• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 The president’s report, University...
 Reports of the deans, etc.














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00359
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: December 1936
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00359
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The president’s report, University of Florida
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Reports of the deans, etc.
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
Full Text






BIENNIAL REPORT
OF THE PRESIDENT

of the

UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA

to the

BOARD OF CONTROL


FOR THE BIENNIUM
ENDING JUNE 30
1 936

















The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the
annual announcements of the colleges of the University, announce-
ments of special courses of instruction, and reports of the Univer-
sity Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply
for them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or
what information is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results
of research work. Papers are published as separate monographs num-
bered in several series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with
institutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence
concerning such exchanges should be addressed to the University
Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and
sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on
Publications. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies
not included in institutional exchanges, should be addressed to the
University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida





TABLE OF CONTENTS


THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ................................................ 7

Educational Features ........---------------...................---...................................................... 7

Physical Plant ..................................................................-------------------------------------------------------................... 9

Budgetary Requirements ....................--------------- ------------.. -----....... ---.......... 11

REPORTS OF THE DEANS, ETC.:

The Dean of Students ........................ .....-----------................................................. 13

The Business Manager .. ------------------------...................................................... 16

The Registrar ....................----------------------..................---------------............................................ 25

The Dean of the Graduate School ..........................................---------------------------................... 34

The Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences ........................................... 35

The Dean of the College of Agriculture (Teaching Division) .................... 44

The Dean of the College of Business Administration .................................... 46

The Dean of the College of Engineering ....................................................... 51

The Dean of the College of Law ................-----------............................---------------------...................----59

The Dean of the College of Education .........-----..-.....------......-..---....................... 63
The Director of the Summer Session ...-..- --.-.. ......................................... 68

The Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts ........................ 70

The Dean of the General College ........................................................................ 73

The Dean of the General Extension Division ................................................ 78

The University Librarian .....-..-----------..------..........................--------------------..........---...................-. 88

The Professor of Military Science and Tactics ............................................ 91

The Acting Director of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs ....--............ 92
The Director of the Florida State Museum ...- ....----.......................... 94

The Director of the Division of Athletics and Physical Education ........... --------95

The Director of Publicity ...................---------...............................----------------------------------................... 96

The University Physician ........-..--........--------.......................--------------------------------................... 97
The Dean of the College of Agriculture (The Experiment Stations and

the Agricultural Extension Service) .-........------......--.................................... 99

The Director of Radio Station WRUF ............................................................ 119





REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY
(Biennium Ending June 30, 1936)

To the Honorable Board of Control of
State Institutions of Higher Learning:
GENTLEMEN: Appended hereto are the usual detailed reports of the deans
and other administrative officers covering all of the activities of the University
of Florida during the past two years. I shall not duplicate these but will set
out some of the outstanding features, present briefly concrete needs, and offer
an explanation of our budgetary requirements for the approaching biennium.
EDUCATIONAL FEATURES
A good many educational experiments have been going on in the colleges and
universities of the United States during the last few years. The educational
structure is as unstable as has been the economic and social structures. The
University of Florida has been compelled to make certain accommodations to this
situation. Three projects are sufficiently important to justify mentioning here.
These are: the General College; the Cooperative Plan of Engineering Education;
and the School of Adult Education at Camp Roosevelt.
A drastic reorganization of the curriculum of the University was explained
in my last report. This was necessitated by a reduction of nearly twenty-five per-
cent in the funds available from the State and involved the elimination of one
college and the reduction of the School of Pharmacy to a department in the
College of Arts and Sciences. Mention was made of a plan of reorganization
of the curriculum on the junior college or lower division level, in accordance with
a resolution passed by the Board of Control.
The University of Florida was confronted with obvious breakdowns or fail-
ures at certain points in its educational procedures. These difficulties were
more or less general in colleges and universities elsewhere. Only half of the
students entering the University were continuing their work to the end of the
sophomore year and approximately one-third were going on to graduation. With
the bachelor's degree as the sole objective, it was apparent that two-thirds of
our students were failing in the purposes for which they came to college. The
several colleges were highly isolated and the work in them departmentalized in
various specialties. Curriculum materials were not integrated within the col-
leges or within the University. There was much waste occasioned by useless,
though unconscious, duplication in departments and colleges. Many students
selected their courses of study upon superficial grounds. Convenient hours for
the meeting of classes, the economy of books, rumors concerning the severity or
softness of the courses, et cetera, were often the determining factors. The Uni-
versity provided no attempt to diagnose aptitude, or ability, or provide guidance
for students. It was not uncommon for students to try several colleges. The
lock step method of education was in general use. No stimulation or oppor-
tunity was granted to students who desired to do more than mediocre work.
These are some of the deficiencies that existed two or three years ago.
In the fall of 1935, the program of the General College was begun for all
students entering the University at that time. The purposes of the General
College are in accord with the best educational philosophy that has been de-
veloped during recent years. It involves something of plans which have been
projected at Minnesota, Chicago, and other institutions. On the whole, it is





adapted more particularly to meet the peculiar conditions existing at the Uni-
versity of Florida. Some of its elements are original with us. A detailed account
is given in the report of the Acting Dean of the General College, submitted here-
with. It is my conviction that the College has provided some apparent advantages
and eliminated many of the difficulties described above. It has provided a more
adequate program of selection and guidance. The mastery of certain general
fundamental tool subjects is required before specialization is begun. All stu-
dents must acquire a minimum facility in reading, writing, speaking, and think-
ing; an acquaintance with the social sciences, as well as the physical and bio-
logical sciences, and something of the humanities, before entering upon the
highly specialized or technical fields in the upper division. With the oppor-
tunity which is given the student for guidance, a broader base is provided for
the more specialized work of the upper divisions. Greater freedom is given stu-
dents in pursuing their studies, provided they are found to deserve this. Stimu-
lation is given to those who desire to do more and better work than the ordinary
student. Class attendance and grades are not the motivating forces. Ability,
skill, and knowledge are the objectives.
The reduction in appropriations would have made it impossible to continue
to teach the greatly increased student body of the University of Florida on the
old basis. Fortunately, the General College has served as an adequate device
for eliminating waste growing out of useless duplication and has afforded a
richer educational opportunity at the same time. The University of Florida is
the first state university which has been able to inaugurate a program requiring
all students to go through a general college. The overwhelming majority of
freshmen who began this work last year are enthusiastic. Many of them have
taken occasion to explain the work of the General College and offer their com-
mendation before civic bodies and other groups in the State. Some of the more
technical colleges, such as the College of Engineering, found it difficult to adapt
themselves to the General College and find sufficient time for the technical
branches of the Upper Division. Through the patient and constant cooperation
of the various faculties, some obstacles which appeared insuperable have been
removed.
The General College of the University of Florida has attracted the attention
of administrators and educationists in other parts of the country. Some have
visited the University and spent days and weeks in making a careful examina-
tion of what is going on. There have been frequent requests for a presentation
at educational meetings and at other institutions. Articles have been written con-
cerning it in various educational journals by the Acting Dean of the General
College, the President of the University, and others.
The Plan of Cooperative Engineering, or Florida Industries Cooperative
Course, has been worked out and organized during the past biennium. This
plan is similar to the plan originally instituted at the University of Cincinnati
by Dean Schneider whereby students alternate periods of study at the University
with periods of work in industry. By this method the theoretical and practical
training are developed hand in hand. Furthermore, this plan enables the student
without means to earn the necessary money to defray his college training by the
work that he does in industry. Under this plan, seven years are required for
a student to complete his training in industry and secure one of the bachelor's
degrees in engineering. The periods of alternation are for six months and two





men work together alternating at work and in school. A number of industries
in Florida have expressed themselves in an enthusiastic way and have agreed
to enter into a period of cooperation with the University.
The University of Florida has been offering short intensive courses in a
number of professions and vocations for many years. These courses have in-
cluded medicine, dentistry, nursing, photography, radio service, et cetera. Those
availing themselves of these courses are usually among the more successful
in their several callings. It must be necessary for them to leave their work
for a period of time and forego their earnings as well as defray a hotel bill
of some five or six dollars per day while they are at the University. No dormi-
tories or other facilities have been available for the adults pursuing these
courses.
When work stopped on the Florida Ship Canal, President Roosevelt sought
some useful purpose for the plant which had been built at Ocala to house the
engineers and other technical workers. This plant includes dormitories for
men and women, four administrative buildings, shops, and about 75 residences.
The University of Florida proposed the operation of a continuous School of
Adult Education. This proposal met with instant approval by the President
and this school is now in operation. Its activities are not a proper part of the
biennium just closed, as the school has only recently been opened. It is mentioned
here as one of the attempts being made at this time to provide more technical
education and leisure-time training for persons who find themselves below or
near the margin of earning a livelihood. An appropriation by the Federal gov-
ernment, partially matched by a sponsor's contribution from the University, is
making the courses at the School of Adult Education available at a nominal cost
to men and women who have the interest and desire to lift themselves higher in
occupational skills or levels.

PHYSICAL PLANT
The physical plant of the University has been compelled to suffer consider-
able deterioration during the years of the depression. All available funds were
needed in order to provide for the instruction of students and administration.
Only dire needs were met in keeping the plant in repair. Even so, disaster was
barely averted during the last two or three years. Unless material sums are
made available for repairs and additions to the plant during the next biennium
the costs will be progressively higher and the work of the institution will suffer
very palpably.
The need for buildings has reached a limit. The State has made no funds
available for building at the University since 1930, with the exception of
$150,000 which was appropriated by the Legislature to match a similar sum
donated by the General Education Board of New York. Because of the consti-
tutional limitations in Florida, which prevent the State and its subdivisions
from incurring loans and obligations, the University has been unable to get any
considerable assistance from Public Works Administration funds. Two projects
have been approved on a grant basis. No projects involving loans have been
approved.
For years an attempt has been made to meet an acute shortage in dormitory
space. With 3,000 regular full-time students and dormitory space for less than
500, it was hoped that PWA would make available through grant and loans
sufficient funds to house several hundred additional students. This expectation





has not been realized. In the meantime, many students are living in quarters
which are below the standards of best sanitation.
In my last report I mentioned the availability of funds through the Civil
Works Administration for the building of a Union on the campus. The con-
struction of this building progressed very slowly, and extended through three
emergency relief administrations: CWA, FERA, and WPA. Last summer the
work was carried to a point at which it became practicable to make use of the
building, though it is still incomplete in numerous details. It will require some
$20,000 or $25,000 to complete this building and the Annex, which also was be-
gun as a relief project. The Government has performed all of its obligations
in this respect, but the University has been unable to realize the funds which
it promised to put into this building. A new kitchen which cost approximately
$45,000 has been built during the biennium. This was made available almost
entirely through relief funds by the FERA. The University put only about
$5,000 in this project.
The Florida Union, the Annex, and kitchen make a continuous unit which
adjoins the University Cafeteria. When completed in all details, this will consti-
tute a most valuable addition to the facilities. It would be hard to discover a
medium through which larger service could be secured for the students and
the University community, generally, than through the expenditures which have
been made in this connection.
During the biennium some smaller buildings and additions to the plant have
been made. These include a photographic laboratory, costing approximately
$16,000, built through the cooperation of Federal relief agencies, the University
and the State Road Department; the rebuilding of portions of the interior of the
dormitory, Thomas Hall, with modern and fireproof materials at a cost of
$33,000; the completion of the new athletic field and running track, south of
Florida Field, at a cost of $27,000; and the erection of a small laboratory build-
ing adjoining the central heating plant for the housing of the Drake Laboratory.
This building cost $6,000, one-half of which was made available from WPA
funds and one-half from University funds.
The work of improving the electrical distribution system, whereby new lines
have been placed underground and all equipment modernized, was recently com-
pleted. It is difficult to describe what might have happened, if the Federal
Government had not made the above improvements possible through the avail-
ability of relief funds.
Several buildings on the campus remain incomplete; another has been con-
demned for some years and has been temporarily shored up, so that it can re-
main in use without endangering the lives of the occupants. The boilers of
the central heating plant have been only partially protected under a temporary
structure for a number of years. Engineers inform us that these boilers are
rapidly deteriorating. An expenditure of some $50,000 or $60,000 for the com-
pletion of the central heating plant would have saved considerable money if this
could have been done during the past biennium. As it is, when a new building
is erected much expensive equipment will have to be bought as a result of a
failure to provide adequate protection in the immediate past.
It will not be possible to accommodate any more students without additions
to the plant. Every possible device which will permit the utilization of our
present plant has been employed. Much remodeling has been done so that
classrooms could be enlarged to accommodate larger groups of students. There





are many classes now in the University which have more than 100 students in
them. The classrooms were originally intended to accommodate some 35 or 40
students. Every kind of makeshift plan has been employed. We are now faced
with the alternative of enlarging our facilities, or denying admission to addi-
tional students.
Some measure of relief is in prospect as a result of work which is now pro-
gressing on the Seagle Building. This is a ten-story structure, originally in-
tended for a hotel, which was purchased jointly by the city and Miss Georgia
Seagle, a resident of Gainesville, and turned over to the Board of Control. Nearly
$200,000 has been made available from PWA funds and the million-dollar ap-
propriation secured by Governor Sholtz in the last legislature for relief purposes.
When this building is completed, it will be possible to move the Museum and some
of the non-instructional activities of the University, thus releasing some space
on the campus for classrooms and offices. The University has been accumulat-
ing a rather extensive museum for some years. We have valuable collections
of birds, eggs, coins, ceramics, and silver, and other articles which have been
presented by various donors. A small fraction of the Museum has been on ex-
hibition. The space in the Seagle Building will make it possible to display the
largest and best collection in the State of Florida and, in some respects, one of
the most complete in this section of the country.
BUDGETARY REQUIREMENTS
It is important to set out here the basis upon which a budget for the next
biennium is being proposed. In general, the Legislature is being asked to re-
store the appropriations of 1930-31. In that year, the appropriations for the
several major divisions were: University proper, $851,884.50; Agricultural Ex-
periment Stations, $396,895; Agricultural Extension Service, $89,352.25. During
the biennium just closed, the annual appropriations for these three units were
as follows: University proper, $625,000; Agricultural Experiment Stations,
$374,940; Agricultural Extension Service, $86,639.98. In order to restore the
appropriations as of 1930-31, it will be necessary to increase the amount avail-
able for the University proper 36%. Even if this is done, it will entail upon us
the necessity of providing for 38% more students than we had in 1930-31. In
that year, there were 2,388 students enrolled in the two semesters of the regular
session, and 1,530 students enrolled in the summer school. During the year
1935-36, there was a total enrollment of 2,983 in the two semesters of the regu-
lar session and 1,706 students enrolled in the summer school.
To restore the 1930-31 appropriations for the Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tions and Agricultural Extension Service, the present appropriation must be in-
creased 6% and 3%, respectively. These services have not suffered in reductions
comparable to those which have been imposed upon the University proper. In
1933, it was necessary to make a cut in the appropriation of the University
proper of approximately 22%, reducing the annual amount available from
$725,000 to $561,600. In 1935, an increase of approximately 10% was allowed,
bringing the amount back to $625,000. Should the appropriation for the Uni-
versity proper be restored to the 1930-31 amount, it is problematic whether
the institution could be operated successfully. While the present enrollment
is 38% greater than in 1930-31, it is probable that the enrollment in the next
biennium will be considerably more. It should be noted that the largest annual
increases in the enrollment have been experienced in the last four or five years.
For example, between the years 1933-34 and 1934-35, the enrollment of the





University increased from 2,371 to 2,848, a gain in one year of 477. This gain
is larger than the total enrollment of the University twenty years ago.
When one surveys the situation through which we have been passing, in-
cluding the economic depression, the greatly increased enrollment, unavailability
of State funds for buildings or maintenance of the plant, and other factors, we
believe that the University has fared as well as could be reasonably expected
during the biennium just closing. The morale of the staff and of the students
has been exceptionally high. Appreciable educational progress has been made,
particularly through the inauguration of the General College, and no pronounced
setback has been evident in any part of our program. For this, I am sure that all
friends of the University join the administration in an expression of profound
and sincere gratitude. I wish to close this report with an expression of appre-
ciation to the Board of Education, the Board of Control, Governor Sholtz, the
faculty, alumni, students, and that great company of citizens who have cooperated
toward the advancement of this high cause through these years of difficulty which
might well have resulted in retardation rather than progress.

Respectfully submitted,
JNO. J. TIGEaT, President.





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS


To the President of the University.
SIR: The Office of the Dean of Students exists to help create and maintain
conditions under which learning can take place. Since learning is not a passive
process and since even all University learning is not a matter of classroom in-
struction, this office is primarily interested in the activities and attitudes of the
students and their willingness to assume responsibility for University affairs.
In trying to secure correct attitudes, activities, and student participation, we
work with organizations and with individuals.
By far the greater part of the time of our office force is spent with students
in personal conferences. We feel that this is right because each person must
be treated as an individual. Records indicate that approximately half of the
members of the student body come in for conferences at some time during each
year. The problems are varied, but all are important and merit consideration.
Counsel, guidance, and information are given, but the attitude is maintained
that the problem is, after all, the student's and his own effort must provide the
solution. Thus we feel that the first purpose of this office is to provide a place
where any student can come at any time and find sympathetic, intelligent, and
cooperative counsel.
The next most important function of this office has to do with student organi-
zations. Of these, the most important is student government which consists
of the Student Body President, the Executive Council, and the Honor Court.
Through these organizations the students exert a very pronounced influence on
university life. Fortunately, our students have been most successful in select-
ing first-class representatives to carry on their affairs. These representatives
have shown a splendid attitude of cooperation with University officials in carry-
ing out public spirited policies designed to serve the best interest of the Univer-
sity as a whole.
The social fraternities include in their membership, slightly less than half of
the student body. These organizations fill a very definite need on our campus,
and, generally speaking, work to attain the best interest of university life. They
cooperate with the administration in many helpful ways and as a group exert
a helpful influence on the campus. Most of the social activities are conducted
by these organizations and all matters of this kind clear through the Office of
the Dean of Students. We are now engaged in a thorough study of the financial
set-up of the social fraternities and with the cooperation of these organizations
we hope to put this part of their activity on a more stable basis.
We are pleased with the democratic social spirit which pervades the campus
and are glad to report that there is no distinction between fraternity and non-
fraternity men in social or other activities. Participation in various activities
seems to depend on the taste of particular individuals rather than on member-
ship in any group.
Each honorary, and professional fraternity is organized and operated to
appeal to a definIte group of students. There is a bit of over-organization
and some over-lapping. However, most of these organizations perform a useful
function in stimulating scholarship and professional interest.
A recent check indicates that 1140 of our students have jobs of one kind
or another directly controlled by the University. These jobs vary from campus
laborers to graduate assistants. Most of these are cleared through this office.





The entire work relative to the selection and employment of all National Youth
Administration employees is done here. This involves a great deal of investiga-
tion since only needy students who give promise of ability to do high grade
college work are appointed. In fact the general policy of the University is that
no student be employed on any job or given any help unless he is making satis-
factory academic progress.
Another important function of this office has to do with scholarships and loan
funds. It is through this office that most of the checking, relative to the needs
and qualifications of students applying for either, is done. Here the records
are kept. The lack of funds for both scholarships and loans is one of our most
pressing problems. The Rotary Clubs of the state have contributed most lib-
erally and there are several endowed scholarships; there are also a few small
funds from which loans are made. However, all of these together do not satisfy
the need.
Several years ago, the students of the summer session began to collect a fund
which has now reached approximately $1,500. This fund is to help teachers at-
tend the summer session. The students of the regular session have raised about
$2,000 which is used for short-term loans. Each year this fund is turned over
about three times, thus enabling the $2,000 principal to do at least $6,000 worth
of work. Plans are now under way to increase this fund each year.
Since a great deal depends on the spirit and way in which a freshman begins
his work, Freshman Week was organized a number of years ago. During this
week students are introduced to campus life. All questions relating to registra-
tion, selection of courses, adjustment to living conditions, are handled during this
time. In addition to Freshman Week, for orientation purposes, a monthly
meeting of the freshman class is held throughout the year. The Office of the
Dean of Students plans and carries on the activities of Freshman Week as well
as the orientation program at these assemblies.
We have dormitory space for approximately five hundred students. All mat-
ters of conduct of students in the dormitories are handled by the President of
the Student Body with student monitors for each section. All this work heads
up in our office.
Fraternity houses are able to accommodate approximately one thousand stu-
dents. This means that fifteen hundred students must find rooming accommoda-
tions in private homes and rooming houses located in Gainesville. Careful in-
spection is made of these rooming houses two or three times a year and every
effort is made to insure wholesome and sanitary conditions in these places.
Many people seem to think of the Dean of Students' Office as primarily a
disciplinary office. Fortunately, only a small part of the work of this office has
to do with the punitive side of discipline. It is felt that conferences with individ-
ual students and working with organizations provides for the positive side of
student conduct and removes much of the reason for the negative or punitive side.
As in most schools, more than ninety per cent of disciplinary trouble is caused
by approximately five per cent of the members of the student body. We attempt
to locate this small number as early as possible and bring influence to bear on
them which will cause them to reform or to resign.
Much of the work of the University administration is necessarily done through
committees. This office has either chairmanship or membership on approximately
one-third of these committees. This, of course, is very much worthwhile and
accounts for much of the work of the officials of this department.





All records relating to problems and progress of individual students are kept
here. These records provide the basis for intelligent guidance and handling
problems which arise with reference to individuals and organizations. We have
accumulated fairly complete records which are proving more and more help-
ful in guidance of undergraduates and the placement of graduates.
The three-fold purpose of Florida Union is to serve as a center for student
activities; a tie binding faculty, alumni, students and friends of the University;
and an aid in developing a culture pattern to distinguish Florida men. Florida
Union has a director, two janitors, eleven regular assistants and two N.Y.A.
employees. Florida Union is kept open seven days out of each week from eight
in the morning until eleven at night.
The facilities of the building include a game room, reading room, lounge,
offices for the various student body officers and publications, and general meeting
rooms for student organizations.
The facilities of the Florida Union have been used to present an intra-mural
program and handbook, weekly vesper services, and the student elections during
the summer sessions.
The first of four exhibits of Living American Art was recently held in the
building.
The major needs at the present include the completion of the Banquet Hall
in the Annex, placing of Florida Union on the Student Activity List and asking
each student two dollars per year for maintenance, further construction, and
the complete furnishing of the whole building.
In closing, permit me to express the thanks of this office to you for your uni-
form courtesy and intelligent cooperation with us in trying to establish and main-
tain conditions under which learning may prevail and growth may go on in a
satisfactory way.
Respectfully submitted,
B. A. TOLBERT, Dean of Students.





REPORT OF THE BUSINESS MANAGER


To the President of the University.
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the Business Office and
its subsidiary activities for the biennial period ending June 30, 1936. This re-
port includes a complete financial statement and balance sheet for all depart-
ments of the University, the Agricultural Experiment Station and Agricultural
Extension Service, as well as such auxiliary activities as Bookstore-Soda Foun-
tain, Cafeteria, dormitories, et cetera. These statements are printed annually
as exchange publications.
Budget recommendations for the Business Office and Maintenance Depart-
ments for the biennium ending June 30, 1939, have been submitted to you with
explanations as to certain increases for salaries, upkeep and plant maintenance.
The plant investment has increased in the last six years as much as in the pre-
vious nineteen years with very little increase in appropriation, and we must have
additional funds if the workers are to have living wages and the physical plant
is to be maintained with efficiency so as to lower the depreciation due to natural
causes.
BUSINESS OFFICE
This office has been operated at a minimum expense. By reason of the rapid
growth and development of all colleges and departments of the University, in-
cluding Experiment Stations, Agricultural Extension and General Extension,
Radio Station and P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, this office has had additional
duties imposed on its staff to handle the details and records required in collect-
ing student fees, requisitions, purchase orders and making up vouchers for
all budgetary and custodian funds. The change in the Summer School extending
the one term of eight weeks to two terms of six and five weeks respectively, has
likewise added to the work.
To do all this work efficiently and satisfactorily, we should have at least
two additional full time workers, one in the Purchasing Department, and one
for keeping an encumbrance ledger as recommended in the survey made by Mr.
Lloyd Morey, Comptroller of the University of Illinois. We should also increase
the salaries of those staff members who are underpaid. Had it not been for
NYA help the past few years and the loyalty of the staff in rendering overtime
service, the detailed records of the office could not possibly have been kept with
any degree of efficiency and the numerous reports and budgets required of this
office prepared.
MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENTS
BUILDINGS
With the meager funds available in this biennium, I feel much has been
accomplished.
To take care of equipment and furnish necessary storerooms we have erected
additional buildings along the spur track. This track installed some years ago
is still proving its economic value by continued savings on carload shipments
of materials and supplies. Our records show that eighty-seven carload shipments
were delivered over this track during the fiscal year 1934-35 and eighty-six during
1935-36. The greatest saving is on coal shipments for the Central Heating Plant.
In addition to the new buildings which have been erected on the campus this
Department has had charge of and completed the following major improvements:





UNIVERSITY
1. Rehabilitation of bathrooms in Section B, Thomas Hall, of fireproof construction in accord-
ance with the architect's plans. The rooms in this section have all been done over, and
battleship linoleum laid on all floors.
2. To provide additional and larger classrooms for the General College it was necessary to
alter and improve a number of rooms in Language Hall, also room 106 in Agriculture
Building and two large rooms on the second floor of Science Hall formerly used by the
Museum. Space for storage of Museum equipment was provided by laying floors in the
attic of Science Hall.
3. The attic of Chemistry-Pharmacy Building was finished to provide satisfactory labora-
tories for the new Naval Stores Research Project.
4. Partitions were added and improvements made in the basement of the Auditorium for
more efficient handling of ROTC uniforms and ordnance.
5. Additional 36-inch concrete highway pipe was installed and the low area filled in to
provide necessary space for construction of storage buildings.
6. 4-inch water mains connecting Agriculture Building and Student Union Building with
Buckman Hall, and 6-inch water mains connecting Language Hall and Law College with
the main near Peabody Hall were installed to comply with the Southeastern Underwriters
Association's recommendation.
7. Rehabilitation of the Barracks to provide classrooms for the Military Department.
Other less extensive improvements were made to instructional buildings, such
as painting inside and out, replastering, installing linoleum in hallways and
offices, sanding and varnishing floors, changing partitions, et cetera.
For the Experiment Station we have painted farm buildings on the Archer
Road; installed plumbing at Cellon Farm; altered the Beef Cattle Barn, installed
partitions, plastered and painted walls; built a small animal house at the Animal
Hospital; constructed a portable poultry house; built a tool and machine shed
at the Warrington Farm.

GROUNDS
This department has the additional responsibility of the beautification and
maintenance of the recently completed P. K. Yonge Laboratory School campus,
the Stadium, track and other playing fields of the Athletic Department; all of
which has greatly increased the work of the Grounds Department, with no addi-
tional funds appropriated for this expense.
We are handicapped by the lack of adequate watering facilities on the cam-
pus, making it most difficult to keep the shrubbery and grass in condition during
the hot, dry season. In spite of these difficulties, continued improvement has
been made on the campus as attested by the complimentary statements of edu-
cators and other distinguished visitors from universities and colleges throughout
the country.
The following is taken from a report of the Superintendent:
1. Beautification by planting shrubs, laying sod, et cetera, around Stadium, track and ath-
letic fields, including planting of 1000 Australian pines at south end of Stadium.
2. Azalea border in front of the Experiment Station.
3. Improvement of parking spaces along Language and Peabody halls and the Library by
laying colored cement blocks, planting grass between the blocks and setting out shrubs
at end of each section.
4. All gravel walks on the campus and at the P. K. Yonge School have been resurfaced
with crushed old brick, tile and cement. A hedge was planted the full length of the
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School grounds and cannas planted around the buildings.
5. A cement walk of diamond design in two colors was laid in front of Thomas Hall.
Also plantings of grass and shrubbery were made in this area.
6. Dogwood, redbud, holly, mimosa and other native trees and shrubs have been planted
on the campus, particularly along the walk from Engineering Building to P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School.
7. Beautification work around Florida Union.

