three significant figures, then 243 times Pi should be written
to three figures, and all others dropped.
E. The application of common-sense checks on work, as for example:
.913 X 4.687 X 89.04 1 X 5 X 90
.055 x 493.02 is roughly equal to .06 X 500
which is readily seen to equal 15. Therefore, the correct answer should be
reasonably near 15
II. Mathematics of Business and Government
A. The meaning of per cent
B. How to express per cent in decimal or common fractional form, as:
25% = % =.25
C. What per cent one number is of another, thus:
2 is 50% of 4. 7 is what per cent of 17?
D. Finding net cost after series discounts are made
E. Simple taxation problems
F. Elementary problems in insurance








226 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

III. The Symbolism of Mathematics
A. The meaning of letters in mathematical problems. Emphasize the significance
of putting a letter to stand for a number
B. Operations with expressions involving letters
C. Use of signs of grouping and other symbols. Show why it is desirable, some-
times to remove parentheses, sometimes to introduce them
D. The law of signs in the fundamental operations
IV. Factoring Methods
A. A thorough understanding of the use of certain special products, such as:
1. (a+b) (a+b) =a2+b2+2ab
2. (a+b+c)2 =a2+b2+c2+2ab+2ac+2bc
3. (a+b) (a-b) =a2-b2
4. (x+a) (x+b) =x2+(a+b)x+ab
5. x(a+b) = xa+xb
6. (a+b) (c+d) =ac+ad+bc+bd
B. Use of the above special products in the factoring of expressions
1. Special emphasis upon the form of an expression, as:
x2-2x+1-16 is the difference of two squares.
2. Skill in grouping advantageously, as:
x2+x+ax-a-2 = x2+x-2+ (x-1) a
= (x-1) (x+2)+a(x-1)
= (x-1) (x+a+2)
V. Fractions and Their Simplification
A. Reduction to lowest terms
B. Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of fractions
C. Simplification of complex fractions by multiplication. Examples:
1. 2 1/4 2 1/4 X 20 45 5

3 3/5 3 3/5 X 20 72 8
2. a+b/c c(a+b/c)

a-b/c c (a-b/c)
ac+b

ac-b
VI. The Equation
A. Solution of first degree equations in one unknown
1. Axioms used in operating upon equations. Thus, equals may be added to
both members of an equation.
2. Types involving fractional, numerical, literal coefficients
B. Systems of first degree equations
1. With two unknowns
2. With three unknowns
3. Types involving fractions or literal coefficients
C. Emphasis on setting up necessary equations for the solution of word problems;
translating word problems into algebra.










APPENDIX


VII. Functional Relationships Expressed in Algebraic Language
A. The meaning of a formula
Examples: Interpret I = Prt, s = %gt2, A = Pi r2, A = %ab
B. How simple formulas are derived
C. Solving a formula for each of the letters involved
D. Graphical representation of functional relationships, particularly of an equation
giving y as a function of x, as for example, to graph 3x+2y=6, or y=x2
1. How the graph is constructed
2. How to interpret the graph. For example, after the graph of y=x2 is
constructed, how can it be used to obtain the squares of numbers, and the
square roots of numbers?
E. Writing a formula when the functional relation is expressed verbally
VIII. The Theory of Exponents and Radicals
A. A thorough understanding of the four definitions of exponents
1. Nq = NxNXNxN . to q factors if q is a whole number
2. NP/q = the pth power of the qth root of N, if p and q are whole numbers
3. N-x = l/Nx, x any number
4. NO = 1, N any number except 0
B. A knowledge of the four laws of exponents
1. AxAY = Ax+y
2. (AB)x Ax Bx
3. (Ax)P = Ax
4. Ax/AY = Ax-y
C. How to convert an expression in exponential form to radical form
D. Simplification of expressions either in exponential or radical form
E. Fundamental operations with exponents and radicals
IX. Ratio and Proportion
A. The meaning of a ratio; ratio as a quotient or a fraction
B. Proportion as the equality of two ratios
C. Use of ratio and proportion in the solution of problems
X. Simple Mensuration Problems
A. Tables of weights, lengths, etc.
1. General notion of a unit of measure
2. How to convert from one unit to another, as
3 feet = 36 inches
50C. = 41OF
B. The prism, cylinder, pyramid, cone and sphere
1. Measurement of surface and volume
2. Knowledge of simple formulas for areas and volumes
XI. Informal Proofs in Intuitive Geometry
A. Use of straight-edge and compass in construction of simple geometric figures
B. Comparison of plane figures as to kinds, similarity and symmetry







228 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE

XII. Formal Geometry
A. The nature of a formal proof
B. Acquaintance with the most significant theorems in elementary plane geometry,
as:
1. The Pythagorean theorem
2. Theorems on congruence and equality
3. Those on similar figures
4. Those pertaining to parallel and perpendicular lines
5. The simpler locus theorems
6. Theorems relating to chords, arcs, and tangents
7. Theorems on the measurement of angles
C. Some ability in the solution of original exercises in geometry




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