• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Table of Contents
 Calendar
 Map of campus
 University calendar
 Administrative officers
 Organization of the university
 Admission
 Expenses
 General information
 Summer session
 Military science and tactics
 Libraries
 Bureau of vocational guidance and...
 Colleges and curricula
 Departments of instruction














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00351
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: July 1936
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00351
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 213
    Calendar
        Page 214
    Map of campus
        Page 215
    University calendar
        Page 216
        Page 217
    Administrative officers
        Page 218
        Page 219
    Organization of the university
        Page 220
    Admission
        Page 221
        Page 222
    Expenses
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
    General information
        Page 233
    Summer session
        Page 234
    Military science and tactics
        Page 235
    Libraries
        Page 236
        Page 237
    Bureau of vocational guidance and mental hygiene
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
    Colleges and curricula
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
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        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
    Departments of instruction
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
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Full Text


TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
Calendar ................ ................................ ............... 214

M ap of Campus......................... ............................... 215

University Calendar ...................................................... 216

Administrative Officers .................................................... 218

Organization of the University.................. . ........................... 220

Admission ........................ ........................................ 221

Expenses .................... ... ....... ................................ 223
Tuition and Fees ............... ................................... 223
Room and Board ....................... ............................ 225
Self-Help ....... .. ..... ....................................... 227
Scholarships and Loan Funds............................................ 228

General Information ..................... .................................. 233

General Extension Division .................... ............................. 233

Summer Session ................ ....... ........... ........................ 234

Athletics and Physical Education............................................... 234

M military Science and Tactics................. .................. .... .......... 235

M usic .. ..... ............... ............... ..... ................ 235

Libraries ................ ................................ ............... 236

Florida State Museum .......... .. ...................................... 236

Health Service ............................ ............................. 236

Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene.............................. 238

Student Organizations and Publications......... ...... ... ...................... 238

Colleges and Curricula ............. ..................................... 242
College of Agriculture .................... .......................... 242
School of Architecture and Allied Arts ................. .... .............. 251
College of Arts and Sciences .......................................... 257
School of Pharmacy.................... ............................. 269
College of Business Administration ............. .... .. ................... 272
College of Education ............. .................................. 275
College of Engineering ................................................. 283
Graduate School ............ ...................... ................ 298
College of Law .......................... .......................... 298

Departments of Instruction ................................................. 302-357

213










*1936 1

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*1937*

JULY
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NOVEMBER
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JANUARY
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BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
August 31-Sept. 5, Monday-Saturday. ..Comprehensive Examinations.

REGULAR SESSION, 1936-37

FIRST SEMESTER
September 14, Monday, 9 A.M. ......... 1936-37 session begins. Placement Tests.
September 15-19, Tuesday-Saturday.... Freshman Week.
*September 18, Friday ............... Registration of Second-Year General College students.
*September 19, Sat., 7 A.M. to 12 NOON.. Registration of Upper Division students.
*September 21, Monday, 8 P.M......... Classes for the 1936-37 session begin; late registra-
tion fee, $5.
September 29, Tuesday, 5 P.M. ......... Last day for registration for the first semester, and
for adding courses.
October 3, Saturday, 2:30 P.M.......... Meeting of the General Assembly, P. K. Yonge Lab-
oratory School Auditorium.
October 13, Tuesday, 5 P.M............ Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be
designated as Honor Students.
October 17, Saturday, 12 NOON ........ Last day for making application for a degree at the
end of the first semester.
October 31, Saturday................. Homecoming-classes suspended.
November 2, Monday ................ Last day for those beginning graduate work to file
with the Dean an application (Form 2) to be con-
sidered candidates for advanced degrees.
November 7, Saturday ............... Georgia-Florida football game in Jacksonville.
Classes suspended at 10 A.M.
November 11, Wednesday ............ Armistice Day-special exercises.
November 24, Tuesday, 5 P.M. ......... Delinquency reports for all Upper Division students
due in the Office of the Registrar.
November 25, Wednesday, 5 P.M. ...... Thanksgiving recess begins.
November 30, Monday, 8 A.M. ......... Thanksgiving recess ends.
December 1, Tuesday ................ Last day for removing grades of I or X received in
preceding semester of attendance.
December 9, Wednesday, 5 P.M. ....... Last day for dropping courses without receiving
grade of E and being assessed failure fee.
December 10, Thursday, 5 P.M. ........ Progress reports for General College students due
in the Office of the Registrar.
December 19, Saturday, 12 NOON ...... Christmas recess begins.

1937
January 4, Monday, 8 A.M. ............ Christmas recess ends.
January 21, Thursday, 8:30 A.M ....... Final examinations begin for Upper Division students.
February 1, Monday, 10 A.M........... Conferring of degrees.
February 1, Monday, 5 P.M............ First semester ends; all grades for Upper Division
students are due in the Office of the Registrar.
Last day of classes for the General College, first
semester.
February 2-3, Tuesday-Wednesday..... Inter-semester days.


SECOND SEMESTER

February 4, Thursday ................ Registration for second semester.
February 5, Friday, 8 A.M............. Classes begin; late registration fee, $5.
February 11, Thursday, 5 P.M.......... Last day for registration for the second semester,
and for adding courses.
*Dates printed in The Bulletin of Information for The General College were in error.













UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 1936-37


February 13, Saturday, 2:30 P.M....... Meeting of the General Assembly, P. K. Yonge Lab.
oratory School Auditorium.
February 27, Saturday, 12 NOON ....... Last day for making application for a degree at the
end of the second semester.
March 11, Thursday, 5 P.M. ........... Progress reports for General College students due in
the Office of the Registrar.
March 15, Monday .................. Last day for those beginning graduate work in the
second semester to file with the Dean an application
(Form 2) to be considered candidates for advanced
degrees.
Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be
designated as Honor Students.
March 30, Tuesday ................. Last day for removing grades of I or X received in
preceding semester of attendance.
April 2, Friday, 5 P.M.................. Delinquency reports for all Upper Division students
due in the Office of the Registrar.
April 14, Wednesday, 5 P.M............Spring recess begins.
April 19, Monday, 8 A.M............... Spring recess ends.
April 28, Wednesday, 5 P.M............Last day for dropping courses without receiving
grade of E and being assessed failure fee.
April 30, Friday ................... Last day for graduate students, graduating at the
end of the semester, to submit theses to the Dean.
May 26, Wednesday, 8:30 A.M.........Final examinations begin for Upper Division students.
June 5-7, Saturday-Monday ......... Commencement Exercises.
June 5, Saturday ................... Last day of classes for the General College.
Annual Phi Kappa Phi banquet, 7:30 P.M.
June 6, Sunday ..................... Baccalaureate Sermon.
June 7, Monday ..................... Commencement Convocation.
June 7, Monday, 5 P.M................ Second semester ends; all grades for Upper Division
students are due in the Office of the Registrar.
June 7, Monday ..................... Boys' Club Week begins.


SUMMER SESSION, 1937
June 14, Monday .................... First Summer Term begins.
July 23, Friday ..................... First Summer Term ends.
July 26, Monday .................... Second Summer Term begins.
August 27, Friday ................... Second Summer Term ends.


FIRST SEMESTER, 1937-38
September 13, Monday, 11 A.M. ........1937-38 session begins (date provisional).





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
1936-37

BOARD OF CONTROL

GEORGE H. BALDWIN, Ph.B. (Yale)..............Executive Vice-President, Bisbee-Baldwin
Corporation, Barnett National Bank Building, Jacksonville, Florida
Chairman of the Board
THOMAS W. BRYANT, B.S., LL.B. (Florida) .............................. Attorney-at-Law
Lakeland, Florida
HARRY C. DUNCAN, LL.B. (Stetson)......Attorney-at-Law; President of the Bank of Tavares,
Tavares, Florida
OLIVER J. SEMMES, B.S. (Alabama Polytechnic Institute)........................Merchant
601 North Tarragona Street, Pensacola, Florida
John T. Diamond..........Secretary of the Board of Control
Tallahassee, Florida


STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
DAVID SHOLTZ .............................................................. Governor
R. A. GRAY ......................................................... Secretary of State
W V. KNOTT ......................................................... State Treasurer
CARY D. LANDIS ...................................................... Attorney General
W. S. CAWTHON, Secretary.....................State Superintendent of Public Instruction



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LLD., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D.
President of the University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. ................Acting Vice-President of the University;
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D. .............................Dean of the Graduate School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S. .....................Registrar, Secretary of the Council
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A. ....................... Dean of the College of Business
Administration; Acting Dean of the General College
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc................................Dean of the College of Agriculture
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D...........................Dean of the College of Education
BERT CLAIR RILEY, B.A., B.S.A. ................... Dean of the General Extension Division
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E. ....................................Dean of Students
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B. ........................Dean of the College of Law
BLAKE RAGSDALE VAN LEER, M.E., M.S. ................Dean of the College of Engineering
















ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS


OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D. .......................Acting Director of the Institute of
Inter-American Affairs
RICHARD DEWITT BROWN .............................................. Director of Music
BERNARD VICTOR CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D. .................. Director of the School of Pharmacy
JOSHUA CRITTENDEN CODY ........................................ Director of Athletics
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S. ................Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM ............................................ Business Manager
H. HAROLD HUME, M.S. ...............Assistant Dean, Research, College of Agriculture and
Assistant Director, Research, Experiment Station
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A. ...................Associate Dean of the General College
JOHN VREDENBURGH McQUITTY, M.A ............. Secretary, Board of University Examiners
CORA M ILTIMORE, B.S. ...................................................... Librarian
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D .................Assistant Dean of the College of Education
ARTHUR PERCIVAL SPENCER, M.S. ..............Vice-Director, Agricultural Extension Service
GEORGE CLARENCE TILLMAN, M.D., F.A.C.S.......................... University Physician
THOMPSON VAN HYNING ............................ Director of the Florida State Museum
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., F.A.I.A ...... Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D..........Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
FRANK S. WRIGHT, B.S.J. ...........................................Director of Publicity


BOARD OF UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS

HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Chairman...................................Registrar
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D. ........................Head, Department of Psychology
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A. ...................Associate Dean of the General College
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D. .....................Head, Department of Mathematics
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E. ....................................Dean of Students
JOHN VREDENBURGH McQUITTY, M.A. .........................Secretary





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY
The University is organized in schools, colleges, and divisions, as follows:


LOWER DIVISION
THE GENERAL COLLEGE




UPPER DIVISION
THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, including
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, including
THE COLLEGE PROPER
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS
THE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, including
THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION
THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, including
THE LABORATORY SCHOOL
THE HIGH SCHOOL VISITATION
THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS


THE COLLEGE OF LAW
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL



THE GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION
THE SUMMER SESSION
THE DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
THE DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
THE DIVISION OF MUSIC
THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
THE STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
THE BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE





ADMISSION


ADMISSION


FROM THE GENERAL COLLEGE

After the student has completed the work of the General College and received a certificate
of graduation, he may enter one of the colleges or professional schools of the Upper Division
by meeting the specific admission requirements of that college or school.
The Board of University Examiners administers the admission requirements of the Upper
Division. Besides the certificate of graduation from the General College, the student must
be certified by the Board as qualified to pursue the work of the college or school he wishes
to enter.
In addition to the general requirements stated above, the various colleges and schools
of the Upper Division have specific requirements for entrance. These requirements are
listed under the curricula of the several colleges and schools. Students in the General College
may prepare to meet these requirements by taking the courses indicated under the various
curricula presented, as electives.
The comprehensive examinations of the General College will cover the content of the
courses required for admission to any specific curriculum of the Upper Division selected by
the individual student.

OLD STUDENTS

Students who have registered at the University of Florida prior to the 1935 Summer
Session may continue in the curriculum they have elected to follow in one of the colleges
or professional schools of the Upper Division, without completing the prescribed require-
ments for graduation from the General College.


TRANSFER STUDENTS

During the 1936-37 session, students with 45 acceptable semester hours credit of advanced
standing, may be admitted to one of the colleges of the University. Students who cannot
meet this standard will be admitted to the General College, provided they meet the other
standards for admission. After a student has completed his first year in the General College,
as prescribed by the Board of University Examiners, the Board will review his case and make
such adjustments as may be necessary.
Beginning with the 1937 Summer Session, all students admitted to the colleges and
professional schools of the Upper Division will be required to meet the requirements for
admission to those colleges as provided by the new plan.
The manner in which students transferring from other colleges to the University may
meet these requirements will be determined by the Board of University Examiners, after due
consideration of the training of the student before application for admission to the Univer-
sity of Florida. In general, the policy of the Board of University Examiners will be as fol-
lows:
1. The Board of University Examiners will always bear in mind the aims of the curri-
culum of the General College. All students must present training equivalent to the
work of the General College, and must pass the prescribed comprehensive examinations.

















BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


2. Students with poor or average records from other institutions will be required to
nmeet in toto the requirements for admission to the Upper Division.
3. The Board of University Examiners, in the case of transfer students with high or
superior records, may vary the requirements for admission to the colleges and pro-
fissional schools of the Upper Division, under the new plan, to the best interest of
the student.
Students attending other institutions who contemplate entering the University of Flor-
ida shotild communicate with the Registrar for information concerning the method of ad-
mission. Such students should, at the end of their last term or semester in another in-
stitutionii request the registrar of that institution to send directly to the Registrar of the
University of Florida a complete official transcript of their work, and should also have such
transcripts sent from any other institutions previously attended.
Students who, for any reason, are not allowed to return to the institution they last attended,
or have not made a satisfactory record in the work carried at other institutions, will be denied
admission to the University of Florida. Students with an average below C need not apply
for admission. Students with an average of C or higher are not guaranteed admission.

SPECIAL STUDENTS

Special students may be admitted either to the General College or to the various colleges
of the University (except the College of Law, to which special students are never admitted)
only by approval of the Board of University Examiners. Applications for admission of
these students must include:
1. The filing of satisfactory preliminary credentials.
2. A statement as to the type of studies to be pursued.
3. Reason for desiring to take special courses.
4. Satisfactory evidence of ability to pursue these studies.





EXPENSES


EXPENSES

TUITION
Classification of Students.-For the purpose of assessing tuition, students are classified
as Florida and non-Florida students.
A Florida student, if under twenty-one years of age, is one: (1) whose parents have
been residents of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registra-
tion; or (2) whose parents were residents of Florida at the time of their death, and who
has not acquired residence in another state; or (3) whose parents were not residents of
Florida at the time of their death but whose natural guardian has been a resident of Florida
for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration. A Florida student, if
over twenty-one years of age, is one (1) whose parents are residents of Florida (or were
at the time of their death) and who has not acquired residence in another state; or (2)
who, while an adult, has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months
next preceding his registration; or (3) who is the wife of a man who has been a resident
of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding her registration; or (4) is
an alien who has taken out his first citizenship papers and who has been a resident of
Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration.
All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as non-Florida students.
If the status of a student changes from a non-Florida student to a Florida student, his
classification may be changed at the next registration thereafter.
No tuition is charged Florida students except in the College of Law.
In addition to the fees charged Florida students, non-Florida students, including those
pursuing graduate work, pay a fee of $50 per semester.
A fee of $10 in addition to the fee for non-Florida students will be charged all students
registering incorrectly. The burden of proof as to residence is with the student.


GENERAL FEES REQUIRED OF FLORIDA STUDENTS
Upper Division College of Law
1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 1st Sem. 2nd Sem.
Registration & Contingent Fee................ $15.00 $15.00 $ 5.00 $ 5.00
Infirmary Fee .............................. 3.75 3.75 3.75 3.75
Student Activity Fee ........................ 10.75 9.10 10.75 9.10
Swimming Pool Fee ......................... .50 .50 .50 .50
Law Tuition ................................ .00 .00 20.00 20.00

Total ............... ............. .... $30.00 $28.35 $40.00 $38.35


GENERAL FEES REQUIRED OF NON-FLORIDA STUDENTS

In addition to the above fees Non-Florida Students are charged $50 per semester.

DESCRIPTION OF GENERAL FEES
General fees listed in the above table are described below:
Infirmary Fee.-All students are charged the infirmary fee which secures for the student
in case of illness the privilege of a bed in the Infirmary and the services of the University
Physician and professionally trained nurses, except in cases involving a major operation,


223






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-- UPPER DIVISION


A student requiring an emergency operation, which is not covered by the fee assessed, may
employ the services of any accredited physician whom he may select, and utilize the facilities
of the Infirmary for the operation. To secure this medical service, the student must report
to the physician in charge of the Infirmary. When the operating room is used a fee of
$5 is charged. Board in the Infirmary is charged at the rate of $1 a day.
Student Activity Fee.-This fee is assessed to maintain and foster athletic sports, student
publications, and other student activities. Student fees are passed by a vote of the Student
Body and approved by the Board of Control before they are adopted.
Swimming Pool Fee.-This fee is charged all students for use of the lockers and supplies
at the swimming pool.


SPECIAL FEES

Fees which apply in special cases only are listed below:

LABORATORY FEES
There are no laboratory or course fees.

BREAKAGE FEE
Any student registering for a course requiring locker and laboratory apparatus in one
or more of the following departments is required to buy a breakage book: Chemistry,
Pharmacy, and Biology. This book costs $5. A refund will be allowed on any unused portion
at the end of the year, when the student has checked in his apparatus to the satisfaction of
the departments concerned.

LATE REGISTRATION FEE
A fee of $5 is charged all students who do not complete their registration on the dates
set by the University Council and published in the Calendar. Registration is not complete
until all University bills are paid, and any who fail to meet their obligations are not regarded
as students of the University.

ROOM RESERVATION FEE
Students wishing to reserve rooms in the dormitories must pay a room reservation fee
of $10 at the time such reservation is made. The fee is retained as a deposit against
damage to the room and its furnishings. The fee, less charges for any damage done to the
room by the student, is refunded when he returns his key and gives up his room.

SPECIAL EXAMINATION FEE
A fee of $5 is charged for each examination taken at a time other than that regularly
scheduled.

LIBRARY FINES
A fine of 2 cents a day is charged for each book in general circulation which is not
returned within the limit of two weeks. "Reserve" books may be checked out overnight,
and if they are not returned on time the fine is 25 cents for the first hour and five cents
an hour or fraction of an hour thereafter until they are returned. No book may be
checked out if the fine due is more than 50 cents.





EXPENSES


NON-RESIDENT PENALTY FEE
A fee of $10 in addition to the fee for non-Florida students will be charged all students
registering incorrectly. The burden of proof as to residence is with the student.

FAILURE FEE
A fee of $2.50 a semester hour is charged for courses in which the student does not
receive a passing grade. Once the student has failed a course, this fee must be paid before
he will be permitted to register again in the University.

FEES FOR ADULT SPECIAL STUDENTS
Adult special students who carry 9 hours or less will be charged the registration and con-
tingent fee of $15 a semester and a proportionate part of any tuition fee assessed on the basis
of a normal load of 15 semester hours. These students will not be entitled to any of the
privileges attached to any other University fee.


SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR
Minimum Maximum
General Fees and Course Expenses ....................$ 58.35* $ 58.35*
Books and Training Supplies for the Year................ 30.00 50.00
Laundry and Cleaning... ........................... 25.00 35.00
Room and Board ................................. .. 184.50 300.00

Estimated total expense .......................... $297.85* $443.35*

REFUNDS

Students resigning before they have attended classes for three days are entitled to a
refund of all fees except the registration and contingent fee of $15. This fee is never refunded.


ROOM AND BOARD

DORMITORIES

The University operates three dormitories, the New Dormitory, Thomas Hall, and Buck-
man Hall, together accommodating about five hundred students. It is recommended that
freshmen room in one of the dormitories for at least the first year. Accordingly, preference
is given freshmen applying for rooms in the dormitories.
Rooms in the dormitories are partially furnished. Students must provide their own
bedding, towels, and toilet articles. Janitor and maid service is provided. Student monitors,
of whom the president of the student body is head monitor, supervise the conduct of students
in the dormitories. Students are not permitted to cook in the dormitories.
All dormitory rooms are furnished with beds, chifforobes, study tables, and chairs.
Additional easy chairs may be secured at a rental charge of $1 per semester. Different accom-
modations are provided in the three dormitories.
New Dormitory.-The New Dormitory is of strictly fireproof construction. Most of the
rooms are arranged in suites of two rooms, a study and a bedroom, accommodating two
students. A limited number of single rooms and several suites for three students are

*Non-Florida students are charged $100 tuition per year in addition.





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


available. All rooms are equipped with lavatories, while adjacent bathrooms provide hot
and cold showers.
Thomas Hall.-Sections C, D, and E have been remodeled throughout, making available
both single and double rooms. All rooms in these sections are equipped with lavatories.
In other sections the rooms are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom, accom-
modating three students. Some rooms accommodate four students, and a few single rooms
are available.
Baths, with lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of each section,
thus providing a bathroom for each four rooms.
Buckman Hall.-Rooms in Buckman Hall are arranged in suites of study and bedrooms
accommodating three students. Some suites accommodate four students. Baths, with lava-
tories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of each section, thus providing
bathroom facilities for each four suites.
Room Rent.-Rooms in the dormitories are rented to students at the following rates:


ROOM RENT PER STUDENT PER SEMESTER
New Dormitory Thomas Hall Buckman Hall
Single rooms, 1st, 2nd, 3d floors.................$42.00 $38.00 ....
Single rooms, 4th floor........................ 40.00 .... ....
Two-room suites, 1st, 2nd, 3d floors.............. 40.00 .... ....
Two-room suites, 4th floor ..................... 34.00 .... ....
Three-room suites, 1st, 2nd, 3d floors............. 36.00 .... ....
Double rooms, Section D ........................ .... 30.00 ....
Double rooms, Sections C and E ................ .... 32.00 ....
All other rooms ............................... .... 24.50 $24.50
Applications.-Applications should be made as early as possible, since accommodations
in the dormitories are limited to five hundred students. Applications must be accompanied
by the room reservation fee of $10. If a room has been assigned, no refund will be made
later than September 10. Students not assigned a room will be given a refund upon request.
Students signing contracts and being assigned rooms will not be granted a refund if they
withdraw from the dormitories during the period stipulated in the contract. Contracts for
dormitory rooms are for the scholastic year, and in the absence of exceedingly important
reasons, no student will be given permission to vacate a room during this time unless he
transfers his contract to some student not living on the campus.
Keys for dormitory rooms may be secured by student occupants from the Head Janitor
at the New Dormitory on presentation of a signed receipt secured by payment of a Room
Reservation Deposit.
ROOMING HOUSES
Board and rooms in off-campus boarding houses and private homes may be procured at
rates of $25 to $40 per student per month. Such houses are inspected periodically. Students
will be assisted in securing comfortable living quarters by the Assistant Dean of Students.
For further information, inquiry should be made of the Dean of Students.

UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA
For the past several years the University has operated a cafeteria with modified service.
This service will be changed to a strictly cafeteria style with coupon tickets having a mone-





EXPENSES


tary value instead of the present meal value. All articles of food will be labeled according
to value. Coupon books will be sold at a discount sufficient to warrant their purchase
rather than paying cash for individual meals.
The University will also endeavor to offer a family style of service in connection with
the cafeteria for those who prefer a more home-like atmosphere. Meals will be similar to
those in the cafeteria but regular menus will be followed instead of individual selections.
The price per month will be in keeping with the University's policy in rendering its service
from this department at actual cost.
With the completion of the new kitchen-annex, modern equipment will be installed and
the service rendered will be as complete and up-to-date as that found in any school cafeteria
in the South.

SELF-HELP

In view of the fact that there are comparatively few positions on the campus and in
the City of Gainesville, it is strongly urged that no freshman come to the University with
the expectation of depending very largely upon his earnings during his first college year.
The Committee on Self-Help, of which the Assistant Dean of Students is chairman,
undertakes to award positions on the campus to deserving upperclassmen.
A few students are employed as laboratory assistants, office workers, waiters, janitors,
and in other capacities. Application for employment should be made to the Dean of Stu-
dents or to the department in which the student desires employment.

REQUIREMENTS AND QUALIFICATIONS FOR STUDENT EMPLOYMENT
A. The student must be making an average of C.
B. The student must give evidence of need for the job.
C. Possession of a car will be evidence of lack of need unless explained on the basis of
necessity for the student's livelihood.
D. Preference will be given to those having experience.
E. No graduate students will be used except as graduate assistants in positions requiring
the training which the student has secured in college.
F. No student on probation of any kind will be given a position. If, while holding one,
he is placed on probation, he will be required to resign the position.
G. A student may not hold two University positions the combined salaries of which exceed
$180 per year.
CLASSIFICATION OF WORK AND RATE OF PAY
A. Laboratory Assistance:
1. Technical-Requiring skill and training in a particular field ... 40c-45c per hour
2. General-Requiring some skill above common labor........... 30c per hour
3. Common Labor ........................................... 25c per hour

B. Clerical:
1. Highly skilled in a certain field, expert stenographer and typist.40c-45c per hour
2. Typing, filing, bookkeeping, and limited amount of stenographic
work .................................................. 35c per hour
3. General office work ....................................... 30c per hour

C. Mechanical:
1. Skilled ................................................ 35c per hour
2. Common ................................................ 25c per hour





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS

The University of Florida is unfortunate in the paucity of scholarships and loans which
are open to students. Generally, the scholarships and loans which are available are admin-
istered directly by the donors. However, the Committee on Scholarships, of which the Dean
of Students is chairman, collects all information relative to vacancies, basis of award, value,
and other pertinent facts and supplies this information to interested students. The Com-
mittee also collects information on applicants and supplies this information to the donors.
In some instances, the Committee has been given authority to make the awards without
consulting the donors.
While scholarship, as evidenced by scholastic attainment, is an important feature in
making awards, it is by no means the only consideration. The student's potential capacity
to profit by college training and to make reasonable returns to society is a large factor
in making all awards.
Unless otherwise specified, applications for the scholarships and loans listed below should
be addressed to the Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loan Funds, University
of Florida.
County Agricultural Scholarships.-Provision has been made by a legislative act for a
scholarship from each county-to be offered and provided for at the discretion of the Board
of County Commissioners of each county. The recipient is to be selected by competitive
examination. The value of each scholarship is a sum sufficient to pay for board in the dining
hall and room in the dormitory. Whether such a scholarship has been provided for by any
county may be learned from the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, or the
County Agent of the county in question. Questions for the examination are provided and
papers graded by the University if desired.
Vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships.-The Department of Vocational Rehabilitation
is willing to aid any citizen of Florida who can give evidence of being prepared to enter
college, and who gives promise of being a successful student, provided that he has sustained,
by reason of physical impairment, a vocational handicap; and provided the course which he
selects can be reasonably expected to fit him to earn a livelihood. The sum spent on
recipients of this fund at the University of Florida during the present year will amount to
approximately one hundred dollars per student. Inquiries for these scholarships should be
addressed to Mr. Claude M. Andrews, State Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation, Talla-
hassee, Florida.
Rotary Loan Fund.-The Rotarians of Florida have set aside a considerable sum of
money to be used in making loans to worthy boys who would not otherwise be able to attend
college. The maximum loan is $150 per year. These loans are not available to freshmen.
Applications for these loans should be made to the President of the Rotary Club of the city
from which the student registers, or to Mr. K. H. Graham, Secretary-Treasurer, Rotary
Educational Loan Fund, Inc., Language Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
Knights Templar Scholarship Loans.-The Grand Lodge of Knights Templar in the State
of Florida has arranged a number of loans, in amount of $200 to each student, for students
pursuing a course at the University of Florida. These loans are made available through
application to the Knights Templar Lodge in the various cities in the state, and are handled
by the Grand Lodge officers. Approximately thirty students receive aid from these scholar-
ships each year.
Knights of Pythias Scholarship Loans.-Eight scholarship loans have been established
by the Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. Applications for these loans should be
made to Dr. J. H. Coffee, Arcadia, Florida.





SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS


United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships.-Scholarships have been established
by various chapters of the Florida Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy. Appli-
cations should be made to Mrs. David D. Bradford, Chairman of Education, 2109 Watrous
Ave., Tampa, Florida.
Loring Memorial Scholarship.-A scholarship of approximately $250 per year is main-
tained by Mrs. William Loring Spencer in memory of her distinguished uncle, General Loring.
Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship.-Established in 1919 by Mrs. Elizabeth C. Ham,
in accordance with the last will and in memory of her husband, Captain Arthur Ellis Ham,
a former student of the University, who fell in battle at St. Mihiel, France, on September 14,
1918. Value, the income from a fund of $5,000.
Albert W. Gilchrist Memorial Scholarship.-This scholarship is open to students of the
junior and senior classes. Two of these awards are made annually, each one being worth
$200 per year. Scholastic achievement is the principal basis of this award.
David Levy Yulee Memorial Scholarship.-This scholarship is awarded annually on the
basis of scholarship, and is open to the members of the sophomore, junior, and senior classes.
Value, about $200.
Duval High Memorial Scholarship.-An act creating the Memorial Duval High School
Scholarship and authorizing and appropriating annually $275 of the Duval County funds as
financial assistance for one worthy high school graduate is covered by House Bill No. 823,
and was approved May 20, 1927.
This scholarship, created to memorialize and assist in preserving the high standards and
traditions of the Duval High School, where many of Florida's worthy citizens were educated,
was established by the Board of County Commissioners of Duval County, Florida. Appli-
cation should be made to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, Jacksonville.
Jacksonville Rotary Club Scholarship.- The Jacksonville Rotary Club maintains a
scholarship of $250, which is given, at their discretion, to a student meeting such require-
ments as they may make pertaining to the scholarship. Application should be made to the
President of the Jacksonville Rotary Club.
William Wilson Finley Foundation.-As a memorial to the late President Finley, and in
recognition of his interest in agricultural education, the Southern Railway Company has
donated to the University of Florida the sum of $1,000, to be used as a loan fund. No loan
from this fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per year. Recipients are selected by the
Dean of the College of Agriculture, to whom applications should be directed.
Florida Bankers Association Scholarship. The Florida Bankers Association awards
three scholarships annually; one for North and West Florida, one for Central Florida, and
one for South Florida. These scholarships are awarded on an examination given at the
Annual Boys' Short Course. The examination is given and the award made by the State
Boys' Club Agent. Application for these scholarships should be made to the Dean of the
College of Agriculture.
The American Bankers Association Foundation.-One loan scholarship to a student at
the University of Florida whose major course is in banking, economics, or related subjects
in classes of junior grade or above. Value, $250. Application for loan should be made
to the Chairman of the Committee on Awards, 110 E. 42nd Street, New York City.
Murphree Engineering Loan Fund.-On September 16, 1929, a friend of our late Pres-
ident, Dr. A. A. Murphree, gave to the Engineering College $500, to be used as a revolving
loan fund. This fund was to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial
difficulties, worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they could receive some
assistance. Only in special cases are these loans made to members of the junior class.







BULLETIN OF INFORMATION UPPER DIVISION


Applications for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of the College of Engi-
neering.
Florida Association of Architects Loan Fund.-The Florida Association of Architects has
created a revolving loan fund of $500 for the purpose of aiding needy students in Architecture
who have proved themselves worthy. Applications should be made to the Director of the
School of Architecture and Allied Arts.
The Colonial Dames of America, Betty W'ollman Scholarship.-Established by Mr.
William J. Wollman in memory of his mother and awarded to a worthy student. Value, $250.
Application should be made to Mrs. Walter W. Price, 1 West 72nd Street, New York City.
The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida Scholar-
ship.-The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida has
established a loan scholarship for deserving students. This scholarship is administered
by the Directors of the Florida Educational Loan Association. Application should be made
to the Chairman of the Florida Educational Loan Association, University of Florida.
Lake Worth Woman's Club Scholarship.-The Lake Worth Woman's Club, of Lake
Worth, Florida, maintains a scholarship of $100 a year. Application should be made to
the Chairman of the Scholarship Committee, Lake Worth Woman's Club, Lake Worth, Florida.
Fairchild Scholarship National.-Mr. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers
annually a scholarship amounting to $500. The award is made, by competitive examination,
to a graduate in pharmacy who will do post-graduate work in the year immediately following
his graduation. Examinations are held in June at the various colleges of pharmacy which
are members of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Further information
may be obtained from the Director of the School of Pharmacy.
The Ladies Auxiliary Fund.-The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida State Pharmaceutical
Association has established a loan fund for deserving students of pharmacy in need of
assistance. Application should be made to Mrs. David W. Ramsaur, 1044 Park Street, Jack-
sonville, Florida.
Interfraternity Conference and Student Organization Loan Fund.-A number of the
student organizations on the campus have pooled their resources to form a fund for short-
time emergency loans to students. Application should be made to the Office of the Dean
of Students.
Jacksonville Kiwanis Club Scholarships.-The Jacksonville Kiwanis Club maintains two
scholarships for Jacksonville boys. Application should be made by letter to Mr. W. S.
Paulk, Supervisor, Boys and Girls Work Committee, Jacksonville Kiwanis Club, Chamber
of Commerce Building, Jacksonville, Florida.
Phi Kappa Phi Loan Fund.-The Florida chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, national honorary
scholastic society, has established a $250 annual loan fund for Phi Kappa Phi members.
Loans will be made principally to students intending to pursue graduate work. Application
should be made to Mr. B. J. Otte, Chairman, Phi Kappa Phi Loan Fund, University of
Florida.
University Scholarship Tag Fund.-Through the co-operation of the State Motor Vehicle
Commission, arrangements have been made to sell front automobile tags to alumni and friends
of the University. The income thus acquired is used to provide additional scholarships for
students. During the past year the income from this source was about $4,000. Awards are
made on the basis of need, scholarship, and extra-curricular activity. Application should be
made to the Dean of Students.





PRIZES AND MEDALS


PRIZES AND MEDALS

Board of Control Awards.-The Board of Control annually awards the following medals:
1. The Freshman-Sophomore Declamation Contest Medal, to the best declaimer of the
freshman and sophomore classes.
2. Junior Oratorical Contest Medal, to the best declaimer of the junior class.
3. Senior Oratorical Contest Medal, to the best declaimer of the senior class.

Harrison Company Award.-A $25 credit, applicable to the purchase of any Florida law
Looks published by the Harrison Company of Atlanta, Georgia, is offered by this company
to the senior law student doing all his work in this institution, and making the highest record
during his law course.
Harrison Company First Year Award.-Redfearn on Wills and Administration of Estates
in Florida is offered by the Harrison Company to the first year law student making the highest
average in twenty-eight hours of law taken in this institution.
Redfearn Prize.-For the past two years Hon. D. H. Redfearn of Miami has offered a prize
of $50 for the best essay by a law student on some topic of legal reform. This prize will be
continued in 1936-37.
Groover-Stewart Drug Company Cup.-Mr. F. C. Groover, president of the Groover-
Stewart Drug Company, has given a large silver loving cup which is awarded to the graduating
class in the School of Pharmacy attaining the highest general average in scholarship and
is held by that class until this average is exceeded by a subsequent graduating class.
David W. Ramsaur Medal.-Mrs. D. W. Ramsaur of Jacksonville offers a gold medal
and an engraved certificate to that graduate of the School of Pharmacy making the highest
average in scholarship and evincing leadership in student activities.
Haisley Lynch Medal.-The University is grateful to Mrs. L. C. Lynch of Gainesville
for her gift of the Haisley Lynch Medal for the best essay in American history. This medal
is awarded annually by her in loving memory of her son, Haisley Lynch, a former student
of the University, who was killed in action in France during the World War.
Gargoyle Key.-Gargoyle awards a gold key each year to the sophomore in the School of
Architecture and Allied Arts, who, in the opinion of the members, was outstanding in
scholarship, leadership, initiative, and general ability during his freshman year.
The David Levy Yulee Lectureship.-Under the provisions of the will of Nannie Yulee
Noble, a sum of money was bequeathed to the University of Florida, the income of which
was to be used to bring outstanding speakers to the University to deliver lectures to the
student body and faculty on the general topic "The Ideal of Honor and Service in Politics."
In 1935-36, the special lecturer was Harry Nelson Snyder, president of Wofford College,
the topic of whose address was "On Being Frontier-Minded."
In addition there was held a David Levy Yulee Speech Contest in which the subject of
the oration was "Honor and Service in Politics." Prizes of $75 and $50 were awarded to
the winners of this contest.
The James Miller Leake Medal.-This is a medal awarded annually for an essay in
American History. The medal is given by the Gainesville Chapter of the Daughters of the
American Revolution and named for the Head of the Department of History and Political
Science of the University of Florida.
Fine Arts Society Award.-The Fine Arts Society annually offers a gold medal and
citation to the outstanding student receiving the baccalaureate degree in the School of
Architecture and Allied Arts in recognition of his scholastic standing and leadership.



















BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


Sigma Tau Award.-The Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Tau awards annually a medal for
scholastic ability to the sophomore in the College of Engineering who, during his freshman
year, made the highest average in his scholastic work.
Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship Key Award.-Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic
fraternity, awards annually a key to ten percent of the students graduating in journalism who
have the highest scholastic average for the three years' academic work immediately preceding
the year in which the nominee is a candidate for a degree.
Dillon Achievement Cup.-Mr. Ralph M. Dillon, Tampa, has given a large silver loving
cup on which is engraved each year the name of that student graduating in journalism who,
in the opinion of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the faculty of the
Department of Journalism, possesses the highest qualifications for service to the press of
Florida.
Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key.-Each year the Florida chapter of the international
fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi, professional business administration fraternity, awards a gold
key to that male senior in the College of Business Administration who upon graduation ranks
highest in scholarship for the entire course in Business Administration.
Beta Gamma Sigma Scroll.-Each year the Florida chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, na-
tional honorary business administration fraternity, awards a scroll to the junior in the College
of Business Administration who, during his preparatory work in the General College, made
the highest scholastic average of all students who enter the College of Business Administra-
tion.
American Institute of Chemical Engineers, Sophomore Award.-A Certificate of Merit,
signed by the President of the Institute and the Chairman of the Committee on Student
Chapters, and a student membership badge, are given to the sophomore member of each
chapter who attained the highest scholarship standing during his freshman year.






GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL INFORMATION

DEGREES

The Board of Control will confer the degree appropriate to the course pursued under the
following conditions:
1. Curriculum requirements.-Certification by the Registrar of completion of all require-
ments of the course of study as outlined in the college announcement, or its equivalent as
determined by the faculty of the college offering the course.
2. Recommendation of the faculty.
3. Residence requirements.-Advanced standing will be allowed on certification from
other recognized institutions and may be obtained also by examination held before a com-
mittee of the faculty appointed for that purpose provided that the following minimum
requirement for residence at the University of Florida has been met:
The student must earn at least one year's credit in residence in this University. If the
term of residence is only one year, that year must be the senior year. In addition, special
residence requirements must be met in several of the schools and colleges. See individual
announcements.
4. Attendance at commencement.-All candidates for degrees are required to be present
at commencement exercises. A student who fails to attend shall not receive his diploma
until he complies with this requirement.

BY-LAWS

For information relative to grades, failure in studies, attendance, etc., the student should
consult the Bulletin of By-Laws. Each student is held responsible for observance of the rules
and regulations of the University insofar as they affect him.



GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION

The General Extension Division of the University of Florida offers educational oppor-
tunities to those who are removed from the campus, and numerous service functions.
The Division represents the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Education, Engineering, Law,
Business Administration, and the School of Pharmacy of the University, and the College
of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Education and Music of the State College for
Women.
The work is carried on through departments. The Extension Teaching Department
offers courses by correspondence study and in extension classes. Short courses, community
institutes, and conferences are held to give opportunity for discussion on problems con-
fronting groups or communities. The Department of Auditory Instruction offers cultural
programs, instruction, information, and entertainment by lectures and discussions for the
benefit of special groups, schools, and individuals.
Training for naturalization, citizenship schools, and cooperation with the War Depart-
ment in enrolling young men for the Citizens' Military Training Camps because of their
educational value, are some phases of the work of the Department of Citizenship Training.
Through the Departments of Visual Instruction and General Information and Service, the
world of letters and arts and music is carried to thousands in the back country through the





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


traveling libraries and art exhibits which are sent out. A picture of the world and its
work is circulated in the slides and filmslides furnished for instruction and entertainment.
The best in recorded music is provided for work in music appreciation and for culture.
These and the various service functions of the Division establish contacts which enable
the University to aid individuals, organizations, and communities, and contribute to adult
education.

SUMMER SESSION
The University Summer Session is an integral part of the University. The General Col-
lege, the College of Education, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Law, the
College of Business Administration, the College of Agriculture, and the Graduate School
operate during the summer.
Since women are admitted to the Summer Session, many professional courses for primary
and elementary school teachers are offered in addition to those usually given in the winter
session.


DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
In September, 1933, the University of Florida joined twelve other southern institutions
in forming the new Southeastern Conference. This new conference represents colleges
and universities in the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Ten-
nessee, and Kentucky.
The type of athletic program undertaken by the Department of Physical Education at
the University of Florida compares with that in leading universities. A two-year course
of required Physical Education is included in the curriculum of the Lower Division. Students
who are exempt from Military Science are required to take this work, which is designed to
present participation, training, and instructional opportunities in sports included in the
intramural program. This course may also be taken as an elective.
The second major sub-division of this Department is that in which are included inter-
collegiate athletics. These sports are divided into two groups, generally known as major
and as minor sports. In the major group are football, basketball, boxing, baseball, and
track; and in the minor group, swimming, tennis, and golf. The equipment includes two
baseball diamonds, four athletic fields, six handball courts, two indoor basketball courts,
eight tennis courts, a large outdoor swimming pool, a concrete stadium with a seating
capacity of 23,000, and two quarter-mile running tracks, one providing permanent seats for
approximately 1,500.
The function of the Intramural Department is to encourage the entire student body to
participate in organized athletic sports and wholesome recreation. The Department pro-
vides facilities for such competition and recreation; organizes and promotes competition
between students, groups, and individuals; and fosters a spirit of fair play and sportsman-
ship among participants and spectators.
The program of intramural activities includes the following sports: golf, swimming,
horseshoes, touch football, basketball, boxing, wrestling, diamond ball, tennis, handball,
water basketball, track, shuffle board, foul shooting, ping pong, and Sigma Delta Psi
(national athletic fraternity) events.
The proper utilization of leisure time through recreation and play is splendidly expressed
in this program. It is estimated that more than 2,000 students (about seventy per cent of






GENERAL INFORMATION


the student body) take part in some sport sponsored by the Department. There is a decided
trend toward the expansion of recreational facilities to a large group of students as opposed
to intense competition for a few.
The rules of the Southeastern Conference do not permit member institutions to employ
athletes or to pay students for their services on athletic teams. However, this does not
mean that a student is ineligible to receive aid from his institution in the form of scholar-
ships, loan funds, or compensation for student labor merely because he may be proficient
in athletics. Athletes in the University of Florida are eligible to all forms of assistance
that may be available to other students. As a rule, awards are made only to those who are
unable financially to attend the University without assistance and whose standards of con-
duct and scholarship are worthy of consideration. Awards are usually made in the form
of board, rent, books, and similar items rather than in the form of cash, and may be
continued from year to year throughout the college course to those students whose records
prove satisfactory. Administration of these funds is in the hands of the Committee on
Scholarships. Further information may be secured by writing to the Dean of Students, who
is chairman of that Committee.


DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS

The course in Military Science is required of all physically qualified General College
students except adult special students and students transferring from other universities or
colleges.
Students who complete the basic course and are selected by the Professor of Military
Science and Tactics and the President of the University may elect the advanced courses.
Students electing these courses must carry them to completion as a prerequisite to graduation.
Upon the completion of these courses, those students recommended by the Professor of
Military Science and Tactics and the President of the University will, upon their own
application, be offered a commission in the Officers Reserve Corps, United States Army.
An advanced course in summer camp is compulsory, usually between the junior and senior
years. The War Department pays all expenses, including mileage, rations, medical attend-
ance, clothing, and laundry service, and in addition the pay of the seventh grade, United
States Army.


DIVISION OF MUSIC

The Division of Music offers opportunity for membership in three musical organizations:
The Military Band, the Orchestra, and the Glee Club.
The Band is made up in part of students in the freshman and sophomore years who
take military training. The Band frequently plays at athletic contests and takes several
trips a year.
The Orchestra plays at certain assemblies.
The Glee Club makes several trips a year throughout the state.
Opportunities are afforded qualified students tt broadcast as soloists, instrumentally or
vocally, over radio station WRUF.
Private lessons in violin, orchestra instruments, band instruments, harmony, voice, organ,
and piano may be arranged. Tuition will be required of all students taking private lessons.





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES

The libraries of the University are: the General Library, the Experiment Station Library,
the General Extension Division Library, the Law Library, and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School Library. The libraries now contain over 117,000 volumes.
The General Library is housed in the Library Building, a modern fire-proof structure,
with a seating capacity of between 750 and 800, and stack capacity of 200,000 volumes. There
are 48 carrels in the stacks for the use of faculty and graduate students. A collection of
Floridiana, material concerning Florida and written by Floridians, is housed in the Florida
room.
The Library contains general reference books, encyclopedias, dictionaries, yearbooks,
handbooks, standard encyclopedias and dictionaries in foreign languages, and files of bound
periodicals in both English and foreign languages. These are used by students and faculty.
The University Library is a depository for official publications of the United States
Government. The Library receives valuable studies from universities, learned societies, and
other organizations on exchange. It receives regularly by subscription 448, and by gift and
exchange 554 periodicals of a general and scientific nature. Many daily and weekly state
newspapers send complimentary copies, which are filed.
The Library welcomes every opportunity to be of assistance to both faculty and students.
In addition to an open shelf browsing collection of over 1600 volumes, recreational reading
is fostered by means of a book display on special subjects and a smaller display which con-
tains books of timely interest. Bibliographies are prepared and information is collected for
class work. Special attention is given to collecting material for debate activity.
The Library is open from 7:45 A.M. to 10 P.M. every week day except Saturday, when it
closes at 5 P.M. During the regular session it is open on Sunday from 2 to 5 P.M.


FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM

The Florida State Museum at the University houses thousands of classified specimens of
flora and fauna, and numerous relics pertaining to the natural and social history of the State.
Students and visitors are welcome to inspect its exhibits.


HEALTH SERVICE

Through the Students' Health Service the University makes available to any student
physical examinations, health consultations, and medical attention. General service is
provided free of charge, but special fees are charged for services which are individual in
character, such as dentistry, X-rays, board and laundry in the Infirmary, special drugs and
serums, major surgery, special nurses, etc. No student, however, will be denied service
because of inability to pay these fees.
The University Infirmary and the offices of the Health Service are on the campus. The
Infirmary is open day and night for the admission of patients. The Resident Physician
lives at the Infirmary and his services are available at all hours, in case of emergency. The
Dispensary in the Infirmary building is open from 7:30 to 9 A. M., from 12 noon to 1 P. M.
and from 4 to 7 P. M., during which time physicians are in attendance and may be con-
sulted. A nurse is constantly on duty from 7 A. M. to 9 P. M. for emergency treatment.





GENERAL INFORMATION


It is the aim of the Health Service not only to function as a Health Service and render
preventive measures, but to provide full hospital care in cases of illness. The Infirmary
is rated as a Fully Approved Hospital by the Examining Board of the American College
of Surgeons.
The facilities of the Dispensary are such that any number of students can be given
attention in a day. The Dispensary is maintained to offer conferences with physicians, exam-
inations, diagnosis, and treatment of minor injuries and illnesses which a student may suffer.
The student is encouraged to use this service freely in order that he may avoid more serious
illnesses by the lack of treatment or from improper treatment. In the Dispensary, a
modern, well equipped drug room furnishes drugs to the student without charge. A labor
tory in connection with the Infirmary and Dispensary is in charge of a trained nurse-
technician, rendering efficient service in prompt diagnosis. The normal capacity of the
Infirmary, 45 beds, in emergencies can be increased. Ample provisions are made for the
isolation of communicable diseases. A completely equipped operating room is maintained
to provide facilities for major surgical operations. The Infirmary is equipped with a mobile
unit X-ray, which is used for the examination of fractures, but the equipment does not
provide sufficient service for an extensive diagnostic X-ray study of the intestinal tract, etc.
This service is made available to the students at actual cost of the materials used.
Students enrolling in the University for the first time are furnished by the Registrar's
Office a physical examination form which is to be completed by the family physician and
attached to Registration papers. On admission, the student is given a careful physical
examination by the University Physician. It is necessary that this physical examination
by the home physician be completed in order that parents may be aware of defects which
should be corrected prior to the student's entrance in the University, for the correction of
these defects is necessary in order that he may be in proper physical condition to begin his
college work.
There are three principal phases of the activities of the University Health Service:
(1) personal attention, (2) sanitation, and (3) education.
1. Personal Attention.-This division is concerned with the physical examination of
students. A complete record of the physical condition of each student is made and filed
when he is admitted to the University. From this record can be determined, in large
measure, what procedure is essential to keep the student in the best physical condition
during his academic life. The following are some of the phases of the work in the personal
division:
a. Provision for maintaining the health of normal, physically sound students; cooper-
ation with the Department of Physical Education regarding physical exercise; edu-
cation concerning right living; safeguarding of environment.
b. Protection of the physically sound students from communicable diseases; early
detection, isolation, and treatment of all cases of communicable diseases-tuber-
culosis, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, typhoid fever, smallpox, mumps, etc.
c. Treatment and professional care of all students who are ill or in need of medical
advice or treatment. For extended care by the Health Service it is necessary that
the student enter the Infirmary. Any student may be admitted to the Infirmary upon
the recommendation of the University Physician. To all patients in the Infirmary
the staff will furnish medical and nursing services.
d. Reconstruction and reclamation: correction of defects, advice, and treatment of all
abnormalities.
2. Sanitation.-The student's environment should be made as hygienic as possible.
Hence, this division concerns itself with the sanitary conditions both on and off the campus.





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


3. Education.-Every student in the University is made familiar with the fundamentals
of both personal and public hygiene. Through personal conferences education in hygiene
and right living is conducted.

VACCINATION
Prospective students are advised to be vaccinated against smallpox and to be inoculated
against typhoid fever. Unless a certificate is presented showing successful vaccination within
five years, students will be vaccinated against smallpox at the time of registration.


BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE
A program of vocational guidance is carried on for the students through a series of
tests, interviews, and the application of scientific occupational information. The Bureau
offers a service to those encountering mental difficulties which interfere with their scholastic
work. Further information concerning these services may be obtained from the Bulletin
of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene.


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS
Student Government.-Student government in the University of Florida is a cooperative
organization based on mutual confidence between the student body and the faculty. Con-
siderable authority has been granted the Student Body for the regulation and conduct of
student affairs. The criterion in granting authority to the Student Body has been the
disposition of the students to accept responsibility commensurate with the authority granted
them. Generally speaking, the fields of student activity include regulation of extra-curricular
affairs and the administration of the Honor System.
Every enrolled student, having paid his activity fee, is a member of the Student Body
and has an equal vote in its government.
The University authorities feel that training in acceptance of responsibility for the
conduct of student affairs at the University is a valuable part of the educational growth of
the individual student. The Student Body is practically a body politic, occupying its fran-
chise under grant from the Board of Control and subject to its continued approval.
Student government is patterned on the state and national form of government, but
adapted to the local needs of the Student Body. Powers are distributed into the three
branches: (1) legislative, which is embodied in the Executive Council; (2) judicial, which
is embodied in the Honor Court with penal and civil jurisdiction of all judicial matters;
(3) executive, embodied in the President and shared with the Vice-President and the
Secretary-Treasurer of the Student Body. Members of all three branches are elected directly
by the Student Body once a year.
Student government enacts and enforces suitable laws, promotes athletics, debating,
publications of the Student Body, entertainments of a general educational value, and such
other activities as the Student Body may adopt. The officers of the Student Body are the
President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, members of the Honor Court, Athletic
Council, Executive Council, Lyceum Council, editors and business managers of student
publications, and student members of the Board of Student Publications.
Debating.-Practice in debating is open to all students through the programs of the
varsity and freshman debate squads. This work, which is sponsored by the Debate Club,






STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS


is under direction of the Department of Speech, and culminates in an extensive schedule
of intercollegiate debates.
Dramatics.-Any student has an opportunity to participate in several plays which are
presented each year by the Florida Players, a dramatic group under direction of the Depart-
ment of Speech.
Executive Council.-The Executive Council is composed of representatives elected from
the colleges on the campus and in general acts as administrator of Student Body affairs.
The Athletic Council and the Lyceum Council have jurisdiction over their respective fields.
Publications.-The Student Body publishes The Seminole, the year book; The Florida
Alligator, a weekly newspaper; and The "F" Book, the student's guide. The Florida Review
(the campus literary magazine) is published by its staff without student funds.
Y. M. C. A.-The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Association is to provide a
medium through which the highest ideals of education and religion may be expressed in
terms of service. The program of the Association is planned to meet definite needs as they
become apparent. There is no membership fee. Any student may become a member by
subscribing to its purpose and contributing to its support. A secretary having extensive
experience with the problems of students is available for counsel and help.
Social Fraternities.-Twenty-two national social fraternities have established chapters at
the University; most of them have already built chapter houses and the others have leased
homes. The general work of the fraternities is controlled by the Interfraternity Conference,
composed of two delegates from each of the national fraternities. The national fraternities
at Florida are Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi, Delta Chi,
Delta Tau Delta, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi
Beta Delta, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Alpha
Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Epsilon Phi, Theta Chi, and Theta
Kappa Nu. There is one state-organized fraternity on the campus, Pi Delta Sigma.
Honor Societies and Fraternities.-Various honor societies and fraternities have been
established at Florida. Phi Kappa Phi elects annually from the highest ten per cent,
scholastically, of the Senior Class. Blue Key is an honor group electing men to membership
on the basis of leadership and participation in campus activities.
Other honorary fraternities are Alpha Kappa Psi, professional fraternity; Alpha
Zeta, agricultural; Beta Gamma Sigma, honorary commerce fraternity; Delta Epsilon, local
pre-medical; Gamma Sigma Epsilon, chemical; Gargoyle, architectural; Kappa Delta Pi,
educational; Kappa Gamma Delta, aeronautical; Kappa Phi Kappa, professional educa-
tional; Phi Alpha Delta and Phi Delta Phi, legal; Phi Sigma, biological; Pi Delta Epsilon
and Sigma Delta Chi, journalistic; Delta Sigma Pi, professional commerce; Pi Gamma Mu,
social science; Sabres, military; Sigma Delta Psi, athletic; Sigma Tau, engineering; Tau
Kappa Alpha, forensic; Phi Eta Sigma, freshman scholastic; Rho Chi, pharmacy; Kappa
Kappa Psi, honorary band; Thyrsus, horticultural.
Other professional fraternities and clubs are: Agricultural Club; Alpha Tau Alpha,
educational fraternity for teachers of agriculture; Student Branch of the American Institute
of Electrical Engineers; Student Branch, American Pharmaceutical Association; Student
Chapter of the American Society of Chemical Engineers; Student Branch of the American
Society of Mechanical Engineers; Benton Engineering Society; Commerce Club; Fourth
Estate Club, journalistic society; Leigh Chemical Society; Mathematics Colloquium; Mortar
and Pestle; Order of the Palms, honorary cultural fraternity; Peabody Club, education club;
Society of Chemical Engineers.





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


HONOR SYSTEM
The Honor System.-One of the finest tributes to the character of the students at the
University of Florida is the fact that the Student Body is a self-governing group. The
details of the system by which this result is reached will be explained to all freshmen during
the first week of their enrollment in the University. However, each parent, as well as each
prospective student, is urged to read the following discussion of the Honor System, as this
phase of student government forms the keystone of the entire system.
In addition to permitting student legislation on questions of interest to the members of
the Student Body, execution of the laws passed, and the expenditure of student funds, the
governing system at the University gives to the students the privilege of disciplining them-
selves through the means of the Honor System. Inaugurated by some of our greatest edu-
cators, in higher institutions of the nation, and early adopted in some departments of the
University of Florida, the Honor System was finally established in the entire University in
1914, as the result of student initiative. This plan, having met with the approval of all
officials of the University, was given the sanction of the Board of Control, and student repre-
sentatives were selected by the students to administer the system.
Among the basic principles of an Honor System are the convictions that self-discipline
is the greatest builder of character, that responsibility is a prerequisite of self-respect, and
that these are essential to the highest type of education. Officials of the University and the
Board of Control feel that students in the University of Florida should be assumed to be
honest and worthy of implicit trust, and they display this confidence through the privilege
of an Honor System.
In order to protect against the character deficiencies of a few men who may violate the
Honor Code, it becomes the duty of each member of the Student Body not only to abide
by the Honor Code but to report to the Honor Court any violations he may observe. Many
men coming to the University for the first time may feel hesitant about assuming this
responsibility, inasmuch as early school training has created feelings of antipathy toward
one who "tattle-tales" on a fellow-student. The theory of an Honor System adequately
overcomes this natural reaction, however, when it is realized that this system is a student
institution itself, and not a faculty measure for student discipline, and that to be worthy of
the advantages of the Honor System each student must be strong enough to do his duty
in this regard. In this way the responsibility for each man's conduct is placed where it must
eventually rest-on himself.
The Honor Code of the Student Body is striking in its simplicity, yet it embodies the
fundamentals of sound character. Each man is pledged to refrain from:
(a) cheating, (b) stealing, (c) passing worthless checks.
On the basis of this Code, students are extended all privileges conceived to be the
basic rights of men of Honor. There are no proctors or spies in the examination rooms, each
student feeling free to do his work, or to leave the room as occasion arises. Secondly,
fruits and supplies are placed openly on the campus, with the confidence that each man will
pay for any he may take. This system makes each man the keeper of his own conscience
until he has proven to his fellow-students that he no longer deserves the trust placed in him.
A breach of the System may be flagrant and serious, or it may be extenuated by cir-
cumstances. It may need only mild corrective measures to help the violator obtain a finer
conception of right and wrong; it may need strong measures. To enforce the System
equitably and punish occasional infractions in every case, the students have established
the Honor Court. The Court is composed of twelve students and a chancellor elected

















HONOR SYSTEM


annually from the upper classes of the various colleges on the campus. Their jurisdiction
of all violations of the Honor Code is final, but with the privilege of appeal by a student
to the Faculty Discipline Committee, an appeal both as to procedure and as to the merits
of the case. It is significant of the care with which the Court works that since the estab-
lishment of the Honor System in 1914, only one decision of the Honor Court has been
altered on appeal.
The penal purpose of the Honor Court should receive less stress, perhaps, than its
educational purpose, which is its most important function. The responsibility of acquaint-
ing every member of the Student Body with the purpose, advantages, and principles of
the Honor System is placed upon members of the Court. In line with this work, members
of the Honor Court participate in the orientation program each year during Freshman Week.
In addition to a series of explanatory talks at that time, special chapel programs are con-
ducted by the Honor Court during the school year. Honor System talks are delivered in
the high schools of the State upon request and at regularly scheduled times each spring,
and radio programs are broadcast especially for the high schools from Station WRUF in
Gainesville. In this way the Honor Court has endeavored to fulfill its responsibility to
the men who undertake the problem of self-government and self-discipline at the University
of Florida.
The parent of every prospective student should feel that it is his responsibility to stress
the paramount importance of honorable conduct on the part of his son while the latter is
in attendance at the University of Florida. Dishonest action brings sorrow to parent and
student alike.
Because University students have proved worthy of the trust and responsibility involved
in administering an Honor System, this feature of student government has become the
greatest tradition at the University of Florida. It must be remembered that inasmuch as
it is primarily a student responsibility, the future of the system rests with each new class
of students who enter the University. The University faculty and authorities pledge their
support to the Honor System. Each student must support it, or, in failing to support it,
contributes to the loss of this tradition.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

ADMINISTRATION
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Liti., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
WILMON NEWELL, D.Sc. (Iowa State College), Dean and Director
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Assistant Dean, Administration, College of Agriculture
H. HAROLD HUME, M.S., Assistant Dean and Director, Research
HAROLD MOWRY, M.S.A., Assistant Director, Administration, Experiment Station
ARTHUR PERCEVAL SPENCER, M.S., Vice-Director and County Agent Leader, Agricultural
Extension Service
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
JOHN FRANCIS COOPER, M.S.A., Editor
CLYDE BEALE, B.A.J., Assistant Editor
EDWIN F. STANTON, Supervisor, Egg-Laying Contest, Chipley
IDA KEELING CRESAP, Librarian
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Agricultural Chemistry

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
CLARENCE VERNON NOBLE, Ph.D. (Cornell), Head Professor of Agricultural Economics
(Part Time).
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Marketing
JULIUS WAYNE REITZ, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor of Agricultural Education

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Head Professor of Agricultural Engineering
AGRONOMY
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Soils
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor of Farm Crops and Genetics.
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY, D.V.M. (McKillip), Head Professor of Animal Husbandry
CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, M.A., Professor of Animal Husbandry
RAYMOND BROWN BECKER, Ph.D. (Minnesota) Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Animal
Nutrition
NORMAN RIPLEY MEHRHOF, M.S., Professor of Poultry Husbandry
NATHAN WILLARD SANBORN, M.D. (City of New York), Professor of Poultry Husbandry
(Special Status).
MARK WIRTH EMMEL, D.V.M. (Iowa State), Professor of Veterinary Science
LLOYD MASSENA THURSTON, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor of Dairy Husbandry
WAYNE MILLER NEAL, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor of Animal Nutrition
WILLIAM GORDON KIRK, Ph.D. (Iowa State), Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry
P. T. Dix ARNOLD, B.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry
OLIVER WENDEL ANDERSON, M.S., Instructor in Poultry Husbandry






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY
MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Head Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor of Botany and
Bacteriology
ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY
JOHN THOMAS CREIGHTON, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Assistant Professor and Head of Department
FORESTRY
HAROLD STEPHENSON NEWINS, M.F., Head Professor of Forestry
HORTICULTURE
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Head Professor of Horticulture
CHARLES ELLIOTT ABBOTT, M.S., Professor of Fruits and Vegetables
JOHN VERTREES WATKINS, M.S.A., Assistant Horticulturist

ORGANIZATION
The College of Agriculture is composed of three divisions:
1. Instruction Division (the College proper)
2. Research Division (Experiment Station)
3. Agricultural Extension Service
THE COLLEGE
The aim of the College is to afford young men the best possible opportunity for gaining
technical knowledge and training in the art and science of Agriculture, thus enabling grad-
uates to become effective producing agriculturists, leaders in educational work, research
workers, etc.
LIBRARIES
The University Library contains many works on agriculture and horticulture. Each
department has a small collection of well selected volumes which are always accessible. In
the Experiment Station Library are bulletins from the United States Department of Agricul-
ture and from the experiment stations of the world, all fully indexed.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA
To enter the College of Agriculture and register for the curriculum leading to the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, students are required to present a certificate of
graduation from the General College, and to have completed the following courses as
electives in the General College:
Cy. 101-102, General Chemistry ...................... .for C-7
C-6D, Animal Science ............................... for C-8
C-6E, Plant Science ................................. for C-9
The minimum load for students in the College of Agriculture will average 17 hours a
semester. A total of 68 hours with 68 honor points will be required for graduation, includ-
ing Military Science, if it is elected.
Students entering the College of Agriculture may take a major in any one of the follow-
ing departments:
Agricultural Chemistry Animal Husbandry
Agricultural Economics Botany and Bacteriology
Agricultural Education Entomology and Plant Pathology
Agricultural Engineering Forestry
Agronomy Horticulture






244 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


The head of the department in which a student majors (or his appointee) will act as
the student's adviser, assist the student in arranging his course of study, and make necessary
recommendations to the Dean. The student's courses for each semester are subject to the
approval of the Dean and department head.
If a student anticipates pursuing graduate work, he will find it helpful to elect as many
basic courses as possible, such as chemistry, biology, mathematics, botany, physics, econom-
ics, and a language. On the other hand, if a student anticipates going into applied agriculture
(farming, county agent work, farm superintendency, etc.) he will find it profitable to elect
as much technical agriculture as possible in departments related to his major work.
To graduate with honors a student must complete 68 semester hours with 136 honor
points; to graduate with high honors he must pass a comprehensive examination on all his
courses in agriculture, in addition to earning 136 honor points.
CREDIT FOR PRACTICAL WORK
By previous arrangement with the head of the department and the Dean, students may,
during their course of study, do practical work under competent supervision in any recog-
nized agricultural pursuit, and upon returning to the college and rendering a satisfactory
written report showing faithful service, will be entitled to one credit for each month of
such work. Such credits may not total more than three.
CURRICULA
AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY
First Semester Second Semester
Courses Credits Courses Credits
Junior Year
C-2D -Basic Mathematics ......... 4 C-2D Basic Mathematics ........... 4
Cy. 201 --Analytical Chemistry ...... 4 Cy. 202 --Analytical Chemistry ...... 4
Cy. 301 -Organic Chemistry ......... 4 Cy. 302 -Organic Chemistry ........ 4
Ps. 101, 103-Elementary Physics ..... 4 Ps. 102, 104-Elementary Physics ...... 4

16 16
Senior Year
Ay. 301 -Soils ...................... 3 Cy. 402 -Physical Chemistry ........ 4
Bey. 301 -Bacteriology ............... 4 Cy. 432 -Agricultural Analysis ...... 5
Cy. 401 -Physical Chemistry ........ 4 Cy. 482 -Chemical Literature ...... 1/.
Cy. 481 -Chemical Literature ........ /2 Gn. or Fh. -(Reading course) .......... 4
Gn. or Fh. (Reading course) .......... 4 Electives .................. 4
Electives ................. 3

181%/ 17%
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
Junior Year
*As. 303 -Farm Records ............ 3 *As. 306 -Farm Management ........ 3
tElectives .................. 14 *As. 308 Marketing ................ 3
tElectives .................. 11

17 17
Senior Year
*As. 405 -Agricultural Prices ........ 3 *As. 410 -Agricultural Statistics ...... 3
*As. 409 -Cooperative Marketing ..... 3 tElectives .................. 14
tElectives .................. 11

17 17
*Other courses in agricultural economics may be substituted.
tA minimum of 18 hours in agricultural economics and a minimum of 35 hours in other technical
agricultural subjects will be required. The remaining electives may be chosen in agricultural or non-
agricultural subjects. The non-agricultural subjects especially recommended are mathematics,
accounting, economics, business English, and public speaking.








COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


AGRICUI
First Semester
Cr


-Farm Shop ................
- Soils ......................
-Swine Production ..........
-Educational Psychology ....
-Methods of Teaching Voca-
tional Agriculture .......
-Poultry Practice ...........
*Electives ...................


LTURAL EDUCATION

edits Courses
Junior Year
3 As. 306
3 Ay. 302
2 En. 304
3
En. 306
3 He. 312
1 Py. 318
3


Senior Year
-Supervised Teaching in As.
Vocational Agriculture ... 3 En.
-Plant Materials ............ 3
-Poultry Management ....... 3 Py.
-Livestock Diseases and
Farm Sanitation ......... 2
*Electives .................. 5


Second Semester


Credits


-Farm Management ........
-Fertilizers and Manures.....
-Methods of Teaching Voca-
tional Agriculture ........
-Vocational Education ......
-Olericulture ...............
-Poultry Practice ...........
*Electives ..................




- Marketing .................
-Supervised Teaching in
Vocational Agriculture ...
-Poultry Management .......
*Electives ..................


*To be approved by the professor of Agricultural Education and the Dean. At least six hours of
elective credits must be in technical agriculture.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

1. The student must complete a minimum of ]8 semester hours in Agricultural Engi-
neering.
2. A minimum of 38 semester hours of electives must be in technical agriculture or
agricultural education.

3. A minimum of 20 semester hours of the agricultural electives must be taken from the
following courses: Al. 311, As. 306, As. 308, Ay. 301, Ay. 306, Dy. 311, Ey. 301, Ey. 406,
Fy. 301, He. 310, He. 312, He. 315.

AGRONOMY


Junior Year
Ay. 301 Soils ...................... 3 Ay.
Ay. 303 -Soils Laboratory ........... 2 Ay.
Ay. 309 Genetics .................. 3 Ay.
Ay. 311 -Genetics Laboratory ....... 2 Bty.
Bcey. 301 -Bacteriology ............... 4 Cy.
Electives .................. 3

17
Senior Year
Al. 311 -Elementary Nutrition ...... 4 As.
Bty. 311 -Plant Physiology .......... 4 Ay.
He. 315 -Citrus Culture ............ 3 Ay.
Electives .................. 6 Pt.


-Fertilizers and Manures .... 2
-Fertilizers Laboratory ...... 2
-Forage and Cover Crops.... 3
-Botany of Seed Plants...... 4
-Organic Chemistry ........ 5
Electives .................. 2

18


- Marketing ................. 3
-Plant Breeding ............ 3
-Soil Classification .......... 3
-Plant Pathology ........... 3
Electives .................. 4


SUGGESTED ELECTIVES
As. 306 ; Ag. 301 ; Ay. 305, 405 ; Bey. 302 ; Bty. 308; Cy. 202 ; Ey. t01 ; Fy. 301 ; Gy. 201 ; He. 312.


Courses






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

(a) Major in Animal Production
First Semester
Credits Courses


-Fundamentals in Animal
Husbandry ...............
-Elementary Nutrition ......
- Genetics ..................
-Genetics Laboratory .......
-General Bacteriology .......
Electives ..................




-Beef Production ...........
-Swine Production ..........
-Meat Products .............
-Livestock Diseases and
Farm Sanitation .........
Electives ..................


Junior Year
Al.
2 Al.
4 Ay.
3 Ay.
1 Vy.


Senior Year
2 Al.
2 Al.
2 Al.
Al.


-Feeds and Feeding .........
-Livestock Judging .........
-Forage and Cover Crops....
-Forest Soils ...............
-Anatomy and Physiology ...
Electives ..................


-Animal Breeding ...........
-Horse and Sheep Production.
-World Meats ..............
- Seminar ...................
Electives ..................


(b) Major in Dairy Production

Junior Year


Al. 311 -Elementary Nutrition ...... 4
Bey. 301 -General Bacteriology ....... 4
Dy. 311 -Farm Dairying ............. 3
Electives .................. 7


Al. 312
Al. 314
Bcy. 302
Vy. 302


Senior Year


- Genetics ...................
-Genetics Laboratory ........
-Dairy Herd Management....
-Market Milk ...............
Electives ...................


-Feeds and Feeding .........
-Livestock Judging .........
-Agricultural Bacteriology ..
-Anatomy and Physiology....
Electives .................




-Forage and Cover Crops....
- Forest Soils ................
-Milk Production ...........
- Seminar ...................
Electives ..................


(c) Major in Dairy Manufactures


Al. 311 -Elementary Nutrition .......
Bey. 301 -General Bacteriology ......
Dy. 311 -Farm Dairying ............
Electives ..................


Junior Year
4 *Ag.
4 Bcy.
3 Dy.
7 tDy.


Senior Year
Dy. 413 -Market Milk ............... 3 Dy.
Dy. 415 -Ice Cream Manufacture..... 3
Electives ............... ... 10 Dy.
Dy.


16

*Will be offered in alternate years. Offered in 1937-38.
tWill be offered in alternate years. Offered in 1936-37.


-Dairy Engineering .........
-Agricultural Bacteriology ...
--Theory of Dairy Manufacture
-Condensed Milk and Dry Milk
Electives ..................




-Manufacture of Butter and
Cheese ...................
-Dairy Technology ..........
- Seminar ...................
Electives ...................


Courses


Second Semester


Credits






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


(d) Major in Poultry Husbandry

Credits Courses


-Elementary Nutrition ......
- Genetics ...................
-Genetics Laboratory ........
-Poultry Judging ...........
E lectives ..................


Junior Year
4 Py.
3 Py.
1 Py.


Senior Year


Py. 415 -Poultry Management .......
Py. 417 -Marketing Poultry Products.
Py. 421 -Research and Seminar ......
E lectives ..................


-Incubation and Brooding.... 3
-Poultry Feeds and Feeding.. 3
-Poultry Housing and Equip-
m ent .................... 2
Electives .................. 10

18


-Poultry Management .... 3
-Poultry Breeding ........ 2
-Poultry Breeding........ 1 (or 2)
-Research and Seminar... 1
-Poultry Diseases ........ 2
Electives ............... 7 (or 6)

16


BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

(a) Botany

Junior Year


- Soils ...................... 3
-Advanced Botany .......... 4
- Floriculture ............... 3
-Principles of Fruit Production 3
Electives ................... 5


Senior Year
Bey. 301 --General Bacteriology ....... 4 Ay.
Bty. 311 -Plant Physiology .......... 4 Bey.
Bty. 431 -Plant Histology ............ 4
Electives ................. 4 Bey.


Ay. 302 -Fertilizers and Manures .... 2
Bty. 304 -Advanced Botany .......... 4
Cy. 262 -Organic Chemistry ......... 5
*Electives ................... 5


-Plant Breeding or Option*.. 3
-Agricultural Bacteriology
or
-Bacteriology of Foods ...... 4
-Taxonomy ................. 4
-Advanced Plant Physiology
or Option in Botany ...... 4
Electives .................. 3


16 18
*Either Ay. 309 or Bly. 325.
tBty. 432 may be elected, depending on necds of the undergraduate major in Botany.

DESIRABLE ELECTIVES
Ag. 301; As. 308, 410; Ay. 311; Bly. 325; Bty. 401, 432; En. 303, 304 ; Fy. 301, 303, 304; Ey. 301,
304 ; Gy. 204 ; He. 315, 415 ; Advanced German or Scientific French.

(b) Bacteriology

Junior Year


Bey. 301 -General Bacteriology ......
Bty. 303 -Advanced Botany ..........
C-3G -Reading of German ........
Electives ..................


Bcy. 302 -Agricultural Bacteriology .. 4
Bey. 304 -Pathogenic Bacteriology .... 4
Bty. 308 -Taxonomy ................. 4
C-3G -Reading of German ........ 8
Cy. 215 -Water and Sewage ......... 3
or
Cy. 262 -Organic Chemistry ......... 6

(18 or) 20


Courses


First Semester


Second Semester


Credits






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


First Semester
Credits Courses

Senior Year
-Immunology ............... 4 Bey. 306
-Plant Physiology .......... 4 Bey. 412
-Analytical Chemistry ...... 4 Cy. 202
-Scientific German ......... 3 Gn. 326
Electives .................. 2

17


Second Semester


Credits


-Food Bacteriology ......... 4
-Industrial Bacteriology ..... 4
-Analytical Chemistry ...... 4
-Scientific German .......... 3
Electives .................. 3

18


Approved deviations may be made from this schedule.

DESIRABLE ELECTIVES
Ay. 301 ; Bly. 316; Bty. 304; Cy. 262, 432; Dy. 311 ; C-3F (Reading of French) ; Gn. 101-102;
Ply. 451-452; Pt. 302; Vy. 402.
ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY
Requirements for graduation:
Not less than 20 semester hours of Entomology or Plant Pathology. Forty-eight
semester hours of approved electives, of which not more than 12 semester hours may be
in non-agricultural subjects.


Junior Year
Ey. 301 -Introduction to Economic Ey.
Entomology ........... 4 Pt.
Ey. 311 -Entomology Seminar ... 1
Electives ............... 12(-14)

17(-19)

Senior Year
Ey. 405 -Insect and Disease Control 3 Ey.
Electives ................ 14(-16)

17 (-19)


312 -Entomology Seminar .... 1
302 -Introduction of Plant
Pathology ............ 3
Electives ................. 8(-10)

12(-14)


406 -Insect and Disease Control 3
Electives ................ 14(-16)

17(-19)


APPROVED ELECTIVES
As. 306, 308; Ag. 302 ; Al. 309 ; Ay. 301, 302, 309 ; Bey. 301 ; Bty. 304 ; Dy. 311; Ey. 408, 411, 420,
430; Fy. 301 ; He. 311, 0314, 315, 412, 413 ; Py. 313.

Any other subjects, agricultural or non-agricultural, must have the approval of the head
of the department before they can be used as electives.


SHORT COURSE

TRAINING FOR FOREST RANGERS
Applicants 18 years of age or over who meet the regular entrance requirements of the
University, and who have been employed in some practical forestry service, may apply to
the Dean of the College of Agriculture for the Short Course for Forest Rangers.
Since all regular students entering the University are enrolled in the General College
where clock hours, class grades, and credits as prerequisites to the completion of its curricu-
lum have been abolished, in a like manner the College of Agriculture will administer the
admission, progress records, and the granting of appropriate certificates to students who are
in training as Forest Rangers. The work of the short course is given to increase the prac-
tical efficiency of these men. The usual University credits will not be granted, and the
work taken does not count toward any University degree.
Much of the laboratory instruction will be given in nearby forests to which classes will
be transported by bus or automobile.


Courses


Bey. 411
Bty. 311
Cy. 201
Gn. 325






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 249


Upon satisfactory completion of the first-year curriculum and summer camp, students
will be given a certificate of work accomplished. They may return later, complete the
second year, and secure a certificate of completion of the Ranger curriculum.

CURRICULUM FOR FOREST RANGERS
First Semester Second Semester
Courses Hrs. per Week Courses Hrs. per Week
First Year
Cy. 101 -General Chemistry ......... 4 Bty. 304 -Botany of Seed Plants...... 4
Fy. 101 -Principles of Forestry ...... 4 Cy. 102 -General Chemistry ......... 4
Fy. 103 -Forest Influences .......... 3 Fy. 102 -Forest Regions ............ 2
Fy. 105 -Seeding, Planting, and Fy. 104 -Tree Identification ......... 4
Nursery Practice ......... 3 Fy. 106 -Forest Improvement ........ 3
Fy. 107 -Forest Protection .......... 4 Fy. 108 -Forest Reproduction ........ 4
Ms. 85 -Plane Trigonometry ....... 3

21 21

Summer Camp.-Eight weeks. At least 40 hours a week in the forest doing practical
work, making observations in surveying, mensuration, identification, protection, improve-
ments, and utilization.
Second Year*
As. 201 -Agricultural Economics .... 3 As. 311 -Rural Law ................ 2
Cl. 223 -Surveying ................. 5 Ag. 306 --Farm Machinery ........... 4
Fy. 201 -Lumbering ................ 3 Fy. 202 -Wood Identification ........ 3
Fy. 203 -Naval Stores .............. 3 Fy. 204 -Forest Economics .......... 3
Fy. 205 -Forest Finance ............ 3 Fy. 206 -Grazing and Wild Life ..... 3
Ps. -General Physics ........... 4 Fy. 208 -Forest Administration ..... 3

21 18

*Second-year courses will not be offered in 1936-37.

DESCRIPTION OF FOREST RANGER COURSES

(As second-year courses will not be offered in 1936-37, only first-year courses are described
below. Courses other than Forestry are described in the latter part of this bulletin under
Department o/ Instruction.)
Fy. 101.-Principles of Forestry. 4 hours.
A basic course required of all students in Forestry, designed to acquaint them with fundamentals, and a survey
of the field.
Fy. 102.-Forest Regions. 2 hours.
The silvicultutal and economic factors affecting the important regions of the United States.
Fy. 103.-Forest Influences. 1 hour, and 2 hours laboratory.
Factors affecting and controlling the growth and development of forest trees and stands, and effects of forests
on environment.
Fy. 104.-Tree Identification. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory.
The identification of native and naturalized trees and use of botanical keys.
Fy. 105.-Seeding, Planting, and Nursery Practice. 1 hour, and 2 hours labora-
tory.
Methods of growing forest seedlings and principles and ways of transplanting them.
Fy. 106.-Forest Improvement. 3 hours.
Character and construction of roads, trails, electric lines, lookout towers, and improvements and conveniences.
Fy. 107.-Forest Protection. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory.
The protection from fire, animals, insects, and other enemies.
Fy. 108.-Forest Reproduction. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory.
Natural reproduction and improvement of forest crops ; application to different types of forests.












BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


FORESTRY


First Semester
Credits Courses

Junior Year
-Surveying ................. 3 Ay. 3
-Introduction to Economic Bty. 3
Entomology .............. 4 Fy. 3
-Dendrology ................ 3 Fy. 3
- Silviculture ................ 3 MI. 2
-Elementary Physics ........ 3
-Elementary Physics
Laboratory .............. 1
Approved Electives ......... 1


Second Semester


Credits


- Forest Soils ...............
-Taxonomy .................
-Forest Mensuration ........
-Forest Protection ..........
-Engineering Drawing ......
Approved Electives ........


SUMMER CAMP

Eight weeks: Silviculture, Forest Engineering, Utilization, and Forest Management.
Required for graduation.


Sei
-Logging and Lumbering.... 3
-Wood Technology .......... 3
-Forest Economics .......... 3
-Forest Products
(Naval Stores) ........... 4
Approved Electives ......... 3


nior Y


'ear
Fy. 404 -Forest Administration and
Organization ............
Fy. 406 -Reforestation and Nursery
Technique ...............
Fy. 408 -Wood Preservation (Includ-
ing Conditioning) ........
Fy. 410 -Forest History and Policy..
Approved Electives ........


HORTICULTURE


-Farm Records .............
-Irrigation and Drainage ....
- Soils ......................
-Introduction to Economic
Entomology .............
-Floriculture or
-Principles of Fruit Production


Bey. 301 -General Bacteriology .......
Bty. 311 -Plant Physiology ..........
He. -Approved Courses ..........
Approved Electives ........


Junior Year
3 Ay.
3 Ay.
3
Bty.
4 Cy.
He.
3 Pt.

16

Senior Year
4 As.
4
6 Ey.
3 He.


-Fertilizers and Manures.....
-Laboratory in Fertilizers and
Manures .................
-Botany of Seed Plants......
-Organic Chemistry .........
-Approved Courses ..........
-Plant Pathology ...........




-Marketing Fruits and
Vegetables .............
-Insects and Disease Control.
-Approved Courses ..........
Approved Electives ........


Courses





SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS


SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., F.A.I.A., Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar

FACULTY
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., F.A.I.A., Director, Head Professor of Architecture
0. C. R. STAGEBERG, B.S. Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture
FREDERICK T. HANNAFORD, B.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture (Part Time)
WILLIAM T. ARNETT, M.A. Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture (Part Time)
ELIOT C. FLETCHER, M.F.A. Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture
WARREN F. DOOLITTLE, B.F.A., Instructor in Drawing and Painting
ARTHUR D. McVov, B.S. Arch., Graduate Assistant

GENERAL INFORMATION

With the inauguration of the General College in 1935, the work of the School of Architec-
ture and Allied Arts was reorganized on the basis of an Upper and Lower Division. Five
professional courses are offered: Architecture, Building Construction, Landscape Architec-
ture, Painting, and Commercial Art.
The work in the School is conducted in a manner which will aid the student in forming
the habit of constructive thinking and develop the initiative necessary to apply his thoughts.
Full responsibility for his work and actions is placed upon the individual as is done in the
professional fields. Each curriculum is devised with the intention of giving thorough training
in the fundamentals of the profession chosen and the methods of instruction fully carry out
this intention.
ARCHITECTURAL REGISTRATION
The State of Florida is among 36 states which have prescribed by law the qualifications
for architectural practice and require the passing of examinations given by a state board.
Students who receive the degree in Architecture from the University of Florida will, by
action of the Florida State Board of Architecture, be exempt from examination in certain
subjects when applying for a certificate of registration.

SPECIAL LECTURES
Prominent men from related fields and from the various chapters of the American
Institute of Architects and the Florida Association of Architects are invited to give lectures
which are intended to acquaint the student with the best professional thought and with
the culture of our times.
The semi-annual business meeting of the Florida Association of Architects, which is held
in the rooms of the School, is open to the students. An opportunity is thus provided for
the students to become acquainted with the problems which confront the practicing archi-
tect, particularly in Florida, and to meet future employers.

SPECIAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION
Admission to the School of Architecture and Allied Arts is granted to students who
show definite aptitude and ability to pursue the work of the School and who pass compre-






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION .-UPPER DIVISION


hensive examinations in the subjects which are listed under "Admission" in each curriculum.
For more detailed information concerning admission, see the Bulletin of Information for
the General College.
ADULT REGISTRATION PRIVILEGE
Persons twenty-one or more years of age who are not candidates for a degree may, by
special vote of the faculty and the approval of the Board of University Examiners, be permit-
ted to register in subjects for which they are adequately prepared. For information con-
cerning the Admission of Special Students see page 222.
GRADUATE STUDY
The degree of Master of Arts in Architecture is offered in the Graduate School. For
further information, see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.
METHODS OF INSTRUCTION
The problem or project method of teaching is employed in every course in the School
of Architecture and Allied Arts, and instruction is given each student individually. Because
of the individual nature of the work, the student passes from one group of problems to the
next in varying lengths of time, according to his accomplishment, and irrespective of Uni-
versity time units and the progress of other students.

GENERAL REGULATIONS

ADVANCEMENT
Advancements in the Departments of Architecture and Painting are made by vote of
the faculty. To be advanced from one course to the succeeding one, a student must have
completed the problems or projects of the course successfully, and must give evidence of
satisfactory accomplishment in all the corequisite courses of his curriculum.

ACADEMIC CREDIT
The School of Architecture and Allied Arts has dispensed with clock hours, class grades,
and semester hours credit as prerequisites to the completion of its work. Understanding
and demonstrated proficiency are used as a test for granting a degree, rather than the
traditional accumulation of credits.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
The student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. The faculty will assist and advise, but the
student must take the initiative and assume responsibility for managing his own affairs.

ELECTIVE COURSES
Any student in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts may by permission enroll in
courses in addition to those of his regular program to broaden his general or professional
education in any direction he may choose.

STUDENT WORK
The School reserves the right to retain for purposes of exhibition or instruction any
work or drawings submitted by students.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Students successfully completing the work of the School shall, according to the char-
acter of their work as determined by the faculty, receive diplomas of graduation, of gradua-
tion With Honors, or of graduation With High Honors.






SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS


DEGREES AND CURRICULA

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE
The Department of Architecture offers instruction in Architecture, Building Construc-
tion, and Landscape Architecture.
Architecture.-The work in Architecture is for students who desire to become architects
or to enter some related field in which beauty is combined with utility. It is the aim of this
course to prepare students to become draftsmen, designers, inspectors and superintendents
of construction, specification writers, teachers, etc., or ultimately to become practicing
architects or specialists in their chosen fields.
The course in Architecture, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require three
years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Architecture.
Building Construction.-The work in Building Construction is for students who are
interested in the construction and erection of buildings rather than in their planning, and
who wish to prepare themselves for the design of the structural parts of buildings, the busi-
ness of contracting, the manufacture or sale of building materials, or for other branches
of building construction.
The course in Building Construction, while not of fixed duration, will nominally re-
quire two years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Building Construction.
Landscape Architecture.-The course in Landscape Architecture is designed to fit students
for work in the arrangement and preservation of land areas for use and beauty. The aim
is not only to prepare a graduate for immediate usefulness as an assistant to an established
practitioner, but also to lay a foundation for his ultimate independent practice of the
profession.
The course in Landscape Architecture, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require
two years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Landscape Architecture.
CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE*
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission
to candidacy for the degree in Architecture will include the following subjects which are
offered in the General College:
Man and the Social World; Man and the Physical World (or General Chemistry);
Reading, Speaking, and Writing; Basic Mathematics; Military Science or Physical Educa-
tion; The Humanities; Man and the Biological World; Fundamentals of Architecture; and
General Physics.
Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Architectuie
a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the Faculty and must
successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Architecture.

Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs
Ae. 21A.-Architectural Design ............... 1st 2nd ... ... ...
Ae. 21B.-Architectural Design ................ ... ... 3rd 4th 5th ...
Ae. 31A.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color.. 1st 2nd ... ... ... ..
Ae. 31B.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color.. ... ... 3rd 4th 5th ...
Ae. 41A.-History of Architecture............. 1st 2nd ... ... ... ...

*Students regularly registered in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts in or before February,
1935, will be supplied with a statement of course equivalents as a guide for their subsequent registra-
tions.






254 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION

Ae. 41B.-History of Architecture............. ... ... 3rd 4th ... ...
Ae. 41C.- Decorative Arts .................... ... ... ... ... 5th ...
Ae. 51A.-Materials and Methods of Construction 1st 2nd 3rd ... ... ...
Ae. 51B.-Mechanical Equipment of Buildings.. ... ... ... 4th ... ...
Ae. 51C.-Professional Relations and Methods.. ... ... ... ... 5th ...
Ae. 61A.-Structural Design of Buildings....... 1st 2nd ... ... ... ...
Ae. 61B.-Structural Design of Buildings ....... ... ... 3rd 4th 5th ...
Ae. 71A.- Thesis ............................ ... ... ... ... ... 6th

CURRICULUM IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION*
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission
to candidacy for the degree in Building Construction will include the following subjects
which are offered in the General College:
Man and the Social World; Man and the Physical World (or General Chemistry);
Reading, Speaking, and Writing; Basic Mathematics; Military Science or Physical Educa-
tion; The Humanities; Man and the Biological World; Fundamentals of Architecture; and
General Physics.
Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Building Construction a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of
the Faculty and must successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Building Con-
struction.
Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs
Ae. 22A.-Architectural Design ...................... 1st 2nd ... ...
Ae. 31A.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color......... 1st 2nd ... ...
Ae. 41B.-History of Architecture .................... 1st 2nd ...
Ae. 51A.-Materials and Methods of Construction...... 1st 2nd 3rd ...
Ae. 51B.-Mechanical Equipment of Buildings ......... ... ... ... 4th
Ae. 51C.-Professional Relations and Methods......... ... ... 3rd ...
Ae. 61A.-Structural Design of Buildings ............. 1st 2nd
Ae. 61B.-Structural Design of Buildings .............. ... ... 3rd 4th
C-1D. -Economic Foundations of Modem Life........... ... 3rd
C-1K. -Elementary Accounting .................... ... ... ... 4th

CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE*
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission to
candidacy for the degree in Landscape Architecture will include the following subjects
which are offered in the General College:
Man and the Social World; Man and the Physical World (or General Chemistry);
Reading, Speaking, and Writing; Basic Mathematics; Military Science or Physical Educa-
tion; The Humanities; Man and the Biological World; Fundamentals of Architecture; and
General Physics.
Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science in
Landscape Architecture a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction
of the Faculty and must successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Landscape
Architecture.
*Students regularly registered in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts in or before February,
1935, will be supplied with a statement of course equivalents as a guide for their subsequent registra-
tions.







SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 255

Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs
Ae. 23A. -Landscape Design ...................... 1st 2nd ... ..
Ae. 23B. -Landscape Design ...................... ... ... 3rd 4th
Ae. 33A. -Freehand Drawing and Water Color...... 1st 2nd ...
Ae. 33B. -Freehand Drawing and Water Color ....... ... ... 3rd 4th
Ae. 41B. -History of Architecture and Landscape
Architecture ......................... 1st 2nd ...
Ae. 53A. -Materials and Methods of Construction... ... 2nd ... 4th
Ay. 301. Soils .................. .. ; ............. ... ... 3rd
C-6E. -Plant Science ......................... 1st 2nd ...
Ey. 405-406.-Insect and Disease Control ............... ... ... 3rd 4th
Fy. 301. Dendrology ....................... .... ... ... 3rd ...
He. 310. -Pruning and Tree Surgery.................. ... ... 4th
He. 415. Plant Materials ........................ 1st ... ...

DEPARTMENT OF PAINTING
The Department of Painting offers instruction in Painting and in Commercial Art.
Painting.-The purpose of the work in Painting is to develop the student's technical
ability in pictorial art. Beginning with the fundamentals of drawing, design, and color,
the work expands into a highly specialized study of pictorial art, including mural decora-
tion, figure, landscape, and portrait painting.
The course in Painting, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require three years
beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts.
Commercial Art.-In all fields of commercial activity the product must possess, to a high
degree, the quality of beauty; in bringing the products of industry to the attention of the
public the best artistic talent is demanded. To prepare designers for this field of endeavor,
the work in Commercial Art is offered. In addition to work in drawing, design, and color,
a sound foundation is laid in the fundamentals of business practice.
The course in Commercial Art, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require two
years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Com-
mercial Art.
CURRICULUM IN PAINTING*
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission
to candidacy for the degree in Painting will include the following subjects which are offered
in the General College:
Man and the Social World; Man and the Physical World; Reading, Speaking, and
Writing; an elective (or Man and His Thinking, and General Mathematics) ; Military
Science or Physical Education; The Humanities; Man and the Biological World; Funda-
mentals of Pictorial Art; and an elective.
Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts a
student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the Faculty and must
successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Painting.

*Students regularly registered in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts in or before February,
1935, will be supplied with a statement of course equivalents as a guide for their subsequent registra-
tions.












BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


Pg. 21A.-Pictorial Composition ..............
Pg. 21B.-Pictorial Composition ..............
Pg. 31A.-Freehand Drawing ................
Pg. 31B.-Freehand Drawing .................
Pg. 41A.-History of Painting ................
Ae. 41B.-History of Architecture ............
Ae. 41C.-Decorative Arts ...................
Pg. 51A.- Oil Painting ......................
Pg. 51B.- Oil Painting ......................
Pg. 61A.-Thesis ...........................


Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs
1st 2nd 3rd ... ... ..
... ... ... 4th 5th
1st 2nd 3rd ... ...
... ... ... 4th 5th
1st 2nd ...
... ... 3rd 4th ...
... ... ... ... 5th ...
1st 2nd ... ...
... ... 3rd 4th 5th ...
... ... ... ... ... 6th


CURRICULUM IN COMMERCIAL ART*
Admission.-The comprehensive examinations by which students are granted admission to
candidacy for the degree in Commercial Art will include the following subjects which are
offered in the General College:
Man and the Social World; Man and the Physical World; Reading, Speaking, and Writ-
ing; an elective (or Man and His Thinking, and General Mathematics) ; Military Science
or Physical Education; The Humanities; Man and the Biological World; Fundamentals of
Pictorial Art; and an elective.
Requirements for the Degree.-To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Com-
mercial Art a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the Faculty
and most successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Commercial Art.
Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs
Pg. 22A. -Commercial Design ....................... 1st 2nd
Pg. 22B. -Commercial Design .......................... ... 3rd 4th
Pg. 32A. -Freehand Drawing ....................... 1st 2nd ... ...
Pg. 32B. -Freehand Drawing ....................... ... ... 3rd 4th
Pg. 52A. -Oil Painting ............................ 1st 2nd ...
Pg. 52B. -W ater Color ............................. ... ... 3rd 4th
Bs. 433. -Principles of Advertising..................... ... 3rd ...
Bs. 446E.-Economic Principles of Consumption ........ ... ... ... 4th
C-1D. -Economic Foundations of Modern Life....... 1st ... ... ...
C-1K. -Elementary Accounting ................... ... 2nd ... ...

*Students regularly registered in the School of Architecture and Allied Arts in or before February,
1935, will be supplied with a statement of course equivalents as a guide for their subsequent registra-
tions.






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President and Dean
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Dean
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar

ANCIENT LANGUAGES
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D. (John Hopkins), Head Professor
WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, M.A., Associate Professor (Part Time)

BIBLE
JOHN EVANDER JOHNSON, B.D., M.A., Professor of Bible

BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D. (Michigan), Head Professor
THEODORE HUNTINGTON HUBBELL, Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor
HARLEY BAKWEL SHERMAN, Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Professor
HOWARD KEEFER WALLACE, M.S., Part-time Instructor, and Curator

CHEMISTRY
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Head Professor
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, D.Sc. (Princeton), Professor of Chemical Engineering
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Agricultural Chemistry
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D. (Purdue), Associate Professor
BURTON J. H. OTTE, M.S., Assistant Professor and Curator
JOHN ERSKINE HAWKINS, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor
JESSE WILFORD MASON, Ph.D. (Yale), Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

ENGLISH
CLIFFORD PIERSON LYONS, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Head Professor
JAMES MARION FARR, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor (Special Status)
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., Professor
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., Associate Professor
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., Assistant Professor
ALTON CHESTER MORRIS, M.A., Assistant Professor
CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, M.A., Instructor (On Leave of Absence)
WILLIAM EDGAR MOORE, M.A., Instructor
HERMAN EVERETTE SPIVEY, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Instructor
WASHINGTON ALEXANDER CLARK, JR., M.A., Instructor
JOSEPH EDWIN PRICE, B.A.E., Instructor
ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, B.A., Instructor
FREDERICK WILLIAM CONNER, M.A., Instructor





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


FRENCH
ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D. (Harvard), Head Professor
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D. (Stanford), Assistant Professor
ROBERT WILLIAM HUSTON, M.A., Instructor

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor of Americanism and Southern
History, Head Professor
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, Ph.D. (Michigan), Associate Professor
ANCIL NEWTON PAYNE, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor
MANNING JULIAN DAUER, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor
ARTHUR SYLVESTER GREEN, M.A., Instructor

JOURNALISM
ELMER JACOB EMIG, M.A., Head Professor
DOWLING BuRRus LEATHERWOOD, B.A.J., Instructor

MATHEMATICS
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D. (Illinois), Professor
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Assistant Professor
HALLETT HUNT GERMOND, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Assistant Professor
BERNARD FRANCIS DOSTAL, M.A., Assistant Professor
ZAREH MEGUERDITCH PIRENIAN, M.S., Assistant Professor
URI PEARL DAVIS, M.A., Instructor
SAM W. MCINNIS, M.A., Instructor
EDWARD SCHAUMBERG QUADE, Ph.D. (Brown), Instructor
ROBERT DICKERSON SPECHT, B.A., Instructor

PHILOSOPHY
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D. (Boston), Head Professor

PHYSICS
ROBERT CROZIER WILLIAMSON, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S., Associate Professor
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D. (Kansas), Assistant Professor
DANIEL CRAMER SWANSON, B.S., Instructor (On Leave of Absence)
FRANCIS DUDLEY WILLIAMS, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Instructor
HERBERT B. MESSEC, Curator
PSYCHOLOGY
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D. (Chicago), Associate Professor and Head of Department
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D. (Chicago), Assistant Professor
CHARLES ISAAC MOSIER, B.A., Instructor

SOCIOLOGY
LucIus MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D. (Harvard), Head Professor
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A., Associate Professor (Part Time)
BENJAMIN REMINGTON WELD, B.A., Instructor (Part Time)





COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


SPANISH AND GERMAN
CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, Ph.D. (Goettingen), Head Professor (Special Status)
WILLIAM BYRON HATHAWAY, M.A., Associate Professor
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Instructor
THOMAS JEFFERSON HIGGINS, M.A., Instructor
FRANCIS MARION DEGAETANI, B.A.E., Instructor

SPEECH
HENRY PHILIP CONSTANS, M.A., Associate Professor and Head of Department
ARTHUR ARIEL HOPKINS, M.A., Assistant Professor
LESTER LEONARD HALE, M.A., Instructor


GENERAL REGULATIONS

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree.
Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Office of the Registrar and must
pay the diploma fee very early in the semester in which they expect to receive the degree; the
official calendar shows the latest date on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be
dropped or changed without penalty only through the office of the Dean of the College.

SPECIAL STUDENTS
Persons twenty-one or more years of age who cannot satisfy the entrance requirements,
but who give evidence of ability to profit by the courses they will take, may, under excep-
tional circumstances, be admitted as "Adult Special" students. They are required to comply
with the same regulations as the regular students. For information concerning the Ad-
mission of Special Students see page 222.
The College of Arts and Sciences strongly discourages the registration of "Adult Special"
students. It is felt that every student in the College ought to regularize himself if this is
at all possible.
CORRESPONDENCE STUDY
Students who are registered in the College of Arts and Sciences will not be allowed to
carry on correspondence study while in residence in the University. While in residence,
students may neither begin new correspondence studies nor complete studies already begun.
No part of the last thirty credits counted toward a degree may be earned by correspondence
or extension study.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

All beginning students are required to enroll in the General College. For
information concerning the requirements for admission to the College of Arts
and Sciences see page 185, Bulletin of Information for the General College.
The curricula for students entering the College of Arts and Sciences from the
General College will be found on pages 265 of this bulletin
The curricula which follow apply only to students who registered in the Uni-
versity during or before the academic year 1934-35.





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


UPPER AND LOWER DIVISION
The work of the College of Arts and Sciences is divided into a Lower Division and an
Upper Division. The Lower Division corresponds roughly to the work which the student
will pursue in his first two years in the University, while the Upper Division corresponds
roughly to the work which the student will pursue in his junior and senior years. Freshmen
and sophomores entering the College of Arts and Sciences become members of the Lower
Division, in which they remain until they have fulfilled the requirements listed below for
admission to the Upper Division.
Not later than his last term in the Lower Division each student should apply at the office
of the Dean of the College for the assignment of an advisory committee of faculty members,
who will help him arrange his program of studies throughout the remainder of his under-
graduate work.
This plan operates to enable the College of Arts and Sciences to meet the needs of students
as individuals. In particular those students who show unusual ability or aptitude may
take advantage of the following provision:
Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division will, according to the
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of
graduation With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors,
and Upper and Lower Division requirements, see the Bulletin of By-Laws.

GROUPS OF STUDY
Group I Group II Group III Group IV
Military Science French Bible Bacteriology
Physical Education German Economics Biology
Greek Education Botany
Latin English Chemistry
Spanish History Geology
Journalism Mathematics
Philosophy Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Speech

The curricula of the College of Arts and Sciences are designed to give the student a
broad, basic knowledge of the humanities, the social sciences, and the physical sciences.
Opportunity is provided for concentration and for the development of special techniques.
Courses of study providing pre-law, pre-medical, and pre-dental training, and courses of
study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of
Arts in Journalism are offered. The various curricula are described below.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
The course of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts is a four-year course in which
the humanities and the social sciences are emphasized. The study of foreign language is
given some prominence, both ancient and modern languages being offered. College English,
foreign language, and mathematics are required of every student electing this curriculum,
and to insure some understanding of scientific fact and method, every student is required
to study a basic year-course in one of the natural sciences, in addition to which he may
elect a limited amount of work in natural science if he so desires.






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 261


CURRICULUM

A. College Credits Required for Admission to the Upper Division:
Semester Hours
*Military Science and Physical Education ............................ 10
E english 101-102 .................................................... 6
tM them atics ....................................................... 6
tIn Group III (not including English or Education).................... 12
Foreign Language ................................................. 12
Laboratory Science ................................................. 8 or more
E english 103-104 .................................................... 6
Approved Electives ................................................... 7 or less

TOTAL-67 semester credit hours and 67 honor points.


B. Credit Requirements for Graduation from the Upper Division:
1. A total of at least 134 semester credit hours and 134 honor points.
2. At least 24 semester credit hours in foreign language in secondary school and
in college of which at least 12 must be in college and in courses numbered 100 or above.
Each year-course passed satisfactorily in secondary school will reduce the total lang-
uage requirement by 3 semester credit hours, provided, however, that the student
presents two entrance units in the language or that he continues the language
successfully in the University.
3. A major in Group II, in Group III, or in pure Mathematics. The majors are
described on pages 263 to 265, inclusive.
4. Two minors (or a double minor), each consisting of at least 9 semester credit
hours above the elementary course. It is advisable that the minors be in subjects
related to the major.
5. Not more than 66 semester credit hours in the major and minor fields com-
bined will be counted toward graduation.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Students who are interested primarily in the sciences may hope to gain a thorough intro-
duction to the natural sciences and a working grasp of the scientific methods by pursuing
the four-year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. Each student must
select one science in which he is expected to gain a mastery. A limited amount of foreign
language is required in order that the student may read scientific works in at least one
foreign language. The candidate is expected also to acquire breadth of viewpoint and train-
ing by devoting some time to the study of mathematics, English, and kindred subjects.

CURRICULUM

A. College Credits Required for Admission to the Upper Division:
Semester Hours
*Military Science and Physical Education ............................ 10
E english 101-102 .................................................... 6
M them atics 101-102 ............................................... 6
tIn Group III (not including English or Education).................... 6
Foreign Language ................................................. 6 or 12
Science (a one-year course in each of two laboratory sciences)......... 16 or more
Electives (approved by the Dean) ..................................... 17 or less

TOTAL-67 semester credit hours and 67 honor points.

*Students exempt from Military Science, or from Physical Education, or from both, for any reason
whatever, must earn an equal number of credit hours in some other group or groups. Choice of these
subjects must in all cases be approved by the Dean.
fFor students who earned credit for trigonometry in secondary school the required mathematics
consists of courses 101 and 102. For those who did not earn credit for trigonometry in secondary school
the required mathematics consists of courses 85 and 101.
tSee page 260 for courses in Group III.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


B. Credit Requirements for Graduation from the Upper Division:
1. A total of at least 134 semester credit hours and 134 honor points.
2. At least 18 semester credit hours in foreign language in secondary school and
in college of which at least 6 must be in college and in courses numbered 100 or
above. Each year-course passed satisfactorily in secondary school will reduce the
total language requirement by 3 semester credit hours, provided, however, that the
student presents two entrance units in the language or that he continues the language
successfully in the University.
3. A major in Group IV or in Psychology. The majors are described on pages
263 to 265, inclusive.
4. Two minors (or a double minor), each consisting of at least nine semester
credit hours above the elementary year-course. It is advisable that the minors be in
subjects related to the major.
5. Not more than 72 semester credit hours in the major and minor fields com-
bined will be counted toward graduation.

PRE-LAW COURSE
Students may meet the requirements for admission to the College of Law by pursuing
the combined academic and law course. In this course a fixed amount of law credit may
be substituted for free electives in the B.A., B.S., or B.A. in Journalism curricula. Thus it is
possible for the student to earn the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, together with the degree in Law, by three years of intensive
study in the College of Arts and Sciences, followed by three years of study in the College
of Law.
During his first three years the student pursues the regular curriculum in the College
of Arts and Sciences leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or
Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. When he has completed a minimum of 110 semester credit
hours of work in the College, including all of the requirements for his degree, he will be
admitted to the College of Law. However, the degree from the College of Arts and Sciences
will not be conferred until he has completed one full year of work (28 semester credit hours
and 28 honor points) in the College of Law.

THE PRE-MEDICAL COURSE
Since a broad cultural and scientific training is of advantage in the profession of medi-
cine, and since it is becoming increasingly difficult to gain admission to the better medical
schools without a college degree, the student preparing himself for the study of medicine
is strongly urged to earn the degree of Bachelor of Science.
The student registered in the College of Arts and Sciences who cannot earn the degree
should correspond with the dean or the registrar of the medical school of his choice con-
cerning admission requirements. His courses will then be arranged as far as possible to
meet these requirements. He should keep in mind, however, that emphasis should be placed
upon cultural as well as upon scientific subjects.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM
Instruction in Journalism is intended to provide training in technical fundamentals as
well as cultural development. It does not profess to produce finished newspaper men, but it
does attempt to shorten the period of apprenticeship.
Students who are primarily interested in cultural and intellectual training which the
study of Journalism affords, rather than in the study of Journalism as a profession, may select
Journalism as a major for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, instead of pursuing the curriculum
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism.






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM


First Semester


LOWER DIVISION

Credits Courses


Second Semester


263


Credits


Freshman Year (Discontinued)
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)
Es. 201 -Principles of Economics..... 3 Es. 202 -Principles of Economics..... 3
Foreign Language* ........ 3 Foreign Language* ........ 3
Jm. 205 -History of American Journal- Jm. 206 -Principles of Journalism.... 3
ism ...................... 3 Laboratory Sciencet ...... 5 or 4
Laboratory Sciencet ..... 5 or4 My. 204 -Artillery .................. 2
My. 203 Artillery .................. 2

16 16
*Must be a continuation of the language begun in the freshman year.
tCy. 101-102 ; Ps. 101-102, 103-104 ; Bly. 101-102 ; or Bty. 101-102. If the student takes eight hours
of laboratory science instead of ten, he must substitute two hours of approved electives for the two
extra hours of laboratory science.

UPPER DIVISION
Junior Year


-Advanced News
W writing ......... 3
-Newspaper Editing 3
-Business and
Mechanics of
Publishing ....... 3
Approved Electives. 8
(or more)

17 (or more)


-Editorial Writing and
Management ..... 3
-Law of the Press... 3
-Public Relations ... 3
Approved Electives 7
(or more)


Jm. 302

Jm. 310
Jm. 318


-Advanced News
W writing .........
-Newspaper Editing.
-Newspaper Manage-
ment ...........
Approved Electives..
(or more)


17 (or more)


Senior Year
Jm. 408 -Advanced Public
Opinion .........
Jm. 412 -Contemporary Jour-
nalistic Thought ..
Approved Electives.
(or more)


16 (or more)


16 (or more)


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS


BIOLOGY

All majors in biology will include Bly. 101-102, 210, and 325, and at least four additional
semester courses approved in advance by a representative of the department. Students who
plan to undertake graduate work in this department should include Bly. 225-226; students
planning to enter medical school should include Bly. 315 and 316.

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

The basic course is Bty. 101-102. The additional courses should be determined by con-
sultation with the head of the department.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 101-102, 201-202 (or 203 and 305), 301-302 (or 361-362), and either the year course
in Physical Chemistry or a half-year course in Physical Chemistry, depending on courses


Courses


Jm. 407

Jm. 409
Jm. 411






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


previously taken. Cy. 481-482 will also be required of students beginning a major in chem-
istry after June 1, 1935.
ECONOMICS
Economics 101-102, 201-202, and 12 semester hours from other courses in the Department
of Economics. The selection of courses must be approved by the head of the department.

ENGLISH
The major in English will include: English 103-104 or 201-202; 301-302; and such other
courses as the student may select with the approval of the department head and in con-
formity with the general requirements for majors.

FRENCH
A total of twenty-four semester hours must be earned in the Department of French as
a minimum requirement for a major. C-3F or French 21-22 is to be counted for six hours
in this requirement.
GEOLOGY
No major is offered in Geology. A minor, Geology 201, 202, and 204, is available.

GERMAN
The student must earn or have credit for German 101-102 and must earn a total of 24
semester hours of college credit in the Department of German. The selection of courses must
meet the approval of the head of the department.

GREEK
Twenty-four semester credit hours in courses approved by the head of the department.
Usually grammar and prose composition are required.

HISTORY
History 101-102 and 18 semester credit hours in other courses in history in the Department
of History and Political Science.
HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
History 101-102 and Political Science 101-102 and 18 semester credit hours of other work
in the Department of History and Political Science.
JOURNALISM
A major in Journalism consists of at least eighteen semester credit hours in courses in
Journalism above the elementary year-course.

LATIN
Twenty-four semester credit hours in courses approved by the head of the department.
Usually grammar and prose composition are required.
MATHEMATICS
Thirty semester hours, including Mathematics 101-102, or their equivalents, selected from
courses offered by the Department of Mathematics. The courses selected must include cal-
culus, and the selection must meet the approval of the head of the department.
PHILOSOPHY
Not less than 24 semester hours in the Department of Philosophy. Any two of the begin-
ning courses should be taken, after which the following courses should be taken in order, as
far as possible: Logic, Advanced Logic, Philosophy of Nature, and Ethics. For the two
beginning courses Philosophy 203 and 204 are recommended.






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


PHYSICS
The general introductory course in college physics, preferably Physics 211-212, 213-214,
followed by at least 18 semester credit hours in Physics approved by the head of the depart-
ment.
In addition to the required courses in mathematics, calculus is either prerequisite or core-
quisite for the work above the introductory course, and the student is advised to take Differ-
ential Equations.
If the student is planning to take graduate work in physics he should take at least two
years of German, and if possible, two years of French.

POLITICAL SCIENCE
Political Science 101-102 and 18 semester credit hours in other courses in political science
in the Department of History and Political Science.
The major in political science and history is described above.

PSYCHOLOGY
Twenty-four semester credit hours in the Department of Psychology, including Psychology
201, 304, 309, 310, and 424.
SOCIOLOGY
Twenty-four semester credit hours in the Department of Sociology. The selection of
courses must be approved by the head of the department. The following courses are recom-
mended: Sociology 111, 112, 303-304, 441, 442. It is also recommended that the student
take the following courses, although they do not count in the above 24 semester credit hours:
Psychology 201 and Economics 201-202.
SPANISH
The student must earn or have credit for Spanish 101-102 and he must earn a total of 24
semester hours of college credit in the Department of Spanish; the selection of courses must
meet the approval of the head of the department.

SPEECH
The work in the Department of Speech is divided into two classes, as follows:
Class A. Speech 212, 214, 301, 303, 304, 405, 406.
Class B. Speech 307, 308, 311, 403, 404.
All students majoring in Speech are required to complete Speech 201-202. If the student
majoring in Speech is primarily interested in original speaking, he should elect at least 12
semester hours from Class A and a minimum of 6 semester hours (preferably Speech 307 and
404) from Class B. If the student is primarily interested in the interpretative and dramatic
aspects of Speech, he should elect at least 12 semester hours from Class B and a minimum of 6
semester hours (preferably Speech 301 and 303) from Class A.

CURRICULA FOR STUDENTS ENTERING FROM THE GENERAL COLLEGE

Suggested General College electives for students who contemplate entering one of the
curricula of the College of Arts and Sciences will be found on pages 185 to 186 of the Bulletin
of Information for the General College.
REGULATIONS
Students in the College of Arts and Sciences are restricted in the maximum load which
they will be permitted to carry in any semester by the following regulations: In no case





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


will a student be permitted to carry more than 19 credit hours in one semester; if his honor
point average for the preceding semester is less than 1.5 he will be permitted to take not
more than 16 credit hours.
In all curricula administered by the College of Arts and Sciences registration in elective
courses is subject to the approval of the Dean or his appointee.

THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
The curricula which lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science are
alike in all basic requirements. These curricula give emphasis to subject matter fields
which have been the essence of American colleges from the beginning. The requirements
for graduation from these curricula are as follows:
I. Sixty-four semester credit hours of which 12 must be earned outside the major
which is defined below
II. sixty-four honor points, and
III. either a departmental major as described in (a), or a group major as described
in (b)
(a) Many students desire or find it expedient to specialize in some one subject-
matter field. Such students should undertake to earn a departmental major.
A departmental major consists of three parts, as follows:
(1) Concentration consisting of not less than 24 and not more than 32
semester credit hours in one major department,
(2) a reading knowledge of a foreign language or 6 semester credit hours
in foreign language in a course numbered above 100, and
(3) such subsidiary courses from departments other than the major de-
partment as are essential to thoroughness of concentration in the
major department.
The work of the major may require and use all of the credits earned in
the College of Arts and Sciences except 12, which the student will elect
subject only to the restrictions that they must be earned in departments
other than those which contribute to the major, and that they must be
approved by the Dean or his appointee.
The head of the major department, or his appointee, will act as regis-
tration adviser and as councilor for the student who intends to earn this type
of major. The student's program of studies will be subject to the approval
of the adviser, the curriculum committee, and the Dean or his appointee.
The definitions of majors, as given on pages 263 to 265, do not apply for
students entering the College of Arts and Sciences from the General College.
For information concerning the requirements for majors under the new
curricula the student should consult the head of the department in which
he intends to earn the major.
(b) Many students do not need the intensive concentration required in a depart-
mental major. For such students group majors are provided. For the
group majors the courses offered by the College are divided into three groups.
One group consists of the humanities, another group consists of the social
sciences, and the remaining group consists of the laboratory sciences and
mathematics.
A group major also consists of three parts, as follows:






COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES


(1) Courses in one of the three groups with not less than 12 semester
credit hours in some one department of the group and not more than
18 semester credit hours in any of the departments
(2) A reading knowledge of a foreign language or 6 semester credit hours
in foreign language in a course numbered above 100
(3) Such subsidiary courses from one or both of the other groups as may
be deemed necessary to a complete program of study.
The group major may require and use all of the credits earned for graduation
with the exception of 12 which the student shall elect subject only to the
restrictions that they must be earned outside of the major group and must
be approved by the Dean or his appointee. Each student who intends to
earn a group major shall have as his registration adviser the head (or his
appointee) of a department
(1) which offers courses in the group, and
(2) in which the student intends to earn not less than 12 semester credit
hours.
The program of courses agreed upon by the student and his adviser will be
subject to the approval of the curriculum committee and of the Dean or his
appointee.
The group major provides for individual programs, and any student who is
interested in this type of major may secure information concerning his own
program from the office of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, or
from the head of a department in which he expects to earn 12 semester
credit hours.
BACHELOR OF ARTS
The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the
requirements for degrees with either departmental or group majors in the
humanities and social science groups.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
The degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon those who fulfill
the requirements for degrees with either departmental or group majors in
the laboratory sciences and mathematics group.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM
Instruction in journalism is intended to provide training for:
(1) Those who are primarily interested in journalism as a profession, and
who seek preparation for careers in such journalistic activities as
advertising, free-lance writing, general magazine work, metropolitan
newspaper work, small-town daily newspaper work, press association
and syndicate work, public relations and publicity work, radio news-
writing; specialized journalism, such as political writing, foreign corre-
spondence, etc.; trade journalism, such as the business and agricul-
tural press; and weekly newspaper work.
(2) Those who plan careers in one of the many types of work closely
related to journalism, and in which the broad cultural knowledge and
training afforded by professional education in journalism will be either
a requirement or an essential to success.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


(3) Those who are interested in journalism as a social science, and as a
powerful agency for directing civilization's evolving processes, and
who realize that an education in journalism, and the life situations
with which journalism concerns itself, constitute a liberal education.
Students who are primarily interested in the cultural and intellectual train-
ing which the study of journalism affords, rather than in journalism as a
profession, may select journalism as a major for the degree of Bachelor of
Arts, instead of pursuing the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor
of Arts in Journalism.
Requirements for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Jour-
nalism are:
I. Sixty-six semester credit hours, in which the student must include
from the following courses in journalism those not already completed
in the General College: 213, 214, 215, 216, 301, 302, 309, 310, 314,
317, 318, 407, 408, 409, 411, and 412. The remainder of the 66
semester credit hours are elective subject to requirement III.
Unless there is reason acceptable to the head of the Department of
Journalism and to the Dean of the College, the student will be required
to complete journalism courses numbered in the 200's before entering
upon journalism courses numbered in the 300's, and similarly he will
be required to complete journalism courses in the 300's before he
enters journalism courses numbered in the 400's.
II. Sixty-six honor points.
III. The head of the Department of Journalism will be the registration
adviser for students in this curriculum. The student's program of
studies will be subject to the approval of the head of the Department
of Journalism and the Dean or his appointee.

THE COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAW CURRICULA
The College of Arts and Sciences offers three curricula in combination with Law. In
these curricula it is possible for capable, industrious students to complete the requirements
for admission to the College of Law by one year of work in the College of Arts and Sciences
after graduation from the General College or its equivalent. To do this, however, it is neces-
sary that the student use all electives and options in the General College toward fulfillment
of the requirements for graduation from the College of Arts and Sciences.
The requirements for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in these
curricula are basically the same, and may be described as follows:
I. Thirty-six semester credit hours and 36 honor points in the College of Arts and
Sciences,
II. twenty-eight semester credit hours and 28 honor points in the College of Law, and
III. a departmental major or a group major leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts
or Bachelor of Science. (See page 266)
The requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism in the combined
Journalism-Law curriculum are the same as the requirements for graduation in the curricu-
lum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism (see page 267), provided, how-
ever, that credit must be earned as follows:
I. Thirty-eight semester credit hours and 38 honor points in the College of Arts and
Sciences, and
II. twenty-eight semester credit hours and 28 honor points in the College of Law.






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


THE PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM
The College of Arts and Sciences cooperate with students who wish to secure training
which will fit them to enter upon the study of medicine. All such students are advised to
consult medical school bulletins carefully and widely. The program in the College of Arts
and Sciences will be planned in accordance with the needs of the individual student. It
is strongly urged, however, that pre-medical students follow and complete the curriculum
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science.
Students who are interested in medicine are invited to the Office of the Dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences for counsel and advice.


SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

ADMINISTRATION
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President; Dean, College of Arts
and Sciences
BERNARD V. CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Director
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY
BERNARD V. CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Pharmacognosy and
Pharmacology
EDWARD J. IRELAND, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Instructor in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology

PHARMACY
WILLIAM J. HUSA, Ph.C., Ph.D. (Iowa), Head Professor of Pharmacy
PERRY A. FOOTE, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Pharmacy

GENERAL STATEMENT
All work offered in the School of Pharmacy meets the highest requirements of pharma-
ceutical instruction in this country. As a member of the American Association of Colleges
of Pharmacy, the School receives recognition for its courses from all state boards requiring
attendance in a school of pharmacy of membership standard as a prerequisite for examination
and registration.
All students are enrolled by the Florida State Pharmaceutical Association as associate
members, as per resolution adopted by the Executive Committee in January, 1935. Upon
graduation and registration as pharmacist, full membership in the Association is granted
free for one year. "Students' Hour" is a feature of the annual convention of the State
Pharmaceutical Association.
The curricula are designed to provide a broad scientific education, to train retail phar-
macists, and to provide an opportunity for specialization either in Commercial Pharmacy, in
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, or in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology. Specialization in
Commercial Pharmacy should qualify a student for a position as manager in a drug store,
or as a salesman of drugs and chemicals. The work in Pharmaceutical Chemistry is designed
to train men for positions in food and drug laboratories, or as manufacturing pharmacists.
The completion of the work in pharmacognosy or pharmacology should qualify one to act
in the capacity of pharmacognocist or inspector of crude drugs with a manufacturing con-
cern, or with the Federal Customs Service, or as pharmacologist for manufacturing houses
or for hospitals. The foregoing are only a few of the many positions open to men who





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION UPPER DIVISION


possess training along any of the above lines. The demand for graduates of this school
exceeds the supply. These curricula also provide opportunity, through selection of
approved electives or options, for the completion of minimum requirements for entrance into
certain medical colleges.
A ten-acre tract has been allotted to the School of Pharmacy for use as a medicinal plant
garden, which is used as a teaching adjunct and as a source of supply of fresh material for
study, investigation, and classroom illustration.
The General Edmund Kirby-Smith Memorial Herbarium, consisting of 5,600 specimens,
with those collected locally, provides a collection of approximately 6,000 plant specimens.
Some of these were collected as early as 1846. Specimens from nearly every state and many
foreign countries make up this collection. This herbarium provides actual specimens for
study of plant classification and for comparison and identification of new species.
The Chemistry-Pharmacy branch of the main library is housed in the Chemistry-Pharmacy
building. The library includes text and reference books and several of the American and
foreign periodicals on chemical and pharmaceutical subjects.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
(a) Graduation from the General College or its equivalent as determined by the Board of
Examiners, and (b) recommendation of the Board of Examiners.
Note: Students planning to study pharmacy are advised to offer General Chemistry for C-7;
Pharmacy 223-224 for C-8; Pharmacognosy 221-222 for C-9. Students of the Superior Group
are advised to offer General Chemistry for C-2; Basic Mathematics for C-4; and General
Physics for C-7.
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
(a) Students registered in the University before or during the academic year 1934-35 may
meet the requirements of the "Old Curriculum".
(b) Students entering from the General College, or equivalent as determined by the Board
of Examiners, must meet the requirements of the "New Curriculum" as outlined under
that title.
GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Students may receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of graduation
With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors, see the
Bulletin of By-Laws.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY
The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy is awarded on completion of one of
the curricula as outlined below. Opportunity for specialization in Pharmacy, Pharma-
ceutical Chemistry, Pharmacognosy, or Pharmacology is provided through choice of electives
or options in the senior year. Electives and options are listed after curricula.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY
Courses are offered leading to the degree of Master of Science in Pharmacy. Candidates
for that degree must possess the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy from an insti-
tution of recognized standing.
The student must spend at least one entire academic year in residence at the University
as a graduate student, devoting his full time to the pursuit of his studies.
For further requirements for the Master's Degree, see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.






SCHOOL OF PHARMACY


DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Courses are offered leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy with specialization in
Chemistry, Pharmacy, Pharmacognosy, and Pharmacology. For further information consult
the Bulletin of the Graduate School.


OLD CURRICULUM

Students enrolled before September, 1935, may continue with the old curriculum as out-
lined below:
First Semester Second Semester
Courses Credits Courses Credits
Freshman Year (Discontinued)
Sophomore Year (Discontinued)
Junior Year (Discontinued after August, 1937)
Bcy. 301 -General Bacteriology ...... 4 Pgy. 342 -Microscopy of Drugs. ....... 3
Ply. 351 -Pharmacology ............. 3 Ply. 362 -Pharmacological Standard-
Phy. 353 -Organic and Analytical ization .................. 4
Pharmacy ............... 5 Phy. 354 -Organic and Analytical
Ps. 101 -General Physics ........... 3 Pharmacy ............... 5
Ps. 103 -Physics Laboratory ........ 2 Ps. 102 -General Physics ........... 3
Ps. 104 -Physics Laboratory ........ 2


Senior Year
-French or German ......... 3 Fh. or Gn.
-Principles of Biologicals ... 3 Phy. 362
-Prescriptions and Dispensing 3 Phy. 372
-Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence 2 Phy. 402
Approved Electives ......... 6


-French or German .........
-Prescriptions and Dispensing
-Commercial Pharmacy .....
-Pharmaceutical Arithmetic..
Approved Electives ........


Whenever the term "approved elective" occurs in the curriculum it will be understood
that the electives are to be recommended by the head of the department concerned and
approved by the Director.
Electives: Pgy. 425-426; PJy. 452; Ply. 455-456; Ply. 517; Phy. 432; Phy. 453.


NEW CURRICULUM

The curriculum outlined below will become effective beginning with September, 1937.
To be eligible for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy all requirements of the
curricula for pharmacy students in both the General College and the School of Pharmacy
must be completed. For example, if Pharmacy 223-224 or Pharmacognosy 221-222 are not
completed in the General College, these courses must be completed after admission to the
School of Pharmacy. However, in such cases these courses may be taken in lieu of an
equal number of hours of options.
NEW CURRICULUM


Junior
Cy. 0262 -Organic Chemistry ......... 5
Pgy. 0242 -Drug Plant Histology ...... 2
Ply. 351 -Pharmacology .............. 3
Phy. 211 -Inorganic Pharmacy ....... 5
*Options ................... 3



18


Year
Pgy. 342 -Microscopy of Drugs........
Ply. 362 -Pharmacological Standard-
ization ..................
Phy. 0353 -Organic and Analytical
Pharmacy ...............
Phy. 372 -Commercial Pharmacy .....
*Options ....................


Fh. or Gn.
Ply. 451
Phy. 361
Phy. 381






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


First Semester Second Semester
Courses Credits Courses Credits
Senior Year
Ply. 451 -Principles of Biologicals.... 3 Ply. 456 -New Remedies ............. 3
Ply. 455 -New Remedies ............. 3 Phy. 362 -Prescriptions and Dispensing 3
Phy. 0354 -Organic and Analytical Phy. 402 -Pharmaceutical Arithmetic.. 2
Pharmacy ............... 5 Phy. 432 -Advanced Drug Analysis.... 3
Phy. 361 -Prescriptions and Dispensing 3 *Options .................... 7
Phy. 381 -Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence 2
*Options ................... 2
18 18
*OPTIONS
At least 9 hours must be selected from Group II.
Group I Group 11
Bey. 301, 304, Bly. 102, 203, Cy. 303, C-1K (Elementary Accounting), Pgy. 442,
Foreign Language, Physics Ply. 452, 517, Phy. 453



THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

ADMINISTRATION
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head Professor of Economics, Acting Dean of the General
College, Dean of the College of Business Administration
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
NANNIE BELLE WHITAKER, B.A., Executive Secretary

FACULTY
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head of the Department and Professor of Economics
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D. (Robert Brookings), Professor of Business
Statistics and Economics
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D. (Clark), Professor of Economic Geography, Acting
Director of Institute of Inter-American Affairs
DAVID MIERS BEIGHTS, Ph.D. (Illinois), C.P.A. (Florida, West Virginia), Professor of
Accounting
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, Ph.D. (Stanford), Professor of Economics
ROLAND B. EUTSLER, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Professor of Economics and Insurance
ARCHER STUART CAMPBELL, Ph.D. (Virginia), Associate Professor of Economics and Foreign
Trade, Director of the Bureau of Economic and Business Research
HARWOOD BURROWS DOLBEARE, B.A., Associate Professor of Finance
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, M.A., LL.B., Associate Professor of Business Law and Economics
JAMES EDWARD CHACE, JR., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics and Realty Management
SIGISMOND DER DIETTRICH, Ph.D. (Clark), D.Sc. (Budapest), Assistant Professor of Eco-
nomic Geography
WILLIAM TROTTER HICKS, Ph.D. (Northwestern), Assistant Professor of Economics and
Marketing
FRANK WALDO TUTTLE, Ph.D. (Iowa), Assistant Professor of Economics
BEN COGBURN, B.S.B.A., Instructor in Accounting






THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


GENERAL INFORMATION
Instruction in Business Administration is designed to provide analysis of the basic prin-
ciples of business. Its purpose is to prepare students (1) to become business executives;
(2) to assume the increasing responsibilities of business ownership; and (3) to act in the
capacity of business specialists.
Business education involves consideration of the following occupational levels: (1) upper
levels composed of proprietors and executives; (2) intermediate levels composed of depart-
ment heads and minor executives; and (3) lower levels composed of clerical and routine
workers. The scope of business education includes preparation for all of these levels. While
the College of Business Administration has organized its curricula in business administration
to prepare students primarily to occupy the upper and intermediate levels, it has not entirely
ignored the lower levels.
The College of Business Administration does not profess to turn out finished business
managers, executives, department heads, or minor executives. Its curricula provide instruc-
tion that will help to shorten the period of apprenticeship for those who expect to enter
business occupations.

SPECIAL INFORMATION

LECTURES BY BUSINESS EXECUTIVES
It is the policy of the College to invite from time to time prominent business executives
both from within and from without the state to address the students in business adminis-
tration.
BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH
The College of Business Administration maintains a Bureau of Economic and Business
Research which provides faculty members and graduate students with an opportunity to
engage in specific types of research work. Its activities are coordinated with the research
activities of the College as a whole.

MEMBERSHIP IN NATIONAL AND REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
The College of Business Administration was admitted to membership in the American
Association of Collegiate Schools of Business in 1929. The College is also a member of the
Southern Economic Association.
DEGREES AND CURRICULA
The College of Business Administration offers two types of curricula leading to the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration: the Curriculum in Business
Administration Proper, and the Curriculum in Combination with Law.
Students who are registering as Juniors in the College of Business Administration are
advised to arrange their courses to comply with the new curriculum. They will be expected
to have completed the required courses or their equivalent as specified in the first two years
of the old curriculum. Seniors will remain under the old curriculum and wherever courses
specified in the old curriculum have been discontinued they may petition the Committee
on Curricular Adjustments for substitutes.

ADMISSION
To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for the Curriculum in
Business Administration Proper, or the Curriculum in Combination with Law, students are
required to present a certificate of graduation from the General College and to have com-
pleted the following courses:






274 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION

C-1D.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life
C-1J. -Elementary Statistics
C-1K.-Elementary Accounting.
One additional half-year elective course in the General College.
These courses may be taken for C-7, C-8, and C-9 electives in the General College during
the second year.

THE CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR
OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The maximum credit load for all students in the College of Business Administration
during their first semester, except students registered for the Curriculum in Combination
with Law, is 15 academic semester hours (6 in summer session) to which advanced military
science may be added. A student may increase his credit load to 18 academic semester
hours (9 in summer session) to which advanced military science may be added, following
any semester in which he has attained an honor point average of 2 or more. The minimum
requirement for graduation from the College of Business Administration is 60 semester hours
with 60 honor points. To graduate with honors, a student must complete 60 semester hours
with 120 honor points. To graduate with high honors, a student must complete 60 semester
hours with 120 honor points and pass satisfactorily a comprehensive examination on all his
courses in business administration.
CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
First Semester Second Semester
Courses Credits Courses Credits
Junior Year
Bs. 311 -Accounting Principles ...... 3 Bs. 322E -Financial Organization of
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Society .................. 3
Society .................. 3 Bs. 0335E-Economics of Marketing.... 3
Bs. 327E -Public Finance ............ 3 Bs. 0351E -Transportation Principles .. 3
Electives .................. 6 Electives .................. 6

15 15
Senior Year
Bs. 401 -Business Law .............. 3 Bs. 402 -Business Law ............. 3
Bs. 407E -Economic Principles and Bs. 408E -Economic Principles and
Problems ................ 3 Problems ................ 3
*Electives ................... 9 *Electives ................... 9

15 15
*Electives are limited to courses in business administration and six semester hours in advanced
military science.

THE CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The College of Business Administration combines with the General College and the
College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately
to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first two years in the General
College and the third year in the College of Business Administration; when they have fully
satisfied the academic requirements of these three years, they are eligible to register in the
College of Law and may during their last three years complete the course in the College
of Law. When students have, after entering the College of Law, completed one year's work
in law (28 semester hours and 28 honor points), they may offer this year's work as a sub-
stitute for the fourth year in the College of Business Administration and receive the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.






COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


The maximum credit load for students pursuing the curriculum in combination with
law is 18 academic semester hours (6 in the summer session) to which may be added
advanced military science. To graduate with honors, a student must complete 64 semester
hours with 128 honor points.

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
First Semester Second Semester
Courses Credits Courses Credits
Bs. 311 -Accounting Principles ...... 3 Bs. 312 -Accounting Principles ...... 3
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Bs. 322E -Financial Organization of
Society .................. 3 Society .................. 3
Bs. 327E -Public Finance ............ 3 Bs. 0335E -Economics of Marketing..... 3
Bs. 407E -Economic Principles and Bs. 0351E -Transportation Principles... 3
Problems ................ 3 Bs. 408E -Economic Principles and
*Electives .................. 6 Problems ................ 3
*Electives ................... 3
18 -
18

*Electives are limited to courses in business administration and six semester hours in advanced
military science.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Assistant Dean in Charge of Laboratory
School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
FACULTY
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean and Professor of Education
ALFRED CRAGO, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Educational Psychology and Measurements, and
School Psychologist
JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D. (Nebraska), Professor of Public School Administration
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor of Agricultural Education
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Professor of Secondary Education and High School Visitor
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor of Supervised Teaching and Director
of Educational Research
ELLIS BENTON SALT, M.A., Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Assistant Dean, and Professor of
Education
BUNNIE OTHANEL SMITH, M.A., Assistant Professor of Curriculum Revision
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor of Education
HARRY EVINS WOOD, M.A.E., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education and Itinerant
Teacher Trainer
STAFF OF THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL
ELIZABETH BLANDING, B.A., Teaching Fellow in English Education
JACK BOHANNON, M.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts Education
MARGARET WHITE BOUTELLE, M.A., Assistant Professor of English Education
CLEVA JOSEPHINE CARSON, B.A., Instructor in Music Education
JAMES DEWBERRY COPELAND, M.A., Assistant Professor of Business Education


275





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


JOHN BROWARD CULPEPPER, B.A., Assistant Professor of Social Science Education
CHARLOTTE DUNN, B.S., Instructor in Kindergarten Education
WILLIAM THOMAS EDWARDS, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education
CHARLES JACKSON GANTT, B.S.E., Teaching Fellow in Science Education
WILLIAM Louis GOETTE, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Science Education
JAMES DOUGLAS HAYGOOD, M.A., Assistant Professor of Foreign Language Education
HOMER HOWARD, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education
KATHLEEN TENNILLE KING, B.S.E., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to the
Fourth Grade
WILLIAM FRANCIS LOCKWOOD, B.A.E., Instructor in Practical and Fine Arts Education
LILLIAN MAGUIRE, M.A., Instructor in English Education
INGORIE VAUSE MIKELL, B.M., Assistant Instructor in Kindergarten Education
BEATRICE T. OLSON, M.S., Instructor in Home Economics Education
CLARA McDoNALD OLSON, M.A.E., Assistant Professor of Integrated Education
RUTH BEATRICE PEELER, M.A., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to the First Grade
EULA MAE SNIDER, B.S. in L.S., Librarian and Instructor in Education
BILLIE KNAPP STEVENS, B.S. in H.Pl., Instructor in Physical Education for Boys
GRACE ADAMS STEVENS, B.A.E., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to the Sixth
Grade
ADAM WEBSTER TENNEY, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education
ALENE MAE TINDALL, M.A., Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to the Third Grade
(To Be Appointed) Instructor in Physical Education for Girls
(To Be Appointed) Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to the Fifth Grade
(To Be Appointed) Instructor in Elementary Education assigned to the Second Grade

GENERAL INFORMATION
Opportunities for educational investigation, student teaching, and observation are pro-
vided through the courtesy of the public school authorities of Gainesville and Alachua
County. More than a score of accredited elementary and secondary schools are within a
thirty-mile radius of the University. The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School increases many
times the facilities for the study of educational problems.
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES
Not more than one-fourth of the credits which are applied toward a degree, nor more
than 12 of the last 36 credits which are earned toward a Bachelor's degree, may be taken by
correspondence study or extension class. Candidates for the Normal Diploma may not earn
more than 16 credits by correspondence study or extension class. While in residence, the
student will not be allowed to carry on correspondence work without the consent of the Dean;
this permission will be granted only in exceptional cases. Not more than 9 credits may
be earned by correspondence study during the summer vacation period.
GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES
Graduates of the University are granted Graduate State Certificates without further
examination, provided three-twentieths of their work has been devoted to professional
training and provided that they have satisfied the requirement of the law as to the Constitu-
tion of the United States. It is well for the student to note that a Graduate State Certificate
permits him to teach only those subjects listed on such certificate, and that only those
subjects will be placed on his certificate in which he has specialized in his college course.
This will ordinarily mean that a subject must have been pursued at least three years in
college, in addition to credit for all high school courses offered in that subject by






COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


a standard high school, before a certificate to teach that subject will be granted. The
student who expects to meet the requirements for specialization should familiarize himself
with the regulations regarding specialization as printed in the Handbook for Teachers, Section
1, published by the State of Florida, Department of Public Instruction. Applicants for
the Graduate State Certificate must apply to Superintendent W. S. Cawthon, Tallahassee,
for application blanks and for further information.
Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by "presenting satis-
factory evidence of having taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under a
Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of three holders of Life State, Life
Graduate State, or Life Professional Certificates." Application for a Life Graduate State
Certificate must be filed before the expiration of the Graduate State Certificate.

EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATE
Students enrolled in the College of Education, upon recommendation of the faculty,
receive an extension of one year on any or all valid Florida certificates.


DEGREES AND CURRICULA

For information concerning the requirements for admission to the College of
Education, see page 187 Bulletin of Information for the General College or pages
281 of this bulletin.
The curricula which follow apply only to students registered in the Univer-
sity during or before the academic year 1934-35.

UPPER AND LOWER DIVISIONS
The College of Education is composed of a Lower and an Upper Division. The Lower
Division contains all students who have not satisfied the requirements for admission to the
Upper Division.
For detailed regulations concerning the Upper and Lower Division, see the Bulletin of
By-Laws.
GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division will, according to the
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of
graduation With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors,
see the Bulletin of By-Laws.
DEGREES OFFERED
Students completing any of the prescribed four-year courses may obtain the respective
degrees: Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Education, Bachelor of
Science in Agricultural Education, Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education,
or Bachelor of Arts in Health and Physical Education.
Students completing the prescribed course may obtain the Normal Diploma.

MAJORS AND MINORS
In the following discussion a major is defined to consist of 18 credit hours above the
elementary year-course in a subject other than Education. A minor is ordinarily defined
to consist of 9 credit hours above the elementary year-course in a subject other than Educa-
tion, but in case the number of hours thus specified is not sufficient to meet the requirements
necessary for certification, the student must take enough additional hours to meet these
requirements.





278 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA AND TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 11
EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

Lower Division
(Discontinued after August, 1937)
Leading to the Normal Diploma
For Those Who Expect to Teach in the First Six Grades Credits
tEn. 103 Health Education ............. ......................... 3
fEn. 121 Primary Methods .........................................
or 3
tEn. 124 The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth I
G rades ................................................ J
tEn. 122 Teaching Reading and Literature in the First Six Grades.... 3
tEn. 201 The Teaching of the Social Sciences in the Fourth, Fifth and]
Sixth Grades .................... ...................... I
or } 3
tEn. 221 Advanced Primary Methods .............................. J
En. 207 Educational Psychology ................................... 3
tEn. 209 The Teaching of Science in the First Six Grades............. 2
tEn. 253 Supervised Teaching of the Elementary Subjects............ ]
or 3
En. 308 The Public School Curriculum ............................. J
tGl. 101-102 General Natural Science .................................. 8
Sy. 111-112 Introduction to Social Studies ............................. 6
Eh. 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition ................................. 6
tPublic School Art......................................... 4
tPublic School M usic ....................................... 4
tHandwriting (one course) ................................. 0
My. 103-104, 203 204- Field Artillery ....................................... 8
M ajor and M inors ........................................ 12

Total ................................................... 68

Upper Division Credits
En. 308* The Public School Curriculum ............................. 3
En. 319 Child and Adolescent Psychology .......................... 3
Approved Electives in Education ........................... 6
One major** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives
approved by the Dean .................... ................ 52

Total ................. ............. ..................... 64
Total Credits and Honor Points ........................... 132

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION OR
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
For Those Who Expect to Teach in the Junior and Senior High School
Lower Division
(Discontinued after August, 1937) Credits
PI. 101-102 Physical Education ....................................... 2
En. 101 Introduction to Education ................................. 3
En. 207 Educational Psychology ................................... 3
Eh. 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition ................................. 6
Eh. 103-104 Introduction to Literature ................................. 6
Gl. 101-102 General Natural Science .................................. 8
Sy. 111-112 Introduction to Sociology ................................. 6
Sch. 201 Public Speaking ......................................... 3
Major and minors and electives approved by the Dean-(Mini-
m um ) .................................................. 24
My. 103-104, 203-204-Field Artillery ..................................... 8

Total ................................................... 69

*Students who have taken En. 308 must elect three hours of Education in its place.
**For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the natural
sciences.
tOffered only in the Summer Session.







COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 279


Upper Division Credits
En. 319 Child and Adolescent Psychology .......................... 3
En. 323 -- General Methods in the Secondary School................... 3
*Supervised Student Teaching .............................. 6
En. 403 Problem-Project Method .................................. 3
tApproved Electives in Education........................... 6
Completion of one major** and two minors (or a double minor)
and electives approved by the Dean....................... 42

Total .................................................. 63
Total Credits ........................................... 132

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA
(Discontinued after August, 1937)
If, while the student is working on the curriculum leading to a Bachelor's degree, he
desires to secure the Normal Diploma, he may do so when he has satisfactorily completed
the following work:
Credits
PI. 101-102 Physical Education ....................................... 2
En. 101 Introduction to Education .................................. 3
En. 207 Educational Psychology ................................... 3
En. 323 General Methods in the Secondary School.................... 3
Supervised Student Teaching .............................. 3
Eh. 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition ................................ 6
Eh. 103-104 Introduction to Literature ................................ 6
Gl. 101-102$ General Natural Science ................. .................. 8
Sy. 111-112 Introduction to Social Studies-Introduction to Sociology.... 6
M ajor and m inors ........................................ 24
My. 103-104 Freshman Field Artillery ................................. 4

Total ................................................... 68

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education

Lower Division
(Discontinued after August, 1937)
Credits
Ag. 202 Farm M achinery ......................................... 4
Al. 104 Types and Breeds of Animals .............................. 4
Bty. 101-102 General Botany ...................................... 8
Cy. 101-106 General Chemistry ....................................... 10
En. 207 Educational Psychology ................................... 3
Eh. 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition ................................. 6
He. 101 Elements of Horticulture ................................. 3
Ms. 104 Mathematics for Agricultural Students ..................... 3
My. 103-104 Freshman Field Artillery ................................. 4
My. 203-204 Sophomore Field Artillery ................................ 4
PI. 101-102 Physical Education ....................................... 2
Ps. 101-102 Elementary Physics Lecture .............................. 6
Ps. 103-104 Elementary Physics Laboratory ........................... 4
Sch. 201 Public Speaking ......................................... 3
E lectives ................................................. 3

Total .................................................. 67

*These courses carry three credits each and must be selected in accordance with the major and
two minors in which the student is working.
**For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the natural
sciences.
tStudents preparing to become principals must take En. 305, 317, and 401, 406, or 408.
tStudents who major or minor in a natural science are not required to take GI. 101-102. It may
be taken as an elective.






280 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


Upper Division Credits
As. 306 Farm Management ....................................... 3
As. 308 M marketing ............................................... 3
Ag. 303 Farm Shop ............................................... 3
A y. 301 Soils .................................................... 5
Ay. 302 Fertilizers and Manures .................................. 3
En. 303-304 Methods of Teaching Vocational Agriculture ............... 6
En. 306 Vocational Education ..................................... 3
En. 319 Child and Adolescent Psychology .......................... 3
En. 409-410 Supervised Teaching of Vocational Agriculture. ............ 6
Ey. 302 Economic Entomology
or
Bcy. 301 General Bacteriology ..................................... 4
H e. 206 Trucking ................................................ 3
Vy. 302 Elementary Veterinary Science ............................ 2
Electives in Agriculture (above 300 courses)................ 12
Electives, General ........................................ 9

T total .................................................. 65
Total credits ............................................ 132

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Lower Division
First Semester Second Semester
Courses Credits Courses Credits
Freshman Year (Discontinued)
Sophomore Year (Discontinued after August, 1936)
En. 207 -Educational Psychology .... 3 HPI. 214 -Theory and Practice of
HPI. 111 -Fundamentals of Basketball. 2 Natural Activities ....... 2
HPI. 211 -Applied Anatomy and HP1. 216 -History and Principles of
Physiology ............... 2 Physical Education ...... 3
HPI. 213 -Theory and Practice of My. 204 -Field Artillery ............. 2
Natural Activities ........ 2 Sch. 0201 -Public Speaking ........... 3
My. 203 -Field Artillery ............. 2 Work in Minor ............. 7
Work in Minor ............. 6

Total .................... 17 Total .................... 17

Upper Division
(Discontinued after August, 1937)
Junior Year
Bcy. 301 -General Bacteriology ...... 4 En. 0323 -General Methods in the
En. 319 -Child and Adolescent Secondary School ........ 3
Psychology .............. 3 HP1. 304 Track ..................... 3
HPI. 301 -Advanced Football ......... 2 HPI. 312 -Administration of Health
HPI. 303 -Advanced Basketball ....... 2 Education ............... 3
HPI. 311 -Administration of Physical HPI. 314 -Theory and Practice of
Education ............... 3 Natural Activities ........ 2
HPI. 313 -Theory and Practice of HPI. 0353 -Practice in Conducting an
Natural Activities ....... 2 Intramural Program ..... 1
Work in Minor ............. 5

Total .................... 16 Total ................... 17
Senior Year
En. 401 -School Administration ...... 3 En. 403 -Philosophy of Education .... 3
En. 475 -Supervised Teaching in Health En. -Supervised Teaching in Minor 3
and Physical Education... 3 Eh. -English Electives .......... 3
Eh. -English Electives .......... 3 HPI. 344 -Baseball ................... 3
Approved Electives ........ 7 Approved Electives ......... 4

Total .................... 16 Total .................... 16
Total Credits ............... ...............................................132
NOTE: In addition to the specific courses noted above the student in Health and Physical Educa-
tion must select and complete one minor from the following group:






COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


Credits
1. Biology (in addition to Bly. 101-102).. 15
2. Botany and Bacteriology (in addition to
B ey. 301) ........................ 15
3. Chemistry (in addition to Cy. 101-102). 15
4. Econom ics .......................... 15


Credits
5. H history ............................. 15
6. M them atics ........................ 15
7. Physics ............................. 16
8. Political Science .................... 15
9. Sociology (in addition to Sy. 111)..... 15


NEW CURRICULA

CURRICULA IN THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
EDUCATION AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
For admission to the College of Education all students will be required to present a
certificate of graduation from the General College, or its equivalent, and have the approval
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTAIN GROUPS
Certain additional requirements for admission are specified for admission to the curricula
in Health and Physical Education, Agricultural Education, and Industrial Arts Education.
For these requirements, see page 187 of the Bulletin of Information for the General College.

DEGREES
Only two degrees are offered in the College of Education-Bachelor of Arts in Education
and Bachelor of Science in Education.* The former degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor
of Science in Health and Physical Education, Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education.
and Bachelor of Science in Industrial Arts Education are incorporated in these two degrees.
For either degree the student is required to complete 60 semester hours, with 60 honor
points, at least 18 resident hours of which must be in Education and the remaining hours of
which will be elected by the student in conference with his advisory committee. In every
case, the student must complete at least 24 semester hours in a subject or field of concen-
tration, to be eligible for graduation.
All students except those whose fields of concentration are Health and Physical Education,
Agricultural Education, or Industrial Arts Education, will be graduated upon completion
of the following curriculum:

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN EDUCATION
(For those who expect to teach in the junior and senior high school)
First Semester Second Semester


Courses


Credits Courses


Credits


Junior Year
En. 375 -Directed Observation and En.
Teaching ................ 3
En. 385 -The Individual and En.
Education ............... 2
Electives .................. 10


En. 421 -Directed Teaching ......... 2
En. 491 -Education and the
Social Order ............. 2
Electives .................. 11

15


-Directed Observation and
Teaching ................ 3
-The Individual and
Education ................ 2
Electives .................. 10


nior Year
En. 422 -Directed Teaching ......... 2
En. 492 -Educational Conceptions .... 2
Electives .................. 11


15


*For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the Natural
Sciences.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


CURRICULUM FOR THOSE WHOSE FIELD OF CONCENTRATION IS HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION


First Semester
Cr

-Directed Observation and
Teaching* ...............
-The Individual and Education
-Administration of Health and
Physical Education .......
-The Physical Education
Program in Schools .......
-Practice in Conducting an
Intramural Program ......
Electives ..................


edits Courses
Junior Year
En. 3'
3
2 En. 31
HPI. 3
3
HPI. 3:
a


Second Semester


Credits


-Directed Observation and
Teaching* ...............
-The Individual and Education
-Principles of Health Educa-
tion .....................
-The Physical Education
Program in Schools ......
Electives ..................


Senior Year


En. 421 -Directed Teaching ......... 2
En. 0492 -Educational Conceptions ... 2
HPI. 401 -Principles of Athletic Coach-
ing ...................... 3
Electives .................. 7


En. 0491 -Education and the Social
Order ....................
En. Electives ..................
HPI. 341 -Principles of Physical
Education ...............
HPI. 402 -Principles of Athletic
Coaching ................
Electives ...................


CURRICULUM FOR THOSE WHOSE FIELD OF CONCENTRATION IS AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


-Farm Management ........
-Farm Shop ................
- Soils ......................
-Methods of Teaching Agricul-
ture .....................
-The Individual and
Education ...............
-Poultry Practices .........




-Supervised Teaching in
Vocational Agriculture ...
-Plant Materials ..........
-Poultry Management .......
-Livestock Diseases and
Farm Sanitation .........
tElectives ...................


Junior Year
3 En.
3
3 En.
En.
3
He.
2 Py.
1

15
Senior Year
As.
3 Ay.
3 En.
3
Py.
2
4


-Methods of Teaching
Agriculture ..............
-Vocational Education ......
-The Individual and
Education ...............
-Olericulture ...............
-Poultry Practices ..........
Electives ...................




-Marketing ................
-Fertilizers and Manures....
-Supervised Teaching in
Vocational Agriculture ...
-Poultry Management .......
+Electives ...................


CURRICULUM FOR THOSE WHOSE FIELD OF CONCENTRATION IS INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION
Junior Year
En. 375 -Directed Observation and En. 376 -Directed Observation and
Teaching* ............... 3 Teaching* ............... 3
En. 385 -The Individual and Educa- En. 386 -The Individual and
tion .................... 2 Education .............. 2
In. 301 -Design and Construction in In. 302 -General Shop ............ 3
Sheet Metal ............ 3 In. 304 -History of Industrial Arts
In. 303 -General Machine Shop and Education .............. 3
Metal W ork ............ 3 Electives ................. 5
Electives ................. 5

16 16

*Directed Observation and Teaching in the junior year to be in student's minor field.
tTo be approved by the Professor of Agricultural Education and the Dean.


Courses






THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


First Semester Second Semester
Courses Credits Courses Credits
Senior Year
En. 421 -Directed Teaching ........ 2 En. 492 -Educational Conceptions .... 2
En. 491 -Education and the En. Electives .................. 2
Social Order ........... 2 In. 402 -Methods and Organization.. 3
In. 401 -Architectural Drawing for In. 404 -Advanced Industrial Arts... 3
Industrial Arts Teachers. 3 Electives .................. 4
In. 403 -Design and Construction in
Wood and Concrete ..... 3
Electives ................. 4
14 14

THE NORMAL DIPLOMA
For the Normal Diploma a student will be required to complete 30 semester hours, at
least 9 resident hours of which must be in Education and the remaining hours of which will
be determined by the student in conference with his advisory committee.



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

ADMINISTRATION
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
BLAKE RAGSDALE VAN LEER, B.S. in E.E., M.S. in M.E., M.E. (Purdue), Dean of College
of Engineering and Professor of Engineering
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, M.S., D.Sc. (Princeton), Professor of Chemical Engineering
JESSE WILFORD MASON, Ch.E., Ph.D. (Yale), Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

CIVIL ENGINEERING
PERCY LAWRENCE REED, M.S., C.E., Head of the Department and Professor of Civil Engi-
neering
THOMAS MARVEL LOWE, S.B., M.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
WILLIAM LINCOLN SAWYER, B.S.C.E., Instructor in Civil Engineering
ROBERT MILTON JOHNSON, B.S.C.E., Graduate Assistant in Civil Engineering

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
JOSEPH WEIL, B.S.E.E., M.S., Head of the Department and Professor of Electrical Engineer-
ing; Head of Engineering Division, State Radio Station WRUF
STEPHEN PENCHEFF SASHOFF, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical
Engineering
EDWARD FRANK SMITH, B.S.E.E., E.E., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
JOHN WESLEY WILSON, B.S.E.E., M.S., Instructor in Electrical Engineering

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
PHILIP OSBORN YEATON, B.S., S.B., Head of Department and Professor of Industrial
Engineering
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
NEWTON CROMWELL EBAUGH, B.E. in M. and E.E., M.E., M.S., Head of the Department and
Professor of Mechanical Engineering





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


EDGAR SMITH WALKER, Colonel, U. S. Army (Retired), Graduate, U. S. Military Academy,
West Point, Professor of Drawing (Special Status)
ALBERT J. STRONG, B.S.M.E., Professor of Drawing
WILLIAM WARRICK FINEREN, M.E., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
SILAS KENDRICK ESHLEMAN, M.A., S.M., M.E., E.E., J.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical
Engineering
CHESTERFIELD HOWELL JANES, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering
ROBERT ALDEN THOMPSON, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering

GENERAL INFORMATION
The curricula offered by the College of Engineering are designed primarily to equip
young men to enter the fields of Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Industrial and Mechanical
Engineering as junior engineers.
To those who desire to study the Engineering Sciences primarily because of their
cultural value to citizens of an industrial age, attention is directed to the curriculum leading
to the degree of Bachelor of Engineering Science.

ENTRANCE TO COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Entrance to the College of Engineering is gained through the General College of the
University of Florida or by transfer from another technical institution.
This does not delay the graduation of a student of Engineering provided he chooses the
proper electives indicated in the curricula below while in the General College and provided
he has the previous training, temperament and mental capacity which fits him for Engineering.
The curricula of the College of Engineering have always required a certain proportion
of the student's time in the social sciences and liberal arts courses. The introduction of
the General College has concentrated these courses in the first two years in a more com-
prehensive way.
TIME REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION
Previously the curricula in the College of Engineering were arranged on the assumption
that the average student could complete them in four years. Experience has shown that
only a small percentage of the entering freshmen were able to accomplish this. Hence,
two sets of curricula are offered below, one for the student who may be able to complete
the prescribed work in four years and one for those who may require an additional year.
The five-year curricula do not intensify the specialization in technical engineering subjects,
but they do intensify and broaden the student in the basic fundamental sciences.
The faculty of the College of Engineering believe the five-year curricula are broader
and better and recommend them to all engineering students, but especially to those who are
not well grounded in mathematics, physics, and chemistry in high school, or who are not
capable of making a B average.
Students who entered the University prior to September 1, 1935, should follow the
curricula shown on pages 288 to 291, marked "To Be Discontinued."

BACHELORS DEGREES
The Bachelors degrees which may be earned in the College of Engineering are:
Bachelor of Engineering Science
Bachelor of Chemical Engineering
Bachelor of Civil Engineering
Bachelor of Electrical Engineering
Bachelor of Industrial Engineering
Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering






THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


BACHELOR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS-HONOR POINTS
Students desiring to earn degrees in the College of Engineering must complete the courses
outlined in the various curricula and must do work of such quality that the total number
of honor points which they have earned in all of their courses will equal the total number
of semester hours required for the degree. For information concerning the honor point
system, see the Bulletin of By-Laws.
ENGLISH REQUIREMENT
The responsibility for the correct and effective use of his spoken and written English
rests primarily upon the student. Any instructor in the College of Engineering may, at
any time, with the approval of the head of his department and the Dean of the College of
Engineering, require a student who shows a deficiency in English to elect additional courses,
over and above the curriculum requirements, in the Department of English.

THESIS
Theses are not required of candidates for the Bachelor's degrees in the College of
Engineering. However, exceptional students, whom the head of a department believes would
be benefited thereby, may be granted permission by the Dean of the College, upon recom-
mendation of the head of the department, to undertake a thesis in lieu of prescribed or
elective work in the department in which he is enrolled. Not more than four semester credit
hours will be allowed for such thesis work.

FLORIDA INDUSTRIES' COOPERATIVE PLAN
Several of Florida's industries, under a cooperative arrangement with the College of
Engineering, will train Florida men in industry at the same time they are studying at the
University. This plan will require seven years for a student to complete the course which
leads to one of the degrees: Bachelor of Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Industrial, or Mechanical
Engineering. During the first year the student will be registered as a regular freshman in
the General College. He should, if possible, take the electives offered to the superior group.
During the month of April any student may file an application with the Dean of the
College of Engineering for assignment to industry. Placement will depend upon the places
available and the industrial experience of the applicant, his scholarship and personality.
Applications may be accepted from men already in industry who wish to complete their
college courses and need one or more year's college credit towards a degree.
After assignment to an industry, it will normally require a student six years to finish
his course because he alternates between industrial work and academic work every six
months with his industrial partner. There are two men in each team. During each period
in industry each student is paid for his work. The rate of pay should cover necessary living
expenses.
Any industry which wishes to enter the Florida Industries' Cooperative Plan should
write to Dean B. R. Van Leer, College of Engineering, University of Florida.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering may be earned through the Graduate
School. (See Bulletin of the Graduate School.) A student who holds a Bachelor's degree
and the requisite scholastic standing is eligible to perform research work and major in any
departments of the College of Engineering, namely, Chemical, Civil, Electrical, Industrial,
and Mechanical Engineering. A few graduate assistantships are available from time to
time and those interested in graduate research in any particular department should address
the head of that department.





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-UPPER DIVISION


Information concerning graduate fellowships in the Graduate School may be obtained
by application to the Dean of the Graduate School. (See Bulletin of the Graduate School.)

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES
The professional degrees of Civil Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Electrical Engineer,
Industrial Engineer, and Mechanical Engineer will be granted only to graduates of the
College of Engineering of the University of Florida who have:
(a) Shown evidence of having satisfactorily practiced their profession for a minimum
of five years following receipt of the Bachelor's degree, during the last two years of which
they shall have been in responsible charge of important engineering work. A graduate
who is a registered engineer in the State of Florida in at least two branches of his major
subjects will be accepted as satisfying this requirement.
(b) Presented a thesis showing independence and originality and of such a quality
as to be acceptable for publication by the technical press or a professional society.
(c) Satisfactorily passed an examination at the University upon the thesis and pro-
fessional work.
A candidate for a professional degree must make application to the Dean of the College
of Engineering prior to March 1 of the year in which he expects to have the degree con-
ferred. If the candidate appears to satisfy requirements listed in section (a) above, the
Dean will form a committee of which the head of the department by which the degree is
to be administered is chairman. This committee shall satisfy itself that the candidate has
fulfilled all requirements for the degree and report its recommendation to the faculty of
the College of Engineering, which will have final authority to recommend to the President
and the Board of Control the conferring of the degree.

LABORATORY FACILITIES
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY
The Chemical Engineering Laboratory is arranged to give the student experience in
the operation of chemical engineering equipment. This equipment illustrates such funda-
mental processes as distillation, filtration, heat transfer, absorption, size reduction and
drying. The aim of the laboratory work is to give the student better acquaintance with the
principle upon which the unit operation is based and to enable him to test the performance
of the equipment.
CIVIL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES
The Civil Engineering Department has laboratories equipped for work in Surveying,
Hydraulics, Sanitary Engineering, Materials Testing, and Hydrology.
The Surveying Instrument Room contains the following equipment: Repeating theodolite,
precise levels, base-line measurement apparatus, plane tables, transits, levels, precision
pantagraph, current meter, and smaller pieces of equipment necessary for field and drawing
room work in elementary and higher surveying.
The Hydraulic Laboratory contains the necessary apparatus for illustrating the fundamental
principles underlying the behavior of fluids at rest and in motion, their storage, measurement,
transportation, and utilization.
The Materials Testing Laboratory contains one four-hundred-thousand-pound capacity
high column Riehle testing machine equipped for both tension and compressive tests; one
fifty-thousand-pound low column machine and apparatus for the usual physical and chemical
tests on brick, wood, concrete, steel, cement, asphalt, tars, and oils.
The Sanitary Engineering Laboratory is maintained in conjunction with the operation of
the campus sewage disposal plant. It contains all the necessary apparatus and equipment for






THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


routine tests in connection with the design and operation of sewerage systems and sewage
disposal works. The Imhoff tank trickling filter disposal plant was designed for the dual
purpose of laboratory experiments on its operation and for the practical treatment of the
campus sewage and laboratory wastes.
The Hydrological Laboratory contains anemometers, rain gauges, recording barometers,
recording thermometers, recording hygrometer, water level recorders, and other apparatus
useful in illustrating the fundamentals of hydrology as applied to engineering design and
construction.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES
The Dynamo Laboratory contains dynamo electrical machinery of various types. Motor-
generators are used for securing alternating currents of a wide range of voltages and fre-
quencies and for conversion to direct current. Other equipment includes mercury arc rectifier
units, miscellaneous battery charging equipment, automotive testing equipment, transformers,
electro-dynamometers, and a wide range of miscellaneous electrical equipment.
The Precision Laboratory contains special devices and instruments for calibrating and
standardizing work and is available to the utilities of the State for the solution of special
problems. In addition to the instruments of the Precision Laboratory, there is a special
double sine wave alternator for special testing purposes. Miscellaneous instruments of various
types, including an oscillograph and a klydonograph, are available for performing tests on
miscellaneous electrical equipment.
The Communications Laboratory is well equipped. It provides means for testing telephone,
telegraph, radio equipment, and electronic devices. In this laboratory will be found a special
panel board incorporating cable terminals, line fault equipment, transmission measuring
equipment, audio and high frequency oscillators, repeaters, filters, networks, bridges, and a
large number of special devices including cathode ray oscilloscopes, field strength measuring
equipment, automatic signal recorder, miscellaneous receiving equipment, static recorders,
radio goniometers, etc.
State Radio Station WRUF, a 5000-watt Western Electric transmitter, operating at 830
kilocycles, cooperates with the laboratory in courses on radio station operation, which are
open to students who have attained sufficient knowledge to benefit by this work. Station
W4XAD is a special experimental radio-telephone station licensed at 600 watts for fre-
quencies of 4756, 6425, 8655, 12,862.5, and 17,310 kilocycles, and is used for experimental
work in the field of short wave radio communications. In addition to this station, short
wave radio stations W4DFU and W4IX are licensed for operation in the amateur bands.
Students who in general show that they may benefit by additional laboratory work, and
who have the necessary educational experience, may be given special permission to carry
on individual experimentation and research in these laboratories.

PHOTOGRAPHIC LABORATORY
The Photographic Laboratory is a model aerial photography laboratory. It contains the
following rooms: chemical storage, dark room, film washing, film storage, printing, paper
washing and drying, enlarging, paper storage, camera repair, studio, office, and finished film
fireproof vault. The laboratory is used for experimental research in photography, as a service
photographic shop for the University, and for class instruction in photography.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES
The laboratories of the Mechanical Engineering Department include facilities for draw-
ing, design, and production of machinery and equipment; and for the study of the per-
formance of machinery and allied apparatus.
Modern drafting rooms are provided, which are capable of taking care of approximately






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION-- UPPER DIVISION


100 students. These rooms are well-lighted and ventilated, and are properly equipped for
making and reproducing drawings.
Laboratory facilities for studying the production of machinery include equipment for
casting, machining, heat treating, forging and welding of metals, and various types of wood-
working machines.
Extensive equipment is available for the study of the strength and behavior of wood,
cement, concrete, metals, and other materials used in engineering structures and machines.
Coupled with this is the Metallography Laboratory, which is arranged for the study of
internal crystal structure of these materials.
Facilities are provided for studying the performance and other characteristics of steam
engines, turbines, boilers, automobile engines, airplane engines, Diesel engines, refrigeration
equipment, air conditioning apparatus, airplanes, and auxiliary equipment used with these
machines.
Basic engineering instruments are available for use in connection with special studies and
research in any of the foregoing fields.


UPPER DIVISION CURRICULA
To Be Discontinued

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


Courses


First Semester


C-1D. -Economic Foundat
Cy. 301 -Organic Chemistry
Cy. 401 -Physical Chemistr
Ml. 481 -Applied Mechanics
Ml. 485 -Thermodynamics .


Credits Courses
Junior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1
ions ..... 3 Cy. 302
......... 4 Cy. 402
y ........ 4 Cl. 0427
......... 5 Me. 202
.......... 3 M l. 482


Second Semester


Credits


-Organic Chemistry ........
-Physical Chemistry ........
- Hydraulics .................
-Foundry .......... ........
-Applied Mechanics ........


Senior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1938)
y. 335 -Unit Processes ............ 3 *Cy. 402 -Physical Chemistry ........
y. 343 -Industrial Chemistry ....... 3 Cy. 444 -Chemical Engineering
y. 351 -Metallurgy ................ 3 Laboratory .............
y. 451 -Fuels ..................... 3 Cy. 446 -Industrial Chemistry .......
y. 481 -Chemical Literature ....... 1/2 Cy. 482 --Chemical Literature .......
1. 307 -Principles of Electrical Ig. 472 -Human Engineering .......
Engineering ............ 3 Approved Electives ........
1. 309 -Dynamo Laboratory ....... 1


*Replaces Cy. 422, which will not be offered.

CIVIL ENGINEERING


Junior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1!
-Sanitary Laboratory Cy. 0215
Practice ................. 3 Cl. 332
-Principles of Electrical Cl. 426
Engineering ............. 3 Cl. 427
-Dynamo Laboratory ........ 1 MI. 482
-Physical Geology ........... 4
-Applied Mechanics ......... 5
-Materials of Engineering... 2


--Water and Sewage .........
-- Highway Engineering ......
--Theory of Structures .......
-Hydraulics ................
-Applied Mechanics .........


Bey. 0308

El. 307

El. 309
Gy. 201
Ml. 481
Ml. 483





THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 289


First Semester


Second Semester


Courses


Senior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1938)
Cl. 427 -Hydraulics ................ 3 El. 448 -A.C. Apparatus ........... 3
El. 447 -A.C. Apparatus ............ 3 El. 452 -Advanced Dynamo Labor-
El. 451 -Advanced Dynamo Laboratory 2 atory .................... 2
El. 541 -Electrical Engineering El. 542 -Electrical Engineering
Seminar ................. 1 Seminar ................. 1
MI. 0486 -Power Engineering ........ 3 Ig. 560 -Engineering Practice ....... 3
*Approved Electives ......... 6 Ml. 420 -Mechanical Laboratory ..... 2
*Approved Electives ........ 7

18 18
*Eight hours marked "Approved Electives" must be taken in the Department of Electrical
Engineering.
COURSES SUGGESTED AS ELECTIVES


Power Plant and Industry Option
544 -Applied Electronics
545-546-Electronics Laboratory
547 -Electrical Instruments, Meters,
and Relays
552 -Industrial Applications of
Electrical Engineering
581 -Internal Combustion Engines

Communication Option
543 -Theory of Thermionic Vacuum
Tubes
544 -Applied Electronics
545-546-Electronics Laboratory
549 -Theory of Electric Circuits
550 -Theory of High Frequency Circuits
551 -Symmetrical Components
553-554-Radio Station Operation
0420 -Differential Equations


Transmission Option
El. 543 -Theory of Thermionic Vacuum
Tubes
El. 544 -Applied Electronics
El. 547 -Electrical Instruments, Meters,
and Relays
El. 548 -Electric Power Transmission
El. 549 -Theory of Electric Circuits
El. 550 -Theory of High Frequency Circuits
El. 551 -Symmetrical Components
El. 552 -Industrial Application of Electrical
Equipment
Ms. 0420 -Differential Equations

General
Ig. 463 -Specifications and Engineering
Relations
Ig. 472 -Human Engineering
Ml. 495-496-Aeronautics
Psy. 201 -Psychology
Accounting
Economics
Literature
Military Science
Modern Languages
Public Speaking
Shop


Credits Courses Credits
Senior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1938)
-Materials Laboratory ...... 2 Cl. 520 -Hydraulic Engineering ..... 2
-Hydrology ................ 2 Cl. 526 -Water and Sewerage ....... 3
-Water and Sewerage ....... 3 Cl. 532 -Concrete Design ........... 4
-Structural Engineering ..... 4 Cl. 536 -Structural Engineering ..... 4
-Specifications and Engineer- Approved Electives ......... 5
ing Relations ............ 2
Approved Electives ......... 5

18 18

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Junior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1937)
-Elements of Electrical El. 442 -Elements of Electrical
Engineering ............. 3 Engineering ............. 3
-Problems in D.C. and A.C... 3 El. 446 -Electrical Communications .. 4
-Electrical Illumination ..... 4 El. 450 -Dynamo Laboratory ........ 1
-Dynamo Laboratory ....... 1 Ml. 302 -Machine Elements ......... 2
-Machine Elements ......... 1 Ml. 482 -Applied Mechanics ......... 5
-Applied Mechanics ......... 5 Ml. 0485 -Thermodynamics ........... 3
*Approved Electives ......... 1






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION UPPER DIVISION


INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING


Courses


First Semester


Credits Courses


Second Semester


Credits


Junior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1937)
C-1K -Elementary Accounting .. 0 or 5 C-1K -Elementary Accounting ..0 or 5
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Bs. 322E -Financial Organization of
Society ................. 3 Society .................. 3
El. 441 -Elements of Electrical El. 442 -Elements of Electrical
Engineering ............ 3 Engineering ............. 3
El. 449 -Dynamo Laboratory ....... 1 El. 450 -Dynamo Laboratory ........ 1
Ml. 481 -Applied Mechanics ......... 5 MI. 482 -Applied Mechanics ......... 6
MI. 488 -Materials of Engineering.... 2 Ml. 0485 -Thermodynamics ........... 3

14 or 19 15 or 20
Senior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1938)
Bs. 401 -Business Law .............. 3 Bs. 402 -Business Law .............. 3
Ig. 463 -Specifications and Engineer- Ig. 472 -Human Engineering ........ 2
ing Relations ............ 2 Ig. 560 -Engineering Practice ....... 3
MI. 486 -Power Engineering ........ 3 Ml. 420 -Mechanical Laboratory ..... 2
*Approved Electives ........ 11 *Approved Electives ......... 8

19 18
*At least six of these credits should be taken in the College of Business Administration from the
following courses:
C-1J -Elements of Statistics Bs. 0440 -Trade Horizons in Caribbean
Bs. 313 -Cost Accounting America
Bs. 321E -Financial Organization of Bs. 0351E -Transportation Principles
Society Es. 372 --Labor Economics
Bs. 322E -Financial Organization of Bs. 422 -Investments
Society Bs. 454E -Principles of Public Utility
Bs. 327E -Public Finance Economics
Bs." 829E -Elements of Personal Finance Bs. 465 -Realty Principles
Bs. 835E -Economics of Marketing Bs. 466 -Realty Management
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Junior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1937)
Bs. 0202 -Principles of Economics .... 3 El. 442 -Elements of Electrical
El. 441 -Elements of Electrical Engineering ............. 3
Engineering ............. 3 El. 450 -Dynamo Laboratory ........ 1
El. 449 -Dynamo Laboratory ....... 1 Me. 304 -Patternmaking ............ 2
Ms. 420 -Differential Equations Ml. 302 -Machine Elements ......... 2
(Part of course only)..... 2 Ml. 482 -Applied Mechanics ......... 5
Me. 301 -Machine Shop ............. 2 MI. 484 -Metallography ............. 2
MI. 301 -Machine Elements ......... 1 MI. 0485 -Thermodynamics ........... 3
Ml. 481 -Applied Mechanics ......... 5
Ml. 483 -Materials of Engineering... 2


Senior Year
(Discontinued after August, 1938)


-Hydraulics ................. 3
-Specifications and Engineer-
ing Relations ............ 2
-Mechanical Laboratory ..... 1
-Power Engineering ......... 3
-Machine Design ........... 3
-Aeronautics ............... 3
-Approved Electives ........ 3


Cl. 520 -Hydraulic Engineering
or
Ml. 496 -Aeronautics ................
Ig. 472 -Human Engineering .......
Ml. 418 -Mechanical Laboratory .....
Ml. 0581 -Internal Combustion Engines
MI. 582 -Refrigeration and Air
Conditioning
or
Ml. 590 -Aerodynamics .............
Ml. 586 -Advanced Machine Design...
MI. -Approved Electives ........






THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 291


Approved Electives
Ml. 495-496-Aeronautics Ml. 590 -Aerodynamics
MI. 586 -Advanced Machine Design Ml. 592 -Aerodynamic Laboratory
MI. 587-588-Mechanical Design Ml. 595 -Power Plant Design


NEW CURRICULA

For Engineering students who register in the University after September 1, 1935, the
following curricula will apply.
The first two years are spent in the General College where the following subjects must
be taken, although the order may be varied:
First Year
C-1 -Man and the Social World
C-2 -Man and the Physical World, or General Chemistry (Cy. 101-102)
C-3 -Reading, Speaking, and Writing
C-4 Man and His Thematkin or Basic Mathematics (C-2D)
X -Military Science or Physical Education
Second Year
C-5 -The Humanities
C-6 -Man and the Biological World
C-7 -General Chemistry (Cy. 101-102) or
General Physics (Ps. 205-206-207-208)
C-8 -Basic Mathematics (C-2D) or
Differential and Integral Calculus (Ms. 253-254)
C-9 -Engineering Drawing (Ml. 281)-Descriptive Geometry (MI. 282)
C-10 -Introduction to Engineering (Ig. 261-262)
Y -Military Science or Physical Education

Upon completion of the above courses, and the receipt of an Associate of Arts Certificate
from the General College which must indicate that the student has completed:
C-2D -Basic Mathematics
Ml. 281-282 -Engineering Drawing
Ig. 261-262 -Introduction to Engineering
Cy. 101-102 -General Chemistry
he may enroll in the College of Engineering and pursue any of the following curricula.

CURRICULA FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN CIVIL, CHEMICAL, ELECTRICAL, INDUSTRIAL, AND
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LEADING THROUGH THE DECREE OF BACHELOR
OF ENGINEERING SCIENCE
Courses Credit Hours
First Second
Semester Semester
Junior Year
Ms. 253-254 Calculus ................................ 4 4
Ps. 205-6-7 8 Physics ................................. 4 4
Cl. 223 Surveying ............................... 3
Ml. 380 Shop Practice ........................... 3
Gy. 201 -Physical Geology I ..................... 4
Cy. 0215 -Water and Sewage ..................... (a) 3
or
Cl. 226 -Higher Surveying 1 ........... 3
Bey. 0308 -Sanitary Laboratory Practice J .......... (b) 3
or
Cy. 201-202 -Analytic Chemistry ...................... (c) 4 4
or
Foreign Language ...................... (d) 4 4
or
Ml. 387-388 -Mechanism, Kinematics; and Design ...... (e) 4 4
or
*C-1D -Economic Foundations ................... (f) 5 orO 0 or 5
or
Approved Electives ...................... (g) 4 4

*Students taking C-ID must take three additional hours of electives.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


Students will select any two of the above groups. Students taking two years of advanced


Military Training can receive full credit as an Approved Elective.
A student contemplating receiving the Bachelor's degree in
Engineering must elect definite groups as follows:
For the degree of B.Ch.E., groups c and d.
For the degree of B.C.E., groups a and b.
For the degree of B.E.E., groups e and g.
For the degree of B.I.E., groups f and g.
For the degree of B.M.E., groups e and g.

A student contemplating receiving the B.C.E. degree must take
Cl. 229, 6 credit hours, before the beginning of the fifth year.
Courses


427
485
441-442
449-450
481-482
331-332


426

301-802

401-402

486
444


Ml. 487-488
Ml. 488
MI. 484

C-1K
MI. 483


a









Su




S


Senior Year
- Hydraulics ........................... ..
-Thermodynamics .........................
-Elements of Electrical Engineering........
-Dynamo Laboratory ......................
-Applied Mechanics ......................
-Highway and Railway Engineering........ (a)
or
Approved Electives 1 ...................
-Theory of Structures ................... (b)
or
-Organic Chemistry ....................... (c)
or
-Physical Chemistry ...................... (d)
or
-Power Engineering ............... (e)
-Problems in D.C. and A.C. S ..............
or
Electrical Elective ....................... (f)
or
-Mechanical Laboratory ...............
-Materials of Engineering .............. (g)
-Metallography J ...............
or
-Elementary Accounting ...............
-Materials of Engineering 5 ............... (h)
or
Approved Electives ....................... (i)


specialized branch of









unmer Camp Surveying


Credit Hours
First Second
semester Semester

3 or 0 0 orS
3
3 3
1 1
5 5
4 3

8
4

4 4


A student contemplating receiving the Bachelor's degree in a specialized branch of En-
gineering must elect definite groups as follows:
For the degree of B.C.E., groups a and b.
For the degree of B.Ch.E., groups c and d.
For the degree of B.E.E., groups e and f.
For the degree of B.I.E., groups h and i.
For the degree of B.M.E., groups e and g.

Upon completion of the above curriculum, the degree of Bachelor of Engineering Science
may be awarded.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
The curriculum in Chemical Engineering is based upon a thorough training in the fun-
damentals of mathematics, physics, and chemistry. Emphasis is placed upon the theory
and practice of the unit processes. In addition, instruction is given in the more complicated
industrial calculations, plant design, and the elements of electrical and mechanical engineer-
ing. Trips to industrial plants supplement the class and laboratory work. Students who






THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 293


follow this curriculum and graduate are prepared to assume the duties of junior chemical
engineers in the construction and economical operation of chemical plants.
Professional Year
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


Courses
Cy. 345- 346
Cy. 443- 444
Cy. 447- 448
Cy. 0445
Cy. 457- 458
Cy. 481- 482
Ig. 463
Ig. 472


Credit Hours
1st. Sem. 2nd. Sem.
-Chemical Technology-Industrial Stoichiometry .............. 2 2
-Chemical Engineering Laboratory .......................... 2 2
-Principles of Chemical Engineering ........................ 4 3
-Chemical Thermodynamics .................................. 2
-Chemical Engineering Design ............................... 2 2
- Chemical Literature ............... ......................... 1/2
-Specifications and Engineering Relations ................... 2
- Human Engineering ....................................... 2
Approved Electives ........................................ 6 4

18% 17%


CIVIL ENGINEERING
The courses in Civil Engineering are designed to give the student a comprehensive grasp
of the principles underlying the practice of civil engineering, so that upon graduation he
will be prepared to fill such positions as are usually allotted to young engineers in the
general field of civil engineering, or in the special branches of surveying, mapping, hydraulics,
sanitation, highways, railways, and construction.


Summer Camp Surveying ..................................
Materials Laboratory ......................................
H ydrology .................................................
526 W ater and Sewerage ......................................
Hydraulic Engineering ....................................
Concrete Design ...........................................
536 Structural Engineering ....................................
-Specifications and Engineering Relations ...................
Materials of Engineering ..................................
Approved Electives ........................................


Credit Hours
1st. Sem. 2nd. Sem.
6


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
The curriculum in Electrical Engineering is planned to give to the student a basic
education for entrance into the field of professional engineering. It is built upon a founda-
tion of mathematics and physics, a group of courses in electrical engineering and in the
allied engineering fields. It takes cognizance of the fact that many students, particularly
those who later find themselves in managerial and executive positions, will have need for
more than technical information. While all students are required to study problems per-
taining to the generation, transmission, distribution and utilization of electrical energy,
additional specialization can be obtained in the following groups: Electrical Power Plants
and Design; Transmission and Distribution; Communication; Research.


448 -Alternating Current Apparatus ............................
452 -Advanced Dynamo Laboratory .............................
542 -Electrical Engineering Seminar ............................
Electrical Engineering Electives ...........................
-Specifications and Engineering Relations ....................
Engineering Practice ......................................
488 Mechanical Laboratory ....................................
Manufacturing Operations .................................
Approved Electives ........................................


NOTE: See list of approved electives on page 289.


1


Credit Hours
st. Sem. 2nd. Sem.
3 3
2 2
1 1
3 5
2
8
2 2
3
3 3

19 19


Courses
Cl. 229
Cl. 425
Cl. 431
Cl. 525-
Cl. 520
Cl. 532
Cl. 535-
Ig. 0463
Ml. 483


Courses
El. 447-
El. 451-
El. 541-






294 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
The Industrial Engineering curriculum is designed to give young men with engineering
ability some degree of training in the fundamentals of business administration. The cur-
ricula emphasizes men, materials, money, machinery, methods, markets, and management.
It is especially designed for those who desire to enter the managerial fields of industry
through technical avenues.


Courses
Bs. 401- 402
Ig. 463
Ig. 469- 470
Ig. 472
Ig. 560
Ml. 489- 490


Credit Hours
1st. Sem. 2nd. Sem.
- Business Law ............................................. 3 3
-Specifications and Engineering Relations .................... 2
-Plant, Shop, Layout, and Design ............................ 3 3
- Human Engineering ....................................... 2
- Engineering Practice ...................................... 3
-Manufacturing Operations or Approved Electives ............ 3 3
Approved Electives ........................................ 4 2
Business Administration Electives ......................... 3 3

18 19


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
The Mechanical Engineering curriculum presents a sequence of courses which permits
one to obtain a well-rounded technical education. A liberal amount of humanistic and
business studies are included with the essential scientific, mathematical, and technical sub-
jects. This permits the graduate to choose practically any industry or business for his
life work.
Opportunity for a moderate degree of specialization is provided in the last year for those
who desire to learn more in a particular branch of engineering. The specialized fields
include Aeronautical Engineering, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, Internal Combustion
Engines, Power Plant Engineering, Machinery Design, Manufacturing Plants, Research.


Courses
Ig. 463
Ig. 472
MI. 489-
Ml. 491
Ml. 581
Ml. 582
MI. 583-


Credit Hours
1st. Sem. 2nd. Sem.
-Specifications and Engineering Relations..................... 2
Human Engineering ....................................... 2
490 Manufacturing Operations ................................. 3 3
M machine Design ........................................... 3
Internal Combustion Engines ................. ................ 3
-Refrigeration and Air Conditioning .......................... 3
584 Mechanical Laboratory .................................... 2 2
Approved Electives ........................................ 5 8

18 18


NOTE: See list of approved electives on page 291.

Third Terminal-Upon the completion of any specific curriculum above, the student may
be awarded the specific degree appertaining thereto, namely: Bachelor of Chemical Engineer-
ing, Bachelor of Civil Engineering, Bachelor of Electrical Engineering, Bachelor of Industrial
Engineering, or Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering.

CURRICULA LEADING TO THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN CHEMICAL, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL, INDUSTRIAL,
AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING-FOUR-YEAR PLAN
Students in the superior group who desire to secure the Bachelor's degree in a specialized
branch of Engineering in four years, must complete the following courses in the General
College by exercising the substitution privilege for C-2 and C-4.
First Year
General Chemistry, Basic Mathematics, Engineering Drawing, and Descriptive Geometry.
Second Year
General Physics, Calculus, Introduction to Engineering, and the departmental prerequisite
according to the branch of engineering the student intends to follow.






THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Departmental Prerequisites
Chemical Engineering ................. Cy. 201-202, Analytical Chemistry
Civil Engineering ...................... CI. 223-226, Elementary and Higher Surveying; and MI.
381-382, Shop Practice.
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering.. Ml. 387-388, Mechanism and Kinematics, and Elementary
Design.
Industrial Engineering ................. C-1D, Economic Foundations

Special Requirement-During the summer between the end of the sophomore year and
the beginning of the junior year, students contemplating receiving the Bachelor's degree in
a specialized branch of Engineering in four years must take either summer surveying or
summer shop work as follows:
(1) Cl. 229-Summer Camp Surveying .............................. 6 credits
(2) Ml. 380-Shop Practice ......................................... 3 credits
(3) 12 weeks practical work in an approved shop away from University.. 3 credits
Civil Engineering students must take (1).
Chemical, Electrical, Industrial, or Mechanical Engineering Students must take either
(2) or (3).
Important-Students must arrange with the head of the department in which they expect
to major between May 1 and 15 of their last semester in the General College for satisfaction
of the above SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Summer between Sophomore and Junior Year
Ml. 380, Summer Shop Course or 12 weeks work in an approved shop away from the University-
3 credits.


Courses
Cy. 301- 302
Cy. 345- 346
Cy. 401- 402
Fh. or Gn.
Ml. 481- 482
)My. 303- 304


443- 444
0445
447- 448
457- 458
481- 482
441- 442
449- 450
463
472
485
486
403- 404


Junior Year

- Organic Chem istry ........................................
-Chemical Technology-Industrial Stoichiometry ..............
- Physical Chem istry ........................................
- French or German .........................................
-Applied Mechanics (Lectures Only).........................
-Military (or Approved Electives) ..........................


Senior Year
--Chemical Engineering Laboratory ..........................
-Chemical Thermodynamics .................................
-Principles of Chemical Engineering.........................
-Chemical Engineering Design ..............................
- Chem ical Literature .......................................
-Elements of Electrical Engineering ........................
- Dynamo Laboratory .......................................
-Specifications and Engineering Relations ....................
- Human Engineering .......................................
- Thermodynamics ..........................................
- Power Engineering ........................................
-Military (or Approved Electives) ...........................


CIVIL ENGINEERING
Summer between Sophomore and Junior Year
Cl. 229 -Summer Camp Surveying (6 weeks) .........................
Junior Year
Bey. 0308 -Sanitary Laboratory Practice ..............................
Cy. 0215 W ater and Sewage .........................................
Cl. 331 Railway Engineering ......................................
Cl. 332 Highway Engineering .....................................
CI. 426 Theory of Structures .......................................
Cl. 427 Hydraulics ................................................
Gy. 201 Physical Geology ..........................................
MI. 481- 482 Applied Mechanics ........................................
Ml. 483 Materials of Engineering ..................................
My. 303- 304 -Military (or Approved Electives) ...........................


Credit Hours
st. Sem. 2nd. Sem.
4 4
2 2
4 4
4 4
4 4
2 2

20 20

2 2
2
4 3
2 2

3 3
1 1
2
2
3
3
2 2

19% 20%

6

3
3
4


1









BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


Senior Year


- Materials Laboratory .....................................
- Hydrology ................................................
- Hydraulic Engineering ...................................
- W ater and Sewerage ......................................
-Concrete Design ..........................................
- Structural Engineering ....................................
-Elements of Electrical Engineering ........................
-Dynamo Laboratory .......................................
-Specifications and Engineering Relations ...................
- Military (or Approved Electives) ...........................


Credit Hours
1st. Sem. 2nd. Sem.
2
2


2
3 3
4
4 4
3 3
1 1
2
2 2

19 19


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Summer between Sophomore and Junior Year
Ml. 380, Summer Shop Course, or 12 weeks work in an approved shop away from the University-
3 credits.


441- 442
449- 450
481- 482
485
486
487- 488
303- 304





447- 448
451- 452
541- 542
548
549
463
560
489
403- 404


Junior Year
-Elements of Electrical Engineering .........................
- Dynamo Laboratory .......................................
-Applied Mechanics ........................................
- Therm odynam ics ..........................................
-Power Engineering .....................................
- Mechanical Laboratory ....................................
-Military (or Approved Electives) ..........................
E lectives ....... ...........................................


Senior Year
- A. C. Apparatus ..........................................
-Dynamo Laboratory ..... ...............................
-Electrical Engineering Seminar ............................
-Electric Power Transmission ..............................
-Theory of Electric Currents ................................
-Specifications and Engineering Relations ....................
-Engineering Practice ..................................
- Manufacturing Operations .................................
-Military (or Approved Electives) ...........................
*Approved Electives ........................................


19 19


INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Summer between Sophomore and Junior Year
Ml. 380, Summer Shop Course, or 12 weeks work in an approved shop away from the University-
3 credits.
Junior Year


C-1K
El. 441- 442
El. 449- 450
Ml. 481- 482
MI. 483
Ml. 0485
MI. 489- 490
My. 303- 304


-Elementary Accounting ................. ................. 5 or 0 0 or 5
-Elements of Electrical Engineering ......... ................... 3 3
- Dynamo Laboratory ....................................... 1 1
- Applied M echanics ........................................ 5 5
- Materials of Engineering ................................ 2
- Thermodynam ics .............. ............................. 3
- Manufacturing Operations ................................. 3 3
-Military (or Approved Electives) ........................... 2 2

16 or 21 17 or 22


*At least 9 hours of electives must be taken in the Department of Electrical Engineering. Sug-
gested list of electives is given on page 289.


Courses
Cl. 425
CI. 431
CI. 520
Cl. 525- 526
Cl. 532
Cl. 535- 536
El. 441- 442
El. 449- 450
Ig. 463
My. 403- 404














THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


Courses


Credit Hours
1st. Sem. 2nd. Sem.


Senior Year
Bs. 401- 402 Business Law ......................... .. ................ 8 3
Ig. 463 -Specifications and Engineering Relations ................... 2
Ig. 469- 470 -Plant, Shop, Layout, and Design ........................... 3 3
Ig. 472 Human Engineering ....................................... 2
Ig. 560 Engineering Practice ...................................... 3
My. 403- 404 -Military (or Approved Electives) ........................... 2 2
*Approved Electives ........................................ 9 5

19 18
*At least six of these credits should be taken in the College of Business Administration from the
following courses:
C-1J -Elements of Statistics Bs. 0440 -Trade Horizons in Caribbean
Bs. 313 -Cost Accounting America
Bs. 321E-322E-Financial Organization of Bs. 351E -Transportation Principles
Society Bs. 372 -Labor Economics
Bs. 329E -Elements of Personal Finance Bs. 422 -Investments
Bs. 335E -Principles of Marketing Bs. 465 -Realty Principles
Bs. 466 -Realty Management

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Summer between Sophomore and Junior Year
Ml. 380, Summer Shop Practice, or 12 weeks work in an approved shop away from the University-
8 credits.
Junior Year


-Elements of Electrical Engineering ........................
- Problems in D.C. and A.C. .................................
- Dynamo Laboratory .......................................
- Applied Mechanics ........................................
- Materials of Engineering ..................................
- Thermodynam ics ..........................................
- Power Engineering .......................................
- Mechanical Laboratory ....................................
- Mechanical Laboratory ....................................
-Military (or Approved Electives) ...........................


Senior Year
- H ydraulics ...............................................
-Specifications and Engineering Relations ...................
-Human Engineering ........................................
- Metallography .............................................
- Manufacturing Operations .................................
- M machine Design ...........................................
-Internal Combustion Engines .............................
-Refrigeration and Air Conditioning .........................
- Mechanical Laboratory ....................................
-Military (or Approved Electives) ..........................
Approved Electives .......................................


Credit Hours
1st. Sem. 2nd. Sem.
3 3
8
1 1
5 5
2
3
3
2
2
2 2

18 19

3
2
2


NOTE: See list of approved electives on pgae 291.


Courses
El. 441- 442
El. 444
El. 449- 450
Ml. 481- 482
Ml. 483
Ml. 485
Ml. 486
Ml. 487
Ml. 488
My. 303- 304


0427
463
472
0484
489- 490
491
581
582
583- 584
403- 404






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
LILLIAN WOOD, B.A., Secretary to the Dean
THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
THE DEAN
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agronomy
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Education and Dean of the College of
Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Mathematics
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S., Head Professor of Electrical Engineering
ROBERT CROZIER WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Physics

GENERAL INFORMATION
ADMINISTRATION
The affairs of the Graduate School are administered by the Graduate Council, which
consists of the Dean as ex-officio chairman, and certain members of the faculty, who are
appointed annually by the President.
THE MASTER'S DEGREE
Degrees Offered.-Master of Arts; Master of Arts in Architecture; Master of Arts in
Education; Master of Science; Master of Science in Agriculture; Master of Science in
Engineering; and Master of Science in Pharmacy.
THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Departments.-The Doctor's degree is offered in the following departments: Biology,
Chemistry, and Pharmacy.
For general information, including the teaching faculty, all departments offering graduate
work leading to an advanced degree and all strictly graduate courses, as well as conditions
of admission and requirements for the advanced degrees, see the Bulletin of the Graduate
School.

COLLEGE OF LAW

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. (Chicago), Acting Vice-President
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B. (Michigan), Dean and Professor of Law
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B. (Michigan), Professor of Law
ROBERT SPRATT COCKRELL, M.A., B.L. (Virginia), Professor of Law
DEAN SLAGLE, M.A., LL.B. (Yale), Professor of Law
CLARENCE JOHN TESELLE, M.A., LL.B. (Wisconsin), Professor of Law
JAMES WESTBAY DAY, M.A., J.D. (Florida), Professor of Law
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, M.A., LLB. (Florida), Lecturer on Corporation Finance
ILA ROUNTREE PRIDGEN, Librarian and Secretary





COLLEGE OF LAW


GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMISSION
Applicants for admission to the College of Law must be eighteen years of age, and must
have received a degree in arts or science in a college or university of approved standing, or
must be eligible for a degree in a combined course in the University, upon the completion
of one year of work in the College of Law.
Women Students.-Women students who are twenty-one years of age and who fully meet
the entrance requirements of the College may enter as candidates for degrees.
Special Students.-Special students are not admitted to the College of Law.
Advanced Standing.-No work in law done in other institutions will be accepted towards
a degree unless the applicant passes satisfactorily the examination held in the subjects in
question in this College, or unless credit is given without examination. Credit of an average
of C from schools which are members of the Association of American Law Schools, of which
this College is a member, will be accepted without examination. In no case will credit be
given for work not done in residence at an approved law school.

PURPOSE
The aim of the College, which is a member of the Association of American Law Schools,
registered by the New York Board of Regents, and an approved school of the American Bar
Association, is to impart a thorough scientific and practical knowledge of the law. It aims
to develop keen, efficient lawyers, conversant with the ideals and traditions of the profession.
Its policy is characterized by the emphasis of practice as well as theory; pleading as well as
historical perspective; skill in brief making as well as legal information.
LIBRARY
The Law Library contains over 12,100 volumes. In it are included the published reports
of the courts of last resort in every state in the Union and of the Federal Courts, the full
English Reprints, the English Law Reports, Law Journal Reports, Dominion Law Reports,
and the Canadian Reports, together with a collection of digests, encyclopedias, series of
selected cases, and English and American treatises and textbooks.

ADMISSION TO THE BAR
Upon presenting their diplomas and satisfactory evidence that they are twenty-one years
of age and of good moral character, the graduates of the College are licensed, without
examination, to practice in the courts of Florida. They are also admitted without examina-
tion to the United States District Courts of Florida.

PLEADING AND PRACTICE
An intensive knowledge of pleading and practice should be secured by the student, since
legal rights cannot be well understood without a mastery of the rules of pleading whereby
they are enforced. The College offers thorough courses in criminal pleading and procedure,
common law pleading, equity pleading, Florida civil practice, trial practice, and Federal
procedure. Thus, the student on graduation is enabled to enter understandingly upon the
practice of law. The College endeavors to serve those who intend to practice elsewhere as
efficiently as those who expect to locate in this State.
Believing the students obtain in the Practice Court a better practical knowledge of
pleading and practice than can be acquired in any other way, aside from the trial of actual
cases, the faculty places special emphasis upon this work. Sessions of the Practice Court
are held throughout the year. Each student is required to participate in the trial of at least
one common law, one equity, and one criminal case, and is instructed in appellate procedure.





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


LEGAL RESEARCH
To enable students to specialize in legal problems of particular interest to them, to
acquire a grasp of the technique of legal investigation, and to do more creative work than
ordinary courses in law permit, a course in legal research (Lw. 601 or Lw. 0601) is offered.
Each student taking the course is required to make an original study of the subject he
selects under the guidance of the member of the faculty in whose field it falls. Suitable
studies will be submitted by the College to law journals for publication.
Applications for the course should be filed with the Secretary of the College at least
one week prior to the first day of registration. Students who register for two or three
hours will not be permitted to drop the course for the number of hours for which they have
registered and continue it for a lesser number of hours, unless they do so within the first
two weeks of the term. No more than three credits may be earned by a student in this
course in one term, but the faculty may admit a student to the course (Lw. 602 or Lw. 0602)
for a second term.
STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION
The Council on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar of the American Bar Asso-
ciation requests that attention be called to the Standards of the American Bar Association
adopted in 1921 and by it recommended for enactment by all states. These Standards
provide in effect that every candidate for admission to the bar, in addition to taking a
public examination, shall give evidence of graduation from a law school which shall require
at least two years of study in a college as a condition of admission, and three years of law
study (or longer if not a full-time course), which shall have an adequate library and a
sufficient number of teachers giving their entire time to the school to ensure actual personal
acquaintance and influence with the whole student body, and which shall not be operated
as a commercial enterprise.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA
BACHELOR OF LAWS
The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) is conferred upon those students who satisfac-
torily complete eighty-five semester hours of law, which must include all of the first-year
subjects. Students who have an honor point average of 2 for all the law work offered for
graduation will be eligible for the degree of LL.B. With Honors. Those who have an honor
point average of 2.5 for all the law work offered for graduation, which work must include
Legal Research, will be eligible for the degree of LL.B. With High Honors.
Students admitted to advanced standing may receive the degree after one year's residence,
but in no case will the degree be granted unless the candidate is in actual residence during
all of the third year and passes in this College at least twenty-eight semester hours of law.
All students are required to complete the last twenty-eight credit hours applied towards
the degree during regular residence. This may be varied only upon written petition approved
by the faculty of the College of Law.
COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAW COURSE
By pursuing an approved course of collegiate and law studies a student may earn both
the academic and the legal degree in six years. Both the College of Arts and Sciences
and the College of Business Administration offer such a combined course. For further
particulars, see pages 268 and 275 of this Bulletin.
CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS
Students completing the first year as outlined below and a total of 85 semester hours of
law credit will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Laws.




























COLLEGE OF LAW


Course

Lw.
Lw.
Lw.
Lw.


First Semester
ea Cr

301 Torts .....................
303 -Contracts .................
305 -Criminal Law and Procedure
309 Property ..................



401 -U. S. Constitutional Law...
0404 -Quasi Contracts ...........
405 -Equity Pleading ...........
409 -Property ..................
411 -Florida Constitutional Law..
413 -Florida Civil Practice .....
4156 -Abstracts .................
417* Sales .....................


edits Courses
First Year
5 Lw. 3
3 Lw. 3
4 Lw. 3
2 Lw. 3
Lw. 3


Second
4
2
3
3


Third Year
Lw. 503 -Public Service Corporations. 2 Lw. 502
Lw. 0504 -Municipal Corporations .... 2 Lw. 506
Lw. 505 -Federal Procedure ......... 2 Lw. 508
Lw. 509 -Partnership ............... 2 Lw. 0515
Lw. 513 -Property .................. 3 Lw. 516
Lw. 517 -Practice Court ............ 1 Lw. 520
Lw. 519 -Trial Practice ............. 3 Lw. 522
Lw. 521 -Trusts .................... 2 Lw. 524
Lw. 601 -Legal Research .......... 1 to 3 Lw. 0601

*Offered in alternate years; Lw. 417 offered in 1936-37.


Second Semester
Ci

-Equity Jurisprudence ......
- Contracts ..................
-Marriage and Divorce .....
-Common Law Pleading .....
- Property ..................


Year
Lw. 402 -Evidence ..................
Lw. 0403 -Agency ...................
Lw. 406 -Private Corporations .......
Lw. 408 -Legal Ethics and Biblio-
graphy ..................
Lw. 410 -Property ..................
Lw. 416 -Insurance .................
Lw. 418 -Taxation ..................


- Damages .................. 2
-Negotiable Instruments .... 3
-Conflict of Laws .......... 3
-Mortgages ................ 2
-Practice Court ............. 1
-Creditors' Rights .......... 3
-Admiralty ................. 2
-Corporation Finance ....... 3
-Legal Research .......... 1 to 3





BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Courses with odd numbers are regularly offered in the first semester; courses with even
numbers are regularly offered in the second semester. However, in case the number begins
with 0, the reverse is true. In many cases courses are offered both semesters. To determine
which courses come in this category the reader should consult the Schedule of Courses.
The number of hours listed is the number of hours a week which the class meets.
The number of credits is the number of semester hours credit assigned a student who
receives a passing grade (A, B, C, or D) when the course is completed.
A course designated by a double number (for example, Eh. 201-202) is continued
throughout the first and second semesters. Unless otherwise noted, the student must take
both semesters of such a course in order to receive credit.
The abbreviations used are wherever possible the first and last letter of the first word
of the department name. Occasionally, a third central letter is inserted to distinguish
between departments.
Several General College courses are listed with departments in the same general field.
The credit for these courses is listed which will be assigned to Upper Division students
permitted to take such courses.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
**As. 201.-Agricultural Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits. REITZ.
The fundamental principles of economics in their relation to agriculture.
As. 302.-Agricultural Resources (Formerly As. 202). 2 hours, and 2 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. HAMILTON.
Potentialities and limitations of agricultural production in the various regions of the United States and the
world. Development of surplus and deficient agricultural areas.
As. 303.-Farm Records. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. REITZ. Pre-
requisite: As. 201.
Methods and practice of making and keeping farm inventories, feed records, and crop records.
As. 304.-Farm Finance and Appraisal. 2 hours. 2 credits. REITZ.
Problems peculiar to financing farmers and farmers' associations. Special attention is given to the Farm
Credit Administration.
As. 306.-Farm Management. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. REITZ.
Prerequisite: As. 201.
The factors of production; systems of farming, their distribution and adaptation; problems of labor,
machinery, layout of farms, and rotation systems.
As. 308.-Marketing. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. HAMILTON. Pre-
requisite: As. 201.
Marketing and distributing farm products; marketing organizations and laws governing them; the relation of
foreign trade and general business conditions to the farmers' market.
As. 311.-Rural Law. 2 hours. 2 credits. HAMILTON.
Classification of farm property; study of farm boundaries, fences, stock laws, rents, contracts, deeds, abstracts,
mortgages, taxes, and laws governing shipping of farm products. Green, Law for the American Farm.
As. 403.-Advanced Farm Management. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
REITZ. Prerequisite: As 306.
Laying out and locating buildings, lots, fields, and crops, cropping systems, farm surveys; study of successful
Florida farms. Two-day field trip, at an estimated cost of $10, paid at time trip is made.
As. 405.-Agricultural Prices. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAMILTON. Prerequisite: As. 201.
Prices of farm products and the factors affecting them.
As. 408.-Marketing Fruits and Vegetables. 2 hours, and 1 hour for discussion of
assigned problems. 3 credits. HAMILTON. Prerequisite: As. 201.
Marketing of citrus, tomatoes, beans, potatoes, and other Florida products. Two-day field trip, at an esti-
mated cost of $10, paid at time trip is made.
**Not offered after 1936-37.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


As. 409.-Cooperative Marketing. 2 hours, and 1 hour for discussion of assigned
problems. 3 credits. HAMILTON. Prerequisite: As. 201.
Cooperative buying and selling organizations, their successes and failures; methods of organizations, financing,
and business management. Two-day field trip, at an estimated cost of $10, paid at time trip is made.
As. 410.-Agricultural Statistics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. REITZ.
Prerequisite: As. 201.
The principles involved in the collection, tabulation, and interpretation of agricultural statistics.
As. 412.-Land Economics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. HAMILTON.
Prerequisite: As. 201.
History of public land policies; land utilization; land reclamation; marginal and submarginal lands; rural
land reclamation; and land credit. Particular attention is given to the Land Section of the National Resources
Board.
GRADUATE COURSES
As. 501-502.-Agricultural Economics Seminar
*As. 505.-Research Problems
*As. 506.-Farm Management
*As. 508.-Land Economics
*As. 509.-Citrus Grove Organization and Management
*As. 510.-Organization and Management of Truck Farms
*As. 511-512.-Research Problems-Marketing Agricultural Products
*As. 514.-Advanced Marketing of Agricultural Products

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Ag. 301.-Drainage and Irrigation. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS.
Farm surveying, drainage and irrigation systems; field practice. Surface and subsurface drainage systems
used in clearing lands and preventing soil erosion; types of irrigation systems used in Florida. Scoates and Ayres,
Land Drainage and Reclamation.
Ag. 302.-Farm Motors. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS.
The sources of power on the farm.
Ag. 303.-Farm Shop. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS.
Belt lacing, carpentry, concrete construction, soldering, and other farm shop operations. Especially useful
for students intending to teach agricultural engineering in vocational schools.
Ag. 306.-Farm Machinery. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS.
Construction, operation, and selection of harvesting, seeding, spraying, and tilling machinery. Smith, Farm
Machinery and Equipment; Davidson, Agricultural Machinery.
Ag. 401.-Farm Buildings. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits. ROGERS.
Construction, cost, management, sanitation, and ventilation of farm buildings; laboratory exercises in design-
ing and estimating costs. Foster and Carter, Farm Buildings; Ekblaw, Farm Structures.
Ag. 402.-Farm Concrete. 1 hour, and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits. ROGERS.
Selection of materials; curing, mixing, placing, reinforcing, testing and waterproofing concrete. Season,
Concrete Construction for Rural Communities.
**Ag. 403-404.-Agricultural Engineering Investigations. 2 hours. 4 credits.
ROGERS. Prerequisite: A minimum of seven hours in Agricultural Engineering.
Reports on investigational work as found in recent literature.
*Ag. 405.-Horticultural Machinery. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
ROGERS.
The machinery used in the cultivation, harvesting, marketing and refrigeration of fruits and vegetables.
*Ag. 406.-Dairy Engineering. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS.

GRADUATE COURSES
Ag. 501-502.-Agricultural Engineering Seminar
*Ag. 503-504.-Research Work

*Not offered in 1936-37.
**Credit may be received for either half of this course.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


AGRONOMY

Ay. 301.-Soils. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRYAN. Prerequisites: Cy. 101-102.
An introductory course dealing with the nature and properties of soils as related to plant growth. Lyon
and Buckman, Soils.
Ay. 302.-Fertilizers and Manures. 2 hours. 2 credits. BRYAN. Prerequisite:
Ay. 301.
The composition, nature, and source of fertilizer materials; their influence on crops and soils; calculating
fertilizer formulas. Van Slyke, Fertilizers and Crop Production; Bear, Theory and Practice in the Use of
Fertilizers.
Ay. 303.-Laboratory Problems in Soils. 4 hours laboratory. 2 credits. BRYAN.
A series of laboratory exercises in soils, to parallel the work in Ay. 301.
Ay. 304.-Forage and Cover Crops. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
SENN.
Plants that produce feed for livestock and methods of establishing pastures. Consideration of plants suited
for cover crops in rotation systems of the South. Laboratory consists of survey work, topic development, and
field trips.
Ay. 305.-Crop Judging. 2 hours. 2 credits. SENN.
Designed to fit one to judge competitive farm crop displays. Especially adapted to students preparing for
teaching agriculture in high schools, and county agent work. Arrangement of exhibits, assimilation of materials,
and preparation of premium lists for fairs are considered.
Ay. 306.-Laboratory Problems in Fertilizers and Manures. 4 hours laboratory.
2 credits. BRYAN.
A series of laboratory exercises in Fertilizers and Manures, to parallel the work in Ay. 302.
Ay. 308.-Forest Soils. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. BRYAN.
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the principles of forest soils, their formation
and development. Forest zones and soil types are also discussed, with particular reference to the areas and
types in Florida.
Ay. 309.-Principles of Genetics. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. Prerequisite: Bty.
101-102 or Bly. 101-102.
A basic course dealing with the fundamental principles of heredity, variation and selection, and the appli-
cation of genetic principles to plant and animal improvement. Snyder, The Principles of Heredity; Sinnott and
Dunn, Principles of Genetics.
Ay. 311.-Laboratory Problems in Genetics. 2 or 4 hours laboratory. 1 or 2 credits.
SENN. Corequisite: Ay. 309.
Laboratory methods in applying genetic principles, with breeding experiments illustrating the laws of inheri-
tance. Designed to be taken in conjunction with Ay. 309.
Ay. 402.-Plant Breeding. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. Prerequisite: Ay. 309.
The fundamental principles of crop improvement. Field practice in artificial pollination and hybridization.
Hayes and Garber, Breeding Crop Plants; Hunter and Leake, Recent Advances in Agricultural Plant Breeding.
Ay. 405.-Soil Management. 2 hours. 2 credits. BRYAN.
The factors involved in crop production; nutrient cycles in the soil; source and function of soil organic
matter and manures; soil reaction and plant response; lime and soil amendment. Bear, Soil Management.

GRADUATE COURSES

Ay. 500.-Advanced Plant Genetics
Ay. 501-502.-Seminar
Ay. 504.-Soil Development and Classification
Ay. 505-506.-Special Problems in Soils and Crops
*Ay. 508.-Methods of Crop Investigation
Ay. 511.-Soil Analysis
Ay. 514.-Advanced Soils

*Not offered in 1936-37.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

Al. 309.-Fundamentals in Animal Husbandry (Formerly Al. 104). 2 hours. 2
credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Types and breeds of farm animals; principles of breeding, selection and management.
Al. 311.-Elementary Nutrition (Formerly Al. 306). 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory.
4 credits. BECKER.
Elements and compounds, metabolic processes in animal nutrition.
Al. 312.-Feeds and Feeding (Formerly Al. 201). 3 hours. 3 credits. BECKER.
Prerequisite: Al. 311.
Composition of plants and animals; feeding standards and rations for farm animals.
Al. 314.-Livestock Judging (Formerly Al. 307). 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory.
3 credits. KIRK. Prerequisite: Al. 309.
Special training in livestock judging; show ring methods; contests at fairs.
Al. 411.-Beef Production (Formerly Al. 203). 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Prerequisite: Al. 309.
Selection, feeding and management of beef cattle; finishing and marketing.
Al. 412.-Animal Breeding (Formerly Al. 207). 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Prerequisite: Al. 309.
Principles of breeding applied to animals; pedigree and record work; foundation and management of a
breeding enterprise.
Al. 413.-Swine Production (Formerly Al. 204). 2 hours. 2 credits. SHEALY.
Prerequisite: Al. 309.
Selection, feeding and management of hogs; forage crops and grazing; diseases and parasite control; slaugh-
tering of hogs on the farm.
Al. 414.-Horse and Sheep Production. 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY. Pre-
requisite: Al. 309.
Production methods with horses and mules, sheep and goats; breeds; management in Florida.
Al. 415.-Meat Products (Formerly Al. 303). 4 hours laboratory. 2 credits. KIRK.
Prerequisite: Al. 309.
Farm slaughtering and packing house methods; curing and processing of meats.
Al. 416.-World Meats (Formerly Al. 404). 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Prerequisites: Al. 309, 411, 413.
Meat production in other countries of the world compared with United States.
Al. 417.-Breed History (Formerly Al. 301). 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Prerequisite: Al. 309.
History of breeds of beef, dairy, and dual purpose cattle; pedigree studies and registration methods.
Al. 418.-Breed History (Formerly Al. 302). 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Prerequisite: Al. 309.
History of breeds of horses, sheep, and swine; pedigree studies and registration methods.
Al. 420.-Market Classes and Grades of Live Stock. 1 hour, and 2 hours labora-
tory. 2 credits. SHEALY. Prerequisites: Al. 309, 411, 413.
Classifying and grading cattle and hogs from the standpoint of marketing.
Al. 422.-Seminar. (Formerly Al. 401-402). 1 hour. 1 credit. SHEALY.
Seminar will be conducted jointly with Dairy Production and Dairy Manufacturing groups.

GRADUATE COURSES
Al. 501-502.-Animal Production
Al. 503-504.-Animal Nutrition
Al. 505-506.-Live Stock Records
Al. 508. -Methods in Animal Research
Al. 509-510.-Problems in Dairy Production and Animal Nutrition






306 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


ARCHITECTURE

Courses in the Department of Architecture are carried on by means of the problem or
project method, and accomplishment is the sole criterion for advancement. Consequently, the
courses are of indeterminate duration, and the time listed for each course represents merely the
nominal time which the average student will need to complete the work.

Lower Division

Ae. 11A.-Fundamentals of Architecture. WEAVER, ARNETT.
A comprehensive introductory course to the field of architecture carried on by means of a coordinated series
of beginning problems involving the design of simple buildings. Only fundamental architectural elements are
used, and the solutions are presented as plan arrangements interpreted in three dimensions by plastic models.
Freehand drawing, descriptive geometry, shades and shadows, and perspective are introduced successively, not as
abstract and unrelated subjects, but as means whereby the building in process of design may be visualized,
studied, or presented more readily or completely. A work book showing the results of the student's research and
study is required. Nominal time, 9 hours a week for 4 semesters, or 18 hours a week for 2 semesters.


Upper Division

DESIGN
The work in design consists of the solution of problems of the type encountered in contem.
porary practice. In general, the problems are non-competitive in character and the time for the
completion of the solutions is not fixed. Criticisms are given individually and solutions are in
the form of plans, sections, plastic models, and elevations. Other problems which are competitive
in character occur regularly every four weeks. Such problems are solved without criticism and
without references and the solutions are generally limited to nine hours.

Ae. 21A.-Architectural Design. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 11A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11A. The design of minor buildings. Library research
and some emphasis on presentation. Nominal time, 15 hours a week for 2 semesters.
Ae. 21B.-Architectural Design. FLETCHER, WEAVER. Prerequisite: Ae. 21A.
A continuation of Ae. 21A. The design of more complex buildings and of groups of buildings. Conferences
on the theory of composition. Nominal time, 15 hours a week for 3 semesters.
Ae. 22A.-Architectural Design. FLETCHER. Prerequisite: Ae. 11A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11A. A course similar to Ae. 21A for students in Building
Construction. Nominal time, 15 hours a week for 2 semesters.
Ae. 23A.-Landscape Design. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 11A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11A. The design of minor properties. Nominal time,
15 hours a week for 2 semesters.
Ae. 23B.-Landscape Design. FLETCHER. Prerequisite: Ae. 23A.
A continuation of Ae. 23A. The design of public and private properties. Nominal time, 15 hours a week
for 2 semesters.

DELINEATION
Prerequisites listed for courses in delineation apply only to students in the Department of
Architecture. Beginning students from other departments may, with the consent of the instructor,
enroll in Ae. 31A or Ae. 33A.

Ae. 31A.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 11A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11A. Drawing in pencil and charcoal from architectural
subjects. Color theory and methods of applying water color. Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 2 semesters.
Ae. 31B.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 31A.
A continuation of Ae. 31A. Drawing from casts and outdoor sketching in various media. Still life and
simple landscapes in water color. Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 3 semesters.
Ae. 33A.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 11A.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11A. For students in Landscape Architecture. Drawing
in pencil, charcoal, and water color. Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 2 semesters.
Ae. 33B.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite: Ae. 33A.
A continuation of Ae. 33A. Outdoor sketching in various media. Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 2
semesters.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 307


HISTORY
The work in history consists of a series of projects carried on by means of individual research,
conferences, and illustrated reports. The work is outlined as a study of the development of the
art of building with emphasis on historical and other influences, materials and methods of con-
struction, and principles of composition and planning.
Ae. 41A.-History of Architecture. FLETCHER.
For students in Architecture. A study of Ancient and Medieval architecture. Nominal time, 6 hours a
week for 2 semesters.
Ae. 41B.-History of Architecture. STAGEBERG. Prerequisite for students in Archi-
tecture: Ae. 41A.
For students in Architecture, Building Construction, Landscape Architecture, and Painting. A study of
Gothic, Renaissance, and Modern architecture. Students in the various curricula will, in their individual research,
place major emphasis on their particular field. Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 2 semesters.
Ae. 41C.-Decorative Arts. FLETCHER. Prerequisite or corequisite: Ae. 41B.
For students in Architecture and Painting. A brief study of the decorative arts allied with architecture.
Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 1 semester.
CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT
Ae. 51A.-Materials and Methods of Construction. HANNAFORD.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11A. Nature and properties of building materials, and
methods of building construction. Elementary surveying. Nominal time, 9 hours a week for 3 semesters.
Ae. 53A.-Materials and Methods of Construction. HANNAFORD.
A continuation of the Lower Division course Ae. 11A. For students in Landscape Architecture. Similar
to Ae. 51A. Nominal time, 9 hours a week for 2 semesters.
Ae. 51B-Mechanical Equipment of Buildings. ARNETT, WILSON. Prerequisite:
Ps. 101-102-103-104, or equivalent.
Heating, ventilation, electric lighting, and plumbing in buildings. Nominal time, 9 hours a week for
1 semester.
PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS
Ae. 51C.-Professional Relations and Methods. WEAVER.
Conferences on professional relations and on methods of modem practice. Ethics, law, specifications, and
estimates. Nominal time, 9 hours a week for 1 semester.
STRUCTURES
The courses in structures presuppose a satisfactory knowledge of physics, trigonometry, algebra,
analytic geometry, and elementary calculus. The work consists of a series of projects designed
to give the student proficiency in solving the structural problems of buildings.
Ae. 61A.-Structural Design of Buildings. HANNAFORD. Prerequisites: C-2D or
equivalent, and Ps. 101-102-103-104, or equivalent.
The structural design of the component parts of buildings of wood and masonry construction. The weights
of building materials, live loads, and the investigation of the stresses produced in the component parts. Nominal
time, 12 hours a week for 2 semesters.
Ae. 61B.-Structural Design of Buildings. HANNAFORD. Prerequisite: Ae. 61A.
A continuation of Ae. 61A. The structural design of the component parts of buildings in wood, masonry,
cast iron, steel, and reinforced concrete. Nominal time for students in Architecture, 12 hours a week for 3
semesters; for students in Building Construction, 15 hours a week for 1 semester and 21 hours a week for 1
semester.
THESIS IN ARCHITECTURE
Ae. 71A.-Thesis. WEAVER and staff. Prerequisite: Completion of all other require-
ments for the degree.
A comprehensive final project in architecture based on a program submitted by the student and approved
by the faculty. The program must be approved in time to permit not less than 14 weeks for the study of
the problem. The presentation will include the architectural, structural, and mechanical equipment drawings,
and portions of the specifications. Models and written descriptions may accompany the solution. Nominal
time, 48 hours a week for I semester.
GRADUATE COURSES
Ae. 501-502.-Architectural Design
Ae. 521-522.-Advanced Freehand Drawing






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION -UPPER DIVISION


Ae. 525-526.-Advanced Water Color
Ae. 531-532.-Historical Research
Ae. 551-552.-Building Construction
Ae. 553-554.-Structural Design of Buildings

ASTRONOMY
C-2E.-Descriptive Astronomy. 3 hours per week and 2 hours per week laboratory-
observing, during one semester. KUMER.
A survey of the astronomical universe. The earth as an astronomical body; the solar system; stars and
nebulae; the galaxy; the constellations; astronomical instruments and their uses; amateur telescope making.
Aty. 302.-Navigation. 3 hours. 3 credits. KUSNER. Prerequisite: Plane Trigonom-
etry. Recommended: Advanced trigonometry and elementary descriptive astronomy.
The geographical and astronomical principles and practices involved in determination of position at sea
and in the air. Instruments of navigation and their use.

BACTERIOLOGY
tBcy. 301.-General Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CARROLL.
Prerequisites: Bty. 101 or Bly. 101, and Cy. 101.
Morphology, physiology and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms. Tanner, Bacteriology.
ttBcy. 302.-Agricultural Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Bacteria and associated micro-organisms in relation to water, milk, soil, silage, and farm problems.
Bcy. 304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Recognition, culture, and special laboratory technique of handling pathogens and viruses; theories and prin-
ciples of immunity and infection. Stitt, Practical Bacteriology, Parasitology, and Blood Work.
ffBcy. 306.-Bacteriology of Foods. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 301.
Relation of bacteria, yeast, molds, and other micro-organisms commonly found in foods. Tanner, Microbi-
ology of Foods.
Bey. 0308.-Sanitary Laboratory Practice. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
CARROLL. Prerequisite: Cy. 215.
Problems in sewage and public sanitation, designed primarily for sanitary engineers. American Public Health
Association and American Water Works Association, Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Sewage.
Bey. 411.-Principles and Practices of Immunology. 2 hours, and 4 hours labo-
ratory. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bcy. 301.
Consideration of preparations and therapeutic uses of biologicals from a bacteriological standpoint. Zinsser,
Resistance to Infectious Diseases.
*Bey. 412.-Industrial Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. CARROLL.
GRADUATE COURSES
Bey. 500. -Seminar
Bey. 501-502.-Problems in Soil Bacteriology
Bey. 503-504.-Problems in Dairy Bacteriology
Bey. 505-506.-Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology
Bey. 507-508.-Problems in Water Bacteriology
Bey. 509-510.-Problems in Industrial Bacteriology
Bey. 519-520.-Research

*Not offered in 1936-37.
tGraduate credit is not allowed. Should be elected in junior or senior year by students contemplating a
minor in bacteriology.
ttEither Bey. 302 or 306 will be given, depending upon the demand.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


BIBLE

C-5D.-Foundation of Bible Study. 3 hours per week during one semester. 3 credits.
Designed for General College students. Prerequisite to advanced courses in Bible. Offered
each semester. JOHNSON.
Through selected readings from the Bible and through comment, the student will be introduced to (1) the
dominant personalities and historical periods of the Hebrew people in their relations to people of other cultures,
and (2) the rise and extension of Christianity through the first century.
*Be. 209.-Biblical Geography and History (Formerly Be. 103). 3 hours. 3 credits.
JOHNSON.
An introductory course to a more intensive study of Biblical literature. Emphasis on the geography of
Palestine and its relations to Assyria, Babylonia, and Egypt. Growth of Old Testament literature as affected
by these civilizations.
*Be. 210.-Biblical Geography and History (Formerly Be. 104). 3 hours. 3 credits.
JOHNSON.
The influence of Persian, Greek, and Roman cultures on Jewish religion and the rise of Christianity. A
brief survey of the Apocalyptic movement and its literature.
Be. 303-304.-The World's Great Religions (Formerly Be. 401-402). 2 hours. 4
credits. JOHNSON.
A study of the world's great religions in their historical development.
*Be. 403.-Old Testament Literature (Formerly Be. 201). 3 hours. 3 credits.
JOHNSON. Prerequisites: Be. 209, 210.
A survey of Old Testament writings dealing with histories, laws, and legends of Israel, authorship and
composition of books, the united and divided kingdoms and the dominating leaders, showing historical sequence
and spiritual affiliation.
*Be. 404.-The Prophets of Israel (Formerly Be. 202). 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON.
Prerequisites: Be. 209, 210.
A study of the background, message, and significance of the creative personalities in the Hebrew and
Jewish religious life.
Be. 405.-New Testament Writings (Formerly Be. 211). 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHN-
SON. Prerequisites: Be. 209, 210.
A study of the New Testament writings dealing with their background, authorship, occasion, content, and
purpose.
Be. 406.-The Life of Jesus (Formerly Be. 212). 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON.
Prerequisites: Be. 209, 210.
An introduction to the main facts in the life of Jesus and to a general knowledge of the Gospel literature.


BIOLOGY

Bly. 101.-Invertebrate Zoology. 2 hours, and 2 three-hour laboratory periods.
4 credits. BYERS.
The biology, morphology, and classification of the invertebrate animals. Hegner, Invertebrate Zoology.
Bly. 102.-Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. 2 hours, and 2 three-hour lab-
oratory periods. 4 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly. 101.
The morphology and classification of chordate animals. Adams, Introduction to the Vertebrates; Hyman,
Laboratory Manual of Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy.
Bly. 203.-Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology. 2 hours, and 2 three-hour
laboratory periods. 4 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisites: Bly. 101, 102.
Lectures on the physiology and anatomy of the mammalian body supplemented by individual dissections
of the cat. Zoethout, A Textbook of Physiology, 4th edition.
Bly. 210.-Vertebrate Embryology. 2 hours, and 2 three-hour laboratory periods.
4 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisites: Bly. 101, 102.
The principles of general embryology, early development of chordate animals, and the special development
of vertebrates. Wieman, An Introduction to Vertebrate Embryology.

*Not offered in 1936-37.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


Bly. 225-226.-Natural History of the Gainesville Region, with Particular Ref-
erence to the Arthropods. 2 hours, and 2 three-hour field or laboratory periods. 8 credits.
HUBBELL, first semester; ROGERS, second semester. Prerequisites: Bly. 101, 102.
The natural history and classification of the insects and other conspicuous animal groups with special
reference to their natural habitats and ecological relationships.
Bly. 315.-Histology. 2 hours, and 2 three-hour laboratory periods. 4 credits.
WALLACE. Prerequisite: Bly. 210.
The classification and structure of animal tissues. Maximow, Textbook of Histology.
Bly. 316.-Animal Parasitology. 2 hours, and 2 three-hour laboratory periods.
4 credits. BYERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 315.
The animal organisms, especially the protozoa and worms, producing disease in man and the higher ver-
tebrates. Blacklock and Southwell, A Guide to Human Parasitology.
Bly. 325.-Genetics and Evolution. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROGERS. Prerequisite:
Bly. 210 or 225-226, or equivalent.
An introduction to the data and methods of genetics with special reference to their bearing on the problems
of organic evolution. Sinnott and Dunn, Genetics; Shull, Evolution.
Bly. 333.-Insect Biology. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory or field work. 4 credits.
HUBBELL. Prerequisite: Bly. 225-226.
An advanced course in the morphology, classification, and natural history of insects, with special emphasis
upon field work on the local insect fauna.
Bly. 411-412.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. 6 credits. May be taken
either or both semesters. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, BYERS, or WALLACE. Prerequisite:
Permission of the instructor.
Qualified students may choose a topic or problem for study. Possible topics or problems: the morphology,
development, or life history of a selected animal; the taxonomy of an approved natural group of animals; the
fauna of a local animal habitat; natural history of vertebrate or invertebrate group.

GRADUATE COURSES
Bly. 505. -History of Biology
Bly. 506. -Biological Literature and Institutions
Bly. 507-508.-Taxonomic Studies
Bly. 509. -Zoogeography
Bly. 510. -Animal Ecology
Bly. 513-514.-Vertebrate Morphology
Bly. 515-516.-Invertebrate Morphology
Bly. 519-520.-Individual Problems
Bly. 521-522.-Natural History of Selected Animals
Bly. 523-524.-Natural History of Selected Animals
Bly. 533-534.-Problems and Concepts of Taxonomy and Nomenclature
Bly. 539-540.-Graduate Seminar
Bly. 651-652.-Research

BOTANY

Bty. 303.-Advanced Botany of Cryptograms. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. CODY, CARROLL.
Special emphasis will be given to the structure, functioning and environment of the more important lower
plants.
Bty. 304.-Advanced Botany of Seed Plants. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. CODY, CARROLL.
A detailed consideration of the structure and responses and the adjustments of seed plants.
Bty. 308.-Taxonomy. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY. Pre-
requisites: Bty. 303, 304. Desirable prerequisites: Ay. 301; Bty. 311.
Identification of common seed plants and ferns of the Gainesville region. Gray, New Manual of Plants.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


*Bty. 310-Advanced Taxonomy. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 or 5 credits.
CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 308 or equivalent. Desirable prerequisites: Bty. 303, 304 and
Pt. 302. Corequisites: Bty. 431, 432.
A critical study of a plant family or genus. Field work. Library assignments. Gray, Manual of Botany;
Small, Flora of Southeastern States.
Bty. 311.-Plant Physiology (Formerly Bty. 301). 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. CODY. Desirable prerequisites: Cy. 232 or 262; Ay. 301; Ps. 211.
Physiological processes of plants with respect to absorption, assimilation, transpiration, metabolism, respira-
tion, and growth. Mimeographed outlines on Plant Physiology.
Bty. 401.-Plant Ecology. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY. Pre-
requisites: Bty. 311, Bty. 308, Ay. 301. Desirable corequisites: Ay. 405, Ay. 504.
The relation of plants to their environment; plant survey. MacDougal, Introduction to Plant Ecology;
Mimeographed Outlines.
Bty. 403.-Advanced Plant Physiology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CODY. Prerequisites or corequisites: Bty. 311, Bcy. 301, Cy. 201-202, Cy. 262, Ps. 211-212.
Special attention will be given to the processes of absorption and relation of the plant cell to water and
the soil; transpiration and photosynthesis. Miller, Plant Physiology; Mimeographed Exercises.
Bty. 404.-Advanced Plant Physiology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 403.
Principles of syntheses of carbohydrates, proteins, oils and fats; digestion; respiration and growth. A
continuation of Bty. 403. Miller, Plant Physiology; Mimeographed Exercises.
Bty. 431.-Plant Histology (Formerly Bty. 331). 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory.
4 credits. CODY. Desirable prerequisites: Bty. 403, Cy. 262. Corequisite: Bty. 311.
Methods, and practice in killing, fixing, sectioning and staining of plant tissues and organs. Chamberlain,
Methods in Plant Histology (5th ed.) ; Mimeographed Outlines in Plant Histology.
Bty. 432.-Plant Anatomy (Formerly Bty. 332). 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory.
4 credits. CODY. Desirable prerequisites: Bty. 431, Cy. 262, and Ps. 211.
Origin, structure, and function of principal tissues and organs of plants. Stevens, Plant Anatomy (4th ed.);
Mimeographed Exercises.
GRADUATE COURSES
Bty. 500. -Seminar
Bty. 501-502.-Problems in Taxonomy
Bty. 503-504.-Problems in Plant Physiology
Bty. 505. -Problems in Plant Histology
Bty. 506. -Research in Plant Histology
*Bty. 507. -Advanced Plant Anatomy
*Bty. 508. -Problems in Plant Anatomy
Bty. 509-510.-Research

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS

(Courses designed for students in the General College. May be taken for credit by
Upper Division students.)
C-1D.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 5 hours per week throughout one
semester. 5 credits. Offered each semester. ELDRIDGE, HICKS and TUTTLE. Prerequisite:
C-1.
Emphasis on the functioning of the economic system. Economic organization and institutions as parts of
the economic order in their functional capacities. The understanding of economic principles and processes,
especially those relating to value, price, cost, rent, wages, profits, and interest, insofar as such knowledge is
necessary in understanding the economic situation of the present day. The evaluation of economic forces and
processes in terms of their contribution to social well being. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics
and Business Administration.

*Not offered in 1936-37.






BULLETIN OF INFORMATION- UPPER DIVISION


C-1J.-Elementary Statistics. 3 or more hours per week for one semester. 3 credits.
Offered each semester. M. D. ANDERSON, GERMOND. Prerequisite: C-4B.
The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with such fundamental
techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology, sociology, etc.; basic
preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics
and Business Administration.
C-1K.-Elementary Accounting. 5 hours per week for one semester. 5 credits.
Offered each semester. BEIGHTS, CAMPBELL, COGBURN. Prerequisite: C-4B.
Designed to provide the basic training in accounting. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and
Business Administration.
(Courses Designed for Students in the College of Business Administration)
The courses in Business Administration followed by the letter E are courses in Economics.
Bs. 0202E.-Principles of Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits. HICKS.
Analysis of production, distribution, and consumption. This course is offered only during the first semester
in order that students may complete previous catalogue graduation requirements.
Bs. 0212.-Principles of Accounting. 3 hours. 3 credits. CAMPBELL.
Introductory study of the underlying principles of accounting, accounting procedure, and technique. This
course is offered during the first semester only to give students an opportunity to fulfill previous catalog grad-
uation requirements.
Bs. 0305.-Development of Modern Capitalism. 3 hours. 3 credits. MATHERLY.
The origin of the capitalistic system; the Industrial Revolution; the breakdown of local economy and the
rise of national and international economy; the changing characteristics of capitalism; the status of present day
capitalism.
Bs. 311.-Accounting Principles. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEIGHTS, COGBURN. Pre-
requisite: C-1K or Bs. 211-212.
Lectures, discussions, and problems. A study of principles underlying the preparation of financial state-
ments; brief consideration of the problems of valuation; analysis and interpretation of financial statements;
internal check; financial budgets; and other accounting problems of interest to management.
Bs. 312.-Accounting Principles. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEIGHTS, COGBURN. Pre-
requisite: Bs. 311.
A continuation of Bs. 311. An intensive and critical study of the valuation of balance sheet items and
problems incident thereto; tangible and intangible assets, funds, reserves, capital and capital stock, dividends,
and other problems.
Bs. 0313.-Cost Accounting. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEIGHTS. Prerequisite: Bs. 311.
A study of the methods of collection, classification, and interpretation of cost data; special problems,
standard costs, cost systems, uses of cost data in business control. Lectures and problems.
Bs. 321E-322E.-Financial Organization of Society. 3 hours. 6 credits. DOL-
BEARE, TUTTLE.
An introduction to the field of finance: a study of the institutions providing monetary, banking and other
financial services; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institutions; central banking; government
control of finance; significance of financial organization to the economic system as a whole.
Bs. 327E.-Public Finance (Formerly Bs. 429E). 3 hours. 3 credits. CAMPBELL.
Principles governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue; public credit; principles and
methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems of leading countries.
Bs. 329E.-Elements of Personal Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits. HURST.
A study of the legal, economic, and social aspects of personal as contrasted with corporation finance; the
basis of personal credit; types of institutions and systems serving the individual as lending and as saving agencies.
Bs. 335E.-Economics of Marketing (Formerly Bs. 431E). 3 hours. 3 credits.
EUTSLER, HICKS.
The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular attention given to
interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages, and comparative disadvan-
tages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying on trading operations; retail and whole-
sale agencies; elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of marketing; price maintenance; unfair competition;
the relation of the government to marketing.
Bs. 351E.-Transportation Principles. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
The economics of transportation, including railroads, inland waterways, highways, airways, pipe lines, and
communications, specifically with reference to development of facilities and service, contribution to the economic
and social process, characteristic, including competition and monopoly, rates; regulation; and problems of
valuation, discrimination, accounting, finance, service, coordination.




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