17





ELECTRICAL

Professor Joseph Weil, Head of the Department of Electrical Maintenance,
submits the following report:
The work of the Electrical Maintenance Department is primarily of five types:
(1) Maintenance of electrical equipment on the campus.
At regular intervals the campus electrical equipment, which consists of over 1,400 pieces
valued at $400,000, is carefully inspected, properly lubricated and adjusted, and instructions
are given for the correct use of the equipment.
(2) Maintenance of an adequate, safe and continuous electrical service.
Under the auspices of the FERA and WPA many improvements-such as greater safety,
lower maintenance cost, and more efficient service-have been made in the distribution sys-
tem. In addition, the appearance of the campus has been considerably improved by building
a complete underground system to replace the old overhead system.
(3) Control of various factors affecting the cost of electrical energy.
Although our use of electricity has increased about 100 per cent since 1930, our total bill
for electricity is now only about two-thirds as much as it was then. This is in a great part due
to the curtailment of electricity by constant supervision.
(4) Operation and maintenance of the telephone plant.
The number of telephone stations has increased 19 per cent since 1930, but the operation
cost is about $1,000 less than it was at that time. A new telephone switchboard has been
installed. The increased number of calls makes the employment of an additional operator
almost imperative.
(5) Design, approval and installation of new equipment.
The Department, in cooperation with the Business Office and other departments, has affected
large savings in the selection and operation of electrical equipment. It has rendered service
in the installation of equipment in the new campus units. Improved illumination of the campus,
class rooms and offices, and display lighting for special occasions have been secured at no cost
to the University.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Several buildings should be rewired. It is hoped' this can be done within the next few years.
There are still many places where poor illumination is particularly harmful to the users of
these rooms, so a request is made in the budget for improving this condition. While the amount
requested can only partially accomplish this, it will correct many of the most outstanding faults.

MILITARY PROPERTY

To secure greater efficiency in the handling of ordnance, uniforms, and other
U. S. Government property, which the University holds as custodian, the supply
rooms in the basement of the Auditorium were altered to provide office space for
the Assistant Custodian. This was necessary for better cooperation between
the Office of the Military Property Custodian and the Supply Officer of the ROTC.
New records have been set up which will enable the University to have a more
efficient system for handling ordnance, clothing and other supplies furnished
to the students by the Federal Government, and further reduce to a minimum the
loss of said equipment by ROTC students.

UNIVERSITY COMMONS AND CAFETERIA

Due to constantly increasing cost of foodstuffs, it has been difficult to operate
the Cafeteria as a non-profit service to the students of the University without
raising the price of board. During the construction of the new $40,000 kitchen,
which was completed during the past year, a temporary setup was necessary, thus
making it difficult to operate with any degree of satisfaction or efficiency. The
Cafeteria has probably rendered a greater service to the students than in any
similar period, as it has held prices charged for board to a minimum and thus
controlled prices at off-campus eating places at a time when students were least
able to pay. With probably the largest number of students in the history of





the University working their way, partially or wholly, through school, increased
costs for sustenance would have compelled many of them to withdraw during
this period.
With the much needed up-to-date and sanitary kitchen in use, the Cafeteria
for the first time will be able to render really effective service to the students.
However, this cafeteria service is not the ideal method of feeding students. Other
universities and colleges having tried it, either discontinued it or operated the
cafeteria in connection with a dining room serving family style or plate service.
I am recommending that our service be modified accordingly, and that board
and rooms be provided for students living in the dormitories at the following
rates:
$26.00 to $30.00 per month for 3 meals
$17.00 to $27.00 per month for 2 meals
depending on rooms selected. This would insure approximately five hundred
regular student boarders, which is the minimum number required in equalizing
the overhead expense necessary to the efficient operation of our size plant.
The Cafeteria offers employment to approximately fifty students.

DORMITORIES
For the past two years it has been impossible to meet the demand for dormi-
tory rooms. Sections of Thomas Hall have been remodeled into up-to-date fire-
proof construction, with funds which have accumulated from rentals. Last year
Section C and the bathrooms in Section B were remodeled, thereby completely
rehabilitating Thomas Hall with the exception of Sections A and F and a part
of B. This is a worth-while plan and should be continued until these old dormi-
tories are completely remodeled. May I again stress the need of additional
dormitory space, at least sufficient to take care of incoming freshmen. This con-
struction might well be considered one of the most necessary improvements in
any building program of the University. This year the demand for dormitory
space has surpassed any other year in the history of the University, and all rooms
were reserved several months in advance of the fall opening.
The dormitories are under the supervision and care of two housekeepers
with the assistance of eleven maids and three janitors. Each section of the
dormitory is in charge of a monitor, under the administration of a head monitor,
who is President of the Student Body, and is directly responsible to the Dean
of Students. These monitors are selected from among the outstanding seniors.
The morale of the students living in the dormitories has been improved under
this setup.

BOOKSTORE-SODA FOUNTAIN
This Department is operated on a non-profit basis, supplying text books, sta-
tionery, and other supplies to the students at the lowest possible cost. By close
cooperation with the faculty, it is possible to always have on hand sufficient quan-
tities of textbooks, thus avoiding inconvenience or delay when registration is
completed and classwork begins.
The Bookstore is also cooperating with the students in the purchase and
resale of their secondhand books, paying higher prices than could be secured
elsewhere.
The Soda Fountain-Lunchroom adds to the service of this activity, employ-
ing some twenty students who are selected on the basis of financial need and





ability. During recent years, there has been an apparent tendency among stu-
dents to eat sandwiches and light lunches as an economic necessity. The facilities
for this service have been greatly increased to take care of their needs in this
respect.
The new quarters in Florida Union Annex will be up-to-date in every particu-
lar and will enable this University activity to offer improved service for the
students.
DUPLICATING DEPARTMENT
The Duplicating Department of the University serves only the University
and official University organizations in reproducing forms and copy by use of
mimeograph, multigraph, ditto, and multilith machines. All work is charged
to the departments of the University at actual cost of producing the work. This
Department serves a two-fold purpose in economizing in the production of ac-
cumulated quantities at one point and in eliminating the purchase of similar
machines for each of the many departments of the University which would re-
quire some or all of the above machines if this service was not available to
them.
This department has made very definite strides during the past two years in
the reproducing of material by the photo offset method. It has been possible
to reproduce and make available to the public research material, due to the low
cost of this method as compared with other methods.
The only equipment added to this department has been two typewriters spe-
cially made for the preparation of master copies for this photo offset method.






REPORT OF INCOME AND DISBURSEMENTS
UNIVERSITY PROPER
1934-1936


STATE APPROPRIATIONS:
University of Florida-Salaries* .......................................
University of Florida-Necessary and Regular Expense*
Radio Station WRUF ..............................................................
Chair of Americanism ...........................................................
Campus Police .........................................................................
Naval Stores Research ........................................................
F orestry .......................... ..............- ........................................-

T ota l ..................................................... ......................

Permanent Building Fund Chapter 14573 .....................
Permanent Building Fund Chapter 15719 .......................
General Education Board Building Fund ........................

T otal ........................ ......... .................... .................

FEDERAL SOURCES:
Morrill-Nelson Fund ........................ ..............................
Smith-Hughes Fund ..................................................................
Bankhead-Jones Fund ..........................................................

T ota l .............................................. ......... .................

ENDOWMENT FUNDS:
Agricultural College Fund ......................... ...................
American Legion Interest Fund .......................................
Seminary Interest Fund ........................................................

T ota l ..................................................... ..........................


Income
1934-35


$454,410.00
111,467.33
25,000.00
2,500.00
783.37



594,160.70

5,478.32
2,701.33
2,615.98

10,795.63


25,000.00
6,264.00


31,264.00


2,585.93
2,200.00
208.20

4,994.13


INCIDENTAL INCOME:
University .................................................................................. 172,601.05
General Extension Division ................................................... 45,250.00
Radio Station W RU F ............................................................ 4,340.42

Total ............................................................................... $222,191.47


Disbursements
1934-35


$454,410.00
111,467.27
25,000.00
2,499.22
783.37
..............................86


594,159.86


5,373.09
2,701.33
2,615.98

10,690.40


25,000.00
6,264.00
.............................

31,264.00


2,579.89
2,200.00
208.20

4,988.09


172,479.00
43,740.87
4,339.29


$220,559.16


Reverted
6-30-35



.06

.78

.................


.84


Income
1935-36


$510,000.00
115,000.00
32,600.00
2,500.00

2,500.00
7,500.00


670,100.00


Disbursements
1935-36


$510,000.00
114,999.96
32,471.44
2,499.70

2,500.00
7,500.00


669,971.10


I IiI


5,527.35


5,334.67


! I-


5,527.35 5,334.67


25,079.59
5,850.00
10,000.00

40,929.59


23,943.29
2,200.00
4,659.34

30,802.63


141,942.25
46,494.35
4,876.32


25,000.00
5,850.00
10,000.00

40,850.00


23,943.29
2,200.00
4,659.34

30,802.63


128,565.72
44,050.53
3,532.48

$176,148.73


...................... $193,312.92


*Includes General Extension Division Funds.
Note: Balances not reverting June 30. 1935, are carried forward as income in 1935-36.


Balance
Forward
7-1-36



.04
128.56
.30

..............................


128.90


192.68

..............................


192.68


79.59



79.59


13,376.53
2,443.82
1,343.84

$ 17,164.19


i i


---------- ...........


-----------------.----
......................
------.--.--------.---

---.-------.----------


................
......................
......................





REPORT OF INCOME AND DISBURSEMENTS
EXPERIMENT STATIONS AND AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION
1934-1936

| 'Balance
Income Disbursements Reverted Income Disbursements Forward
1934-35 1934-35 6-30-35 1935-36 1935-36 7-1-36

STATE APPROPRIATIONS:
Main Experiment Station Fund .................................. I $182,330.87 $182,329.10 $ 1.77 $173,650.50 $167,139.70 $ 6,510.80
Celery Disease Investigations ......................................... 6,680.52 6,673.28 7.24 5,250.00 5,246.17 3.83
Citrus Disease Investigations .......... .............. 3,500.93 3,499.38 1.55 3,500.00 3,489.94 10.06
Fumigation Research ........................................................... 3,774.25 3,773.35 .90 3,062.50 3,052.73 9.77
Grape Pest Investigations ................................... .......... 3,571.90 3,570.81 1.09 3,500.00 3,494.49 5.51
Pecan Insect Investigations ................ ................... 2,915.16 2,914.06 1.10 4,150.00 2,310.92 1,839.08
Potato Disease Investigations ...................................... 5,359.89 5,357.83 2.06 4,000.00 3,993.35 6.65
Potato Laboratory at Hastings ............. .. .......... ............... ............................... 5,250.00 .............................. 5,250.00
Strawberry Disease Investigations ................... 6,405.14 6,405.07 .07 6,300.00 6,234.57 65.43
Tomato Disease Investigations ............................................. 2,940.49 2,937.05 3.44 2,900.00 2,788.50 111.50
Citrus Experiment Station .................................................... 11,548.90 11,548.37 .53 46,451.00 37,161.07 9,289.93
Everglades Experiment Station* .............................. 50,376.36 50,374.65 1.71 50,339.00 49,716.04 622.96
North Florida Experiment Station ............................. 20.986.32 20,985.42 .90 25,968.00 25,890.82 77.18
Sub-Tropical Experiment Station ............................... 10,596.71 10,595.21 1.50 10,579.00 10,567.07 11.93
N Watermelon Disease Investigations .................................. 6,246.63 6,245.92 .71 7,000.00 6,905.43 94.57
N Special Dairy Teaching and Research ................................ ...... ..... . .................................. .... .. ... 15,540.00 7,177.04 8,362.96
Special Poultry Teaching and Research ...................... ............. ..................................... ... 12,500.00 8,916.48 3,583.52
Cooperative W ork with U. S. W weather Bureau .............. .......................................................... ............ ... 10,000.00 7,044.76 2,955.24
Total ...................................................................... 317,234.07 317,209.50 24.57 389,940.00 351,129.08 38,810.92
Agricultural Extension Division ................................. 70,385.57 70,250.74 134.83 86,639.98 77,855.51 8,784.47
Screw W orm Control ..................................... ..................................................... ...... ... ................ .. . ............... 50,000.00 22,053.27 27,946.73
Total ................................. 70,385.57 70,250.74 134.83 136,639.98 99,908.78 36,731.20
FEDERAL FUNDS:
Experiment Station ......... .............................. 90,000.00 90,000.00 .................... 97,700.41 97,700.41 .............................
Agricultural Extension Division ....................................... 134,739.98 134,739.98 ...................... 218,727.67 211,792.95 6,934.72
Total ........................ .......... 224,739.98 224,739.98 ................... 316,428.08 309,493.36 6,934.72
INCIDENTAL INCOME:
Experim ent Station ..1.................... .......................................... 37,504.21 16,580.15 .................. 48,390.84 25,594.35 22,796.49
Everglades Station ................................................................... 2,906.71 2,906.71 ......................
Interest on Federal Extension Funds ................................. 789.32 212.84 ...................... 646.23 250.83 395.40
Total ....................................................... ....................... $ 41,200.24 $ 19,699.70 ..................... $ 49,037.07 $ 25,845.18 $ 23,191.89


'Includes $5,000.00 continuing Fund each year.
Note: Balances not reverting June 30, 1935,. are carried forward as income in 1935-36.



























BOARD OF CONTROL ACCOUNTS, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS AND BALANCES
JULY 1, 1934 TO JUNE 30, 1935

Balances [ Disburse- Balances
Name of Account June 30, 1934 1 Receipts I ments June 30, 1935

Cafeteria ........................................................... $ 197.60 $63,051.60 $62,333.55 $ 915.65
Dorm itory Bonds ......................................,0 0........................ 8,100.00
Resident Halls ......................................... ..... 32,491.88 34,775.97 27,002.38 40,265.47
Book Store ....................................................... 5,082.15 84,284.64 80,944.83 8,421.96
Duplicating Department ................................ 44.77 5,204.57 5,248.98 .36
Infirmary ........................................................... 2,191.47 23,110.18 21,820.40 3,481.25
Student Activity Funds ............................... 2,510.27 59,193.98 54,534.09 7,170.16
ROTC Student Account ............ ................. 428.03 12,906.65 12,268.73 1,065.95
Return Check Fund-General Extension .... 18.25 Dr 27.25 9.00 ........................
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station .... 9,381.64 90,000.00 96,473.68 2,907.96
Drug Research .................. ................... 293.06 1,000.00 830.52 462.54
Cash Deposit-Student Bank ... .... 6,211.15 137,351.29 135,423.71 8,138.73
Scholarships and Loans ........................ .. 867.80 42,849.14 42,509.72 1,207.22
Southern Railway Loan Fund ........................ 49.86 ......................... 48.00 1.86
U university Incidentals ................ .................................. 183,798.90 183,798.90 ..........................
Station Incidentals .......................... ....... ........................... 25,995.14 25,995.14 .........................
General Breakage and Room Reservations 5,569.06 12,727.65 11,283.71 7,013.00
Locker Service Fund ................ ..... ......... .... 883.50 853.50 30.00
Smith Hughes Agricultural Education ........ 2,752.50 Dr 6,292.00 7,139.50 3,600.00 Dr
FERA Students 1934-35 ........................ ...... ....................... 32,669.13 32,683.83 14.70 Dr
FERA Escrow Account .................................... ........................ 7,400.00 30.00 7,370.00
FERA Kitchen Rehabilitation .................... .........39,000.00 162.54 38,837.46
Student Union Building ............................... 16,784.49 15,675.36 29,110.92 3,348.93
Murphree Memorial Fund ....... ......................... 2,691.53 .......................... 2,691.53


Total .......................... ............................ 87,432.48 880,888.48 830,505.63 137,815.33


Special Trust Accounts
Parsons Museum Fund .................................... 245.49 Dr 6,300.20 6,983.91 929.20 Dr
Parsons Museum Bond Fund ..................... 6,100.00 5,000.00 6,100.00 5,000.00


Total .......................................................... $ 93,286.99 $892,188.68 $843,589.54 $141,886.13










BOARD OF CONTROL ACCOUNTS, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS, DISBURSEMENTS AND BALANCES
JULY 1, 1935 TO JUNE 30, 1936

Balances DI isburse- Balances
Name of Account I July 1, 1935 Receipts ments June 30, 1936

Cafeteria ........................................................... $ 915.65 $54,773.88 $55,249.55 $ 439.98
Dormitory Bonds ............................................. 8,100.00 2,000.00 ....................... 10,100.00
Resident Halls ................................................. 40,265.47 37,869.21 67,149.74 10,984.94
Infirmary .............................................................. 3,481.25 28,318.64 29,302.93 1,996.96
Book Store ....................................................... 8,421.96 96,408.53 97,072.42 7,758.07
Duplicating Department ............................... .36 6,086.43 6,204.15 117.36 Dr
Student Activity Funds ................................. 7,170.16 64,874.48 62,023.69 10,020.95
Student Union Building ............................. 3,348.93 10,500.00 14,307.70 458.77 Dr
Student Union Building Fireplace Fund .... ........................ 200.00 186.50 13.50
ROTC Student Account ................................. 1,065.95 15,867.85 15,146.18 1,787.62
Drug Research ............................................. 462.54 ......................... 117.43 345.11
Southern Railway Loan Fund ..................... 1.86 130.62 132.48
University Incidentals .................................... .......................... 194,529.89 194,529.89 ........................
Station Incidentals ........................................... .......................... 27,900.03 27,900.03 ..........................
Breakage and Reservations ......................... 7,013.00 11,367.93 10,672.76 7,708.17
Smith Hughes-Agri. Education Fund ........ 3,600.00 Dr 4,650.00 1,050.00 .........................
Cash Deposit, Student Bank ....................... 8,138.73 146,633.49 140,828.56 13,943.66
Scholarship and Loan Fund .................... 1,207.22 57,058.87 58,644.57 378.48 Dr
FERA ........................................................... 14.70 Dr 13,200.00 13,200.00 14.70 Dr
FERA Escrow Account ................................. 7,370.00 ....................... 7,346.00 24.00
FERA Kitchen Rehabilitation Account ...... 38,837.46 3,501.41 42,829.17 490.30 Dr
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.... 2,907.96 97,700.41 95,660.47 4,947.90
Physical Education and Locker Fund ........ 30.00 3,112.00 3,117.90 24.10
Murphree Memorial Fund .......................... 2,691.53 30.91 ....................... 2,722.44
Salary Advance .................................................. ......................... 12,775.53 13,618.75 843.22 Dr
Gum, Rosin, Turpentine Control Comm ................................ 1,053.27 1,053.27 ..........................
National Association of Audubon Society .......................... 1,800.00 1,800.00 ........................
Eng. Exp. Sta. Beach Erosion Fund .......... .......................... 2,600.00 2,600.00 ..........................
Drake Memorial Laboratory Fund ................ .......................... 1,350.00 930.34 419.66

Total .............................................................. 137,815.33 896,293.38 1 963,174.48 70,934.23

Special Trust Accounts
Parsons Museum Trust Fund ..................... 929.20 Dr 2,173.70 1,127.41 117.09
Parson Museum Bond Fund ............................ 5,000.00 ......................... 2,000.00 3,000.00


Total .....................

Total Liabilities ...........


.............................. 4,070.80


2,173.70


... 141,886.13 898,467.08


3,127.41

966.301.89


3,117.09

74.051.32


In conclusion let me stress the need for additional buildings to take care
of classrooms for the constantly increasing student body. We are now using
all the available space including the unfinished Banquet Hall Annex to Florida
Union and the wooden Barracks. The last named building has long since served
its usefulness and is out of keeping with the dignity and importance of our
University.
We need more dormitories. Now that we have a new kitchen and Florida
Union, this need is most imperative.
Our plant investment has been increased this past biennial period approxi-
mately $223,000 with additions on our campus of the following new buildings:

Florida U union ................................................................... $166,000
K kitchen ................... ........................................................... 40,000
Photographic laboratory ................................................ 16,000
2 hurricane laboratories ($500.00 each) .............. 1,000

This does not include the John F. Seagle Building which is now under construction.

Respectfully submitted,
K. H. GRAHAM, Business Manager





REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR

To the President of the University.
SIR: As Registrar of the University of Florida, I have the honor to submit
the following report for the regular sessions of 1934-35 and 1935-36 and the
summer sessions of 1935 and 1936. In compiling this report I have included
only the most pertinent information. Inasmuch as the University inaugurated
its General College in September 1935, many of our traditional reports are not
comparable for both of the two years covered by the biennium.
From a purely statistical standpoint the outstanding feature of the biennium
was the increase in enrollment and teaching loads. In 1933-34 the total regular
session enrollment was 2371; in 1935-36 it had risen to 2983, an increase of
slightly over 25 per cent. The largest gross annual increase in enrollment the
University has ever experienced came between the years 1933-34 and 1934-35
when the enrollment increased from 2371 to 2848, a gain of 477; a figure larger
than the total enrollment of the institution twenty years ago.
In the regular session of 1933-34 the University taught a total of 76,406
student clock hours; in 1935-36 the figure rose to 103,262, an increase of 48
per cent.
More detailed information on the enrollment trend and the student clock
hours will be shown later.

TEACHING LOADS
The trend in the number of clock hours taught at the University of Florida
from 1933-34 to 1935-36 is shown in Table I. It will be observed that the load
increased 48 per cent during the period concerned. This is indicative of a
tremendous increase in the faculty load and one speculates on how calamitous
the situation might have been in 1935-36, had it not been for the inauguration
of the General College which permitted larger classes. Even as it was the
University probably carried the heaviest load per capital in its history.
A more detailed report of the teaching load for 1935-36 is shown in Table
II. Here again the new comprehensive courses which are non-departmental
made it difficult to compile a teaching load based on the traditional departmental
system. In arriving at the total clock hours shown for 1935-36 the load in C-3,
Reading, Speaking, and Writing, was classified as English and assigned wholly
to the Department of English. However, in cases where work in C-3 was taught
by persons not connected with the English Department that load is indicated
in parentheses after the total for the department concerned. For instance, the
Department of German and Spanish taught 1931 clock hours in German and
Spanish and an additional 440 hours in C-3. The 440 is in parentheses because
it has already been counted in the total for the Department of English. The
teaching load in C-4B, General Mathematics, was credited wholly to the Depart-
ment of Mathematics, but here no duplication such as was mentioned for C-3
occurred because all instruction in C-4B was furnished by members of the
Mathematics Department.
In all other comprehensive courses the load was credited to the department
with which the instructor was connected. Such loads are indicated under the
clock hours for 1935-36 by the second series of numbers which are joined to
the others by plus signs. For instance, the Department of Chemistry taught
10,113 hours of chemistry proper plus 657 clock hours in the General College.





As might be expected, most departments show an increase in teaching loads.
This is particularly true of those departments which contributed to the com-
prehensive courses.
In interpreting the data revealed in Table II it should be remembered that
a number of our courses are in a transitory period, and that the forthcoming
years will bring additional adjustments in departmental teaching loads.


TABLE I.-TREND IN NUMBER OF STUDENT
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1933-34 TO 1935-36


Number of
Student Clook
Hours


110,000





100,000





90,000





80,000


1933-34


70,000

INCREASE 1933-34 TO 1935-36:
48 PER CENT


1934-35


CLOCK HOURS


1935-36


Office of the Registrar
April 4, 1936






TABLE II.-TEACHING LOAD REPORT FOR THE REGULAR SESSION 1935-36 WITH TOTALS FOR
1934-35 AND 1935-36


College and
Department


ARTS AND SCIENCES

Bible ........ ..................
Biol. and Geol. ............
Chem istry ......................
English ..........................
French ..........................
German and Spanish _..
Greek and Latin ..........
Hist. and Pel ..............
Journalism ....................
Mathematics and Aty.
Philosophy ....................
Physics .........................
Psychology ................
Sociology ........................
Speech ............................

COLLEGE TOTAL ....


BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION


ENGINEERING

Civil Eng ....................
Elec. Eng. .....................
Mech. Eng. ....................

COLLEGE TOTAL ....


Student Clock Hours

34-35 35-36




189 242
4747 3645
12533 10113+657
8361 11570
1424 1357
2088 1931+(440)
102 27
3904 2593+2226
971 858+(94)
6686 7490+2128
504 588
2513 3085+1185
1867 2270+952
1084 920+860
866 1359+(500)

47839 48048+8008



12589 11931+3526




2160 1497
1185 1380+553
4987 4172

8332 7049+553


Dept. Load (Not I
Including Staff I% of Dept. Incr.
Load in Other I Carried by New
Depts.) Staff Members or
% Incr. or Deer. by Other Depts.



+ 28.0 ..................................
23.2 ..................................
19.3 ..................................
+38.4 66.8
3.7 .............................
7.5 .................................
73.5 ..................................
35.5 .................................
11.6 ................................
+12.0 27.4
+ 16.7 ..................................
+ 22.7 ..................................
+ 21.6 ..................................
15.1 ...............................
+56.9 77.9

+ .44 ......................... ....



5.2 .................................




30.7 ..................................
+ 16.5 ..................................
16.3 ..................................

15.4 ..............................


Dept. Load (In- % of Dept. Load % of Dept. Load
eluding Staff Load Taught by Staff Taught by this
in Other Depts.) of Other Depts. Staff in Other
% Incr. or Deer. Depts.


+28.0
-23.2
-14.1
+38.4
- 3.7
+13.5
-73.5
+23.4
- 1.9
+43.9
+16.7
+41.1
+77.9
+64.2
+114.7

+17.2



+22.8




-30.7
+62.7
-16.3

- 8.8


......... .... ...................
1.3
.. ....... ....................
12.6
..................................
..................................
.. . ... I ....... ...... ......
............... ........
................ ........
............... .. ....
................ ........
........ .......
................ .................
..................................


..............................




18.6

46.2
9.9
28.4
............... .............
28.1
29.5
48.3
26.9


22.8


............... ... ..... ... ... ........
.................................. 28.6
...... ........... ............ ......


- Decrease. + Increase.






TABLE II.-TEACHING LOAD REPORT FOR THE REGULAR SESSION 1935-36 WITH TOTALS FOR
1934-35 AND 1935-36-Continued


College and
Department


AGRICULTURE
Agric. Econ. ................
Agric. Eng. ...................
Agronomy ....................
Animal Husb. ...........
Bot. and Bact. ............
Entomology ..................
Forestry ...............
Horticulture ..................

COLLEGE TOTAL ....

LA W ..................................

0o EDUCATION


Health-Phys. Ed. ........

COLLEGE TOTAL ....

ARCHITECTURE AND
ALLIED ARTS ............

PHARMACY

Pharmacognosy and
Pharmacology ..........
Pharmacy .... ..............

SCHOOL TOTAL ........


Student Clock Hours

34-35 35-36



582 815+266
476 761
702 821+27
1025 872
2409 2210+23
510 637
.................. .. 343
774 647

6478 7106+316

5472 4269



2408 1815+(143
873 839

3281 2654+(143


2952




796
876

1672


I Dept. Load (Not
Including Staff
Load in Other
Depts.)
% Incr. or Decr.


6)


6)


3728


N ON-DEPARTMENTAL
INSTRUCTION .................................. 2808

UNIVERSITY TOTAL ..j 88615 103262

Decrease. + Increase.


