• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Instructins for graduate stude...
 Administrative officers
 General information
 Departments of instruction
 Graduate assistants and graduate...
 Recipients of graduate degrees
 Register of students, graduate...














Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00346
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: February 1936
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00346
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 41
    Instructins for graduate students
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Administrative officers
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    General information
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Departments of instruction
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Graduate assistants and graduate scholars, 1935-1936
        Page 69
    Recipients of graduate degrees
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Register of students, graduate school
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
Full Text





The University Record

of the


University of Florida


Bulletin of the

graduate School
With Announcements for the Year
1936-37


Vol. XXXI, Series 1


No. 2 February 1, 1936


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida





















The Record comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the Bulletins of
Information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of
the University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The appli-
cant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired. Address

THE REGISTRAR, University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of research work.
Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in several series.

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions are
arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges should
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The
issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on Publica-
tions. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional
exchanges, should be addressed to the University Library, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
THE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida










CONTENTS
Page
Graduate School Calendar ...................- ...................... .....................42, 43
Instructions for Graduate Students.................................................----- ---------...--............-------... 43
A dm inistrative O fficers........................................................................................................................ 44
The Graduate Council.............................................................................. .................. .... ... ............. 44
Teaching Faculty....................... .............................................. ...............-------- ..............------- 44, 45, 46
General Information.... ..........-- ... ............................................................ ....... --------------- 47
Graduate Assistantships and Graduate Scholarships.................................................................. 48
Requirements for the Master's Degree.......................................................-----......................... 48, 49, 50
Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy .......................................................... 50, 51
Departments of Instruction, Graduate Courses ...................................... 51
Agricultural Econom ics ................................................................- ---- --.-----..... ..................... 51, 52
Agricultural Engineering ...............----------------..------------ --- .................... 52-- -- - 52
Agronomy.................................................. ...--. ........... ..........................................................-- -----.. -- 52
Animal Husbandry ................--- ...... --------..........................................-- ............................. 52, 53
Architecture......................... ... -------........................................................ ----------- ------ 53
Biology ..........----- ------................... ........................................................................................... 53, 54
Botany and Bacteriology.............. ......................................... ........................................... 54, 55
Chemistry--...............--.....----------..----------------------........................................... ---..............-------55, 56, 57
Economy ics................ ... ...................... ....... .... ................- ......................... 57, 58
Education...................... .......... ..-- ----- -- ......................... ............................... 58, 59, 60
Engineering .................................................................................. . .............. 60, 61, 62
English......................................... ....... ..................... .............. .... ..... ..........- .... 62
Entomology........................................................................................................----------------................ 62, 63
F rench ..................---------- ................. ..... ......... ..................... ............. ..... ............... ... 63
G reek ............................................ .. ........ .. .. .... .. ..- ........ .......... .... 63
History ................. ........ ...----------------..........................--....... ............................ 63
H horticulture ........ ........................ ....... .. ... ................. ....--- --- ........ .................... 63
Journalism ..................................................................... ................... ..........................................-- - - 63
Latin -.....-............----- ................------------..----- .....-- ......-------......63, 64
Mathematics..........................................................---- .......--................. .................64, 65
Painting-......--.......-..------.............................................----------- 65
Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology .....----------....... ........................................--......65, 66
Pharm acy ....................... .................................. ................................................-- -- -- -- -......................... 66
Philosophy .....................----..............................................---- --- --......................--- ....... --- -................. 66
Physics......................---- --- ---.............................------ ------..................................................-- ---.....--- 66, 67
Political Science ..........................................--............. ---- ----................................ ....................... 67
Psychology ................................... --------......................................... ......................---- ------67, 68
Sociology .......................--- - ....... .......68.......68........................... .......... .... ......... 68
Spanish .....................................-- --------- ------.......-----------------------------------------------.......... ....... 68
Graduate Assistants, 1935-1936........--------.....................................................---................------................ 69
Graduate Scholars, 1935-1936..--..-....-- ----------.............................. ....-........ ..................... 69
Recipients of Graduate Degrees......----....................................................................................70, 71, 72
Sum m ary................... ........... .....-- -- ............................................ ............................ ......... 72
Register of Students, Graduate School ......................................................... 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

GRADUATE SCHOOL CALENDAR

SECOND TERM, 1935-36


February 6, Thursday....................................
February 13, Thursday, 5 p. m..................
February 29, Saturday, 12 noon..................

March 16, Monday................ ..................








April 20, M onday........................................



M ay 1, Friday.............. .. ...............

June 6-8, Saturday-Monday..........................


Registration for second term.
Last day for registration for second term.
Last day for making application for a degree
at the end of the second term.
Last day for those beginning graduate work in
the second term to file with the Dean an ap-
plication (Form 2) to be considered candidates
for advanced degrees.
Last day for resident students to satisfy the
language requirements if they wish to be can-
didates for the Master's degree at the end of
the First Summer Term.
Last day for resident students to satisfy the
language requirements if they wish to be can-
didates for the Master's degree at the end of
the Second Summer Term.
Last day for students graduating at the end of
the term to submit theses to the Dean.
Commencement Exercises.


SUMMER SESSION, 1936

FIRST SUMMER TERM
June 15, Monday .................................... Registration.
June 22, Monday, 12 noon ........................... Last day for registration for the First Summer
Term, and for adding courses.
June 27, Saturday, 12 noon --....................... Last day for making application for a degree
at the end of the First Summer Term.
July 2, Thursday ........ ..------.......... Last day for students graduating at the end of
the First Summer Term to submit theses to
the Dean.
July 11, Saturday ........................................... Last day for those beginning graduate work to
file with the Dean an application (Form 2)
to be considered candidates for advanced
degrees.
July 24, Friday, 12 noon......................... First Summer Term ends.
July 25, Saturday, 10 a. m.................... Conferring of degrees.

SECOND SUMMER TERM
July 27, M onday ...................--.................. Registration.
July 29, Wednesday...................................... Last day for registration for the Second Summer
Term, and for adding courses.
August 1, Saturday, 12 noon ....................... Last day for making application for a degree
at the end of the Second Summer Term.
August 7, Friday ........................................ Last day for students graduating at the end of
the Second Summer Term to submit theses to
the Dean.







INSTRUCTIONS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS


August 15, Saturday................................... Last day for those beginning graduate work to
file with the Dean an application (Form 2) to
be considered candidates for advanced degrees.
August 28, Friday, 12 noon.................... Second Summer Term ends.
August 29, Saturday, 10 a. m..................... Commencement Convocation.

REGULAR SESSION, 1936-37

FIRST TERM
September 22, Tuesday ............. ................-- Registration.
October 3, Saturday, 12 noon................... Last day for registration for the first term, and
for adding courses.
October 17, Saturday. 12 noo1 ................... Last day for making application for a degree at
the end of the first term.
November 2, Monday ................................... Last day for those beginning graduate work to
file with the Dean an application (Form 2) to
be considered candidates for advanced degrees.
November 25, Wednesday, 5 p. m........-..-... Thanksgiving recess begins.
November 30, Monday, 8 a. m..................... Thanksgiving recess ends.
December 19, Saturday, 12 noon ............. Christmas recess begins.
1937-
January 4, Monday, 8 a. m........................ Christmas recess ends.
Last day for students graduating at th- end of
the first term to submit theses to the Dean.
February 1. Monday, 10 a. m....................... First term ends. Conferring of degrees.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

1. Correspond with the Dean and if necessary with the head of the dearmnient in
which you propose to take your major work.
2. If you are found eligible and decide to come to the University of Florida, have the
Registrar of your school send a transcript of your work to the Dean of the Graduate School.
This should be in the hands of the Dean at least a month before the date for registration.
3. At the proper time, register with the Dean. He will give you blank form No. 1
to take to your department head. Either the head of the department or some other
professor in this department will become the professor of your major subject and will
suggest courses for which you should register for the session. Take this blank to the Dean
and complete your registration.
4 Within the time indicated in the calendar, get blank form No. 2, have it signed by
your professors and file it with the Dean.
5. See that the language requirements are satisfied at the proper time.
6. Early in your last term before graduation, notify the Registrar by the time indicated
in the calendar that you are a candidate for a degree.
7. When you are ready to put the thesis in final form, get instructions at the Dean's
office. Watch your time. Consult the calendar.
8. Look to the professor of your major subject and your special supervisory committee
for guidance.
9. Always feel free to seek information at the Dean's office if you have any doubt in
regard to requirements.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
LILLIAN WOOD, B.A., Secretary to the Dean

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
THE DEAN
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agronomy
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Education and Dean of the College of
Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Mathematics
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S., Head Professor of Electrical Engineering
ROBERT CROZIER WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Physics

TEACHING FACULTY
Those offering courses listed in this bulletin

CHARLES ELLIOTT ABBOTT, M.S., Assistant Professor of Horticulture
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Ancient Languages and Dean of the
Graduate School
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D., Professor of Business Statistics and Economics
ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D., Head Professor of French
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economic Geography
RAYMOND BROWN BECKER, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Animal Nutrition
*WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, D.Sc., Professor of Chemical Engineering
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, Ph.D., Professor of Economics
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, Ph.D., Professor of Physics
Lucius MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D., Head Professor of Sociology
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agronomy
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., Assistant Professor of English
ARTHUR FORREST CAMP, Ph.D., Horticulturist, Experiment Station, Head of Department
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
BERNARD VICTOR CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology,
and Director of the School of Pharmacy
MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Head Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
ALFRED CRAGO, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology and Tests and Measurements
JOHN THOMAS CREIGHTON, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Acting Head of Department of
Entomology and Plant Pathology
CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, Ph.D., Head of Department of Spanish and German
MANNING J. DAUER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science

On leave of absence, 1935-1936.







TEACHING FACULTY


HARWOOD BURROWS DOLBEARE, B.A., Associate Professor of Economics
WARREN FORD DOOLITTLE JR., B.F.A., Instructor in Drawing and Painting
NEWTON CROMWELL EBAUGH, B.E., M.E., M.S., Head Professor of Mechanical Engineering
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics
LINUS MARVIN ELLIS JR., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry
ELMER JACOB EMIG, M.A., Head Professor of Journalism
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D., Head Professor of Philosophy
ROLAND BYERLY EUTSLER, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Insurance
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., Associate Professor of English
WILLIAM WARRICK FINEREN, M.E., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Head Professor of Horticulture and Assistant Dean of the
College of Agriculture
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy
JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D., Professor of Public School Administration
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education
HALLETT HUNT GERMOND, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing Agricultural Products
FREDERICK T. HANNAFORD, B.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, Ph.D., Instructor in Spanish
JOHN ERSKINE HAWKINS, Ph.D., Acting Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry
WILLIAM TROTTER HICKS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics
THOMAS JEFFERSON HIGGINS, M.A., Instructor in Spanish
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Head of Department of Psychology
THEODORE HUNTINGTON HUBBELL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology
WILLIAM JOHN HUSA, Ph.D., Head Professor of Pharmacy
EDWARD J. IRELAND, Ph.D., Instructor in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry
HENRY NORTON JUNE, B.S. Arch..A.I.A., Professor of Architecture
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics
JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D., Head Professor of History and Political Science
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences
THOMAS MARVEL LOWE, M.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
JESSE WILFORD MASON, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head Professor of Economics, Dean of the College of
Business Administration and Acting Dean of the General College
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D., Professor of Supervised Teaching and Director of Educa-
tional Research
WAYNE MILLER NEAL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Nutrition
CLARENCE VERNON NOBLE, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agricultural Economics
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Education and Dean of the College of
Education
ANCIL NEWTON PAYNE, Ph.D., Assis:ant Professor of History and Political Science
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S., Associate Professor of Physics
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry
PERCY LAWRENCE REED, C.E., M.S., Head Professor of Civil Engineering



















BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


JULIUS WAYNE REITZ, M.S., Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics and Farm
Management
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., Professor of English and Acting Head of Department
of English
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Head Professor of Agricultural Engineering
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D., Head Professor of Biology and Geology
STEPHAN P. SASHOFF, M.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Agronomy
ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY, B.S., D.V.M., Head Professor of Animal Husbandry
HARLEY BAKWEL SHERMAN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Assistant Dean in Charge of
Laboratory School
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Mathematics
BUNNIE OTHANEL SMITH, M.A., Assistant Professor of Curriculum Revision
0. C. R. STAGEBERG, B.S. Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture
ROBERT ALDEN THOMPSON, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering
FRANK WALDO TUTTLE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Administration
BLAKE RAGSDALE VAN LEER, M.E., M.S., Professor of Engineering and Dean of the College
of Engineering
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B S.. F.A.I.A., Head Professor of Architecture and Director of the School
of Architecture and Allied Arts
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S., Head Professor of Electrical Engineering
BENJAMIN R. WELD, B.S., Instructor in Sociology
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology
ROBERT CROZIER WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Physics
CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, M.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D., Professor of Education
PHILIP OSBORNE YEATON, B.S., S.B., Head Professor of Industrial Engineering







GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMINISTRATION

The affairs of the Graduate School are administered by the Graduate Council, which
consists of the Dean as ex-officio chairman, and certain members of the faculty, who are
appointed annually by the President.

ADMISSION

For unqualified admission to the Graduate School, two things are needed: (1) graduation
from a standard college or university; (2) foundation work in the major subject sufficient
in quantity and quality to satisfy the requirements of the department in which the student
proposes to major.
If the student cannot meet these two requirements, he may nevertheless be permitted
to register and take such courses as may be required as prerequisites to satisfy either, or
both, of the above requirements. The work done under these conditions does not count
toward a degree. Therefore such students often will be required to spend longer than
the prescribed time in completing the requirements for the degree. It is permissible for
well-qualified students to take courses in the Graduate School without becoming candidates
for an advanced degree.

REGISTRATION

All graduate students, old or new, are required to register in the Office of the Dean
on the regular registration days as indicated in the bulletin. The student should consult
in advance the Dean and the head of the department in which he proposes to major, and
inquire if he is eligible to register for this work. A complete transcript of all undergraduate
and graduate work should be sent direct to the Dean of the Graduate School from the
institution in which the credits have been earned.
This transcript should be in the Dean's hands at least one month before the beginning
of the session. If the student seems eligible, he will be referred by the Dean to the head
of the department concerned. Either the head of the department or some professor in
that department will become the professor of the major subject for the student, and will
plan the courses for which he is to register. A blank form is furnished at the Dean's Office.

FEES

A registration fee of $7.50 is required of all students; for the summer session this fee
is $15 for each term, or $25 for the two terms. Students taking laboratory courses must
pa3 the laboratory fees that are listed with those courses. All students pay a diploma fee
of $5 before graduation.
Students from other states or countries who have not established residence in the State
of Florida are required to pay an additional fee of $200 for the regular session and an
additional fee of $10 for the summer session.
Holders of graduate assistantships and graduate scholarships are exempt from the tuition
fee for non-Florida students and from laboratory fees, but not from breakage fees.
Some fees are optional: for instance, the student activity fee and the infirmary fee.
If a student wishes the privileges that go with these fees, he must pay the fees in advance.











BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AND GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS

With the Annual Stipend


AGRICULTURE :
Agricultural Economics-One Graduate
Assistant in Farm Management ..........$ 450
Agronomy-One Graduate Assistant....... 450
Entomology and Plant Pathology-
One Graduate Assistant.......................------... 450
Horticulture-One Graduate Assistant ..... 450
(Agricultural Chemistry is included in
Chemistry)
ARCHITECTURE :
One Graduate Assistant.......................... 450
BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY:
Two Graduate Assistants at $360 each .. 720
One Graduate Assistant at $350.......--......... 350
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS :
Two Graduate Assistants at $405 each... 810
CHEMISTRY :
Six Graduate Assistants at $450 each...... 2,700
Naval Stores Research-
Two Graduate Assistants at $600 each 1,200
One Graduate Assistant at $900............ 900


ENGINEERING:
Civil Engineering-One Graduate
Assistant..............................................$....
Mechanical Engineering-One Graduate
A ssistant...............................................
(Chemical Engineering is included in
Chemistry)
ENGLISH:
Teaching Fellow in English, P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School ......................................
PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY:
Two Graduate Assistants at $450 each...
PHARMACY:
Two Graduate Assistants at $450 each...


PSYCHOLOGY:
One Graduate Assistant....


................. 360


PHYSICS:
Three Graduate Assistants at $360 each.. 1,080
GENERAL:
Ten Graduate Scholarships at $250 each.. 2,500


(The Graduate Scholarships may be in any department that offers major work for a
Master's degree. Application must be filed not later than March 15. Students accepting
these scholarships are not permitted to take other remunerative positions.)

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

Degrees Offered.-Master of Arts; Master of Arts in Architecture; Master of Arts in
Education; Master of Science; Master of Science in Agriculture; Master of Science in
Engineering; and Master of Science in Pharmacy.
Application.-Those who wish to be considered candidates for the Master's degree must
present to the Dean a written application not later than the first of November of the first
year's residence, or March 15 for students beginning work the second term. The blank
for this application may be obtained at the Office of the Dean. This application must
name the major and minor subjects offered for the degree, and the title of the thesis,
and carry the signed approval of the professor of the major subject and the professors of
the minor subjects.
Residence Requirement.-The student must spend at least one entire academic year at
the University as a graduate student devoting his full time to the pursuit of his studies.
If there is a break in the student's work, his whole course must be included within a period
of seven years.
Work Required.-The major work consists of twelve semester hours in courses designed
for graduate students only (courses numbered above 500). Twelve semester hours are
also required in one or more minors. The courses selected for the minor or minors, as
well as the courses for the major work, must meet the approval of the professor of the
major subject and the approval of the Dean or Graduate Council. The minors may be
taken from courses numbered above 300. The work in the minors is estimated to take
about one-third of the student's time, the other two-thirds being devoted to the major work









REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE


and the thesis. As a rule the student will have had four years of college work, or its
equivalent, in the subject selected for his major, and not less than two years of college
work in the subject, or subjects, selected as minors. As a rule, it is not permissible to
select a minor in the same department as the major, but the departments should be allied.
Grades.-To obtain credit for a graduate course the student must attain a grade not
lower than B in both major and minor work. Re-examinations are not permitted.
Foreign Language.-A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language is required
of all candidates. The examination in the foreign language will be conducted by the
language department concerned. This requirement must be satisfied before the beginning
of the last term. A student in the regular session must pass the language examination
by March 15 if he expects to graduate at the end of the first summer term of that year
and by April 20 if he expects to graduate at the end of the second summer term. In case
the student is completing all his work in the summer terms, the foreign language require-
ment must be satisfied before the beginning of the fourth short summer term. If the
student is majoring in a language, that language cannot be used to satisfy this requirement.
Thesis.-Every candidate for the Master's degree must present a thesis showing original
research and independent thinking on some subject accepted by the professor under whom
the major work is taken, and duly submitted to the Dean or to the Graduate Council for
approval. The student should consult the Dean's Office for instructions concerning the
form of the thesis. Two copies of this thesis must be in the hands of the Dean not later
than May 1. If the student expects to graduate at the end of the first term, the thesis must
be submitted by January 3. These copies are deposited in the Library if the thesis is accepted.
Special Committee.-When the student has qualified as a candidate by having his course
of study and the title of his thesis approved, a Special Supervisory Committee consisting
of not less than three members will be appointed by the Dean. The professor of the major
subject will be the chairman of this committee. The Dean is ex-officio a member of all
supervisory committees.
General Examination.-It will be the duty of the Special Supervisory Committee, when
all work is complete or practically complete, including the regular courses and the thesis,
to conduct a general examination, either written or oral, or both, to embrace: first, the
thesis; second, the major subject; third, the minor or minors; fourth, questions of a general
nature pertaining to the student's field of study. The Committee shall report in writing
to the Dean not later than one week before the time for the conferring of the degree if
all work has been completed in a satisfactory manner and the student is recommended
for the degree.
Work Done in Absentia.-Credit is not given for work done in absentia. No courses
may be taken for credit by extension or correspondence. Under the following conditions,
however, the Graduate Council may vote to allow the student to finish and submit his thesis
when not in residence:
(1) If he has completed his residence requirement.
(2) If he has completed his course requirements.
(3) If he has submitted while in residence a draft of his thesis and obtained the
approval of his supervisory committee as to the substance of his thesis.
(4) If the Supervisory Committee recommends to the Graduate Council that the student
be given the privilege of finishing the thesis in absentia and submitting it later.
In case this privilege is granted and the final draft of the thesis is approved, it will be
necessary for the student to appear and stand the final examination. His presence will
also be necessary at Commencement if the degree is conferred.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Summer Terms. -Three complete summer sessions, or six short summer terms, devoted
entirely to graduate work, will satisfy the time requirement. The terms need not be
consecutive, but the work must be completed within seven years. The application, Form 2,
must be presented not later than four weeks after the beginning of the first term. The
title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the second summer term. It must
be submitted and approved by the end of the third summer term, or the student will not
be permitted to graduate in three more terms. Unless the s'uden: presents by the end
of his fourth summer term a draft of his thesis sufficient to convince the professor of his
major subject that he will have a satisfac ory thesis, the student will not be eligible to
graduate at the end of his third summer. The thesis itself must be completed and sub-
mitted to the Dean not later than three weeks before the end of the summer term in which
the student expects to receive his degree.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The University of Florida is now prepared to register students who wish to enter upon
a course leading to the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, but only in the departments of
Chemistry and Pharmacy. It is expected that other Departmen:s will be added from year
to year as facilities are increased.
Time and Residence.-A minimum of three academic years of resident graduate work,
of which at least the last year must be spent at the University of Florida, is required
of all candidates for the Doctor's degree. In many cases, it will be necessary to remain
longer than three years, and necessarily so when the student is not putting in his full time
in graduate work.
Distribution of Work.-Two-thirds of the student's time is expected to be spent upon
his major subject and the dissertation, and about one-third on his minor or minors. The
student will be guided by the professor of his major subject and by his special committee
in regard to his whole course of study. The Graduate Council does not specify just what
courses or how many courses will be required. The work is now mainly research, and
the student will be thrown largely upon his own responsibility. He is expected to familiarize
himself thoroughly with his field of study, and as a result of his studies and investigations,
to produce a work which will add something to human knowledge.
Minors.-The student must take one minor and may not take more than two minors.
In general, if two minors are taken, the second minor will require at least one year. The
first minor will require twice as much work as the second, and if only one minor is taken
it will require as much work as two minors.
Special Committee.-When the student has advanced sufficiently towards his degree,
a special committee will be appointed by the Dean, of which committee the professor of
the major subject will be chairman. This committee will direct, advise, and examine the
student. The Dean is ex-officio a member of all supervisory committees.
Language Requirement.-A reading knowledge of both French and German is required
of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. The examinations in the languages are held by
the language departments concerned. These requirements should be removed as early as
possible in the student's career, and must be satisfied before the applicant can be admitted
to the qualifying examination.
Qualifying Examination.-A qualifying examination is required of all candidates for
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. This examination may be held during the second
term ot the second year of residence. The examination is both written and oral and
covers both major and minor subjects. It will be conducted by his Special Supervisory







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Committee. After passing the qualifying examination the student must put in one full
academic year of residence before he comes up for the degree. If the student fails in
his qualifying examination, he will not be given another opportunity unless for special
reasons a re-examination is recommended by his special committee and approved by the
Graduate Council.
Dissertation.-A satisfactory dissertation showing independent investigation and research
is required of all candidates. Two typewritten copies of this dissertation must be presented
to the Dean not later than May 1 of the year in which the candidate expects to receive
his degree. If the student should be a candidate for the degree in a summer term, July 1
would be the final date for submitting the dissertation to the Dean.
Printing of Dissertation.-One hundred printed copies of the dissertation must be
presented to the University within one year after the conferring of the degree. After
the dissertation has been accepted, the candidate must deposit with the Business Manager,
not later than one week before the degree is conferred, the sum of $50 as a pledge that
the dissertation will be published within the prescribed time. This sum will be returned
if the printed copies are received within the year.
Final Examination.-After the acceptance of the dissertation and the completion of all
the work of the candidate, he will be given a final examination, oral or written, or both,
by his Special Supervisory Committee.
Recommendation.-If the final examination is passed, the Special Committee will report
to the Dean in writing not later than one week before the time for conferring the degree
that the student has met all requirements for the degree, and that he is presented to the
Graduate Council for recommendation to the Board of Control for the degree of Doctor
of Philosophy.

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION
Graduate Courses.-Only strictly graduate courses are listed in this bulletin. For other
courses in the various departments, see the Bulletin of Information for the Colleges and
Professional Schools of the Upper Division.
The courses are arranged alphabetically. Not all the courses will be given in 1936-37.
In some cases the courses not offered for that year are indicated. In other cases the courses
actually given will be determined by the demand.

GRADUATE COURSES

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
As. 501-502.-Agricultural Economics Seminar. 2 hours. 4 credits. NOBLE
and the Agricultural Economics STAFF.
A study of recent literature and research work in agricultural economics. (An entire change
of subject matter will be made.)
As. 505-506.-Research Problems.-Farm Management. Hours to be arranged
by the Head of the Department. NOBLE, REITZ.
As. 508.-Land Economics. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
HAMILTON.
Rural taxation, colonization, and adjustment of rural lands to their best uses.
As. 509.-Citrus Grove Organization and Management. 1 hour and 2 hours
laboratory. 2 credits. REITZ.
The organization and management of successful citrus properties in Florida.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


As. 510.-Organization and Management of Truck Farms. 1 hour and 2 hours
laboratory. 2 credits. NOBLE.
The economic organization and management of successful truck farms in Florida.
As. 511-512.-Research Problems-Marketing Agricultural Products. Hours
and credit to be arranged and approved by the Head of the Department. HAM-
ILTON.
As. 514.-Advanced Marketing of Agricultural Products. 2 hours and 2 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. HAMILTON.
Study of private and cooperative agencies marketing agricultural products and commodities.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Ag. 501-502.-Seminar. 2 hours. 4 credits. ROGERS.
Discussion of agricultural engineering problems and review of literature. Required of all
graduate students registered in the department.
Ag. 503-504.-Research. 6 hours. 12 credits. ROGERS.
Special problems in agricultural engineering.

AGRONOMY

Ay. 500.-Advanced Plant Genetics. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. Prerequisite:
Ay. 309. (Offered in even years.)
Variation and inheritance in plants and the application of genetic principles to plant improve-
ment. Sterility, hybrid vigor, inbreeding, pure lines, disease resistance, chromosomal variations,
and the newer cytological approach to genetical investigations.
Ay. 501-502.-Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. BRYAN and SENN.
Discussion and review of current literature dealing with soils and crops.
Ay. 504.-Soil Development and Classification. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
3 credits. BRYAN. Prerequisite: Ay. 301.
Origin, nomenclature, and classification of soil materials; effect of climate, vegetative cover,
and parent material on development of the soil profile; basis of soil classification, mapping, and
utilization; soil groups and genetic types of the world.
Ay. 505-506.-Special Problems in Soils and Crops. 2 to 5 credits. BRYAN,
SENN.
Ay. 508.-Methods of Crop Investigation. 2 hours. 2 credits. SENN. Pre-
requisites: Ay. 201, 301, and 309. (Offered in odd years.)
Field plot technic, statistical analysis of data based on biometrical methods; environmental
factors influencing experimental results.
Ay. 511.-Soil Analysis. 1 hour and 5 hours laboratory. 3 credits. BRYAN.
Prerequisites: Ay. 301, Cy. 305.
Methods of total and partial analysis of soils and technic in soil research; physical, chemical
and biological principles involved; quantitative methods of measuring soil reaction, replaceable
bases and carbon.
Ay. 514.-Advanced Soils. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. BRYAN.
Prerequisite: Ay. 511.
Organic and inorganic components of the soil and their physico-chemical properties, including
the origin, nature, and significance of soil colloids, replaceable bases; reaction and solubility of
.minerals as related to plants.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

Al. 501-502.-Animal Production. 3 hours. 6 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Problems in the production of domestic animals; development of types and breeds; management
of herds: research on selected topics.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Al. 503-504.-Animal Nutrition. 3 hours. 6 credits. BECKER. Prerequisite:
Cy. 262.
Relative composition of feeds; digestion in ruminants ; development of feeding standards;
protein, energy, vitamins, and mineral elements in nutrition.
Al. 505-506.-Live Stock Records. 2 hours. 4 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
History of live stock in the South; methods of breed associations; research on selected topics.
Al. 508.-Methods in Animal Research. 2 hours. 2 credits. BECKER.
Methods employed in nutritional, feeding and management investigations with farm animals.
Al. 509-510.-Problems in Dairy Production and Animal Nutrition. 2 to 5
credits. BECKER, NEAL.

ARCHITECTURE

Ae. 501-502.-Architectural Design. 18 hours design and research. 12 credits.
WEAVER, JUNE. Prerequisite: Ae. 21 B.
Research on a special phase of architectural design, selected by the student with approval of
the Director. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Ae. 521-522.-Advanced Freehand Drawing. 6 hours studio. 4 credits.
DOOLITTLE. Prerequisite: Ae. 31 B.
LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Ae. 525-526.-Advanced Water Color. 6 hours studio. 4 credits. STAGEBERG.
Prerequisite: Ae. 31 B.
Outdoor sketching from nature. Advanced architectural rendering. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each
term.
Ae. 531-532.-Historical Research. 2 hours. 4 credits. JUNE, STAGEBERG.
Prerequisite: Ae. 41 C.
Research on some historical phase or phases of architecture and allied arts, determined by the
student in consultation with his advisers.
Ae. 551-552.-Building Construction. 2 hours. 4 credits. HANNAFORD. Pre-
requisite: Ae. 51 A.
Research on various types of building materials, their methods of and fitness for use in various
parts of the country, with advancement of some original theories in connection with such subjects.
Ae. 553-554.-Structural Design of Buildings. 2 hours. 4 credits. HANNA-
FOFD. Prerequisite: Ae. 61 B.
Research on a special phase of reinforced concrete or steel design and construction of buildings,
with advancement of some original theories in connection with such subjects.

BIOLOGY

Bly. 503.-Advanced General Biology. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROGERS. Pre-
requisite: An undergraduate major in biology.
Certain fundamental concepts and theories of biology discussed from the standpoint of the
advanced student. Collateral readings and reports. Required of all graduate students majoring
in biology.
Bly. 0505.-History of Biology. 2 hours. 2 credits. ROGERS. Prerequisite:
an undergraduate major in biology.
Bly. 507-508.-Zoological Classification and Nomenclature. 1 hour and 6 or
12 hours laboratory. 3 or 5 credits each term. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or
BYERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 503.
An approved group of animals is studied under direction of a member of the staff, as an
illustration of the biological and taxonomic problems involved in animal classification. LABORATORY
FEE: $5 each term.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Bly. 513-514.-Vertebrate Morphology. 1 hour and 6 or 12 hours laboratory.
3 or 5 credits each term. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: An undergraduate major in
biology, including Bly. 211.
LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Bly. 515-516.-Invertebrate Morphology. 1 hour and 6 or 12 hours laboratory.
3 or 5 credits each term. HUBBELL or BYERS. Prerequisite: An undergraduate
major in biology, including at least two terms of work on invertebrates.
LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Bly. 517-518.-Bionomics. 1 hour and 6 or 12 hours laboratory. 3 or 5 credits
each term. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 503.
A selected species or larger taxonomic group of local animals, or some particular type of
animal habitat, is studied from the standpoint of life history or ecology, under direction of a
member of the staff, as an illustration of the problems involved in a consideration of the relations
of animals to their environment. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Bly. 519-520.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Hours to be arranged.
Thesis required. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS. Prerequisite: an ap-
proved major in biology.
All applicants for the Master's degree are required to undertake an approved individual problem
in biology, the results of which will be embodied in a Master's thesis. Such problems will be
carried out under direction of a member of the staff. Problems may be chosen from one of the
following fields: vertebrate or invertebrate morphology or embryology; classification or taxonomy
of certain approved groups; natural history or distribution of a selected group of local animals;
investigations of animal habitats in the Gainesville area. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Bly. 651-652.-Research. Hours to be arranged. 3, 5, or 8 credits each term.
ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS.
At present open to students who have completed their Master's work or its equivalent and are
prepared to carry on partially independent work on certain phases of animal ecology, or ecological
or geographic distribution.

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

BOTANY

Bty. 500-0500.-Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. CODY, CARROLL.
Review and discussion of current literature on problems of botany and bacteriology. Required
of all graduate students majoring in botany or bacteriology.
Bty. 501-502.-Problems in Taxonomy. 8 hours field or laboratory. 8 credits.
CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 308, or its equivalent; desirable prerequisite: Bty. 401.
An assignment to a special problem, or a critical study of a specific plant family or genus;
plant surveys with special emphasis on predominating flora of a community. LABORATORY FEE:
$5 each term.
Bty. 503-504.-Problems in Plant Physiology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
8 credits. CODY. Prerequisites: Bty. 302, Cy. 0262, or equivalent.
Special physiological processes of plants; principles and methods of nutrition, respiration, etc.
LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Bty. 505.-Problems in Plant Histology. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 331, or its equivalent.
Comparative methods in histological technique. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bty. 506.-Research in Plant Histology. 8 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY.
Prerequisites: Bty. 331, 505, or equivalents.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bty. 507.-Advanced Plant Anatomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. Prerequisites: Bty. 331, 332, or equivalents.
Special problems in plant anatomy. A prerequisite to Bty. 508.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bty. 508.-Problems in Plant Anatomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 507.
Research or a critical study of certain plant tissues and organs. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Bty. 509-510.-Research. Hours to be arranged. No credit in hours. Thesis
required. CODY. Prerequisites: An approved major in botany or bacteriology.
Applicants for a Master's degree with a major in botany are required to undertake an approved
problem, the results of which are to be included in a thesis. The problem may be elected in
morphology, physiology, histology, anatomy or taxonomy. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.

BACTERIOLOGY
Bcy. 500-0500.-Seminar. See Botany 500.
Bcy. 501-502.-Problems in Soil Bacteriology. 8 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 8 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bcy. 301; desirable prerequisite:
Cy. 0262, or its equivalent.
Special problems on isolation, cultivation and identification of certain micro-organisms of the soil.
LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Bcy. 503-504.-Problems in Dairy Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory, or
its equivalent. 6 or 8 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisites: Bey. 301-302 or 304;
desirable antecedent: Cy. 0262, or its equivalent.
Assignment to a special phase of research pertaining to dairy problems involving activities
of micro-organisms; sanitation of dairy products, etc. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Bey. 505-506.-Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory
or its equivalent. 6 or 8 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisites: Bey. 301, 304, or
equivalents.
Research. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Bcy. 507-508.-Problems in Water Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory, or its
equivalent. 6 to 8 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 301, or its equivalent.
Research. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Bcy. 509-510.-Problems in Industrial Bacteriology. 2 hours laboratory work
a week for each semester hour credit desired. A minimum of 4 credits allowed.
CARROLL.
LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
NOTE: In the above courses a graduate student requiring more than 2 terms to complete a
major or minor in an elected field will use the letters, a, b, c, for respective additional terms.
Bcy. 519-520.-Research. Hours to be arranged. No credit in hours.- Thesis
required. CARROLL. Prerequisites: An approved major or minor in bacteriology.
Applicants for the Master's degree with a major in bacteriology are required to undertake an
approved problem, the results of which are to be included in a thesis. Problems may be elected in
(1) Soil, (2) Dairy, (3) Food, (4) Industrial, (5) Sanitary and (6) Pathogenic Bacteriology,
and may be pursued year after year in accordance with the need of each candidate. LABORATORY
FEE: $5 each term.
CHEMISTRY

*Cy. 501.-Organic Preparations. 9 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 3
credits. POLLARD.
The preparation of some typical compounds, with discussion of principles and theories. A
reading knowledge of French and German is desirable. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations. 9 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 3
credits. LEIGH.
Laboratory work involving preparation of a number of typical inorganic compounds in addition
to collateral reading and discussion. A reading knowledge of French and German is desirable.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.

Not offered in 1936-37.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


*Cy. 0505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
ELLIS.
Special lectures and collateral reading relative to the electronic and other theoretical concep-
tions of organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives, pseudo-acids, certain dyes, alkaloids,
proteins, etc.
**Cy. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Lectures and collateral reading. In general, topics to be studied will be chosen from the
following list: stereochemistry, tautomerism, acetoacetic ester syntheses, malonic ester syntheses,
the Grignard reaction, benzene theories, diazo compounds, and indicators.
**Cy. 0508.-Synthesis and Structure of Organic Compounds. 3 hours. 3 credits.
POLLARD.
Study of fundamental reactions for synthesizing organic compounds and proving their structures.
**Cy. 0509.-Electrochemistry. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. JACKSON.
A theoretical and laboratory study of the applications of electrochemical principles. LABORATORY
FEE: $5.
*Cy. 510.-The Phase Rule. 3 hours. 3 credits. JACKSON.
A study of the application of the phase rule to heterogeneous equilibria.
Cy. 0512.-Applications of Physical Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. JACKSON.
Kinetic considerations of gases, liquids, and solids; solutions; photochemistry; pyrolysis;
introduction to quantum theory. Problem work will be stressed.
*Cy. 0513.-Colloid Chemistry. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
HAWKINS or MASON.
The theories, practice, and applications of colloid chemistry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
*Cy. 515.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. HEATH.
This course covers recent theories and progress in inorganic chemistry.
**Cy. 0516.-Chemistry of the Rare Elements. 3 hours. 3 credits. HEATH.
Deals with the mineral occurrences, preparation, properties, and uses of the rarer elements
and their compounds. Relations to the more common elements will be clearly shown as well as
methods for separation and purification.
Cy. 525.-Chemistry of the Terpenes. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
ELLIS.
A study of hydroaromatic compounds, including the terpenes and their derivatives.
Cy. 526.-Chemistry of the Terpenes. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
ELLIS.
A continuation of Cy. 525.
*Cy. 0531.-Advanced Qualitative Analysis. 3 hours laboratory or its equiva-
lent. 3 credits. JACKSON.
Systematic laboratory study of the qualitative reactions for the detection and confirmation
of rare and precious metals. Use of the spectroscope as a means of qualitative tests is stressed.
LABORATORY FEE: $5.
**Cy. 533.-Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory.
3 credits. BLACK.
Application of physico-chemical methods to quantitative analysis. Electrometric titrations.
Colorimetry. Nephelometry. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
Cy. 534.-Advanced Sanitary Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLACK.
A study of the applications of physico-chemical principles to water and sewage treatment.
Cy. 537.-Qualitative Organic Chemistry. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory.
3 credits. POLLARD.
Methods of identifying organic compounds. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

Not offered in 1936-37.
** Not offered in 1937-38.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cy. 538.-Quantitative Organic Chemistry. 9 hours laboratory or its equiva-
lent. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Ultimate analysis of organic compounds. LABORATORY FEE: $5.
**Cy. 542.-Catalysis. 3 hours. 3 credits. MASON.
Theories and applications of catalysis with special reference to use of catalytic agents in
industry.
**Cy. 545.-Chemical Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAWKINS.
The fundamental principles of thermodynamics which are particularly applicable to chemistry.
**Cy. 581.-Chemical Technology. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. MASON.
Special problems and topics in industrial chemistry.
*Cy. 583.-Distillation. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAWKINS.
Theory and practice of distillation processes.
**Cy. 586.-Chemical Engineering Processes. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3
credits. HAWKINS.
An advanced course in certain of the unit processes of chemical engineering.
Cy. 588.-Heat Transmission. 3 hours. 3 credits. MASON.
Industrial applications of flow of heat.
Cy. 601-602.-Chemical Research. No credit in hours. THE STAFF. Pre-
requisite or corequisite: Cy. 481-482 (Chemical Literature).
Required of students majoring in the following fields: Inorganic, Organic, Physical, Agricul-
tural, and Water Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering. LABORATORY FEE: $5.

ECONOMICS

Es. 505.-The Development of Economic Thought. 3 hours. 3 credits. ELDRIDGE.
Development of economic thought; analysis of theories of various schools of economic thought;
a study of the Physiocrats, Mercantilism, the Classical Economist, the leading economists of the
Austrian School, and a brief survey of the beginning of Socialism; the development of theoretical
background for research and graduate work of an advanced nature. Required of all candidates
for the Master's degree in this department.
Es. 506.-The Development of Economic Thought, continued. 3 hours. 3
credits. ELDRIDGE.
Analysis of the thought of the followers and defenders on the one hand and of the abler critics
on the other hand of the Classical I 'onomists; appraisals of recent contributions of the various
schools in formulating a system of economic analysis. Required of all candidates for the Master's
degree in this department.
Es. 509.-The Development of Economic Institutions. 3 hours. 3 credits.
TUTTLE.
An intensive study of the development of the fundamental institutions of the existing economic
order, including the price system-money, credit, and banking; business enterprise-types of in-
dustrial organization, industrial combination, the business cycle; machine technique-the machine
and its effects, mining, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation.
Es. 524.-Corporation Finance and Investments. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER.
A study and analysis of the corporation as an institution making use iof society's savings;
the processes, practices, and institutions involved in the acquisition of capital funds, with an
evaluation of corporation practices and problems ; the social responsibilities of the corporation;
the nature of the capital market and the sources of capital funds; factors influencing the accumu-
lation and distriLution of capital fun s; and the international flow of capital.
Es. 526.-Monetary and Banking Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOLBEARE.
Critical analysis of monetary standards and cen ral banking control of credit, especially as
they are related to price and business fluctuations.

Not offered in 1936-37.
** Not offered in 1937-38.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Es. 530.-Problems in State and Local Taxation. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
An intensive study of the problems of state and local taxation primarily related to the following
taxes: general property, income, business, inheritance, and commodity.
Es. 531.-The Economic Functions of Middlemen. 3 hours. 3 credits. HICKS.
The significance of middlemen and of the functions performed by them in the economic
organization of society will be covered, with chief emphasis upon the social viewpoint. Attention
will be given to some of the social problems arising to the consumer, and to the role played by
middlemen in the functional distribution of income.

Es. 563-564.-Seminar in Statistics and Business Forecasting. 3 hours. 6
credits. ANDERSON.
Critical stu.'y of special problems in statistics and business forecasting.
Es. 589.-Geographic Factors Underlying World Economy. 3 hours. 3 credits.
ATWOOD.
A lecture and research course stressing the geographic factors that affect the industrial and
commercial development of the leading countries of the world. Students will be required to select
subjects for intensive study and make formal reports.

EDUCATION

En. 500.-An Introduction to Educational Research. 2 hours. 2 credits. WISE.
Designed primarily to help graduate students in Education in writing their theses. Required
of all students majoring in Education; open to all graduate students.
En. 501.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH.
Intensive study of the Cevelopment and present content of the elementary school curriculum,
including the kindergarten; selection and evaluation of material.
En. 503.-Seminar in Educational Measurements. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of educational problems involving measurement,
diagnostic and remedial measures. This course is primarily for graduate students with experience
in residence or in the field. LABORATORY FEE: $1.50.
En. 504.-The School Survey. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK, CRAGO, SIMMONS.
En. 505.-The Organization and Administration of Extra-Curricular Activities
in Junior and Senior High Schools. 2 hours. 2 credits. WISE.
An attempt will be made to work out constructive school policies having to do with the
developing of the pupil's initiative, leadership, cooperation, etc.
En. 506.-Methods of Teaching Farm-Shop Work. 2 hours. 2 credits. GARRIS.
Selection and organization of subject matter, selection of equipment, and methods of teaching
farm-shop jobs. Offered as demands arise and during the summer session.
En. 507.-Seminar in Educational Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems in directed learning, individual
differences, and adjustment of problem children. Primarily for graduate students with experience
in residence or in the field.
En. 508.-Democracy and Education Seminar. 3 hours. 3 credits. NORMAN.
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual,
society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, education its own end.
En. 509.-Problems in the Administration of a School System. 3 hours. 3
credits. FULK. Prerequisite: En. 401 or its equivalent, or administrative
experience.
Problems selected to meet individual needs; each student selects some problem for special
study and presents the results of his study in the form of a thesis.
En. 510.-The History of Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-teacher, student,
curriculum, and educational plant, control and support-back to their beginnings; and to point
out present ten 'encies and possible developments.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 511.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GARRIS.
Selection and organization of subject matter from the vocational point of view. Offered when
demand arises and during the summer session.
En. 512.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GARRIS.
A continuation of Education 511.
En. 514.-Problems in Adolescence. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO. Prerequisite:
En. 319 or equivalent.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems peculiar to the period of adolescence.
En. 516.-Character and Personality Development. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
A study of methods used in development of character and personality, together with an
evaluation of them for use in public schools.
En. 517.-Educational Statistics. 2 hours. 2 credits.
To acquaint students with statistical methods as applied to Eoucation. It is recommended
that this course be taken before En. 503.
En. 518.-Special Problems in High School Organization and Administration.
3 hours. 3 credits. SIMMONS. Prerequisite: En. 408.
This course will consist of an intensive study of specific problems in organizing and administer-
ing the modern high school. Special reference will be made to Florida.
En. 519.-High School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH.
Problems of the curriculum of the high school in its organization; standards for selection of
the curriculum; factors to be considered age of pupils, social standing, probable school life,
probable vocation; traditional subjects and their possible variations; new subjects and their values,
systems of organization, election, and prescription; problems of articulation with the elementary
school, the college, the vocational school, and the community.
En. 521.-Business Administration of a School System. 3 hours. 3 credits.
FULK. Prerequisite: Wide administrative experience.
Problems concerned with the procuring and spending of revenue; a thesis on a special problem.
En. 528.-Supervision of Instruction. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD.
A course dealing with objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in
elementary and secondary schools, and in preparation of teachers. Each student completes a
minor research.
En. 541.-Control and Support of Public Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
State, federal and other agencies of control and support of education in the United States;
world-history background; present tendencies and possible developments. Saturday class; planned
primarily for teachers in service.
En. 542.-The Curriculum and the Educational Plant. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
Present status of curriculum and plant and their relation in all types of schools, viewed in
the light of their historical development; a world view with emphasis on present tendencies in
the United States.
En. 543.-The Teacher and the Educand. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
Some outstanding teachers, including educational theorists, philosophers, reformers, statesmen,
and administrators, and their students; the training and professionalizing of the teacher; the
spread, compulsion, and extension of education and its relation to world revolutions.
En. 544.-Constitutional and Legal Basis of Public School Administration.
2 hours. 2 credits. SIMMONS.
Special emphasis will be given to Florida conditions, school laws, constitutional provisions,
judicial decisions, Attorney General's rulings, and regulations of the State Board of Education.
Students will be required to prepare a term report dealing with some special field of school
law. Only graduate students with experience in administration and supervision will be admitted.
En. 562.-Guidance and Counseling. 2 hours. 2 credits. GARRIS.
Study of guidance and counseling of high school students. Educational and vocational guidance
and problems of personality adjustment. Offered only in the summer session.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


En. 565-566.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours. 6
credits. GARRIS.
Designed for graduate students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced problems.
Problems will be selected to suit individual needs and the results of the study will be reported in
the form of term papers. The class will meet for three hours every other Saturday during both
terms.
En. 567-568.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours. 6
credits. GARRIS.
Similar to En. 565-566 in organization and offered in alternate years with it.
En. 569.-Problems in Organizing Part-time and Evening Classes. 6 hours.
3 credits. GARRIS.
The class will organize and teach a part-time or evening class in vocational agriculture in
the Alachua community. Offered only in the summer term.
En. 603.-Foundations of Method. 3 hours. 3 credits. NORMAN.
Improvement of college and high school teaching. Open to graduate students and members
of the University faculty who care to enroll.
En. 605-606.-Seminar in Public School Administration. 3 hours. 6 credits.
FULK. Prerequisites: En. 504 or 521 and En. 509 or 518, or permission of
instructor. Each term's work is a complete course and gives 3 credits.

ENGINEERING
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Listed under that name.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
See Chemistry.
CIVIL ENGINEERING
Cl. 521-522.-Advanced Work in Steel Structures. 3 hours and 6 hours lab-
oratory. 6 credits. REED. Prerequisite: Cl. 433-434.
Advanced work in the theory, design, and drawing of steel structures, particularly in connection
with bridges and buildings.
Cl. 523-524.-Advanced Work in Concrete Structures. 3 hours and 6 hours
laboratory. 6 credits. LOWE. Prerequisite: Cl. 432-433-434.
Advanced work in the theory, design, and drawing of concrete structures, particularly in
connection with bridges and buildings.
Cl. 527-528.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours and 6 hours
laboratory. 6 credits. LOWE. Prerequisite: Cl. 429.
Study of action and operation of Imhoff sewage disposal plant of the University. Physical,
biological, bacteriological, and chemical observations to determine efficiency and economy of various
methods of operation and improvements in operation to increase the same.
Cl. 529-530.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours and 6 hours
laboratory. 6 credits. LOWE. Prerequisite: Cl. 527-528.
Supplementing C1. 527-528, which covers similar investigations in connection with other types
of sewage disposal plants.
Cl. 533-534.-Similarity and Model Applications to Beach and Shore Erosions
Problems. 3 hours and 6 hours laboratory. 6 credits. VAN LEER. Prerequisite:
Cl. 427.
A study of laws of similarity, use of Reynolds Number, effects of density, viscosity, friction
and actual model studies with practical applications.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Radio courses in the Department of Electrical Eng'neering are given in co-operation
with State Radio Station WRUF. Students can secure practical experience in radio station
operation and should be able to qualify as firs:-class radio telephone operators on com-







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


pletion of the elementary courses listed in the Bulletin of Information for the Colleges
and Professional Schools of the Upper Division.
El. 501-502.-Advanced Experimental Electrical Engineering. Variable credit.
WEIL and STAFF. Prerequisite: Not less than 9 credits in electrical engineering
theory and electrical engineering laboratory work.
Experimental investigation on electrical apparatus.
El. 503.-Advanced Electrical Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL. Prerequisite:
El. 317-318.
Laws of the electric and magnetic circuit; transient phenomena.
El. 504.-Electric Measurements. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
WEIL and STAFF. 'Prerequisite: El. 401.
Theory and practice of the measurements of electrical quantities with particular attention to
measurements in alternating current circuits.
El. 505-506.-Advanced Course in Communication Engineering. 3 hours. 6
credits. WELL and SASHOFF. Prerequisite: El. 305.
High frequency circuits and apparatus.
El. 507-508.-Radio Engineering Laboratory. 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
WEIL and STAFF.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 505-506.
El. 509.-Electric Power Plant Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL. Pre-
requisite: El. 411.
The relation of various machines in the power plant to one another, switchgear, control
apparatus, selection of types of units, construction problem. A part of this course includes the
design of the electrical end of a power plant.
El. 510.-Electric Transmission Line Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF.
Prerequisite: El. 401.
A study of the theory of transmission line circuits.
El. 511.-Electronic Devices. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF. Prerequisites:
El. 305-306, 318.
Vacuum, gas filled, and photoelectric tubes and their applications.
El. 512.-Symmetrical Components. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF. Pre-
requisite: El. 317-318.
The theory of Symmetrical Components as applied to the solution of unbalanced alternating
current circuits.
El. 513-514.-Electrical Engineering Seminar. 2 credits. WEIL and STAFF.
Lectures and discussions upon current engineering problems with summaries of articles
appearing in the current technical publications.
El. 516.-Meters and Relays. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
SASHOFF. Prerequisite: El. 317-318.
The fundamentals of design of electricity meters and relays, their types, principles of operation,
construction and care.
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Ig. 561-562.-Advanced Shop Layout and Design. 6 credits. YEATON.
Ig. 563-564.-Management Training. 6 credits. VAN LEER and YEATON.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Ml. 580.-Thesis Research. No credit in hours. EBAUGH, VAN LEER and STAFF.
Ml. 581-582.-Advanced Mechanical Design. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
6 credits. EBAUGH, VAN LEER or FINEREN.
MI. 583-584.-Mechanical Research. Variable credit. EBAUGH, VAN LEER,
YEATON and STAFF.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Ml. 585.-Advanced Air Conditioning. 3 hours. 3 credits. EBAUGH.
Ml. 586.-Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. EBAUGH.
Ml. 587.-Advanced Aerodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. THOMPSON.
MI. 589-590.-Advanced Mechanical Laboratory. Variable credit. EBAUGH
or STAFF.
ENGLISH

Eh. 501-502.-American Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. FARRIS.
A study of the prose and poetry of America as influenced by the historical background, and
of the English and continental literary movement.
Eh. 503-504.-The Novel. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON, CALDWELL.
This course centers in the study of both the historical development and the technique of the
English and American novel, but with attention directed to the European movements.
Eh. 505-506.-Modern Drama. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON.
A survey of the English and American fields and their connection with European movements.
In the first term, English and Irish dramatists are stressed; in the second, Continental and
American writers since the World War.
Eh. 507.-The Modern Novel. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROBERTSON, FARRIS.
English and American fiction of the last half-century.
Eh. 508.-Modern American Poetry. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROBERTSON, FARRIS.
Chief stress is laid on the work of Whitman, Emily Dickinson, and poets of the present day.
Eh. 509-510.-Chaucer. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON.
The Canterbury Tales and minor works; Middle English.
Eh. 511-512.-Anglo-Saxon. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON.
Anglo-Saxon grammar; reading of selections in Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader; the Beowulf.
Eh. 513-514.-The Renaissance in Italy and England. 3 hours. 6 credits.
CALDWELL.
A study of sixteenth and seventeenth century literature as directly and indirectly influenced
by the Renaissance.
Note: For those majoring in English, the foreign language requirement is either French or
German.
Eh. 0515.-Milton. 3 hours. 3 credits. CALDWELL.
This course is devoted almost exclusively to Milton's poetry.
Eh. 517.-Spenser. 3 hours. 3 credits. CALDWELL.
The poetry of Spenser studied in relation to the Renaissance.
Eh. 531.-A Critical Approach to the Study of Poetry. 3 hours. 3 credits.
FARRIS.
The history of important critical concepts; the basic facts and principles of prosody.

ENTOMOLOGY

Ey. 501-502.-Research. 3 hours. 6 credits. CREIGHTON.
Special laboratory, insectary, and field methods. A survey of the leading problems and methods
in certain laboratories; practice in the more complicated methods of research will be undertaken.
Ey. 503-504.-Problems in Entomology. 3 hours. 6 credits. CREIGHTON.
Problems in the various phases of entomology, as selected on approval of the instructor.
Require of graduate students registered for degrees in the department.
Ey. 505-506.-Advanced Insect Histology. 3 hours. 6 credits. CREIGHTON.
The outstanding histological metho's used in the handling of insect tissues.
Ey. 507-508.-Advanced Insect Taxonomy. 3 hours. 6 credits. CREIGHTON.
Collection, study, and classification of local economic insects down to families. In some one
group the individuals will be traced down to the genus and species.
Ey. 509-510.-Advanced Insect Embryology. 3 hours. 6 credits. CREIGHTON.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ey. 511-512.-Thesis Research. No credit in hours.
Required of all students majoring in Entomology.

FRENCH

Fh. 505-506.-The French Novel. 3 hours. 6 credits. ATKIN.
Fh. 507-508.-Special Study in French. 3 hours. 6 credits. ATKIN, BRUNET.
Individual reading and reports under supervision of the instructor, on selected topics in the
field of French literature and language.
Fh. 517-518.-Old French. 3 hours. 6 credits. BRUNET.
A study of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Old French; reading of selected texts.

GREEK

Gk. 501-502.-Homer-Iliad and Odyssey. 3 hours. 6 credits. ANDERSON.
All the Iliad and Odyssey and selections from allied poets.
Gk. 503-504.-Historians, Herodotus and Thucydides. 3 hours. 6 credits.
ANDERSON.
HISTORY
*Hy. 501-502.-American History, 1492-1830. 3 hours. 6 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. 503-504.-American History-1830 to the Present. 3 hours. 6 credits.
LEAKE.
Hy. 505-506.-English History to 1688. 3 hours. 6 credits. PAYNE.
*Hy. 507-508.-The Renaissance and the Reformation. 3 hours. 6 credits.
LEAKE.
Hy. 509-510.-Seminar in American History. 6 credits. LEAKE.
*Hy. 511-512.-English History-1688 to the Present. 3 hours. 6 credits.
PAYNE.
HORTICULTURE
He. 503-504.-Horticulture Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. FLOYD, ABBOTT.
A study of current horticultural literature and practice; assigned topics and discussion.
He. 505-506.-Horticultural Problems. 2 hours. 4 credits. ABBOTT.
A critical study of advanced problems in horticulture as given in recent literature; methods
used in experimental horticulture; results of experiments and their application.
He. 507-508.-Research Work. 3 hours. 6 credits. FLOYD and ABBOTT.
Specific problems in horticulture.
He. 509-510.-Special Problems in Refrigeration of Fruits. 3 hours. 6 credits.
CAMPt, FLOYD.
JOURNALISM

Jm. 503-504.-Special Studies in Newspaper Production. 3 hours. 6 credits.
No credit toward a degree allowed until entire 6 credits are earned. EMIG.
Jm. 505-506.-Special Studies in Public Opinion. 3 hours. 6 credits. No
credit toward a degree allowed until entire 6 credits are earned. EMIG.

LATIN

Ln. 501-502.-Cicero and the Ciceronian Age. 3 hours. 6 credits. ANDERSON.
Based mainly on the Ciceronian Correspondence.

Not offered in 1936-37.
t Member of Experiment Station Staff.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Ln. 505.-Virgil. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Mainly the Bucolics and Georoics.
Ln. 507.-Ovid. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Mainly Heroides and Fasti.
Ln. 508.-The Roman Satire. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Mainly Horace and Juvenal.

MATHEMATICS

Not all courses are given each year. Prerequisites to the courses should he determined
by consultation with the instructor.

Ms. 502.-Vector Analysis. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND.
The algebra and calculus of vectors in two and three dimensions. Applications to problems
in Physics and Engineering.
Ms. 511-512.-Introduction to Higher Algebra. 3 hours. 6 credits. SIMPSON.
An introduction to the theory of matrices, linear dependence, linear transformations, bilinear
and quadratic forms.
Ms. 518.-Theory of Groups of Finite Order. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMPSON.
Intro auction to the group concept, a treatment of the pure group-theory, and numerous examples
and applications.
Ms. 521.-Empirical Analysis and Curve Fitting. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND.
Derivation of equation to suit data. "Best fit" under given conditions. Use of various
graphical methods of analysis. Illustrated with problems from fields of botany, physics, chemistry.
Ms. 522.-Method of Least Squares, and Statistics. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND.
Probability; method of least squares; application ; normal frequency curves ; correlation factors;
handling of data.
Ms. 524.-Synthetic Projective Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
Pure geometry dealing primarily with properties unaltered by the processes of projection and
section ; principal theorems involved ; theory of poles, polars, involution, and kindred topics.
Ms. 525-526.-Econometrics. 3 hours. 6 credits. GERMOND.
The mathematical interpretation of economic hypotheses. Conclusions reached by mathematical
treatment and procedure. Mechanism for the comparison of conclusions with observations. This
course is concerned with the method of dealing mathematically with the material of economics,
rather than with the validity of the hypotheses and laws involved.

Ms. 534-535.-General Projective Geometry. 3 hours. 6 credits. KUSNER.
Development, from a simple set of very general postulates, of the properties of geometric
configurations which remain invariant under the transformations of projection and section. The
treatment is abstract, and serves as an introduction, both to modern geometry and to the postu-
lational methods of modern mathematics.
Ms. 536.-Foundations of Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
An investigation of the assumptions of geometry; the parallel postulate; steps leading to
non-Euclidean geometries; consequent development of modern branches of the subject; elements of
non-Euclidean plane geometry.
Ms. 551-552.-Advanced Topics in Calculus. 3 hours. 6 credits. KOKOMOOR.
Topics of advanced nature selected from the calculus, including partial differentiation, Taylor's
theorem, infinite series, continuation of simple multiple integrals, line and surface integrals,
Green's theorem, etc.
Ms. 555-556.-Functions of a Complex Variable. 3 hours. 6 credits. SIMPSON.
Fundamental operations with complex numbers; differentiation and integration theorems;
mapping; transformations; series.
Ms. 559-560.-Functions of Real Variables. 3 hours. 6 credits. PHIPPS.
The real number system; theory of point sets; rigorous investigation of many questions arising
in the calculus; Lebesque integral; infinite series.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special emphasis on
the changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching. No specific text is followed,
but numerous works are used as references.
Ms. 575.-Fundamental Concepts of Modern Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
SIMPSON.
An introduction to such topics as the number system of algebra, sets of points, group theory,
theories of integration, postulational systems, and non-Euclidean geometry. No textbook is used,
but many references are assigned.
PAINTING

Pg. 501-502.-Pictorial Composition. 9 to 18 hours studio. 6 to 12 credits.
DOOLITTLE. Prerequisite: Pg. 61 A.
Designed for students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced problems in pictorial
composition. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Pg. 523-524.-Oil Painting. 9 to 18 hours studio. 6 to 12 credits. DOOLITTLE.
Prerequisite: Pg. 61 A.
Designed for students who are qualified for advanced work in oil painting. LABORATORY FEE:
$5 each term.
PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY

PHARMACOGNOSY
Pgy. 501.-Advanced Histology and Microscopy of Vegetable Drugs. 2 hours
and 4 hours laboratory and field work. 4 credits. IRELAND.
Plant tissues and cell inclusions of importance as diagnostic characters. Detection of a ultera-
tions and substitutions and pharmacognostical description of new plants. LABORATORY FEE: To be
arranged.
Pgy. 521-522.-Special Problems in Pharmacognosy. 4 hours laboratory or
field work. 2 to 4 credits. Either term may be taken for credit without the
other. IRELAND.
Identification, classification, and qualitative determination of constituents and properties of
drug plants; special experiments in the propagation, cultivation, harvesting and curing of native
and exotic plants; field work in the collecting of drug plants native to Florida.
Pgy. 525-526.-Drug Plant Analysis. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory and field
work. 4 to 8 credits. Either term may be taken for credit without the other.
CHRISTENSEN.
Special problems in drug culture and in the isolation and identification of plant constituents.
The effect of climatic and soil features on plant constituents. Pharmacognostical characteristics
of new plants. LABORATORY FEE: To be arranged.
Pgy. 533-534.-Seminar in Pharmacognosy. 4 credits. Either term may be
taken for credit without the other. CHRISTENSEN.
Sources of information on crude druzs; study of current plant literature. Written and oral
reports.
Pgy. 551-552.-Pharmacognosy Research. No credit in hours. CHRISTENSEN.
Required of those majoring in Pharmacognosy.
PHARMACOLOGY
Ply. 512.-Advanced Pharmacology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CHRISTENSEN.
Theories of drug action. A comparison of methods of physiological assaying with applications
to evaluation of drugs and medicines. LABORATORY FEE: To be arranged.
Ply. 517.-Clinical Methods. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
IRELAND.
Modern methods employed in clinical procedure. A detailed study of normal and abnormal
metabolism with emphasis on blood and urine analysis. LABORATORY FEE: $3.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Ply. 551-552.-Special Problems in Pharmacology. 2 hours and 4 hours
laboratory. 4 to 8 credits. Either term may be taken for credit without the
other. CHRISTENSEN.
A comparison of methods of biological assaying. Special lectures and collateral reading,
laboratory experiments, oral and written reports.
Ply. 571-572.-Pharmacology Research. No credit in hours. CHRISTENSEN.
Required of those majoring in pharmacology.

PHARMACY
Phy. 502.-Selected Topics in Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A general study of the newer types of pharmaceuticals, such as vitamin preparations, newer
solvents, etc., with assigned readings on selected problems of current interest.
Phy. 503.-Advanced Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
Lectures and assigned readings on important pharmaceutical preparations, particularly those
involving chemical changes.
Phy. 504.-Advanced Galenical Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A detailed study of the fundamental research work on which formulas for various galenicals
are based.
Phy. 541.-Manufacturing Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A general study of the apparatus and processes used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on
a factory scale. A detailed study of selected technical problems of current interest to those engaged
in pharmaceutical manufacturing.
Phy. 553.-Synthetic Pharmaceuticals. 2 hours. 2 credits. FOOTE. Pre-
requisite: Phy. 354.
The preparation and chemotherapy of the more complex synthetic remedies.
Phy. 554.-Advanced Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. FOOTE.
Lectures and assigned reading on the pharmacy and chemistry of vegetable drugs.

PHILOSOPHY
*Ppy. 501-502.-Advanced Logic Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. ENWALL.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 303, 304.
Theories of thought and knowledge. Readings from the original sources. Papers for discussion.
Ppy. 503-504.-Advanced History of Philosophy. 3 hours. 6 credits. ENWALL.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 301, 302.
The problems of philosophy in the:r historical development. Special readings from the original
sources.
Ppy. 505-506.-Philosophy of Nature Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. ENWALL.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 303, 304.
Readings from the original sources. Papers for discussion. Man's relation to nature; the
various philosophical doctrines; animism, pantheism, materialism, realism, agnosticism, humanism,
idealism, etc.
Ppy. 507-508.-Hume and Kant Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. ENWALL.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 205, 301, 302, 303, 304.

PHYSICS
A knowledge of the differential and integral calculus is prerequisite to all the following
courses, together with Physics 321-322 or the equivalent.
In connection with the foreign language requirement, it is recommended that the student
present German, or German and French.
Ps. 503.-Kinetic Theory of Gases. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON.
The elements of the kinetic theory, the application of the theory to gases and liquids, the
electrical and magnetic properties of the molecules from the standpoint of the theory.
Not offered in 1936-37.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ps. 505.-Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
Statics of systems of rigid bodies. Motions of particles and of rigid bodies under constant
and variable forces. Assigned reading, problems, and reports.
Ps. 506.-Advanced Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
A continuation of Ps. 505. Introduction to vector analysis and generalized coordinates.
Ps. 508.-Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
The laws of Thermodynamics, chemical reactions from the thermodynamical standpoint, Electro-
chemistry, and the Nernst Heat Theorem.
Ps. 510.-Physical Optics and Spectroscopy. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON.
Prerequisite: Ps. 309 or equivalent.
The electro-magnetic theory of light applied to reflection, refraction, dispersion, polarization,
interference, diffraction, and the theory of optical instruments.
Ps. 513-514.-Advanced Experimental Physics. 6 or 8 hours laboratory. 6 or
8 credits. WILLIAMSON, BLESS, PERRY, KNOWLES.
A series of experiments on a particular topic of physics, a review of classical experiments,
or the development of an assigned experimental problem. The work will be assigned to meet the
needs and interests of the particular student. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Ps. 517-518.-Modern Physics. 3 hours. 6 credits. WILLIAMSON.
The electronic theory of atomic structure, the interpretation of the properties of matter and
radiation from the standpoint of this theory, and spectroscopy.
Ps. 523-524.-Seminar in Modern Theory. 2 or 3 hours. 4 or 6 credits.
STAFFS of Mathematics and Physics Departments.
Some particular phase of the most recent developments in theoretical physics is taken up in
detail.
Ps. 527-528.-Colloquium. hour. 1 credit. WILLIAMSON.
The most interesting papers are selected from the current literature in physics, and these
papers are reported upon by the students.
Ps. 551-552.-Thesis. No credit in hours. WILLIAMSON, BLESS, PERRY,
KNOWLES.
POLITICAL SCIENCE

Pcl. 501-502.-American Constitutional Law. 3 hours. 6 credits. LEAKE.
*Pcl. 503-504.-International Law. 3 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.
Pcl. 505-506.-Political Theories. 3 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.
*Pcl. 507-508.-Comparative Government. 3 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.
*Pcl. 509-510.-International Relations. 3 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.
Pcl. 511-512.-Political Science Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.

PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 501-502.-Readings in Experimental Psychology. 3 hours. 6 credits.
HINCKLEY.
Lectures and assigned readings in some of the more important fields of psychological research.
Psy. 505.-Advanced Statistical Methods in Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
HINCKLEY.
Studies in correlation, regression, and prediction, as applied to psychological measurement.
Psy. 506.-Psycho-physical Theory in the Construction of Tests. 3 hours. 3
credits. HINCKLEY.
Application of psycho-physical theory in the measurement of psychological and social values.
Critical discussion of Weber's Law, Fechner's Law, and the Law of Comparative Judgment. Special
attention is given to the problems of psychological scale construction and attitude measurement.

Not offered in 1936-37.










BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Psy. 508.-Advanced Comparative Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
A study of the intelligence and learning capacity of animals, with an attempt to formulate
and explain the psychological concepts of reflex, conditioned reflex, instinct, learning, memory,
intelligence, thinking, and motivation as problems primarily in nerve physiology.
Psy. 509.-Studies in Personality. 3 hours. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Lectures and readings in experimental studies of personality. Special attention will be given
to the clinical work of the personnel bureau.
Psy. 510.-Readings in Abnormal Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Lectures and readings on the various forms of mental disease, with special attention to
diagnosis and treatment.
Psy. 514.-History and Systems of Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
A critical survey of the historical development of psychology, with special emphasis on
representative writers and the more recent systems and programs.

SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 503-504.-Cultural Development of the United States. 3 hours. 6 credits.
BRISTOL, WELD.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 303-304.
Sy. 523.-Social Pathology. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL and WELD.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 323.
Sy. 524.-Crime and Treatment. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL and WELD.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 324.
Sy. 531-532.-Development of Social Thought. 2/2 hour seminar. 6 credits.
BRISTOL.
*Sy. 541.-Advanced Social Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 441.
*Sy. 0551.-Social Progress. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 0351.

SPANISH

Sh. 501-502.-Old Spanish. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite:
A reading knowledge of Latin.
Spanish Historical Grammar. Readings from 12th, 13th, and 14th centuries.
Sh. 503-504.-Golden Age. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor.
Lectures, readings, reports.
Sh. 505-506.-Contemporary Spanish Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPT-
MANN. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
A study of the generation of '98 and their predecessors. Lectures, readings, reports.
Sh. 507-508.-Spanish-American Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. HIGGINS.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Special study of Ruben Dario and the most important "Modernist" verse and prose writers.
Lectures, readings, reports.

Not otfered in 1936-1937.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


GRADUATE ASSISTANTS, 1935-1936

ANDERSON, JOHN, B.A. (Georgetown College, 1934)............................Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
BAIN, JOSEPH PAUL, B.S. (University of Florida, 1935) ........................ Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
BELLAMY, RAYMOND EDWARD, B.S. (University of Florida, 1935) .........Graduate Assistant in Biology
BLANDING, SARAH ELIZABETH, B.A. (Florida State College for Women, 1931)
-Teaching Fellow in English, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
COCHRAN, RONALD VERN, B.S. (Parsons College, 1934) ..............................Graduate Assistant in Physics
FEHDER, PAUL, B.S. (Columbia University, School of Pharmacy, 1932),
M.S. in Pharmacy (University of Florida, 1934)-----..........-......-------............Graduate Assistant in Pharmacy
FURMAN, WALTER LAURIE, B.S. (The Citadel, 1933)..................................Graduate Assistant in Physics
GILLIES, DWIGHT BURROWS, B.S. in Agriculture
(University of Florida, 1935) .......................................................Graduate Assistant in Agronomy
GREEN, WILSON PAYNE, B.S. in Mechanical Engineering
(University of Florida, 1931) .................................... Graduate Assistant in Mechanical Engineering
GULICK, HAROLD MARION, B.S. in Chemical Engineering
(University of Florida, 1932)......................... Graduate Assistant in Naval Stores Research
HAFT, ALBERT MATHEW, B.S. in Business Administration
(University of Florida, 1931)................... ..........................Graduate Assistant in Economics
HOBBS, HORTON HOLCOMBE JR., B.S. (University of Florida, 1935) ..........Graduate Assistant in Biology
HUNTER, WILLIAM PUTNAM, B.S.
(Clemson Agricultural College, 1933).......................................Graduate Assistant in Entomology
JOHNSON, ROBERT MILTON, B.S. in Civil Engineering, 1929;
Civil Engineer, 1931 (University of Florida) ... .. Graduate Assistant in Civil Engineering
JONES, GEORGE ROBERT, B.S. in Pharmacy
(University of Florida, 1934)........... ..... ..................Graduate Assistant in Pharmacy
KILBY, JOHN DAVIS, B.S. in Education
(University of Florida, 1934). .. .... ... ... ........ __...............Graduate Assistant in Biology
MACDOWELL, LouIs GARDNER, B.S. (University of Florida, 1933)........Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
MCLEAN, ANDREW P., B.S. in Pharmacy, 1933; M.S. in Pharmacy, 1935
(University of Florida)..... ............................. .................------------- Graduate Assistant in Pharmacology
McVoY, ARTHUR DUBOSE, B.S. in Architecture
(University of Florida, 1933) ........................................Graduate Assistant in Architecture
OVERPECK, BOYD H. JR., B.A. (University of Florida, 1935) .............. Graduate Assistant in Psychology
P8CKEL, IRVING, B.S. in Chemical Engineering
(University of Florida, 1935). ............................... Graduate Assistant in Naval Stores Research
REESE, JESS ALLEN, B.S. in Pharmacy
(Medical College of Virginia, 1930) .....................................Graduate Assistant in Pharmacognosy
ROGERS, HARRY AVON, B.S. in Chemical Engineering
(University of Florida, 1933)-................................ Graduate Assistant in Naval Stores Research
SMITH, MARSHALL EVERETT, B.S., 1932; M.S., 1935
(University of Florida) ......................................------ .................... Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
STEARNS, CHARLES ROBERT JR., B.S. in Agriculture
(University of Florida, 1935)......................... ................Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
STIRLING, WALTER WILLIAM, B.S. in Agriculture
(University of Florida, 1935)...........................................................Graduate Assistant in Horticulture
TAKAHASHI, NELSON, B.S. in Chemical Engineering
(University of Florida, 1930)............................. .....................Graduate Assistant in Chemistry

GRADUATE SCHOLARS, 1935-1936

ANDERSON, GEORGE W., B.S. (University of Florida, 1935) ........................Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
CALENDAR, KENNETH E., A.B. (Georgetown College, 1935) ......................Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
FEINBERG, IRVING, B.S. in Chemical Engineering
(University of Florida, 1935) ................................................ ............. Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
GRAMLING, LEA G., B.S. in Pharmacy
(University of Florida, 1935).........................................................Graduate Scholar in Pharmacology
HAMPTON, BURT LAURENT, B.S. (University of Florida, 1934)................Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
KITCHENS, BOZE H., B.A. in Education (University of Florida, 1935) ....Graduate Scholar in English
SANFORD, ROBERT M., B.A. (University of Florida, 1935)............................Graduate Scholar in English
STEWART, VINCENT E., B.S. (University of Florida, 1934)......................Graduate Scholar in Chemistry








70 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES

February 4, 1935

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE

HARRY JOHN BRINKLEY, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1932...... ................Jacksonville
Horticulture
THESIS: A Study of the Effect of the Length of the Daily Light Period upon Certain Growth
Reactions of the Plant and upon the Composition of the Tubers of the Irish Potato
(Solanum Tuberosum).
MATILDA A. ROESEL, B.S. in Home Economics, Florida State College for Women, 1927 ...................Ocala
Agricultural Economics
THESIS: The Role of Livestock in the Farm Live-at-Home Program.

MASTER OF SCIENCE

JAMES FREDERICK PAYNE JR., B.S. in Electrical Engineering,
The North Dakota Agricultural College, 1932 ............................ ..................Fargo, N. Dakota
Physics
THESIS: The Effect of X-Rays and Spark Discharge on the Dielectric Constant of Several
Organic Liquids.
MARSHALL EVERETT SMITH, B.S., University of Florida, 1932........ ............ .......................Tampa
Chemistry
THESIS: Derivatives of Piperazine II.
COLBERT WILLIAM WILKINs, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1933.... ..Hawthorne
Chemistry
THESIS: The Reaction between Sodium Hydroxide and Manganese Dioxide.

MASTER OF ARTS

BEN FERLOFF, B.A., University of Florida, 1929 ...................... ................................................... Tallahassee
Spanish
THESIS: Cervantes' Attitude toward Morals as Found in Don Quijote and Las Novelas
Ejemplares.


RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES

June 10, 1935

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE

VICTOR V. BOWMAN, B.S. in Agriculture, Purdue University, 1920.................................... Winter Park
Agricultural Economics
THESIS: The Relative Importance of the Grade-Lowering Factors of Citrus.

MASTER OF SCIENCE

W FRANK BLAIR, B.S., University of Tulsa, 1934 .............................. ...... ..................... Tulsa, Oklahoma
Biology
THESIS: An Ecological Investigation of the Marsh Rabbit of the Region of Gainesville, Florida.
KENT SMITH LITTIG, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1931 ........................................ Tallahassee
Entomology
THESIS: The External Anatomy of the Florida Walking Stick "Anisomorpha buprestoides
Stoll".
JOHN A. ROBERTS, B.S., University of Florida, 1933....... ............... .......................Gainesville
Chemistry
THESIS: A Study of the Reducing Action of Molybdous, Chromous, and Vanadous Salts.
CHARLES BASSEL SMITH, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1933............................... Fort Pierce
Mathematics
THESIS: A Study of Non-Analytic Functions.








RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES 71

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION

THOMAS CHAFER PRINCE, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1929................................Jacksonville
Education
THESIs: A Study of Special School Legislation in Florida.
ANDREW DOUGLAS RIPPEY, B.S., University of Florida, 1932 ....................................................Gainesville
Education
THESIS: The Participation of the State in the Support of Elementary and Secondary Schools
of Florida.
RICHARD WARREN, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1931 .................... ....................Lake Butler
Education
THESIS: The Activities Program of the Lake Butler High School.

MASTER OF ARTS

JOSEPH BLISS JAMES, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1934 ............................Clearwater
History
THESIS: Edmond Kirby Smith-Soldier of the South.
JAMES RUSSELL MCCAUGHAN, B.A., University of Florida, 1932 .................... .. .................. Gainesville
Economics
THESIS: The Regulation of Electric Light and Power Companies in Florida.
Lucy BELLE SETTLE, B.S., Florida State College for Women, 1927 ............... ............................ Gainesville
Sociology
THESIS: Use of Leisure Time by a Group of Florida Home Demonstration Women.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

LAWRENCE HARDIN AMUNDSEN, B.S., The College of the Ozarks, 1931.. ........................ Gainesville
Chemistry
DISSERTATION: Derivatives of Ortho-Aminophenol.
ELBERT Voss, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1928, M.S. in Pharmacy, 1930; University of Oklahoma
Pharmacognosy -Checotah, Oklahoma
DISSERTATION: The Histology of Cracca Virginiana Root.


RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES

July 29, 1935

MASTER OF SCIENCE

HOMER TODD TOWNSEND, A.B., Kalamazoo College, 1915.................... ................ ..Orlando
Biology
THESIS: The Biota and Environmental Conditions of a Northern Florida Sink-Hole Pond.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

HAROLD JOHN LYNCH, B.S. in Pharmacy, South Dakota State College, 1931;
M.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1932......................................Faribault, Minnesota
Pharmacology
DISSERTATION: A Comparative Study of the Pharmacological Actions of Natural and Synthetic
Camphor.


RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES

August 30, 1935

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY

ANDREW P. MCLEAN, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1933........................................Pensacola
Pharmacology
THESIS: The Assay of Veratrum Viride.







72 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
CARREL INGERSOLL TOD, A.B., University of Virginia, 1927.......................................................... Gainesville
Agricultural Economics
THESIS: Local Taxation with Special Reference to the Plant City Trucking Area of Florida.

MASTER OF SCIENCE
WILLIS ALFRED DUSTIN, B.S., University of Florida, 1933 ...................... ...........................Gainesville
Chemistry
THESIS: Conventional Constants of Pure Gum Rosin of Known Origin.
MARSHALL GLECKLER HOLLOWAY, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1933.................. Haines City
Physics
THESIS: An Experimental Investigation of the Coherence of Photons.

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
DAVID SMITH WESTBURY, B.A. in Education, University of South Carolina, 1925........................Melrose
Education
THESIS: Subject Combinations Taught in the Junior and Senior High Schools of Florida Over
a Ten Year Period.

MASTER OF ARTS
WILLIAM HARRY JOUBERT, B.S. in Business Administration, University of Florida, 1933..............Tampa
Economics
THESIS: A History of the Seaboard Air Line Railway Company.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
DAVID E. ADELSON, B.S., 1932; M.S., 1933; University of Florida ....................................................... Tampa
Chemistry
DISSERTATION : Derivatives of Piperazine III.
ALLEN THOMAS COLE, B.S., Hamline University, 1930; M.S., University of Florida, 1933....Gainesville
Chemistry
DISSERTATION: Derivatives of Piperazine V.
WILLIAM THOMAS FORSEE JR., A.B., Georgetown College, 1931; M.S., University of Florida, 1932
Chemistry -Gainesville
DISSERTATION: Derivatives of Piperazine IV.
ROBERT SHERMAN JUSTICE, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1930; M.S., 1933; The Ohio State University
Pharmacognosy -Columbus, Ohio
DISSERTATION: A Study of Several Species of the Genus Monarda.

SUMMARY

Number of Master's Degrees Granted in Regular Session 1934-1935................ ................... 17
Number of Master's Degrees Granted in Summer Session 1935......----------............ ................. 7

T otal for the Y ear................................... .. .............. ...............- ......................... 24

Number of Doctor of Philosophy Degrees Granted in Regular Session 1934-1935................ 2
Number of Doctor of Philosophy Degrees Granted in Summer Session 1935 .................... 5

T total for the Y ear.......- .................................... .. ..................... ......... ............ 7

Number of Students Registered in the Graduate School, 1935 Summer Session,
First Term .................. .................................. -----........ ........................................................ 100
Number of Students Registered in the Graduate School, 1935 Summer Session,
Second T erm ................................................................... ................................. ................... 60
Number of Students Registered in the Graduate School, First Term, 1935-1936.......... 108

Grand Total (Not excluding duplicates)..................... ..... ........... .......... 268








REGISTER OF STUDENTS


REGISTER OF STUDENTS, GRADUATE SCHOOL

1935 Summer Session


ADELSON, DAVID E., B.S., 1932; M.S., 1933;
University of Florida............................. Tampa
Chemistry
*ANDERSON, CYRUS E., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1934 ..........Jacksonville
Education
*BARNHILL, MIRIAM FITTZ, A.B., Rollins College,
1934....................... ................- ............---- H ollyw ood
Psychology
*BARSHELL, FRED H., B.S. in Education,
University of Florida, 1931 .............. Avon Park
Education
*BECK, Dow GARY, B.S. in Electrical Engineer-
ing, University of Tennessee, 1915; M.S. in
Engineering, University of Florida,
1932 ................................................................ O cala
Electrical Engineering
BECKNER, VIRGIL D., B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Missouri, 1924 -................. Tampa
Education
*BEEVER, FLORENCE MAY, B.S. in Education,
Florida State College for Women,
1934 ... -.. ..... .. ........... ........ St. Petersburg
History
BENSON, JOEL HARRY, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935..............Gainesville
English
BLENDING, SARAH ELIZABETH, A.B., Florida
State College for Women, 1931..............Bartow
English
*BOTTS, RALPH RUDOLPH, B.S. in Business
Administration, University of Florida,
1933.................................... ......................-- ..... T am pa
Agricultural Economics
*BRIDGES, CLAUDE F., B.S. in Education,
University of Florida, 1933 ................Titusville
Education
*BRIDGES, ERNEST, A.B., Furman University,
1917; M.A., University of Florida,
1930 .......................- .......... .................. E verglades
History
*BRYANT, ELEANOR, A.B., Florida State College
for W omen, 1926 ..................................Gainesville
Spanish
CAMERON, EDITH M. (MRS.), B.J., University
of M issouri, 1927 .................................. Gainesville
English
CAMPBELL, JAMES T. JR., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932 ..........--. Zephyrhills
Education
CASON, ANNIE LEE, B.S. in Education, Florida
State College for Women, 1930................Jasper
Psychology
*CHAPMAN, RUTH, A.B., Wesleyan College, 1920
Education -Carrabelle

Attended First Term only.
t Attended Second Term only.


*CHASE, ESTHER MARY, B.S. in Education,
Florida State College for Women, 1931,
Education -Jacksonville
CHENEY, NEIL SIMPSON, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932 ..-...-......... Gainesville
Education
*CHENEY, VIRGINIA MARGARET, A.B., Stetson
University, 1930...................Gainesville
English
tCLARK, CHARLES HENRY, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1934 ..........----.Bradenton
Education
*CLARK, VERNON W., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932..............Bradenton
Education
CLAYTON, ARCHIBALD L. JR., B.S. in Civil Engi-
neering, University of Florida, 1928
Civil Engineering -Jacksonville
tCOLBERT, PAUL FRANKLIN, B.A., Hiram College,
1925 ................. ... .........................--- ---- Tavares
Education
COLE, ALLEN THOMAS, B.S., Hamline Univer-
sity, 1930 ; M.S., University of Florida,
1933 ............... .... ......... ..........--- Gainesville
Chemistry
*COLLINS, ELDRIDGE RUTHVEN, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1934 ..............Fort White
History
CONROY, DANIEL JOHN JR., A.B., University of
M iam i, 1930 ................................................. M iam i
Psychology
tCORNELIUS, THOMAS BURCH, B.S., University of
Florida, 1931 ................... .......Haines City
Education
*CRANE, LESLIE BURDICK, A.B., Grove City
College (Pennsylvania), 1931........Lake Worth
Education
*CUMMING, WILLIAM K., A.M. in Education,
University of Kentucky, 1924........Denton, Md.
Education
*DAVIES, JOHN MARSHALL, B.S. in Education,
University of Florida, 1929..............Cross City
Mathematics
*DAVIS, WILLIAM BRYAN, A.B., Union University
(Tennessee), 1922 .............. ................ Ormond
Education
*DELAVAN, PAUL TUTTLE, B.C.E., University of
Michigan, 1912 .................................... Dade City
Education
tDEw, BERNICE L., B.A. in Education, University
of Florida, 1925........................................Alachua
Education
DEWEY, MARY IONE, B.S. in Education, Kansas
State Teachers College, 1925 ........Delray Beach
History








BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


*DOUGLASS, MAMIE RUTH, B.S. in Education,
Florida State College for Women, 1930
History -Tavares
*DUGAN, R. RUSSELL, A.B., Southern College,
1929 .................. ........... Arcadia
Education
DUGGER, LONNIE LEE, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1928 ............ Maclenny
Education
*DUNCAN, WILLIAM C., A.B., Wofford College,
1910 .................... ..... .......................... K ey W est
Education
*DURRANCE, CHARLES L. JR., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1934 ............ Pine Cassle
Education
tDuSTIN, WILLIS ALFRED, B.S., University of
Florida, 1933 ............ ........................... Gainesville
Chemistry
*EASTHAM, JEROME F., A.B., Berea College,
1931 ............................ ---..... ..... ......... L ake City
Education
EDWARDS, WILLIAM THOMAS, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932 ................ Titusville
Education
EFF, SAMUEL, B.S. in Education, University of
Florida, 1929 .... ....................---------....Lake City
Education
*FEAGLE, WILLIAM BARNETT, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935 ........ Lake Butler
Education
*FEHDER, PAUL, B.S., Columbia University
(School of Pharmacy), 1932; M.S. in
Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1934
Pharmacy -Jamaica, N. Y.
*FERNANDEZ, ISABEL MARY, A.B. in Education,
Florida State College for Women, 1929
Spanish -Starke
FINLAY, WALLACE BURNS, B.A., University of
Alabama, 1932............................. ....Blountstown
History
FISHER, CHARLES MONTGOMERY, B.S., University
of Florida, 1908 ..........................-------.............. Miami
Education
FORESEE, WILLIAM THOMAS JR., A.B., George-
town College, 1931; M.S., University of
Florida, 1932............. ... Gainesville
Chemistry
*FRIDY, ELLA INEZ, A.B., Southern College,
1923 ------- --.. ............... --- -- ............ .......Reddick
Mathematics
FULLER, MELVIN OTIS, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935.............. Clearwater
Mathematics
*GILLIS, ORENE, A.B. in Education, Florida State
College for Women, 1929..DeFuniak Springs
Education
*GOODRICH, MARY JANE, B.A., Agnes Scott
College, 1930 ....................... .... ......... City Point
English

Attended First Term only.
t Attended Second Term onl,'.


*GORDON, MARIE C. (MRs.), B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1934.................Miami
English
*GRAHAM, BURTON W., B.S., University of
Florida, 1935 ........................... .................N aranja
Chemistry
GRAY, LEON ARCHIBALD, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1922 ....................Starke
Education
*HAMBLIN, LESTER M., B.S., Lombard College,
1921 ............... .. .. ............... ..Lake W orth
Education
*HAMILTON, EARL E., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1934 ............ Chiefland
Education
HARRIS, CARL HENLEY, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1928 ............Jacksonville
Education
HARRIS, SARAH S. (MRS.), B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1928 ............Jacksonville
Education
HERRING, BARNARD E., B.A., Mississippi
College, 1929 ..... ..... ................ Clewiston
Education
*HILL, EDWARD JOEL, B.S. in Mechanical
Engineering, University of Florida,
1931 ...............----- ... .......... ..-- Tallahassee
Psychology
*HILL, J. CLARENCE, B.C.S., New York
University, 1931 ..................---- ----..... ...... Day
Education
fHOLLOWAY, MARSHALL GLECKLER, B.S. in
Education, University of Florida, 1933
Physics -Haines City
*HOUCK, J. F., B.S., Gettysburg College,
1914 ........-- ... ........................M oore H aven
Education
*HUYCK, CLEMENT LEE, B.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Buffalo, 1932; M.S. in Phar-
macy, University of Florida, 1934 Melbourne
Pharmacy
JACOBI, GERTRUDE FLORENCE, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1930 ............ Jacksonville
English
*JONES, GEORGE ROBERT, B.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Florida, 1934 ...................Archer
Pharmacy
*JONES, HOMER L., B.S. in Education, Univer-
sity of Florida, 1932 ..............DeFuniak Springs
Education
JONES, THEODORE REYNOLDS, B.S., State
Teachers College (Johnson City, Tennessee),
1932 .................. ---.. ---- ....................M adison
Education
JOUBERT, WILLIAM HARRY, B.S. in Business
Administration, University of Florida,
1933 ........... ..... .......---- -------- ..Tampa
Economics








REGISTER OF STUDENTS


JUSTICE, ROBERT SHERMAN, B.S. in Pharmacy,
1930; M.S., 1933; The Ohio State University
Pharmacognosy -Gainesville
*KIRTON, LAURA SCOTT (MRS.), B.S. in Educa-
tion, University of Florida, 1935
Education -Winter Garden
KITCHENS, BOZE HARRIS, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935............Pine Mount
English
tLANEY, HARRISON JEAN, A.B., Birmingham
Southern College, 1926 ..........................Apopka
Sociology
LEITCH, DANA TEMPLE, B.S. in Education,
University of Florida, 1934..........Lynn Haven
Education
*LIVINGSTON, ALICE MAE, B.A., University of
Alabama, 1934...................... ... ........ Gainesville
History
LORD, MILLS MINTON JR., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932....................Oviedo
History
*LOVELL, N. BROWARD, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1930........................Ocala
Education
*LYNCH, HAROLD JOHN, B.S. in Pharmacy,
South Dakota State College, 1931; M.S. in
Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1932
Pharmacology -Faribault, Minn.
*MCCLELLAN, ESSIE S. (MRS.), B.A. in Educa-
tion, University of Florida, 1930. Canal Point
Education
MACDOWELL, Louis GARDNER JR., B.S.,
University of Florida, 1933 ................ Melbourne
Chemistry
McLEAN, ANDREW P., B.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Florida, 1933 ................Pensacola
Pharmacology
*McVoY, EDGAR C., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1934 ..............Gainesville
English
*MAHON, DAISY BELLE, B.S. in Education,
Florida State College for Women, 1930
Mathematics -Arcadia
MANNING, JANIE STROUD (MRS.), B.A., Texas
State College for Women, 1923....Jacksonville
Education
*MARKHAM, JULIAN E., B.S. in Education,
University of Florida, 1931......................Eustis
Education
MEADOWS, CAROLYN HARRIS (MRs.), B.A. in
Education, University of Florida, 1928
Sociology -Umatilla
MOTT, THELMA P., A.B., Bessie Tift College,
1928 ...................... .. ..................... Gainesville
English
PIKE, MARY GEORGE, A.B. in Education, Florida
State College for Women, 1927................Miami
Education

Attended First Term only.
t Attended Second Term only.


tREDDING, CLIFFORD MCNIEL, B.A., Emory
University, 1925................... Okeechobee
Education
*RICE, ORA STAMPS (MRS.), B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1933..................Sarasota
French
*ROWLAND, LEWIS E., B.S., Colgate University,
1913 ........................................................ Zephyrhills
Education
tRuss, ILA CRAWLEY (MRS.), B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932........St. Petersburg
Education
SHAW, WILLIAM HENRY, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1929....................Raiford
Education
*SMEDLEY, WILLIAM GEORGE, B.S. in Education,
University of Florida, 1930...............Orlando
Education
*SMITH, EDMOND R., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1933..................Pahokee
Education
*SMITH, FOSTER SHI, B.A. in Social Science,
1924; LL.B., 1928; University of Florida
History -Hawthorne
SMITH, MARSHALL E., B.S., 1932; M.S., 1935;
University of Florida................................Tampa
Chemistry
*STALLCUP, WILLIAM DAVID, B.S., University of
Florida, 1934 .................................. St. Petersburg
Chemistry
*STARBUCK, BETTY-EVELYN WILLIAMS (MRS.),
Ph.B., University of Chicago, 1925
Psychology -Jacksonville
fSTEEN, VERNON C., B.S. in Mechanical Engi-
neering, 1927; M.S., 1931; University of
Florida ............... ..... ... ....... ......... E ustis
Education
STEWART, FRED KELSEY, B.A., Bethany College,
1922 .............. ....... .. ......... .... ....St. Petersburg
Education
tSTRINGFELLOW, MARGUERITE, B.A., 1924; M.A.,
1925; Washington University (St. Louis)
English -Gainesville
TERRY, CARROLL B., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932 ........ ... ....... Ocoee
Education
TOO, CARREL INGERSOLL, B.A., University of
Virginia, 1927 ..................................Gainesville
Agricultural Economics
*TOWNSEND, HOMER TODD, A.B., Kalamazoo
College, 1915 .................. .. ..... .......Orlando
Biology
TROTTMAN, WARREN ELLIS, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1929 ....Zephyrhills
Education
fTULANE, LIDA, B.A. in Education, University
of Florida, 1928 ..... ...... St. Petersburg
Education








BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


*TURNER, ELSIE A., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932................Leesburg
Education
VINSON, KATHLEEN TURNEY (MRs.), A.B. in
Education, Florida State College for Women,
1929..........................................South Jacksonville
English
WATERS, DAVID WILLOUGHBY, A.B., Stetson
University, 1922 ............. ........................... Tampa
Education
*WATSON, WILMA RUTH, A.B., Florida State
College for Women, 1925 .................Gainesville
History


WEINBERG, SYDNEY JAY, B.S. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935..................Sanford
History
WESTBURY, DAVID SMITH, A.B., University of
South Carolina, 1925 ................................Melrose
Education
tWHITE, MARJORIE, B.S., Wesleyan College,
1919-........................................................ Gainesville
English
WHITE, RUTH, A.B., Wesleyan College, 1916
English -Gainesville
*YON, SALLY, B.S. in Education, Florida State
College for Women, 1931 ....... ....Gainesville
Education


* Attended First Term only.
t Attended Second Term only.

REGISTER OF STUDENTS, GRADUATE SCHOOL
First Term, 1935-1936


AMES, BURTON WEBER, B.S. in Agriculture,
1923; M.A. in Education, 1932; University
of Florida............................................... Gainesville
Education
ANDERSON, GEORGE W., B.S., University of
Florida, 1935 ................... ................. ..Gainesville
Chemistry
ANDERSON, JOHN, B.A., Georgetown College,
1934 .......................---........................... Scarboro, Ont.
Chemistry
ARNOLD, P. T. Dix, B.S., Cornell University,
1924..........................................................Gainesville
Animal Husbandry
ARTMAN, LAWRENCE POLYCARP JR., A.B.,
Loyola University, 1935 ..................Key West
English
BABERS, FRANK HUBERT, B.S., 1926; M.S., 1927;
University of Florida; M.A., Princeton
University, 1929 ....................................Gainesville
Chemistry
BAIN, JOSEPH PAUL, B.S., University of
Florida, 1935 ..... ....... ........ ....... ...........Gainesville
Chemistry
BARBER, FRED WILLIAM, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1933................Pensacola
Agricultural Economics
BEASLEY, JESSE BRYANT, B.S. in Electrical
Engineering, University of Florida, 1928
Education -Starke
BELLAMY, RAYMOND EDWARD, B.S., University
of Florida, 1935 ..................................Tallahassee
Biology
BENSON, HERBERT J., B.S. in Business, Univer-
sity of Minnesota, 1925......................Gainesville
Economics
BENSON, JOEL HARRY, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935..............Gainesville
English
BLENDING, SARAH ELIZABETH, B.A., Florida
State College for Women, 1931..............Bartow
English


BOYER, KENNETH FRANKLIN, B.S., University
of Florida, 1935....................................Gainesville
Biology
CAIN, JOHN CARLTON, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1935..-.................Perrine
Botany
CALENDAR, KENNETH ELWOOD, A.B., Georgetown
College, 1935..........................Williamstown, Ky.
Chemistry
CAMERON, EDITH MCBRIDE (MRS.), B.J., Uni-
versity of Missouri, 1927 ..................Gainesville
English
CAMP, JOHN PERLIN, B.S. in Agriculture, 1926;
M.S. in Agriculture, 1927; University of
Florida .............----- ----......... Gainesville
Agronomy
CARR, ARCHIE FAIRLY, B.S., 1933; M.S., 1934;
University of Florida.............. ..-.......Umatilla
Biology
CLARK, ELMER BANKS JR., B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935 ..............Gainesville
French
COCHRAN, RONALD VERN, B.S., Parsons College,
1934 .................................................. Fairfield, Iowa
Physics
COPELAND, JAMES DEWBERRY, B.S. in Business
Administration, 1929; M.A., 1933; University
of Florida ...................... .... .Gainesville
Education
CORR, ALYS MAY, B.A. in Education, University
of Florida, 1929 .............. ...................... Gainesville
Sociology
CREEL, EUGENE MATHEW, B.S., Alabama Poly-
technic Institute, 1924........................Gainesville
Education
DALALIAN, HARRY PETER, B.S., Pennsylvania
State College, 1929-..............................Gainesville
Chemistry
DEAN, ARNOLD WALKER, B.S., 1929; M.S., 1930;
University of Florida............................Leesburg
Chemistry








REGISTER OF STUDENTS


DEEB, NASSEEF AUGUSTUS, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935............Tallahassee
Mathematics
DEw, JOHN HUGH, B.S., Davidson College,
1922 ....- ...........................Alachua
Education
DEW, LYNNE BERNICE, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1925 ..................Alachua
Education
DUKES, HUGH, B.S. in Agriculture, University
of Florida, 1934....................................... ...Dukes
Agronomy
DURRANCE, S. P. JR., B.A., Harding College,
1935 ................................. ................. Gainesville
French
EDWARDS, WILLIAM THOMAS, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932.................... Bartow
Education
Epp, SAMUEL, B.S. in Education, University of
Florida, 1929...................................... ..Lake City
Education
ELLIOTT, DONALD FREDERICK, B.A., Monmouth
College, 1931.................................Penney Farms
French
FAGAN, HENRY LORIMER, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1933................Apopka
Education
FEHDER, PAUL, B.S., Columbia University,
School of Pharmacy, 1932; M.S. in Phar-
macy, University of Florida, 1934
Pharmacy -Jamaica, N. Y.
FEHMERLING, GOTTLIEB BERNARD, B.S. in Agri-
culture, University of Florida, 1935
Chemistry -Winter Haven
FEINBERG, IRVING, B.S. in Chemical Engineer-
ing, University of Florida, 1935......Gainesville
Chemistry
FRIESNER, JOHN WESLEY, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1933............Lake Alfred
Horticulture
FURMAN, WALTER LAURIE, B.S., The Citadel,
1933 ..................... ............. Charlotte, N C.
Physics
GILLIES, DWIGHT BURROWS, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1935.-. Winter Park
Agronomy
GILLILAND, CHARLES HERBERT, B.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Florida, 1935 .......Gainesville
Pharmacology
GRAHAM, BURTON WELLINGTON, B.S., University
of Florida, 1935........................................Naranja
Chemistry
GRAMLING, LEA GENE, B.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Florida, 1935..............Plant City
Pharmacology
GRAY, LEON ARCHIBALD, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1922 .......... ......Starke
Education
GREEN, WILSON PAYNE, B.S. in Mechanical
Engineering, University of Florida, 1931
Mechanical Engineering -Reddick


GULICK, HAROLD MARION, B.S. in Chemical
Engineering, University of Florida, 1932
Chemistry -Tampa
GUY, ALFRED HUGH, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1934................Wildwood
Education
HAFT, ALBERT MATHEW, B.S. in Business
Administration, University of Florida,
1931......................................... .................. Gainesville
Economics
HALL, WILLIAM GARNOL, B.S., Alabama
Polytechnic Institute, 1935............Dothan, Ala.
Agricultural Economics
HAMPTON, BURT LAURENT, B.S., University of
Florida, 1934 ..................... .............. Gainesville
Chemistry
HEATH, ERRAH D. S. (MRS.), B.A. in Educa-
tion, University of Florida, 1933.. Gainesville
English
HEISHMAN, JAMES OGDEN, B.V.Sc., University
of Toronto, 1934................................Gainesville
Bacteriology
HOBBS, HORTON HOLCOMBE, B.S., University of
Florida, 1935 ........... ......... ..................Alachua
Biology
HOWARD, HOMER, B.S. in Education, University
of Florida, 1922............................Gainesville
Education
HUDNALL, FRANK SAMUEL, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1928......Jacksonville
Education
HUNTER, WILLIAM PUTNAM, B.S., Clemson
Agricultural College, 1933 ...............Gainesville
Entomology
HUYCK, C. LEE, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1932,
University of Buffalo; M.S. in Pharmacy,
1934, University of Florida..............Melbourne
Pharmacy
JANES, C. HOWELL, B.S. in Mechanical Engi-
neering, University of Florida, 1930
Mechanical Engineering -Gainesville
JOHNSON, ROBERT MILTON, B.S. in Civil Engi-
neering, 1929; Civil Engineer, 1931,
University of Florida .................... Gainesville
Civil Engineering
JONES, GEORGE ROBERT, B.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Florida, 1934........... ........Archer
Pharmacy
KILBY, JOHN DAVIS, B.S. in Education,
University of Florida, 1934....................Quincy
Biology
KITCHENS, BOZE HARRIS, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935 ............Pine Mount
English
KLOTZ, LESLIE JULIUS, Advanced Senior,
University of Florida......................Jacksonville
Electrical Engineering
LANEY, HARRISON JEAN, A.B., Birmingham
Southern College, 1926 ............................Oviedo
Sociology
MCCLANE, JAMES HUSTON, B.S., University of
Florida, 1935 ............... .......................Gainesville
Chemistry





78 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


MACDOWELL, Louis GARDNER, B.S., University
of Florida, 1933.............. ................ ... Melbourne
Chemistry
MCLEAN, ANDREW P., B.S. in Pharmacy, 1933;
M.S. in Pharmacy, 1935; University of
Florida.................................................Pensacola
Pharmacology
McVoY, ARTHUR DuBosE, B.S. in Architecture.
University of Florida, 1933..............Gainesville
Architecture
MAHORNER, SUE ALDERMAN (MRS.), A.B.,
Florida State College for Women, 1927..Ocala
Psychology
MARCO, MILTON BERYL, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1934............Jacksonville
Agronomy
MATTHEWS, DONALD RAY, B.A., University of
Florida, 1929 ............................ Hawthorne
Education
MATTHEWS, ELMER LAVERN, B.S. in Agricultural
Education, University of Florida, 1933
Education -Lake City
NEWBERN, COPELAND DAVIS, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1933..............Broo'sville
Education
NORRIS, LOUISE, B.S., Juniata College,
1934 ................ ........................ Johns own, Pa.
Biology
OVERPECK, BOYD HENRY, B.A., University of
Florida, 1935 ........................................ Orlando
Psychology
P6CKEL, IRVING, B.S. in Chemical Engineering,
University of Florida, 1935 .......... Gainesville
Chemistry
POTTS, JOSEPH DASCOMB, B.A., University of
Florida, 1932............... ... Gainesville
History
RAGAN, GEORGE LESLIE, Advanced Senior,
University of Florida ..................... Sarasota
Physics
REESE, JEss ALLEN, B.S. in Pharmacy,
Medical College of Virginia, 1930
Pharmacognosy -St. Charles, Va.
RIDENOUR, RUTH SHIRLEY, B.A. in Journalism,
University of Florida, 1934 ........... Gainesville
Sociology
ROGERS, HARRY AVON, B.S. in Chemical Engi-
neering, University of Florida, 1933
Chemistry -Panama City
ROGERS, LEWIS H., B.S. in Chemical Engineer-
ing, 1932; M.S., 1934; University of
Florida .............. ................ DeFuniak Springs
Chemistry
RUSSELL, ROY WILLIAM, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1935.......... .... Tampa
Sociology
SADLER, GLENDY GRAHAM, B.S., 1933; M.S.,
1934: University of Florida ................Mt. Dora
Biology
SANFORD, ROBERT MERIWETHER, B.A., University
of Florida, 1935............................... Jacksonville
English
SAWYER, WILLIAM L., B.S. in Civil Engineering,
University of Illinois, 1928............Decatur, Ill.
Civil Engineering


SHAW, WILLIAM HENRY, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1929 ...................Raiford
Education
SHEFFIELD, LEXINGTON ODETT, B.S. in Social
Administration, University of Florida,
1929................................. Raiford
Sociology
SHIRLEY, JOHN J., B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1931..............Bradenton
Education
SIMMONS, EVALYN MCNIEL (MRS.), B.A. in
Education, University of Florida, 1924
Psychology -Gainesville
SINGLETON, FREDERICK GRAY, B.S., University
of Florida, 1935 ................... St. Augustine
Chemistry
SMITH, EDWARD ROUSSEAU, B.A., University of
Tennessee, 1935 ...................... Knoxville, Tenn.
Bacteriology
SMITH, MARSHALL EVERETT, B.S., 1932; M.S.,
1935; University of Florida................. Tampa
Chemistry
STEARNS, CHARLES ROBERT, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1935 ...............Leesburg
Chemistry
STEARNS, THOMAS WESLEY, B.S., University of
Florida, 1934 ............... ........ ......... Leesburg
Chemistry
STEWART, VINCENT EVANS, B.S., University of
Florida, 1934 .............. ..............St. Petersburg
Chemistry
STIRLING, WALTER WILLIAM, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1935.......Ft. Lauderdale
Horticulture
TAKAHASHI, NELSON, B.S. in Chemical
Engineering, University of Florida,
1930 ................ ..... ............ ................ G ainesville
Chemistry
TENNEY, ADAM WEBSTER, B.S. in Agricultural
Education, 1930, University of Florida; M.A.,
Ohio State University, 1933. ............Gainesville
Education
THAXTON, KARL LEHMAN, B.S., University of
Georgia, 1935.......... ............................. Griffin, Ga.
Physics
THOMAS, TYRE SHEPARD, B.A. in Education,
University of Florida, 1932 ............Lake Butler
Education
THOMPSON, ROBERT ALDEN, B.S. in Mechanical
Engineering, University of Florida, 1932
Mechanical Engineering -Miami
TREADWELL, THOMAS A., B.S., Alabama
Polytechnic Institute, 1923................Gainesville
Education
WAKEFIELD, FRANCIS BRYAN, B.A., University
of the South, 1923............................ Gainesville
English
WALLACE, HOWARD KEEFER, B.S., 1929, Univer-
sity of Florida; M.S., 1932, University of
Pittsburgh .................. ......... W ilkinsburg, Pa.
Biology
WHEELER, BUREON KYLUS, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1932............Hawthorne
Education
WILSON, ESTHER BARNEY (MRS.), B.A., Albion
College, 1916....................................... Gainesville
French




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