• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Map of the campus
 Table of Contents
 Summer session calendar
 Officers of administration
 Admission, general information
 Expenses, rooming facilities
 General regulations
 Colleges and schools
 Departments of instruction
 Questions and answers
 Back Matter














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00366
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1935
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00366
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Map of the campus
        Page 135
    Table of Contents
        Page 136
        Page 137
    Summer session calendar
        Page 138
    Officers of administration
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
    Admission, general information
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
    Expenses, rooming facilities
        Page 148
        Page 149
    General regulations
        Page 150
    Colleges and schools
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Departments of instruction
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
    Questions and answers
        Page 177
        Page 178
    Back Matter
        Page 179
        Page 180
Full Text






The University Record

of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of


%he University Summer Session

1935


First Term-June 17 to July 26
Second Term-July 27 to August 30


Vol. XXX, Series 1


No. 5


May 1, 1935


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida


I


19






















The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletin
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual
colleges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruc-
tion, and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what informa-
tion is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in
several series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with in-
stitutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications
is under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for indi-
vidual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges,
should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida











GYMNASIUMSAUM
BASKET IALL
INFUUAARY


.7 -14" THOMAAS HALL




EXPERIMENT~
STATION CCr it






olsmo 37.









AGRIL30M ST
POST O!C






4





Lifi
SHOPS
PEABOsY HALL z

4 ~~LANGIJULAGE.
SENGINEEN



SCAMPUSo
OF
s N FLORIDA 000 ST







I NTH S EET DIXIE HIGHWAY
TO -lN~n Jt
0 o is






TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
Map of the Campus ..................-- ....- .. --.. ------------ .......-- ..... . 135
Summer Session Calendar ..................-............-...... -.. .. .... 138
Officers of Adm inistration.................. ....... ..... .............. 139
Faculty -....-.......... ... ....................... ................ 140
A dm mission ........_..... ....... ..... .......... ......... .... ........ ..... ......- .. 143
General Information. ........... ............. .. ................................... ................ 143
Societies and Clubs.....................-..-...-... ...... ... ........ .. ...... .......... 144
Employment Bureau ........ .............................. ... 145
Laboratory School.... ...... ........-........-- ..... .. ...... ........ ...... ...... ..... 145
The Courses for Teachers of Trades and Industries....................................... 145
Summer Session English Council. .................................... ............. 146
L oan F unds................................... ................... .... ....................................... 146
Certificates and Extension of Certificates..................... ...... .........--........... .. 146
E expenses ....... ............... ............. .................. ........................................... ...........4.... 148
Rooming Facilities..... ........ ........ ... ....... ...... .............. .......... .. .............. 148
General Regulations........................... ....................... .. ...... ........... 150
Colleges and Schools................. ..................... .................................. 151
Graduate School...................... ..... ..... ...................... ... .......... ............................. .... 151
College of Agriculture.................................. ................... ................. 152
College of Arts and Sciences....... .......................... ............... 152
College of Business Administration................................................. 153
College of Education...... .. ........................ ............. ..... ............................ 153
College of Engineerin g.......................................................... ....... .............. 156
College of Law ..... .......... . .................................................. ......................... ......... 156
School of Architecture and Allied Arts.................. ....--- .... ...... ... 156
School of Pharm acy............... ...... .................... ................. ............................................. 156
Departm ents of Instruction........................ .. ....... .. ............... . ............ ............ 158
Agricultural Economics.......... ......... .......................................... 158
Agricultural Engineering -......... ... ...... ................................................... 158
Architecture, Painting and Allied Arts...............................- -...... ........... 158
Bacteriology ..... ............... ....... .. ..... .... ...... ..... .............. 158
Botany ...... ..........-- .................................... ......... ................. 158
Business Administration and Economics...- ...................... ..... .. ...................... 159
Chem istry ........................... ...... ............... ..... .... ....... ..---... .. ... ....- ....- ....... 160
Civil Engineering-......... .............. ..... ......... ...... .................. ......-- ....-- . 160
Commercial Education....................... ........... . ......... ......... .................... 161
Drawing .......... ................................................ 161
Economics ........ ...... ....... .. ............ --.... .... .. .......... ............. 161
Education ...................................................................... ................... .... 162
English ...... ........ ....... .......... ............. 165
French ...... ... ................... ............ .. ...... .. .. ---.. 165
General Natural Science........ ...................... ......... .......... 166
Handwriting ............................................ -.......----- ---. .. 167
Health and Physical Education............................. ....-- ... .- 167
History ............................. ...... .. ... ..... .. ...... ..... .... 168
Journalism .............................. .... ...... ......... ............ ..- ...-....- ... 168
Law .............................. ........................ ............. ..... ...-- .. ..- ...... ....... 169
M them atics ........... ..... ............ .............. ..... ... . ....... 170
M mechanic Arts........................... ....... .... ... ... .. .. 170
M music ............................ ...... ...... ....... .. ..- ...- ..- ............... .......... ..- ..- ..-- 171
Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology ........................ .......-....- ... ..... 171
Philosophy ................................- .... ........ ............ .. ... 172
Physics ......................... ....... ................... ---....-....... 172
Political Science............................................... ........... ..... 172
Psychology .....................................................-----. --. -- ......... 173
P public School A rt.............................................. .... ............................ ..... 173
Sociology ................ ....... ...........-- ..... ......- ....... ..- .... ... .-....... 174
Spanish ............. ....................... .... .... .---....- ........ 175
Speech .................... .. ........ ................... ..... ............. 175
Trades and Industrial Education........................ .... .......-.... ..-.. ..... 176
Questions and Answers.......................... .......... -.. ..... 177
Admission Information Blank...... ... ................ .... ....... ... ........ 179

[136]







IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO SUMMER TERM STUDENTS

All who expect to attend the 1935 Summer
Session at the University of Florida must fill
out the Admission Information blank on
page 179 and mail it to the Registrar, Uni-
versity of Florida, Gainesville. Previous at-
tendance at the University of Florida does
not waive this requirement.
Upon receipt of this questionnaire, the
Registrar will send a registration permit for
the 1935 Summer Term if the applicant is
eligible for admission. In order to save time
and confusion during registration, each per-
son who expects to register should mail in
this questionnaire before June 1, 1935.
Upon request, blank questionnaires will be
supplied by the Registrar.

PLEASE READ QUESTIONS AND
ANSWERS ON PAGES 177-178



IMPORTANT DIRECTIONS
TO STUDENTS
After arriving at the University:
1. For room reservations in the dormitories, see Mrs. Margaret Peeler, south end of
Buckman Hall, Room 43.
2. For outside boarding accommodations, see Dean of Women, Language Hall, Room 105,
or New Dormitory, Room 144.
3. For arrangements for boarding in the University Cafeteria, see Cashier, first floor of
Language Hall.
4. For information concerning social activities among women students, or any matter of
interest to women, see Dean of Women, Language Hall, Room 105, or New Dormitory,
Room 144.


[137]







SUMMER TERM CALENDAR


June 15, Saturday, 9 A.M. ........Placement tests, and the College Aptitude Test.
June 16, Sunday ........................... Dormitories open. First meal served in cafeteria Sunday
night.
June 17, Monday ....................Registration of students 8-12 A.M. and 1-4 P.M.
A late registration fee of $5 will be charged to those not
registering on this date.
June 18, Tuesday, 7:10 A.M.........Classes begin.
June 19, Wednesday ....................Last day for students to register in the First Summer Term,
or to add new courses to their schedules.
June 24, Monday ........................Last day for filing with the Registrar an application for
a degree or diploma to be conferred at the end of the
First Summer Term.
June 29, Saturday ................... Last day for making application to be designated as an
honor student.
July 4, Thursday 10 A.. ........Special exercises.
July 5, Friday ............................Last day for those receiving master's degree at the end of
the First Term to submit theses to Dean.
July 12, Friday ...... ...............Last day for those beginning graduate work to file with
the Dean application (Form 2) to be considered candi-
dates for advanced degrees.
July 17, Wednesday ...................Last day for filing application for an extension of certificate.
July 26, Friday, 12 M. ........... .First Summer Term ends. All grades for the First Term
are due in the Office of the Registrar at 5 P.M.
July 27, Saturday .....................Registration of students 8-12 A.M.
A late registration fee of $5 will be charged to those not
registering on this day.
July 28, Sunday, 8 P.M. ............Baccalaureate Sermon in the Auditorium.


July 29, Monday ..........

July 30, Tuesday ...........

August 3, Saturday .-


August 9, Friday -.....



August 21, Wednesday


...............Classes begin.
Commencement Address, 9 A.M.
...............Last day for students to register in the Second Summer
Term, or to add new courses to their schedules.
-...........Last day for filing with the Registrar an application for a
degree or diploma to be conferred at the end of the
Second Summer Term.
........--- Summer Law Term ends 5 P.M. Conferring of Law Degrees
8 P.M.
Last day for those receiving master's degree at the end
of the Second Term to submit theses to Dean.
..............Last day for filing an application for an extension of
certificate.


August 24, Saturday ....................Last day for those beginning graduate work to file with
the Dean application (Form 2) to be considered can-
didates for advanced degrees.
August 30, Friday, 12 M. ...........Second Summer Term ends. All grades for the Second
Term are due in the Office of the Registrar at 5 P.M.
Conferring of degrees at end of Second Summer Term,
8 P.M.


[1381







OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University.
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Acting Vice-President of the University and Dean of
the College of Arts and Sciences
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Director of the Summer Session
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Business Administra-
tion, Second Term
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, Business Manager
ELIZABETH SKINNER JACKSON, B.A., Dean of Women
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Dean of the College of Business Administration
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Acting Dean of the College of Agriculture
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education
GEORGE CLARENCE TILLMAN, M.D., Resident Physician
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E., Dean of Students
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Dean of the College of Law
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph D., Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D., Principal, Laboratory School

LIBRARY STAFF
CORA MILTIMORE, B.S., Librarian
ETHEL DONAHEY, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Acting Head Circulation Department
HENRIE MAY EDDY, M.S., Assistant Librarian and Head Reference Department
JEAN ELIZABETH HASELTON, B.A., Acting Assistant Catalog Department
DOROTHY GWENDOLYN LLOYD, B.A., B.S. in L. S., Acting Assistant in Periodicals and
Binding
ELIZABETH THORNE, B.A., Acting Head Catalog Department
MARIAN AMELIA YOUNGS, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Acting Assistant in Catalog and Reference
Departments
ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION

HELEN FRANCES AMUNDSEN, B.A., Secretary, College of Arts and Sciences
MADGE FORSYTH BAKER, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Business Manager
LEWIS F. BLALOCK, B.S.B.A., Assistant Registrar
J. B. GOODSON, Cashier
MARGARET MIXSON GRAMLING, Stenographer, Off:ce of the Registrar
PENELOPE GRIFFIN, B.A., Secretary, Graduate School
ROSA GRIMES, R.N., Head Nurse
HELOISE B. HANDLEY, Secretary, Office of the Dean of Students
GARLAND HIATT, B.A., Auditor
RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S. in Pharm., Chief Clerk, Office of Registrar
MARTHA ELIZABETH KNIGHT, Stenographer, Office of the Registrar
PRISCILLA MCCALL KENNEDY, Chief Clerk, College of Arts and Sciences
JOHN V. McQUITTY, M.A., Officer of Admissions
CLAUDE L. MURPHREE, B.A., University Organist
BURTON J. OTTE, M.S., Curator, Chemistry Department
MARY E. PARROTT, Secretary, Office of the President







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


MARGARET PEELER, Housekeeper
IRENE ERSKINE PERRY, B.S., Secretary, College of Education
ILA ROUNTREE PRIDGEN, Secretary, College of Law
ELEANOR GWYNNETH SHAW, Secretary, College of Agriculture
ELLEN E. TOPH, Acting Dietitian
NANNIE BELLE WHITAKER, B.A., Secretary, College of Business Administration
HESKIN ALEXANDER WHITTAKER, B.S.B.A., Recorder, Office of the Registrar
HOMER D. WINGATE, Auditor, Custodian Funds

FACULTY

LAWRENCE HARDIN AMUNDSEN, M.S., Chemistry
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D., Economics
ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D., French
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Economic Geography
GEORGE L. BIRD, M.A., Sociology
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D., General Natural Science
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, Ph.D., Physics
ERNEST JEROME BOWYER, B.A. in HPI., Health and Physical Education
Lucius MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D., Sociology
EILEEN FINKLE BROWN, R.N., School Nurse, Laboratory School
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D., General Natural Science
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., English
ARCHER STUART CAMPBELL, Ph.D., Economics
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D., Bacteriology
CLEVA JOSEPHINE CARSON, B.A., Public School Music
BERNARD VICTOR CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D., Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology
MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Botany
E. C. COMSTOCK, B.S., Trades Education
HENRY PHILIP CONSTANS, M.A., LL.B., Speech
JAMES DEWBERRY COPELAND, M.A., Business Education
ALFRED CRAGO, Ph.D., Education
CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B., Law
MANNING JULIAN DAUER, Ph.D., History
JAMES WESTBAY DAY, M.A., J.D., Law
FRANCIS MARION DEGAETANI, B.A.E., Spanish
CHARLOTTE DUNN, B.S., Kindergarten Education
ELMER JACOB EMIG, M.A., Journalism
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D., Philosophy
WILLIAM BARNETT FEACLE, Handwriting
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., English
JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D., Education
WILLIS LLOYD GARD, Ph.D., Education
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D., Agricultural Education
HALLETT HUNT GERMOND, Ph.D., Mathematics
WILLIAM LEWIS GOETTE, M.A.E., Education
ARTHUR SYLVESTER GREEN, M A., History and Political Science
ALAN DOUGLAS GRINSTED, M.A., Sociology
BERNICE MANSFIELD HACK, B.M., Public School Music
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D., Agricultural Economics







FACULTY


JAMES DOUGLAS HAYGOOD, M.A., Education
WILLIAM TROTTER HICKS, M.S., Economics
THOMAS JEFFERSON HIGGINS, M.A., Spanish
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Psychology
ZOLA PADGET HOLLIDAY, B.A.E., Elementary Education
ARTHUR ARIEL HOPKINS, M.A., Speech
HOMER HOWARD, M.A., Education
CHARLES ROY HUGHES, M.A., History
ROBERT WILLIAM HUSTON, M.A., French
JOSEPH BLISS JAMES, B.A.E., History
CHESTERFIELD HOWELL JANES, B.S.M.E., Drawing and Mechanic Arts
DOROTHEA KNOCKEL, M.S., Education
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Physics
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D., Mathematics
JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D., History
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Chemistry
WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, M.A., Education
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Education
MINNIE S. McAULEY, M.A., Elementary Education
SAMUEL W. MCINNIS, M.A., Mathematics
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Economics
HAROLD DIEDRICH MEYER, M.A., Sociology
INCORIE VAUSE MIKELL, B.M., Assistant to Kindergartner
JEAN OLTMAN MITCHELL, B A.E., Public School Art
WILLIAM EDGAR MOORE, M.A., English
ALTON CHESTER MORRIS, M.A., English
CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, M.A., English
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Education
BESSIE AMANDA NORTON, B.A.E., Public School Art
ANCIL NEWTON PAYNE, Ph.D., History
RUTH BEATRICE PEELER, M.A., Elementary Education
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D., Mathematics
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D., Chemistry
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., English
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Agricultural Engineering
ELLIS BENTON SALT, M.A., Health and Physical Education
WILLIAM LINCOLN SAWYER, B.S., Civil Engineering
FANNIE BELLE SHAW, M.A., Health Education
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Mathematics
LILA SINCLAIR, Public School Art
KENNETH GORDON SKAGGS, M.A., English
DEAN SLAGLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
BUNNIE OTHANEL SMITH, M.A., Education
HERMAN EVERETTE SPIVEY, M.A., English
KATHERINE SPROULL, B.A.E., Elementary Education
THOMAS BRADLEY STROUP, Ph.D., English
DANIEL CRAMER SWANSON, S.B., Physics
CLARENCE JOHN TESELLE, M.A., LL.B., Law







142 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

MAE ALENE TINDALL, M.A., Elementary Education
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Law
BENJAMIN REMINGTON WELD, M.A., Sociology
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Psychology
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D., Education

STUDENT ASSISTANTS

JOHN DAVIS KILBY, B.S.E., General Natural Science
BERT O'NEALL, Civil Engineering
WILLIAM EVERETT ROBINSON, M.S., General Natural Science
ROY WILLIAM RUSSELL, Education
GRACE ADAMS STEVENS, Education
(To be appointed), Law







GENERAL INFORMATION


ADMISSION

The prospective student should refer to the enclosed supplement to the Bulletin of
General Information for regulations concerning admission to the University.
Students are advised not to enter the University for the first time during the Summer
Session if they plan to continue in the University during the regular session of 1935-36.
Such students must pursue the comprehensive courses of the new General College, and these
courses will not be offered in the 1935 Summer Session.
Placement tests, including the College Aptitude Test, will be given Saturday, June 15,
beginning at 9 A.M.
COLLEGE OF LAW

Applicants for admission to the College of Law as candidates for degrees must be
eighteen years of age and must have received a degree in arts and science in a college or
university of approved standing; or must have fully satisfied the academic requirements
for a degree in a combined course in the University of Florida. The College of Arts and
Sciences and the College of Business Administration offer such a course. Evidence of
this work must be presented to the Registrar of the University on or before the day on
which the candidate wishes to register.


GENERAL INFORMATION

TWO TERMS

The Summer Session of 1935 will consist of two terms. The First Term will extend
from June 17 to July 26 and classes will meet five days per week. The Second Term
will begin on July 27 and end on August 30. Classes will meet six days per week during
the Second Term.
LECTURES AND ENTERTAINMENTS

Adequate facilities for entertainments and lectures are provided in the auditorium,
which has a seating capacity of 1800. Stress is placed upon performances by the students,
plays and musical entertainments being produced from time to time by students of the
Departments of Speech and Music.

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE

The moral and religious atmosphere of the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading
religious denominations have attractive places of worship, and students are welcomed at
every service. Transportation to and from church is provided for students who will
attend. Frequent devotional services are held in the University Auditorium in connection
with the Student Assembly.

THE Y. W.-Y. M. C. A.

The Y. M. C. A. Hall will be operated as a social center for the campus. An assistant
to the Dean of Women will be in charge and will take pleasure in doing everything possible
to make the student's stay pleasant so far as this department is concerned. A piano, reading
matter, committee rooms, kitchenette, ice water, games and other things to enable students
to pass leisure hours comfortably are in this building.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ATHLETICS

The gymnasium, basketball court, the baseball grounds, tennis courts, and swimming
pool are at the disposal of the students, and instructors are at hand to direct athletic
activities. A well-kept golf course is near the University, and for a nominal fee students
of the Summer Term are permitted to play.
The brick gymnasium will be used for women students exclusively; the basketball
gymnasium will be for men students exclusively. Dressing rooms will be provided in each
of these buildings; students will not be permitted to wear swimming suits or gymnasium
suits on the campus.
The following schedule will be employed for the use of the swimming pool:
Men and Women: 2-6 P.M. T. W. Th. F. S. Sun.

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

All students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly, which
will be held in the University Auditorium at hours scheduled below. Important announce-
mients will be made at the General Assembly, for the observance of which students will be
held responsible.
First week 9 A.M. Monday
Third week 10 A.M. Thursday
Fifth week 11 A.M. Wednesday
Seventh week 8 A.M. Wednesday
Ninth week 9 A.M. Friday

SOCIETIES AND CLUBS

PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University
during the spring of 1912. To be eligible for membership, a student must previously have
earned at the University at least thirty semester hours credit, must have been guilty of
no serious breaches of discipline, and must stand among the upper fifth of the graduating
class of the University. Candidates for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an
honor point average of at least 2.00 on all scholastic work. If a student comes within the
quota for his college, an average of 2.00 assures his eligibility, but if he does not come
within the quota, it is necessary that he have an average of 2.30 or higher.

KAPPA DELTA PI

Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary fraternity, similar to Phi Kappa Phi, except that only
juniors and seniors in the College of Education are eligible for membership.

KAPPA PHI KAPPA

Kappa Phi Kappa is an honorary professional fraternity for men. Students enrolled in
the College of Education with an honor point average of 1.5 are eligible for membership.

PEABODY CLUB

All students of the College of Education are eligible for membership in Peabody Club.
This organization meets weekly in Peabody auditorium, where instructive programs are
given.







GENERAL INFORMATION


COUNTY CLUBS

During each Summer Term, clubs are formed from each county of the State and many
interesting and delightful associations are formed among the students and members of the
faculty.
ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN

A mimeographed sheet is issued each day during the session. It appears on all bulletin
boards for the dissemination of information, changes in schedule, club meetings, lost and
found notices, etc. This is the medium used by faculty and students for announcements.
Each student should read the Orange and Blue Bulletin daily.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Peabody Hall and
Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are responsible for all an-
nouncements made in the General Assembly, on the bulletin boards, and in the Orange
and Blue Bulletin.

THE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

The Employment Bureau of the College of Education attempts to render a public ser-
vice. This is not mere mechanical routine of finding teaching positions for graduates;
the Bureau considers the welfare of the school concerned, and tries to get the right person
in the right teaching position.
There is no service fee for University graduates. Students who wish the help of the
bureau may arrange an interview with the Director and submit complete credentials. On
request this information is sent to school officials of the State.
Many specific requests are received from district trustees and county school boards.
Every effort is made to furnish these officials with information that will enable them
to select the teachers most likely to succeed in the schools concerned.
Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the Director of
the Teachers' Employment Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville.

LABORATORY SCHOOL

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School will conduct a few demonstration classes in the
elementary grades and the kindergarten. Provision will be made for four groups: kinder-
garten, combined first and second grades, combined third and fourth grades, combined
fifth and sixth grades. Application for enrollment should be sent to the Director of the
Laboratory School and as soon as possible, since the number who may be accommodated is
limited.
Registration of pupils will be held in Room 120, Yonge Building, Monday, June 17.
Classes will meet Wednesday, June 19, at 9 o'clock.

THE COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES

Special courses for teachers of trades and industries will be given during the first
Summer Term. The nature of the work may be learned by referring to the description
of the courses as announced on page 176. For further information write to Mr. C. O.
Holley, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Tallahassee, Florida, or to
the Director of the Summer Term, University of Florida.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


THE SUMMER SESSION ENGLISH COUNCIL

The Summer Session English Council meets every Tuesday evening after the first week
at 7:30 in Language 212. All teachers of English in junior and senior high schools are
invited to attend and take part in discussions. In addition to informal exchange of
opinion, helpful talks are given by various members of the Summer Session faculty on
pertinent topics.

STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY

For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University,
funds may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of twenty-five cents is made
on each account.

LOAN FUNDS

By means of the Florida State Scholarship Fund, the College Girls' Club Scholarship
Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan Fund, and the R. A. Gray Loan Fund.
the Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of women students
to help defray expenses in the current term. These loans are governed by the following
regulations:
(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for succeeding term of school.
(3) Applicant must be in need of aid.
(4) Applicant should apply for Scholarship Loan at least two weeks before opening of a
Summer Term.
(5) Application must be made directly to the Director of the Summer Session.
(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in which she is
teaching at the time of application.
(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at a University of Florida Summer Term.
(8) Loans will be for a period not to exceed nine months from the day on which a Summer
Term begins.
(9) Loans will bear interest at the rate of 8%. which will be added to the main fund.

Upon application to the Director of the Summer Session blank forms for application
for a scholarship loan will be furnished.

TEXTBOOKS

The University Book Store carries a full line of all textbooks used in the Summer
Session sold at list prices. The Book Store also handles stationery and other supplies.
Students may well bring English dictionaries and other books of reference. Students
in Education courses should bring professional books and textbooks related to courses they
plan to take.

CERTIFICATES

GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES

Graduates of the University are granted Graduate State Certificates without further
examination, provided that three-twentieths of their work has been devoted to professional
training and provided that they have satisfied the requirement of the law as to the Consti-
tution of the United States. It is well for the student to note that a Graduate State Certifi-
cate permits him to teach only those subjects that are listed on such certificate, and that
only those subjects will be placed on his certificate in which he has specialized in his
college course. This will ordinarily mean that a subject must have been pursued at least












GENERAL INFORMATION


three years in college, in addition to credit for all high school courses offered in that
subject by a standard high school, before a certificate to teach that subject will be granted.
The student who expects to meet the requirements for specialization should familiarize
himself with the regulations regarding specialization as printed in the Handbook for Teach-
ers, Section 1, latest edition, published by the State of Florida, Department of Public In-
struction. Applicants for the Graduate State Certificate must apply to Superintendent W. S.
Cawthon, Tallahassee, for application blanks and further information.
Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by "presenting
satisfactory evidence of having taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under
a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of three holders of Life State,
Life Graduate State, or Life Professional Certificates." Application for a Life Graduate
State Certificate must be filed before the expiration of the Graduate State Certificate.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES

The following more important items govern the granting of extension of certificates:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended
and at the time formal application for extension is made.
2. The applicant must pass six semester hours in which no grade is below a
"C." At least one-third of this work must be in professional subjects.
3. Courses in Education and all other courses which definitely apply toward
meeting the requirements for a diploma or a degree are counted as profes-
sional subjects.
4. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply
for the same on the student Registration Card. In case the student fails to
apply on the Regis:ration Card at time of registration, request may be made
to the Registrar, Room 110, Language Hall, to have his application for
extension properly recorded. A list of those who have applied will be
posted on the bulletin boards in Language Hall and Peabody Hall not later
than July 1 for the First Term and August 12 for the Second Term. In
case of error in this list, students should report to the Registrar. No student
will be recommended for extension whose name does not appear on this
list by July 17 for the First Term or August 19 for the Second Term. Stu-
dents should register under exactly the same name that appears on the
certificate which they wish to have extended.
5. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to W. S.
Cawthon, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida,
within a year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension
will not be granted.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EXPENSES

GENERAL FEES
Tuition ..........--- .- ... ....-- -...........-.. ....... .......$00.00
Registration fees, each term:
Florida Students ---................... .. ... ....... ...........................$15.00
($25.00 for both terms if paid in advance)
Non-Florida Students .......................... .. ...................... 25.00
($35 for both terms if paid in advance)
College of Law (one term of eight weeks) ............................ 30.00
($6 a semester hour for less than five hours)
Demonstration School (First Term only) .............................. 6.00
Kindergarten (First Term only) ................. ... ....... ........ 9.00
Breakage fee for Biology and Chemistry ...................... ........-- ....-....... ... 5.00
Diplom a fee ....................... ... ...... ..... ........... ................ 5.00
Failure fee, per sem ester hour ... ............. ...................... ..... ................. 2.50
(For any course failed during the last term of attendance, except
that no fee will be assessed for any course failed before the
Summer Session, 1933.)
Late Registration fee ......... ......................................... ........ 5.00
R oom R registration fee ..................... .....- ... .... ..... ........-- ...... .......... 5.00
(Payable May 1 for First Term and June 5 for ihe Second Term.
This fee is held as a breakage fee, to be returned at the end of the
term if no damage to the room has been reported.)

REFUND OF FEES
Fees paid in advance for room reservations will be refunded up to and including, but
not after June 1, for First Term reservations, or July 1 for Second Term reservations.
If by Wednesday of the first week of each term students for any reason wish to with-
draw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3. will be refunded. No refunds
will be made after this date.
No refunds of laboratory fees will be made after the first two weeks of each term.
The instructor has the right to refuse any refund of laboratory fees when these funds have
been used in the purchase of supplies.



ROOMING FACILITIES

UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES

The University dormitories are reserved for women students during the Summer Session.
Rooms are rented for the term or session, payable in advance. The dormitories will be open
from June 16 to noon August 31.
Rooms may be reserved at any time by application to the Business Manager. A de-
posit of $5 is required with each reservation, payable May 1 for reservations for the first
term, and June 5 for the second. This deposit is held as a breakage fee, to be returned
at the close of the term if no damage to the room has been reported.
All bedrooms are furnished with single beds and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table,
washstand, and chairs. Students must furnish linen and other things they may require
for their own special comfort and convenience.
Students are not permitted to cook in the dormitories.






ROOMING FACILITIES


NEW DORMITORY
The New Dormitory is of strictly fireproof construction. Rooms are arranged in suites,
consisting of study and bedroom, and accommodating two students. A limited number of
single rooms and several suites accommodating three students are available. All rooms
are equipped with lavatories and built-in chifforobes, with adjacent bathrooms containing
lavatories and hot and cold showers. They are furnished with two beds, study tables, and
chairs. Additional easy chairs may be secured at a rental charge of 50c a term.
RATES Both Terms
First Term Second Term in Advance
Single rooms, floors 1, 2, and 3 .............................. $15.75 $13.25 $26.00
Single rooms, floor 4 ............................ .............. 15.00 12.50 25.00
Two-room suites, floors 1, 2, and 3 ............................ 15.00 12.50 25.00
Two-room suites, floor 4 ...................................... 12.75 10.75 21.00

THOMAS HALL
Sections "D" and "E" of Thomas Hall have been remodeled throughout. Both single
and double rooms are available. All rooms in Section "E" and the single rooms in Section
"D" are equipped with lavatories.
The rooms in other sections are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom,
accommodating three students. A number of rooms accommodating four students and
a few single rooms are available.
Baths, with lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of each sec-
tion, thus providing a bathroom for each four rooms. Rooms are furnished with beds,
chifforobes, study tables, and chairs.
RATES Both Terms
First Term Second Term in Advance
Single rooms, Sections D and E ........................... $14.25 $12.00 $24.00
Double rooms, Section D .................. ............... 11.25 9.50 19.00
Double rooms. Section E ........-................... ..... 12.00 10.00 20.00
All other rooms .-........... .....-.. ....... .. ....- 9.00 7.50 15.00

BUCKMAN HALL
Rooms in Buckman Hall are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom, and
accommodating three students. A number of suites accommodating four students are
available. Bath, with lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor
of each section, thus providing a bathroom for each four suites. Rooms are furnished
with beds, chifforobes, study tables, and chairs.
RATES Both Terms
First Term Second Term in Advance
All rooms ... --. --. .................. .. .. .......... $ 9.00 $ 7.50 $15.00

UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA
Meals may be obtained at the University Cafeteria at the following rates:
Three meals a day for four weeks, tickets .................... ............................ $19.00
Two meals a day for four weeks, tickets ........................ ...... ....... 16.50
Three meals a day for one week, ticket .......................................... 5.00
MEALS WITHOUT TICKETS
Breakfast ................... .... ............. $ .25
Dinner ............... .................... 35
Supper .................. ...............--. ... .30







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


OFF-CAMPUS ROOMING ACCOMMODATIONS

A number of comfortable rooming and boarding houses off the campus will be open
during the Summer Session. A list of approved rooming houses may be secured by ap-
plying to the Dean of Students. Living expenses off the campus will be somewhat higher
than University rates.
In no case will men and women he permitted to room in the same house; special
arrangements will be made in the case of married couples.


GENERAL REGULATIONS

The student is advised to procure the University Bulletin entitled By-Laws and acquaint
himself with all general regulations. Particular attention is invited to the following items:

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two regular
terms, or one regular term and three summer terms, or five summer terms. New students
offering advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the University.
Students who break their residence at the University by attending another institution for
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University. See
also Section 5 below.
2. For the master's degree two regular terms or six summer terms are necessary to
satisfy the residence requirements.
3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (27 for the Normal
Diploma; 28 in the College of Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during
regular residence in the college from which the student is to be graduated. Exception
to this regulation may be made only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the
college concerned, but in no case may the amount of extension work permitted exceed
more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required for a baccalaureate degree.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED
No person shall be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree
by correspondence study and extension class. No person shall be allowed to take more
than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's degree by correspondence study
or extension class. No person shall be allowed to take more than 9 credits of work by
correspondence during the summer vacation period. While in residence, a student shall
not be allowed to take work by correspondence without the consent of the dean. This will
be granted only in exceptional cases. In the case of candidates for the Normal Diploma,
the students may not take more than 16 credits by correspondence or extension.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
The minimum load of any student in a Summer Term shall be four hours.
The maximum load, including work by correspondence or extension, shall be regulated
according to the following schedule:
Maximum load
Honor Point average for previous Term Summer Term
Below 2 ..................-..................-.... . .............. ... 6 hours
2 or above .......................-..-. ....-...... ........... ..... 8 hours

For persons who have not previously attended the University of Florida. the maximum
load is six hours.







REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE


STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dean of their
college, regarding choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to this,
juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which they expect
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be
dropped or changed only through the office of the dean of the College.


COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The major courses are regularly numbered above 500 and the minors between 300 and
500, but there is no objection to counting a course above 500 in one department as a minor
in another. On the other hand, there are courses in the 300 and 400 number that are not
acceptable as minors.
As a usual thing, undergraduate students are not permitted to register for courses that
are numbered above 500.
A number of courses have already been arranged that may count as majors. Efforts
will be made to arrange still others upon request. If the major work wished is not listed,
requests for it should be made at an early date.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

A candidate for the master's degree must be in residence for at least one scholastic year,
devoting his entire time during this period to study and research. The Summer Session of
eleven weeks will count as one-third of a year. One-half of this term will be one-sixth
of a year.
In addition to registration for the courses which a graduate student wishes to take, he
must have an application blank (Form 2) properly filled out and presented to the Dean of
the Graduate School not later than July 15 for the First Term or August 24 for the Second
Term. These blanks may be secured at the time of registration from the Dean of the
Graduate School.
The candidate must complete one major and two minors. A major consists of twelve
semester-hours of rank above the senior class. A minor consists of six semester-hours of
rank above the sophomore class.
In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em-
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer.
A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely allied to the major
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. The
thesis itself should be completed and submitted in time to allow an interval of three
full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the summer term.
A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language is required.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


All students majoring in Education are required to take Education 500. All others
taking Education are advised to take this course.
The passing grade for graduate students is B.
The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from the time
of first registering for graduate work.
For requirements for the Ph.D. degree and other information in regard to graduate work
see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

The College of Agriculture can offer but a limited number of courses during the First
Summer Term. Regular students and teachers may take these for college credit. Voca-
tional agricultural students may be interested in taking some as minors for advanced de-
grees, others as additional training for teaching.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

With the exception of a few departments, the College of Arts and Sciences operates
during the Summer Session much as it does during regular sessions.
The College offers eight curricula, each of which is designed to meet the needs of a
large group of students. The purposes, general requirements, and provisions of these
curricula are described briefly below. For further details, see the Bulletin of Courses.

UPPER AND LOWER DIVISIONS
The work of the College, in all curricula, is divided into a Lower Division and an
Upper Division. Students remain in the Lower Division until they have completed re-
quirements for admission to the Upper Division (see the Bulletin of Courses, pages 221-
224, for these requirements), and they should fulfill these requirements before taking
courses in the Upper Division.
The student in the Upper Division must complete a major, consisting of at least eighteen
semester hours above the foundation courses, and two minors in related subjects, each con-
sisting of at least nine hours above the foundation course, or a double minor, consisting
of at least eighteen hours above the foundation course.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS

In this curriculum special emphasis is placed upon the humanities and the social sciences.
College English, foreign language, mathematics, and a basic year-course in one of the
natural sciences are required.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Students interested primarily in the sciences should select this curriculum. Each
student must elect one science of which he is expected to gain mastery. Included in the
requirements are cultural courses and a limited amount of foreign language.

COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAW COURSES
The College offers pre-law training in curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor
of Arts and Bachelor of Laws, and Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Laws. For stu-
dents who make adequate scholastic progress it is possible to earn the academic and law
degrees in six years, of which three are spent in the College of Arts and Sciences, and
three in the College of Law.







THE COLLEGES


PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM

The College offers courses by which students may prepare to meet requirements for
admission to the medical schools. Only the first year of this curriculum is prescribed.
During the remaining years of pre-medical work, the student should select courses in
accordance with requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes to enter,
and he should correspond with the registrar or the dean of that school for information
and advice.
PRE-DENTAL CURRICULUM

Students who expect to enter the study of dentistry should enroll for the first year in
the pre-medical curriculum. Each student who enters this curriculum should correspond
with the registrar or the dean of the school he wishes to enter for information and advice.

CURRICULA LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM

Two curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism are offered, one
with a major in newspaper writing, and the other in newspaper management.
Three courses in journalism are offered during the First Summer Term. These courses
are organized for public school administrators, supervisors, and teachers, as well as for
students attending the regular terms. They are designed for those who are majoring in other
fields and desire electives in journalism, those who may wish to pursue courses during the
summer term leading toward the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, and those who
wish to work toward the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in journalism.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The College of Business Administration will operate during the Summer Session as during
the regular terms. The courses offered will appeal to students attending the regular terms
who wish to return during the Summer Session, and to teachers and others who wish to take
courses to prepare for teaching commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare for
teaching social sciences.
Attention of teachers attending the Second Summer Term is especially invited to Bs. 103,
Principles of Human Geography.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

UPPER AND LOWER DIVISIONS

The College of Education is composed of a Lower and an Upper Division. The Lower
Division contains all students who have not satisfied the requirements for admission to the
Upper Division. For details regarding the regulations of the Upper and Lower Division,
Honor Students, and Honors Graduation, the student is referred to the Bulletin of By-Laws.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

DEGREES OFFERED

Students completing any of the prescribed four-year courses may obtain the respective
degree: i.e., Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Education, Bachelor of
Science in Agricultural Education, Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education,
or Bachelor of Arts in Health and Physical Education.
Students completing the prescribed course may obtain the Normal Diploma.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


MAJORS AND MINORS

In the following discussion a major is defined to consist of 18 credit hours above the
elementary year-course in a subject other than Education. A minor is ordinarily defined
to consist of 9 credit hours above the elementary year-course in a subject other than
Education, but in case the number of hours thus specified is not sufficient to meet the
requirements necessary for certification, the student should take enough additional hours
to meet these requirements.
One major and two minors or one major and a double minor are required of students
in the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education or Bachelor of
Science in Education.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA AND TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN' EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

Lower Division

Leading to the Normal Diploma. For Those Who Expect to Teach in First Six Grades
CREDITS
Education .................... ...-.......... ....................... ...... ......................... . ...... 20
This must include:
En. 103-Health Education.
En. 121-Primary Methods.
or
En. 124--The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades.
En. 122-Teaching Reading and Literature in the First Six Grades.
En. 201-The Teaching of the Social Sciences in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth
Grades.


or
[ En. 221-Advanced Primary Methods.
En. 207-Educational Psychology.
En. 209-The Teaching of Science in the First Six Grades.
SEn. 253-Supervised Teaching of the Elementary Subjects.
or
En. 308-The Elementary School Curriculum.
General Natural Science 101-102.................................................................................
Sociology 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies.................................................
English 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition................................................ ...
P public School A rt...................... ......... ............................................................. ........
Public School M usic................. ...................................... ..... .................. ... ................
H andw writing 101 ....................... .. ......................................... ....................................
M major and M inors.............................. .. .............. ................................. ...
E lectives ..................... ... ..... ......... .. .................. ...................


8
4,5, or 6
4,5, or 6
4
4
0
18
0,1,2,3, or 4


Total credits needed ......... ...-........... ....................... .. 66
Upper Division
E education ................................. .............. ...... ................. ................ ..... 12
This must include:
En. 308*-The Public School Curriculum.
En. 319 -Child and Adolescent Psychology.
Complete one major** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives
approved by the Dean..............-................ .....-- .. ....-- ............. 54

Total credits needed in upper division ........... ................................. 66
Total credits and Honor Points............................... .... ...................... .... 132

*En. 308 is required of all students who have not taken En. 200. Students who have taken
En. 200 will not be permitted to take En. 308.
**For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the natural
sciences.







THE COLLEGES


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DECREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
For Those Who Expect to Teach in the Junior and Senior High School
Lower Division
CREDITS
Education ....................................-... ........... .... .... ............. 6
This must include:
En. 101-Introduction to Education.
En. 207-Educational Psychology.
English 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition......--..............-....--........................ 4,5, or 6
English 103-104--Introduction to Literature...... ....................... ... ............. 4,5, or 6
General Natural Science 101-102 ---..........----- ................. ............... 8
Sociology 111-112- Introduction to Social Studies......-...........- ................. ............ 4,5, or 6
Speech 201- Public Speaking .................-- ........-.............. ........................ ........ 2 or 3
Major and minors and electives approved by the Dean........................................... 31-40

Total credits and honor points needed in Lower Division...........................--..... 66

Upper Division
Education --.------------....................... -...... ....----- ... 21
*This must include:
En. 319-Child and Adolescent Psychology.
En. 323-General Methods.
En. 403-Problem-Project Method.
**Supervised Student Teaching (two courses).
Complete one major*** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives
approved by the Dean ...... .......- ..- ... .......................... 45

Total credits and honor pins needed in Upper Division............................ 66
Total Credits and Honor Points ...............-- ...-- ... ...-- ............ ..... 132

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA
If, while the student is working on the curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree, he
desires to secure the Normal Diploma, he may do so when he has satisfactorily completed
the following work:
Education -- --............ ................................... 12
This must include:
En. 101-Introduction to Education.
En. 207-Educational Psychology.
En. 323-General Methods.
Supervised Teaching (one course)
English 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition -....... .............. .. ............... 4,5, or 6
English 103-104-Introduction to Literature.............-- ---.................... 4.5, or 6
****General Natural Science 101-102-..................... .......... ...........................------ 8
Sociology 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies----............................... ....... 4,5, or 6
M major and minors............................ ...........- -----.... ......... .................. 28-- 34

Total credits and honor points needed for Normal Diploma........................... 66
For the curriculum in Health and Physical Education, the student is referred to the
Bulletin of Courses.

*In addition to the courses listed above, students preparing to become principals must take
En. 305, 317, and 401, or 406 or 408.
**These two courses must be selected in accordance with the major and two minors in which
the student is working.
***For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the nat-
ural sciences.
'***Students who major or minor in natural science are not required to take Gl. 101-102. It
may be taken as an elective.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

The courses offered by the College of Engineering in the Summer Session of 1935 are
limited to one course each in Drawing, Wood Shop, and Surveying. These courses are
the same in content and will be given the same credit as courses of the same designation
and number given in the regular terms. They will be administered by the same personnel
as offer these courses in the regular terms.
Those interested in enrolling in any of the courses should communicate directly with
the Dean of the College of Engineering. Attention is invited to the fact that because these
are all laboratory courses, and must be supported entirely from the fees obtained, special
laboratory fees are charged in addition to the Summer Term registration fee. If less than
ten students should enroll for any one course, the right to omit the course is reserved. The
courses offered are: Dg. 101-102-104-Mechanical Drawing, Cl. 101-Surveying, and Me.
101-Woodshop.
SUMMER CAMP SURVEYING

During the Summer Session of 1935 a summer surveying camp (Cl. 209) will be held
under auspices of the Civil Engineering Department, for all sophomore civil engineers.
This is a required course but will be open to all other qualified students who have had
CI. 207 or its equivalent.

COLLEGE OF LAW

Since 1909, the purpose of the College of Law has been to impart a thorough scientific,
and practical knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the op-
portunities in this field. Since 1927, the College has operated during the Summer Session.
Requirements and standards of the regular terms have been maintained. Courses offered
during the regular terms are rotated. Courses not given during the regular terms are taught
in the Summer Session. The variety of courses is sufficient to enable students of different
types to carry a full load.
The courses offered, all counting towards a degree, appeal to a wide range of students.
Those who have never studied law are given suitable instruction. Advanced students may
hasten the time of their graduation. Practicing attorneys may review basic subjects and
familiarize themselves with new ones. Students in other fields who desire a knowledge of
the law applicable thereto may carry one or more law courses in conjunction with their
other studies.

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

The School of Architecture and Allied Arts offers curricula leading to the degrees of
Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Bachelor of Fine Arts. Courses in this division
will be offered in the Summer Session for the benefit of students who wish to make up
deficiencies in their regular work and for those who are interested in increasing their
knowledge of architecture, painting, drawing, and the allied arts and crafts. By special
arrangement, these courses may he taken without university credit by qualified individuals
who do not desire to matriculate in the Universi:y.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

Courses offered by the School of Pharmacy are so rotated that all courses of major
interest are offered during the course of several summers. Foundation courses such as
Botany. Bacteriology, and Chemistry may also be offered during the Summer Session.






THE COLLEGES 157

The courses offered will appeal: First, to students attending the regular session who
wish to make more rapid progress toward graduation; Second, to drug clerks and appren-
tices who are ambitious to improve their knowledge of Pharmacy.
Mature students who have not completed entrance requirements may with the approval
of the Director of the School and the Director of the Summer Session enroll as "Adult
Specials" provided all other requirements of the Summer Session are met.
A graduate course in Pharmacology will also be offered during the Summer Session.
Address the Director of the School of Pharmacy for information.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

All classes meet for fifty minutes beginning at ten minutes past the hour. In
the first term classes scheduled to meet daily meet M. T. W. Th. F., while in the
second term classes scheduled to meet daily meet M. T. W. Th. F. S.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
First Term
As. 405.-Agricultural Prices. 3 credits. HAMILTON.
Section 1. 9 daily. (2 extra hours to be arranged). H-215.
Section 2. (July 8 to July 26). Hours to be arranged.
Prices of farm products and the factors affecting them. FEE: $1.
As. 409.-Cooperative Marketing. 11 daily. H-215. Laboratory 1-3 T. Th.
H-215. 3 credits. HAMILTON. Prerequisite: As. 201.
Cooperative buying and selling organizations, their successes and failures; methods of organi-
zation, financing, and business management. One field trip, at an estimated cost of $5, paid when
trip is made. LABORATORY FEE: $2.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
First Term
Ag. 302.-Farm Motors. 8 daily. A-106a. Laboratory 4 hours, to be arranged.
3 credits. ROGERS.
The source of power on the farm; automobile, tractor, stationary gasoline engines, electric
motors, and windmills. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Ag. 405.-Horticultural Machinery. 10 daily. A-106a. Laboratory, 4 hours,
to be arranged. 3 credits. ROGERS.
The machinery used in the cultivation, harvesting, marketing, and refrigeration of fruits and
vegetables.
ARCHITECTURE, PAINTING, AND ALLIED ARTS

Courses which are listed in the regular bulletin of the School of Architecture and
Allied Arts may be taken for credit by Summer Session students by special arrangement
with the Director of the School, and by a payment of a fee of $5 per credit hour.

BACTERIOLOGY
First Term
Bcy. 301.-General Bacteriology. 8 daily. S-111, Laboratory 9-11 daily. S-104.
4 credits. CARROLL.
Morphology, physiology, cultivation, and identification of bacteria and related micro-organisms
and their relation to diseases and other human problems. FEE: $10.
Bcy. 304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology. 5 hours and 5 two-hour laboratory peri-
ods, to be arranged. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bcy. 301.
Identification, cultivation of disease-producing micro-organisms; special technique for diagnostic
tests; theories and principles of immunity, and prevention of disease. FEE: $10.

BOTANY
First Term
*Bty. 101.-General Botany. 9 daily. S-111. Laboratory 1:30-3:30 daily. S-2.
4 credits. CODY.
Structure and life histories of many important algae, fungi, mosses, and ferns. Holman and
Robbins, Textbook of General Botany; Mimeographed Outlines of General Botany (Pt. I). LABORA-
TORY FEE: $5.
Students wishing to satisfy a year's credit in Botany may register for Bty. 101 and 102.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


*Bty. 102.-General Botany. 11 daily. S-111. Laboratory 4-6 daily. S-2.
4 credits. CODY.
Structure, functioning, and identification of important seed plants. Holman and Robbins,
Textbook of General Botany; Mimeographed Outlines of General Botany (Pt. II). LABORATORY
FEE: $5.
Students wishing to satisfy a year's credit in Botany may register for Bty. 101 and 102.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS
First Term
Bs. sl02E.-Economic History of the United States. 10 daily. L-210. 2
credits. MATHERLY.
Industrial development of America; exploitation of natural resources; history of manufac-
turing, banking, trade, transportation, etc.; evolution of industrial centers; historical factors
contributing to growth of the United States.
Bs. s201E.-Principles of Economics. 11 daily. L-10. 2 credits. M. D.
ANDERSON.
A general understanding of present day economic organization; brief analysis of production,
distribution, and consumption.
Bs. s211.-Principles of Accounting. 8 daily. L-201. 2 credits. CAMPBELL.
Lectures, problems, and laboratory practice. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
Bs. s212.-Principles of Accounting. 9 daily. L-201. 2 credits. CAMPBELL.
Continuation of Bs. 211. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
Bs. s302E.-Elements of Statistics. 8 daily. L-10. 2 credits. M. D. ANDER-
SON. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
An introduction to statistics; brief consideration of statistical theory; collection, classification,
and presentation of economic data; construction of graphs and charts; study of index numbers;
problems of statistical research. Each student is required to complete one or more projects in
statistical investigation.
Bs. s311.-Advanced Accounting. 11 daily. L-201. 2 credits. CAMPBELL.
Prerequisite: Bs. 211-212.
Lectures and problems. Advanced study in accounting theory and practice. Special types of
problems involving partnerships, corporations, valuation of various types of assets, analysis of
financial statements, etc. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
Bs. s321E.-Financial Organization of Society. 9 daily. L-203. 2 credits.
MATHERLY. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
An introduction to the field of finance. The pecuniary organization of society; monetary
systems; banks and institutions connected with short-term and long-term financing.
Bs. s351E.-Transportation Principles. 9 daily. L-10. 2 credits. M. D.
ANDERSON. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
Development of transportation; the place of transportation in the economic order; types of
transportation agencies; railway transportation; rate making; government regulation of railroads.

Second Term
Bs. sl01E.-Economic History of England. 8 daily. L-201. 2 credits. HICKS.
A survey of economic history; evolution of capitalistic economy in England; development of
the wage system; the Industrial Revolution; growth of British trade; relation of economic de-
velopment to political policy; effect of England's industrial progress on the United States.
Bs. sl03.-Principles of Human Geography. 9 daily. L-204. 2 credits.
ATWOOD.
Basic principles underlying the study and teaching of Modern Geography; the earth as a
planet; wind systems; seasons; elements of meteorology; weather and climate; land forms. How
peoples have adjusted life and work to changing world environment. Correlation between geography
and history is stressed. Opportunity given students who wish to carry on special studies relating
to any specific part of the course. LABORATORY FEE: $1.
Bs. s202E.-Principles of Economics. 11 daily. L-201. 2 credits. HICKS.
Continuation of Bs. 201E.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Bs. s431E.-Principles of Marketing. 9 daily. L-201. 2 credits. HICKS.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
The marketing structure of industrial society; fundamental functions in the marketing process
and methods; agencies, and factors responsible for development and execution of these functions;
marketing problems of the manufacturer, wholesaler, and different types of retailers; marketing
functions in business management.
Bs. s485E.-International Economic Relations. 8 daily. L-204. 2 credits.
ATWOOD.
Historical study of the development of international economic policies; geographic, economic,
social, and political factors underlying contemporary international problems; economic and
political methods employed by leading commercial nations to expand their economic interests in
Latin America, Asia, and Africa.