+40.0
+59.9
+16.9
-14.9
- 8.3
+24.9
-16.4

+ 9.7

-22.0



-24.6
- 3.9

-19.1


+26.6




+20.3
+47.5

+34.6


% of Dept. Incr. Dept. Load (In- % of Dept. Load
Carried by New cluding Staff Load Taught by Staff
Staff Members or in Other Depts.) of Other Depts.
by Other Depts. I % Incr. or Decr. |


.................................. + 59.9 ..................................

.................................. + 20.8 ..................................
.................................. +24.9 .........................
.................................. . ..... ......::::::::::: .::::::::::::
.................................. 4. .................................
..... ........................... .. + 2. ..................................
.................................. 1 ... .... .......

........- ...........1 .6 .+...

............................... 3.9 ..





.........+........... 24.7


.................................. +26.6



.................................. + 20.3 ..................................
.................................. + 47 B ..................................

..................................4 .


% of Dept. Load
Taught by this
Staff in Other
Depts.


32.6

3.2
1.0
-*------------g^---
... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ..


44.0





STUDENT STATISTICS
ENROLLMENT
As previously pointed out, the regular session enrollment increased from
2371 for 1933-34 to 2983 for 1935-36, a gain of over 25 per cent. Table III shows
enrollment of students by schools and colleges. In the main reports the enroll-
ments in Journalism and Pharmacy are included in the College of Arts and
Sciences. However,' for information these enrollments are reported separately
in a sub-table. Inasmuch as the inauguration of the General College makes it
impossible to draw comparative enrollment figures for the various colleges for
the two years of the biennium, the enrollment of upperclassmen by colleges' for
the two years is shown in Part 2 for those desiring to draw comparative figures.


TABLE III.-ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS BY SCHOOLS
AND COLLEGES

1. REGULAR SESSION RESIDENT STUDENTS
1934-35 1935-36
General College ....................................................... ....... ...... 888
College of Agriculture ............................................ 243 186
School of Architecture and Allied Arts ......... 76 56
College of Arts and Sciences ............................... ----------------832 586
College of Business Administration ................... 724 518
College of Education .............................................. 281 186
College of Engineering ...................................... 457 324
Graduate School ......---------......-----------...........----......----................. 122 125-
College of Law .................. .--- ........-- ........ 199 158
Grand Total ........................... ....................... 2934 3027
Less Duplicates ........................................ 86 44

NET TOTAL --............... ...........-------- -----.............---. 2848 2983

Supplementary Report Covering Journalism and Pharmacy

1934-35 1935-36
Journalism .----------------------...................................................-............ 82 59
Pharmacy -.----------------................................-......-.....-...........--.....--..... 97 77

2. REGULAR SESSION RESIDENT UPPERCLASSMEN
1934-35 1935-36
College of Agriculture ....-...........................--........-------------.. 137 167
School of Architecture and Allied Arts -............ 54 54
College of Arts and Sciences ................................ 478 546
College of Business Administration .................... 393 487
College of Education ..-......-.....---------..---.......-................-------... 213 176
College of Engineering .......................................... 243 298
Graduate School ....-...---------------............--............-----...............--..... 122 125
College of Law ....................................................... 199 158
Grand Total ..--....-....--....-.......---.-------------..........-.... 1839 2011
Less Duplicates ...................--------------.................... 43 40

NET TOTAL ...............................-- .................. 1796 1971





3. ENROLLMENT BY CLASSES


1934-35 1935-36


General College Students .................................. ......
Freshm en .................................................................. 1095
Sophomores ..--..........-.........-..-......--................................. 713
Juniors .........-.....--------.......-........-----.....-----------........-..................---------.... 360
Seniors .............................----------------------------................................. 372
Law Students ...--........-------------...--.------------................----......... 199
Graduate Students .......................------------------------...................... 122
Special Students ...................................................... 73

Grand Total ...............................----------------------------..................... 2934
Less Duplicates ........................................ 86

NET TOTAL ............................................................ 2848


4. SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS


Men
General College ......-......-- ....-............ ......
College of Agriculture .................--............... 62
School of Architecture and Allied Arts .... 9
College of Arts and Sciences
(Including Pharmacy) ........................ ---------------207
College of Business Administration .......... 121
College of Education ................-................. 239
College of Engineering ................................ -------------------56
Graduate School ..-..........-..-.............--------------................ 116
College of Law .....................----------------------........................ 62

Grand Total ........................................ 872
Less Duplicates .......................

NET TOTAL ...........................................


1935 1936
First and Second Terms
Women Total Men Women
.... ...... 144 64
...... 62 55 ......
2 11 4 ......


54
21
1150
32
1

1260


261
142
1389
56
148
63

2132
530


191
152
210
52
171
57

1026


80
6
1077

68
2

1297


Supplementary Report Covering Pharmacy
1935
Men Women Total
School of Pharmacy ............................... 37 2 39


1936
Men Women Total
14 ...... 14


5. ENROLLMENT-P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL


1934-35


G:
Kin
Firs
Seco
Thir
Fou:
Fift
Sixt
Seven
Eigl
Nint
Tent
Elev
Twe


rade


Boy


dergarten ................ 18
t .............................. 17
nd ............................ 19
d -.........-..-..-..----..- ........--..--- 15
rth .---------..................... 16
h ....-.....-.....-------....--.--.....--- 16
h .. .......................... 14
nth .......................... 27
ith ..... ...... ............ 23
h ........................ ..... 32
h ........................ ..... 21
'enth ....-................... 24
Fifth ......................... 19

Total --.................... 261


's Girls
11
13
11
15
15
14
16
12
19
16
14
19
12

187


Total
29
30
30
30
31
30
30
29
42
48
35
43
31

448


Boys
13
13
15
20
16
15
14
20
23
24
33
21
20

247


1935-36
Girls Total
17 30
14 27
14 29
10 30
13 29
13 28
15 29
23 43
17 40
18 42
19 52
23 44
23 43

219 466


888
128
820
468
412
158
125
28

3027
44

2983


Total
208
55
4

271
158
1287
52
239
59

2333
627

1706





1935 1936
Summer Session Summer Session
Grade Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total

Kindergarten ......-...... 6 3 9 10 6 16
First and Second .......... 12 2 14 9 8 17
Third and Fourth ........ 9 6 15 3 3 6
Fifth and Sixth ............ 9 4 13 5 5 10

Total ...................... 36 15 51 27 22 49

The enrollment for the summer sessions likewise showed an increase during
the biennium. The net enrollment for the 1934 Summer Session was 1310; for
the 1936 Summer Session it was 1706, an increase of almost 38 per cent. The
University offered two summer terms during 1935 and during 1936. The gross
enrollment for the first and second terms in 1935 was 2132; and 2333 for 1936.
The enrollment figures for the University of Florida from 1905 to 1936 are
shown in Table IV. In twenty-seven of the last thirty years the total annual
enrollment has shown an increase over the preceding year's figures.

TABLE IV.-ENROLLMENT IN THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
FROM 1905 TO 1936

Number Summer *Number
Regular Session Enrolled Term Enrolled Total

1905-06 ............. ...... ... 135 ......- ..... 135
1906-07 ....................... 102 ......- ...... 102
1907-08 ............. ......... 103 ........ 103
1908-09 ........................... 103 ......-- ........ 103
1909-10 ...............-----....... 186 ......--........ 186
1910-11 ................-- ........ 241 ........ ........ 241
1911-12 ........ .. ............ 302 ........ ........ 302
1912-13 ......................... 321 1913 140 461
1913-14 ........................... 361 1914 269 630
1914-15 ........................... 395 1915 402 797
1915-16 ................. ....-- 447 1916 539 986
1916-17 ........................... 460 1917 434 894
1917-18 ..... ................. 421 1918 434 855
1918-19 ........................ 554 1919 612 1,166
1919-20 ......--- ................ 664 1920 743 1,407
1920-21 ............................ 823 1921 783 1,606
1921-22 ............................ 1,002 1922 895 1,897
1922-23 .........--........---.. 1,183 1923 1,028 2,211
1923-24 .......................... 1,347 1924 944 2,291
1924-25 ............................ 1,488 1925 987 2,475
1925-26 ....................... 1,860 1926 908 2,768
1926-27 .......... ............... 1,968 1927 1,269 3,237
1927-28 ............................ 2,073 1928 1,686 3,759
1928-29 .......................... 2,270 1929 1,613 3,883
1929-30 .............--......... 2,257 1930 1,480 3,737
1930-31 ................. 2,388 1931 1,530 3,918
1931-32 ............................ 2,558 1932 1,746 4,304
1932-33 ........................... 2,628 1933 1,086 3,714
1933-34 ............................ 2,371 1934 1,310 3,681
1934-35 .........-............. 2,848 1935 1,602 4,450
1935-36 ................... 2,983 1936 1,706 4,689
*These figures include the enrollment in the demonstration school, except for the Summer
Sessions of 1933, 1934, 1935, and 1936.





PLACEMENT TESTS
During the spring of 1935 the state-wide high school testing movement spon-
sored by the Florida Association of Colleges and Universities assumed large
proportions, and psychology examination, and high school content examinations
were administered to more than five thousand Florida high school seniors. On
the basis of these results it was possible to determine the quarter of the high
school class from which the University of Florida drew its General College fresh-
men in 1935-36. For instance, Figure 1 shows that 41 per cent of the freshmen
came from the upper 25 per cent of the Florida high school seniors. Only 12
per cent of the freshmen came from the lowest quarter of the high school seniors.


FLORIDA
H. S. SENIORS
1935


GENERAL COLLEGE
FRESHMEN
1935


First
Quarter






Second
Quarter






Third
Quarter
25%


22.

Fourth
Quarter
25%1



FIGURE 1.-Proportion of the University of Florida Freshmen Coming from
Each Quartile of the High School Senior Class.
Note: Quartiles for the high school class are based on Iowa Content test.





All General College applicants are required to take the placement tests. The
results of these tests are very helpful. It has been found that the placement
tests correlate almost 65 with the results on the comprehensive examinations.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
Inasmuch as the University has given comprehensive examinations for one
year only, it is impossible to make a very complete or full report regarding them.
Furthermore, it is impossible to include any figures for the examinations given at
the end of the 1936 Summer Session.
During the regular session 1935-36, 13,700 three-hour examination booklets
were printed. Of this number 6,104 were given and scored. The additional copies
have been placed on sale in the University Book Store.
The average cost of printing, giving, and scoring for each three-hour examina-
tion booklet given was slightly over 43 cents. It required an average of 25.5
minutes to score and re-score each three-hour examination booklet. The grade
distribution for all comprehensive courses February and June was:
A ........................... 7 per cent
B ............................ 18 per cent
C ...................-...... 40 per cent
D .......................... 18 per cent
E-......--------................-...-.. --17 per cent

Respectfully submitted,
H. W. CHANDLER, Registrar.





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

To the President of the University.
SIR: The Graduate School is designed primarily for those who have the am-
bition and the ability to attain a higher type of scholarship than is usually
attained in a college curriculum. Our Master's degree does not mean just one
more year of college work but is something different in kind, not only in the
courses offered but in the requirement of a bit of research-the results of which
are incorporated in the Master's thesis. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy calls
for even more research and more originality.
The Graduate School was established in 1910. Since that time there has been
a constant endeavour to improve the graduate work. We have learned much
from our own experience and we have learned something from the experience of
others. We now have a respectable and respected Graduate School. Our organi-
zation and our standards compare favorably with those of the best institutions in
the country.
We have never cared particularly for numbers, but even in numbers we make
a good showing. For the year 1935-36 we enrolled 125 in the winter session and
181 in the summer session. This is by far the largest enrollment we have ever
had. The number of Graduates is somewhat smaller. For the biennium now
closing we have 48 Masters to contrast with 65 for the preceding biennium, but we
have 9 Ph.D.'s for this biennium while we had only 3 the preceding biennium.
Counting this summer the total number of Master's degrees conferred is 356;
Doctor's degrees, 12. The Department of Biology, beginning with the year 1936-
37, will offer work leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. This depart-
ment is strong in research and its addition to the list strengthens our Ph.D. work.
It would be well if we could add two or three more departments to this list.
For about eleven years the deans of graduate schools of the Southern states
have been meeting once a year to discuss problems connected with graduate work.
Originally the organization was loose and rather informal. No attempt was
made to set up any standards or lay down any requirements. But in December
1935 a different organization was set up and certain minimum requirements
were laid down for a standard Master's degree. We were invited to take out
institutional membership and did so. We meet their requirements in all essen-
tial particulars. It seems to me very important to maintain this relationship,
for if ever a list of accredited graduate schools is made up we should be in an
unfavorable position if we could not qualify in our own region.

SUGGESTIONS FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

1. Greater cooperation among those who ought to wish to see a greater graduate school
at the University of Florida.
2. Larger appropriations.
3. Better adjustment whereby professors who give graduate courses may be relieved of a
proportionate amount of undergraduate teaching.
4. Some adjustments in the Summer School:
(a) More graduate courses to be offered in departments other than Education. Only three
such courses were offered in the second term of the Summer Session for 1936.
(b) Some arrangement to be made whereby it will not be necessary to make so many
changes in the Supervisory Committees.

Respectfully submitted,
JAMES N. ANDERSON, Dean





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

To the President of the University.
SIR: I respectfully submit the following report on the activities of the College
of Arts and Sciences during the biennium ending June 30, 1936, together with
recommendations for the biennium beginning July 1, 1937. As has been our
custom, I shall first present the report of the College of Arts and Sciences
proper and append the report of the School of Pharmacy, which is administered
by the College.
PURPOSE AND POLICIES
The main purpose of the College of Arts and Sciences was admirably set
forth by the former Dean several years ago as follows:
"The purpose and aim of the College of Arts and Sciences is to impart culture and refinement,
to train the mind and strengthen the intellect, to build up ideals and establish the character, to
enlarge the vision, to ennoble the thoughts, to increase the appreciation of the beautiful and the
true, to add charm to life and piquancy to companionship, to make the man a decent fellow, a
useful citizen, an influential member of society in whatever community he may be thrown, in what-
ever field his life-course be run."
The intention of the College remains the same, but the manner of accomplish-
ing its purpose has, in many cases, gradually evolved to meet changing conditions,
as is evidenced by new methods and programs that have come into existence
during the last few years. Indeed, the present importance of the College is
largely the result of its readjustments of methods and programs to the needs
of the students in the complexity of modern civilization.
While the fundamental principles of imparting the ability to think clearly
and to stimulate the love of learning and the desire for more abundant life
through character and scholarship are very much alike in the various depart-
ments, the different methods of approach and the particular specialization in
view are interesting and worthy of mention. Each department, while con-
tributing to cultural values, has also its individual function to perform. The
information and approach required for the training of the chemist, for example,
differ greatly from those needed for the historian. It is, therefore, the duty
of the College to nurture and strengthen the scholarship peculiar to each depart-
ment in recognition of its particular purposes, as well as to harmonize and direct
the various interests of respective departments toward the goal of education.
Since each department composing the College is designed to offer something
particular in its courses, something to meet the various needs of different stu-
dents, I shall consider some of the special purposes and aims of a few typical
departments, choosing the ones representing great fields of learning that will
serve as examples of the principles under discussion.
The Department of Biology and Geology will be used to illustrate the general
purposes and policies of the natural sciences such as astronomy, chemistry,
physics, etc., the study of which leads to an understanding of the order and
system prevailing in the physical world. Though the contents of the several
sciences differ, their intent and aim are so similar in their respective fields that
much repetition would result if these subjects were treated individually. This
department conceives its primary objective to consist of several interrelated
functions that are kept in view in shaping its plans and formulating its policies.
They are: (1) the cooperation with the General College by assisting in allied





general courses; (2) the presentation of the basic subject matter and the prin-
ciples of biology as a part of a liberal education; (3) the presentation of adequate
pre-medical courses in the technique and principles of animal and general biology;
(4) the provision of a thorough grounding in biology as a scientific discipline for
students who are looking toward biology as a profession; (5) the development
of a well-rounded and thorough graduate training within a few interrelated fields
of specialization: namely, ecology, distribution and phylogenetic taxonomy;
(6) the stimulation and encouragement of research by the staff and its graduate
students (particularly contribution toward knowledge of the biology of Florida) ;
(7) the rendering of professional assistance in the case of campus and state
problems. In this practice the Department of Chemistry is even more active,
owing to its closer relation to the health of the people and the industries of
the State.
The departments offering instruction in the languages have distinct problems
and purposes. It is more important now than ever before, with transportation,
communication and news service so highly developed and learning so generally
diffused, that every student seeking a liberal education should have contact not
only with the rich heritage left him through the literature of his own language,
but with the language and culture of some other civilization than his own. The
Department of English, including English and American language and literature,
has several clearly defined objectives: (1) to promote the understanding of our
language, its structure, history, and effective use; (2) to acquaint students with
the best that has been written in our common language, and make vital our
rich heritage; (3) to understand and interpret human letters as primary docu-
ments in the history of our civilization; (4) to assist in the great task of pre-
serving, editing, and interpreting the literary records of our civilization, past
and present; (5) to encourage creative writing as well as scholarship; (6) to
recognize the cultural needs and interests of the average student; and (7) to
provide for those who are ambitious to become teachers, scholars and writers.
In brief, the Department, wishing to promote creative scholarship and creative
living, is interested in teaching and studying literature as record and as vital
experience. The foreign languages have, for their specific purposes: (1) to
give the student help to read intelligently the particular foreign language studied;
(2) to prepare students to teach these languages; (3) to teach the elements of
phonetics and philology; (4) to inculcate an appreciation of the literature of
these languages; and (5) in the case of French, German and Spanish, to speak
and write these languages, to conduct foreign correspondence, and to provide
material for the understanding of the French, German and Spanish peoples.
The departments representing the social sciences and kindred fields are rapidly
becoming more important for the understanding of contemporary life. The
Department of History and Political Sciences is an excellent example of the
departments of this group-history, political science, philosophy, psychology,
sociology and allied subjects. The courses in history and political science are
designed largely with the following purposes in view: (1) to give the student
the opportunity of learning something about the social experiences of mankind;
(2) to help him acquire an intelligent familiarity with the society in which he
lives; (3) to do the very best teaching possible subject to departmental limita-
tions such as excessive teaching load, inadequate library facilities and, at times,
too large sections; (4) to build up and maintain a tradition of scholarly traits
and attitudes; (5) to enable the student to elect, from a wide offering in both





history and political science, subjects essential to an'adequate and comprehensive
knowledge of the two fields; and (6) to develop graduate work along the lines
of a sane, conservative and constructive policy. If a member of the Department
is an excellent teacher and prefers to devote his time and energy to other forms
of usefulness instead of research he is permitted to do so.
The instruction in Journalism is intended to provide training for: (1) those
who are primarily interested in journalism as a profession, and who seek prepara-
tion for careers in such journalistic activities as advertising, free-lance writing,
general magazines, metropolitan newspapers, small-town daily newspapers, press
association and syndicate work, public relations and publicity, specialized journal-
ism (such as political writing and foreign correspondence) and trade journalism
(such as business, agricultural or science press, and weekly newspapers);
(2) those who plan careers in many of the types of work closely related to
journalism, and in which the broad, cultural knowledge and training afforded
by professional education in journalism will be almost essential to success;
(3) those who are interested in journalism as a social science and as a powerful
agency for directing civilization's evolving process and those who realize that the
training in journalism and the life situations in which journalism concerns itself,
constitutes a liberal education. The curricula in journalism, therefore, are de-
signed to combine the elements of a liberal education. They include not only
technical and cultural courses in journalism but many other cultural and basic
courses.
The special purposes of the Department of Speech are: (1) to make students
aware of the value of the ability to speak effectively; (2) to prepare the basic
work so that it will aid all students; (3) to give adequate training to those who
contemplate a career in which speaking ability will be an important consideration;
(4) to offer an intelligent program of remedial training to those who are handi-
capped by defective speech; and (5) to promote debating and dramatics.
From the examples that have been given, it is clear that, while the subject
matter and the specific purposes of the various departments differ, all of them
have the same great educational objectives. The program is based upon the
principle that education does not mean simply the acquisition of extensive in-
formation but the ability to understand things as they are and to think truly
and logically about their values and relations to other things, and that mental
strengthening depends largely upon the way a student exerts his mind rather
than upon the subjects to which he may direct it.
CURRICULAR REVISIONS
The present biennium has been remarkable for the improvements that have
been made in the curricula of the College of Arts and Sciences, as well as the
advancement in the excellence of the courses in many departments. Plans have
been perfected for the admission of students from the General College on a
procedure harmonious with the modern or advanced trend in education now pre-
vailing in the University. The quality of the requirement for graduation from
the College of Arts and Sciences has been improved partly by a reduction in the
number of credit hours necessary for a degree and partly by demanding of every
candidate for graduation the completion of either the improved departmental
major or the new group major. The latter is a desirable innovation designed to
meet the need of students seeking a broader cultural training than is offered
by the departmental major, which requires more specialized work, as indicated
by its title.





For group majors our courses have been divided into three great fields of
study: the humanities; the social sciences; and the laboratory sciences and
mathematics. A student planning to graduate must select either a departmental
major or a group major and fulfill in either case other requirements, among
them the completion of a certain number of electives and a reading knowledge
of a modern language, or certain specified courses in it before he reaches his
goal. If he chooses a departmental major his course will consist of considerable
concentration in one department and such subsidiary courses in other depart-
ments as are essential to thorough concentration. If he selects a group major
his concentration will be in one of the fields of study designated above, consisting
of several allied departments in one of which he centers a limited amount of
special study. Our new system, furthermore, provides that each student have
an adviser who will aid and guide him in the planning of his course of study.
Not only has the Administration of the College formulated improved curricula
and revised the requirements for graduation, but the staffs of the different de-
partments have introduced changes in their courses that have been progressive
and beneficial.
A syllabus has been prepared for each course offered by the College of Arts
and Sciences since our last report. A study of these syllabi has been beneficial
in the detection of duplication and has led to the revision of courses in some
of the departments. These syllabi, moreover, have proved very useful to the
teaching staff, as well as the Administration, in determining the instruction
offered in each course. The formulation of syllabi for new courses is being con-
tinued by members of the College staff.
NEW FACILITIES
Owing to the lack of funds, there has been only a very slight addition to
the laboratories or other buildings housing the College during the present bi-
ennium, though more space has been greatly needed for practically every purpose
that we are sponsoring. So meager, in fact, has been the increase in room that
it may be summed up by saying a small solvent room has been built and an
attic fixed up for a naval stores research laboratory in the Chemistry-Pharmacy
Building. A very limited amount of permanent equipment, excepting the L. M.
Drake Memorial Laboratory described below, has been added to a few depart-
ments in the way of scientific instruments and apparatus, including about six
hundred dollars' worth of navigation instruments secured without cost to the
College from the Government. While most of the departments are suffering
from want of sufficient supplies, in many cases they would be unable to handle
them if they had them on account of the unavailability of space to house and
use them. In fact it has been difficult to find room adequately to place the
L. M. Drake Memorial Laboratory which has been recently acquired largely
through the initiative of the officers of the College. For this reason the fine
and extensive equipment of this laboratory has remained stored in Daytona
Beach; but plans are now under way to bring it to the University at an early
date. The L. M. Drake Memorial Laboratory became the property of the Univer-
sity largely through the early activities of the Dean of the College who was
assisted by the President and a special committee of the alumni and other friends.
Generous gifts toward its acquisition were received from several benefactors, in-
cluding the heirs of the late L. M. Drake, whose large gift carried with it the
understanding that the Laboratory was to be known as the L. M. Drake Memorial
Laboratory.





FACULTY PERSONNEL

During the present biennium many members of the faculty have engaged in
activities looking toward their professional improvement. Some have been
granted leaves of absence to pursue advanced studies during the academic year;
others have taken advantage of the summer vacation for doing graduate work.
Several professors have helped to promote the work of the Division of General
Extension by serving as chairmen of short courses closely allied with their
respective fields of knowledge.
An increasingly large number of our professors have taken an active part
in their respective professional organizations-foreign, national, regional and
state. Several of them have held prominent offices in them. Many have served
on committees and helped toward their advancement. They have also read
research papers before these bodies and made other valuable contributions. In
nearly every case it has been necessary for the professor attending such meet-
ings to pay a part or all of his traveling expenses owing to the limited funds
available for that purpose.
Some of the changes, such as additions, etc., and activities that have taken
place within our faculty deserve special mention:
It is with regret that we record the death of Professor L. W. Buchholz, the grand oil scholar
and Christian gentleman, who served as Head of the Department of Bible for many years, and
who was on special status at the time of his demise in 1935. Dr. C. L. Crow, also on special
status, has made valuable contributions in his "Studies Anticipatory to the Writing of a History
of the University of Florida".
Early in the fall of 1934 the Department of English lost the active teaching services of
Dr. J. M. Farr on account of ill health. Dr. Farr had been, for more than a quarter of a century,
Head Professor of English, and for a long period of years Vice-President of the University. He
was placed on special status, Professor C. A. Robertson serving as Acting Head of the Depart-
ment. Dr. Clifford P. Lyons, of Johns Hopkins University, enters upon his duties as Head
of the Department July 1 of this year. Various other alterations in the personnel of the College
have been occasioned by increased enrollment or by the absence of regular professors on leave
for the purpose of advanced study or engaging in research, or of rendering special service in
their line of work. One member of the teaching staff, Instructor H. E. Spivey, after two years'
leave of absence, has completed his doctorate and will resume his duties in the College this fall.
Indeed, the spirit of intellectual advancement among the faculty is better than ever. before.
It has become almost a tradition with the younger members who have not yet received the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy to continue their graduate studies during the summer or to request leave
of absence during the academic year for that purpose.
A number of new appointments and promotions have been made since the
last biennial report. However, our teaching staff is still inadequate, and several
who deserve promotion have had to remain in the lower ranks because of lack
of the necessary funds to pay higher salaries. Many members of the faculty of
the College have been active in special service and in creative work during the
present biennium, and in addition to their regular schedule of teaching have
written textbooks, given many addresses, published numerous articles and carried
out programs of research-some independently, some with the aid of graduate
students.
All members of the teaching staff of the Department of Biology and Geology
have been carrying on as extensive research programs as duties would permit.
Part of this is embodied in more than seventy papers published in about twenty
American and foreign journals during the past ten years. Graduate students
have published about ten papers in the past three years based on work of the





Department. Beginning next fall, this Department will offer work leading to
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
The amount of research done by the chemistry staff and the graduate stu-
dents in chemistry has increased steadily during the biennium, one member alone
of the staff having published, with his students, since July 1, 1934, a total of
fifteen research papers. As a result of the preliminary work done during the
summer of 1934, a WPA research project has been set up in the Department.
While it is most specifically concerned with the determination of chlorine in
water, it has opened up other fields having to do with chlorine content of Florida
fertilizers and soils. The Naval Stores research project has been progressing
satisfactorily through the activities of the Director and the three research
assistants, and promises to lead to worth while results. A furfural-rosin plastic
of the laminated type has been prepared; a cracking outfit has been built for the
thermal decomposition of rosin at constant temperature and pressure and is
being experimentally used; and attempts have been made to prepare bornyl
thiocyanate with the expectation that it will prove to be a good insecticide.
Through the activities of the chemistry staff the curriculum leading to the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering has been registered by the
Higher Education Division, State Education Department, University of the State
of New York.
Among the various research projects carried on by the Department of English
the one most worthy of special notice is "A Study of Florida Folk-lore and
Balladry", by one of the assistant professors who has also been chosen editor
of the newly established Journal of Southeastern Folk-Lore, to be published by
the University of Florida. Another member of the Department is among its
advisory editors.
Research is in progress in the Department of Physics in the fields of bio-
logical effects of X-rays and in molecular spectroscopy from the standpoint of
application to problems in molecular structure. Twelve research projects have
been completed by members of the staff of the Department of Psychology and
Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene. An instructor in the Department
of Spanish and German is collecting Spanish tales still current in Florida.
The Department of Speech has continued its fine record in the training of
debating squads, both inter-fraternity and -collegiate, including freshman and
varsity squads. It has given sixteen one-act plays during the biennium, and its
work in dramatics, as well as its special programs, has been praiseworthy.

GROWTH
All of the departments, with few exceptions, have experienced a substantial
growth, which means the enrollment of students in the College is steadily in-
creasing, the figures for the three years, 1932 to 1935 inclusive, being 625, 679
and 750 respectively. In 1935-36 only the three upper classes registered in the
College of Arts and Sciences, the freshmen being received into the General Col-
lege. The enrollment of the three upper classes that year was 489, which
exceeded the enrollment of the three upper classes in 1934-35 by seventy-one.
From July 1934 to June 1936 seventy-nine B.A., eighty-seven B.S., and seven-
teen B.A. in Journalism degrees have been conferred, making a total of one
hundred and eighty-five, which is seventy-three more than were conferred in
the previous biennium. Many of our departments have also directed the course
in research work of students who are candidates for Master's and Doctor's
40





degrees. The growth of this work will no doubt be reported by the Dean of the
Graduate School.
The distribution of the major fields of study by the recipients of the B.A. and
B.S. degrees during the present biennium is as follows:
Chemistry, fifty-one; English, twenty-five; Biology, twenty-four; Economics, eleven; Mathe-
matics, ten; History, nine; Spanish, seven; Speech, six; Physics, five; Psychology, four; History
and Political Science, three; French, two; Political Sciences, two; Bacteriology, one; Botany, one;
Journalism, one; Philosophy, one; and Sociology, one.
We have made a study of the frequency of choice of life work as expressed
by students registering in the College during the last two years. More students
expressed a choice for medicine each year than any other profession. The signifi-
cant frequencies of choice were:
In 1934-35: medicine, 214; law, 106; writing (including journalism), 98; undecided, 74;
chemistry, 46; engineering, 35; dentistry, 28; teaching-(in public schools) 24, (in college) 17;
business, 18; ministry, 9; advertising, 8; government service, 6. In 1935-36 (only seniors, juniors,
and sophomores included here, all freshmen being registered in the General College) : medicine,
171; law, 80; writing (including journalism), 58; undecided, 36; chemistry, 29; teaching-(in
public schools) 17, (in college) 16; business, 16; dentistry, 9; biology, 6; government service, 6;
ministry, 6.
Other interesting features relating to the growth of the College will be found
in the Report of the Registrar.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

This report on the School of Pharmacy represents the report by the Director
in a condensed form.
PURPOSE AND POLICIES
The policies governing the operation of this school are formulated and ad-
ministered to serve three ends, namely: the training of drug-store practitioners,
research workers, and teachers. Since the majority of our graduates become
retail pharmacists, this type of training is emphasized. The curricula are designed
to provide a broad scientific and professional training as well as opportunity
for specialization and advanced study in the several aspects of pharmacy. Hence,
courses are offered leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science, Master of
Science, and Doctor of Philosophy.

CURRICULAR REVISION
Due to the organization of the General College, it has been necessary to
reorganize the curricula. Consequently, students now begin professional courses
in the sophomore year. Since the 1935 Legislature passed a law permitting
women to enroll in the University to study pharmacy, curricula suitable for
women have also been adopted. The course in Galenical Pharmacy has been
revised, the course in Pharmaceutical Formulas has been modified, and the
course in Advanced Drug Analysis has been reorganized and made required.
The course in New Remedies has been considerably expanded. The purpose of
this course is to acquaint students with important packaged items which they
will encounter in practice. Approximately fifteen hundred stock packages are
available for students' use, exhibition, display and lecture purposes. This
material is also intended to serve as a nucleus for a model pharmacy which, it
is hoped, may be established as soon as space is available.





A new course entitled Clinical Methods has been organized. This concerns
modern methods employed in clinical diagnosis with emphasis on blood and
urine analysis.
PROBLEMS AND PROJECTS
The demand for graduates of this school regularly exceeds the supply. This
state has the capacity to absorb annually fifty new registered pharmacists,
whereas our graduates annually number less than fifty. Hence, it appears
essential that the enrollment should be increased. To this end radio addresses
have been given and bulletins of information mailed to high schools, libraries,
and unregistered employees of drug stores. Students and pharmacists of the
state are encouraging young men to enter this profession, and the State Asso-
ciation stimulates interest by making students associate members without dues
and granting free membership for one year upon graduation.
A short course for pharmacists was carried out in cooperation with the
University Extension Division and Florida State Pharmaceutical Association in
April, 1936. The program was considered excellent and the course, as a whole,
considered a success.
A vital and important forward step in the improvement of instruction could
be accomplished through a compounding service offered to the campus through
the facilities of the School of Pharmacy. From the standpoint of the School
of Pharmacy the advantage of such a service is fundamentally educational
because it would provide a highly effective means of improving and vitalizing
instruction. This problem has been given careful study and consideration and
is considered not only highly advisable but feasible as well. However, it can
not be effectively inaugurated until increased facilities, such as room, equipment,
and personnel are available.
FACULTY PERSONNEL
An instructor in pharmacognosy and pharmacology was again added in
September, 1935. One of the professors spent the summer of 1934 traveling
and studying in Europe, giving particular attention to points of pharmaceutical
interest, such as drug stores, factories, and colleges. Another professor published
a textbook on Pharmaceutical Dispensing in 1935. Twenty-four articles cover-
ing the results of research in the School of Pharmacy have been published in
leading scientific journals. Faculty members have continued their activities in
state and national organizations and have served on important committees as
well as presenting scientific papers. The American Pharmaceutical Association
Research Fellowship of $1,000 was awarded annually to this School for three
successive years.
GROWTH
Enrollment in the School of Pharmacy has been steadily increasing. In
1934-35 there was a total of ninety-one enrolled; in 1935-36 a total of eighty-
three were enrolled, but beginning freshmen were enrolled in the General College
and, therefore, it is to be noted that the enrollment in the upper classes
represented an increase over that of the previous year. In 1934-35 six Ph.G.,
nine B.S., one M.S., and three Ph.D. degrees were conferred. The graduate
degrees, of course, were conferred under the jurisdiction of the Graduate School,
but majors were in pharmacy.





RECOMMENDATIONS

I shall here briefly list our principal recommendations for the coming bi-
ennium. Provision has been made in the budget of the College, including the
School of Pharmacy, for funds necessary to carry them out with the exception
of Items 7, 8 and 9, below, provision for which reaches the College through other
budgets. I urgently recommend the granting of all our budgetary requests,
including the following which merit special emphasis:
(1) That the increase in salary be made to many worthy members of the faculty; (2) that
the promotion in rank be given the several deserving members of the teaching staff; (3) that the
appointment of the few additional instructors be granted; (4) that the research in Naval Stores
be continued and enlarged; (5) that the funds be granted for the salary of the technician for
the Drake Memorial Laboratory; (6) that more liberal financial support be given to the purchase
of laboratory supplies; (7) that thq additional building needed be erected and equipped to provide
additional offices for professors, class-rooms and laboratory space; (8) that additional funds be
provided for travel for professors attending professional meetings; and (9) that the increased
appropriation for books, journals and other literature for the College, requested through the
Librarian, be granted.
Respectfully submitted,
TOWNES R. LEIGH, Dean





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
TEACHING DIVISION

To the President of the University.
SIR: I respectfully submit the following report of the Teaching Division
of the College of Agriculture for the biennium ending June 30, 1936.
There has been a marked increase in attendance during the biennium, re-
flecting the growing interest in education for agriculture and improved condi-
tions and outlook for trained workers.
The number of graduates has been the greatest in the history of the college.
The establishment of the General College of the University has made necessary
important changes in the curriculum. These have been made after thorough
study by a special committee and free discussion by the faculty. They will
not go into full operation till the beginning of the session of 1936-37. Effort
has been made to follow modern trends and fitness to Florida conditions. Some
important ones are:
For those contemplating enrolling for Agriculture after completing the General College,
Animal Science has been prepared for the elective C-8, and Plant Science for the elective C-9.
These will be taught mainly by the instructors of the College and will give fundamental training
for the technical courses of the junior and senior years.
The courses of the last two years have been revised, combinations made and new courses
added. These call for more detailed study and specialization in each of the several fields of
agricultural activity.
The following are some important courses that have been added:
Horse and Sheep Production; World Meats; Market Classes and Grades of Livestock; Poultry
Judging; Poultry Housing and Equipment; Turkey Production; Marketing Poultry Products;
Condensed and Dry Milks; Manufacture of Butter and Cheese; Ice Cream Manufacture; Dairy
Technology; Forest Soils; Insect and Disease Control; Apiculture; Medical and Veterinary Ento-
mology; Insect Histology and Physiology; and Systematic Pomology.
Dr. C. V. Noble, Head of the Agricultural Economics Department in the
Experiment Station, has been made Head of the combined Department in the
three divisions-teaching, research, and extension-thus bringing about better
coordination and unity. J. W. Reitz, M.S. (Univ. of Ill.) has been employed
as Associate Professor of Farm Management, taking the place made vacant
by the death of Dr. J. E. Turlington.
Assistant Professor P. H. Senn, teaching farm crops, plant breeding and
genetics, has been promoted to Associate Professor, and a Graduate Assistant in
Soils added.
Dr. 0. C. Bryan, Head of the Department of Agronomy and a recognized
authority on soils and soil management, is a coordinating agent in Soil Erosion,
U.S.D.A., and land uses in Florida, including reconnaissance soil surveys, co-
operating with the Resettlement Division in land use studies, and Agricultural
Extension Division in special lectures and soil amendment demonstrations and
State Department of Soil Conservation.
Provision was made in the budget for some teaching to be done by certain
Experiment Station and Extension workers beginning July 1, 1935. As a conse-
quence Dr. A. L. Shealy was made Head, and all courses in Animal Husbandry,
Nutrition, Dairying, Poultry Husbandry and Veterinary Science were combined
in this department. Seven part time 'instructors from the other divisions are
teaching courses, each in his own field, thus enlarging and improving their num-
ber and content. 0. W. Anderson has been added as Instructor in Poultry





Husbandry. He did his undergraduate work in this college; later he obtained
his Master's degree, majoring in poultry, at Rutgers University.
A Graduate Assistant has been added in Bacteriology, to help in preparation
of media, sterilizations and other important work, much increased by the grow-
ing number of students.
The graduate work in Economic Entomology has been broadened by the
addition of some members from the Experiment Station staff.
The Department of Forestry was inaugurated at the beginning of the 1935-36
session by special legislative appropriation. It is receiving the hearty coopera-
tion of national and state forest services, forestry associations, federations of
women, garden clubs and other organizations interested in conserving the State's
natural resources. The enrollment is gratifying, necessitating an increase in
teaching personnel for next session.
A two-year non-credit curriculum for forest rangers has been prepared,
designed to give training to those adults needed in practical forestry who can-
not pursue a longer period of preparation. An eight-weeks summer camp for
all students of forestry is being planned, where practical problems will be
studied in the woods.
J. T. Creighton received the Ph.D. degree, with major in Entomology, last
June, at Ohio State University. Three others of our younger instructors are
doing work toward their doctorates during the summer.
As time permits, all instructors carry on research investigations closely
related to their specialties.
The Rohm-Haas Insecticide Fellowship has been established in the Depart-
ment of Entomology for investigating the effects of certain new insecticides on
the control of citrus and vegetable insects under Florida conditions.
A number of new machines have been consigned to the Department of Agri-
cultural Engineering by farm machinery companies for laboratory study.
The Department of Botany has received from Mrs. Fuller, in charge of
WPA Art Project in this State, thirteen paintings of Florida flowers, which
are displayed on the walls of the lecture room.
An electric soil heating unit has been installed in the horticulture greenhouse
to hasten the rooting of cuttings. A small aster cloth structure has been
erected for the growing of asters and other annuals in summer, free from
insect pests and insect borne disease. Hundreds of ornamental plants are being
propagated for use in beautifying the campus.
Many departments are using carefully planned student tours into the interior
of the State to study methods being used by successful growers or gather data
and make observations which are direct applications of principles studied in
class.
Respectfully submitted,
WILMON NEWELL, Dean





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

To the President of the University.
SIR: I beg to submit herewith the following report on the activities of the
College of Business Administration for the biennium ending June 30, 1936,
together with a brief statement of the needs for the biennium beginning July
1, 1937.
With the close of the last biennium, the College of Business Administration
ended its first decade of activity. During this decade, the number of graduates
as well as the number of students has increased rapidly. Student enrollment
increased from 343 in 1926-27-the year the College was organized-to 729 in
1934-35. Since all freshmen in 1935-36 were registered in the General College,
the enrollment dropped to 518. Graduates, however, have increased steadily
from 8, in 1926-27, to 60, in 1935-36. Due to recent trends toward increased
registrations in the sophomore year in general, and in the junior year in particu-
lar, the number of graduates during the next biennium will, I predict, increase
to approximately 75 annually.
The College of Business Administration offers all courses in general economics
as well as all courses in business administration. It serves not only its own
students, but also students of other instructional divisions of the University.
While, according to the Office of the Registrar, the number of student clock
hours in economics and business administration carried by the faculty in the
College of Business Administration decreased from 12,589 in 1934-35 to 11,933
in 1935-36, or 5.2 per cent, the total departmental load which includes the staff
load carried in other departments, particularly in the General College, increased
22.8 per cent.
The College of Business Administration, with the beginning of the session
of 1936-37, becomes a professional college. Since all sophomores, as well as
all freshmen, will register in the General College, students in business adminis-
tration will be composed exclusively of juniors and seniors. This means that
our enrollment will probably be reduced to 280, possibly even to 240.
To readjust the program of the College of Business Administration to that
of the General College, we have completely reorganized our individual offerings
as well as our curriculum. We have formulated and will put into effect with the
beginning of the session of 1936-37 three requirements for admission: (1) gradu-
ation from the General College which includes the six comprehensive courses
prescribed for all students; (2) completion of three new introductory courses
in economics and business administration; and (3) completion of one elective
comprehensive course in the General College. The three new introductory courses
in economics and business administration are as follows: Economic Foundations
of Modern Life; Elementary Accounting; and Elementary Statistics. The first
two courses are half-year courses meeting five hours a week, and the last
course is a half-year course meeting three hours a week. These three courses
will take the place of four specialized year courses in business administration
which we formerly required of 'all students during the first two years. While,
with the exception of Professor H. H. Germond of the Department of Mathe-
matics who will assist with the course in Elementary Statistics, these courses
are taught directly by our own faculty, they are offered in, and are open to,
all students in the General College.





Since the College of Business Administration becomes a senior professional
college, we have reduced the number of semester hours required for graduation
from sixty-eight to sixty. We have, likewise, reduced the student load, except
in the case of superior students and students pursuing the curriculum in com-
bination with law, from eighteen to fifteen semester hours per week. We have
dispensed with the eight groups which prevailed in the old curriculum. Instead
of these groups we have adopted two types of courses: first, those which might
be called pervasive; and second, those which are specialized. The pervasive
courses, consisting of thirty semester hours, deal with economic and business
principles underlying all businesses and are required of all students. The other
thirty hours are devoted to specialized elective courses in business administra-
tion, and electives in military science, not to exceed six semester hours. The
new curriculum is adjusted to the changing conditions of the present-day eco-
nomic world, and is designed to prepare students to become broad-minded
economic leaders as well as business executives, business owners and business
specialists.
Two permanent changes have occurred in the faculty of the College of
Business Administration during the past biennium. Both of these changes
were due to resignations. Howard W. Gray, who had served as Professor of
Accounting for nine years, resigned to engage in private business, and Joseph
P. Wilson, who had served as Assistant Professor of Marketing and Advertising
for seven years, resigned to go with the United States Resettlement Administra-
tion. David M. Beights, who secured his Doctor's degree from the University
of Illinois and his C.P.A. from both Florida and West Virginia, was appointed
in Professor Gray's place; and Frank W. Tuttle, who secured his Master's degree
from the University of Illinois and his Doctor's degree from the University of
Iowa, was appointed in Professor Wilson's place. Both of these men during the
past year have entered upon their duties, adjusted themselves to their new sur-
roundings, and have begun to make creditable records.
During the past two years many faculty members of the College of Business
Administration have engaged in activities looking toward their professional
improvement. Assistant Professor Hicks obtained his Doctor's degree from
Northwestern University, and Assistant Professor Diettrich took a half-year
leave of absence and obtained his Doctor of Science from the University of
Budapest. While completing this degree, he was affiliated with the University
of Budapest as University Lecturer. Assistant Professor James E. Chace has
served as field representative of the United States Employment Service during
the summer of 1936. The Dean of the College served as President of the Ameri-
can Association of Collegiate Schools of Business during the academic year
1935-36. He is the first southern dean to be elected to this position in spite of
the fact that the Association has eleven member schools in the South. Professor
T. C. Bigham was granted leave of absence during the academic year 1935-36
to spend two terms teaching at the University of Washington and one term
at Stanford University completing a book on the principles of transportation.
C. Ward Macy, who received his Doctor's degree from Stanford University,
and who is professor of economics in Coe College, was appointed visiting pro-
fessor of economics in Professor Bigham's place.
Many members of the faculty during the past biennium have been engaged
in prosecuting research projects of one kind or another and in writing books
and articles. The Dean of the College has written and published the following





articles: "A New General College", Journal of Higher Education, November,
1935; "Comprehensive Courses", Journal of Higher Education, March, 1936;
"The Urban Development of the South", a paper read before the Southern Eco-
nomic Association and published in the Southern Economic Quarterly, February,
1935; "The Emergence of the Metropolitan Community in the South", Social
Forces, March, 1936; "Public Benefits of Private Profits", South Atlantic Quar-
terly, April, 1936; "Economic Education", Social Science, April, 1935; and "The
Measurement of the Extent and Effects of Extra-Regional Controls Exercised
by the Federal Government", a paper prepared jointly with Dr. Manning Dauer
of the Department of History and Political Science, and read before Southern
Social Science Research Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, March 1936, and which
will later be published in the proceedings of that conference. In addition to these
papers and articles, he has written a chapter for a forthcoming book on new
plans in higher education to be published by Northwestern University. The
chapter is to appear under the title "Program, Organization, and Achievements
of Florida's New General College". He, jointly with W. W. Little, has also
prepared an article entitled "The First Year's Achievements of the General
College", which has been submitted for publication to the Journal of Higher
Education.
Professor Bigham, who is joint author with Dr. Eliot Jones of Stanford
University of Principles of Public Utilities, has completed and published in the
Journal of Land and Public Utility Economics, February, 1935, the results of
his study on the taxation of railways in the Southeast. Moreover, he has made
considerable progress on his book dealing with the economics of transportation.
Professor M. D. Anderson, who is author of Capital and Interest, has completed,
but has not yet published, his book on the distribution of wealth. Professor Roland
B. Eutsler, together with G. Lloyd Wilson and James M. Herring of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, has completed a book on Public Utility Industries, which
will come from the press in the very near future.
The Bureau of Economic and Business Research has continued to function
in a limited way during the biennium. Dr. A. S. Campbell, the Director, has
finished, and the University has recently published, his study on The Foreign
Trade of Florida. This appears in our regular University publications as Vol. I.,
Economic Series No. 7. Dr. R. S. Atwood, Acting Director of the Institute of
Inter-American Affairs, has continued to cooperate with the Carnegie Institution
of Washington in his study of the Guatemalan Indians. Other members of the
staff have been engaged in certain types of research, but have not yet published
their results.
On the whole, the faculty of the College of Business Administration has
rapidly improved both in character and in distinctiveness. At present there are
six professors, four associate professors, four assistant professors and one in-
structor. Of the fifteen, there are nine with Doctor's degrees, four with Master's
degrees and only two with Bachelor's degrees. Of the two with Bachelor's
degrees, one has completed all the residence work for a Doctor's degree and the
other will soon receive his Master's degree. Of those with Master's degrees,
one has a degree in law.
The needs of the College of Business Administration are of two varieties:
first, needs pertaining to personnel; and second, needs pertaining to quarters.
Due to its increased teaching load, the College of Business Administration must
be provided with an increase in the number of its staff members during the next





biennium. The Dean of the College has not only functioned as Acting Dean of
the General College, but he has also participated in the teaching of Man and the
Social World, one of the required comprehensive courses in the General College.
Five other staff members have participated to the extent of from one-third to
two-thirds of their time in the teaching of this course. While the original
specialized freshman courses in the College of Business Administration have
been eliminated since the organization of the General College, the increased load
of 22.8 per cent in 1935-36 over 1934-35 arising out of increased enrollments
in the junior and senior years and increased use of staff members in the General
College make it absolutely necessary to add one assistant professor and one
instructor to the faculty of the College of Business Administration at the begin-
ning of the next biennium.
Moreover, it is absolutely imperative that the salaries of staff members in
the College of Business Administration be increased at the beginning of the
next biennium. To show the urgent need for increased salaries, I have, with the
assistance of the Office of the Business Manager and Professor M. D. Anderson,
made a study of the average annual salaries, as well as the purchasing power
thereof, of 137 instructional and 70 non-instructional staff members in the Uni-
versity of Florida proper from 1933-34 to 1936-37. The salaries studied are
those of the same staff members throughout the period of four years. The study
shows that salaries of non-instructional staff members have been raised during
the four years appreciably more than the salaries of instructional staff members.
The most important feature, however, is that in neither division of the staff
have salary increases been sufficient to meet the mounting cost of living. Thus,
the salaries of the instructional staff increased only 5.31 per cent between
1933-34 and 1935-36, while the cost of living rose approximately 8 per cent,
with the result that the purchasing power of the average salary paid instructors
actually declined 2.6 per cent. The slight increases in salaries in 1936-37 are
not sufficient to meet the probable rise in the cost of living which will undoubtedly
occur in the immediate future.
The United States Department of Commerce announced on July 13, 1936, by
the Associated Press that the average annual wage or salary of full-time em-
ployees in the United States had risen 11 per cent since 1933. Thus the average
worker in the country has received twice as large a percentage increase in pay
as the instructional staff of the University, and almost twice as large as the
non-instructional staff.
Of course, nobody can predict with accuracy what will happen to the cost
of living during the biennium of 1937-39. But it is very probable that prices
will continue to rise with the result that the cost of living will continue to mount.
Hence, unless salaries are increased, staff members are confronted with serious
reductions in their standards of living.
Salaries in the College of Business Administration are not wholly dissimilar
to those in the University of Florida proper. When this College was organized
in 1926-27, the Dean adopted the policy of building a faculty out of young men.
Instead of bringing high-salaried mature scholars here and ranking them as
full professors, he brought in young men at moderate or lower salaries and gave
them moderate or lower ranks. He attempted to give them opportunity not
only to make themselves, but in turn to make the College. The entire faculty
of this College, with the exception of the Dean, is made up of men forty years
of age or under. They came to us because they wanted a young and growing





institution in which to start and to achieve success. Two or three of them have
already attracted national attention. All of them have done good teaching and
at the same time have begun to achieve reputations in the field of research or
in other fields. It is highly desirable that provisions be made for keeping these
men in the University. Unless we are in a position to raise them both in salaries
and in rank during the next two or three years, the College is going to be
seriously crippled, if not permanently set back, in the pursuance of its policies
to serve effectively the State of Florida and to make a high record in the field
of American collegiate business education.
The College of Business Administration should have additional funds for
research. This is especially true of the Bureau of Economic and Business Re-
search. This Bureau not only should have its research assistants restored which
it lost due to reduced budgets during the past four years, but it also should have
separate funds of its own to carry on and publish the results of a comprehensive
research program of direct interest to the State as a whole.
I wish to renew the recommendations, made in each of my last five biennial
reports, concerning our needs for new quarters. Even though the College of
Business Administration was established ten years ago, it has never had a
building of its own. The Dean's offices and certain classrooms and offices for
certain faculty members are in Language Hall, whereas the remainder of our
quarters are in Science Hall and Buckman Hall. This separation of quarters
interferes greatly with our efficiency both in instruction and in administration.
We should have a building where we could concentrate all our activities. A
building of our own would not only meet the urgent expanding needs of the
College of Business Administration, but it would also relieve the pressure upon
existing buildings and enable us to release Language Hall, Buckman Hall, and
Science Hall to other colleges. New quarters for us would mean larger quarters
greatly needed by other divisions and departments.

Respectfully submitted,
WALTER J. MATHERLY, Dean





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

To the President of the University.
SIR: I have the honor to submit to you the following report on the College
of Engineering of the University of Florida for the biennium June 30, 1934 to
June 30, 1936.

PURPOSES AND POLICIES
The College of Engineering is organized to afford technical and professional
instruction in the higher levels in special fields of Engineering. At present
the curricula offered in the College of Engineering are designed to equip young
men to enter the fields of chemical, civil, electrical, industrial, and mechanical
engineering as junior engineers. The College also offered for the first time, in
1936, a course of study designed to meet the needs of those who desire to study
the engineering sciences primarily because of their cultural value to citizens of
an industrial age.
The policy of the College is to encourage only those students who are espe-
cially equipped mentally to profit by engineering training and to prepare them
in the fundamentals so necessary in the training of competent professional
engineers.

DEGREES
The College of Engineering offers Bachelor's degrees in Engineering Science,
Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Industrial
Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.
The titles of these degrees are those recommended by the Society for the
Promotion of Engineering Education.

CURRICULA
The College of Engineering endeavors to offer curricula which especially
meet the needs for engineering training in Florida and the Southeast. The
college does not endeavor to cover the entire field of engineering instruction nor
to compete with engineering colleges in fields of learning and branches of
engineering for which there is not a definite need and demand in Florida. The
curricula stress the fundamentals of mathematics, chemistry, English, physics, and
the broad social courses. Because Florida especially needs men trained in these
fields the College of Engineering should maintain outstanding excellence in the
following specialized branches of engineering: topographic, and aerial mapping
and surveying; electronics and radio; air conditioning and refrigeration; aero-
nautics, hydraulics, hydrology, beach erosion, and chemical engineering.
During the past two years the various curricula have been extensively revised
to meet modern needs. The faculty now believes that the College of Engineering
has the best curricula in its history. The curricula continue to emphasize funda-
mental principles and also permit a reasonable specialization. They are char-
acterized by the following features which make them different from previous
curricula:
1. The broad general courses dealing with matters of common concern to all educated men
are concentrated in the first two years' work in the General College.
2. The curricula are more professional and contain a much smaller percentage of vocational
courses than ever before.





3. Encouragement is offered the student to secure shop work, shop experience, drawing anJ
surveying in high schools, during the summers or at summer camps. An effort has been made to
eliminate from the regular term's work as much as possible of the so-called sub-professional work.
4. The shop courses have been placed in the Upper Division and organized on the same basis
as other engineering laboratories.
5. The terminal facilities for various curricula are today much more convenient and honor-
able. A student may with a feeling of satisfaction and accomplishment terminate his efforts
toward an engineering education at the end of two, four, or five years.
6. The superior student is now able to advance more rapidly, and more emphasis is place -
upon what he knows, what he can do, and less upon having a given number of credit hours
in a subject.
SPECIAL PROBLEMS AND PROJECTS
STUDENTS
The students of the College of Engineering are on the whole serious minded
young men coming mostly from the highest intelligence quartile of the Univer-
sity student body. They largely conduct their own affairs through various
student organizations, such as Benton Engineering Society, and student branches
of the professional societies; the American Society of Civil Engineers, the
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Institute of Electrical
Engineers, the American Society of Industrial Engineers, and the American
Institute of Chemical Engineers. The students are honest, honorable, hard work-
ing young men with serious purposes for their lives. The Dean of the College
has never worked with groups of young men who had higher, better morale or
moral standards.
THE FACULTY
Some of the excellent results found among the engineering students is due
in no small measure to the example set them by the faculty. Students are quick
to appraise a teacher for what he is, regardless of what he says or teaches.
This fact has reacted in a wholesome manner because the faculty of the College
of Engineering are good teachers and social credits to the state and community
of Gainesville. It is doubtful if a better teaching faculty could be obtained
for the same money. However, it needs to be strengthened with several out-
standing research workers and specialists in the several branches of engineering
of particular interest to Florida.

SUMMER SURVEY CAMPS
During the past biennium summer surveying camps were held upon the
campus of the University of Florida. These have been very successful. How-
ever, a properly equipped camp site away from the campus is more desirable
and in a few years will become a necessity. A possible location would be on the
Gulf coast in North Florida where Government land could be obtained for very
nominal rentals. Buildings or tent shelters, however, will have to be provided
by the University. This activity is in need of additional equipment.

FLORIDA INDUSTRIES COOPERATIVE PLAN
An outstanding improvement and experiment in the College of Engineering
this past biennium has been the organization and beginning of the Florida
Industries Cooperative Plan.
Several of Florida's industries, under a cooperative arrangement with the
College of Engineering, will train Florida men in industry during the same
period that they are studying at the University. This plan will require seven





years for a student to complete the course which leads to one of the degrees:
Bachelor of Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Industrial, or Mechanical Engineering.
He should, if possible, take the electives offered to the superior group.
After his assignment to an industry, it will normally require a student six
years to finish his course because he alternates between industrial work and
academic work every six months with his industrial partner. There are two
men in each team. During each period in industry each student is paid for
his work. The rate of pay should cover necessary living expenses.
The work of organizing this course has largely been done by Professor
P. 0. Yeaton. Thus far five industries-the American Agricultural Chemical
Company, Florida Power & Light Company, Tampa Electric Company, West
Palm Beach Water Company, and the State Road Department-are cooperating
and affording educational assistance to eighteen men.
This system of cooperation is distinct and different from the usual apprentice
courses offered by other institutions. The Florida system is predicated upon
the assumption that the cooperative student can perform satisfactorily the job
set aside for him by the industry concerned, and therefore actually earns the
money paid him.
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
A curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Industrial Engineering
has been formulated and Professor P. 0. Yeaton placed in charge. Its growth
in courses, students, and interest has been almost phenomenal. This course
is a basic engineering course having all the fundamentals and rigor which usually
accompany an engineering curriculum, and because of its additional training
in accounting and business administration it should prove a popular and useful
course of study for an increasing number of young men.

CONSTRUCTED EQUIPMENT
The Mechanical, Electrical and Chemical Engineering departments have
constructed some very useful equipment, notably a year-round air conditioner,
improved refrigeration plant, out-door mounting for an airplane engine, com-
munication testing apparatus, static range finder, radio static photographic
recording equipment and many short wave radio transmitters, receivers, and
an absorption tower for study of gas absorption.

RESEARCH
In spite of heavy teaching schedules, lack of space, equipment and funds
with which to publish results, research has been carried on in increasing amounts.
1. Hurricane-Radio Research, Prof. Weil and staff.
2. Florida Woods-W. L. Sawyer.
3. Utilization of Solar Energy for Air Conditioning in Florida-W. P. Green.
4. Investigation of a New Type of Airplane Propeller-R. A. Thompson.
5. The Electrical Industry in Florida-J. W. Wilson.
6. Rate of Absorption of Carbon Dioxide Solutions-J. W. Mason.

Research projects listed below could be profitably studied if funds were
available.





PROPOSED ELECTRICAL PROJECTS

1. Location of electrical storms by means of associated static.
2. A general study of static in Florida.
3. A study of the cause of the breaking of insulators in Florida.
4. Availability of D.C. transmission in Florida.
5. A study of the deterioration of poles in Florida.
6. A study of the ground resistance of Florida soils.
7. Field intensity studies of radio transmission in Florida.
8. Radio facilities for adequate state coverage for broadcast and police purposes in Florida.
9. A general study of fading of radio signals in Florida.
10. Electrical standardizing laboratory for Florida utilities.
11. The location of buried metals by electrical methods in Florida.
12. Mechanism of the glow discharge.
13. Research on insulation and dielectrics in Florida.
14. A study of lightning strokes on transmission lines in Florida.
15. Rural electrification in Florida.
16. A general study of telephone facilities in Florida.
17. Electrification of small industrial plants in Florida.
18. Effect of plant and animal growth by various radiations in Florida.
19. Modification of dictaphone so that electrical amplifiers can be used.
20. The location of faults in underground cables.
21. Television possibilities in Florida.
22. Illumination study for Florida highways.

PROPOSED MECHANICAL PROJECTS
1. Determination of proper design factors for air conditioning systems in Florida.
2. Recommended ways for cooling Florida homes.
3. Development of lower cost air conditioning systems for Florida homes.
4. Further development of the silica gel absorption system of air conditioning.
5. Investigation of ground water supply in Florida with respect to its use for air conditioning.
6. Determination of the possibilities of the reversed refrigeration cycle for heating in Florida.
7. Heating in Florida with the aid of solar energy.
8. Survey of Florida air currents with respect to wind power devices.
9. Survey of Florida city water supplies with respect to their suitability as boiler feedwater.
10. Study of fuels available in Florida and recommendation for proper selection.
11. Study of Florida peat as a possible source of fuel.
12. Study of new ways to utilize Florida's wood resources.
13. Development of an electrical meter for measuring the flow of streams.

PROPOSED CHEMICAL PROJECTS
1. Formulation of paints, varnish, and lacquers to withstand Florida climatic conditions.
2. Fundamental studies on tung oil to correct some of its deficiencies.
3. Extraction of tung oil with volatile solvents.
4. Developments of uses for Florida palmetto.
5. Design, construction and development of chemical engineering equipment.
6. Study of Florida clays, properties and possible uses.

PROPOSED CIVIL ENGINEERING PROJECTS
1. An investigation of lime rock concrete for building construction and other purposes.
2. A study of the operation of Inhoff tank trickling filter sewage disposal plants.
3. Beach and shore protective structures for Florida.
4. Bearing values of Florida soils.
5. Properties of Florida timber for construction purposes.

SHORT COURSES

In cooperation with the General Extension Division the Electrical Engineer-
ing Department has continued its practice of the past fifteen years and has
offered instruction in the following short courses: Electric Meters and Relays,
and Radio Service Men. The College of Engineering also cooperated in the
Photographers Short Course.





TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN NEED OF SPECIAL ATTENTION
Every Biennial Report of the past has been filled with pleas for additional
funds with which to secure additional faculty members, research workers and
physical equipment. The need today for these things is even more pressing than
at any time in the history of the College.
There have been tremendous changes in Florida in the last fifty years. For
example, in 1870 over seventy per cent of the population gainfully employed
were engaged in agriculture, today less than twenty-three per cent of those
gainfully employed are engaged in agriculture. Today more people in Florida
are engaged in manufacturing and the mechanical industries than are engaged
in agriculture, even when we count for agriculture the unpaid family workers.
Today the value of manufactured products is at least fifty per cent greater
than the value of agricultural products including live stock. Yet agriculture
receives almost a half million dollars yearly for research and engineering re-
ceives practically nothing.
All investigations in Florida and the southeast point glaringly to this
deficiency in technical development. The latest authoritative investigation of
this character "Southern Regions of the United States" by H. W. Odum (N. C.
Press 1936) says:
"In higher education the region affords no university of the first rank, while nine of the
eleven states composing the Southeastern Region have no universities rated by the American
Council on Education as capable of giving the Ph.D. degree. No southern university is rated
competent to give this degree in civil, chemical, mechanical, electrical, or mining engineering, or
in bacteriology, entomology, geography, plant pathology, plant physiology, soil science. There is,
therefore, no institution equipped for advanced instruction and training for land study and use,
or for other highest technical equipment necessary for the development of an agrarian culture.
Nor is there anywhere in the South a technical school of the first rank."

Our leaders should take some cognizance of these existing facts and do some-
thing about them.
The College of Engineering, University of Florida, is prepared to correct
this situation immediately, as far as Florida is concerned, if the necessary
appropriations can be secured. Specific recommendations have repeatedly been
made and these are summarized below.
The State of Florida should have an Engineering Experiment Station similar
to that in operation in many northern states. This would cost for the first
biennium approximately $500,000 divided about as follows:

A building ................................... ................................. $350,000
Equipment ..... ........ ..... .................... ... ............. 100,000
Staff and personnel ......... ... ... 50,000

Total .............. .................................... $500,000

and thereafter the cost should be about $25,000 per year. This Experiment
Station building should house the following research laboratories: hydraulics,
sanitation, hydrology, beach erosion, materials testing, aeronautics, refrigeration,
air conditioning, adequate chemical engineering laboratory, electrical standard
testing, and an industrial research laboratory-all of which should be flexible
and adaptable to the changing needs of Florida. Until such facilities are
available we will continue to have leveled at us such accusations as are quoted
from Mr. Odum's book.





NEW FACILITIES
The College of Engineering has secured no large, important, or outstanding
engineering equipment purchased from state funds in the past biennium. Eco-
nomies made necessary by the depression would not permit that. The various
laboratories have hardly been maintained in the condition in which they were
found. The laboratory maintenance and equipment budget today is slightly in
excess of $6,000 as compared with $7,500 two years ago and $27,250 eight years
ago. The total Engineering Staff has been reduced from 18 to 16 members.

PHOTOGRAPHIC LABORATORY
Through the good offices of the CWA, FERA, and the State Road Department
one small brick unit (40 ft. x 90 ft.) of the future Engineering Experiment
Station has been secured as a photographic laboratory. This building could
not have been secured without the unusual assistance rendered by Mr. Chester
B. Treadway, Chairman of the State Road Department; Mr. Julius Stone, then
Administrator of the Florida FERA; and the President of the University. This
building is the best arranged building in the South for a photographic laboratory.
It, however, lacks considerable equipment and permanent personnel. It is now
largely occupied by the WPA State Planning Board sponsored Florida Mapping
Project under the direction of the Dean of the College of Engineering.
RADIO AND ELECTRONICS EQUIPMENT
Considerable radio and electronic apparatus was secured through the United
States Navy, the United States Weather Bureau, and the Works Progress Ad-
ministration, so that today our laboratories are quite outstanding in this
respect.
The equipment in the laboratories of the College has been given more care
and maintenance due to Federal Government assistance rendered by the National
Youth Administration.
FACULTY PERSONNEL
The following changes have occurred in the faculty of the College of Engi-
neering:
Professor Melvin Price, Head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering,
resigned and was replaced by Professor Newton C. Ebaugh, a graduate of Tulane
University and Georgia School of Technology. He is a recognized expert in
thermodynamics and air conditioning.
Dr. Walter H. Beisler was away two years on a leave of absence doing
commercial research work, and during his absence his work was carried on by
Dr. A. M. Muckenfuss and Dr. J. E. Hawkins.
The Chemical Engineering faculty has been strengthened by the addition of
Assistant Professor Jesse W. Mason, Ph.D.
In the Civil Engineering faculty Professor T. M. Lowe was promoted from
Assistant to Associate Professor of Civil Engineering.
Professor P. 0. Yeaton, formerly Associate Professor of Mechanical Engi-
neering, has been promoted to Professor of Industrial Engineering and placed
in charge of that newly created department.
Colonel E. S. Walker, connected with the University of Florida in some
capacity almost continuously since it was established in Gainesville, has been
given a special status as Professor of Drawing. It is believed that every grad-
uate of the College of Engineering up to 1936 came in personal contact with





Colonel Walker either in his classes in Descriptive Geometry or in the Military
Department. He has been a wholesome and inspiring teacher to engineering
students for many years.
Profesor W. W. Fineren was promoted from Assistant to Associate Professor
of Mechanical Engineering.
Mr. Robert A. Thompson has been made full time Instructor in charge of
the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory.

SPECIAL WORK OF FACULTY MEMBERS
All members of the faculty of the College of Engineering have been busy
with their regular duties and many extra curricula activities-but special men-
tion should be made of several.
Professor Weil, Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering, has directed
three WPA electrical projects with credit to himself and material benefit to
the University. The first placed most of the electric wires on the campus under-
ground; the second gave safety, continuity and a more modern service.
The third is now in operation and promises to be an outstanding piece of
research to locate and follow tropical storms by radio. He has directed the
campus electrical maintenance work, served as Engineer for WRUF, the Univer-
sity and State Broadcasting Station, and as a member of the State Board of
Engineering Examiners.
Professor N. C. Ebaugh greatly improved the facilities of the Mechanical
Engineering Department and published two books, one on thermodynamics and
another on air conditioning.
Professor P. 0. Yeaton has organized the Florida Industries Cooperative
Course and assumed administrative charge of the Photographic Laboratory where
is being developed an excellent photographic ,service for the entire University.
Professor P. L. Reed has served as Faculty Adviser to the honorary engi-
neering society of Sigma Tau and as a member of the University Committee
on Athletics.
Professor W. W. Fineren has aided in the development of the Engineering
Experiment Station, Beach Erosion Studies, as Assistant Consultant to the
N.R.C. on the Drainage Basin Studies and as Secretary to the Florida Engi-
neering Society.
Professor T. M. Lowe has supervised the testing and operation of the Uni-
versity sewage disposal plant, designed a new hydraulic laboratory for the Uni-
versity, served as Principal Assistant on the N.R.C. Drainage Basin Studies.
Professor S. P. Sashoff, the most extensive traveler on the faculty, has made
two trips to Europe, presented a paper at the S. E. Section of the S.P.E.E.
and aided the General College in its teaching of general sciences.
Dr. J. W. Mason was co-author of a technical paper on gas absorption pre-
sented at the Columbus meeting of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers,
November 1935.
Mr. W. L. Sawyer has directed the Civil Engineering Summer Camp; written
the first Engineering Experiment Station Bulletin, "The Mapping Situation in
Florida"; conducted extensive investigations into the properties of Florida
woods; served the Local Control Surveys of the Coast and Geodetic Survey and
the State Road Department in the structural design of the new highway to be
built to Key West. He also conducted an extensive investigation on behalf of
the S.P.E.E. concerning the surveying equipment at all technical institutions.





Mr. J. W. Wilson has the honor of writing the second bulletin of the Engi-
neering Experiment Station, "The Electrical Industry in Florida". This bulletin
was published by the State Planning Board and has received extensive publicity.
Mr. C. H. Janes has installed and developed an excellent blueprinting service,
available not only to the College of Engineering but to the entire University.
During the past two years the Dean of the College has held the following
positions:
Technical Consultant to the Florida FERA
Member, State Board of Engineering Examiners
Florida Representative, U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey
Technical Advisor, Florida State Planning Board
Water Consultant, National Resources Committee
Director, Florida Local Control Surveys
Director, Florida Mapping Project
Chairman, Florida Mapping Authority
Honorary Chairman, Student Branch A.S.M.E.
Secretary, Florida Section, A.S.M.E.
Member, Council of S.P.E.E.

GROWTH
The College of Engineering has had a healthy, normal increase in enrollment.
It is difficult since the introduction of the General College to compare that
growth with previous years, but it appears that the growth in numbers has
paralleled the growth of the State. Thus far the General College has shown
no effect upon the enrollment in the Upper Division of the College of Engineer-
ing. The Upper Division enrollment was practically the same for 1935 and 1936.
At the present time there are enrolled in the University about 460 young men
who are working toward a degree in Engineering. Of this number 204 are in
the Upper Division, or what is now constituted as the College of Engineering.
There were graduated with Bachelor degrees in Engineering 51 in 1935 and
47 in 1936. These graduates have found little difficulty in securing employment
the past year, and indications are that the demand for young men with engi-
neering training is increasing.

RECOMMENDATIONS
1. The outstanding need of the State of Florida and the College of Engi-
neering is an adequate Engineering Experiment Station with its accompanying
research workers, equipment, and laboratories.
2. The campus heating plant and equipment should be administered by the
Department of Mechanical Engineering as is now the electrical equipment by
the Electrical Department, and this change is recommended.
3. As soon as physical equipment is available through an Engineering Ex-
periment Station, it is recommended that the Department of Chemical Engineer-
ing be placed physically, as well as academically, under the control of the College
of Engineering.
4. Extensive purchases for laboratory equipment should be made at an early
date for practically all of the laboratories.
5. The south wing of the Engineering Building should be completed to afford
additional drafting rooms, laboratories and large lecture rooms.

Respectfully submitted,
B. R. VAN LEER, Dean





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF LAW

To the President of the University.
SIR: I beg to submit the following report df the College of Law, with
recommendations for a budget for the biennium beginning July 1, 1937.
PURPOSE
It always has been the purpose of the College of Law to serve the state by the
development, through thorough legal training, of students capable of handling
the private and public business of its people; in other words, to make lawyers
in the best sense of the term. Thereby the law of the state is improved, litiga-
tion better attains its goal of justice, and the policies of government are ad-
vanced. The need for lawyers is in direct ratio to the problems and complexity
of society.
The attainment of the above objective involves a consideration of students,
teachers, methods, and equipment. Success is a matter of the proper selection,
use, and adjustment of these factors.

STUDENTS
A machine civilization has complicated the industrial life of the country.
Some think its problems are mainly economic. However this may be, a lawyer
today, more than in the past, must call to his aid various disciplines to solve
the problems of his clients and to participate effectively in public life. Aware
of this, the faculty recommended higher entrance requirements, and in Septem-
ber, 1934, the following rule went into effect:
To be admitted to the College of Law the applicant must: (1) have received a degree in arts
or sciences in a college or university of approved standing; or (2) have fully satisfied the academic
requirements for a degree in a combined course in the University of Florida.
This rule has raised the general level of the student body, resulting in better
effort and interest and reducing student fatalities.
One hundred students attended the 1934 Summer Law School, including most
of the entering class in September 1934. So the restrictive effect of the higher
requirements was not really felt until September 1935. At this time students
who had begun their pre-law studies two years ago and who, but for the new
rule, would normally have been eligible to enter the Law School found them-
selves lacking one year of preparation if they were taking a combined course
and two years of preparation if they were taking work in a college not offering
a combined course. Notwithstanding this adverse condition, the law enrollment
for 1935-36 was: first year class, 41; second year class, 50; third year class,
66; a total of 157.
The degrees in law conferred during the past two years, are as follows:
1934-35-first term, 4; second term, 44; summer term, 11; a total of 59. 1935-
36-first term, 12; second term, 45; summer term, 10; a total of 67. I may re-
mark that there has been an increased demand for our graduates. Many of
them have secured excellent connections, and, so far as our records show, all
of our last year's graduates have found employment in law.
Our students have effectively participated in undergraduate activities. They
have been leaders in politics, the Honor Court, the Blue Key, and oratory and
debating. The John Marshall Law Club won the Faculty Debate Cup for 1936;
and J. B. Patterson, Law '37, won the David Levy Yulee speech award.





Phi Delta Phi and Phi Alpha Delta, law fraternities, have continued to bring
distinguished speakers to address our students.
With gratifying interest our students have participated in the Redfearn
Contest, made possible by the offer of $50 by Honorable Daniel H. Redfearn of
Miami for the best study of vital state problems. In 1935 the revision of the
judicial system was considered, and I. R. Pridgen and B. C. Willis tied for first
place. In 1936 the reform of criminal law and procedure was examined, and
H. C. Duncan, Jr., won first place. The character of the studies submitted has
been high, and the contests have centered student attention upon the broader
problems of the law.
TEACHERS
Since 1909 law attendance has been large compared with faculty personnel.
Should our law teachers appear college-centered, there has been no choice ex-
cept to concentrate on teaching, not only in the class room, but outside of it.
Poor lesson preparation in any subject is poor economy; but in law it is worse
than useless; it is dangerous. To teach well, to make every recitation count, is
an humble but worthwhile ambition. It is not unusual for our teachers to go years
without missing a single recitation. When a teacher cannot meet his class, it
is taught by another professor, for nothing is ever learned from an untaught
recitation. This spirit, once caught by faculty and students alike, makes strong
students and alumni.
To teach students with academic degrees is more exacting than to teach
high school graduates. Moreover, the pressure of governmental experiments
and novations upon the courts is producing a changing law. Merely to keep up
to date on a number of subjects, such as United States Constitutional Law,
Florida Constitutional Law, taxation, etc., is an enormous undertaking. Our
policy not to rotate subjects among teachers enables the faculty better to cope
with this situation and to teach with more authority.
Better to fit our students for practice in Florida where the vast majority of
them locate, we have developed what might be termed creative courses of a
changing content. The course on Damages is based on Florida statutes and
cases; and the advantages of students getting acquainted with their Supreme
Court, of noting their opinions on the multiplicity of points raised in the de-
cisions, have been satisfactorily demonstrated. The course on Abstracts also
is based on Florida statutes and cases, the local peculiarities of title law are ex-
amined, and students are trained to pass on Florida abstracts. Without dwelling
on Practice Court work, which is Florida law in action, or other courses where
much Florida law is correlated, mention should be made of our course in Legal
Research where students, under the individual guidance of assigned professors,
acquire a grasp of the technique of legal investigation and do more creative
work than ordinary courses in law permit.
Despite the major attention of the faculty to teaching, its activities have
embraced participation in the work of the Association of American Law Schools,
the American Bar Association, the State Bar Association, and various educa-
tional organizations. Chapters were contributed to the 1934 and 1935 Year
Book of School Law, legal articles and a book review were published and assist-
ance was given in the preparation of an English book on Depositions. Two
associate editorships have been held. Legal advice to various university officials
and law alumni has been given. Civic and patriotic lectures have been delivered,





and General College students have been addressed. Participation in committee
work includes chairmanships in Discipline, Student Appeals, and Athletics.

METHODS
The one thought of the faculty has been, with the resources available, to
develop the greatest possible legal skill and knowledge in law students. We
have striven for the careful selection of teaching material and the mastery and
illumination thereof preliminary to instruction. Although limited facilities
have circumscribed experimentation in legal education, it has been found that any
new method or technique which proves itself valuable can readily be adopted.
The latest contributions to legal thought are found in the leading law journals,
with which the library is liberally supplied.
When in 1917 the law course was extended from two to three years, much
thought was given, and has continued to be given to every aspect of the cur-
riculum. Subjects deemed most important for Florida students are offered,
and changes therein have been made. While some other colleges on the campus
appear to change curricula more often than the Law College, there have been
frequent changes in the hours offered and the materials upon which law
courses are based. Like a river, our law curriculum may seem the same, but
it is different. One policy guides us in offering new courses. We offer all the
work we can without impairing teaching efficiency. Hence we ask, Would the
new course be more valuable than an established course which we would have
to displace? The Summer School, however, has afforded the opportunity of
offering courses not given during the regular sessions.
The faculty is not unmindful of the new problems presented by New Deal
legislation. It would be possible to devote much of the time of students to their
attempted solution. These problems are so unique, unprecedented, and perhaps
transient, however, that little good except mental stimulation could result from
their consideration before the courts have spoken. The Law School of the
University of North Carolina has devoted in seminar form about two-thirds of
its course in Constitutional Law to student investigation of some twenty-one prob-
lems presented by New Deal legislation. Our students in Legal Research have
considered some of these problems. But there is such a large body of sound,
settled constitutional principles, of which a student should have systematic
knowledge, that we have not turned over our course to speculations for which
students ungrounded in constitutional law are not prepared.

EQUIPMENT
The plan recommended in my last report for the enlargement of library
space has been put into effect. Law 105 has been converted into a library annex,
and tables, chairs, and five book stacks provided, thus increasing our library space
about thirty per cent. An improved lighting system for both rooms of the
library has been installed, and the window shades have been repaired and
painted. Due to the initiative of the law class of 1936, who shared half of the
expense as a parting gift, five electric fans have been placed in the library.
On July 1, 1936, the Law Library had 12,068 volumes. Among the additions
thereto since my last report may be mentioned:
English Statutes at Large prior to 1776; British Columbia Reports; Manitoba Reports; New
Brunswick Reports: New York Court of Appeals Decisions; Journal American Judicature Society;
California Law Review; Bogert's Law of Trusts and Trustees; Crawford and Harlan's Law of





Group Insurance; Drone's Law of Copyright; Gray's Attorney's Text Book of Medicine; O'Donnell's
Common Law Pleading and Forms; Sime's Law of Future Interests; Thompson's Law of Wills,
2d edition; Vernier's American Family Laws; Tax Systems of the World; and Restatements of
Trusts and Conflict of Laws.

Various other works for reference purposes have been procured, the idea
being to enrich the material germane to instruction.
Students are using the Law Library more than in the past. This may be
attributed to their greater maturity and to some changes in instructional prac-
tices; but the excellent course in Legal Bibliography and the unfailing assistance
of the Law Librarian undoubtedly are contributing causes. Alvin Cassel, L'36,
won first place in a national contest in the use of law books sponsored by "The
Law Student."
More and more the Law Library is being used by lawyers throughout the
state. Students working for advanced degrees and academic faculty members
engaged in research frequently consult it, and it is the source from which legal
information used in short courses, seminars, and other colleges is obtained.

TRANSITION
The College is going through a period of transition. Its attendance probably
will not increase, and may decline, for several years-a result clearly understood
when its work was placed upon a graduate basis. It was placed there in an
effort to enrich its work and to graduate lawyers of more ample training. Its
progress is no less real because not so spectacularly measured by the objective
yard-sticks of attendance, clock hours, and per capital cost of instruction. Its
per capital cost of instruction will continue much less than that of other colleges;
and relatively speaking, it is and will continue to be a large law school. The
College is like a youth who, having acquired tan and brawn by outdoor life,
devotes himself to indoor study. He improves himself but not by objective
standards. He should not disappoint; his facilities for education should not be
lessened; his intellectual growth will more than compensate for the slowing
down of his physical growth. This is a picture of the growth that with fine morale
both teachers and students are making possible for the College.

Respectfully submitted,
HARRY R. TRUSLER, Dean





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

To the President of the University.
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith my report of the College of Educa-
tion and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School for the biennium ending June 30,
1936.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
FACULTY PERSONNEL
During the biennium there has been one addition to the line faculty. In the
fall of 1934, Winston W. Little, who had served for many years as principal of
the St. Petersburg (Florida) High School and had been a member of the faculty
of the College of Education from 1931 to 1933, was made Professor of Secondary
Education and High School Visitor.
Although there has been only one addition to the faculty, and no resigna-
tions from it, there have been several shifts in positions. Soon after Professor
Little returned to the University, President Tigert asked that he be excused from
teaching for the remainder of that year to devote his entire time to the study
of a proper set-up for the proposed General College. This request was readily
granted. Then, when the General College was established, Professor Little was
made Associate Dean of that college, which position he still holds. He remains,
however, a member of the faculty of the College of Education but has not
taught any courses in the college since the first term of 1934-35.
In the second year of the biennium, Dr. A. R. Mead, after serving one year
as Director of the Laboratory School, was made Director of Educational Re-
search. This is a new line of work and will be described in more detail below.
To take Dr. Mead's place in the Laboratory School, Dr. G. Ballard Simmons was
appointed principal and general manager, with the title Assistant Dean in charge
of the Laboratory School. Dr. Simmons had for many years served in the
double capacity of Assistant Professor of Education and Assistant Dean of the
College of Education.
When the General College was established, Dr. J. Hooper Wise, who had
served as principal of the Laboratory School the first year of its existence, was
called to be chairman of the course in Reading, Speaking and Writing, called
Comprehensive Course No. 3. He devotes most of his time to this course but
remains a member of the faculty of the College of Education and teaches one
course in the College.

LEAVES OF ABSENCE
The first year of the biennium Associate Professor E. Benton Salt was on
leave studying at New York University. He returned to the same institution in
the summer of 1936 and has just completed the work for the Doctor's degree.
Assistant Professor B. 0. Smith has been granted a leave of absence for
1936-37 to study at Columbia University.

RELATION OF THE GENERAL COLLEGE TO THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
The new courses offered in the General College seem to be better suited to the
preparation of secondary and elementary teachers than the specialized courses
that preceded them. This is because a broad, general education is better suited to





the preparation of teachers in high schools and the grades than specialized
courses.
It was thought by some that if all freshmen and sophomores should be regis-
tered in the General College it would reduce very materially the number of courses
in the various colleges. This is doubtless true in some cases, but it is not
true in the College of Education because even before the General College came
into existence only two courses in education below the junior level were offered,
and these courses are still offered as electives for sophomores in the General
College.
CURRICULUM REVISION
In the spring of 1936 new curricula were worked out for the College of Edu-
cation. There are four of these curricula designed to prepare those who expect
to teach: (1) general subjects, (2) vocational agriculture, (3) health and physi-
cal education, and (4) industrial arts.
These curricula will go into effect in the fall of 1937. Two degrees will be
offered; namely, Bachelor of Arts in Education and Bachelor of Science in Edu-
cation. The six degrees offered at present will all be consolidated into these two.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT
Specific recommendations for improvement have been submitted in the special
report that accompanied the budget. Here, briefly, two are mentioned: (1) pro-
vision for expansion in vocational education, (2) the development of research.

DEPARTMENT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
The passage of the George-Deen Act by the last Congress has made funds
available to strengthen the Department of Vocational Agriculture and to add
a department of trades and industrial education and one in home economics edu-
cation. It is planned to add a professor to the Department of Vocational Agri-
culture. This man will devote his time to what is called in other states "materials
research and publicity." The other two departments will begin with one teacher
in each. Both of these will be itinerant teacher trainers in their respective
fields.
THE BUREAU OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
It is intended that the Bureau of Educational Research, to which reference
was made above, shall act as an agency for the study of educational problems
by investigation and research. This can be done in several ways: (1) by
actual research in the Bureau itself; (2) by guiding other research workers
in cooperative projects; (3) by stimulating research in the Laboratory
School, College of Education, and in other schools elsewhere; and (4) by co6p-
erating in research and investigation of educational problems in the university.
In addition to the research problems, it is the function of the Bureau to pub-
lish and to disseminate the results of investigation. This may be done by pub-
lishing, (1) research materials; (2) related materials, such as digests and
bibliographies; (3) a bulletin every six weeks, as is done by most of the better
known institutions.
For the past year the Bureau has been engaged in making two studies: (1)
The NYA Comparative Evaluation Project; and (2) Statewide Survey of the
Economic Status of Teachers.
The NYA Comparative Evaluation project attempts to discover the compara-
tive effects upon the children of the school programs of about twenty-eight





different schools, twenty-one of which are white schools and seven of which are
Negro schools. Subordinate to this main purpose is the attempt to discover
whether the program of the Laboratory School is more effective in securing edu-
cational results than programs of other schools. During the year 1935-36 we have
devoted our time to investigating the status of the children primarily with ref-
erence to personality and character traits, and have also, as far as possible, studied
the achievements in school subjects.
The project involved visitation to schools, instructing the school principals
and teachers in the program to be carried out, the collection of data from these
different schools, tabulating the information, making graphs of the data, prepar-
ing a final written report of the entire 'study, and distributing this written re-
port. The present condition is that of being about mid-way in the tabulation
and graphic organization of the data.
The study was financed from February to June, 1936, by the National Youth
Administration. Nothing was done on it during the summer months because we
had no one we could assign to it.
The year's study we expect to complete by the Christmas holidays. How-
ever, the first year's work is but the beginning of what we hope will be a con-
tinuous study covering a period of five to eight successive years with the same
children.
The State Wide Survey of the Economic Status of Teachers secures data in
an attempt (1) to establish a sound basis for a standard salary to be paid public
school teachers to enable them to pay for the necessities of life, and carry on
their professional and civic functions, and (2) to assist with basic information in
plans for a state-wide teachers' retirement system.
The Bureau of Educational Research has immediate direction of the study,
as a part of the state-wide survey of education under the State Planning Board.
Preparation of data forms, gathering, compilation and organization of data, and
preparation of final report constitute the work of the Bureau on this project.
All tabulations are made by workers paid by the Works Progress Adminis-
tration. The Florida Education Association and the State Department of Educa-
tion have paid the costs of mimeographing and postage involved. The Bureau
furnishes space, and supervision for the work. Probable date of completion:
about December 15, 1936.

THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL
In the fall of 1934 the beautiful and attractive P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
was opened to the children of Alachua county. Admission is granted in the order
of application. So great has the demand for admission been that the number now
on the waiting list is almost equal to the number now in attendance. There are
applications now on file for admission to the kindergarten as far ahead as the
year 1941-42. Eighty-seven applications are on file for the kindergarten for the
several years 1937-42. The number of applications on file for the elementary
division (grades 1-6 inclusive) is 179; the number in the high school division
(grades 7-12 inclusive) is 173. These applications are kept on file, and whenever
a pupil drops out for any reason the parents of the next applicant are notified of
the vacancy and their child is accepted at the beginning of the next school
period. Applications are not accepted in the middle of the school term. The
following table shows the enrollment and the number of graduates for each of
the two years of the biennium just closed:





1934-35 1935-36
Elementary Division, including kindergarten .................... 213 203
H igh School D division .................................. .............................. 238 269
H igh School Graduates ......................................................... ... ....... 36 41
The Laboratory School serves many other purposes than that of the education
of the children who attend. First, it serves as a center for study, investigation
and experimentation in the field of education. Studies are being made constant-
ly both by undergraduate and graduate students, faculty members, and the
office of the Director of Research.
The type of program offered to students in the grades 7-9, called the "core
curriculum," within itself constitutes one of the major experiments carried on in
the school. This is an attempt to integrate the knowledge and information
pertinent to the life of children of that age into a comprehensive whole rather
than to teach isolated sections of knowledge without very much relation among
the parts and with very little relation to the lives of the children.
Second, the Laboratory School, as its name signifies, serves as a laboratory
for students to study best practices in schoolroom procedure and the members
of the line faculty of the College of Education make constant use of it in teach-
ing their courses.
Third, by serving as a center for demonstration, the School makes a contri-
bution to a much wider area than the city of Gainesville, or even Alachua county.
Many school officials and teachers from the State of Florida and neighboring
states have visited the school from time to time in order to study our procedures
and practices. In order that these visitors may be accommodated, four times
during the year school is held on Saturday. During the 1935-36 session 810
visitors from Florida spent one or more days in the school and 110 from other
states.
Besides the visits to the classrooms many others have come to study the
building itself and the equipment. It is hoped that in this way the School may
be of benefit to others who contemplate building.

LABORATORY SCHOOL STAFF
High standards in regard to qualifications are met by the teachers of the
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School. Most of the faculty members have had five
years of preparation in the field of education, and rather long periods of success-
ful teaching experience prior to their appointment. Some members of the staff
have almost completed the work for the Ph.D. degree.
Several members of the School staff are called on each year to teach in sum-
mer schools in other states. In the summer of 1936, Assistant Professor Homer
Howard offered courses in mathematics education at Ohio University, Athens,
Ohio; Assistant Professor Jack Bohannon offered courses in industrial arts at
East Texas State Teachers College, Commerce, Texas; and Margaret Bou-
telle offered courses in curriculum revision at Mercer University, Macon, Georgia.
It is the policy of the School to encourage its staff members to take leaves of
absence for the purpose of pursuing advanced study. During the summers of
1935 and 1936 a number too numerous to mention in a brief report pursued
work at various summer schools. In addition, the following members of the
staff have been granted leave for the academic year 1936-37: Grace Adams Ste-
vens, teacher of the sixth grade, to study at Columbia University; Eula Mae
Snider, librarian, to study at the University of Chicago; J. Douglas Haygood,
assistant professor of foreign language education, to study at the Sorbonne, Paris.





The following named staff members have been granted leave for the year
1936-37 to participate in work of a special nature: Clara M. Olson, instructor
in foreign language education, to make an adult education curriculum for
Florida, under the Works Progress Administration; Beatrice T. Olson, instructor
in home economics, to teach methods in home economics at Iowa State College,
Ames, Iowa.
FINANCIAL NEEDS
The financial needs of the Laboratory School have been explained in the
special report accompanying the budget.

CONCLUSION
THE SELECTION OF STUDENTS FOR TEACHER PREPARATION
In conclusion, it should be said that with all the facilities that might be
assembled the preparation of teachers cannot go far unless the right kind of
students are enrolled. The selection of students for teacher preparation, there-
fore, becomes perhaps the most important factor in the whole problem. Many
desirable students cannot finance a four year course without aid. We should,
therefore, look forward to the establishment of a system of scholarship aid to
such students. For several years we had teachers' scholarships provided for by
the State, but they were administered in such a way that many holders of such
scholarships never went into teaching, or if they did they soon changed to an-
other calling. To be effective, scholarship aid should be administered by the
regular University Committee on Loans and Scholarships and should be used
in such a way as to induce promising students to go into teaching. The old
scholarship law provided only for undergraduates; but it is on the graduate
level where this investment would probably yield greatest returns.
In no way, it seems likely, would the teaching situation in the State be so
rapidly improved as by granting this financial assistance to deserving young men.
While no provision has been made for such aid in the present budget it is some-
thing that we should earnestly strive toward in the future.

Respectfully submitted,
J. W. NORMAN, Dean





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE SUMMER TERM

To the President of the University.
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith my report of the Summer Session
for the biennium ending June 30, 1936.

THE QUARTER SYSTEM IN THE SUMMER SESSION
Before the summer of 1935 the Summer Session had always been conducted
on an eight weeks' basis except in 1917 when it was held for ten weeks. In
1935 for the first time the quarter system was adopted.
The quarter is divided into two terms of six and five weeks, respectively.
During the six weeks' term classes meet five times a week. During the five
weeks' term they meet six times a week. Each term is a distinct unit and
students may attend either and complete for credit the work of that term. In
order that the work ordinarily done in a winter semester may be completed in
a short summer term, classes meet oftener and for an hour and a half each day.
This makes the work of a summer term equal to that of a semester.
When the change was made from the eight weeks' term to the quarter system
it was thought that the change would make it possible to render service to a
larger number of students. This expectation seems to have been justified. In
1934, the last year with an eight weeks' term, 1275 students were enrolled.
In 1935 the number reached 1328 the first term and 804 the second term, a total
for the Summer Session of 2132. In 1936 the number enrolled the first term
was 1426 and in the second term 907, a total of 2333.

THE NEED FOR THE QUARTER SYSTEM THROUGHOUT THE YEAR
While the quarter system in the Summer Session seems to have worked quite
satisfactorily even with the rest of the year on a semester basis, it would be
much better if the whole University, both winter and summer, were on a quarter
basis. From what has just been said, it is evident that extreme measures must
be taken to make Summer Session courses and credits fit into the semester sys-
tem. It is recommended, therefore, that as soon as possible the quarter system
be adopted throughout the University.
There are many reasons why the quarter system is desirable throughout the
University:
(1) It is hard for the Summer Session to adjust its work to the semester system, as shown
above. It is easy for the winter session to adjust its work to the quarter system, one
quarter before Christmas and two after.
(2) It would be a distinct help to the Summer Session; and the fact that so many schools
have for years operated on the quarter system and consider it superior to the semester
plan is an indication that no serious disadvantages would accrue to the winter session
should the quarter system be adopted throughout the year.
(3) Courses and credits would then all be based on the quarter system, and in this respect
the summer quarter would be no different from other quarters.
(4) The quarter system would enable certain faculty members, notably those in the College
of Education, who are needed so much worse in the summer than at any other time of
the year, to take their required vacation in a winter quarter. On account of the differential
in salary between winter and summer it is now too great a financial sacrifice to take a
semester off rather than a summer. On the other hand, it is a serious handicap for these
men to be away in summer.
(5) As pointed out in a report of the College of Education more than ten years ago, the quarter
system would be advantageous to those teachers whose schools are affected by seasonal





crops. Some of these schools begin along in May or June and stop at Christmas. Such
teachers cannot come to summer school at all and their vacation period does not fit at
all into the semester plan.

For these reasons it is earnestly hoped that the President and the Board
of Control will seriously consider the advisability of adopting the quarter system.

THE SUMMER VACATION RULE
At present the rule for time off is that each member of the faculty must
take time off each year equivalent to one summer term. In case a faculty
member remains on duty all of one summer he must be away all of the next.
While this is a satisfactory arrangement for those departments that have more
men on their staffs than can be offered work in the summer, it is very distinctly
not the case in other departments that must import teachers for the summer.
This is especially true in the College of Education, for the enrollment in that
College is high in the summer; and every member of that faculty should be
present both terms of every summer because the Summer Session is the time
of greatest opportunity for the preparation of teachers.
Therefore, until the quarter system is adopted throughout the University,
provision should be made for those who are sorely needed during the summer
to take time off during the winter, and this without financial sacrifice.
Since to be absent one term each summer for three successive summers is
the same as to be absent one semester every three calendar years, this plan
might be satisfactory. It seems imperative that provision should be made for
taking care of the excessive demand in some departments of the Summer Session.

GRADUATE WORK IN THE SUMMER SESSION
Special emphasis should be placed on graduate work in the summer. In the
past, graduate students have in increasing numbers been leaving the State for
their graduate work. The University should, so far as possible, satisfy this
demand for advanced work. The present situation can be improved in several
ways:
(1) By keeping in service each summer those of our own faculty who offer graduate courses.
(This has been discussed above.)
(2) By bringing outstanding lecturers to the summer school each summer. Attendance upon
these lectures could supplement classroom and laboratory work.
(3) By bringing to the University a few outstanding teachers each summer, especially in those
departments where the demand is greatest.
(4) By providing a richer offering of courses.

An attempt has been made to provide for all of these in the budget which
has been submitted separately.

CONCLUSION
Finally, in this report three things have been emphasized: first, the need for
the quarter system throughout the University; second, the advisability of provid-
ing for vacation periods for members of certain departments in the winter session
rather than in the Summer Session; and, third, the improvement of graduate
work in the Summer Session.
Respectfully submitted,
J. W. NORMAN, Director





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF
THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

To the President of the University.
SIR: I submit herewith the biennial report of the School of Architecture and
Allied Arts for the period ending June 30, 1936, also a brief statement of the
needs of the five divisions of instruction.

PURPOSE
This division of the University gives instruction in Architecture, Building
Construction, Landscape Architecture, Painting, and Commercial Art, all of
which are professional subjects. The first two curricula are not offered at any
other institution in the State.
During the biennium all graduates have obtained employment in the field of
their preparation and in architecture we have had more requests for men than
we were able to supply. This is a healthy condition.
CURRICULAR REVISION
For a number of years and as mentioned in previous reports, we have been
using in certain classes, the project method of instruction, especially in Design.
With the establishment of the General College we asked and received the approval
of the University Senate to follow this method of instruction in all subjects.
By this method, theory and practice are closely knit at every stage of the prob-
lem. Upon the satisfactory solution of a project the student may proceed to
the next project without waiting for other students who may not be making
the same progress. Upon the completion of all the work prescribed, at a required
standard of excellence, and upon passing comprehensive examinations, students
may graduate. Knowledge and demonstrated proficiency, therefore, become
the basis for graduation rather than the accumulation of credits. By the project
method we have consolidated many divisions of our major field of study. Here-
tofore we had in the upper division of Architecture twenty-six courses; we now
have thirteen. In Painting we had twenty-four; we now have ten.
The consolidation of the schedule for criticism is also an important change.
All design criticism is available at the same hours and days of the week during
both semesters. By this device a student may progress at any time from one
project to another any semester, and still be able to arrange a schedule.
One of the most forward steps ever made in architectural education was taken
during this biennium when we discarded the traditional and universal practice
of first teaching drawing and other so-called prerequisites before teaching build-
ing design itself. The student now creates a small-scale model of a building and
begins at once to think in terms of architecture. Then he learns to make drawings
of his model, studying the reality of the descriptive geometry problems involved.
Heretofore abstract prerequisites now become useful tools which he learns to
use along with the design of his buildings. The results of this change are beyond
expectations. For this forward step we are securing state and national approba-
tion from the members of the architectural profession and from leading archi-
tectural educators.
The new project method requires a higher type of teaching than does the
subject method because a knowledge of all architectural subjects is necessary to
properly direct a student. The members of the faculty have responded with





enthusiasm and have devoted untold hours to better prepare themselves to
meet this necessity. This will build up a group of teachers of architecture instead
of teachers of architectural subjects. It is obvious that a professional type of
man is required in this method of teaching.
Heretofore the degree in Architecture could normally be obtained in four
years. A higher standard has now been set up and five years will normally be
required. The method of instruction will, however, permit the exceptional man
to complete his work in less time.
This past year we have broadened our service to the building industry by
arranging a curriculum in Building Construction for those students who wish
to go into some phase of this great industry but do not desire to become
architects.
The degrees now offered to students who enter the School from the General
College are as follows:
DIVISION OF ARCHITECTURE
1. Bachelor of Architecture. Normally requires three years in the Upper Division.
2. Bachelor of Science in Building Construction. New course. Normally requires two years
in the Upper Division.
3. Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture. Normally requires two years in the
Upper Division.
DIVISION OF PAINTING
1. Bachelor of Fine Arts (Painting). Normally requires three years in the Upper Division.
2. Bachelor of Arts in Commercial Art. Normally requires two years in the Upper Division.

SPECIAL PROBLEMS AND PROJECTS
The preparation of new course outlines and programs and the new system
of project judgments participated in by the entire faculty has given each member
added responsibility and is necessitating research and study to properly prepare
each man to give all-round professional criticism to students working on building
projects. While this demand upon the faculty member requires additional effort
on his part it will result in a better and broader type of teacher, better fitted
for instruction in professional subjects.

EXHIBITIONS
We have sent to the South Florida Fair a large exhibition of architectural
designs, drawings, and paintings which won for the University, during the bi-
ennium, the fifth and sixth consecutive blue ribbons in this division.
We have had at the University fourteen loan exhibitions which have been
open to the general student body and the public.
We have a continuous exhibition of student work.
A small, but comprehensive, exhibition of the work of the School was sent
to high schools at St. Petersburg and Orlando during the spring of '36.

LECTURES
During the biennium Assistant Professor Stageberg gave, on the radio, a
series of twelve lectures on the Home and House Design and Construction. A
number of lectures have been given by Professors June and Weaver to civic
clubs, both locally and elsewhere in the state.





NEW FACILITIES
A project research laboratory and book room has been established in the
attic story which has greatly stimulated student research.
New facilities include a few books, prints and freehand drawing equipment.
This biennium we received gifts of books and magazines from the following
architects or their families: Mellen C. Greeley, Secretary of the State Board of
Architecture, Jacksonville; William R. Vosburg, Tampa; Anthony DeHaven Zinc,
Miami.
FACULTY PERSONNEL
During the past year we lost, by death, Professor Henry Norton June, mem-
ber of the American Institute of Architects, an able and well-liked teacher. We
have added to the staff Assistant Professor Eliot Chapin Fletcher, B.S. in Archi-
tecture, University of Florida, and M.F.A., University of Oregon, who has had
several years of excellent professional practice so much to be desired in the
project method of teaching.
GROWTH
Our growth has been normal, and it is our hope that this division will not
grow beyond the capacity of the various professions to absorb our graduates
profitably.
During this biennium the Director of the School was advanced to the rank
of Fellow of the American Institute of Architects which is the highest pro-
fessional rank which an architect can attain.

RECOMMENDATIONS
The most pressing need is for appropriate and adequate space. Draftsmen,
designers, and painting students need rooms with good light, preferably north
and east light. This division has been using for years an attic which is in-
adequate and poorly lighted, and what is still more serious is that the interior
construction of the building is of inflammable construction and has only one
wooden stair leading to the attic, causing a risk to student life, which should be
corrected if possible. Space on lower floors is desired.
A particular need is a large space to be used for teaching purposes where
exhibitions of the visual arts can be held. Such a room would be useful for
teaching the visual arts to the Humanities students of the General College.
There is now no place where the visual arts can be studied, which is a great
cultural loss to the future citizens of the state.
I recommend that space be made available for adequately carrying on this
phase of cultural education.
Respectfully submitted,
RUDOLPH WEAVER, Director





REPORT OF THE ACTING DEAN OF THE GENERAL COLLEGE

To the President of the University.
SIR: I beg to submit the following report on the first year's activities of the
General College.
The General College which the University of Florida established at the
beginning of the session of 1935-36 has just completed its first year of opera-
tion.1 The achievements of this college may be summarized under six heads:
first, a new system of admissions; second, a group of comprehensive courses
required of all students, with some election for superior students; third, a set
of elective comprehensive courses; fourth, a series of new introductory courses
beginning the work of the colleges and professional schools of the upper divi-
sion; fifth, a system of comprehensive examinations; and, sixth, a definite
program of student guidance.
When the General College was organized it adopted an "advisory" plan of
admission. A profile chart was prepared for all candidates applying for admis-
sion to the freshman class. The following items were included in this chart:
(1) high school record; (2) personal qualities; (3) standing on placement tests;
and (4) standing on mental ability tests.
Upon no one item alone was the applicant granted or denied admission. The
total picture was the consideration. A few high school graduates who appeared
to be very doubtful educational risks were advised not to enter and waste their
time and the money of their parents and the State. About three-fourths took
this advice with no further question and did not attempt to enter the University.
A few insisted and were permitted to enter. The results were very unsatis-
factory. Of the sixteen who came after being advised that they should not
attempt university work, eight resigned during the year with failing records,
five failed completely at the end of the year, and only three were able to pass
as much as 50 per cent of the freshman work.
The profile chart of each student, which was prepared from admission data,
enabled us for the first time in the history of the University to register fresh-
men intelligently. In the past, freshmen registered by passing a table at which
sat the Dean or his representatives. The students were told what subjects
to take, and their schedules were initialed or signed for them. Little opportunity
was offered for them to ask questions or to become acquainted either with their
prospective teachers or with their courses. This procedure was completely
changed this year. Approximately twenty minutes were devoted to registering
each individual student. Since the purpose of our system of admissions is to
reveal the ability of the students to profit by one or more years of higher educa-
tion, and since we had more information about each student than we had ever
had before, we were able to begin our program of guidance and to assist every
registrant in making the proper transition from high school to the university.
The major fields, or areas of study, for which students register in the General
College the first year are: (1) Man and the Social World; (2) Man and the
Physical World; (3) Reading, Speaking, and Writing; and (4) Man and His
Thinking; and General Mathematics. The second year adds (1) Man and the
Biological World, and (2) the Humanities. During the second year, students
elect the remainder of their work from additional comprehensive courses of the
'All the freshmen who entered the University in the fall of 1935 were required to register
in the General College. All sophomores, beginning in the fall of 1936, will be required to register
in this college.





General College, from new introductory courses of the upper division colleges
and schools, or from regular specialized college courses. All students are required
each year to take military science or physical education. Consequently, the
curriculum in the General College, for the average student, represents a common
freshman year and two-fifths of a common sophomore year.
Satisfactory results have been achieved from the first year's operation of
the curriculum. Although the course Man and the Physical World was re-
organized at mid-year and four or five additional staff members assigned thereto,
each of the comprehensive courses has functioned with reasonable effectiveness.
Staff members in every course have had frequent meetings during the year, have
worked out syllabi or outlines, have participated in the formulation of course
policies, and have displayed a fine spirit of cooperation. Not only have the
most competent men in the University participated in giving the courses, but
they have done so with the utmost enthusiasm. In general, the execution of
our program has been attended with a surprisingly small amount of administra-
tive and faculty friction and confusion.
Likewise, the execution of our program has been attended with a surprisingly
small amount of student friction and confusion. While students at first were
somewhat at a loss as to when, where, and how to begin, and while they were
inclined to take their courses less seriously than had been anticipated, once the
courses had been launched and those in charge of the lecture and discussion
groups had had an opportunity to get the work under way, the students began
to find themselves. Some students assumed that, since class attendance was not
compulsory, they were privileged to do as they pleased. Many upperclassmen
argued that freshmen were loafing and that they did not know why they were
in the University. As soon as the first of the progress reports was made on
December 15, students began to understand better what was expected of them,
and their morale quickly improved. Again, when comprehensive examinations
were given at mid-year in Man and His Thinking, and General Mathematics,
each a half-year course, they became even more fully orientated and began to
study, to read, and to think in earnest. Before the term was ended, the great
majority of students in the General College had become enthusiastic about their
courses and were arguing matters discussed therein with each other in their
contacts outside the classroom.
The colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division have displayed
an unusual willingness to cooperate in adjusting their programs to that of the
General College. Certain colleges-like those of Engineering, Agriculture, and
Pharmacy-have found it necessary to make rather far-reaching changes. They
seriously studied the philosophy back of the General College, attempted to under-
stand its implications, and to build their technical and professional curriculums
thereon. While they had made some adjustments prior to the beginning of the
General College, these adjustments were tentative. Virtually all of them during
the past year have very carefully scrutinized everything that they originally did,
have reappraised their offerings and have provided a series of new introductory
courses prerequisite to the beginning of their training programs.
The General College was organized as a terminal as well as a preparatory
institution. One-half of our beginning students in the past have remained in
the University no longer than two years. To round out our offerings and to
meet the needs of such students, we have made definite provisions for giving
the following elective comprehensive courses during the session of 1936-37:





Basic Mathematics, Animal Science, Plant Science, Principles of Personal Health
and Hygiene, Effective Writing, Reading for Leisure, The Reading of French,
The Reading of German, The Reading of Spanish, Effective Speaking, Occupa-
tions and Vocations, History of the Modern World, Political Foundations of
Modern Life, Sociological Foundations of Modern Life, and Economic Foundations
of Modern Life.
The General College has effected a decrease in freshman mortality. Eight
hundred and eighty-eight freshmen were registered in this college during the
session of 1935-36. In 1934-35, all the schools and colleges of the University
registered 1,095 freshmen. Of the 888 registered in the General College in
1935-36, 12.5 per cent had resigned or had been dropped by the end of the year.
Of the 1,095 registered in all the schools and colleges of the University in
1934-35, 16 per cent had resigned or had been dropped by the end of the year.
While these figures are significant in other ways, they do not indicate con-
clusively that the curriculum in general education offered by the General College
in 1935-36 has greater holding power over freshmen than the curriculums in
specialized education offered by the several schools and colleges in 1934-35.
In 1935-36 freshmen in the General College, instead of taking comprehensive
examinations in all their courses at the end of the first semester, took compre-
hensive examinations in only two courses, each a half year in length; and
even if they failed these courses, they were not dismissed for the failure.
Indeed, the General College has adopted a definite policy against sending
home in disgrace freshmen who fail either at the end of the first semester or at
the end of the year. Many students who have failed or who have dropped
out in previous years have done so, not because they were stupid, shiftless, or
lazy, but because our educational program was not adapted to their needs. They
went back to the communities from which they came, proceeded to achieve
success, and later turned up as successful men in public life or in business
to the embarrassment of the University. One semester is not sufficient time for
all who come to find themselves, to adjust themselves to university surroundings,
and to demonstrate their capacities to profit by a university education. To "flunk"
them out of the University either at the end of the first semester or at the end
of the year-especially those who are trying or who are maladjusted in one way
or another-and to send them home as failures with all the social stigma attached
appears unwarranted.
The General College in conformity to these principles did not automatically
drop for failure and place a social stigma on the eighty-seven students who
"flunked" practically all the work they attempted during the session of 1935-36.
Even though they represented the lowest ten per cent of the entire freshman
class, they were not dismissed from the University. Instead, they were given
individual treatment. Parents or guardians as well as the boys themselves were
called in for conferences. In all instances where the students had the ability
to profit by another opportunity, they were readmitted with individual adjust-
ment.
The results of the comprehensive examinations in the General College were
in the main satisfactory. While comprehensive examinations were given at
mid-year in Man and His Thinking and General Mathematics, both half-year
subjects, examinations were not given in full-year courses until the end of the
year. All students in the General College were required to take these examina-
tions.





An aggregate number of 3,765 comprehensive examinations were taken by
students in all courses. Letter grades thereon were given, not to provide figures
for the calculation of honor point averages, but to measure the quality of the
student's achievement and to facilitate possible transfers of credit to other
institutions. Of the aggregate number of examinations taken and graded,
7.6 per cent were "excellent", 19.0 per cent were "good", 39.0 per cent were
"average", 17.6 per cent were "poor", and 16.7 per cent were "failing". Twenty-
six students took comprehensive examinations in courses for which they had
never registered; of this number, twenty-two passed. One student during his
first year passed two-thirds of the total number of courses required for gradua-
tion from the General College.
Guidance in the General College does not depend upon a distinct bureau set
apart from the rest of our activities. The whole program is a guidance program.
Freshmen have been registered not only more intelligently this year than ever
before and provided with a curriculum which enabled them to orient themselves
in the major fields of knowledge, but two other things which we think are
significant in our program of general education have been done. In the first
place, student progress reports were initiated and were sent to parents and
guardians.2 These reports were based on student-instructor evaluation sheets.
These sheets were so arranged that they provided the student as well as the
instructor with a check list of items involving the student's progress. Out of a
total of eleven items, eight were checked by the student in the presence of the
instructor, and three were checked by the instructor in the presence of the
student. The checking was done in an individual interview which usually lasted
twenty minutes. When the checking was completed the student in every course
had been given not only an opportunity to appraise himself and his progress,
but also an opportunity to secure a similar appraisal from each of his instructors.
In the second place, a series of vocational conferences was held during the
year. These conferences were sponsored by the General College in coopera-
tion with the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, each
college or school being assigned a week for holding evening discussion periods.
The purpose of these meetings was to acquaint the students attending with the
gEneral purposes and activities of the college or school in question. The first
conference of each week was usually rather formal in character, while the
remainder of the evenings were devoted to more informal discussion in both
small and large groups. The faculty members also set aside certain hours for
personal interviews with students desiring additional information.
Although freshman attendance was not large at these conferences, the meet-
ings were helpful. The students attending were largely those who did not know
what technical or professional fields they wished to enter for specialization.
For this reason they wanted an opportunity to come directly in contact with
men who could give them authentic counsel and first-hand advice, and they were,
therefore, genuinely interested in the subject matter presented. Students who
desired to take vocational aptitude tests were permitted to do so at the regular
University Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene.
The General College is not a radical educational experiment; it is not the
only right way in higher education; it is a serious attempt to adjust our work
to the changing conditions of modern life. No brief is held for our plan; there
is nothing sacred about it. I do not believe, however, that the plan is an educa-
'These reports were sent to parents and guardians on December 15 and March 15.





tional fad. We still have college men taught on the college level by competent
instructors, using materials that are of tested and proved educational value.
It is obvious, too obvious to require argument, that the formal education of our
schools must be different after such inventions as the motion picture, radio, and
modern printing, and after such revolutionary changes as have occurred in
recent years in our social and economic order. We are not mere opportunists;
we have attempted to adjust our program of higher education to actuality, to
changing conditions, to the world as it is. We have endeavored to preserve the
desirable balance between whimsical change on the one hand, and frozen fixity
on the other.
The most urgent needs of the General College are of two types: first, needs
pertaining to personnel; and, second, needs pertaining to instructional facilities.
The General College thus far has depended upon the faculty members of existing
colleges for its teaching staff. While these colleges have cooperated in a splendid
way, the work which these staff members do falls in fields different from those
of the instructional divisions in which their salaries are carried. To secure
the most effective results, the General College should carry in its own budget
salaries or part-salaries of its instructors. It can better perform its function
when its staff members do not owe first allegiance to some other college.
The program of the General College needs to be constantly checked. No
funds in the past have been available for this purpose. The employment of
some individual or individuals is necessary in order to check the results we
are achieving, to supervise and promote testing, and to assist in more fully
maturing our plans for the future.
Increased instructional facilities are badly needed by the General College.
Devices of visual education and other types of equipment, as well as quarters,
have been seriously lacking. While a large lecture room in Science Hall and
another in the Agriculture Building have been provided, they are entirely
inadequate. More desirable lecture rooms are imperative to take care of large
lecture sections. Such lecture rooms mean not only increased economy but also
increased efficiency in instruction.
Moreover, numerous unsolved problems confront the General College in ad-
justing its program to that of the high schools. Cooperation with the State
Department of Education is essential. Funds are needed for this as well as
for other purposes. If the General College is to face the future with any definite
assurance of success, its budget must be greatly increased.
Finally, the General College proposes to concern itself almost wholly during
the next year or so with making its work actually conform to that which it has
proposed. At present, much of what we do and teach is the parading of old ideas
under new names. It takes time to establish new viewpoints. Many faculty
members do not understand even yet just what our program really involves. The
immediate future demands that we unite our efforts toward bringing our practices
into line with our theories.
Respectfully submitted,
WALTER J. MATHERLY, Acting Dean





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION

To the President of the University.
SIR: I beg to submit herewith the eighth biennial report, covering the activi-
ties of the General Extension Division for the period July 1, 1934, to June 30, 1936.
GENERAL STATEMENT
The General Extension Division is undoubtedly affected more by changing
social and economic conditions than any other part of the University. If it is
to teach the people of Florida, its program must be constantly integrated into
their lives.
Changes are not made on the campus as rapidly as the people demand that
we make them in the State. As a result, we occasionally appear to be pulling
away from the limitations of the academic field, in order to serve the public
in its race to make social and economic adjustments.
We constantly struggle with the fact that to reach the layman, we must
give him what he wants and not what the academic mind thinks he should have.
That we have occasionally had difficulty in adjusting our work to satisfy our
colleagues and the public at the same time is not surprising.
That we have had a fair measure of success is due to the insight of the
President of the University and his sympathy with an improved and larger
program to students and citizens alike.
The work of the General Extension Division consists of
A. INSTRUCTION
1. Formal Instruction
a. Correspondence Study
b. Extension Classes
2. Informal Instruction
a. Short Courses
b. Cooperation with Governmental Agencies
c. Lectures
d. Citizenship Training
B. SERVICE FUNCTIONS
1. Sensory Aids
2. Public Information and Library Service
Our accomplishments are recorded in the following facts and figures:

FORMAL INSTRUCTION
Students registered in correspondence study and extension class work from
501 of the 865 cities and towns, and represented every one of the 67 counties
in Florida. During this biennium, there was a total registration of 9,990.

CORRESPONDENCE STUDY
Through correspondence study, we offered college credit courses, non-credit
courses, high school courses, review courses for teachers, and professional reading
courses for the extension of teachers' certificates.





During the past biennium, we have had 5,541 registrations in correspondence
study; 5,160 of these came from every county in the State, represented 475
towns. Three hundred eighty-one registrations represented 32 other states, the
District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and Cuba.

EXTENSION CLASSES
Extension class work is given for college credit only. Three hundred ninety-
three classes were conducted in 72 centers in 52 counties, with a total registra-
tion of 4,449.
INFORMAL INSTRUCTION
SHORT COURSES
Through short courses, the use of the facilities of the University are ex-
tended to the citizens of Florida who will come together for short periods of
time, and, under recognized leaders, learn of the most improved methods and
recent developments in their fields of interest. In the same manner, organized
groups are given an opportunity to study their problems and make their pro-
grams of work more effective.
Short courses are not intended to give basic training in any field.
A few things about this work are worthy of attention:
We have pioneered in the use of the short course method, and in the number
of fields of interest covered.
The programs fill a need. The people are willing to pay for the work;
repeat courses are consistently requested; and the number of groups asking
for assistance steadily increases.
The programs are conducted on a high plane, and we have always been able
to secure persons of note as instructors.
We believe that the short course method is admirably adapted as a means
of enabling a university to contact groups of people, and to give them assistance.
Other universities are following our example, and we predict that this method
will grow in popularity and usefulness throughout the country.
Nineteen hundred adults were enrolled in 20 short courses during the bi-
ennium. Of these persons, 1,690 came from a large number of towns in the
State, while 210 were from other states.

TREND IS TOWARD INFORMAL INSTRUCTION
With the amount of work which students are permitted to take in cor-
respondence study and extension class work cut to twenty-five per cent of
that required for a degree, it is predicted that the number of enrollments in
formal instruction will be much smaller during the coming biennium.
At the same time, with an increased interest in short courses, we believe
that the attendance in informal instruction will be much larger.

SUMMARY OF REGISTRATION
Registration for the biennium may be summarized as follows:

Formal Instruction .-.........-....................--------------....--...-. 9,999 registrations
Informal Instruction ..................................... 1,900 registrations
Total for the biennium .......................... -----11,890 registrations





Of the 865 post offices in Florida, 501 were represented through correspondence
study, or extension classes, or both. All of these figures are shown in greater
detail in Tables 1 and 2 which follow.

TABLE 1.-CORRESPONDENCE STUDY AND EXTENSION CLASSES
REPORT OF REGISTRATIONS BY COUNTIES AND TOWNS
BIENNIUM-1934-1936.


County


Alachua ....


Baker .........

Bay ............


Regis-
trations

1 393


76

122


Bradford ..........

Brevard ............


Broward ...........


Calhoun ............

Charlotte ..........


Citrus ................


Clay ................ 101


Collier ................ 14

Columbia .......... 171

Dade .................. 331


No. of
Towns

12


4

12


Towns


Alachua, Archer, Campville, Evinston, Gainesville, Hawthorne.
High Springs, LaCrosse, Melrose, Micanopy, Newberry, Waldo

Glen St. Mary, Macclenny, Olustee, Sanderson
Bay Harbor, Bayhead, Cromanton, Farmdale, Fountain, Lynn
Haven, Millville, Panama City, Parker, St. Andrew, West-
bay. Youngstown


4 Brooker, Hampton, Lawtey, Starke

12 Artesia, Canaveral, City Point, Cocoa, Eau Gallie, Malabar.
Melbourne, Mims, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Shiloh, Titusville

7 Dania, Davie, Deerfield, Ft. Lauderdale, Hallandale, Holly-
wood, Pompano

5 Altha, Blountstown, Carr, Clarksville, Frink

5 Boca Grande, Charlotte Harbor, Cleveland, Murdock, Punta
Gorda

6 Crystal River, Floral City, Hernando, Homosassa, Inverness,
Lecanto

5 Doctors Inlet, Green Cove Springs, Keystone Heights, Middle-
burg, Penney Farms

3 Chokoloskee, Everglades, Naples

4 Ft. White, Lake City, Lulu, Watertown
Coconut Grove, Coral Gables, County Club Estates, Fulford,
17 Goulds, Hialeah, Homestead, Lemon City, Miami, Miami Beach,
Miami Shores, Naranja, Ojus, Opalocka, Perrine, Princeton,
Redland


DeSoto .............. 72 2 Arcadia, Ft. Ogden

Dixie .................. 32 5 Cross City, Demery Hill, Jena, Old Town, Shamrock
Arlington, Atlantic Beach, Baldwin, Bayard, Eastport, Grand
Duval ............. 954 12 Crossing, Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, Maxville, Mayport,
South Jacksonville, Yukon


Escambia ..........


Flagler ..............

Franklin ..........

Gadsden ............


Gilchrist ............

Glades ................

Gulf ....................

Hamilton ..........


493


12

24

68


30

4

29

64


14


3

3

8


2

1

3

3


Barth, Bay Springs, Bluff Springs, Cantonment, Century, Cot-
tagehill, Gonzalez. McDavid, Molino, Muscogee, Myrtle Grove.
Pensacola, Walnut Hill, Warrington

Andalusia, Bunnell, Flagler Beach

Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint

Chattahoochee, Concord, Greensboro, Gretna, Havana, Mt.
Pleasant, Quincy, River Junction

Bell, Trenton

Moore Haven

Kinard, Port St. Joe, Wewahitchka

Jasper, Jennings, White Springs





TABLE 1.-CORRESPONDENCE STUDY AND EXTENSION CLASSES
REPORT OF REGISTRATIONS BY COUNTIES AND TOWNS
BIENNIUM-1934-1936-Continued.


County Regis- No. of
trations Towns

Hardee .......... 115 | 6


Hendry .............. 14 3

Hernando ........ 10 2

Highlands ........ 63 6

Hillsborough .... 818 25



Holmes .............. 229 6

Indian River .... 83 6


Jackson ............ 251 13


Jefferson .......... 30 6

Lafayette ........ 88 | 3

Lake .... .......... 173 19



Lee .................. 87 7


Leon .... ....... 92 4

Levy ..... ............. 105 12


Liberty ............. 92 4

Madison .......... 136 | 6

Manatee ............ 154 11


Marion ............. 171 16


Martin ............. 21 3

Monroe ............. 44 1


Nassau .....-...-.| 44 6

Okaloosa ......... 171 9


Okeechobee ...... 27 1


Orange .............. 468 16


Osceola ............ 36 6


Towns


Bowling Green, Ft. Green, Gardner, Ona, Wauchula, Zolfo
Springs

Clewiston, Denaud, Felda

Brooksville, Croom

Avon Park, Brighton, DeSoto City, Lake Placid, Sebring, Venus
Balm, Brandon, Dover, Elfers, Gibsonton, Keysville, Knights,
Limona, Lithia, Lutz, Mango, Plant City, Port Tampa City,
Riverview, Ruskin, Seffner, Sulphur Springs, Sun City, Sydney,
Tampashores, Thonotosassa, Valrico, West Tampa, Wimauma

Bonifay, Dady, Esto, Noma, Ponce de Leon, Westville

Fellsmere, Gifford, Sebastian, Vero Beach, Wabasso, Winter
Beach
Alford, Alliance, Bascom, Campbellton, Cottondale, Cypress,
Graceville, Grand Ridge, Greenwood, Keynesville, Malone,
Marianna, Sneads

Aucilla, Lamont, Lloyd, Monticello, Wacissa, Waukeenah

Day, Mayo, Steinhatchee
Altoona, Astatula, Astor, Clermont, Eustis, Ferndale, Fruit-
land Park, Grand Island, Groveland, Howey-in-the-Hills, Lees-
burg, Mascotte, Montverde, Mt. Dora, Okahumpka, Paisley,
Sorrento, Tavares, Umatilla

Alva, Bokeelia, Bonita Springs, Estero, Ft. Myers, Tice, Useppa
Island

Chaires, Miccosukee, Tallahassee, Woodville
Bronson, Cedar Keys, Chiefland, Gulf Hammock, Hardeetown,
Inglis, Montbrook, Morriston, Otter Creek, Sumner, Williston,
Yankeetown

Hosford, Rock Bluff, Sumatra, Telogia

Ebb, Ellaville, Greenville, Lee, Madison, Pinetta

Anna Maria, Bradenton, Cortez, Ellenton, Manatee, Myakka
City, Oneco, Palma Sola. Palmetto, Parrish, Terra Ceia
Anthony, Belleview, Candler, Citra, Dunnellon, Fairfield, Mc-
Intosh, Moss Bluff, Oak, Ocala, Oklawaha, Orange Lake,
Reddick, Sparr, Summerfiel4, Weirsdale

Hobe Sound, Jensen, Stuart

Key West


Bryceville, Callahan, Crandall, Fernandina, Hilliard, Yulee

Baker, Camp Walton, Crestview, Holt, Galliver, Laurel Hill,
Milligan, Niceville, Valparaiso

Okeechobee

Apopka, Bithlo, Christmas, Gotha, Lake Park, Lockhart, Mait-
land, Ocoee, Orlando, Pine Castle, Taft, Plymouth, Winder-
mere, Winter Garden, Winter Park, Zellwood

Deer Park, Holopaw, Kenansville, Kissimmee, Narcoossee,
St. Cloud


I





TABLE 1.-CORRESPONDENCE STUDY AND EXTENSION CLASSES
REPORT OF REGISTRATIONS BY COUNTIES AND TOWNS
BIENNIUM-1934-1936-Continued.

County Regis- No. of Towns
trations Towns _
Belle Glade, Boca Raton, Boynton, Canal Point, Delray Beach,
Palm Beach .... 225 12 Jupiter, Kelsey City, Lake Worth, Lantana, Pahokee, Palm
Beach, West Palm Beach

Pasco .............. 77 10 Aripeka, Blanton, Dade City, Ehren, Elfers, Lake Jovita,
] New Port Richey, Odessa, Trilby, Zephyrhills

Pinellas ............ 550 8 Clearwater, Dunedin, Gulfport, Largo, Pinellas Park, Safety
Harbor, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs
Alturas, Auburndale, Babson Park, Bartow, Brewster, Daven-
Polk .................. 259 24 port, Dundee, Eagle Lake, Florence Villa, Ft. Meade, Frost-
proof, Galloway, Haines City, Homeland, Kathleen, Lake
Alfred, Lake Hamilton, Lakeland, Lake Wales, Loughman,
Mulberry, Pierce, Winter Haven, Withla
Bostwick, Crescent City, East Palatka, Edgar, Federal Point,
Putnam ............ 114 15 Florahome, Grandin, Hollister, Interlachen, Johnson, Mann-
ville, Palatka, Pomona, San Mateo, Welaka

St. Johns .......... 62 5 Elkton, Hastings, Moultrie, Palm Valley, St. Augustine


St. Lucie .......... 33 1 Ft. Pierce


Santa Rosa ...... 166 5 Bagdad, Jay, Mulat, Munson


Sarasota ...... 73 8 | Bee Ridge, Indian Beach, Laurel, Miakka, Nokomis, Osprey,
SSarasota, Venice

Seminole .......... 79 9 Altamonte Springs, Chuluota, Geneva, Lake Mary, Lake
Monroe, Longwood, Oviedo, Paola, Sanford

Sumter .............. 66 7 Bushnell, Center Hill, Coleman, Linden, Oxford, Webster,
Wildwood-

Suwannee ........ 243 8 Br bowling Park, Falmouth, Live Oak, McAlpin,
O'Brien, riemount, Wellborn

Taylor .............. 83 6 Carbur, Foley, Hampton Springs, Perry, Scanlon, Shady Grove


Union .............. 75 4 Dukes, Lake Butler, Raiford, Worthington

Barberville, Benson Springs, Beresford, Daytona Beach, De-
Volusia ............ 116 13 Lan DeLeon Springs. Holly Hill, New Smyrna, Oak Hill,
Orange City, Ormond, Pierson, Seville

Wakulla ............ 36 5 Arran, Crawfordville, Panacea, Sopchoppy, Wakulla


Walton ............. 197 7 Argyle. Darlington, DeFuniak Springs, Freeport, Lakewood,
Mossyhead, Point Washington

Washington ..... 217 5 Caryville. Chipley, Ebro, Vernon, Wausau


67 Counties .... 9,609 501
Out-of-State .... 381


9,990





TABLE 2.-REPORT ON ATTENDANCE IN SHORT COURSES FOR THE
BIENNIUM PERIOD 1934-1936.


Name of Course


Dates


RepresentationI
Total
Total Fla.
States Towns


1. Short Course on Water
Treatment ............................... March 27-30, 1935
2. Photographers' Short Course .... April 29-May 1, 1935
3. Short Course on Electric
Meters and Relays ..... ......... May 20-24, 1935
4. Short Course for Radio
Service Men .............................. May 27-31, 1935
5. Post Graduate Short Course
Florida State Dental Society June 10-12, 1935
6. Graduate Short Course for
Doctors of Medicine in Fla. June 24-29, 19385
7. County Superintendents'
Short Course .......................... June 17-21, 1935
8. Parent-Teacher Institute and
Leadership Short Course ........ July 15-19, 1935
9. Short Course for Registered
Nurses in Florida ................... August 26-30, 1935
10. Lectures on Anesthesia .............. August 30-31, 1935
11. Short Course on Water
Treatment .............................. Mar. 31, Apr. 1-2, 1936
12. Short Course for Pharmacists April 20-22, 1936
13. Photographers' Short Course ...I April 27-29, 1936
14. Short Course in Real
Estate Appraisal ................. May 11-12, 1936
15. Short Course on Electric
Meters and Relays ............. June 1-5, 1936
16. Post Graduate Short Course
Florida State Dental Society June 8-10, 1936
17. Short Course for Radio
Service Men ............................. June 8-12, 1936
18. Short Course for Garden Clubs June 10-12, 1936
19. Instrumental Music Short
Course and Band Clinic .......... June 17-July 8, 1936
20. Graduate Short Course for
Doctors of Medicine in Fla. .. June 22-27, 1936


Total Attendance .......................


1


Attendance
Out
Fla. of Total
State


39 17
75 0

35 0

102 0


,690 210


COOPERATION WITH GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES
CCC

As chairman of the State Coordinating Committee, organized to promote
a worthwhile educational program in the Citizens Conservation Corps in the
State of Florida, the Dean of the General Extension Division assisted Mr. P. G.
Reynolds, the State Educational Adviser, in every way possible. Mr. Reynolds
worked directly out of the Division, and all of our service functions were placed


I





at his disposal. While this work was organized in the previous biennial period,
it continued until June 30, 1935.
During this period, there were twenty-three camps, with approximately two
hundred men in each camp affected by our work.
The educational program consisted of training in vocational work, agricul-
ture and forestry, citizenship, health, leisure time activities, with the develop-
ment of skills in hobbies and the minor arts, while emphasis was placed on the
removal of illiteracy.
Practically every known method of teaching was used in the program: the
lecture, discussion group, supervised study, correspondence study, visual aids,
job training, the radio, and educational trips were commonly employed.
Thousands of bulletins and monographs on many subjects were distributed.
Original publications from this office included "Outlines in Botany", by Professor
M. D. Cody, and "Outlines in Camp Beautification", by P. G. Reynolds, which
were sent to all the camps in the Corps Area.
Fifteen University of Florida students, paid by FERA, were placed as
assistants to camp educational advisers during the summer of 1934, and ten
during 1935.
The Division lent the camp educational advisers visual aids, including five
thousand slides, large quantities of package and traveling libraries, debate and
reference materials, and correspondence study outlines for boys who wished to
complete high school work.
FERA
Workers' Education. A teacher training center in Workers' Education was
put on at the University, in cooperation with FERA, for the six weeks between
October 28 and December 7, 1935. Fifty-five persons were enrolled. The new
Photographic Building was used for the center.
Present day social, economic and political problems were studied, and the
Federal recovery program explained.
The class room was set up as a large living room, and the discussion method
was used, largely with University instructors acting as leaders. Dramatics and
visual materials as aids to teaching were highly successful. A laboratory was
established, where students wrote up and charted their opinions and ideas.
Camp Byrd. Assistance was given the FERA authority in charge of a
camp for young women at Camp Byrd, near Avon Park, Florida. Intelligence
tests were given to the group at the beginning and end of the period to measure
results. The loan services of the Division were used to advantage; and the use
of dramatics and discussion, as suggested by the Dean, proved to be effective in
teaching this group of young adults.

WPA
The WPA Education Department, following our suggestions, placed in these
offices a parent education staff, consisting of a general supervisor acting as
field organizer, a specialist to write outlines and assemble reference materials,
and an office assistant. This work is attracting national attention.
The Division is lending package libraries, and visual and auditory aids to
parent education, nursery school, and workers' education instructors.





NYA
The package libraries on vocational subjects assembled on a WPA project
sponsored jointly by the NYA and the Kiwanis clubs of Florida will be made
available, through this Division, to the public school authorities of the State
for informational purposes and vocational guidance.

LECTURES
Special Work in Conservation. Through a special arrangement between the
National Association of Audubon Societies and the President of the University
of Florida, Alden H. Hadley was assigned to the staff of the Division as an
extension lecturer on Birds and Conservation.
Lectures were given before school children, civic clubs and many professional
and lay organizations and groups. During the year, Mr. Hadley gave 273
addresses and lectures, with a total attendance of 53,868 persons. Most favor-
able comments have been received on Mr. Hadley's work, and a large number
of Junior Audubon clubs have been organized among the school children of
the State.
Mr. Hadley gave seven radio addresses over WRUF, and gave a series of
six lectures before each of the eight extension classes in Conservation.
Miscellaneous. As a service to the high schools and organizations of the
State, engagements have been made for University professors willing to serve
as speakers for high school commencements, club and civic organization meetings.

CITIZENSHIP TRAINING
On July 1, 1936, the Dean of the General Extension Division was again
appointed State Civilian Aide to the Secretary of War for Florida, and in this
capacity has continued to conduct citizenship training through the Division for
the youth of the State. As usual, he has selected each year a prominent citizen
in every county in Florida to act as County Civilian Aide. A large majority
of these persons have been University of Florida graduates.
With the assistance of these patriotic men, Florida boys, primarily from the
rural sections, have been enrolled in large numbers for the Citizens Military
Training Camps.
They have been trained in discipline and courtesy, and they have carried
into the back country the benefits of instruction in sanitation, hygiene, nutri-
tion, and cooperative effort learned in these camps.

SERVICE FUNCTIONS
DEPARTMENT OF SENSORY AIDS TO INSTRUCTION
Slides. During the biennium 1,022 sets containing 20,432 stereopticon lantern
slides were lent for public school instruction and for cultural influence. These
slides were shown in 47 counties to audiences numbering 102,936 persons, accord-
ing to the estimates of the borrowers. This biennium exceeded by 280 sets (11,672
slides) the largest previous circulation. Lecture notes accompanied the slides,
and the increased interest in other peoples and lands was marked.
Films. Films, both silent and sound, are now available through this Division
to the schools and lay organizations from commercial and institutional film
libraries in other states. There is a reasonable rental charge on most of these





films to be paid directly by the borrower. A large number is available for trans-
portation costs.
This method of supplying Florida's demand for films has been adopted, since
several years ago it became necessary to discontinue our film library because
of excessive costs.
During the past year, the Division, with the assistance of the nurses of
the State, acquired a 16 mm. sound motion picture machine, which will be used
for instruction in connection with the short course program.
Pictures, Charts and Posters. With the loan of 2,119 pictures, charts and
posters to borrowers in twenty-five counties, the circulation of this type of visual
aid has increased considerably.
Talking Machine Records. Talking machine records are available to classes
and groups in music appreciation. Borrowers from 41 counties used 1,713 talking
machine records.

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INFORMATION AND LIBRARY SERVICE
Public Information. The Division attempts to assist citizens by answering
reasonable questions on any subject, or by putting the interested inquirers in
touch with reliable sources of information. Questions on subjects too numerous
to mention have been handled each year.
Club Study and Home Reading Outlines. Bibliographies and lists of study
subjects have been sent to individuals, women's clubs and other groups, and
material and suggestions have been furnished for the preparation of programs.
Plays. Individuals, schools and organizations use the play loan service effec-
tively in selecting the plays they will produce. Copies of plays totalling 4,285
were sent to borrowers in 64 counties. Through gifts from publishers, 1,021
new plays were added to our collection during the biennium.
Programs for Special Occasions. A larger number of requests than usual
has been received for assistance in developing programs for special occasions.
Christmas and commencement materials, particularly, have been in demand. The
Department has increased its supply of exercises, recitations, dialogues, and
songs for school use, and the work of collecting these will be continued.
Traveling Libraries. Because of an insufficient number of children's books
in the rural sections of the State, we sent shipments into 28 counties, in 424
traveling libraries, containing 10,577 volumes. This exceeds by 91 libraries and
2,252 books the circulation during any previous biennium, and still falls far
short of the demand.
Package Libraries. Magazine articles, pamphlets, reprints, etc., are the
sources from which the 1,879 package libraries in the files were compiled. Of
these libraries, 1,347 are on general subjects, about 500 are biographical in
nature, and 32 contain occupational information.
Articles numbering 14,657, assembled in 1,108 packages, have been lent dur-
ing the biennium to persons in 63 counties. There is an increasing demand from
adults for package libraries to be used individually or in group study.
Reference Books. A total of 8,713 reference books was lent, and every county
in the State was represented among the borrowers. This number is 1,248 volumes
in excess of that lent during any previous biennium. More requests than ever
before were received from persons who were not extension students, and this
seems indicative of the general interest in purposeful reading.





REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN

To the President of the University.
SIR: I respectfully submit the following report on the progress of the library
for the biennium, July 1, 1934, through June- 30, 1936.
A total of 5,250 cataloged items were added to the book collection in the year
ending June 30, 1935, and 5,800 cataloged items in June 30, 1936. The funds
for the purchase of books and periodicals have been at a lower level this bi-
ennium than any biennium since 1930. The collection has grown steadily, how-
ever, due in part to gifts, exchanges, the acquisition of state and government
documents and to the addition of the Museum Library. This was combined with
the University Library in the spring of 1935.
Unable to buy many recent books, we have been fortunate in keeping up
our periodical subscriptions. We have also been fortunate in being able to
bind the greater part of the periodicals. The periodical holdings of the library
have been listed in two union lists during the last year: (1) The Union List
of Forestry Serials; (2) Union List of Serials Currently Received in Southern
Libraries.
A department of forestry was added to the College of Agriculture in the
fall of 1935. In order to have a collection which the new department might use
and build upon, the library early in the year gathered reports and bulletins
from the forestry departments of all the states, United States Government
publications relating to forestry and any free bulletins and periodicals of value
in the field.
To meet the needs of the new General College, books for the various courses
were placed on open shelves in the Reserve Reading Room.

DOCUMENTS
The only complete depository of current United States Government docu-
ments in the southernmost states of Alabama, South Carolina and Florida is
at the University of Florida. The library's collection of the earlier documents
is quite incomplete. To meet the demands for information contained in them
now and in future years, it is necessary that as many as possible be procured.
Each year a number have been obtained. The most effective method is by
exchange with other libraries. Although the staff is small and little time can
be found for the vast amount of work that exchanging entails, some has been
done, and important missing items have been acquired.
The State Document collection has been increased each year in response to
the needs felt by the library. It has for some years included subjects such as
taxation reports, geological survey reports and courses of study of all the states
in the Union. In the last biennium it has been expanded to include all state
documents of five states of the Lower South and additional departmental publica-
tions such as state planning, education, etc. Through exchanges, gifts and
requests from departmental offices many hundred of early and current docu-
ments have been obtained.

FLORIDA COLLECTION
Through a study made of the calls at the Loan Desk in the first fifteen days
of the summer school for the last four years, it was learned that there were
three times as many calls for Florida material in 1935 as in 1932. The library





The new reference books purchased for the use of extension class and cor-
respondence study students included 614 new volumes, 280 of which are new
titles. In addition, a very large number of pamphlets and bulletins were secured
in 1936 for the new course in Conservation offered by the Division.
High School Contests. No high school contests have been held during the
biennium, since neither funds nor personnel have been sufficient to carry on
this work.
PUBLICATIONS
One hundred eighty thousand copies of 28 different working bulletins, con-
taining a total of 242 pages, were published and distributed. Large numbers
of pamphlets, bulletins and monographs of special and general interest were
secured from numerous sources without cost and were sent to the patrons of
the University upon request.
Respectfully submitted,
B. C. RILEY, Dean





has been aware of this growth in demand and has tried to have material on hand.
Since no funds were available, the items were obtained by a careful watch for
free material, by trips to Tallahassee and private libraries by the librarian and
through gifts from interested alumni and friends. The library is very grateful
for their interest and generosity.
The Florida Mapping Authority is depositing in the library, a copy of each
map made. These are important additions to a small collection of state maps
we now own.
GIFTS
The library is dependent upon its friends for growth. One-third of the
cataloged items in the last biennium have come to us as gifts. Due to lack of
space, mention cannot here be made of the many contributions, for which the
library is very grateful. The collections of medical books, religious and engi-
neering books particularly were enriched through generous gifts. The funds
given by the American Legion and the books given by the Carnegie Foundation
for International Peace each year are assisting us to build up good collections
in these fields.
NEWSPAPERS
The importance of the library's file of seventy-one newspapers of Florida
is noted in the recently published report of the Committee on Southern Re-
sources of the American Library Association. Two additions of importance
have been made to the file during the biennium. The Museum collection contrib-
uted several volumes of Florida papers, the majority between the years of 1870
and 1890. Mrs. Evans Haile, of Gainesville, donated many numbers of the
Gainesville Sun through the 1890's and early 1900's. Many smaller contributions
have been made and have helped much in completing the file.

EXCHANGES
During the last few years libraries have resorted more strongly than ever
to exchanging duplicates of periodicals and books. The work of carrying on
exchanges consumes much time in the keeping of records, the listing, the check-
ing and the preparation for shipment. With the aid of an NYA assistant the
periodical librarian has been able to do a limited amount with gratifying results.
Of the total library accessions, an average of seven per cent was obtained the
past two years through exchange relations with other libraries and associations.
The University published three numbers of its Studies during the biennium.
Some of the most valuable of the accessions came to the library in return for
these Studies.
STAFF
There have been some changes in the staff since the last biennium. Two
members resigned to pursue further studies, one to be married. Because of ill
health, the Librarian took a six-months leave of absence on March 1, 1936.
All members of the regular staff have attended library meetings during the
year. Two members attended the meeting of the American Library Association
and four attended the meeting of the Florida Library Association.
The Librarian was Chairman of the Nominating Committee of the Agricul-
tural Libraries Section of the American Library Association, 1935-1936. She
was appointed by the Committee on Resources of Southern Libraries of the
American Library Association to make a survey of Florida libraries in 1936-





1937. Miss Thorne was Treasurer of the Florida Library Association in
1934-1935. Other members of the staff served on various committees during
the two years.

FERA AND NYA
Since funds have lagged behind the growth of the school and the demands
upon the library have grown with the increased enrollment, the help provided by
the FERA and NYA has carried the library through a serious time. Many
routine jobs have been performed by these student workers with a good spirit of
cooperation. Many time-consuming projects have been accomplished. Some of
them are: listing duplicate periodicals; listing and tying up of newspapers;
oiling all leather covered books; mending; marking and preparing books for
cataloging; shelving books; taking an inventory of all books in the library;
listing and marking government documents; typing and sorting of pamphlets
and newspapers. Supervision of the large number of untrained workers has put
a burden on the staff members which they have carried willingly.

INTERLIBRARY LOANS
The amount of research and individual study being carried on in the Uni-
versity can be gauged partly by the amount of books and periodicals that are
borrowed from other libraries. The number of items requested on interlibrary
loan has slightly increased during the biennium, though the lack of funds for
buying necessary reference material might tend to discourage study. Fifty-nine
volumes were borrowed from other libraries during the biennium, and twenty-
nine volumes were loaned.
There has been an increase in the number of books loaned. Many of the
requests are from alumni in the state. Every effort is made to give them the
service they desire, either in the loaning of books or supplying of information.

Respectfully submitted,
CORA MILTIMORE, Librarian.





REPORT OF THE
PROFESSOR OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
To the President of the University.
SIR: I respectfully submit the following report on the progress of the De-
partment of Military Science and Tactics for the years 1934-35 and 1935-36.
In this connection, I wish to call your attention to the excellent work of my
assistants and to the growing interest and support of the student body as evidenced
by the increase in enrollment, the high ratings attained by the military students
in the class room and during the Annual Inspections, and the superior perform-
ance of the Rifle Team which has won so many of its competitions.

GENERAL
Since the last biennial report, there has been no change in our method of
developing leadership by requiring seniors to instruct in all practical military
work. Under strict supervision of Regular Army instructors the qualities of
leadership, initiative and the ability to instruct others have been developed in
the upperclassmen.
The excellent results obtained prove the merits of this system whose primary
aim is to develop the best type of Reserve Officer, well prepared to train others
in case of mobilization.
During the biennium 1934-36, applications for enrollment in the Advanced
Course have steadily increased in number. The War Department allotments
for advanced courses at this institution have been increased as follows:
End of Previous Biennium At Present
Infantry ....................... ....... ............. 100 95
A artillery ....................................... 170 225
Total .................................................... 270 320
Records in my office indicate the following enrollment may be expected in the
Advanced Course during the coming semester; in the Infantry 123, and in the
Artillery 130, a total of 253.
To meet the growth of the Field Artillery unit, two additional Regular officers
of that branch have been assigned to duty with the unit.
Developments in motor transportation for field artillery use have made it
desirable to include such training in the curriculum of many universities offering
ROTC courses. Motor vehicles and equipment of the latest available type will
soon be available for the Field Artillery at this institution under the plan now
in process of execution. Undoubtedly, this will greatly increase the popularity
of military training.
For the convenience of the students and to lessen their expenses, as well
as to protect the government of the United States against excessive losses due to
failures of near graduates to successfully pass the physical examination required
for a Reserve commission, it is recommended that room facilities be made avail-
able annually for the conduct of such physical examinations by Regular Army
Medical examiners during a period of three or four days early in October. In
addition to the above advantages, this will also greatly facilitate the completion
of the necessary records in each case.
Certain suggestions regarding housing the new Artillery equipment and
other questions connected therewith will quite likely be covered in recommenda-
tions made by my successor when he submits the next biennial budget
recommendations. Respectfully submitted,
G. M. ALLEN, Colonel Infantry, P.M.S. and T.





REPORT OF THE ACTING DIRECTOR OF
THE INSTITUTE OF INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS

To the President of the University.
SIR: I beg to submit herewith the following report on the activities of the
Institute of Inter-American Affairs for the biennium ending June 30, 1936, to-
gether with the needs for the biennium beginning July 1, 1936.
During the last biennium, the Institute of Inter-American Affairs has limited
its activities to the following fields: The orientation of foreign exchange stu-
dents; the arrangement of exchange scholarships for Florida students going
to other countries to study; distribution of information regarding Latin-Ameri-
can countries to the schools of the State of Florida; the preparation of special
inter-American radio broadcasts presented over radio station WRUF; arranging
for special lecturers on inter-American topics to speak at the University of
Florida.
In addition, the Institute has kept up its cooperative research program with
the Carnegie Institution of Washington.
The number of Latin-American students attending the University of Florida
has increased slightly during the last biennium. We have made no special at-
tempts to get more students and have used extreme caution in choosing those
who are admitted. In regard to foreign exchange scholarships, we have had one
with Italy and arrangements are pending with Germany and Colombia. These
scholarships are handled in cooperation with the Institute of International Educa-
tion, New York City, and provide free board, lodging, and tuition for one academic
year. The Institute of Inter-American Affairs has from time to time supplied
information concerning the Latin-American countries to the schools of the State
of Florida. This has been done in connection with certain Pan-American holi-
days and on Pan-American Day. The Institute has also helped individual teach-
ers in the preparation of special programs dealing with countries of the Western
Hemisphere. With the cooperation of Radio Station WRUF, numerous special
inter-American educational radio programs have been arranged. Numerous
special lecturers have been brought to the University during the past two
years and have presented talks on inter-American topics. In many cases, these
speakers have not only presented a formal speech, but have led round-table
discussions for advanced students. The Institute has also kept in close touch
with and cooperated with, such organizations as the Pan-American Union, the
Institute of International Education, the Pan-American Institute of Geography
and History, and various governmental bureaus in Washington.
My recommendations for the next biennium are that any expansion of activi-
ties should be limited: 1, To increasing the services rendered the schools in
Florida; and 2, To the holding of special conferences and round-table meetings
dealing with inter-American problems.
I do not feel that we are in a position at the present time to appreciably in-
crease the number of exchange scholarships, but if this is deemed advisable, I
recommend most decidedly that all arrangements for such scholarships be handled
by the University authorities through the Institute of Inter-American Affairs.
In reference to increasing the services rendered to the schools of the State, I
feel that this cannot be done with our present arrangements unless a full-time
assistant could be assigned to the Institute. The holding of meetings or con-
ferences would necessitate the addition of approximately $1,000 to the operating





budget of the Institute. As in the past, I strongly recommend that any expan-
sion in connection with the activities of the Institute be delayed until we are
financially able to carry the program through in a highly respectable and digni-
fied manner.
Respectfully submitted,
ROLLIN S. ATWOOD, Acting Director.





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM

To the President of the University.
SIR: I beg to submit herewith my report of The Florida State Museum for
the year ending June 30, 1936, and recommendations for the biennium beginning
July 1, 1937.
Owing to contingencies beyond my control, the activities of the Museum for
the past year have been very greatly reduced. With outside help we have suc-
ceeded in bringing the inventory practically up to date: it now totals 295,718
specimens with a value of $328,252.08. During the inventorying we checked the
cards in the numerical file with the specimens, and placed the value on each
card. During this checking we found many mistakes, which took a great deal of
time to correct; and we no doubt made other mistakes. This is rather to be
expected with untrained help. During the inventories we also made considerable
headway in building an alphabetical catalogue of specimens arranged in chrono-
logical order; this, however, has been practically stopped for the lack of funds,
index cards, and ,repair of several filing drawers which are out of order and
cannot be opened for use. Not being able to continue with the above work,
through the summer months I availed myself of other outside help in working
up and getting in order for use, many thousands of records of historic value
stored in the archives of the museum. This work is being done by the Federal
Historical Record Survey under the direction of H. J. Chaffer, District Super-
visor. To date 7,019 items have been studied and reported on. These reports
go to Washington, D. C., and a copy of each remains in the Museum archives.
These museum papers are about half finished at this date.
With student help during the last semester we packed all the specimens that
were in storage cases on one side of the room on the top floor, and with the
expected student help the coming semester we shall endeavor to pack the speci-
mens in temporary storage cases on the other side of the room, preparatory to
moving.
During the past year fifty-three accessions were received. They were all
small with no large collection among them. This falling-off in accessions is at-
tributable to the large decrease in visitors the last year, as my greatest means
of acquisition has generally been through contact with visitors. This decrease
in visitors is attributed to the disturbance made by classes coming and going
through the Museum.
In consideration of occupying space in the John F. Seagle Building I have
carefully gone over the plans of space allotted the Museum and find that addi-
tional cases will be needed, which will cost $23,328.

Respectfully submitted,
T. VAN HYNING, Director.





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE
DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

To the President of the University.
SIR: I respectfully submit the following report from the Department of
Athletics and Physical Education of the University of Florida.
On December 16, 1936, the State Board of Control announced the appoint-
ment of J. C. Cody as Head Coach, with full authority to select his staff of as-
sistants. On May 15, 1936, Edgar Charles Jones, Director of Athletics since
July 1, 1930, resigned, Mr. Cody then taking over the duties of Athletic Director.
Mr. Cody has made the following appointments to his staff: L. W. Hardage,
football and baseball; Carlos Proctor, football and boxing; Percy Beard, track;
D. K. Stanley, physical education, intra-murals, and football; Frank Genovar,
swimming and assistant in physical education; Randall Dixon, football; and C. E.
Harper, trainer.
Steps were taken at once toward building for a better football team for the
season of 1936, and at the same time building toward stronger teams for suc-
cessive years. Emphasis at this time is being placed on football, because a
successful financial season or seasons in football is the means toward expansion
in all other athletic activities, including intra-murals and physical education.
Rather than waiting several years for increased revenue, every effort possi-
ble is being made by the present staff to operate as economically as possible in
hopes that even during the present year the financial obligations of the Athletic
Department may be reduced.
FINANCES
September 1, 1932, the indebtedness of this Department was $53,000. Be-
cause of the depression and other conditions not conducive to increased reve-
nues, it has been impossible to reduce this balance. However, it has not been
allowed to increase, and remains at the present time at $53,000.
The physical plant of the University has materially increased by the com-
pletion of the quarter-mile running track and concrete stands, seating fifteen
hundred. The completion of this new track on Graham Field should increase
materially the interest in track, a sport that in our State should equal or excel
the accomplishments of our rival state, California.

NEEDS
Again, as in the past biennial reports, there is still the call from our student
body for additional tennis courts. Our five concrete and two clay courts are
hopelessly inadequate for a student body of three thousand. Many students not
having the time nor physical attributes for collegiate varsity sports are able
to indulge in healthful recreation in tennis.

Respectfully submitted,
J. C. CODY, Director of Athletics.





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLICITY
To the President of the University.
SIR: During the past biennium, the Department of Publicity has continued
to render every possible service in behalf of the University as effectively as
limited funds and man-power would permit. While the achievements of the De-
partment and the public service which is extended through many public rela-
tions channels, is a source of pride, it is becoming increasingly more difficult to
do a thorough and efficient job. The requests which are made of the Department
have multiplied many times in recent years, and the growth of the University
and the expansion of its varied program has imposed additional necessities or
opportunities for service which we desire very much to meet.
At the Boston Convention in June, 1936, the Director was elected President
of the American College Publicity Association, an organization representing
public relations directors of more than three hundred of our leading colleges
and universities. This reflects a measure of distinction upon this Department
and upon the University of Florida.
This Department is operated in connection with the General Alumni Associa-
tion. There is, of course, a kinship in considerable of the activities of the
Alumni Association and the University's Department of Publicity, but the time
has already been reached when the activity of each unit is suffering because of
limited financial resources and insufficient man-power.
It would be out of place to attempt to enumerate the varied operations of
our department, which, to say in all candor and honesty, is a one-man depart-
ment of University publicity and alumni association combined. On the pay-
roll of the former are the Director and a part-time stenographer. On the payroll
of the other is alone the position of recorder. Without the part-time, unskilled
assistance of several NYA students, our situation would be desperate.
The matter of interpretation of the affairs of the University and of the stu-
dent body to the press of Florida is in itself a tremendous task. Only a par-
tially satisfactory job can be done because, with our limited setup, we simply
cannot render as individualized a service as is desired, and frequently asked, of us.
Florida has 40 daily newspapers, with which we have established sound re-
lationships. There are over 180 weekly papers; and it is interesting to note
that in 42 of Florida's 67 counties there are no daily newspapers, and the weekly is
our only possible media of expression to the public.
The cooperation we have received consistently by the daily and the weekly
press of Florida is a clear indication of the quality of our service to them, but
again it must be pointed out that we are, of course, able to do only a partial
job. The many hundreds of stories, the many thousands of printed words in
themselves tell the story of our work.
Newspapers represent but one of the mediums through which the Department
deals, but these references were made to cite at least one avenue of our service.
The close relationship in which the Department is allied to the administra-
tion of the University makes it clear, what some of our problems are and what
some of our opportunities are.
We are below the average salary scale in our pay for secretarial help. We
greatly need a full-time assistant in the. Department. We need at least one
student assistant, selected from among the advanced students in journalism,
who can be trained in the work of our department. We need considerable equip-
ment which we do not at this time have. Respectfully submitted,
FRANK S. WRIGHT, Director.





REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY PHYSICIAN


To the President of the University.
SIR: During this period the Infirmary has cared for three summer sessions
and two regular sessions. The sick rate for the summer sessions was principally
made up of patients suffering from various neuroses and the effects of fatigue
syndromes. These patients, being school teachers, report for the summer session
without any, or at best a very short, vacation following the close of the public
schools. The general health condition of the teachers of the public schools
with which we have contact convinces me that the present laws requiring physical
examinations of teachers are at best poorly enforced and that a large percentage
of the teachers attending the University of Florida are in need of corrective
treatment, as well as, in many instances, active treatment for actual disease.
The admissions for the period for the two regular sessions do not show any
marked increase over the admissions in past years for a similar number of
students. It is noted that the number of students suffering with chronic asthma
and nasal infections is increasing, and a study of this group reveals that a
large percentage of them are students from out of the State, who are sent south
in order that they might benefit from the climate. There is also an increasing
number of students with chronic heart diseases who are in this institution in order
to benefit by a climatic change.

COST OF SUPPLIES
Costs of surgical supplies and drugs have not materially increased during
this period, but an increase in food stuffs, from $0.186 to $0.22 per meal is noted
for the past year.
EPIDEMICS
From February 1, to March 18, 1936, 412 patients were admitted to the In-
firmary with influenza or acute respiratory disease, 20 of which developed pneu-
monia. The average hospital days for influenza was 6.30 days per patient, that
for pneumonia was 18.05 days per patient. The length of stay in the hospital
was increased by inclement weather. During the year 1935-36, 84 cases of mumps
were hospitalized, 64 of which occurred during the period from February 1 to
March 18, 1936. This number, with the influenza cases, taxed the Infirmary to
full capacity and an emergency ward was opened in the Y.M.C.A. building to
care for the mumps.
One death occurred during this period from pneumonia, this was the fourth
death of a student in the Infirmary in eighteen years.

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS
Physical examinations of the freshman class, all athletic teams, including
intramural players have been made. Men not in proper physical condition were
denied participation in the various athletic activities.
Regular sanitary inspections of the campus, dormitories, kitchen, and swim-
ming pool have been made.
Thirty-nine cases of malaria were treated in 1934-35, and in 1935-36, thirty-
nine cases were treated. Seven of these cases were primary cases probably con-
tracted in Gainesville, the remainder being chronic, recurring cases which were
no doubt contracted elsewhere.





HEALTH CONDITIONS IN FRATERNITY AND BOARDING HOUSES
The study of admissions shows a proportionately larger number from fra-
ternity and boarding houses than from dormitories. This is attributed directly to
the over crowding that is practiced in the fraternity houses. It is recommended
that the State Hotel Commission exercise control and enforce regulations in fra-
ternity houses as in boarding houses.

APPROVED HOSPITAL
The American College of Surgeons in 1933, 1935 and 1936 again inspected
the Infirmary and awarded it the "Fully Approved Certificate." In 1936 the
Infirmary was inspected by the American Medical Association, who also awarded
their "Approved Hospital Certificate."

STAFF
Dr. Fred Mathers, a graduate of the University of Texas Medical School, re-
placed Dr. C. W. Boyd as Resident Physician, and he was reappointed for 1935-36.
The Resident Physician has accompanied the football team on all out of town
trips.
NURSING STAFF
Eight-hour floor duty was instituted in the beginning of this biennium and
has increased the efficiency of the nursing staff. The number of nurses has varied
from time to time according to the number of patients requiring attention.

EQUIPMENT
The physical equipment remains unchanged and not any new scientific equip-
ment has been added during this period.

Respectfully submitted,
GEORGE C. TILLMAN, M. D., F. A. C. S.,
University Physician.





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE,
EXPERIMENT STATIONS AND AGRICULTURAL
EXTENSION SERVICE

To the President of the University.
SIR: I respectfully submit the following report of the University of Florida
Agricultural Experiment Stations and the Agricultural Extension Service for the
biennium ending June 30, 1936.

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS
The four branch stations, seven field laboratories and eight major research
departments of the Main Experiment Station have been maintained during the
biennium and active cooperation involving a wide program of coordinated re-
search in the agricultural field has been continued with other state agencies, the
federal West Central Florida Experiment Station and various divisions of the
United States Department of Agriculture.
The branch stations, their locations and respective fields of investigations
are: Citrus Station at Lake Alfred, citrus problems; North Florida Station at
Quincy, tobacco and general agriculture of the northwestern region; Everglades
Station at Belle Glade, general agriculture of the Everglades area; and Sub-
tropical Station at Homestead, winter vegetable and subtropical fruit production.
Field laboratories are located at Plant City, Cocoa, Leesburg, Bradenton, Monti-
cello, Hastings and Sanford. These branch stations and field laboratories are
units of the Main Station at Gainesville.
Departments or divisions of research in the stations include Agricultural
Economics, Agronomy, Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Science, Entomology,
Chemistry and Soils, Home Economics, Horticulture and Plant Pathology. All
are staffed by scientists with special training in their respective fields. At the
Main Station the scope of investigations covers those phases of agriculture as
indicated in the foregoing divisions; at the branch stations the work is restrict-
ed to general problems of their areas; and at the field laboratories insect or
disease problems receive major attention. The breadth and diversity of the re-
search program carried is indicated by the number of active projects, which now
exceeds 150.
In the second year of the biennium activities were enlarged somewhat by the
strengthening of the work at the Citrus Station and by the establishment, in co-
operation with the United States Weather Bureau, of a frost forecasting service
for citrus and trucking areas of sixteen counties. The recently enacted Bankhead-
Jones Act made possible the inauguration of a comprehensive project in pasture
research.
During the biennium the Station, in addition to carrying its normal duties,
has participated actively in agricultural recovery and readjustment programs in
cooperation with the Federal Government.
Research efforts of the biennial period have been marked by substantial
achievement, definite progress having been made in all lines of endeavor, and in
many instances with noteworthy and outstanding results that have won more
than nation-wide recognition. The trace element discoveries of the Florida Sta-
tion have a wide application as is indicated by their practical utilization in re-
gions as far removed as New Zealand.





Drastic limitation of space prohibits other than brief mention in the follow-
ing sectional paragraphs of a few of the more significant accomplishments of
the several departments and branch stations. Attention is directed to the pub-
lished annual reports for the years 1935 and 1936, which may be had upon request,
for more detailed information on the scope of the Station's work and its findings
during the biennium.
EDITORIAL
Demand for Experiment Station bulletins and other informational material
continued increasingly heavy during the biennium, and with extra heavy demands
on the Extension Service it was difficult to fill all requests for articles and other
information promptly. The two years have been crucial ones for the State's
farmers, and information in large quantity has been vitally necessary to them.

BULLETIN PRINTING AND DISTRIBUTION
Thirty new bulletins were printed by the Experiment Station during the
biennium, bringing the grand total of bulletins printed since its organization to
298. One-third of the new bulletins were technical in nature, the other 20 being
popular. Around 100,000 Station bulletins a year are mailed now, most of them
on request.
The new bulletins ranged in size from 12 to 100 pages and in edition from
4,000 to 15,000. The 13 bulletins issued during the first biennial year amounted
to 584 pages, and 105,000 copies were printed; the 17 for the second year totalled
680 pages, and 126,000 copies were printed.
Thirty-six new press bulletins were printed and nine old ones reprinted
during the biennium. Each was two pages in size, and the edition was 3,000.

NEWSPAPER AND FARM PAPER ARTICLES
Information was made available to Florida residents through articles in
newspapers, farm papers, and over the radio. From one to six articles relating
to the Station and its work were carried in the clipsheet of the Extension Service
each week. Special stories were sent to dailies at irregular intervals. Questions
and answers, largely supplied by Experiment Station workers, were printed in
one daily each Sunday during the biennium, and in another for part of the time.
The editors wrote 24 articles, 899 column inches in length, which were printed
by Florida farm papers during the biennium. They supplied Southern Farm
journals with 17 articles which totalled 207 column inches. In addition, large
numbers of articles by staff members were forwarded to Florida papers and
printed by them.
Tabulation shows that the Station staff contributed 146 articles to scientific
journals and other publications during the period.

RADIO INFORMATION
Approximately 300 talks were made by Station staff members on the Florida
Farm hour over WRUF in the two years. More than half of these were sent to
five other Florida radio stations as farm flashes.

LIBRARY
Material for 569 volumes was sent to the bindery and 303 new books added by
purchase, gift and exchange, making a total of 13,035 volumes now in the




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs