• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Map of the campus
 Table of Contents
 Summer session calendar
 Officers of administration
 Faculty
 Admission
 General information
 Expenses
 Rooming facilities
 General regulations
 Colleges and schools
 Departments of instruction
 Questions and answers
 Admission information














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00349
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1936
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00349
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Map of the campus
        Page 117
    Table of Contents
        Page 118
        Page 119
    Summer session calendar
        Page 120
    Officers of administration
        Page 121
    Faculty
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Admission
        Page 125
    General information
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
    Expenses
        Page 130
    Rooming facilities
        Page 131
        Page 132
    General regulations
        Page 133
    Colleges and schools
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
    Departments of instruction
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Questions and answers
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Admission information
        Page 161
        Page 162
Full Text





The University Record

of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of


%he University Summer Session

1936

First Term-June 15 to July 24
Second Term-July 27 to August 28


Vol. XXXI, Series 1


No. 5


May 1, 1936


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida






















The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the Board of Control, the Bulletins
of General Information, the annual announcements of the individual
colleges of the University, announcements of special courses of instruc-
tion, and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what informa-
tion is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of re-
search work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in sev-
eral series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with in-
stitutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning
such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, University
of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications
is under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests for in-
dividual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges,
should be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida









TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
M ap of the Campus...........................--.-------. ----... ..... -...............------------------------------........- ----.....--. 117
Sum m er Session Calendar..............---------.............---------............................. .... ........................... 120
Officers of A administration ......................................... -----.......-- ..- .. ........... ..... ..- 121
Faculty ............-.....-------------............ ---------.... ................. ................ .......... ................. ......... ............. 122
A dm ission.......---.----....... .... ..... ................ ..................... ---------.................... ..... ........ 125
General Information.---------.....--- ....................-----.... ----........ --.........--.. 126
Societies and Clubs ...................................------------ --.... .. ................. 127
Employment Bureau....................----------............---------...................---- --- ..........------------. 127
Laboratory School .......... .........................--------- ---------------- ... ... ......... 128
P.T.A. Short Course .............. -- .......----------. .. ... -.... -- ......--- 128
Summer Session English Council..........................................---- --------- .......-------- 128
Students' Depository ................................ ...------ .-- -.--------------..... .. 128
Loan Funds ............................................... ----------------......................................... ......... 129
Certificates and Extension of Certificates -- -- .............................................. 129
Expenses ....................................... ........ .......................-- --------.. ........ .................... 130
Rooming Facilities................... .......---------......... ..............-------------------------------- 131
General R regulations ............... ... .... ........................................................... 133
Colleges and Schools.....-------- -- ------ ................----- ----------------134
Graduate School .................................------........ --- ......-- ..---- ......... 134
College of Agriculture..................................---- -..-----------135
College of Arts and Sciences ................--....-..--.....-- .......------..-.- 135
College of Business Administration ........--. ------136
College of Education ................. .... .. ----.. ....- ....--- ...-... ... --- 136
College of Law ............................ ..- .... ... -- ........ ...... -------------------. 139
School of Pharmacy ........ ... -- .. -. 139
General College--- ...............--.............. ...------ ....... ------------- 139
Departments of Instruction ............--.....- -.....- .... ................................ 140
G general C college ..................... .... ........ ..................................... 140
Animal Husbandry ............................-------- --- ........----.......... .. 141
Biology ..................................------- ....... ............ ---..........---- ......-- .... ..- 141
Business A dm inistration and Econom ics ......................................................................-----.... 141
Chemistry ..............-----.......... -..-------...--- ....143
Civil Engineering ..................... 144
Commercial Education ............ -------... - ------.. -----..-- ...---- 144
Economics ........................... ....-----------------....- ....------ ....--- ---- 144
Education ......................-----.------------- ---. ..-....... ------ -. .......... .. 145
English -- ....... ........ ......-...-...............-- ---...................... ............ ..... ......... 148
Entomology ................--....... -- .. .. ..... ----------------- 149
F rench -................................-.............................................................. ................... ................. 149
General Natural Science.....--............----- --- -- --------- ---- --- 150
Handwriting...............................--------- - --- ..... .... ........ .... 150
Health and Physical Education ........ --- ..............-- ....-- .......... ........----- 150
History .......................................... --..-- --- .....-- ......----- 151
Law ................. . ............... .... --- --......... --.. .. ..- .... 151
M them atics ........... ................................ .. -- ............. ...- .......... ....- 152
Pharmacology ------...- ............--....-....-..........-......-...-...-..-. ....-................... ....-- 153
Pharm acy ...................... ......................................... ...... 153
Philosophy-...---.-----------.. .....................----.... ....... .................----- 153
Physics ....-- .... -------- -------- ------.. ................. 153
Political Science.--..........-- ---. -.... ...... .. ... .... ....................................... 154
Poultry Husbandry........-- --........................................................... -- .. 154
Psychology .................. ------------------------- -................ 155
Public School Art .................. ------ ..- ------ ........ ------- 155
Public School M music ... .... .......... .......... -.....- ...... ...... ..--- 155
Sociology ................................. ............ ..- ............ ...... .... .......... .. ....... -- ------------- 156
Spanish.- ....... ........................... .. --. ...- .. -...--- ....... .....-.. -- 156
Speech........- ---.........................................................-----------------------... ...... .............................. 157
Q questions and A nsw ers ............ ..- .. .. - ...... ....-. .............. .. -- ................................. 158
Admission Information Blank ... ---- .... .. . ....... -................................ 161




[ 118 ]








IMPORTANT NOTICE TO SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS

All who expect to attend the 1936 Summer Session at the
University of Florida must fill out the Admission Information
blank on page 161 and mail it to the Registrar, University of
Florida, Gainesville. Previous attendance at the University
of Florida does not waive this requirement.
Upon receipt of this questionnaire, the Registrar will send
a registration permit for the 1936 Summer Session if the ap-
plicant is eligible for admission. In order to save time and
confusion during registration, each person who expects to
register should mail in this questionnaire before June 1, 1936.
Upon request, blank questionnaires will be supplied by the
Registrar.

READ QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON PAGES 158-159.




IMPORTANT DIRECTIONS
TO STUDENTS
After arriving at the University:
1. If dormitory room assignment has been made, see Mrs. Margaret Peeler, Room 43,
south end of Buckman Hall. If no reservation has been made, call at Office of the
Business Manager, 102 Language Hall.
2. For outside rooming accommodations, see Dean of Students, 105 Language Hall, or
Dean of Women, 144 New Dormitory.
3. Cafeteria meal tickets may be purchased from the Cashier, 102 Language Hall, or
at the cigar counter, Cafeteria.
4. For information concerning social activities among women students, or any matter of
interest to women, see the Dean of Women, 105 Language Hall or 144 New Dormitory.


[ 119 J








June 15, Monday, 8 A.M...
June 15, Monday.................


June
June


16, Tuesday..................
17, Wednesday............


June 22, Monday..................


SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR
FIRST SUMMER TERM
..................................Placement Tests (Room 101 Science Hall)
..............................Registration for First Summer Term
...-.- ..-..-.-.....-..........Classes begin. Late registration fee, $5
.............................Last day for registration for the First Summer
Term, and for adding courses
................................Last day for making application for a degree
or diploma at the end of the First Summer
Term


June 27, Saturday........................... ...... .........Last day for students to apply to the Dean
to be designated as Honor Students
July 2, Thursday............................................Last day for graduate students, graduating
at the end of the term, to submit theses
to the Dean
July 11, Saturday ... ................ ....................Last day for those beginning graduate work
to file with the Dean an application (Form
2) to be considered candidates for advanced
degrees
July 15, Wednesday ..............................--- ......... Last day for filing application for extension
of certificate
July 24, Friday, 12 noon.................................. First Summer Term ends. All grades are due
in the Office of the Registrar by 5 P.M.
July 25, Saturday, 10 A.M.................Conferring of degrees and diplomas

SECOND SUMMER TERM
July 27, Monday, 8 A.M.........................Placement Tests (Room 101 Science Hall)
July 27, Monday, 8-12 A.M ................................Registration for Second Summer Term
July 28, Tuesday.............................. ...................Classes begin. Late registration fee, $5
July 29, Wednesday........................................... Last day for registration for the Second Sum-
mer Term, and for adding courses
August 1, Saturday, 12 noon............................. Last day for making application for a degree
or diploma at the end of the Second Summer
Term
Last day for applications to take comprehen-
sive examinations in September
August 6, Thursday.................... .........................Last day for students to apply to the Dean
to be designated as Honor Students
August 7, Friday .............................................Summer Law Term ends at 5 P.M.; conferring


August 15, Saturday ............. ..



August 19, Wednesday...................----

August 28, Friday, 12 noon..............

August 29, Saturday, 10 A.M...........


of Law degrees, 8 P.M.
Last day for graduate students, graduating at
the end of the term, to submit theses to
the Dean
..................Last day for those beginning graduate work
to file with the Dean an application (Form
2) to be considered candidates for advanced
degrees
...............Last day for filing application for extension
of certificate
..............Second Summer Term ends. All grades are
due in the Office of the Registrar by 5 P.M.
-..................Commencement Convocation


August 31-September 5, Monday-Saturday........Comprehensive Examinations

[ 120 ]







OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Acting Vice-President of the University, Dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Director of the Summer Session, Dean of the College of
Education
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Business Administration,
Second Term
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, Business Manager
ELIZABETH SKINNER JACKSON, B.A., Dean of Women
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Associate Dean of the General College
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Dean of the College of Business Administration, Acting
Dean of the General College
JOSEPH EDWIN PRICE, B.A.E., Acting Dean of Students
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Assistant Dean, College of Education, in charge of
Laboratory School
GEORGE CLARENCE TILLMAN, M.D., F.A.C.S., University Physician
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Dean of the College of Law
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Second
Term
ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION
MADGE FORSYTH BAKER, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Business Manager
LEWIS F. BLALOCK, B.S.B.A., Director of Admissions
J. B. GooDsoN, Cashier
ELIZABETH VIRGINIA GLOVER, B.A., Secretary, College of Arts and Sciences
MAC G. GRIGSBY, Office Manager, Office of the Dean of Students
ROSA GRIMES, R.N., Head Nurse
GARLAND HIATT, B.A., Auditor
RICHARD S. JOHNSON, B.S. in Pharm., Assistant Registrar
PRISCILLA MCCALL KENNEDY, Chief Clerk, College of Arts and Sciences
ELIZABETH K. LYNCH, B.A., Secretary, General College
JOHN V. McQUITTY, M.A., Secretary, Board of University Examiners
CLAUDE L. MURPHREE, B.A., F.A.G.O., University Organist
BURTON J. OTTE, M.S., Curator, Chemistry Department
MARY E. PARROTT, Secretary, Office of the President
MARGARET PEELER, Housekeeper
IRENE ERSKINE PERRY, B.S., Secretary, College of Education
ILA ROUNTREE PRIDGEN, Secretary, College of Law
EULAH MAE SNIDER, B.S. in L.S., Librarian, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
ELLEN E. TOPH, Acting Dietitian
HELEN WATSON, Secretary, Office of the Business Manager
NANNIE BELLE WHITAKER, B.A., Executive Secretary, College of Business Administration
HESKIN A. WHITTAKER, B.S.B.A., Secretary of Examinations
HOMER D. WINGATE, B.S.B.A., Auditor, Custodian Funds
LILLIAN WOOD, B.A., Secretary, Graduate School







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


LIBRARY STAFF
CORA MILTIMORE, B.S., Librarian (On leave)
HENRIE MAY EDDY, B.A., M.S. in L.S., Acting Librarian
NELLIE MATILDA BREDEHOFT, M.A., B.S. in L.S., Acting Head of Reference Department
ETHEL DONAHEY, B A., B.S. in L.S., Head of Circulation Department
JEAN ELIZABETH HASELTON, B.A., Acting Assistant in Catalog Department
GWENDOLYN LLOYD, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Assistant in Periodicals and Binding
ELIZABETH THORNE, B.A., Acting Head of Catalog Department
MARIAN YOUNGS, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Assistant in Catalog and Reference Departments

FACULTY

MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D., Economics
OLIVER WENDEL ANDERSON, M.S.A., Animal Husbandry
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Economic Geography; Chairman Comprehensive Course
C-1. Man and the Social World
JOEL HARRY BENSON, B.A.E., Commercial Education
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, Ph D., Economics
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D., Chemistry; Chairman, Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and
the Physical World
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, Ph.D., Physics: Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical
World
LORIS ROOD BRISTOL, M.A., Sociology
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D., French
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., English
EDWARD CHRISTIAN CLASS, Ph.D., Education
HENRY PHILIP CONSTANT, M.A., LL.B., Speech
JOHN THOMAS CREIGHTON, Ph.D., Entomology
MANNING JULIAN DAUER, Ph.D., History and Political Science; Comprehensive Course C-1,
Man and the Social World
URI PEARL DAVIS, M.A., Mathematics
SIGISMOND DE RHUDESHEIM DIETTRICH, Ph.D., Economic Geography
HARWOOD BURHOws DOLBEARE, B.A., Economics
CHARLOTTE DUNN, B.S., Kindergarten Education
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL. Ph.D., Philosophy
ROLAND BYERLY EUTSLER, Ph.D., Economics; Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the
Social World
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., English
EARL EMERY FLEISCHMAN, Ph.D., Speech
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D., Pharmacy
RICHARD ALLEN FOSTER, Ph.D., Education and English
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, Ph.D., History; Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the Social World
WILLIAM LEWIS GOETTE, M.A.E., Education
EDWIN CRANBERRY, B.A., English
ARTHUR SYLVESTER GREEN, M.A., Political Science
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, Ph.D., Spanish
JAMES DOUGLAS HAYGOOD, M.A., Education
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., Chemistry
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Psychology


122







FACULTY


ARTHUR ARIEL HOPKINS, M.A., Speech
ROBERT WILLIAM HUSTON, M.A., French
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D., Chemistry
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Physics
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D., Mathematics; Comprehensive Course C-4b, General
Mathematics
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D., Mathematics; Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the
Physical World
LILLIAN MAGDALEN LAWRENCE, B.M.E., Public School Music
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Chemistry
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Education; Comprehensive Course C-4a, Man and His
Thinking
CAROLYN B. McCLURE, Handwriting
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the Social World
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D., Education
INGORIE VAUSE MIKELL, B.M., Assistant to Kindergartner
JEAN OLTMAN MITCHELL, B.A.E., Public School Art
WILLIAM EDGAR MOORE, M.A., English; Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking
and Writing
ALTON CHESTER MORRIS, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking, and Writing
CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, M.A., English
ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, B.A., English
VIOLA NELSON, M.A., Elementary Education
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Education
BESSIE AMANDA NORTON, B.A.E., Public School Art
ANCIL NEWTON PAYNE, Ph.D., History
RUTH BEATRICE PEELER, M.A., Elementary Education
EDWARD SCHAUMBERG QUADE, M.S., Mathematics
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., English
ELLIS BENTON SALT, M.A., Health and Physical Education
WILLIAM LINCOLN SAWYER, B.S., Civil Engineering
HARLEY BAKWELL SHERMAN, Ph.D., Biology
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Mathematics
KENNETH GORDON SKAGGS, M.A., English; Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking
and Writing
DEAN SLAGLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
BUNNIE OTHANEL SMITH, M.A., Education
HERMAN EVERETTE SPIVEY, M.A., English; Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking
and Writing
GRACE ADAMS STEVENS, Elementary Education
DANIEL CRAMER SWANSON, S.B., Physics
CLARENCE JOHN TESELLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
MAE ALENE TINDALL, M.A., Elementary Education
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Law
BENJAMIN REMINGTON WELD, B.A., Sociology
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Psychology
ROBERT CROZIER WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Physics
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Education; Chairman, Comprehensive Course C-4a, Man
and His Thinking




























124 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

HARRY EVINS WOOD, M.A.E., Agricultural Education
DEAN AMORY WORCESTER, Ph.D., Educational Psychology

STUDENT ASSISTANTS
JEAN TURNER BARROW, Civil Engineering
ELIZABETH BLANDING, B.A., Education
WALTER WILLIAM WOOLFOLK, JR., B.A., Law
THOMAS NICHOLAS GAUTIER, General College, Comprehensive Course C-2
PAUL FRANKLIN COLBERT, B.A., Education
JEROME FLOYD EASTHAM, B.A., Education
WILLIAM FRANCIS LOCKWOOD, Education
To be appointed Public School Art
To be appointed Public School Music











ADMISSION


ADMISSION

Students who have previously attended the University of Florida may continue in the
college in which they were registered. Transfer students who do not expect to work
toward a degree at the University may be admitted to one of the colleges or professional
schools of the University as special students. Transfer students with at least 45 acceptable
semester hours credit of advanced standing may be admitted to one of the colleges or
professional schools of the University.
Women students transferring from other institutions of higher learning have the option
of entering the General College or one of the colleges or professional schools of the
University.
Students entering college for the first time and transfer students expecting to continue
in the regular session of the Unversity who do not have at least 45 acceptable semester
hours credit of advanced standing must enter the General College.

ADMISSION TO THE GENERAL COLLEGE

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the General
College:
1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required, although
no specific high school units are required.
2. Consistency of the high school record.
3. Achievement in high school.
4. Personal qualities.
5. Recommendation of high school principal.
6. Standing on Placement Tests.

All applicants should submit the Admission Information blank on the back of this
bulletin, and in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent to the
Registrar. These blanks may be secured from high school principals of the State. Appli-
cants for admission from other states may secure an Application for Admission blank
by writing the Registrar.
The Placement Tests will be given at 8 A.M., Monday, June 15, in 101 Science Hall.
All applicants for admission to the General College are required to take these tests before
registration.
COLLEGE OF LAW

Applicants for admission to the College of Law must be eighteen years of age and
must have received a degree in arts or science in a college or university of approved stand-
ing, or must have fully satisfied the academic requirements for a degree in a combined
course in the University of Florida. The College of Arts and Sciences and the College
of Business Administration offer such a course. Evidence of this work must be presented
to the Registrar of the University on or before the date on which the applicant wishes
to register.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GENERAL INFORMATION

TWO TERMS

The Summer Session of 1936 will consist of two terms. The First Term will extend
from June 15 to July 24 and classes will meet five days a week. The Second Term
will begin on July 25 and end on August 28. Classes will meet six days a week during
the Second Term.
LECTURES AND ENTERTAINMENTS

Adequate facilities for entertainments and lectures are provided in the auditorium,
which has a seating capacity of 1800. Stress is placed upon performances by the students,
plays and musical entertainments being produced from time to time by students of the
Departments of Speech and Music.

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE

The moral and religious atmosphere of the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading
religious denominations have attractive places of worship, and students are welcomed at
every service. Transportation to and from church is provided for students who will
attend. Frequent devotional services are held in the University Auditorium in connection
with the Student Assembly.

THE STUDENT UNION BUILDING

The new Student Union Building will be operated as an official social center for the
campus. A director will be in charge and will take pleasure in doing everything possible
to make the student's stay pleasant. Reading, recreation, and lounging rooms will supply
adequate facilities for social activities and for comfortable relaxation.

ATHLETICS

The gymnasium, basketball court, tennis courts, and swimming pool are at the disposal
of the students, and instructors are at hand to direct athletic activities. A well-kept
golf course is near the University, with nominal fees for students of the Summer Session.
The brick gymnasium will be used for women students exclusively; the basketball
gymnasium will be for men students exclusively. Dressing rooms will be provided in each
of these buildings; students will not be permitted to wear swimming suits or gymnasium
suits on the campus.
The following schedule will be employed for the use of the swimming pool:
Men and Women: 2-6 P.M., daily except Monday.

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

All students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly, which
will be held in the University Auditorium at hours scheduled below. Important announce-
ments will be made at the General Assembly, for the observance of which students will be
held responsible.
9 A.M. Wednesday, June 17
10 A.M. Thursday, July 2
11 A.M. Wednesday, July 15
8 A.M. Tuesday, July 28
9 A.M. Friday, August 14







GENERAL INFORMATION


SOCIETIES AND CLUBS

PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University
in 1912. To be eligible for membership, a student must previously have earned at the
University at least thirty semester hours credit, must have been guilty of no serious
breaches of discipline, and must stand among the upper fifth of all candidates for degrees.
Candidates for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor point average
of at least 2.00 on all scholastic work. If a student comes within the quota for his college,
an average of 2.00 assures his eligibility, but if he does not come within the quota, it is
necessary that he have an average of 2.30 or higher.

KAPPA DELTA PI
Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary education fraternity, in which only juniors and seniors
in the College of Education are eligible for membership.

KAPPA PHI KAPPA
Kappa Phi Kappa is an honorary professional fraternity for men. Students enrolled in
the College of Education with an honor point average of 1.5 are eligible for membership.

PEABODY CLUB
All students of the College of Education are eligible for membership in Peabody Club.
This organization meets weekly in Peabody auditorium, where instructive programs are
given.
ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN
An official mimeographed bulletin is published each day during the Summer Session.
It appears on all bulletin boards and carries notices of changes in schedule, meetings,
lost and found articles, etc. Students and faculty members should read the Bulletin daily.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Peabody Hall and
Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are responsible for all an-
nouncements made in the General Assembly, on the official bulletin boards, and in the
Orange and Blue Bulletin.

THE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

The Employment Bureau of the College of Education attempts to render a public ser-
vice. This is not mere mechanical routine of finding teaching positions for graduates;
the Bureau considers the welfare of the school concerned, and tries to get the right person
in the right teaching position.
There is no service fee for University graduates. Students who wish the help of the
Bureau may arrange an interview with the Director and submit complete credentials. On
request this information is sent to school officials of the State.
Many specific requests are received from district trustees and county school boards.
Every effort is made to furnish these officials with information that will enable them
to select the teachers most likely to succeed in the schools concerned.
Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the Director of
the Teachers' Employment Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


LABORATORY SCHOOL

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School will conduct a few demonstration classes in the
elementary grades and the kindergarten, during the first term of the Summer Session.
Provision will be made for four groups: kindergarten, combined first and second grades,
combined third and fourth grades, combined fifth and sixth grades. Application for en-
rollment should be sent to the Director of the Laboratory School as soon as possible, since
the number who may be accommodated is limited.
Registration of pupils will be held in Room 120 Yonge Building, Monday. June 15.
Classes will begin Wednesday, June 17, at 9 o'clock.

P. K. YONGE SCHOOL LIBRARY

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School library will be open both terms for use ot teachers
attending the Summer Session. This library contains over 3000 books for boys and girls
from the kindergarten through the twelfth grade. This material may be examined and
used in the library at the following hours:
8 to 11 A.M., 2 to 5 P.M. daily except Saturday
9 to 12 A.M. Saturday
7 to 9 P.M. Tuesday and Thursday

The regular librarian will be available for guidance and conference at these hours.

P. T. A. SHORT COURSE

The second annual course for leaders in Parent-Teacher organizations will be held
the week of July 6-11, in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Building. Its purpose is
to give parent-teacher workers a practical knowledge of events taking place in the world
today which will enable them to be better parents and better citizens. The theme for
this year will be "Widening Horizons" and the departments of health, public welfare,
home service, and education will be presented in various ways.
In the afternoon a parent education course and a course in parent-teacher technique
will be offered to registrants for the morning sessions. Attendance is not limited to parent-
teacher association members, but is open to all members of women's organizations. The
course is under the immediate direction of Mrs. Frank Petrie, head of the Department of
Education of the Florida Congress of Parents and Teachers. For information, address
communications either to Mrs. Petrie, 2001 University Drive, Orlando, or to the Director
of the Summer Session, University of Florida.

THE SUMMER SESSION ENGLISH COUNCIL

The Summer Session English Council meets every Tuesday evening after the first week
at 7:30 in Language 212. All teachers of English in junior and senior high schools are
invited to attend and take part in discussions. In addition to informal exchange of
opinion, helpful talks are given by various members of the Summer Session faculty on
pertinent topics.
STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY

For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University,
funds may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of twenty-five cents is made
on each account.







GENERAL INFORMATION


LOAN FUNDS

By means of the Florida State Scholarship Fund, the College Girls' Club Scholarship
Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan Fund, and the R. A. Gray Loan Fund,
the Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of women students
to help defray expenses in the current term. These loans are governed by the following
regulations:
(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school.
(3) Applicant must be in need of aid.
(4) Applicant must apply for Scholarship Loan at least two weeks before opening of a
Summer Term.
(5) Application must be made directly to the Director of the Summer Session.
(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in which she is
teaching at the time of application.
(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at a University of Florida Summer Term.
(8) Loans will be for a period not to exceed nine months from the day on which a Summer
Term begins.
(9) Loans will bear interest at the rate of 6%, which will be added to the principal fund.
Upon application to the Director of the Summer Session, blank forms for application
for a scholarship loan will be furnished.

CERTIFICATES
GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES
Graduates of the University are granted Graduate State Certificates without further
examination, provided that three-twentieths of their work has been devoted to professional
training and provided that they have satisfied the requirement of the law as to familiarity
with the Constitution of the United States. It is well for the student to note that a
Graduate State Certificate permits him to teach only those subjects that are listed on
such certificate, and that only those subjects will be placed on his certificate in which
he has specialized in his college course. This will ordinarily mean that a subject must
have been pursued for at least three years in college, in addition to credit for all high
school courses offered in that subject by a standard high school, before a certificate to
teach such subject will be granted. The student who expects to meet the requirements
for specialization should familiarize himself with the regulations regarding specialization
as printed in the Handbook for Teachers, Section 1, latest edition, published by the State
Department of Public Instruction. Applicants for the Graduate State Certificate must
apply to Superintendent W. S. Cawthon, Tallahassee, for application blanks and further
information.
Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by "presenting
satisfactory evidence of having taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under
a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of three holders of Life State,
Life Graduate State, or Life Professional Certificates." Application for a Life Graduate
State Certificate must be filed before the expiration of the Graduate State Certificate.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES

The following more important items govern the granting of extension of certificates:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended
and at the time formal application for extension is made.
2. The applicant must pass six semester hours in which no grade is below a
"C." At least one-third of this work must be in professional subjects.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


3. Courses in Education and all other courses which definitely apply toward
meeting the requirements for a diploma or a degree are counted as profes-
sional subjects.
4. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply
for the same on the student Registration Card. In case the student fails to
apply on the Registration Card at time of registration, request may be made
to the Registrar, Room 110, Language Hall, to have his application for
extension properly recorded. A list of those who have applied will be
posted on the bulletin boards in Language Hall and Peabody Hall not later
than July 1 for the First Term and August 10 for the Second Term. In
case of error in this list, students should report to the Registrar. No student
will be recommended for extension whose name does not appear on this
list by July 15 for the First Term or August 19 for the Second Term. Stu-
dents should register under exactly the same name that appears on the
certificate which they wish to have extended.
5. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to W. S.
Cawthon, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida,
within a year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension
will not be granted.

EXPENSES

GENERAL FEES
T tuition. ......................................................................................................................... N one
Registration fees, each term:
Florida students ...................... ----------------------- -------------... ........................ $15
N on-Florida students ................................................... .....................-.............. 25
Extra hour fee-for each semester hour above normal load of six hours 1
College of Law (one term of eight weeks)............................................... 30
($6 a semester hour for less than five hours)
Laboratory School (first term only)
K kindergarten ...-----........------- .......................-- ... ........ ......... ..... 9
First six grades............-......-------. -- ----....................................... 6
Late registration fee...............................--------------------..........---...--...........-......-------------- 5
Infirmary fee (Required of all students) ................. .......... ........... 1
Breakage fee for Biology and Chemistry ....................... ........ ... ................... 5
Failure fee, per semester hour............................................................................... 2.50
(For any course failed during last period of attendance)
D iplom a fee................................ ......................... .......... 5

REFUND OF FEES
Fees paid in advance for room reservations will be refunded up to and including, but
not after June 1, for First Term reservations, or July 1 for Second Term reservations.
If by Wednesday of the first week of each term students for any reason wish to with-
draw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded. No refunds
will be made after this date.
No refunds of laboratory fees will be made after the first two weeks of each term.
The instructor has the right to refuse any refund of laboratory fees when these funds have
been used in the purchase of supplies.







ROOMING FACILITIES


ROOMING FACILITIES

UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES

The University dormitories are reserved for women students during the Summer Session.
Rooms are rented for the term or session, payable in advance. The dormitories will be open
from June 14 to noon August 29.
Rooms may be reserved at any time by application to the Business Manager. A de-
posit of $5 is required with each reservation, payable May 1 for reservations for the first
term, and June 5 for the second. This deposit is held as a breakage fee, to be returned
at the close of the term if no damage to the room has been reported.
All bedrooms are furnished with single beds and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table,
washstand, and chairs. Students must furnish linen and other things they may require
for their own special comfort and convenience.
Students are not permitted to cook in the dormitories.
A description of accommodations in the several dormitories, with rates per student,
follows.
NEW DORMITORY

The New Dormitory is of strictly fireproof construction. Rooms are arranged in suites,
consisting of study and bedroom, and accommodating two students. A limited number of
single rooms and several suites accommodating three students are available. All rooms
are equipped with lavatories and built-in chifforobes, with adjacent bathrooms containing
lavatories and hot and cold showers. They are furnished with two beds, study tables, and
chairs. Additional easy chairs may be secured at a rental charge of 50c a term.

RATES Both Terms
First Term Second Term in Advance
Single rooms, floors 1, 2. and 3 ................................ $15.75 $13.25 $26.00
Single rooms, floor 4 -............-.... .--... ...........-.. .... 15.00 12.50 25.00
Two-room suites, floors 1, 2, and 3 ............................ 15.00 12.50 25.00
Two-room suites, floor 4 ................. ...................... 12.75 10.75 21.00

THOMAS HALL

Sections C, D, and E of Thomas Hall have been remodeled throughout. Both single
and double rooms are available. All rooms in Sections C and E and the single rooms in
Section D are equipped with lavatories. The rooms in other sections are arranged in
suites, consisting of study and bedroom, accommodating three students. A number of
rooms accommodating four students and a few single rooms are available. Baths, with
lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor of each section, thus
providing a bathroom for each four rooms. Rooms are furnished with beds, chifforobes,
study tables, and chairs.
RATES Both Terms
First Term Second Term in Advance
Single rooms, Sections C, D, and E ............................... $14.25 $12.00 $24.00
Double rooms, Section D .............................................. 11.25 9.50 19.00
Double rooms, Sections C and E ................................... 12.00 10.00 20.00
A ll other room s ................................ .. .. .......... .. 9.00 7.50 15.00

















BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BUCKMAN HALL

Rooms in Buckman Hall are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom, and
accommodating three students. A number of suites accommodating four students are
available. Baths, with lavatories and hot and cold showers, are located on each floor
of each section, thus providing a bathroom for each four suites. Rooms are furnished
with beds, chifforobes, study tables, and chairs.

RATES Both Terms
First Term Second Term in Advance
All rooms .................................... .......................... $ 9.00 $ 7.50 $15.00

UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA

Meals may be obtained at the University Cafeteria at the following rates:
Three meals a day for four weeks, tickets ....... -....--.--....-... ...-- ........... $20.00
Two meals a day for four weeks, tickets ............................... .....-- ........... 17.00
Three meals a day for one week, ticket ............... ................................... 5.50

MEALS WITHOUT TICKETS

Breakfast .......................................... $ .25
D inner ................................................ .35
Supper .............................................. .30

OFF-CAMPUS ROOMING ACCOMMODATIONS

A number of comfortable rooming and boarding houses off the campus will be open
during the Summer Session. A list of approved rooming houses may be secured by applying
to the Dean of Students, 105 Language Hall. Living expenses off the campus will be
somewhat higher than University rates.
Men and women students will not be permitted to room in the same house; special
arrangements will be made in the case of married couples.







GENERAL REGULATIONS


GENERAL REGULATIONS

The student is advised to procure the University Bulletin entitled By-Laws and acquaint
himself with all general regulations. Particular attention is invited to the following items:

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS

1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two regular
terms, or one regular term and three summer terms, or five summer terms. New students
offering advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the University.
Students who break their residence at the University by attending another institution for
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University.
2. For the master's degree two regular terms or six summer terms are necessary to
satisfy the residence requirements.
3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (27 for the Normal
Diploma; 28 in the College of Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during
regular residence in the college from which the student is to be graduated. Exception
to this regulation may be made only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the
college concerned, but in no case may the amount of extension work permitted exceed
more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required for a baccalaureate degree.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED

No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree
by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be allowed to take
more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's degree by correspondence
study or extension class work. No person will be allowed to take more than 9 credits by
correspondence during the summer vacation period. While in residence, a student will
not be allowed to take work by correspondence without the consent of the dean. This will
be granted only in exceptional cases. Candidates for the Normal Diploma may not take
more than 16 credits by correspondence and extension.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD

The minimum load of any student in a summer term is four hours.
The maximum load, including work by correspondence and extension, shall be regulated
according to the following schedule:
Maximum Load
Honor Point Average for Previous Term Summer Term
Below 1 ..................... ........... ............... ......................... 6 hours
1 or above ....... --...... ...................................... .......... 9 hours

For students who have not previously attended the University of Florida the maximum
load is nine hours, provided the previous record is satisfactory.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dean of their
college, regarding choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to this,
juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which they expect
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be
dropped or changed only through the office of the dean of the college in which the student
is registered.

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The major courses are regularly numbered above 500 and the minors between 300 and
500, but there is no objection to counting a course above 500 in one department as a minor
in another. On the other hand, there are courses numbered 300 and 400 which are not
acceptable as minors.
As a general practice, undergraduate students are not permitted to register for courses
numbered above 500.
A number of courses have already been arranged that may count as majors. Efforts
will be made to arrange still others upon request. If the major work wished is not listed,
requests for it should be made at an early date.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

A candidate for the master's degree must be in residence for at least one scholastic year,
devoting his entire time during this period to study and research. The Summer Session of
eleven weeks will count as one-third of a year. One-half of this term will be one-sixth
of a year.
In addition to registration for the courses which a graduate student wishes to take, he
must have an application blank (Form 2) properly filled out and presented to the Dean of
the Graduate School not later than July 11 for the First Term or August 15 for the Second
Term. These blanks may be secured at the time of registration from the Dean of the
Graduate School.
The candidate must complete one major and two minors. A major consists of twelve
semester-hours of rank above the senior class. A minor consists of six semester-hours of
rank above the sophomore class.
In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em-
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer.
A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely allied to the major
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. The
thesis itself should be completed and submitted in time to allow an interval of three
full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the summer term.
A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language is required.
All students majoring in Education are required to take Education 500. All others
taking Education are advised to take this course.
The passing grade for graduate students is B.
The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from the time
of first registering for graduate work. For summer session students this means seven
summers.
For requirements for the Ph.D. degree and other information in regard to graduate work
see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.


134







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

The College of Agriculture can offer only a limited number of courses during the First
Summer Term. Regular students and teachers may take these for college credit. Voca-
tional agricultural students may be interested in taking some courses as minors for advanced
degrees, others as additional training for teaching.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

The College of Arts and Sciences operates in every term. During the Summer Session
most of its departments offer basic courses, and many offer advanced courses. Inasmuch
as most of the subjects taught in the public schools are continued on the college level
by departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, this college is of particular service
to the teachers of the State. Others who profit particularly by the operation of the College
of Arts and Sciences in the Summer Session are students of the College who wish either
to make up deficiencies or to hasten graduation, students of other collegiate institutions
and of other colleges of the University who wish to complete basic arts and sciences
requirements or electives, and men and women who spend their vacations in attendance
at the University for the purpose of securing new points of view and renewed intellectual
vigor.
HONORS GRADUATION

For information concerning graduation with Honors or graduation with High Honors,
see the Bulletin of By-Laws.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS

In the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts special emphasis is placed
upon the humanities and the social sciences. Requirements for the degree of Bachelor
of Arts include at least two years of college foreign language work beyond the level of
the basic year-course; English composition and rhetoric; a survey of the literature of the
Western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance; one year of college mathematics;
a full year-course in a laboratory science; a major in one of the subject-matter fields of
French, German, Greek, Latin, Spanish. Bible, Economics, English, History, History and
Political Science, Journalism, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Speech,
Mathematics; and two minors or a double minor. For complete information concerning
the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, see the Bulletin of Information for
the Colleges and Professional Schools of the Upper Division.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Students interested primarily in the sciences should select the curriculum leading
to the degree of Bachelor of Science. Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science
include basic year-courses in two laboratory sciences; basic mathematics through analytic
geometry; a major in one of the subject-matter fields of Bacteriology, Biology, Botany,
Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology; two minors or a double minor; English
composition and rhetoric; and at least one year of college foreign language work beyond
the level of the basic year-course. For complete information concerning the requirements
for the degree of Bachelor of Science, see the Bulletin of Information for the Colleges
and Professional Schools of the Upper Division.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


THE PRE-LAW COURSE

In cooperation with the College of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences offers the
pre-law course. This course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or to the degree
of Bachelor of Science upon completion of the first full year of the law course, and to
the degree of Bachelor of Laws upon completion of the law course. For students who
make adequate scholastic progress it is possible to earn the academic and law degrees
in six years, of which two years are spent in the General College, one in the College of
Arts and Sciences, and three in the College of Law.

PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES

Students who upon graduation from the General College have not completed require-
ments for admission to the medical and dental schools may continue and complete their
pre-professional training in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student should select
courses in accordance with requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes
to enter, and should correspond with the dean of that school for information and advice.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The College of Business Administration will operate during the Summer Session as during
the regular terms. The courses offered will appeal to students attending the regular terms
who wish to return during the Summer Session, and to teachers and others who wish to take
courses to prepare for teaching commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare for
teaching social sciences.
Attention of teachers attending the Second Summer Term is especially invited to Bs. 285,
Principles of Human Geography.

SUMMER CRUISE

The College of Business Administration, in cooperation with the Institute of Inter-
American Affairs, will offer a cruise through Caribbean America, July 4 to August 12.
Two courses, each carrying three semester hours credit, are to be taught on the cruise.
Detailed information may be secured from Professor W. T. Hicks, College of Business
Administration, University of Florida.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

DEGREES OFFERED

Students completing any of the prescribed four-year courses may obtain the respective
degree: i.e., Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Education, Bachelor of
Science in Agricultural Education, Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education,
or Bachelor of Arts in Health and Physical Education.
Students completing the prescribed course may obtain the Normal Diploma.

MAJORS AND MINORS

In the following discussion a major is defined to consist of 18 credit hours above the
elementary year-course in a subject other than Education. A minor is ordinarily defined
to consist of 9 credit hours above the elementary year-course in a subject other than
Education, but in case the number of hours thus specified is not sufficient to meet the







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


requirements necessary for certification, the student should take enough additional hours
to meet these requirements.
One major and two minors or one major and a double minor are required of students
in the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education or Bachelor of
Science in Education.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA AND TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

Lower Division

Leading to the Normal Diploma. For Those Who Expect to Teach in First Six Grades

CREDITS
E education ....................................................................................................................................... 20
This must include:
En. 103-Health Education.
SEn. 121-Primary Methods.
or
En. 124-The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Grades.
En. 122-Teaching Reading and Literature in the First Six Grades.
En. 201-The Teaching of the Social Sciences in the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth
Grades.
or
En. 221-Advanced Primary Methods.
En. 207-Educational Psychology.
En. 209-The Teaching of Science in the First Six Grades.
{En. 253-Supervised Teaching of the Elementary Subjects.
or
En. 308-The Elementary School Curriculum.
General N natural Science 101-102................................................................................... 8
Sociology 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies..................---.................................. 4,5, or 6
English 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition................................................................ 4,5, or 6
Public School Art......-......................-------------------.-........--............................................................. 4
P public School M usic.......................................................................................................... 4
Handwriting 101 ..................-..........-......-.............----------------.--------------------------........................................... 0
Major and Minors --------.....------.........................------------------...................--................................................ 18
E lectives .......................................- ..----... ........................................................ 0,1,2,3, or 4

Total credits needed................................. --............----------------------......................... 66

Upper Division
E education ......................................................................................................................... 12
This must include:
En. 308*-The Public School Curriculum.
En. 319 -Child and Adolescent Psychology.
Complete one major** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives
approved by the Dean............................................................................................ 54

Total credits needed in upper division............................................................... 66
Total credits and Honor Points...................................................................................... 132

*En. 308 is required of all students who have not taken En. 200. Students who have taken
En. 200 will not be permitted to take En. 308.
**For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the natural
sciences.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
For Those Who Expect to Teach in the Junior and Senior High School

Lower Division
CREDITS
Education .................. .... ..... ------ ... ..... .... -- -- -- ................... 6
This must include:
En. 101-Introduction to Education.
En. 207-Educational Psychology.
English 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition.......................................................... 4,5, or 6
English 103-104-Introduction to Literature .................. ............................. 4,5, or 6
General Natural Science 101-102.................................................................. ............ 8
Sociology 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies ................................................. 4,5, or 6
Speech 201- Public Speaking ...................................................................................... 2 or 3
Major and minors and electives approved by the Dean........................................... 31-40

Total credits and honor points needed in Lower Division............................. 66

Upper Division
E education ................... ....... ........ ........................... ............. ..... .... ............ 2 1
*This must include:
En. 319-Child and Adolescent Psychology.
En. 323-General Methods.
En. 403-Problem-Project Method.
**Supervised Student Teaching (two courses).
Complete one major*** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives
approved by the Dean ................................................................... 45

Total credits and honor points needed in Upper Division ............................. 66
Total Credits and H onor Points....................................... ..... ................................132

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA
If, while the student is working on the curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree, he
desires to secure the Normal Diploma, he may do so when he has satisfactorily completed
the following work:
Education .................................... .................. .. ............. ............. 12
This must include:
En. 101-Introduction to Education.
En. 207-Educational Psychology.
En. 323-General Methods.
Supervised Teaching (one course)
English 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition ......... ---....... ....................................... 4,5, or 6
English 103-104-Introduction to Literature ................... .......................... 4.5, or 6
****General N natural Science 101-102 ..... .................................................................. 8
Sociology 111-112- Introduction to Social Studies ........ ............. .......................... 4,5, or 6
M ajor and m inors ............................................................ ........... ........- 28- 34

Total credits and honor points needed for Normal Diploma......................... 66
For the curriculum in Health and Physical Education, the student is referred to the
Bulletin of Information for the Colleges and Professional Schools of the Upper Division.

*In addition to the courses listed above, students preparing to become principals must take
EIn. 305, 317, and 401, or 406 or 408.
**These two courses must be selected in accordance with the major and two minors in which
the stu lent is working.
***For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the nat-
ural sciences.
****S'udents who major or minor in natural science are not required to take Gl. 101-102. It
may be taken as an elective.






COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


COLLEGE OF LAW
Since 1909 the purpose of the College of Law has been to impart a thorough scientific
and practical knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the
opportunities in this field. Since 1927 the College has operated during the Summer Session.
Requirements and standards of the regular terms have been maintained. Courses offered
during the regular terms are rotated. Some courses not given during the regular terms
are offered in the Summer Session. The variety of courses is sufficient to enable students
of different types to carry a full load, and appeal to a wide range of students.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
Courses offered by the School of Pharmacy are so rotated that all courses of major
interest are offered during the course of several summers. Foundation courses, such as
Botany, Bacteriology, and Chemistry may also be taken during the Summer Session.
The courses offered will appeal: First, to students attending the regular session who
wish to make more rapid progress toward graduation; second, to drug clerks and apprentices
who are ambitious to improve their knowledge of Pharmacy; third, to graduate students
who wish to continue graduate study.
Mature students who have not completed entrance requirements may with the approval
of the Director of the School and the Director of the Summer Session enroll as "Adult
Specials" provided all other requirements of the Summer Session are met.
Graduate courses are also offered during the Summer Session. Address the Director
of the School of Pharmacy for further information.

THE GENERAL COLLEGE
INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT
The General College has been organized to administer the work of the freshman and
sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning students will register in
this College.
The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College in two
years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter time, and others
may find it necessary to remain in the General College for a longer period.
A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this program the
University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all students alike. On this
foundation that has meaning and significance to the student, he may add the special
training of the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, or drop out of
the University with something definite and helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen.
The purposes of the General College are:
1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the guidance
needed by all students.
2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing for ad-
vanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division.
3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give to
college training, and consequently should concern themselves with general
viewpoints and major understandings.
4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general edu-
cation incident to the changing conditions of modern life.
NOTICE TO PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS
The comprehensive courses of the General College are of special significance and value
to the public school teachers. Every teacher is invited to plan for one or more of these
general courses.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

All classes, unless otherwise indicated, meet for one hour and twenty minutes. In the
first term classes scheduled to meet daily meet Monday through Friday; in the second
term such classes meet Monday through Saturday.
Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with no
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule.

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES

Comprehensive examinations for General College students in C-1, C-2, C-3, and C-6
will not be given until the end of the second term and will cover the work of both terms.
Any General College course carried by an upper division student in substitution for
a required course will carry four semester hours credit for each term of the Summer Session.

First Term

C-l.-Man and the Social World. Lecture 10 M. W. A-106. MATHERLY.
Recitation: C-111. 10 T. Th. F. L-204. MATHERLY.
C-112. 10 T. Th. F. L-203. GLUNT.
C-113. 1 T. Th. F. P-209. GLUNT.
C-114. 10 T. Th. F. L-201. EUTSLER.
C-115. 2:30 T. Th. F. L-203. EUTSLER.
Optional attendance: 2-5 daily. L-201. STAFF.
C-2.-Man and the Physical World.
Lecture: Section 1. 7 daily. P-2. KUSNER.
Section 2. 10 daily. L-306. GAUTIER.
Demonstration Laboratory, both sections: 2:30-4:30 W. B-203. STAFF.
C-3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. Lecture 7-8 M. W. F. A-106. STAFF.
Recitation: C-311. 8-10 M. W. F. A-104. MORRIS.
C-312. 8-10 M. W. F. L-210. MOORE.
C-313. 1-3 M. W. F. L-307. SKAGGS.
Writing Laboratory:
C-3A. 7-8:30 T. Th. L-209. MORRIS, MURPHREE.
C-3B. 8:30-10 T. Th. L-209. MORRIS, MURPHREE.
C-4a.-Man and His Thinking. 8:30 daily. L-203. LITTLE.
C-4b.-General Mathematics. 7 daily. P-10. KOKOMOOR.
C-6.-Man and the Biological World. 10 daily. S-101. BYERS.

Second Term
C-l.-Man and the Social World. Lecture 10 M. W. A-106. ATWOOD.
Recitation: C-111. 10 T. Th. F. S. L-204. ATWOOD.
C-112. 10 T. Th. F. S. L-203. DAUER.
C-113. 1 T. Th. F. P-209. DAUER.
C-114. 10 T. Th. F. S. L-201. DIETTRICH.
C-115. 2:30 T. Th. F. L-203. DIETTRICH.
Optional attendance: 2-5 daily. L-201. STAFF.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


C-2.-Man and the Physical World.
Lecture: Section 1. 7 daily. P-2. BLACK.
Section 2. 10 daily. L-306. BLESS.
Demonstration Laboratory, both sections: 2:30-4:30 W. B-203. STAFF.
C-3.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. Lecture 7-8 M. W. F. A-106. STAFF.
Recitation: C-311. 8-10 M. W. F. A-104. MORRIS.
C-313. 1-3 M. W. F. L-307. SPIVEY.
Writing Laboratory:
C-3A. 7-8:30 T. Th. L-209. MORRIS, SPIVEY.
C-3B. 8:30-10 T. Th. L-209. MORRIS.
C-4a.-Man and His Thinking. 10 daily. L-212. WILSON.
C-6.-Man and the Biological World. 10 daily. S-101. BYERS.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
First Term
Al. 104.-Types and Breeds of Animals. 10 M. T. A-205. Conference, 2
hours to be arranged. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
A study of the types of farm animals and origin and development of breeds. The breeds
of livestock commonly found in Florida. Use of the various breeds of cattle and swine in .im-
proving the grade of these animals in the State. The market classes of cattle, sheep, and swine.
The use of the score card in judging.
Al. 207.-Breeding Farm Animals. 11:30 T. Th. A-205. Conference, 3 hours
to be arranged. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Principles of breeding as applied to farm animals. The importance of the law of heredity
in livestock improvement work. The selection as it applies to the improvement of grade of
livestock. Pedigree and record work. Foundation and management of a breeding enterprise.

BIOLOGY
First Term
Bly. 101.-Invertebrate Zoology. 7 M. T. W. Th. S-111. Laboratory 1-5
M. T. W. Th. S-106. 4 credits. SHERMAN.
The structure, classification, and natural history of invertebrate animals. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 102.-Vertebrate Zoology. 10 M. T. W. Th. S-111. Laboratory 1-5
M. T. W. Th. S-107. 4 credits. SHERMAN.
An introduction to the morphology, classification, and natural history of the chordate animals.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bly. 411.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Hours and credits to be
arranged. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly. 315 or 330.
Properly qualified students may select individual topics or problems for study. Possible topics
or problems: the morphology, development, or life history of a selected vertebrate; the taxonomy
of an approved limited group of animals; the natural history of an approved limited group of
vertebrates.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS
First Term
Bs. 201E.-Principles of Economics. Seminar method. 8:30 daily. L-10. 3
credits. ANDERSON.
A general understanding of present-day economic organization; brief analysis of production,
distribution, and consumption.
Bs. 302E.-Elements of Statistics. 10 daily. L-10. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
An introduction to statistics; brief consideration of statistical theory; collection, classification,
and presentation of economic data; construction of graphs and charts; study of index numbers;
problems of statistical research. Each student is required to complete one or more projects in
statistical investigation.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Bs. 321E.-Financial Organization of Society. 8:30 daily. Bu-204. 3 credits.
DOLBEARE. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
An introduction to the field of finance. The pecuniary organization of society: monetary
systems; banks and institutions connected with short-term and long-term financing.
Bs. 322.-Financial Management. Seminar method. 3 credits. DOLBEARE.
Prerequisite: Bs. 321E.
The financial manager's task in an operating business enterprise; financial ratio analysis;
the financial policies, methods, and practices in raising both fixed and working capital.
Bs. 329E.-Elements of Personal Finance. Seminar method. 10 daily. Bu-204
3 credits. DOLBEARE. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
A study of the legal, economic, and social aspects of personal as contrasted with corporation
finance; the basis of personal credit; types of institutions and systems serving the individual
as lending and saving agencies.
Bs. 351E.-Transportation Principles. 7 daily. Bu-305. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
The economics of inland transportation, including railroads, inland waterways, highways,
airways, and pipe lines, specifically with reference to development, facilities and service; con-
tribution to the economic and social process; characteristics, including competition and monopoly;
rates; regulation; problems of valuation, discrimination, accounting, finance, service, coordination.
Bs. 404E.-Government Control of Business. Seminar method. 3 credits.
BIGHAM. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
A general survey of the field of government control.
Bs. 409E-410E.-Applied Economics. Seminar method. 4 credits. ANDERSON.
A restatement of the principles of economics previously presented in more elementary form
to sophomores, pitched on a previous knowledge of the elementary principles of economics,
elementary accounting, elementary statistics, financial organization and financial management,
general mathematics, and elementary psychology.
Bs. 422.-Investments. Seminar method. 3 credits. DOLBEARE. Prerequisite:
Bs. 321E.
The nature of investment; investment policies; types of securities; analysis of securities;
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements
of security prices.
Bs. 429E.-Principles of Government Finance. Seminar method. 8:30 daily.
Bu-305. 3 credits. BIGHAM. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
Principles governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems
of leading countries.
Bs. 431E.-Principles of Marketing. Seminar method. 11:30 daily. L-201.
3 credits. EUTSLER. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
A survey of the marketing structure of industrial society.
Bs. s435E.-International Trade. Summer Cruise.* 3 credits. HICKS.
Economic principles underlying interregional and international trade; the international aspects
of the economic policies and activities of modern nations.
Bs. s440.-Trade Horizons in Caribbean America. Summer Cruise." 3 credits.
HICKS.
A regional trade course covering Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, Colombia, Venezuela,
and the Guianas; the commercial importance of the various republics and islands as a market
for manufactured wares and as a source of foodstuffs and raw materials.
Bs. 446E.-Economic Principles of Consumption. Seminar method. 3 credits.
BIGHAM. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
An economic analysis of the problem of determining the extent and trends of consumer demand.
A study of the adjustment of the conditions of production to changing conditions of demand.

For information concerning the summer cruise, write the Dean, College of Business
Administration.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bs. 461.-Life Insurance. Seminar method. 3 credits. EUTSLER. Prerequi-
site: Bs. 201E-202E.
The functions of life insurance; the science of life insurance and the computation of premiums:
types of life companies; life insurance law; the selling of life insurance.

Second Term

Bs. 202E.-Principles of Economics. 7 daily. Bu. 305. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
Prerequisite: Bs. 201E.
Analysis of production, distribution, and consumption.
Bs. 285.-Principles of Human Geography. 8:30 daily. L-204. 3 credits.
ATWOOD.
Basic principles underlying the study and teaching of modern geography; the earth as a
planet; wind systems; seasons, elements of meteorology; weather and climate; land forms. How
peoples have adjusted life and work to changing world environment. Correlations between
geography and history are stressed. Opportunity given students who wish to carry on special
studies relating to any specific part of the course.
Bs. 305.-Development of Modern Capitalism. Seminar method. 3 credits.
BIGHAM.
The origin of the capitalistic system; the Industrial Revolution; the breakdown of local
economy and the rise of national and international economy; the changing characteristics of
capitalism; the status of present-day capitalism.
Bs. 381E.-Economic Geography of North America. Seminar method. 3
credits. DIETTRICH. Prerequisite: Bs. 103-104, 201E-202E.
The principal economic activities in each of the major geographic regions of North America,
involving analysis of these activities from the standpoint of their relation to the natural environ-
mental complex.
Bs. 385E.-Economic Geography of South America. Seminar method. 11:30
daily. 3 credits. L-204. DIETTRICH. Prerequisites: Bs. 103-104, 201E-202E.
A geographic survey of the continent of South America, organized around the growth of
trade, exports and imports, trade by countries, and general business trend.
Bs. 454E.-Principles of Public Utility Economics. Seminar method. 10 daily.
Bu-305. 3 credits. BIGHAM. Prerequisite: Bs. 201E-202E.
The nature, place, and development of public service corporations; types of public control;
valuation and rate making; regulation of service; accounts, reports, and securities; combinations;
public relations; public ownership.
Bs. 468E.-Economic History in the Making. 8:30 daily. L-201. 3 credits.
DIETTRICH.
The era of industrialism; contemporary economic organization in the leading European
countries; types of economic reform; capitalism; socialism; communism; special consideration
of current social and economic problems in England, Germany, Soviet Russia, and the United States.
Bs. 487E.-Economic Geography of Europe. Seminar method. 3 credits.
DIETTRICH. Prerequisite: Bs. 103-104.
A study of human relationships to natural environment as presented in the economic adjustments
in Europe and in its commercial connections with other continents, especially with North America.
Bs. 530E.-Problems in State and Local Taxation. Seminar method. 3 credits.
BIGHAM.
CHEMISTRY

First Term

Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 8:30 daily. C-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. W. C-230.
4 credits. LEIGH.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and preparation and properties of the common
non-metallic elements and their compounds. LABORATORY FEE: $5.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Cy. 262.-Organic Chemistry. 10 daily. C-110. Laboratory 1-5 M. T. W. F.
C-230. 5 credits. LEIGH and HEATH.
The more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds, chiefly for students in applied
biological fields. Suitable for premedical students who desire only five hours of organic chemistry.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 515.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. To be arranged. 3 credits. HEATH.
Cy. 516.-Chemistry of the Rare Elements. To be arranged. 3 credits.
HEATH.
Cy. 601.-Chemical Research. No credit. LEIGH and HEATH.
Required of graduate students majoring in chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

Second Term
Cy. 102.-General Chemistry. 8:30 daily. C-212. Laboratory 1-4 M. W. F.
C-230. 4 credits. JACKSON.
Metallic elements and their compounds. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 201.-Qualitative Analysis. 10 M. T. W. F. C-212. Laboratory 1-5
M. T. W. Th. F. C-230. 4 credits. JACKSON.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection of the
more common metals and acid radicals. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 533.-Advanced Quantitative Analysis. Lecture and laboratory hours to
be arranged. C-114. 3 credits. BLACK.
Required of graduate students majoring in chemistry. Applications of physico-chemical
methods of quantitative analysis. Electrometric titrations, colorimetry. Prerequisite: major in
chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 601.-Chemical Research. No credit. BLACK and JACKSON.
Required of graduate students majoring in chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

CIVIL ENGINEERING
First Term
Cl. 209.-Higher Surveying. 8-9 M. W. F. B-104. Laboratory, B-104: 9-12
and 1-5 M. W. F., 8-12 and 1-5 T. Th., 8-11 S. 6 credits. SAWYER. Prerequisite:
Cl. 207.
Field astronomy and hydrographic surveying. Field work: the making of a complete topo-
graphical survey; tests and adjustments of instruments; precise leveling; base line work;
determination of time, latitude, and azimuth; triangulation and traverse; hydrographic surveying
and stream gauging. Drawing room work on balancing surveys, reducing field notes, map
drawing, triangulation, and computations. LABORATORY FEE: $6. Students registering for this
course may not register for any other course.

ECONOMICS

Courses in Economics are scheduled under Business Administration and are
marked E.
EDUCATION
COMMERCIAL EDUCATION
Note: Shorthand and Typing are required for certification in Commercial Subjects. They
are not counted as electives in Education.
First Term
En. 83.-Typewriting for Beginners. 2 credits. BENSON.
Laboratory Section 1. 10-12:50 daily. Y-241.
Laboratory Section 2. 1-3:50 daily. Y-241.
Initiation and exercise of correct habits of touch typing; skill development drills; personal
typing problems; common letter forms. Minimum skill for credit: 20 net words per minute.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 85.-Shorthand for Beginners. 8:30 daily. Y-236. 3 credits. BENSON.
Knowledge of Gregg principles and skill developed through extensive reading and writing
according to the functional method. FEE: $2.50.

Second Term

En. 83.-Typewriting for Beginners. Laboratory 1-3:50 daily. Y-241. 2
credits. BENSON.
Initiation and exercise of correct habits of touch typing; skill development drills; personal
typing problems; common letter forms. Minimum skill for credit: 20 net words per minute.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
En. 84.-Advanced Typewriting. Laboratory 10-12:50 daily. Y-241. 2 credits.
BENSON.
Skill development drills and secretarial problems including business letters, tabular material,
legal documents, invoices, and other business papers. Minimum skill for credit: 40 net words
per minute. FEE: $5.
En. 86.-Advanced Shorthand and Dictation. 8:30 daily. Y-236. 3 credits.
BENSON.
A continuation of Education 85. Minimum skill for credit: dictation rate of 80 words per
minute; transcription rate of 25 net words per minute with 95 per cent accuracy. FEE: $2.50.

EDUCATION

First Term

En. 121.-The Teaching of Writing and Speaking in the Grades. 8:30 M. T.
W. Th. L-204. 2 credits. FOSTER.
The teaching of written and spoken expression in the light of experimental findings and
modern practice.
En. 122.-The Techniques of Teaching Reading. 10 daily. P-2. 3 credits.
TINDALL.
Designed primarily to help teachers with reading instruction in the first three grades. The
mechanics of reading will be explained. The methods of approach to reading, remedial measures,
types of materials and methods of evaluation will be treated.
En. 124.-The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Intermediate Grades. 11:30
M. T. W. Th. P-208. 2 credits.
In this course the techniques of teaching those aspects of arithmetic which require more
or less formal study and practice beyond the integrated program will be studied.
En. 207.-Educational Psychology. 8:30 daily. P-209. 3 credits. WORCESTER.
Psychology applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc.
En. 209.-The Teaching of Sciences in the First Six Grades. Y-142. 2 credits.
GOETTE.
Section 1. 7 M. T. W. Th.
Section 2. 8:30 M. T. W. Th.
Section 3. 4 M. T. W. Th.
In this course the content of elementary science together with its organization for use both
in the integrated program and in the departmentalized school will be studied.
En. 221.-Remedial and Directed Reading. 7 daily. P-208. 3 credits.
TINDALL.
Designed primarily for intermediate grade teachers. The techniques of remedial teaching
of those pupils who have found their way into the intermediate grades without the reading
adaptation will be studied. Work in directed reading for intermediate grade pupils will be outlined
and discussed.
En. 253.-Observation of Teaching. To arrange. Y-142. 2 credits. HAY-
GOOD and STAFF.
This course is designed for students who desire to study the actual process of teaching an
,elementary class. Enrollment will be limited to the number which the laboratory school can
adequately accommodate.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 308.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 7 daily. P-206. 3 credits.
HAYGOOD.
A laboratory course in which the construction and continuity of activity units, utilizing the
project, will be studied. Each student will be expected to organize materials about activities
appropriate to his particular needs.
En. 312.-The Teaching of Foreign Languages in the Secondary School. 10
M. T. W. Th. P-4. 2 credits. HAYGOOD.
This course is designed primarily for teachers, principals, and supervisors interested in the
direct reading approach to modern foreign languages. Besides reviewing critically the significant
findings of recent classroom experimentation in language materials, teaching techniques and
philosophies, the course provides actual experience in the direct reading approach.
En. 317.-Tests and Measurements. 11:30 daily. P-4. 3 credits. CLASS.
An elementary course to aid the teacher in the use of tests in improvement of instruction
and solution of school problems. One hour of laboratory work per week is required. LABORATORY
FEE: $1.50.
En. 323.-General Methods in the Secondary School. 7 daily. P-209. 3 credits.
SMITH. Prerequisite: En. 207. Corequisite: En. 319.
En. 401.-Public School Administration. 10 daily. P-208. 3 credits. CLASS.
En. 403.-The Problem-Project Method. 8:30 daily. P-112. 3 credits.
NORMAN.
Educational objectives, methods, and organization; the nature of the individual and society.
Includes course formerly listed as En. 404.
En. 507.-Seminar in Educational Psychology. 7 daily. P-1. 3 credits.
WORCESTER.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems in directed learning, individual
differences, and adjustment of problem children. Primarily for graduate students with experience
in residence or in the field.
En. 509.-Problems in the Administration of a School System. 8:30 daily.
P-11. 3 credits. SIMMONS.
This is a general course in the administration of the public school system.
En. 528.-Educational Supervision. 10 daily. P-1. 3 credits. MEAD.
A course dealing with objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in
elementary and secondary schools, and in preparation of teachers. Each student completes a
minor research.
En. 603.-Foundations of Method. 2 daily. P-102. 3 credits. SMITH.
This course is designed for teachers, supervisors, and administrators who desire to study
the intellectual foundations of the teaching art. Teaching will be analyzed into its essential
elements as a basis for the development of a sound and progressive practice of teaching. Such
elements will include learning activities, learning products, evaluation and approaches as they
have been developed in various teaching types.
Graduate Seminar for Administrators. 4 M. W. F. P-102. No credit.
SIMMONS.
Required of graduate students majoring in administration.
Graduate Seminar for Minor Research and Thesis Work. 4 M. W. F. P-112.
No credit. MEAD.
Introduction to investigations, consideration of possible thesis problems, minor researches
and actual thesis work. Primarily for teachers. Required.

Second Term

En. 101.-Introduction to Education. 7 daily. P-1. 3 credits. CLASS.
An attempt is made to foreshadow the field of Education so that the student may see the
whole field before he studies its detailed and technical parts.
En. 121.-The Teaching of Writing and Speaking in the Grades. 11:30 M. T.
W. Th. L-210. 2 credits. FOSTER.
The teaching of written and spoken expression in the light of experimental findings and
modern practices.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 122.-The Techniques of Teaching Reading. 10 daily. P-2. 3 credits.
TINDALL.
Designed primarily to help teachers with reading instruction in the first three grades. The
mechanics of reading will be explained. The methods of approach to reading, remedial measures,
types of materials and methods of evaluation will be treated.
En. 124.-The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Intermediate Grades. 11:30
M. T. W. Th. P-208. 2 credits.
In this course the techniques of teaching those aspects of arithmetic which require more
or less formal study and practice beyond the integrated program will be studied.
En. 207.-Educational Psychology. 8:30 daily. P-2. 3 credits. WORCESTER.
Psychology applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc.
En. 209.-The Teaching of the Sciences in the First Six Grades. Y-142. 2
credits. GOETTE.
Section 1. 7 M. T. W. Th.
Section 2. 8:30 M. T. W. Th.
Section 3. 4 M. T. W. Th.
In this course the content of elementary science together with its organization for use both
in the integrated program and in the departmentalized school will be studied.
En. 221.-Remedial and Directed Reading. 7 daily. P-11. 3 credits. TINDALL.
Designed primarily for intermediate grade teachers. The techniques of remedial teaching
of those pupils who have found their way into the intermediate grades without reading adaptation
will be studied. Work in directed reading for intermediate grade pupils will be outlined and
discussed.
En. 308.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 7 daily. P-206. 3 credits.
HAYGOOD.
A laboratory course in which the construction and continuity of activity units, utilizing the
project, will be studied. Each student will be expected to organize materials about activities
appropriate to his particular needs.
En. 312.-The Teaching of Foreign Languages in the Secondary School. 10
M. T. W. Th. P-11. 2 credits. HAYGOOD.
This course is designed primarily for teachers, principals, and supervisors interested in the
direct reading approach to modern foreign languages. Besides reviewing critically the significant
findings of recent classroom experimentation in language materials, teaching techniques and
philosophies, the course provides actual experience in the direct reading approach.
En. 319.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. 10 daily. P-205. 3 credits.
WORCESTER.
The nature and development of the child from birth to adolescence with reference to Education.
En. 323.-General Methods in the Secondary School. 8:30 daily. P-11. 3
credits. SMITH. Prerequisite: En. 207. Corequisite: En. 319.
Current conceptions of secondary school procedures.
En. 406.-Elementary School Administration. 11:30 daily. P-206. 3 credits.
CLASS. Prerequisites: En. 305 and the required junior courses.
The problems which usually confront the elementary school principal will be stressed in this
course.
En. 408.-High School Administration. 7 daily. L-210. 3 credits. LITTLE.
Prerequisites: En. 323 and one supervised teaching course.
Practical management and administration of the modern high school.
En. 510.-The History of Education. 10 daily. P-209. 3 credits. SMITH.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-teacher,
student, curriculum, and educational plant, control and support-back to their beginnings; and
to point out present tendencies and possible developments.
En. 517.-Educational Statistics. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. L-203. 2 credits.
WILSON.
The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with statistical methods as applied to
Education. It is recommended that this course be taken before En. 503.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 518.-Special Problems in High School Organization and Administration.
7 daily. L-210. 3 credits. LITTLE.
This course will consist of an intensive study of specific problems in organizing and admin-
istering the modern high school. Special reference will be made to Florida.
En. 544.-Constitutional and Legal Basis of Public School Administration.
8:30 M. T. W. Th. P-209. 2 credits. SIMMONS.
Special emphasis will be given to Florida conditions, school laws, constitutional provisions,
judicial decisions, Attorney General's rulings, and regulations of the State Board of Education.
Students will be required to prepare a term report dealing with some special field of school law.
Only graduate students with experience in administration and supervision will be admitted.
En. 567.-Problems in Agricultural Education (Seminar: July 27 to August 14).
9-12 and 1-4 daily. Y-150. 3 credits. WOOD.
The course is designed for graduate students who are qualified to pursue advanced problems.
Problems, so far as possible, will be selected to meet the individual needs of each student.
Graduate Seminar for Administrators. 4 M. W. F. P-102. No credit.
SIMMONS.
Required of graduate students majoring in administration.

ENGLISH

First Term
Eh. 103.-Introduction to Literature. 8:30 daily. L-212. 3 credits. MURPHREE.
An introduction to the literature of the Western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance.
*Eh. 104.-Introduction to Literature. 11:30 daily. L-311. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
A continuation of English 103.
Eh. 201.-History of English Literature to 1800. 2:30 daily. L-210. 3 credits.
MURPHREE.
A basic course in the historical development of English literature. Stress will be laid upon
the interpretation of representative writers.
*Eh. 207.-English Literature, 1800 to the Present. 11:30 daily. L-311. 3
credits. SPIVEY.
English poetry and prose of the first half of the nineteenth century.
Eh. 211.-Types of Contemporary Literature. 10 daily. L-311. 3 credits.
MOORE.
Types of current literature-prose and poetry. The attempt will be made to stimulate reading
and to establish criteria of literary excellence as a basis of intelligent appreciation.
Eh. 221.-Types of Humorous Literature. 1 daily. L-212. 3 credits. MOORE.
An approach to the masterpieces of humorous literature, with some attention to the nature
and function of humor and to its various types.
Eh. 301.-Shakespeare. 10 daily. L-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
A study of representative history plays and romantic comedies. Prerequisite: Eh. 201-202
or its equivalent.
Eh. s402.-Romanticism in American Literature. 2:30 daily. L-212. 3 credits.
FOSTER.
Eh. 405.-Modern Drama. 11:30 daily. L-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
Contemporary dramatists, from Ibsen to Eugene O'Neill. Recent English and American
plays will be stressed.
Eh. 421.-The Short Story in American Literature. 8:30 daily. L-311. 3
credits. FARRIS.
An historical and critical study of the short story, with illustrative readings.
Eh. 531.-A Critical Approach to the Study of Poetry. 1 daily. L-311. 3
credits. FARRIS.
The history of important critical concepts; the basic facts and principles of prosody. Open
to undergraduates upon approval of the instructor.

Only one of these courses will be offered, contingent upon which has the greater demand.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Second Term

*Eh. 104.-Introduction to Literature. 7 daily. L-311. 3 credits. MOUNTS.
*Eh. 202.-History of English Literature to 1800. 7 daily. L-311. 3 credits.
MOUNTS.
Eh. 203.-The Short Story. 11:30 daily. L-212. 3 credits. GRANBERRY.
Study and practice in the art of short-story creation.
Eh. 302.-Shakespeare. 10 daily. L-210. 3 credits. CALDWELL.
A continuation of English 301. The tragedies and late comedies will be studied.
Eh. 304.-Victorian Poetry. 10 daily. L-311. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
An interpretative survey of the poetry of the Victorian era, with emphasis upon Tennyson
and Browning.
Eh. 403.-The English Novel. 1 daily. L-212. 3 credits. GRANBERRY.
The historical development and technique of the English novel.
Eh. 408.-Contemporary Poetry. 8:30 daily. L-212. 3 credits. FOSTER.
Eh. 413.-The Renaissance in Italy and England. 8:30 daily. L-210. 3
credits. CALDWELL.
Eh. 517.-Spenser. 11:30 daily. L-311. 3 credits. MOUNTS.
The poetry of Spenser studied in relation to the Renaissance.

ENTOMOLOGY

First Term

Ey. 301.-Economic Entomology. 8:30 M. T. W. A-305. Laboratory 10-11:20
W., 8:30-11:20 Th. F. A-305. 4 credits. CREIGHTON.
Introduction to applied entomology, based upon the structure, classification, life histories,
recognition, and control of the injurious insects of Florida. LABORATORY FEE: $2.
Ey. 503.-Problems in Entomology. 11:30 daily. A-305. 3 credits. CREIGHTON.
Problems in the various phases of entomology, as selected on approval of the instructor.
Required of graduate students registered for degrees in the department.

FRENCH

First Term

Fh. 22.-Elementary French. 7 daily. L-307. 3 credits. HUSTON. Pre-
requisite: One semester of college French, or one year of high school French.
The second term of the course in elementary French.
Fh. 102.-Fourth Semester French. 8:30 daily. L-307. 3 credits. HUSTON.
Prerequisite: One and one-half years of college French, or three years of high
school French.
The second term of second-year college French.
Fh. 208.-Survey of French Literature. 7 daily. L-5. 3 credits. BRUNET.
Prerequisite: French 101-102 or permission of instructor.
The period covered begins with the nineteenth century. Historical outline; reading of
representative selections from important prose writers and poets.
tFh. 509.-French Classicism. Hours to be arranged. L-8. 3 credits. BRUNET.
Reading and interpretative criticism of representative seventeenth-century works.
tFh. 513.-Eighteenth-Century French Literature. Hours to be arranged. L-8.
3 credits. BRUNET.
Reading and interpretative criticism of representative selections from the literature of the
period.

Only one of these courses will be offered, contingent upon which has the greater demand.
t Given as a regular class or by conference, depending upon the enrollment.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


*Fh. 515.-French Literature of the Renaissance. Hours to be arranged. L-8.
3 credits. BRUNET.
Selections from outstanding authors of the sixteenth century.

GENERAL NATURAL SCIENCE

(See C-2 and C-6 listed under General College Courses.

HANDWRITING

First Term

Hg. 101.-Handwriting. No credit.
Section 1. 10 daily. A-104. McCLURE.
Section 2. 4 daily. A-104. MCCLURE.
Section 3. 7 P.M. daily. A-104. MCCLURE.
Students enrolling for this course will have opportunity not only to improve their own hand-
writing, but to learn by instruction and demonstration the correct presentation of handwriting in
all grades of the elementary school. The value of measuring diagnostic and remedial teaching will
be emphasized. The State-adopted text, Progressive Handwriting, will be used.
NOTE: A course in penmanship is required for a certificate in subjects of the Elementary School
Course.
Second Term

Hg. 101.-Handwriting. No credit.
Section 1. 10 daily. A-104. McCLURE.
Section 2. 4 daily. A-104. McCLURE.
Section 3. 7 P.M. daily. A-104. McCLURE.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

First Term
HPL 107.-Personal Hygiene. 11:30 M. T. W. Th. Y-138. 2 credits. SALT.
(Open to men and women)
Hygiene as a means to improvement of living; the meaning of health in terms of life values;
the biologic approach to the study of health; the place of intelligent control in modern civilization;
ways of improving health and preventing disease.
HPl. 111.-Basketball. 2:30 M. T. W. Th. Y-Gym. 2 credits. SALT. (Open
only to men)
Fundamentals; analysis of a particular system of play.
HPI. 311.-Administration of Physical Education. 8:30 daily. Y-138. 3
credits. SALT. (Open to men and women)
Physical education in the public schools: playgrounds, gymnasium, swimming pool, service
unit, program of activities, physical education class, intramural program, and interscholastic
athletics.
HPI. 312.-Administration of Health Education. 1 daily. Y-138. 3 credits.
SALT. (Open to men and women)
The public school health education program; principles, methods, and materials in health
education.
HPI. 314.-Theory and Practice of Natural Activities. 4 M. T. W. Th. Y-Gym.
2 credits. SALT. (Open only to men)
The physical education program of activities for the public schools of Florida. This course
will be conducted as a recreational program for summer session students. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.

Given as a regular class or by conference, depending upon the enrollment.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


HPI. 341.-Principles of Physical Education. 10 daily. Y-138. 3 credits.
SALT. (Open to men and women)
Fundamental principles upon which the natural program of physical education is based;
history, aims, objectives, and contemporary trends in this field. This course should be completed
as soon as possible by students majoring or teaching in this field. Not open to those having
credit for HPI. 215-216 or En. 471.

HISTORY

First Term

Hy. 201.-Modern European History, 1815 to 1870. 8:30 daily. P-2. 3 credits.
PAYNE.
Hy. 203.-Latin-American History. 8:30 daily. P-206. 3 credits. GLUNT.
Hy. 302.-American History, 1776 to 1830. 11:30 daily. P-112. 3 credits.
DAUER.
Hy. 305.-English History to 1485. 10 daily. P-112. 3 credits. PAYNE.

Second Term

Hy. 202.-Modern European History, 1870 to the Present. 8:30 daily. P-112.
3 credits. PAYNE.
Hy. 204.-Latin-American History. 8:30 daily. P-206. 3 credits. GLUNT.
Hy. 304.-American History, 1876 to the Present. 10 daily. P-206. 3 credits.
GLUNT.
Hy. 312.-English History, 1815 to the Present. 10 daily. P-112. 3 credits.
PAYNE.
LAW

The Law Summer Term runs for eight weeks, from June 15 to August 7. Classes
scheduled daily meet six days a week. Each period is 55 minutes long.

Lw. 311.-School Law. 11 M. W. Th. F. Law-204. 2 credits. TRUSLER.
Authority and responsibility of teachers; rights and duties of students; reasonableness of
rules and regulations and their extramural operation; incidental fees; contracts of teachers;
pensions; private schools; illegal expenditures of school money; illegal uses of school property;
school contracts and torts; diplomas and degrees; exemption of school property from taxation.
Trusler, Essentials of School Law.
Lw. 314.-The Federalist. 8 W. F. Law-202. 1 credit. TESELLE.
Open letters of Hamilton, Madison, and Jay explaining the provisions of the Federal
Constitution and urging its adoption. The Federalist.
Lw. 350.-Administrative Law. 10 M. Th. and 8 W. F. Law-204. 2 credits.
SLAGLE.
Administrative orders, grant of licenses; conditions in grants; cancellation of licenses;
administrative discretion; summary action; proof of official acts; relief against administrative
action; jurisdictional limitations; administrative finality. Freund, Cases on Administrative Law,
2nd edition.
Lw. 402.-Evidence. 11-12:20 daily. Law-202. 4 credits. TESELLE.
Judicial notice; kinds of evidence; burden of proof; presumption of law and fact; judge
and jury; admissions; confessions; exclusions based on public policy and privilege; corroboration;
witnesses; examination, cross examination, privilege; public documents; records and judicial
writings; private writings. Morgan and Maguire, Cases on Evidence.
Lw. 419.-Air Law. 9 M. Th. Law-202. 1 credit. TESELLE.
Aviation; air space rights; interstate commerce; airports; insurance; carriers ; treatment of
torts, contracts, and crimes in relation to aviation. Zollman, Cases on Air Law.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Lw. 420.-Equitable Relief Against Torts. 8 M. T. Th. S. Law-204. 2 credits.
TRUSLER.
Growth and nature of jurisdiction; the bases of specific relief; relief in equitable proceedings;
defenses to specific relief; protection of public and social interests; enforcement of specific relief.
Chafee, Cases on Equitable Relief Against Torts.
Lw. 430.-Bailments. 10 T. W. F. S. Law-202. 2 credits. SLAGLE.
Mandates; deposits; pledges; custody and use; delivery and redelivery; innkeepers; carriers:
rights and duties of parties; termination of relation. Elliott on Bailments, 2nd edition.
Lw. 502.-Damages. 9 T. W. F. S. Law-204. 2 credits. TRUSLER.
General principles; sorts; measure in contract and tort actions; avoidable consequences;
value; interest; death by wrongful act. Trusler, Florida Cases on Damages.
Lw. 525.-Trade Regulations. 8 M. T. Th. S. Law-202. 2 credits. SLAGLE.
Trade contracts; privilege of competing; intimidating and molesting; disparaging competitor's
goods; appropriating competitor's trade values; boycotting; unfair price practices ; unfair adver-
tising; combinations: anti-trust legislation. Oliphant, Cases on Trade Regulations.

MATHEMATICS

Before registering in any course, the student should ascertain the prerequisites. Stu-
dents desiring courses other than those listed below should write to the Department of
Mathematics, or make inquiry immediately upon arrival at the University.

First Term
Ms. 85.-Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms. 7 daily. P-102. 3 credits.
DAVIS.
Functions of angles; logarithms; solution of triangles. Simpson, Plane Trigonometry and
Logarithms.
Ms. 105.-Basic Mathematics. 8:30 daily. P-102. 4 credits. SIMPSON.
In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession,
this course offers a completely new sequence of topics including the above plus a liberal amount
of calculus. Teachers of high school mathematics who wish to advance in technical command
of the subject matter should elect the sequence Ms. 105-106. This is also designed for those who
plan to major in mathematics or to elect courses above the freshman level. Teachers who desire
a more elementary course combining a survey of the field with applications to practical problems
may elect C-4b, described under offerings of the General College. C-4b is not prerequisite to Ms. 105.
Ms. 251.-Differential Calculus. 10 daily. P-102. 3 credits. SIMPSON.
Differentiation, one of the most important practical and theoretical fields of mathematics.
Granville, Smith, Longley, Differential and Integral Calculus.
Ms. 331.-College Geometry. 11:30 daily. P-1. 3 credits. KUSNER.
A continuation of high school plane geometry, making use of elementary methods in the
advanced study of the triangle and circle. Emphasis on solving original exercises. Valuable to
prospective high school geometry teachers. Altshiller-Court, College Geometry.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 8:30 daily. P-1. 3 credits.
KOKOMOOR.
A survey of the development of mathematics through calculus, with special emphasis on the
changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching. No specific text is followed but
numerous works are used as references.
Second Term
Ms. 101.-College Algebra. 7 daily. P-102. 3 credits. DAVIS.
The quadratic equation, proportion, progressions, the binomial theorem, functions, graphs,
theory of equations, permutations, combinations, probability and determinants.
Ms. 106.-Basic Mathematics. 8:30 daily. P-102. 4 credits. QUADE.
A continuation of Ms. 105.
Ms. 252.-Integral Calculus. 10 daily. P-102. 3 credits. DAVIS.
Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas,
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems. Granville, Smith, Longley, Differential
and Integral Calculus.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ms. 311.-Advanced College Algebra. 11:30 daily. P-102. 3 credits. QUADE.
Further treatment of some of the material and processes of Ms. 101, and introduction to more
advanced topics. Valuable to teachers of algebra and to students of actuarial science. Hall and
Knight, Higher Algebra.
NOTE: In either term, by consulting the instructor, well qualified students may arrange to take.
on a project basis, one of the courses listed in the Bulletin of Information for the Colleges and
Professional Schools of the Upper Division.

PHARMACOLOGY

First Term
Ply. 456.-New Remedies. 7 M. T. .W. Th. C-316. Laboratory 2:30-5:30 M.
T. W. C-316. 3 credits. FOOTE.
A brief history of the organization, policies and accomplishments of the Council on Pharmacy
and Chemistry of the American Medical Association. The pharmacology of new remedies accepted
and placed on the market.

PHARMACY

First Term
Phy. 223.-Galenical Pharmacy. 11:30 M. T. W. Th. C-316. Laboratory
2:30-5:30 M. T. W. C-306. 3 credits. FOOTE.
Galenical preparations, such as syrups, spirits, tinctures, extracts, emulsions. Preparation
of these materials extemporaneously on a small scale and their manufacture in larger amounts.
Amy, Principles of Pharmacy; United States Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary. LABORATORY
FEE: $2.50.
Phy. 353.-Organic and Analytical Pharmacy. 8:30 daily. C-316. Laboratory
2:30-5:30 daily. C-306. 5 credits. FOOTE. Prerequisites: Cy. 262, Cy. 303,
Pgy. 222, Phy. 222.
The chemistry and pharmacy of the natural and synthetic organic drugs, including qualitative
and quantitative drug analysis. Arny, Principles of Pharmacy: United States Pharmacopoeia
and National Formulary. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

PHILOSOPHY

First Term

Ppy. 301.-Ethics. 10 daily. P-209. 3 credits. ENWALL.
Principles of ethics. Study of such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty, freedom,
progress, et cetera. Dewey and Tuft, Ethics.
Ppy. 304.-History of Modern Philosophy. 11:30 daily. P-209. 3 credits.
ENWALL.
Special attention given to the work of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Hume, and Kant. Rogers,
A Student's History of Philosophy.
Ppy. 504.-Advanced History of Modern Philosophy. 11:30 daily. P-209.
3 credits. ENWALL.
Readings from original sources, papers on special topics, group discussions.

PHYSICS

Students in the College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in Physics may enroll
in the courses outlined below. Substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher
is made.
First Term
Ps. 211.-Elementary Theory of Mechanics, Heat, and Sound. 8:30 daily.
B-203. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON. Prerequisite: one year of college mathematics.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Ps. 213.-Elementary Laboratory to accompany Ps. 211. 1-4 M. W. F. B-306.
2 credits. SWANSON.
LABORATORY FEE: $2.25.
Second Term

Ps. 212.-Elementary Theory of Magnetism, Electricity, and Light. 8:30
daily. B-203. 3 credits. BLESS. Prerequisite: Ps. 211-213.
Ps. 214.-Elementary Laboratory to accompany Ps. 212. 1-4 M. W. F. B-306.
2 credits. KNOWLES.
LABORATORY FEE: $2.25.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

First Term

Pcl. 101.-American Government and Politics. 7 daily. P-112. 3 credits.
GREEN.
*Pcl. 203.-American State Administration. 8:30 daily. P-208. 3 credits.
GREEN.
*Pcl. 307.-Comparative Government. 8:30 daily. P-208. 3 credits. GREEN.
Pcl. 309.-International Relations. 10 daily. P-206. 3 credits. DAUER.

Second Term

Pcl. 102.-American Government and Politics. 7 daily. P-112. 3 credits.
GREEN.
*Pcl. 204.-American Municipal Administration. 8:30 daily. P-208. 3 credits.
GREEN.
*Pcl. 308.-Comparative Government. 8:30 daily. P-208. 3 credits. GREEN.
Pcl. 310.-International Relations. 10 daily. P-208. 3 credits. DAUER.

POULTRY HUSBANDRY

First Term

Py. 102.-Farm Poultry. 2:30 daily. A-205. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
A practical course in poultry production designed to meet the needs of the agricultural teacher,
extension worker, or any person interested in any way in poultry raising as a business, part-time
income, or hobby. All phases of the industry will be studied, and those most practical will be
discussed in detail.
Py. 409.-Marketing of Poultry Products. 11:30 W. F. A-205. Conference,
3 hours to be arranged. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
A study of the methods of grading, packing, and marketing poultry and eggs with reference
to the economic as well as the practical aspects of marketing practices. The Florida Egg Law
and Egg Quality Program will be studied in theory and practice.

PSYCHOLOGY

First Term

Psy. 201.-General Psychology. 10 daily. P-10. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Facts and theories current in general psychological discussion; sensation, perception, learning,
retention, emotion, volition, and the self.

Only one of these courses will be given, contingent upon which has the greater demand.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Psy. 310.-Abnormal Psychology. 8:30 daily. P-10. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Abnormal phases of mental life, dreams, illusions, hallucinations, suggestions, hypnotism,
main types of mental disease, mental hygiene.
Psy. 421.-Learning. Seminar. To be arranged. P-114. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
A study of the factors which influence learning efficiency, with special emphasis upon the
experimental literature.
Second Term
Psy. 201.-General Psychology. 10 daily. P-10. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Facts and theories current in general psychological discussion; sensation, perception, learning,
retention, emotion, volition, and the self.
Psy. 305.-Social Psychology. 8:30 daily. P-10. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Influence of the social environment upon the mental, social, moral and emotional development
of the child, adolescent, and the adult.
Psy. 312.-Psychology of Problem Children. Seminar. To be arranged. P-114.
3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Individual trait differences, measurement of intelligence, feeble-mindedness, backward and
gifted children, emotional maladjustment, delinquency, and other types of exceptional and mentally
peculiar children.
PUBLIC SCHOOL ART

First Term
Pc. 101.-Elementary Art. 2:30-4:30 T. Th. P-302. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
Practice in school art work; lettering, poster making, booklet making, construction, design,
and picture study. FEE: $1.
Pc. 123.-Industrial Art. 4-6 M. T. W. F. P-302. 2 credits. MITCHELL.
Based upon clothing, shelter, records, and utensils. FEE: $1.
Pc. 201.-Creative Drawing and Composition. 2:30-4:30 M. W. P-302. 1
credit. NORTON.
Birds, animals, figures and landscapes adapted to grade work. FEE: $1.
Pc. 209.-Arts and Crafts. 4-6 and 7-9 P.M. Th. P-302. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
Weaving problems for grade children. Pattern weaving on the harness loom. Design and
crafts work. FEE: $1.

Second Term
Pc. 101.-Elementary Art. 2:30-4:30 T. Th. P-302. 1 credit. NORTON.
FEE: $1.
Pc. 102.-Frieze Development. 1 M. T. W. F. P-302. 1 credit. NORTON.
Color, trees, landscapes, perspective, costumes, figures, combined in simple school friezes
correlating other school subjects. FEE: $1.
Pc. 123.-Industrial Art. 4-6 M. T. W. F. P-302. 2 credits. NORTON.
FEE: $1.
Pc. 220.-Puppetry. 2:30-4:30 M. W. P-302. 1 credit. NORTON.
Simple problems in puppetry for school children, plays for school entertainments, and stage
design. FBE: $1.
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC

First Term
Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 10 daily.
Auditorium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE.
Study of the child voice; rote songs; the toy symphony; art and rhythm songs; sight singing
from rote to note; appreciation.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 8:30 daily.
Auditorium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE. Prerequisite: Msc. 103.
Development of sight singing; study of problems pertaining to intermediate grades; part
singing;: song repertoire: appreciation.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Msc. 105.-Materials and Methods for Junior and Senior High Schools. 2:30
daily. Auditorium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE. Prerequisite: Msc. 103 or 104.
Sight singing; study of the changing voice; chord formation and theory work pertaining
to high school work ; appreciation.
Second Term
(All courses are offered the same as for the First Term.)

SOCIOLOGY

First Term
Sy. 311.-Problems of Child Welfare. 2:30 M. T. Th. F. P-4. 2 credits. L.
R. BRISTOL. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Sociology, or equivalent.
A consideration of problems growing out of the physical and social maladjustments of the
child; methods of correction and prevention; principles of child-placing; institutions dealing
with the socially inadequate. The class will visit the State Industrial School for Girls at Ocala,
the Farm Colony for the Epileptic and Feebleminded at Gainesville, and the Child Caring Agencies
in Duval County.
Sy. 442.-Applied Sociology. 8:30 daily. P-4. 3 credits. L. R. BRISTOL.
Prerequisite: One course in sociology, or equivalent.
The principles of efficient living together developed in the introductory course will be applied
to concrete problems in the interest of social improvement. Such questions as health, housing,
consumers' cooperation, and social insurance will be considered. Legislative proposals will be
discussed.
Sy. 511.-Problems of Child Welfare. 2:30 M. T. W. Th. F. P-4. 3 credits.
L. R. BRISTOL.
Taken four days a week with Sy. 311. Special seminar on Wednesday.
Sy. 542.-Applied Sociology. 8:30 daily. P-4. 3 credits. L. R. BRISTOL.
Similar to 442, but with added reading and conferences or term paper.

Second Term
Sy. 301.-Introduction to Sociology. 8:30 daily. P-4. 3 credits. WELD.
Open to juniors or to sophomores who have had C-1. Not open to those who
have had Sy. 111 or 112.
An approach to the science of social relations through biology, psychology, and culture history.
Social organization and institutions. Community study.
Sy. 304.-Cultural Development of the United States. 10 daily. P-4. 3
credits. WELD.
Cultural development of the United States from the time of the War between the States
to the present. The study will lead to an appreciation of current social and economic conditions
and problems. Prerequisite: Sy. 303 or consent of instructor.
Sy. 323.-Social Pathology. 2:30 daily. P-4. 3 credits. WELD. Prerequisite:
One course in Sociology or equivalent.
A case method of approach to the study of problems connected with the socially inadequate,
together with a consideration of approved methods of social action.

SPANISH

First Term
Sh. 21.-Elementary Spanish. 7 daily. L-306. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN.
Pronunciation, grammar, written and oral exercises, dictation, reading of simple texts.
*Sh. 22.-Elementary Spanish. 8:30 daily. L-306. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN.
Prerequisite: Sh. 21.
Continuation of Spanish 21.

Only one of these courses will be offered, contingent upon which has the greatest demand.















DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


*Sh. 101.-Second-Year Spanish. 8:30 daily. L-306. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN.
Prerequisite: Sh. 22 or permission of instructor.
Review of grammar, written and oral exercises, reading of modern texts.
*Sh. 102.-Second-Year Spanish. 8:30 daily. L-306. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN.
Prerequisite: Sh. 101 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Spanish 101.
Sh. 303.-Survey of Spanish Literature. 11:30 daily. L-306. 3 credits.
HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite: Sh. 102 or permission of instructor.
Historical outline of the most important literary movements in Spanish literature; study of
representative authors of each period.
Sh. 503.-Special Studies in Spanish Literature and Philology. Conference
to be arranged. L-302. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN.
Seminar; subject to depend largely on needs and desires of students.

SPEECH

Prerequisite: All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have com-
pleted Eh. 101-102 or C-3.

First Term
Sch. 201.-Public Speaking. 3 credits.
Section 1. 7 daily. P-205. CONSTANS.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. P-205. FLEISCHMAN.
The principles used in speaking before a group, with considerable practice in the delivery
of original speeches. Individual improvement is emphasized and encouraged by constructive
criticism. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
Sch. 404.-Dramatic Production. 10 daily. P-205. 3 credits. FLEISCHMAN.
Consideration of voice, line reading, technique of acting, and principles of character interpre-
tation; the problem of directing, stage equipment, costuming, lighting, and make-up. Actual
rehearsal of plays.

Second Term
Sch. 201.-Public Speaking. 3 credits.
Section 1. 7 daily. P-205. HOPKINS.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. P-205. HOPKINS.
The principles used in speaking before a group with considerable practice in the delivery
of original speeches. Individual improvement is emphasized and encouraged by constructive
criticism. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.

Only one of these courses will be offered, contingent upon which has the greatest demand.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

1. What are the days of registration?
Answer: First Term: June 15.
Second Term: July 27.

2. Will there be a late registration fee charged to students registering after
the above days?
Anwser: Yes. A late registration fee of $5 will be charged.

3. What is the last day on which a person may register by paying the late
registration fee?
Answer: First Term: June 17.
Second Term: July 29.

4. What is the maximum load a student may carry?
Answer: A student who in the last term of attendance at the University
of Florida made an honor point average below 1.00 (C) may take
a credit hour load of six. A student who made an honor point
average of 1.00 (C) or above may take a credit hour load of nine.
Transfer students may take nine credit hours of work during the
first term, providing their previous record is satisfactory.

5. How many semester hours of credit may be earned during the summer by
attendance at both terms?
Answer: 12 to 18, depending upon the student's honor point average.

6. May students who expect to receive degrees or diplomas at the end of
either term of the Summer Session be given permission to carry more hours
than are provided for in No. 5 above?
Answer: No. Exceptions will not be made under any circumstances.

7. May a student complete a correspondence course while attending the Summer
Session?
Answer: Yes, but the hours carried will count in the regular load.

8. a. What courses should a student take in place of required courses no
longer offered, viz., English 101-102, Sociology 111-112, General Natural
Science 101-102?
Answer: For English 101-102 --............-- .............. .. C-3
For Sociology 111-112 ..................... ... .. .. .......... C-1
For General Natural Science 101-102 ........................... C-2 or C-6

NOTE: Those who have taken one-half of any of the former courses
may take either half of the comprehensive course indicated
as a substitute.







QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS


b. Will a student taking a substituted course take the comprehensive ex-
amination in that course?
Answer: No. He will take a regular course examination. Only General
College students take the comprehensive examination.

c. How much credit will a student in such cases be allowed for the com-
prehensive course?
Answer: He will be allowed the full credit assigned to such a course.

9. Is there a graduation at the end of the first term?
Answer: Yes.

10. May one visit the classes in the laboratory school?
Answer: Yes. Application should be made to the Principal, 120 Yonge
Building. (Only kindergarten and the first six grades will be
taught this summer.)

11. To whom should application be made for part-time work?
Answer: Dean of Students.

12. To whom should application be made for Summer Session loans?
Answer: Dean of Students.

13. To whom should application be made for approved room lists?
Answer: Dean of Students.

14. To whom should application be made for a room reservation in the
dormitories?
Answer: Business Manager.

15. Must one rooming in the dormitories eat in the cafeteria?
Answer: No.

16. May children be registered in the laboratory school and live in the dormi-
tories when the mother is a regularly registered student of the Summer
Session?
Answer: Each case will be acted upon separately. Application should be
made to the Dean of Students.

17. Will there be Saturday classes?
Answer: First Term: No.
Second Term: Yes.

18. Are the railroads offering reduced fares this summer?
Answer: Yes. Fare and one-third for the round trip. No identification
certificate is necessary. Consult your local ticket agent for dates
of sale and particulars.

19. May one comply with the requirements for extension of certificate during
either term?
Answer: Yes.


159





ADMISSION INFORMATION

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Return to the Registrar


I I
IC L FF


To be filled out by each student who expects to attend the University of Florida
1936 Summer Session

Mr.
1. M rs...... ............................................................................. ....................................... .................
Miss Last Name First Name (in full) Middle Name Husband's
Initials


2. A ddress.......................................... ............................................ ............ ...................
Street and Number City County
3. I wish to be admitted for the 1st term-2nd term of the 1936 Summer Session.
(cross out one)
4. I desire to register in the college checked below:
General College ......................... ........ .. College of Agriculture....--
College of Arts and Sciences ..................... College of Law............
School of Pharmacy.... .................. Graduate School ...........
College of Business Administration. Graduate School..........
College of Engineering.............. ......... School of Architecture and A
College of Education...... ............... .................... Arts.. ....... ................


State


allied
......................


5. Do you expect to work for a degree or diploma at the University of Florida?--..............
6. Place of college preparation....... .. ........................................----
(school) (location)
7. List below all institutions of higher learning you have attended and supply the information.


Name of Institution


Address


Would you be allowed to re-
register there at any time?


II






8. Are official transcripts from all the above schools on file in the Registrar's Office at the
University of Florida? ................ .........................
9. Give last date of attendance at the University of Florida................... ..... ...................
10. Have you earned any credit by correspondence or extension from the University of
Florida? ....................
11. Have you attended any other college since attending the University of Florida? ..... ............
12. If the answer to 11 is "yes," have you filed with the Registrar of the University of Florida a
transcript or its equivalent, from the institution last attended?.......................................................
13. Your father's occupation while he was living and active....................................................................
14. Your birthplace.............................. ........... 15. Date of birth ........... .......... 16. Age in years.....
17. Religious affiliation or preference........................................................ Are you a member? ........
18. I affirm that the above questions have been answered correctly. If I am admitted upon in-
correct information I understand that my registration will be automatically canceled.

Signed ........ ............................. ..... ....... ...
[ 161]




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