CHEMISTRY
First Term
Cy. sl0l.-General Chemistry. 9 and 11 T. W. Th. F. C-112. Laboratory
1-5 T. Th. C-230. 4 credits. AMUNDSEN.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry and preparation and properties of the common
non-metallic elements and their compounds. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 232.-Elementary Physical Chemistry. 9 and 11 T. W. Th. F. C-110.
Laboratory 1-5 T. Th. C-230. 4 credits. POLLARD.
A study of the gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter; the properties of solutions and
colloids. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 262a.-Organic Chemistry. 9 daily. C-212. Laboratory 1-5:30 T. Th.
C-230. 2% credits. LEIGH.
The more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds, chiefly for students in applied biological
fields. Suitable for those premedical students who desire only five hours of organic chemistry. No
credit allowed until Cy. 262b is completed. LABORATORY FEE: $5 (includes fee for 262b).
Cy. 601.-Chemical Research. 0 credit. POLLARD, BLACK.
Required of graduate students majoring in chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

Second Term
Cy. sl02.-General Chemistry, continued. 9 and 11 T. W. Th. F. C-110.
Laboratory 1-5 T. Th. C-230. 4 credits. POLLARD.
Metallic elements and their compounds. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 262b.-Organic Chemistry, continued. 9 M. T. W. Th. F. C-212. Labora-
tory 1-5:30 T. Th. C-230. 212 credits. LEIGH.
A continuation of Cy. 262a, which must have been completed before the student is eligible to
register for Cy. 262b.
Cy. 602.-Chemical Research. 0 credit. POLLARD, BLACK.
Required of graduate students majoring in chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.


CIVIL ENGINEERING

First Term

Cl. 101.-Surveying. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory to be arranged. 2
credits. SAWYER. Prerequisite: Trigonometry.
The use of chain, compass, transit, and level; determination of areas, and instrumental ad-
justments. Field work in chaining, leveling, compass and transit surveys. Drawing-room work in
calculations from field notes, and map-drawing. Textbook: Breed and Hosmer, Vol. 1, The Prin-
ciples and Practice of Surveying. FEE: $3.
Note: The right to withdraw this course is reserved in the event enrollment falls below ten.











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


CI. 209.-Surveying. 3 hours, and 40 hours laboratory. 6 credits. SAWYER.
Prerequisite: Cl. 207.
Field astronomy and hydrographic surveying. Field work: the making of a complete topo-
graphical survey; tests and adjustments of instruments; precise leveling, base line work; determin-
ation of time, latitude, and azimuth; triangulation and traverse; hydrographic surveying and
stream gauging. Drawing room work on balancing surveys, reducing field notes, map drawing,
triangulation, and computations. Text: Breed and Hosmer, Higher Surveying Vol. II. LABORATORY
FEE: $6. Students registering for this course may not register for any other course.

COMMERCIAL EDUCATION

First Term

Note: Shorthand and Typing are required for certification in Commercial Subjects.

En. 83.-Typewriting for Beginners. Laboratory 1-3 daily. Y-226. 2 credits.
COPELAND.
FEE: $10.
En. 84.-Advanced Typewriting. Laboratory 3-5 daily. Y-226. 2 credits.
COPELAND.
FEE: $10.
En. 85.-Shorthand for Beginners. 9 daily. Y-226. 2 credits. COPELAND.
FEE: $5.
En. 86.-Advanced Shorthand and Dictation. 10 daily. Y-226. 2 credits.
COPELAND.
FEE: $5.
Second Term

En. 83.-Typewriting for Beginners. Laboratory 1-3 M. T. W. Th. F. Y-226.
2 credits. COPELAND.
FEE: $10.
En. 84.-Advanced Typewriting. Laboratory 3-5 M. T. W. Th. F. Y-226.
2 credits. COPELAND.
FEE: $10.
En. 85.-Shorthand for Beginners. 9 daily. Y-226. 2 credits. COPELAND.
FEE: $5.
En. 86.-Advanced Shorthand and Dictation. 10 daily. Y-226. 2 credits.
COPELAND.
FEE: $5.
DRAWING

First Term

Dg. 101-102-104.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 hours for each course to be ar-
ranged. 1 credit each. ESHLEMAN or JANES.
Geometrical problems, lettering, and dimensioning. FEE: $3 for each course.
Note: The right to withdraw this course is reserved in the event enrollment falls below ten.

ECONOMICS

Courses in Economics are scheduled under Business Administration and are marked E.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EDUCATION

First Term

En. slOl.-Introduction to Education. 2 credits.
Section 1. For those who have never taught. 8 daily. P-206.
W. A. LITTLE.
Section 2. For experienced teachers. 2 daily. P-206. W. A. LITTLE.
Introduction to the study of classroom teaching.
En. sl21.-Primary Methods. 9 daily. P-206. 2 credits. TINDALL. Pre-
requisite or parallel courses: En. 101, En. 207, or any methods course.
Arithmetic, language, writing, and spelling in the first three grades.
En. s122.-The Teaching of Reading and Literature in the First Six Grades.
10 daily. P-201. 2 credits. TINDALL. Prerequisite or parallel courses: En.
101, or En. 207.
The basic importance of reading in the elementary school; reading as a tool study; methods
of teaching reading, etc.
En. s124.-The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Grades.
11 daily. P-208. 2 credits. W. A. LITTLE.
En. s207.-Educational Psychology. 8 daily. P-201. 2 credits. WISE.
Psychology applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc.
En. 209.-The Teaching of the Sciences in the First Six Grades. 2 credits.
Section 1. 7 A.M. daily. Y-142. GOETTE.
Section 2. 4 daily. Y-142. GOETTE.
Note: Required for certification in elementary school subjects.
En. s221.-Advanced Primary Methods. 12 daily. P-201. 2 credits. TINDALL.
En. s253.-Supervised Teaching in the Elementary Subjects. 10 daily. Y-228.
2 credits. HAYGOOD.
En. s305.-Development and Organization of Education. 9 daily. L-109. 2
credits. GARD.
En. s308.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 1 daily. P-4. 2 credits.
HAYGOOD.
An attempt to formulate curriculum principles based on social conditions and social needs;
demands made on the curriculum by the social-economic outlook. Note: This course or En. 200
is required for certification in Elementary School Subjects.
En. 312.-The Teaching of Foreign Languages in the Secondary School.
2 daily. P-201. 2 credits. HAYGOOD.
En. s317.-Tests and Measurements. 11 daily. S-202. 2 credits. CRAGO.
An elementary course to aid the teacher in the use of tests in improvement of instruction and
solution of school problems. One hour of laboratory work per week is required. LABORATORY
FEE: $1.50.
En. s319.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. 12 daily. S-202. 2 credits.
CRAGO.
The nature and development of the child from birth to adolescence with reference to Education.
En. s323.-General Methods in the Secondary School. 9 daily. P-208. 2
credits. SMITH.
En. s351.-The Field of Adult Education. 9 daily. Y-150. 2 credits. GARRIS.
An introductory course in Adult Education. Major considerations: What constitutes Adult
Education; its history; aims, and objectives; existing types; problems on organization; adminis-
tration, and instruction. Assignments will call for reports on the phases of present-day Adult
Education. Reports will be the basis of class discussion. FEE: $1.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. s352.-Methods of Teaching Adults. 10 daily. Y-140. 2 credits. HOWARD.
Principles and objectives of adult education and formulation of suitable procedures to attain
the objectives. Emphasis on the teaching of adult illiterates. Each student must select some
specific problem in adult education and prepare a definite procedure for meeting that problem.
FEE: $1.
En. s353.-The Development of Pre-School Children. 8 daily. Y-325. 2
credits. KNOCKEL.
Fundamental principles in development of children from birth to six years; relationship of
this growth to natural adjustments which should be made. Students will observe and assist in
the Nursery School. Required parallel course: En. s354.
En. s354.-Laboratory for En. s353. Observation 4 hours weekly to be ar-
ranged. Assistantship 1 hour weekly to be arranged. Meal preparation 4 hours
for the Summer Term to be arranged. Y-325. 1 credit. KNOCKEL. Required
parallel course: En. s353.
En. s356.-Practical Techniques for the Guidance of Young Children. 2 daily.
Y-325. 2 credits. KNOCKEL.
Actual techniques used in the guidance of children. Application of methods used in providing
proper housing and equipment. Students will observe and will be given full responsibility of the
laboratory as part of the assisting. Some time will be spent in planning homemade equipment.
Required parallel course: En. s357.
En. s357.-Laboratory for En. s356. Assistantship 3 hours weekly to be ar-
ranged. Conference 1 hour weekly to be arranged. Y-325. 1 credit. KNOCKEL.
Required parallel course: En. s356.
En. 371.-The Teaching of Science in the Secondary School. 3 daily. Y-142.
2 credits. GOETTE.
En. 372.-Materials and Methods in Mathematics. 3 daily. P-201. 2 credits.
HOWARD.
Open to Juniors and Seniors who have not had En. 301.
En. s401.-Public School Administration. 8 daily. P-208. 2 credits. HOWARD.
En. s403.-The Problem-Project Method. 9 daily. P-201. 2 credits. NORMAN.
The laws of learning, lesson-planning, thinking, questioning, the problem-project method, the
socialized recitation, democracy in the classroom as a preparation for democracy in life.
En. s404.-Philosophy of Education. 10 daily. L-109. 2 credits. GARD.
An attempt to present the educational theories that influence modern educational practice.
The contributions of Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Spencer, Herbart, and Froebel are given special
consideration. The writings of Harris, Hall, James, Eliot, and Dewey are studied, as well as critical
interpretations of theories presented by these writers. Designed for advanced students.
En. s406.-Elementary School Administration. 10 daily. Y-150. 2 credits.
GARRIS.
En. 500.-An Introduction to Educational Research. 12 daily. P-208. 2
credits. SMITH.
Designed primarily to help graduate students in Education in writing their theses. Required
of all students majoring in Education; open to all graduate students.
En. s503.-Educational Tests and Measurements. 11 daily. S-202. 2 credits.
CRAGO.
Intensive study of intelligence and educational tests. It is recommended that this course be
preceded by En. s317. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
En. s507.-Seminar in Educational Psychology. 9 daily. Y-132. 2 credits.
WISE.
En. 517.-Educational Statistics. 11 daily. Y-134. 2 credits. W. W. LITTLE.
Statistical methods as applied to Education. This course should be taken before En. 503.
En. s521.-The Business Administration of a School System. 10 daily. Y-326.
2 credits. FULK.
Open to graduate students qualified by training and experience to pursue advanced work in
this field. Each student selects some problem for special study and presents the results of this
study in the form of a thesis.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. s541.-Control and Support of Public Education. 8 daily. Y-326. 2
credits. FULK.
State, federal, and other agencies of control and support of education in the United States;
world history background; present tendencies and possible developments.
En. 562.-Guidance and Counselling. 2 daily. Y-150. 2 credits. GARRIS.
Guidance and counselling of high school students. Educational and vocational guidance and
problems of personality adjustment.
En. s603. Foundations of Method. 3 daily. Y-134. 2 credits. SMITH.
Improvement of college and high school teaching. Open to graduate students and members of
the University faculty who care to enroll.

Second Term
En. slOl.-Introduction to Education. 8 daily. P-206. 2 credits. WISE.
En. sl03.-Health Education. 12 daily. P-206. 2 credits. SHAW.
En. sl21.-Primary Methods. 9 daily. P-206. 2 credits. SPROULL. Pre-
requisite or parallel courses: En. 101, En. 207, or any methods course.
En. s122.-The Teaching of Reading and Literature in the First Six Grades.
10 daily. P-201. 2 credits. SPROULL. Prerequisite or parallel courses: En. 101
or En. 207.
En. s201.-The Teaching of the Social Studies in the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth
Grades. 2 daily. P-201. 2 credits. SPROULL.
A course in methods of teaching geography, history, and civics from the standpoint of human
relationships.
En. s207.-Educational Psychology. 11 daily. P-206. 2 credits. WISE.
En. 209.-The Teaching of the Sciences in the First Six Grades. 7 A.M. daily.
P-208. 2 credits. SMITH.
En. s305.-Development and Organization of Education. 8 daily. L-109.
2 credits. GARD.
En. s308.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 9 daily. P-208. 2 credits.
SMITH.
En. s317.-Tests and Measurements. 11 daily. S-202. 2 credits. CRAGO.
FEE: $1.50.
En. s319.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. 12 daily. S-202. 2 credits.
CRAGO.
En. s323.-General Methods in the Secondary School. 10 daily. P-208. 2
credits. SMITH.
En. s403.-The Problem-Project Method. 9 daily. P-201. 2 credits. NORMAN.
En. s408.-High School Administration. 11 daily. P-201. 2 credits. W. W.
LITTLE.
En. s508.-Democracy and Education Seminar. 9 daily. L-109. 2 credits.
GUARD.
En. s510.-The History of Education. 12 daily. L-109. 2 credits. GARD.
En. s516.-Character and Personality Development. 8 daily. S-202. 2 credits.
CRAGO.
En. s518.-Special Problems in High School Organization and Administration.
11 daily. P-208. 2 credits. W. W. LITTLE. Prerequisite: En. 408.
En. 581.-The Teaching of Composition in the Secondary School. 10 daily.
P-206. 2 credits. WISE.
Study and evaluation of objectives, materials, methods, and devices in teaching English com-
position. Each student will make an independent and thorough study of some problem underlying
composition work.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


ENGLISH
First Term

Eh. s21.-Minimum Essentials of English. 8 daily. L-109. 0 credit. SKAGGS.
An elementary course in the fundamentals of grammar, punctuation, and sentence construction
to meet the needs of freshmen deficient in preparatory English. For such deficient students this
course is prerequisite to Eh. 101. Entry to the course will be determined by examinations to be
given during the registration period.
Note: Required of all freshmen who, upon entering the University, are found deficient in minimum
essentials of high school English.
Eh. slOl.-Rhetoric and Composition. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. L-311. STROUP.
Section 2. 9 daily. L-209. SPIVEY.
Section 3. 11 daily. L-211. MOORE.
Training in clear and forceful expression. Instruction simultaneously in formal rhetoric,
theme writing, and corrective studies and exercises adapted to the individual student. Students are
encouraged to read for extra credit.
Note: All students expecting to take Eh. 101 must report at Language Hall, Room 210, at nine
o'clock on the first morning of registration, Monday, July 17, to take the required Freshman
English Placement Test. No student will be registered for Eh. 101 who has not taken the Place-
ment Test.
Eh. sl02.-Rhetoric and Composition. 2 credits.
Section 1. 9 daily. L-212. SKAGGS.
Section 2. 10 daily. L-211. MOORE.
Section 3. 11 daily. L-311. STROUP.
A continuation of Eh. 101, supplemented by the study and rhetorical analysis of models of
good writing.
Eh. sl03.-Introduction to Literature. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. L-209. SPIVEY.
Section 2. 11 daily. L-210. CALDWELL.
Survey of the literature of the western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance.
Eh. sl04.-Introduction to Literature. 10 daily. L-311. 2 credits. STROUP.
A continuation of Eh. 103.
Eh. s201.-History of Literature. 11 daily. L-209. 2 credits. SPIVEY.
An outline course in the historical development of English literature and language. Frequent
reports from individual students; constant use of the library.
Eh. s202.-History of Literature. 9 daily. L-211. 2 credits. MOORE.
A continuation of Eh. 201, completing the study of English literary history to the end of the
eighteenth century.
Eh. s302.-Shakespeare. 10 daily. L-212. 2 credits. ROBERTSON.
A continuation of Eh. 301 in which the later tragedies will be emphasized.
Eh. s306.-Modern English Grammar. 8 daily. L-210. 2 credits. CALDWELL.
Eh. s408.-Contemporary Poetry. 11 daily. L-212. 2 credits. ROBERTSON.
Eh. s511.-Anglo-Saxon. 8 daily. L-212. 2 credits. ROBERTSON.
Anglo-Saxon grammar; reading of Alfredian prose.
Eh. s513.-The Renaissance in England. 9 daily. L-210. 2 credits. CALDWELL.
A study of sixteenth and seventeenth century literature as directly and indirectly influenced
by the Renaissance.
Second Term
Eh. slOl.-Rhetoric and Composition. 8 daily. L-209. 2 credits. MORRIS.
Eh. sl02.-Rhetoric and Composition. 8 daily. L-210. 2 credits. MOUNTS.
Eh. sl03.-Introduction to Literature. 9 daily. L-210. 2 credits. MOUNTS.
Eh. sl04.-Introduction to Literature. 11 daily. L-210. 2 credits. MOUNTS.
Eh. s201.-History of Literature. 10 daily. L-209. 2 credits. MORRIS.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Eh. s202.-History of Literature. 9 daily. L-209. 2 credits. MORRIS.
Eh. s301.-Shakespeare. 10 daily. L-212. 2 credits. ROBERTSON.
A study of the history plays and romantic comedies. One comedy chosen by the class will be
studied intensively; several other plays will be read and discussed. Open to those who have Eh. 201
and 202 or equivalent work in English Literature.
Eh. s303.-English Poetry of the Romantic Movement. 8 daily. L-311. 2
credits. FARRIS.
The work of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.
Eh. s407.-The Modern Novel. 10 daily. L-311. 2 credits. FARRIS.
Continental, English, and American fiction of the last half-century.
Eh. s501.-American Literature. 9 daily. L-311. 2 credits. FARRIS.
A survey of American poetry and prose from the beginnings to the middle of the nineteenth
century.
Eh. s509.-Chaucer. 11 daily. L-212. 2 credits. ROBERTSON.
The Canterbury Tales and minor works; Middle English.
Eh. s512.-Anglo-Saxon. 8 daily. L-212. 2 credits. ROBERTSON.
The Beowulf.

FRENCH
First Term
Fh. s21-Elementary French. 8 daily. L-314. 2 credits. HUSTON.
The first term of the course in beginning French. Pronunciation, elements of grammar,
reading of simple prose.
Fh. slOl.-Third Semester French. 9 daily. L-314. 2 credits. HUSTON.
Prerequisite: One year of college French, or two years of high school French.
The first term of second-year college French. Reading, oral and written practice.
Fh. s207.-Survey of French Literature. 8 daily. L-307. 2 credits. ATKIN.
Prerequisite: Fh. 101-102 or the equivalent.
Historical outline of the literature; representative selections from important prose writers
and poets.
Fh. s304.-Nineteenth Century French Literature (Second Half). 9 daily.
L-307. 2 credits. ATKIN. Prerequisite: Fh. 207-208 or permission of instructor.
Literary movements and tendencies; leading authors of the period 1850-1900 studied in repre-
sentative selections.
Fh. s511.-Teacher's Course in French. 10 daily. L-307. 2 credits. ATKIN.
Study of French sounds and connected speech, to secure intelligent handling of pronunciation
difficulties and to perfect accent; intensive study of selected readings (explication de textes).
Primarily for teachers and prospective teachers of French.

GENERAL NATURAL SCIENCE
First Term
Gl. 101.-General Natural Science. 10 daily. C-112. Conference hours to be
arranged. 4 credits. BLACK.
Laboratory section A. 2-4 M. W. C-130.
Laboratory section B. 4-6 M. W. C-130.
An introductory course in the physical sciences, emphasizing relationships between the various
sciences and the importance of the scientific method. Particularly valuable for teachers in ele-
mentary and high schools. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
GI. 102.-General Natural Science. 9 daily. S-101. Conference hours to be
arranged. 4 credits. BYERS.
Laboratory section A. 2-4 T. Th. S-106.
Laboratory section B. 4-6 T. Th. S-106.
An introductory course in the biological sciences. LABORATORY FEE: $3.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


HANDWRITING

First Term

Hg. 101.-Handwriting. No credit.
Section 1. 10 daily. A-104. FEAGLE.
Section 2. 4 daily. A-104. FEAGLE.
Section 3. 7 P.M. daily. A-104. FEAGLE.
Students enrolling for this course will have opportunity not only to improve their own hand-
writing, but to learn by instruction and demonstration the correct presentation of handwriting in
all grades of the elementary school. The value of measuring diagnostic and remedial teaching will
be emphasized. The State-adopted text, Progressive Handwriting, will be used. FEE: $2.
Note: A course in penmanship is required for a certificate in subjects of the Elementary School
Course.

Second Term

Hg. 101.-Handwriting. No credit.
Section 1. 10 daily. A-104. FEAGLE.
Section 2. 4 daily. A-104. FEAGLE.
Section 3. 7 P.M. daily. A-104. FEAGLE.
FEE: $2.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

First Term

HPI. 107.-Personal Hygiene. 11 daily. Y-138. 2 credits. SALT.
Hygiene as a means to improvement of living; the meaning of health in terms of life values;
the biologic approach for the study of health; the place of intelligent control in modern civilization;
ways of improving health and preventing disease.
HPl. 301.-Advanced Football. 5-6:30 daily. Basketball Court. 2 credits.
BOWYER.
Advanced theory, dealing with the science and generalship of the game from the point of view
of the coach. Intensive study of the strength and weakness of various systems of play as they
are related to one another.
HPl. 303.-Advanced Basketball. 3:30-5 daily. Basketball Court. Open to
men. 2 credits. BOWYER.
The game from the viewpoint of a high school coach, and his problems. The student is ex-
pected to show by demonstration his ability to coach a basketball team.
HPI. s311.-Administration of Physical Education. 10 daily. Y-138. 2 cred-
its. SALT. Open to men and women.
The following phases of physical education in the public schools: personnel, playgrounds.
gymnasium, swimming pool, service unit, program of activities, physical education class, intra-
mural program, and interscholastic athletics.
HPl. 313.-Theory and Practice of Natural Activities. 7:30-9 A.M. M. T. Th. S.
Yonge Gymnasium. 2 credits. SALT. Open only to men.
The physical education program of activities appropriate for the public schools of Florida.
Activities of higher organization. FEE: $1.50.
HPl. s341.-Principles of Physical Education. 9 daily. Y-138. 2 credits.
SALT. 'Open to men and women.
Fundamental principles upon which the natural program of physical education is based; history,
aims, objectives, and contemporary trends in this field. This course should be completed as soon as
possible by students majoring or teaching in this field. Not open to those having credit for HP1.
215-216 or En. 471.
HPI. s344.-Baseball. 7-9 daily. Basketball Court. 2 credits. BOWYER.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Second Term
HPI. 213.-Theory and Practice of Natural Activities. 7:30-9 A.M. M. T. W. F.
Yonge Gymnasium. 2 credits. SHAW. Open to women only.
The physical education program of activities appropriate for the public schools of Florida.
Games of low organization. FEE: $1.50.
HPI. s312.-Administration of Health Education. 11 daily. L-109. 2 credits.
SHAW. Open to men and women.
Administrative relationships and procedures in the conduct of health education programs in
public schools. Philosophy and principles of health education; integration of the health education
program into the general education program; organization of program; personnel; curricula and
methods of teaching.

HISTORY
First Term
History courses are year courses and both terms must be completed for final credit.

Hy. sl0l.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. B-210. PAYNE.
Section 2. 9 daily. E-213. HUGHES.
Section 3. 11 daily. P-2. HUGHES.
Development of Western Europe from 395 to the Crusades.
Hy. sl02.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 2 credits.
Section 1. 9 daily. L-311. JAMES.
Section 2. 11 daily. P-206. PAYNE.
Section 3. 12 daily. P-102. JAMES.
Covers the period from the Crusades to the Reformation. A continuation of Hy. sl01.
Note: Hy. 101-102 are prerequisite to all advanced courses in history.
Hy. s302.-American History, 1776 to 1830. 8 daily. P-112. 2 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. s304.-American History, 1876 to 1935. 9 daily. P-112. 2 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. s306.-English History, 1485 to 1688. 9 daily. B-210. 2 credits. PAYNE.
Hy. s510.-Seminar in American History. 11 M. T. Th. F. P-112. 2 credits.
LEAKE. For Graduate students only.

Second Term

Hy. slOl.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. P-209. PAYNE.
Section 2. 11 daily. P-1. JAMES.
Hy. sl02.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 2 credits.
Section 1. 11 daily. P-4. PAYNE.
Section 2. 12 daily. P-1. JAMES.
Hy. s301.-American History, 1492 to 1776. 8 daily. P-112. 2 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. s303.-American History, 1830 to 1876. 9 daily. P-112. 2 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. s311.-English History, 1688 to 1815. 9 daily. P-209. 2 credits. PAYNE.
Hy. s509.-Seminar in American History. 11 M. T. W. Th. F. P-112. 2 cred-
its. LEAKE. For Graduate students only.

JOURNALISM
First Term

Jm. s313.-Magazine Article Writing. 8 daily. L-5. 2 credits. EMIG.
Practice in writing articles follows study of principles and technique. Emphasis on attempt
to market articles. *FEE: $4.50.












DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Jm. s402.-Education Publicity. 11 daily. L-5. 2 credits. EMIG.
Principles of public relations and their use by teachers and officers of educational systems;
methods and means of presenting information to the public. *FEE: $4.50.
Jm. s408.-School Publications. 9 daily. L-5. 2 credits. EMIG.
Supervision of school news and school publications; organization of editorial, advertising, and
circulation departments of school newspapers, magazines, and yearbooks; methods of teaching
journalistic writing; use of newspapers and magazines in classroom instruction. *FEE: $4.50.
Note: *The fee for two courses will be $6; for three courses, $7.50.

LAW
The Law Summer Term begins June 17 and ends August 9. Classes scheduled daily
meet six days per week.

Lw. 306.-Marriage and Divorce. 9 W. S. Lw-202. 1 credit. CRANDALL.
Marriage; annulment; divorce; alimony; effect on property rights; custody and support of
children; separation. Vernier, Cases on Marriage and Divorce.
Lw. 308.-Common Law Pleading. 8 daily. Lw-202. 3 credits. CRANDALL.
History of personal actions at common law; theory of pleadings, demurrers, pleas; replication
de injuria; duplicity; departure; new assignment; motions based on pleadings; pleadings. Keigwin,
Cases on Common Law Pleading.
Lw. 311.-School Law. 11 M. Th. and 10 W. S. Lw-204. 2 credits. TRUSLER.
Authority and responsibility of teachers; rights and duties of students; rules and regulations;
incidental fees; contracts of teachers; pensions; private schools; illegal expenditures of school
money; illegal uses of school property; school contracts and torts; diplomas and degrees; exemp-
tion of school property from taxation. Trusler, Essentials of School Law.
Lw. 312.-Property II. 10 M. T. Th. F. Lw-202. 2 credits. DAY.
Introduction to the law of conveyancing; rights incident to ownership of land, and estates
therein; profits; easements; licenses; covenants running with the land. Warren, Cases on Property.
Lw. 350.-Administrative Law. 11 T. F. and 9 W. S. Lw-204. 2 credits.
SLAGLE.
Administrative orders, grant of licenses; conditions in grants; cancellation of licenses; admin-
istrative discretion; summary action; proof of official acts; relief against administrative action;
jurisdictional limitations; administrative finality. F'reund, Cases on Administrative Law, 2nd.
edition.
Lw. 402.-Evidence. 11-12:20 daily. Lw-202. 4 credits. TESELLE.
Judicial notice; kinds of evidence; burden of proof; presumption of law and fact; judge and
jury; evidence rules; admissions; confessions; exclusions based on public policy and privilege;
corroboration; witnesses; attendance in court; examination, cross examination, privilege; public
documents; records and judicial writings; private writings. Thayer, Cases on Evidence.
Lw. 415.-Abstracts. 8 M. T. Th. F. Lw-204. 2 credits. DAY.
Practical problems covering interpretation of maps and the plotting of lots; formal requisites of
conveyances in use in Florida; deeds executed by officers; liens and contracts for sale of lands;
Florida Statutes and selected Florida cases.
Lw. 420.-Equitable Relief Against Torts. 9 M. T. Th. F. Lw-204. 2 credits.
TRUSLER.
Growth and nature of jurisdiction; the bases of specific relief; relief in equitable proceedings;
defenses to specific relief; protection of public and social interests; enforcement of specific relief.
Chafee, Cases on Equitable Relief Against Torts.
Lw. 525.-Trade Regulations. 10 M. T. Th. F. Lw-204. 2 credits. SLAGLE.
Trade contracts; privilege of competing; intimidating and molesting; disparaging competitor's
goods; appropriating competitor's trade values; boycotting; unfair price practices; unfair adver-
tising; combinations ; anti-trust legislation. Oliphant, Cases on Trade Regulations.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


MATHEMATICS

Before registering in any course, the student should ascertain the prerequisites. Stu-
dents desiring courses other than those listed below should write to the Department of
Mathematics, or inquire immediately upon arrival at the University.

First Term
Ms. s85.-Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms. 8 and 12 daily. P-2. 4
credits. MCINNIS.
Functions of angles; logarithms; solution of triangles. Simpson, Plane Trigonometry and
Logarithms.
Ms. slOl.-College Algebra. 8 and 11 daily. P-102. 4 credits. SIMPSON.
Elementary topics; equations; proportion and variation; progressions; binomial theorem;
applications to business problems; inequalities; complex numbers; permutations and combinations;
probability; determinants; partial fractions; infinite series and method of least squares and related
topics. Hart, Brief College Algebra.
Ms. s252.-Integral Calculus. 10 daily. P-2. 2 credits. MCINNIS.
A continuation of Ms. 251 given in the summer of 1934. Chapters 8 to 12 of the text book.
Granville, Smith, Longley, Elements of Differential and Integral Calculus.
Ms. s253.-Differential Calculus. 9 and 12 daily. P-1. 4 credits. PHIPPS.
Differentiation, one of the most important practical and theoretical fields of mathematics.
Granville, Smith, Longley, Differential and Integral Calculus.
Ms. s331.-College Geometry. 11 daily. P-1. 2 credits. PHIPPS.
A continuation of high school plane geometry, making use of elementary methods in the ad-
vanced study of the triangle and circle. Emphasis on solving original exercises. Valuable to pros-
pective high school geometry teachers. Altshiller-Court, College Geometry.
Ms. s575.-Fundamental Concepts of Modern Mathematics. 10 daily. P-102.
2 credits. SIMPSON.
Introduction to such topics as the number system of algebra, sets of points, group theory,
theories of integration, postulational systems, and non-Euclidean geometry. No textbook is used,
but many references are assigned.
Second Term
Ms. sl02.-Plane Analytic Geometry. 8 and 12 daily. P-102. 4 credits.
GERMOND.
Algebraic study of the figures of geometry and the plane sections of a cone. Systems and
transformations of coordinates. Love, Elements of Analytic Geometry.
Ms. sl08.-Mathematics of Finance. 10 daily. P-102. 2 credits. GERMOND.
Modern mathematical treatment of the problems of banking and business. Derivation and
application of numerous formulas of importance in the financial world. Crenshaw, Pirenian,
Simpson, Mathematics of Finance Preceded by Elementary Commercial Algebra.
*Ms. s253.-Differential Calculus. 8 and 12 daily. P-2. 4 credits. KUSNER.
*Ms. s254.-Integral Calculus. 8 and 12 daily. P-2. 4 credits. KUSNER.
Prerequisite: Ms. s253 or its equivalent.
Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas, volumes,
moments of inertia, and many other problems. Granville, Smith, Longley, Elements of Differential
and Integral Calculus.
Ms. s311.-Advanced College Algebra. 11 daily. P-2. 2 credits. KUSNER.
Further treatment of some of the material and processes of Ms. 101 and introduction to more
advanced topics. Valuable to teachers of algebra and to students of actuarial science. Hall and
Knight, Higher Algebra.
*That one of these courses which is requested by the greater number of students will
be given.
MECHANIC ARTS

Mc. 101.-Woodworking. 6 hours shop to be arranged. 1 credit. ESHLEMAN
or JANES.
Lectures, shop work, and joinery. FEE: $5.
Note: The right to withdraw this course is reserved in the event enrollment falls below ten.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC

First Term

Mse. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 9 daily
and one hour to be arranged. Y-Auditorium. 2 credits. CARSON.
Study of the child voice; rote songs, the toy symphony, art and rhythm songs; sight singing
from rote to note: oral and written dictation; appreciation.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 8 daily
and one hour to be arranged. Y-Auditorium. 2 credits. CARSON.
Development of sight singing; ear training, oral and written dictation, part singing; appre-
ciation.
Msc. 105.-Materials and Methods for Junior and Senior High Schools. 10
daily and one hour to be arranged. Y-Auditorium. 2 credits. CARSON.
Sight singing; study of the changing voice; beginning harmony; appreciation.

Second Term

Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two and Three. 9 daily
and one hour to be arranged. Y-Auditorium. 2 credits. CARSON.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 8 daily
and one hour to be arranged. Y-Auditorium. 2 credits. CARSON.
Msc. 105.-Materials and Methods for Junior and Senior High Schools. 10
daily and one hour to be arranged. Y-Auditorium. 2 credits. CARSON.

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY

First Term

Pgy. s221.-Practical Pharmacognosy. 9 and 2 daily. C-316. 2 credits.
CHRISTENSEN.
Sources of crude drugs and a systematic classification of the vegetable drugs of the United
States Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary. Laboratory work on methods of identifying crude
drugs, illustrated with authentic specimens. LABORATORY FEE: $3.35.
Ply. s451.-Principles of Biologicals. 10 daily. C-316. 2 credits. CHRIS-
TENSEN.
Advanced study of the pharmacology of drugs and pharmacological standardization with special
reference to toxins, antitoxins, antiserums, and vaccines. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Ply. s512a.-Special Problems in Pharmacology. 11 daily. C-316. 2 credits.
CHRISTENSEN.
Methods of biological assaying. Lectures and collateral readings; oral and written reports.

Second Term

Pgy. s222.-Practical Pharmacognosy. 9 and 2 daily. C-316. 2 credits.
CHRISTENSEN.
A continuation of Pgy. s221 offered during the first term. LABORATORY FEE: $3.35.
Ply. s452.-Principles of Biologicals. 10 daily. C-316. 2 credits. CHRIS-
TENSEN.
A continuation of Ply. s451 and with the addition of some important gland products. LABORATORY
FEE: $2.
Ply. s512b.-Special Problems in Pharmacology. To be arranged. 2 credits.
CHRISTENSEN.
Laboratory work to complete credit for Ply. 512; 10 hours per week. LABORATORY FEE: $5.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


PHILOSOPHY

First Term

Ppy. s301.-Ethics. 11 daily. P-209. 2 credits. ENWALL.
Principles of ethics. Study of such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty, freedom, progress,
etc. Dewey and Tuft, Ethics.
Ppy. s303.-History of Ancient Philosophy. 12 daily. P-209. 2 credits.
ENWALL.
Development of philosophic thought from its appearance among the Ionic Greeks to the time
of Descartes with special attention to the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle. Rogers, A Student's
History of Philosophy.
Ppy. s407.-The Philosophic Conception of the Great English Poets. Seminar.
To be arranged. P-209. 2 credits. ENWALL. Prerequisite: One course in
philosophy.
Selected plays from Shakespeare: The Philosophic Poems of Wordsworth.

PHYSICS
First Term
Ps. s211.-Elementary Theory of Mechanics, Heat and Sound, with Laboratory
Exercises. 8 and 11 daily. B-203. BLESS. Laboratory 2-4 M. W. F. B-306.
KNOWLES. 5 credits. Prerequisite: One year of college mathematics.
*Ps. s317.-Modern Theories of Physics. 9 daily. B-205. 2 credits. BLESS.
Prerequisite: Ps. 211-212. Desirable corequisite: Calculus.
*Ps. s320.-X-Rays. 9 daily. B-205. 2 credits. BLESS. Prerequisite: Ps.
211-212. Desirable corequisite: Calculus.
*Only one of the starred courses will be given.

Second Term
Ps. s212.-Elementary Theory of Electricity and Light, with Laboratory
Exercises. 8 and 11 daily. B-203. SWANSON. Laboratory 2-4 M. W. F. B-306.
KNOWLES. 5 credits. Prerequisite: Ps. 211.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
Political Science Courses are year courses and both terms must be completed for final
credit.
First Term
Pce. sl0l.-American Government and Politics. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. E-213. HUGHES.
Section 2. 10 daily. P-11. GREEN.
Section 3. 12 daily. P-4. DAUER.
Structure and functions of the federal government.
Pcl. sl02.-American Government and Politics. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. P-11. GREEN.
Section 2. 11 daily. P-11. JAMES.
Section 3. 12 daily. P-11. GREEN.
State, county and municipal government. A continuation of Pel. 101.
Note: Pel. 101-102 are prerequisite to all advanced courses in Political Science.
Pcl. s306.-Political Theories. 9 daily. P-4. 2 credits. DAUER.
Pcl. s310.-International Relations. 11 daily. P-4. 2 credits. DAUER.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Second Term

Pcl. sl0l.-American Government and Politics. 2 credits.
Section 1. 10 daily. P-4. GREEN.
Section 2. 12 daily. P-11. DAUER.
Pcl. sl02.-American Government and Politics. 2 credits.
Section 1. 12 daily. P-4. GREEN.
Section 2. 9 daily. P-1. JAMES.
Pcl. s203.-American State Administration. 8 daily. P-4. 2 credits. GREEN.
Pcl. s305.-Political Theories. 9 daily. P-11. 2 credits. DAUER.
Pcl. s310.-International Relations. 11 daily. P-11. 2 credits. DAUER.

PSYCHOLOGY

First Term

Psy. s201.-General Psychology. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. S-202. WILSON.
Section 2. 9 daily. S-202. WILSON.
Section 3. 10 daily. P-10. HINCKLEY.
Facts and theories current in general psychological discussions: the sensations, the sense
organs, and the functions of the brain; the higher mental functions-attention, perception, memory,
feeling, emotion, volition, the self, etc.
Psy. s309.-Theories of Personality. 9 daily. P-10. 2 credits. HINCKLEY.
The more inevitable problems of human life and their normal and abnormal solutions; critical
consideration of the most important explanations of these adjustments; development and organiza-
tion of the self.
Psy. s509.-Studies in Personality. To be arranged. 2 credits. HINCKLEY.
Experimental studies of personality. Special attention will be given to problems of motivation.

Second Term

Psy. s201.-General Psychology. 10 daily. P-10. 2 credits. HINCKLEY.
Psy. s310.-Abnormal Psychology. 9 daily. P-10. 2 credits. HINCKLEY.
Abnormal phases of mental life, dreams, illusions, hallucinations, suggestions, hypnotism, hys-
teria, diseases of the memory, diseases of the will, mental hygiene.
Psy. s510.-Readings in Abnormal Psychology. To be arranged. 2 credits.
HINCKLEY.
Lectures and readings on forms of mental diseases, with special attention to diagnosis and
treatment.

PUBLIC SCHOOL ART

First Term

Pc. 101.-Elementary Art. 2-4 T. Th. P-302. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
Practice in school art work; lettering, poster making, booklets, construction, design, and
picture study. FEE: $1.
Pc. 102.-Frieze Development. 2-4 M. W. P-302. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
Color, trees, landscapes, perspective, costumes, figures, combined in simple school friezes corre-
lating other school subjects. FEE: $1.
Pc. 123.-Industrial Art. 4-6 M. T. W. F. P-302. 2 credits. MITCHELL.
Based on clothing, shelter, records, and utensils. FEE: $1.
Pc. 209.-Arts and Crafts. 4-6 Th., 7-9 P.M. Th. P-302. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
Weaving problems for grade children. Pattern weaving on the harness loom. Design and
crafts work. FEE: $1.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Second Term
Pc. 101.-Elementary Art. 2-4 T. Th. P-302. 1 credit. NORTON.
FEE: $1.
Pc. 123.-Industrial Art. 4-6 M. T. W. F. P-302. 2 credits. NORTON.
FEE: $1.
Pc. 201.-Creative Drawing and Composition. 1 M. T. W. F. P-302. 1 credit.
NORTON.
Birds, animals, figures and landscapes adapted to grade work. FEE: $1.
Pc. 210.-Puppetry. 2-4 M. W. P-302. 1 credit. NORTON.
Simple problems in puppetry for school children, plays for school entertainments, and stage
design. FEE: $1.

SOCIOLOGY
First Term
Sy. sl 11.-Introduction to Social Studies. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. Lw-202. MEYER.
Section 2. 8 M. W. F. Lw-202. MEYER and 8 T. Th. P-1. GRINSTED.
Section 3. 8 M. W. F. Lw-202. MEYER and 9 T. Th. P-2. GRINSTED.
Section 4. 9 daily. Lw-202. MEYER.
Section 5. 9 M. W. F. Lw-202. MEYER and 12 T. Th. Lw-202. GRINSTED.
An approach to the social studies through discussion of current social conditions and prob-
lems. Required of all freshmen in the College of Education and of all students majoring in Jour-
nalism. A prerequisite for most of the courses offered in the department.
Sy. sll2.-Introduction to Sociology. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. A-104. BRISTOL.
Section 2. 9 daily. A-104. BRISTOL.
Section 3. 10 daily. Lw-202. GRINSTED.
Section 4. 2 daily. Lw-202. GRINSTED.
The temporary community, rural and urban, and its most typical institutions; the basis of
community life; family life; making a living; acquiring an education; play and recreation; moral
and religious life; community planning; community maladjustments. Social processes and socio-
logical principles.
Sy. s323.-Social Pathology. 12 daily. P-112. 2 credits. MEYER.
Emphasis in this course will be on poverty and relief with minor emphasis on physical and
mental defect and disease, alcoholism, prostitution and vagrancy. Methods of treatment by private
and public institutions and agencies.
Sy. s351.-Social Progress. 11 daily. P-10. 2 credits. BRISTOL.
Sy. s523.-Social Pathology. 12 daily. P-112. 2 credits. MEYER.
To be taken with Sy. s323 with extra reading and reports.
Sy. s551.-Social Progress. 11 daily. P-10. 2 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken with Sy. s351 with extra reading and reports.

Second Term
Sy. slll.-Introduction to the Social Studies. 11 daily. P-205. 2 credits.
BIRD.
Sy. s112.-Introduction to Sociology. 2 credits.
Section 1. 8 daily. A-104. WELD.
Section 2. 9 daily. A-104. WELD.
Section 3. 2 daily. A-104. WELD.
Sy. 311.-Problems of Child Welfare. 2 daily. P-1. 2 credits. BIRD.
Problems of child welfare; emphasis will be given to the teaching of sex hygiene through
nature stories.
Sy. 521.-Problems of Child Welfare. 2 daily. P-1. 2 credits. BIRD.
To be taken with Sy. 311 with extra reading and research to give graduate credit.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


SPANISH

First Term
Sh. s21.-Elementary Spanish. 11 daily. L-203. 2 credits. DEGAETANI.
Pronunciation, grammar, written and oral exercises, memorizing of vocabularies, dictation,
reading of simple texts.
*Sh. s22.-Elementary Spanish. 8 daily. L-203. 2 credits. HIGGINS. Pre-
requisite: Sh. 21 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Sh. 21.
Sh. sl01.-Second Year Spanish. 11 daily. L-109. 2 credits. HIGGINS. Pre-
requisite: Sh. 22 or permission of instructor.
Review of grammar, written and oral exercises, reading of modern texts.
*Sh. s102.-Second Year Spanish. 9 daily. L-204. 2 credits. HIGGINS. Pre-
requisite: Sh. 101 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Sh. 101.
Sh. s304.-Survey of Spanish Literature. 9 daily. E-202. 2 credits. DEGAE-
TANI. Prerequisite: Sh. 303 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Sh. 303. Historical outline of the most important literary movements in
Spanish literature; study of representative authors of each period.
*Sh. s505.-Contemporary Spanish Literature. 10 daily. L-203. 2 credits.
HIGGINS. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Chronological presentation of the more important literary movements beginning with the
Modernistas; study of representative authors.
*Sh. s508.-Seminar in Spanish American Literature. 10 daily. L-209. 2
credits. HIGGINS.
Sh. s512.-Teaching of Spanish Phonetics. 8 daily. E-202. 2 credits. DEGAE-
TANI. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Continuation of Sh. 511. Principles of practice.
*Only two will be given, choice depending upon demand.

SPEECH

First Term
Sch. s201.-Public Speaking. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.
Section 1. 8 daily. P-205. HOPKINS.
Section 2. 10 daily. P-205. HOPKINS.
Principles used in public speaking with practice in delivery of original speeches. Individual
improvement is emphasized and encouraged by constructive criticism. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
Sch. s207.-Interpretation of Literature. 8 daily. P-209. 2 credits. CONSTANS.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.
Oral reading of the lyric, ballad, narrative, short story, and drama. Readings of novels and
plays. Woolbert-Nelson, Art of Interpretative Speech, Revised Edition.
Sch. s404.-Dramatic Production. 9 daily. P-209. 2 credits. CONSTANS.
Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.
Consideration of voice, line reading, technique of acting, and principles of character inter-
pretation; the problem of directing, stage equipment, costuming, lighting, and make-up. Rehearsal
of one-act plays. Dolman, The Art of Play Production.

Second Term
Sch. s201.-Public Speaking. 8 daily. P-205. 2 credits. CONSTANS.
Sch. s202.-Persuasive Speaking. 9 daily. P-205. 2 credits. CONSTANS.
Prerequisite: Sch. 201.
Subject and purpose of the speech and the occasion on which it is to be delivered considered
with the aim of influencing the specific audience. Much practice in speaking. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.





176 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

*Sch. 214.-Parliamentary Practice in Public Discussion. 11 daily. P-209.
2 credits. CONSTANS. Prerequisite: Eh. 101-102.
Practice in facilitating group discussion by proper use of "Parliamentary Law," with special
attention to the problems that confront the chairman. Palmer, New Parliamentary Manual.
*Sch. s303.-One-Act Play. 11 daily. P-209. 2 credits. CONSTANS. Pre-
requisite: Eh. 101-102.
The one-act play as a type of drama; the reading and criticism of the best one-act plays by
contemporary writers; the technique of play writing. Shay, Fifty More Contemporary One-Act
Plays; Wilde, Craftsmanship of the One-Act Play.
*Only one of these courses will be given, depending upon demand.

TRADES AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

First Term
En. 481.-Survey Methods. 8 daily. Y-222. 2 credits. COMSTOCK.
Methods and devices for determining vocational needs of communities and efficiency of voca-
tional programs in progress.
En. 487.-Shop Organization. 10 daily. Y-222. 2 credits. COMSTOCK.
Shop lay-out, organization of equipment and supplies, and instructional devices.
En. 489.-Supervision and Administration of Vocational Education. 11 daily.
Y-222. 2 credits. COMSTOCK.
Supervisory responsibilities and methods and devices for fulfilling them; administrative func-
tions and methods of performance.







QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS


QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

1. What are the days of registration?
Answer: First Term: June 17.
Second Term: July 27.

2. Will there be a late fee charged to those registering after the above days?
Answer: Yes. A late registration fee of $5 will be charged to all regis-
tering after the above days.

3. What are the last days a person may register by paying the late registration
fee?
Answer: First Term: June 19.
Second Term: July 30.

4. How does the changing of credits from three to two affect:

a) Required courses (such as English 101, Sociology 111, etc.)?
Answer? It does not affect such courses; only two hours will be re-
quired instead of three.

b) Requirements in Education?
Answer: The same courses in Education are required and the total
number of hours required are the same. In some cases
elective courses in Education must be taken in order to
earn the required number of hours.

c) Requirements for majors and minors?
Answer: The same number of hours will be required for majors and
minors. In case a person needs six hours to complete a
major (or minor), he will have to take three two-hour
courses instead of two three-hour courses.

5.a) What is the maximum load one may carry?
Answer: The student who in the last term of attendance at the Uni-
versity of Florida made an honor point average below
2.00 ("B") may take a credit load of six. The student
who made an honor point average of 2.00 ("B") or above
may take a credit load of eight. Transfer students may
take only six credits their first term, after which the
general rule applies to them as to others.

b) How many credits may be earned during the summer by attend-
ing both terms?
Answer: Twelve, fourteen, or sixteen, depending upon your honor
point average.

6. May students who expect to receive degrees or diplomas at the end of
either term of the Summer Session be given permission to take more
hours than provided for in No. 5 above?
Answer: No. Exceptions will not be made under any circumstances.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


7. What adjustment will be made for those who planned to graduate at the
end of the eight-week 1935 Summer Term yet who now find they can-
not attend both terms?
Answer: All such cases will be handled individually. The matter
should be presented to the Registrar after registration.

8. May one complete a correspondence course while attending the Summer
Session?
Answer: No.

9. Is there a graduation at the end of the first term?
Answer: Yes.

10. May one visit the classes in the laboratory school?
Answer: Yes. Application for permission to visit the classes in the
laboratory school should be made to the principal, Room
120 Yonge Building. (Kindergarten and six grades only to
be conducted this summer.)

11. To whom should application be made for part-time work?
Answer: Dean of Students.

12. To whom should application be made for Summer Session loans?
Answer: Dean of Students.

13. To whom should application be made for approved room lists?
Answer: Dean of Students.

14. To whom should one apply for room reservations in the dormitories?
Answer: Business Manager.
15. Does one rooming in the dormitories have to take her meals at the
cafeteria?
Answer: No.

16. May children be registered in the demonstration school and live in the
dormitories when the mother is a regularly registered student of the
Summer Session?
Answer: Each case will be acted upon separately. Application should
be made to the Dean of Students.

17. Will there be any Saturday classes?
Answer: There will be no Saturday classes during the First Term,
but there will be Saturday classes during the Second Term.

18. Are the railroads offering reduced fares this summer?
Answer: Yes. Fare and one-third for the round trip. No identifica-
tion certificate is necessary. Consult your local ticket agent
for dates of sale and particulars.

19. May one comply with the requirements for extension of certificate during
either term?
Answer: Yes.






ADMISSION INFORMATION I i
C L FF
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Return to the Registrar

To be filled out by each student who expects to attend the University of Florida
1935 Summer Session

Mr.
1. M rs.............---..................--- ............................................ .. -- ---------------------- .-----
Miss Last Name First Name (in full) Middle Name Husband's
Initials
2. A ddress............................... ............................ ...... ......... ............................... .. .................
Street and Number City County State
3. I wish to be admitted for the 1st term-2nd term of the 1935 Summer Session.
(cross out one)
4. I desire to register in the college checked below:
College of Arts and Sciences. ..................... College of Agriculture.............................
School of Pharmacy...................... ...... ... College of Law.................. ...........
College of Business Administration............. Graduate School ............................. ..
College of Engineering...................... ...... School of Architecture and Allied
College of Education............................. Arts................................. .........

5. Do you expect to work for a degree or diploma at the University of Florida?........................
6. Place of college preparation..............................- .. ................ ..................
(school) (location)
7. List below all institutions of higher learning you have attended and supply the information.

Would you be allowed to re-
Name of Institution Address register there at any time?


. . . . - - - - - I . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ---- - --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - --


.......................................................... ..... ........... ---...- ----....----.. .........--------------- ................ ... ...................................


8. Are official transcripts from all the above schools on file in the Registrar's Office at the
University of Florida?................................
9. Give last date of attendance at the University of Florida............................. ....................
10. Have you earned any credit by correspondence or extension from the University of
Florida?...................
11. Have you attended any other college since attending the University of Florida? ............ ....
12. If the answer to 11 is "yes," have you filed with the Registrar of the University of Florida a
transcript or its equivalent, from the institution last attended?.....................- ........
13. Your father's occupation while he was living and active.................................. ..... .........
14. Your birthplace.......................... ...... .. 15. Date of birth....................... 16. Age in years........
17. Religious affiliation or preference.......................... .............. Are you a member?..........
18. I affirm that the above questions have been answered correctly. If I am admitted upon in-
correct information I understand that my registration will be automatically canceled.

Signed.............................. ...................... .............
[179]




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs