• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Main
 Main














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00365
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: April 22, 1935
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00365
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Main
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Main
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
Full Text










UNIVERSITY RECORD

of t Y/O

UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


THE GENERAL COLLEGE

Principal Features of its

PROGRAM AND ORGANIZATION



Uol. XXX Se;ei 7 4, Exa )No. 2 Apil 22, 1935


Published Monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the Post Office in Gainesville, Florida, as Second-Class Matter
Under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida

















FOREWORD -


The Committee on Curriculum Reorganization
presents herein the salient features of the Gen-
eral College program and organization as approved
by the President and the Board of Control of the
University. This bulletin has embodied in it the
contents of the two bulletins published previously:
Bulletin One, December 6, 1954, and Bulletin Two,
February 27, 1935.
The many details as worked out by the Com-
mittee and its advisory groups for effectuating
the plan are not included in this publication.


(Walter J. Matherly, Chrm.
THE COMMITTEE(Alvin P. Black
(Winston W. Little








ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY


A THE LOWER DIVISION


I. INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

The General College of the University has been organized to administer
the work of the Lower Division. The purposes of this college are:

1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the
guidance needed by all students. Thus the choice of professional
work is postponed until the student knows better his capacity and
disposition to undertake work that will be profitable to himself and
society.

2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing for
advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper
Division, thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization.

3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give to
college training, and consequently should concern themselves with
general viewpoints and major understandings, instead of introductions
to special subject matter fields which they will never enter.

4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general
education incident to the changing conditions of modern life. The
subject matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation
are to be constantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the
student, to stimulate his intellectual curiosity, to encourage inde-
pendent study, and to cultivate the attitudes necessary for enlight-
ened citizenship.


AI. ADMISSIONS

The usual technical requirements for admission to the University have
been removed. Only those applicants are rejected who definitely indicate
iat they are unprepared to profit by the program offered in the General Col-
.ege. Candidates from high schools will submit the following information to
the Registrar on regular University admission blanks:

1. Complete high school record showing detailed information:
a. General level of achievement
b. Consistency of progress
o. Personal qualities
d. School's recommendation

2. Standing on University placement tests:
a. Mental ability
b. High school achievement

Placement tests are offered in the high schools of the State during the
spring semester. Applicants unable to avail themselves of this privilege
must take the tests at the University in June or September. Creditable
achievement, indicative of ability to profit by the General College program,
is required before the Board of University Examiners grants the student






120 THE GEME1RAL COLLEGE

permission to register. Any applicant rejected, or others not included in
the above, may take the college aptitude tests for admission.


III. THE PROGRAM OF STUDIES

All beginning students admitted to the University of Florida will regis-
ter in the General College. The program of studies whioh they will follow is
as indicated below:

FIRST YEAR

C-l : Man and the Social World
C-2 : Man and the Physical World
C-5 : Reading, Speaking, and Writing
0-4( Man and His Thinking (one term)
SGeneral Mathematics (one term)
X : Military Science and Physical Education

*SECOND YEAR

C-6 : The Humanities
C-6 : Man and the Biological World
C-7 : (Elective)
C-8 : (Elective)
C-9 : (Elective)
Y : Military Science and Physical Education

Except as indicated below, four comprehensive courses are required of
all students the first year; two, the second year. For the remainder of his
work the student elects additional comprehensive courses or courses required
by the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division (see page 123).
Comprehensive courses normally meet four times a week.

Provisions for individual differences of students are as follows:

C-2 above: This course is elective for students of the superior group of the
entering class as determined by the Board of University Examiners,
if such students begin science programs which include physics and
chemistry. Also, C-2 may be postponed until the second year and
elective C-7 substituted therefore.
C-4 above: This course is elective for students of the superior group of the
entering class as determined by the Board of University Examiners.
C-6 above: This course is elective, in the same way as C-2 above, for stud-
ents beginning programs which include two or more of the biologi-
cal sciences. Also, C-6 may be elected during the first year in
place of C-2. However, students who elect C-6 in the first year
must take C-2 in the second year.
X,Y above: Only those students exempted from military science by University
regulations are specifically required to take physical education.

THE ELECTIVES

Basic Mathematics Appreciation of the Fine Arts
Our Social Heritage Occupations and Vocations

* Second-year students at the University of Florida in the 1935-56 academic
year will register and continue under the old plan. This applies also to
second-year students transferring from other institutions.







PP^QGIAM A7T'/D (AGA7\IZATI71 121

Selected Literature of the World The Great Religions
Public Opinion Outlines of Philosophy
The Reading of French Economic Foundations of Modern Life
The Reading of German Sanitation and Health
The Reading of Spanish Citizenship in the American Republic

In addition to these or any other comprehensive courses whioh may be of-
fered, a student may elect any course or sequence required by the colleges
and professional schools of the Upper Division. Course descriptions and
specific requirements are listed on page 123 under the specific colleges oon-
oerned.


IV. COMPLETION OF WORK IN THE GENERAL COLLEGE

1. Academic Credits

The General College has dispensed with clook hours, elass grades, and
semester hours credit as prerequisites to the completion of its program. The
program is so designed that the fundamental changes in the thinking of the
student may be measured at a subsequent time. Frequent tests, however, will
be given in each course as a part of instruction, and the results thereof
will be used to make progress reports to guide instructors and students.

2. Comprehensive Examinations

The student must successfully pass comprehensive course examinations -
eight or more to complete the work of the General College. These examina-
tions, set by the Board of University Examiners, measure mastery in terms of
understandings, appreciations, abilities, and skills. A student must be fam-
iliar with the work of the various courses and be able to think in the several
fields in a comprehensive way in order to pass these examinations. About six
hours time, divided into two equal parts, will be required for each examina-
tion. The mere acquisition of facts or the practice of oramming by the
student will not be sufficient preparation for these examinations.

3. Certificate of Graduation

When a student has mastered his program in the General College and has
passed the comprehensive examinations, he will be granted the Associate of
Arts Certificate. The program includes eight or nine basic courses and mili-
tary science or physical education. If a student cares to do so, he may by
permission remain in the General College more than two years and elect addi-
tional courses.

4. Special Provisions

A few superior students well trained in high school or by private in-
struotion may be able to pass one or more of the comprehensive examinations
without attending classes, or without attending classes for the entire year.
These students may petition the Board of University Examiners for this privi-
lege.
Students desiring to transfer to other institutions will be given tran-
scripts of their records to the time of leaving. All students transferring
from other institutions to the University of Florida will be required to
register in the General College and satisfy its program of general education
before they are admitted to the colleges and professional schools of the
Upper Division by the Board of University Examiners.







T[-E QE7NEIRAL COLLEGE


The Dean and Administrative Board of the General College shall have full
authority to act in all cases not covered by specific regulations.


V. DESCRIPTIONS OF COMPREHENSIVE COURSES

1. C-1 : Man and the Social World

The aim of this course is to develop and stimulate the ability to inter-
pret the interrelated problems of the modern social world. The unequal rates
of change in economic life, in government, in education, in science, and in
religion are analysed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective
coordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today.
Careful scrutiny is made of the changing functions of social organizations as
joint interdependent activities so that a consciousness of the significant
relationships between the individual and social institutions may be developed,
from wioh consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be
achieved.

2. C-2 : Man and the Physical World

This course attempts to survey the phenomena of the physical universe
with particular reference to man's immediate environment; to show how these
phenomena are investigated; to explain the more important principles and re-
lations which have been found to aid in the understanding of them; and to
review the present status of man's dependence upon and ability to utilize
physical materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly
from the fields of physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, and geography, and
they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential unity. The practi-
cal significance and the cultural significance of the physical sciences are
emphasized.

3. C-3 : Reading, Speaking, and Writing

The general aim of this course is to furnish the training in reading,
speaking, and writing necessary for the student's work in college and for
his life thereafter. This training will be provided through practice and
counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking, in fundamen-
tals of form and style, in extension of vocabulary, and in control of the
body and voice in speaking. Students will be encouraged to read widely as a
means of broadening their interests and increasing their appreciation of lit-
erature. It is felt that if the student reads widely and well, much of the
English work that is sometimes considered technical and formal, will have a
new and significant meaning to him.

4a. C-4 : Man and His Thinking

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of the men-
tal processes involved in meeting the concrete problems of everyday 'ife,
together with individual differences in making these adjustments. It attempts
to answer the question "Why do we think as we do?" There will be a practical
consideration of such topics as: the association of ideas in logical and il-
logical thinking, peculiarities of associative activity, the development of
emotional attitudes and beliefs with their influences upon man's thinking,
fallacies and pitfalls of thought, superstition and prejudice, crooked think-
ing through rationalization, repression and projection, and the nature of
ideas and thought.









PRoGjRAM A7T LrjGAIIlzATIlo 7


4b. C-4 : General Mathematics

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the general
nature of mathematics, the manner in which the mathematical mode of thought
is used in the world of today, and the role which it has occupied in the de-
velopment of that world. A survey is made of some of the fundamental prin-
ciples and methods of procedure in the main branches of elementary mathema-
tics, with considerable attention being given to the utilitarian and cultural
importance of the subject and its relations to other branches of knowledge.

5. C-5 : The Humanities

While this course has not yet been fully worked out, an attempt will be
made to help the student lay a broad foundation for cultured living. It is
impossible in a brief course to provide an adequate survey of the broad field,
but immediate help will be given in attaining desirable understandings, atti-
tudes, and dispositions. Students react everyday to all culture; the course
will present materials from this and past civilizations to condition this re-
action. In a sense the work is to be thought of as a guidebook to the wide
field of human culture. Even though we think of culture as timeless, ageless,
and not belonging to any particular nation or people, the course will concern
itself largely with the culture of the Western World. The student will study
the agencies of modern culture and try to reach some basis of judgment. The
material will be highly selected. Not an academic survey of the past but a
vital challenge to thinking and living today will form the central theme of
the course.

6. C-6 : Man and the Biological World

This course is designed to give the student a general knowledge and ap-
preciation of the world of living things of the life that goes on around
and within him and of man's place in the organic world. General concepts
from the fields of botany, zoology, and psychology are brought together into
an integrated treatment. Significant principles, consideration of the meth-
ods by which such principles have been determined, and an account of the
application of biological principles to human problems all find proper places
in the course.



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY


B THE UPPER DIVISION


I. ADMISSION

To be admitted to any of the colleges and professional schools of the
Upper Division a student must complete the required work of the General Col-
lege and show definite aptitude and ability to pursue the work of the college
and professional schools of the Upper Division. The Board of University Ex-
aminers will administer the admission requirements of the Upper Division.
The individual colleges have specific requirements as follows:








124 THE GE)EIRAL COLLEGE

II. COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

To be admitted from the General College to the College of Arts and
Sciences the student must present a certificate of graduation from the Gen-
eral College and certification by the Board of University Examiners that the
student is qualified to pursue the work of the College of Arts and Sciences.
The student must present credit earned in the General College for admission
to the curriculum of his choice as follows:

A. For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Arts:
The content of a one-year course basic to thestudent's proposed field of
major concentration, the content of a foreign language course numbered 101-
102, and a semester course in mathematics (either C-4 or Basic Mathematics).
Fields of major concentration open to students in this curriculum are Bible,
Economics, English, French, German, Greek, History, History and Political
Science, Journalism, Latin, Mathematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psy-
chology, Sociology, Spanish, Speech. For the basic course and for sugges-
tions concerning the field of major concentration see page 125.

B. For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science:
The content of a one-year course basic to the student's proposed field
of major concentration, and the content of a one-year course basic to an ap-
proved minor. Fields of major concentration open to students in this curri-
oulum are Bacteriology, Biology, Botany, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics,
Psychology. For the basic course and for suggestions concerning the field of
major concentration see page 125.

C. For admission to the Combined Academic and Law Curricula:
The requirements are the same as in (A) above if the student intends to
earn the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws, the same as in (B)
above if the student intends to earn the degrees of Bachelor of Science and
Bachelor of Laws, and the same as in (E) below if the student intends to earn
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and Bachelor of Laws.

D. For admission to the Pre-medioal and Pre-dental Curricula:
The requirements are the same as in (B) above.

E. For admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Arts in Journalism:
The contents of Journalism 103-104, Journalism 205-206, and Journalism
207-208.

School of Pharmacy

To be admitted from the General College to the School of Pharmacy stud-
ents must present:
1. A certificate of graduation from the General College
2. Biology 101 and Botany 102 as C-6
5. General Chemistry as C-7
4. Pharmacy 225-224 as C-8
6. Pharmacognosy 221-222 as C-9
Note: Students of the superior group are advised to offer General Chemistry
as C-2 and Physics as C-7.







?PROGRAM A7iT) ORGANIZATION 125

SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDENTS WYHO INTEND TO ENTER THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

In the College of Arts and Sciences every student who expects to earn
the degree of Bachelor of Arts or the degree of Bachelor of Science must con-
centrate in some one field. This concentration constitutes a major in that
field. To complete a major in the minimum time the student should decide as
early as possible upon the field in which the major is to be earned. He
should then begin this major as a part of his elective work in the General
College. The student should consult the Head of the Department in which he
plans to pursue his major work.
The basic course of a major should be taken as early as possible. In
some cases students may begin this work in the first year of the General Col-
lege if they have the C-2 or C-4 substitution privilege (see page 120). All
others must take the basic course of the proposed major as C-7 in the second
year. For the electives C-8 and C-9 of the second year the student will take
courses as suggested below after the name of his major. The basic courses in
the major fields are listed below, followed by the suggested minors and elec-
tives:

BIBLE Be. 103-104. Suggested electives: Be. 201, Be. 211, Gk. 21-22

BIOLOGY Bly. 101-102. Suggested minor: Bty., Cy., Gy., Ps., or Psy.
Suggested electives: Gn., Fh., Ms., or Adv. Bly.

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY Bty. 101-102. Suggested minor: Bly., Cy.,
Ms., or Ps.

CHEMISTRY Cy. 101-102. Suggested minor: Ps., Bly., Ms., Bty., or Bey.
Suggested electives: Cy. 201-202, Ms., Gn., Fh.

ECONOMICS Be. 201E-202E. Suggested elective: course in an approved
minor

ENGLISH Eh. 105-104 or Eh. 201-202. Suggested electives course in an
approved minor

FRENCH Fh. 101-102. Suggested electives: course in an approved minor;
additional courses in Fh.

GERMAN Gn. 101-102. Suggested electives: course in an approved minor;
additional courses in Gn.

GREEK Gk. 101-102. Suggested minor: Ln.

HISTORY Hy. 101-102. Suggested elective: course in an approved minor

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE Hy. 101-102 and Pal. 101-102. Either
course may be used as basic to the major. The other course should
be elected if possible.

JOURNALISM Jm. 103-104. Suggested electives: Jm. 205-206; course in an
approved minor

LATIN Ln. 101-102. Suggested minor: Gk.

MATHEMATICS Ms. 101-102. Suggested electives: course in an approved
minor; eM. 251-252, Gn., Fh.







126 THE GENERAL COLLEGE

PHILOSOPHY Ppy. 203-204. Suggested elective: course in an approved
minor

PHYSICS Ps. 211-212. Suggested minor: Ms., Cy., or Bly. Suggested
electives: Ms. 251-252, Gn., Fh.

POLITICAL SCIENCE Pol. 101-102. Suggested elective: course in an ap-
proved minor

PSYCHOLOGY Psy. 201, Psy. 304. Suggested elective: course in an ap-
proved minor

SOCIOLOGY C-l. Suggested electives: course in an approved minor; a
year in Sy.

SPANISH Sh. 101-102. Suggested electives: course in an approved minor;
additional courses in Sh.

SPEECH Soh. 201-202. Suggested elective: course in an approved minor



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

To be admitted from the General College to the College of Agriculture
the student must present a certificate of graduation from the General College
and certification by the Board of University Examiners that he is qualified
to pursue the work of the College of Agriculture. The comprehensive examina-
tions of the General College for students who plan to enter the College of
Agriculture will include not less than sixteen nor more than eighteen semes-
ter hours credit, as measured by present standards, selected from the follow-
ing options as numbered in the current catalog:

As. 201-202 Ag. 201-202
Ay. 201-204 He. 101-204
Bly. 101-102 Bty. 101-102
Boy. 301-302 Bs. 211-212
En. 207 Al. 104-201
Cy. 101-102 Ey. and Pt. 201-202
Ps. 211-212

Certain students are permitted to make substitutions concerning C-2,
C-4, and C-6. These substitutions are listed under the program of studies
of the General College. In all cases the Dean of the College of Agriculture
should be consulted.



THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

To be admitted from the General College to the School of Architecture
and Allied Arts the student must present a certificate of graduation from the
General College and certification by the Board of University Examiners that
he is qualified to pursue the work of the School of Architecture and Allied
Arts. The comprehensive examinations of the General College for students who
intend to enter the School of Architecture and Allied Arts will include the
content of the following courses or subjects:






P R RAM AJ7 0"GA7lIZATI(lV 127

For the Curriculum in Architecture
Basic Mathematics, Man and the Physical World (or Chemistry 101-
102), Physics 211-212, and Architecture lla

For the Curriculum in Building Construction
Basic Mathematics, Man and the Physical World (or Chemistry 101-
102), Physics 211-212, and Architecture 1la

For the Curriculum in Landscape Architecture
Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms (or Basic Mathematics), Botany
101-102, and Architecture lla

For the Curriculum in Painting
Appreciation of the Fine Arts, and Painting 1la

For the Curriculum in Commercial Art
Appreciation of the Fine Arts, and Painting lla

Students who intend to enter the School of Architecture and Allied Arts
should arrange their programs of study in the General College with the advice
of the Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts.


THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

To be admitted from the General College to the College of Business Ad-
ministration the student must present a certificate of graduation from the
General College and certification by the Board of University Examiners that
he is qualified to pursue the work of the College of Business Administration.
The comprehensive examinations for the General College students who plan to
enter the College of Business Administration will include the content of the
following courses taken as C-7, C-8, and C-9:

Curriculum in Business Administration Proper
Bs. 103-104, 201-202, and 211-212

Curriculum in Business Administration in Combination with Law
Bs. 211-212 in place of C-2 in the first year. C-2 in the second
year as C-7. Bs. 201-202 and 311-312 as C-8 and C-9 respectively

Certain students are permitted to make substitutions concerning C-2,
C-4, and C-6. These substitutions are listed under the program of studies of
the General College. In all oases the Dean of the College of Business Admin-
istration should be consulted.


THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

To be admitted from the General College to the College of Education the
student must present a certificate of graduation from the General College and
certification by the Board of University Examiners that he is qualified to
pursue the work of the College of Education. The comprehensive examinations
for General College students who plan to enter the College of Education will
include the content of the following courses taken as C-7, C-8, and C-9:

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Education
Education in the American Democracy as C-7
The first year's work of a subject matter major as C-8
Any elective approved by the Dean as C-9







128 THE QE7JE1RAL COLLEGE

Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education
Education in the American Democracy as C-7
Theory and Praotioe of Natural Activities as C-8
Fundamentals of Football and Basketball and Personal Hygiene as C-9

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education
General Chemistry as C-7
Horticulture, Animal Husbandry, Agricultural Economics, and Agri-
cultural Engineering from the group from which students must elect C-8
and C-9 with approval of the Department Head

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Arts
Education in the American Demooracy as C-7
Bench Woodwork as C-8
Mechanical Drawing as C-9



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

To be admitted to the College of Engineering a student must present the
following:
1. A certificate of graduation from the General College
2. Basio Mathematios
3. General Chemistry and General Physics
4. Differential and Integral Calculus

Additional requirements for special curricula are listed below. The
time and content of courses listed vary for different curricula.


Civil Engineering
Drawing and Descriptive Geometry, Surveying,
Shop Laboratory, Summer Surveying Camp


Chenioal Engineering
Drawing and Descriptive Geometry,
*Summr Shop Course

Electrical Engineering
Drawing and Descriptive Geometry,
oratory, *SumBer Shop Course

Industrial Engineering
DrawVag and Descriptive Geometry,
ing, *Sumer Shop Course

Meoobhanioal Engineering
Drawing and Descriptive Geometry,
ing, *Suaer Shop Course


Water and Sewage,


Surveying, Analytical Chemistry,



Surveying, Mechanism, Shop Lab-



Principles of Economics, Survey-



Principles of Economies, Survey-


*In lieu of the summer shop course, students may work for twelve weeks as
student helpers in an approved shop, power plant, or industrial plant.

Only students of the superior group can finish any complete program
above in two years in the General College.
The first year's work in the General College as reconmended for man of
the superior group who plan to enter the College of Engineering is as follows:






PROGRAM A7NT OGRQAlZATION 129

C-1 : Man and the Social World
C-2 : General Chemistry
C-3 : Reading, Speaking, Writing
C-4 : Basic Mathematics
X : Military Science and Physical Education
: Mechanical Drawing and Descriptive Geometry

Students not in the superior group will enroll in the regular program
of the General College without the substitutions for C-2 and C-4 permitted
above.





-ADVISORY COCIITTEES--


BOARD OF UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS
(Admissions, Guidance, Comprehensive Examinations)
H. W. Chandler, Chairman
E. D. Hinokley, Winston W. Little, T. M. Simpson, B. A. Tolbert


MAN AND THE SOCIAL WORLD

(Comprehensive Course)
R. S. Atwood, Chairman
Robert C. Beaty
L. M. Bristol
M. J. Dauer
J. D. Glunt
C. V. Noble
G. B. Simmons
H. R. Trusler


READING, SPEAKING
AND WRITING
(Comprehensive Course)
C. A. Robertson, Chairman
J. N. Anderson
H. H. Caldwell
H. P. Constant
E. J. Emig
A. C. Morris
W. J. Matherly
J. E. Price
J. H. Wise


LAN AND THE PHYSICAL WORLD

(Comprehensive Course)
A. P. Black, Chairman
R. S. Atwood
A. A. Less
F. H. Heath
T. H. Hubbell
J. H. Kusner
Joseph Weil
R. C. Williamson


THE HUMANITIES
(Comprehensive Course)
Rasse 0. Enall, Chairman
J. N. Anderson
E. G. Atkin
J. D. Glunt
W. W. Little
C. A. Robertson
Rudolph Weaver





GENERAL MATHEMATICS
(Comprehensive Course)
T. M. Simpson, Chairman
F. W. Kokomoor
J. H. Kusner
J. W. Norman
B. R. VanLeer
W. H. Wilson


MAN AND THE BIOLOGICAL WORLD
(Comprehensive Course)
J. S. Rogers, Chairman
0. C. Bryan
C. F. Byers
M. D. Cody
E. D. Hinokley
H. H. Hume
B. 0. Smith
J. R. Watson
G. F. Weber



MAN AND HIS THINKING
(Comprehensive Course)
E. D. Hinokley, Chairman
W. W. Little
W. H. Wilson




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs