• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Map of the campus
 Table of Contents
 Summer session calendar
 Officers of administration
 Faculty
 Admission
 General information
 Expenses
 Rooming facilities
 General regulations
 Colleges and schools
 Departments of instruction
 Questions and answers
 Dormitory information
 Permission to live off campus
 Admission information














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00334
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: April 1937
Copyright Date: 1939
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00334
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 81
        Page 82
    Map of the campus
        Page 83
    Table of Contents
        Page 84
    Summer session calendar
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Officers of administration
        Page 87
    Faculty
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
    Admission
        Page 91
    General information
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    Expenses
        Page 95
    Rooming facilities
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    General regulations
        Page 99
    Colleges and schools
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Departments of instruction
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    Questions and answers
        Page 131
        Page 132
    Dormitory information
        Page 133
    Permission to live off campus
        Page 134
    Admission information
        Page 135
        Page 136
Full Text




The University Record

of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of

%he University Summer Session

1937

First Term-June 14 to July 23
Second Term-July 26 to August 27


Vol. XXXII, Series 1


No. 4


April 1, 1937


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida











The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the Bulle-
tins of General Information, the annual announcements of the indi-
vidual colleges of the University, announcements of special courses
of instruction, and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply
for them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or
what information is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results
of research work. Papers are published as separate monographs num-
bered in several series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with
institutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence
concerning such exchanges should be addressed to the University
Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and
sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on
Publications. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies
not included in institutional exchanges, should be addressed to the
University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
The Committee on University Publications
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


[82]
























































[83]






TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE
M ap of the C am pus ...................................................................................................................... 83
Summer Session Calendar ...............-.- ...........8.5.-...........-.--.....- ...... .............--........- ... 86
Officers of Administration ................................................ ............ ................... ........................ 87
F faculty ................... ......................... ................................................. ...... ............................... 88
A dm mission -----........ --..- ..... .........- ...--- ..-.- .........- ..- ....- ...-- ..- ....... ...........- ....... ..... .... .. .-- ..-- 91
General Information 2............... ............... ...... .............--. .................. ......-- 92
Societies and Clubs ............... ............................ ................................................. ... 92
Employment Bureau .................. .....-...- ..........------...-..- .......--..-..--..................................... 93
Laboratory School .......................-................. ...-- ........................................................... 93
Students' Depository ............................. ...... ........................................................... 94
Loan Funds ............................................... ..... ....... ...... .. 94
Certificates and Extension of Certificates .................................... ..................... ... 94
E expenses .................. ..... ............... ............................................. ...................................... 95
Rooming Facilities ......................................... ........................... ............... ........................... 96
General Regulations .......... ........................................ ....................................................... 99
Colleges and Schools .................................................. ............................................................... 100
Graduate School --..........................---... ........- ..--.- ......... ..-- ..-..... ......................... 100
College of Agriculture ........................-.......---.......... .-....... --... .............................................. 100
College of Arts and Sciences ..-.--..-..-..-.... ......................................-..................................... 101
College of Business Administration -...................................................................................... 102
College of Education ................................................................................................................. 102
College of Law ................ -...--- .........-........ -- .. .............. ........................................ 106
G general C college ................... ............... ........................................ .............................................. 107
Departments of Instruction .....................-....................................... .......--..-.........................- 108
General College ................................ .................................................................................... 108
Agricultural Engineering .....---.----------...............------------..............----------------.........-----................... 111
A gronom y ......... .. -................. ..................... ............................. .... .. .....-.................... 11
Bacteriology and Botany ...........................................-- .......................................................... 111
Biology ..................................................................................... ........... 112
Business Administration and Economics ................. .................................................. 112
C hem istry ................................. ...... ... ..... .......................................... ............ ............................ 115
Civil Engineering ...................-........ ........ .....----- ..-............................................. --.......... 116
Business Education .......................................................................-.. ............................... 116
E conom ics ........................... ..--- ...-- ..- .... .....-..-.- ................ ........... ............ .... ... 116
Education ................-....................- .. ....-... ...........................-................ ................-----------... 117
E n glish ......................................... ... .. ............. ............... .....-- ... ..-- ............-..- .......-- 120
F rench ........................................................................................................................................ 121
G geography ..................................... .... .................... ..... ............................ ................................ 122
Handwriting .................................................................................. ............................... 122
Health and Physical Education ................................................ ............ ............... 122
H history ........................................................................... .......... ................................................. 123
Industrial Arts Education .....................----------...... --.-------....................................................... 124
L aw ............................................................................................................................................ 124
Mathematics ....................... ......--..--..-.................... ............................................................... 125
P philosophy ...................... .................... ....................................................................................... 126
P hysics .......................................................................................................... ............................ 126
P political Science .........................--......---....................... ......... ..................................................... 127
Psychology ........................... ....-----.........................................------............... .................................... 127
P public School A rt ....................................................................................................................... 127
School Music ..................................................................................-.......................... ................. 128
Sociology ..............................................................................................................................---- .. 129
Spanish ........................................................................................................................................ 129
Speech ..................------.............. ..... .... ................... ..... ..-- .................. .............................................. 130
Questions and Answers .................................................................................................................... 131
Dormitory Information Blank ...............................................................1....................................... 133
Permission to Live Off Campus Blank ........................................................................................ 134
Admission Information Blank .................- ...............-- .......................................................... 135


[ 84 ]






IMPORTANT NOTICE TO SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS

All who expect to attend the 1937 Summer Session at the
University of Florida must fill out the Admission Information
blank on page 135 and mail it to the Registrar, University of
Florida, Gainesville. Previous attendance at the University
of Florida does not waive this requirement.
Upon receipt of this questionnaire, the Registrar will send
a registration permit for the 1937 Summer Session if the ap-
plicant is eligible for admission. In order to save time and
confusion during registration, each person who expects to
register should mail in this questionnaire before June 1, 1937.
Upon request, blank questionnaires will be supplied by the
Registrar.

READ QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON PAGES 131-132.





IMPORTANT DIRECTIONS
TO STUDENTS
After arriving at the University:
1. If dormitory room assignment has been made, secure keys from the Head Janitor's
Office in Thomas Hall near the archway joining the latter to the New Dormitory. If
no reservation has been made, call at Office of the Business Manager, 102 Language Hall.
2. For outside rooming accommodations, see Dean of Students, 105 Language Hall, or
Dean of Women, 144 New Dormitory.
3. Cafeteria meal tickets may be purchased from the Cashier, 102 Language Hall, or
at the cigar counter, Cafeteria.
4. For information concerning social activities among women students, or any matter of
interest to women, see the Dean of Women, 105 Language Hall or 144 New Dormitory.


[85]





SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR


FIRST SUMMER TERM

June 14, Monday, 8 a.m. .............. Placement Tests (Room 106 Agriculture Building).
June 14, Monday, 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m..... Registration for First Summer Term.
June 15, Tuesday, 7 a.m. .................. Classes begin. Late registration fee, $5.
June 16, Wednesday ............................ Last day for registration for the First Summer Term,
and for adding courses.
June 21, Monday ................................ Last day for making application for a degree or diplo-
ma at the end of the First Summer Term.
June 26, Saturday .......................... Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be
designated as Honor Students.
July 3, Saturday ............................. Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end
of the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
July 14, Wednesday .........---...-........----------...... Last day for filing application for extension of certifi-
cate. Last day for dropping courses without receiv-
ing grade of E and being assessed failure fee.
July 23, Friday, 12 noon ................. First Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the
Office of the Registrar by 5 p.m.
July 24, Saturday, 10 a.m ......... ----...... Conferring of degrees and diplomas.

SECOND SUMMER TERM


July 26, Monday, 8 a.m ...........-......... Placement Tests (Room 106 Agriculture Building).
July 26, Monday, 8-12 a.m. ......... Registration for Second Summer Term.
July 27, Tuesday ............................. Classes begin. Late registration fee, $5.
July 28, Wednesday ...............-............. Last day for registration for the Second Summer Term,
and for adding courses.
July 31, Saturday, 12 noon .-..-........... Last day for making application for a degree or diplo-
ma at the end of the Second Summer Term.
Last day for applications to take comprehensive ex-
aminations in August.
August 5, Thursday .................... Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be
designated as Honor Students.
August 7, Saturday ............--........ Last day for graduate students graduating at the end
of the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
August 18, Wednesday, 5 p.m. .......... Last day for filing application for extension of certifi-
cate. Last day for dropping courses without receiv-
ing grade of E and being assessed failure fee.
August 27, Friday, 12 noon .............. Second Summer Term ends. All grades are due in
the Office of the Registrar by 5 p.m.
August 28, Saturday, 10 a.m. ............ Commencement Convocation.
August 23-28, Monday-Saturday ...... Comprehensive Examinations.


[ 86]





OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Acting Vice-President of the University, Dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences, first term
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Director of the Summer Session, Dean of the College of
Education
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
ROLAND B. EUTSLER, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Business Administration, second
term
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, Business Manager
ELIZABETH SKINNER JACKSON, B.A., Dean of Women
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Acting Dean of the General College
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A.. Dean of the College of Business Administra!ion, fil.t term
DONALD RAY MATTHEWS, B.A, Director, Florida Union
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean. Graduate School, first term
BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, B.A.E., Dean of Men
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Assistant Dean, College of Education, in charge of
Laboratory School
GEORGE CLARENCE TILLMAN, M.D., F.A.C.S., University Physician
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Dean of the College of Law
WILLIAM H ROI.D WILSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, second
term
ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION
MADGE FORSYTH BAKER, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Business Manager
LEWIS F. BLALOCK, B.S.B.A., Director of Admissions
DOROTHY WILSON GAUNT, Dietitian, University Cafeteria
J. B. GOODSON, Cashier
ELIZABETH VIRGINIA GLOVER, B.A., Secretary, College of Arts and Sciences
MAC G. GRIGSBY, Office Manager, Office of the Dean of Students
ROSA GRIMES, R.N., Head Nurse
GARLAND HIATT, B.A., Auditor
RICHARD S. JOHNSON, B.S. in Pharm., Assistant Registrar
PRISCILLA MCCALL KENNEDY, Chief Clerk, College of Arts and Sciences
GLADYS O'NEAL LAIRD, Librarian, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
ELIZABETH K. LYNCH, B.A., Secretary, General College
JOHN V. McQUITTY, M.A., Secretary, Board of University Examiners
CLAUDE L. MURPHREE, B.A., F.A.G.O., University Organist
BURTON J. OTTE, M.S., Curator, Chemistry Department
MARY E. PARROTT, Secretary, Office of the President
MARGARET PEELER, Housekeeper
IRENE ERSKINE PERRY, B.S., Secretary, Office of the Summer Session
ILA ROUNTREE PRIDGCEN, Secretary and Librarian, Law College
HELEN WATSON, Secretary, Office of the Business Manager
NANNIE BELLE WHITAKER, B.A., Executive Secretary, College of Business Administration
HOMER D. WINGATE, B.S.B.A., Auditor, Custodian Funds
LILLIAN WOOD, B.A., Secretary, Graduate School





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


LIBRARY STAFF
CORA MILTIMORE, B.S., Librarian
HENRIE MAY EDDY, B.A., M.S. in L.S., Assistant Librarian and Head of Reference Department
ETHEL DONAHEY, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Head of Circulation Department
JEAN ELIZABETH HASELTON, B.A., Assistant in Catalog Department
GWENDOLYN LLOYD, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Assistant in Periodicals and Binding
ELIZABETH T. JERNIGAN, B.A, Head of Catalog Department
MARION YOUNGS, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Assistant in Catalog and Reference Departments

FACULTY

ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D., French
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Chairman, Comprehensive Course C-I, Man and the
Social World; Economic Geography
DAVID MIERS BEIGHTS, Ph.D., Accounting
JOEL HARRY BENSON, M.A., Business Education
JACK BOHANNON, M.A., Industrial Arts Education
Lucius MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D., Sociology
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Animal Husbandry
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D., French
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D., Biology
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., English
WILLIAM GRAVES CARLETON, J.D., M.A., Comprehensive Course C-5. The Humanities
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D., Bacteriology
JAMES EDWARD CHACE, JR., M.B.A., Insurance and Economics
WASHINGTON AUGUSTUS CLARK, JR., M.A., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking
and Writing
FREDERICK WILLIAM CONNER, M.A., English
HENRY PHILIP CONSTANT, M.A., Speech
ALFRED CRAGO, Ph.D., Education
JAMES WESTBAY DAY, M.A., J.D., Law
FRANCIS MARION DEGAETANI, B.A.E., Spanish
SIGISMOND DE RHUDESHEIM DIETTRICH, Ph.D., Economics; Comprehensive Course C-2, Man
and the Physical World
CHARLOTTE DUNN, B.S., Kindergarten Education
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Economics
NORMAN ELLSWORTH ELIASON, Ph.D., English
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D., Philosophy
ROLAND BYERLY EUTSLER, Ph.D., Economics; Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the
Social World
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., English
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D., Agricultural Education
THOMAS NICHOLAS GAUTIER, B.S., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical World
HALLETT HUNT GERMOND, Ph.D., Mathematics
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, Ph.D., History
WILLIAM Louis GOETTE, M.A.E., Education
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., Chemistry
WILLIAM TROTTER HICKS, Ph.D., Economics
THOMAS JEFFERSON HIGGINS, M.A., Spanish
PHYLLIS HILL, M.S.S., Sociology
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Psychology





FACULTY


ARTHUR ARIEL HOPKINS, M.A., Speech
LILLIAN PAGE HOUGH, B.S.E., Education
HOMER HOWARD, M.A., Education
CHARLES ROY HUGHES, M.A., Political Science
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D., Chemistry
JOSEPH BLISS JAMES, M.A., History
KATHLEEN TENILLE KING, M.A., Education
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Physics
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D., Mathematics
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical World
ANGUS MCKENZIE LAIRD, M.A., Political Science
LILLIAN MAGDALEN LAWRENCE, B.M.E., School Music
JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D., History and Political Science
DOWLING BURRUS LEATHERWOOD, B.A.J., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking
and Writing
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Chemisty
WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, M.A., Education; Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking
and Writing
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Chairman. Comprehensive Course C-4a, Man and His
Thinking; Education
WILLIAM FRANCIS LOCKWOOD, B.A.E., Public School Art
CLIFFORD PIERSON LYONS, Ph.D., English
CAROLYN B. MCCLURE, Handwriting
SAMUEL W. McINNIS, M.A., Mathematics
IDA RUTH McLENDON, B.A.E., Elementary Education
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Economics; Comprehensive Course C-i, Man and the
Social World
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D., Education
INcORIE VAUSE MIKELL, B.M., Kindergarten Education
BURTON ALVIERE MILLIGAN, M.A.. Comprehensive Course C-5. The Humanities
EUNICE MINTON, M.S.S., Sociology
JEAN OLTMAN MITCHELL, B.A.E., Public School Art
EDGAR LEROY MORPHET, Ph.D., Education
WILLIAM EDGAR MOORE, M.A., English
ALTON CHESTER MORRIS, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking and Writing
CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, M.A., English
ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, B.A., English
CLAUDE L. MURPHREE, B.A., F.A.G.O., Music
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Education
RUTH BEATRICE PEELER, M.A., Elementary Education
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S., Physics
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D., Mathematics
EUNICE JEAN PIEPER, B.S., Elementary Education
ZAREH MEGUERDITCH PIRENIAN, M.S., Mathematics
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D., Chemistry
JOSEPH EDWIN PRICE, B.A.E., Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the Social World
EDWARD SCHAUMBERG QUADE, Ph.D., Mathematics
JOHN CROWE RANSOM, B.A. (Oxon.), English
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., English
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Agricultural Engineering
ELLIS BENTON SALT, Ph.D., Health and Physical Education
















BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


STEPHEN PENCHEFF SASHOFF, M.S.E.E., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical
World
WILLIAM LINCOLN SAWYER, B.S., Civil Engineering
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World
HARLEY BAKWEL SHERMAN, Ph.D., Biology; Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biolog-
ical World
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Mathematics
KENNETH GORDON SKAGGS, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking and Writing
DEAN SLAGLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
HERMAN EVERETTE SPIVEY, Ph.D., English
GRACE ADAMS STEVENS, B.A.E., Education
CLARENCE JOHN TESELLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Law
FRANK WALDO TUTTLE, Ph.D., Economics
BENJAMIN REMINGTON WELD, B.A., Sociology
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Psychology
WILLIE DEE WILLIAN, M.A., Speech
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Education
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D., Chairman, Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing; Education

STUDENT ASSISTANTS

JEAN TURNER BARROW, Civil Engineering
PAUL FRANKLIN COLBERT, B.A., Education
CARROLL FLEMING CUMBEE, B.A., Education
JEROME FLOYD EASTHAM, B.A., Education
OSCAR JOSEPH KEEP, Law Library
EDWARD VAN LAER LIPSCOMB, B.S., Bacteriology
WILLIAM JOSEPH McGUIRE, JR., English
VINCENT EVANS STEWART, B.S.. Chemistry










ADMISSION


ADMISSION

Students who have previously attended the University of Florida may continue in the
college in which they were registered. Transfer students who do not expect to work toward
a degree at the University may be admitted to one of the colleges or professional schools
of the University as special students (excep: that special students are not admitted to
the College of Law). Transfer students with at least 64 acceptable semester hours credit
of advanced standing may be admitted to one of the colleges or professional schools of the
University.
Women students transferring from other institutions of higher learning have the option
of entering the General College or one of the colleges or professional schools of the Univer-
sity. Teachers in active service at the present time desiring to take professional courses
for the purpose of certification may enter the College of Education.
All other students register regularly in the General College.

ADMISSION TO THE GENERAL COLLEGE

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the General
College:
1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required, although
no specific high school units are required.
2. Consistency of the high school record.
3. Achievement in high school.
4. Personal qualities.
5. Recommendation of high school principal.
6. Standing on Placement Tests.

All applicants should submit the Admission Information blank on the back of this
bulletin, and in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent to the
Registrar. These blanks may be secured from high school principals of the State. Appli-
cants for admission from other states may secure an Application for Admission blank
by writing the Registrar.
The Placement Tests will be given at 8 A.M., Monday, June 14, in 106 Agriculture
Building. All applicants for admission to the General College are required to take these
tests before registration.
COLLEGE OF LAW

Applicants for admission to the College of Law must be eighteen years of age and
must have received a degree in arts or science in a college or university of approved stand-
ing, or must have fully satisfied the academic requirements for a degree in a combined
course in the University of Florida. The College of Arts and Sciences and the College
of Business Administration offer such a course. Evidence of this work must be presented
to the Registrar of the University on or before the date on which the applicant wishes
to register.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GENERAL INFORMATION

TWO TERMS
The Summer Session of 1937 will consist of two terms. The first term will extend
from June 14 to July 23 and classes will meet five days a week. The second term will
begin July 26 and end on August 27. Classes will meet six days a week during the
second term.
LECTURES AND ENTERTAINMENTS
Adequate facilities for entertainments and lectures are provided in the auditorium,
which has a seating capacity of 1800, and Florida Union Auditorium. Stress is placed
upon performances by the students, plays and musical entertainments being produced
from time to time by students of the Departments of Speech and Music.

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The moral and religious atmosphere of the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading
religious denominations have attractive places of worship, and students are welcomed at
every service. Transportation to and from church is provided for students who will
attend. Frequent devotional services are held in the University Auditorium in connection
with the Student Assembly.
THE FLORIDA UNION BUILDING
The Florida Union is operated as an official social center for the campus. Director
D. R. Matthews will be in charge and will take pleasure in doing everything possible
to make the student's stay pleasant. Reading, recreation, and lounging rooms will supply
adequate facilities for social activities and for comfortable relaxation.

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
All students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly, which
will be held in the University Auditorium at hours scheduled below. Important announce-
ments will be made at the General Assembly, for the observance of which students will
be held responsible.
9 A.M. Wednesday, June 16
10 A.M. Thursday, July 7
8 A.M. Wednesday, July 28
9 A.M. Friday, August 13

SOCIETIES AND CLUBS

PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University
in 1912. To be eligible for membership, a student must previously have earned at the
University at least thirty semester hours credit, must have been guilty of no serious
breaches of discipline, and must stand among the upper tenth of all candidates for degrees.
Candidates for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor point average
of at least 2.00 on all scholastic work. If a student comes within the quota for his college,
an average of 2.00 assures his eligibility, but if he does not come within the quota, it is
necessary that he have an average of 2.30 or higher.

KAPPA DELTA PI
Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary education fraternity, in which only juniors and seniors
in the College of Education are eligible for membership.





GENERAL INFORMATION


KAPPA PHI KAPPA
Kappa Phi Kappa is an honorary professional fraternity for men. Students enrolled in
the College of Education with an honor point average of 1.5 are eligible for membership.

PEABODY CLUB
All students of the College of Education are eligible for membership in Peabody Club.
This organization meets weekly in Peabody auditorium, where instructive programs are
given.
ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN
An official mimeographed bulletin is published each day during the Summer Session.
It appears on all bulletin boards and carries notices of changes in schedule, meetings,
lost and found articles, etc. Students and faculty members should read the Bulletin daily.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Florida Union,
Peabody Hall and Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are
responsible for all announcements made in the General Assembly, on the official bulletin
boards, and in the Orange and Blue Bulletin.

THE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU

The Employment Bureau of the College of Education attempts to render a public ser-
vice. This is not mere mechanical routine of finding teaching positions for graduates;
the Bureau considers the welfare of the school concerned, and tries to get the right person
in the right teaching position.
There is no service fee for University graduates. Students who wish the help of the
Bureau may arrange an interview with the Director and submit complete credentials. On
request this information is sent to school officials of the State.
Many specific requests are received from district trustees and county school boards.
Every effort is made to furnish these officials with information that will enable them
to select the teachers most likely to succeed in the schools concerned.
Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the Director of
the Teachers' Employment Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville.

LABORATORY SCHOOL

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School will conduct a few demonstration classes in the
elementary grades and the kindergarten, during the first term of the Summer Session.
Provision will be made for four groups: kindergarten, combined first and second grades,
combined third and fourth grades, combined fifth and sixth grades. Application for en-
rollment should be sent to the Director of the Laboratory School as soon as possible, since
the number who may be accommodated is limited.
Registration of pupils will be held in Room 120 Yonge Building, Monday, June 14.
Classes will begin Tuesday, June 15, at 9 o'clock.
There are no fees charged for registration.

P. K. YONGE SCHOOL LIBRARY

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School library will be open both terms for use ot teachers
attending the Summer Session. This library contains over 3000 books for boys and girls





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


from the kindergarten through the twelfth grade. This material may be examined and
used in the library at the following hours:
8 to 11 A.M., 2 to 5 P.M. daily except Saturday
9 to 12 A.M. Saturday
7 to 9 P.M. Tuesday and Thursday
The regular librarian will be available for guidance and conference at these hours.

STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY

For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University,
funds may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of twenty-five cents is made
on each account, per term.
LOAN FUNDS
By means of the Florida State Scholarship Fund, the College Girls' Club Scholarship
Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan Fund, and the R. A. Gray Loan Fund,
the Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of women students
to help defray expenses in the current term. These loans are governed by the following
regulations:
(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school.
(3) Applicant must be in need of aid.
(4) Applicant must apply for Scholarship Loan at least two weeks before opening of a
Summer Term.
(5) Application must be made directly to the Director of the Summer Session.
(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in which she is
teaching at the time of application.
(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at a University of Florida Summer Term.
(8) Loans will be for a period not to exceed nine months from the day on which a Summer
Term begins.
(9) Loans will bear interest at the rate of 6%, which will be added to the principal fund.
Upon application to the Director of the Summer Session, blank forms for application
for a scholarship loan will be furnished.

CERTIFICATES
GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES

Graduates of the University are granted Graduate State Certificates without further
examination, provided that three-twentieths of their work has been devoted to professional
training and provided that they have satisfied the requirement of the law as to familiarity
with the Constitution of the United States. It is well for the student to note that a
Graduate State Certificate permits him to teach only those subjects that are listed on
such certificate, and that only those subjects will be placed on his certificate in which
he has specialized in his college course. This will ordinarily mean that ta subject must
have been pursued for at least three years in college, in addition to credit for all high
school courses offered in that subject by a standard high school, before a certificate to
teach such subject will be granted. The student who expects to meet the requirements
for specialization should familiarize himself with the regulations regarding specialization
as printed in the Handbook for Teachers, Section 1, latest edition, published by the State
Department of Public Instruction. Applicants for the Graduate State Certificate must
apply to Superintendent Colin English, Tallahassee, for application blanks and further
information.





GENERAL INFORMATION


Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by "presenting
satisfactory evidence of having taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under
a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of three holders of Life State,
Life Graduate State, or Life Professional Certificates." Application for a Life Graduate
State Certificate must be filed before the expiration of the Graduate State Certificate.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES

The following more important items govern the granting of extension of certificates:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended
and at the time formal application for extension is made.
2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no grade
is below a "C". At least one-third of this work must be in professional
subjects.
3. Courses in Education and all other courses which definitely apply toward
meeting the requirements for a diploma or a degree are counted as profes-
sional subjects.
4. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply
for the same on the student Registration Card. In case the student fails to
apply on the Registration Card at time of registration, request may be made
to the Registrar, Room 110, Language Hall, to have his application for
extension properly recorded. A list of those who have applied will be
posted on the bulletin boards in Language Hall and Peabody Hall not later
than July 1 for the First Term and August 10 for the Second Term. In
case of error in this list, students should report to the Registrar. No student
will be recommended for extension whose name does not appear on this
list by July 14 for the First Term or August 18 for the Second Term. Stu-
dents should register under exactly the same name that appears on the
certificate which they wish to have extended.
5. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to Colin
English, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida,
within a year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension
will not be granted.

EXPENSES
GENERAL FEES
Tuition -.............................-................----------------------- --.-------- ......... ....... ..................None
Registration fees, each term:
Florida students ............. ... ..... ......... ........ ........ ............ ........... $15
N on-Florida students ....................... ............- -.......-.................... ..................... 25
Extra hour fee-for each semester hour above normal load of six hours 1
College of Law (one term of six weeks) ......... .. ........... ..... --............... 25
($6 a semester hour for less than five hours.)
Late registration fee........................................................................................... 5
Infirmary fee (Required of all students) ........ ...................................... 1
Breakage fee for Biology and Chemistry --......---............................ 5
Failure fee, per sem ester hour................................................................................ 2.50
(For any course failed during last period of attendance)


Diplom a fee..........................................................


... ................................................ 5





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


FAILURE FEES AND EXAMINATION FEES FOR GENERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS
In lieu of a reexamination fee, a failure fee is charged for each failing grade a General
College student has received since he last paid registration fees. This fee is assessed
according to the following schedule and must be paid before the student is permitted to
continue in the University:
Each failing grade in C-1, C-2, C-3, C-4A, C-4B, C-5, or C-6 ............. $5.00
Each semester hour failed in all other courses ................................ 2.50
A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for each
application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary only in case
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned.
These fees will be assessed for the first time beginning with the 1937 Summer Session
and will be assessed at all subsequent registrations.

REFUND OF FEES

Fees paid in advance for room reservations will be refunded up to and including, but
not after June 1, for first term reservations, or July 1 for second term reservations.
If by Wednesday of the first week of each term students for any reason wish to with-
draw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded. No refunds
will be made after this date.


ROOMING FACILITIES

UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES

The University dormitories are reserved for women students during the Summer Ses-
sion. Rooms are rented for the term or session, payable in advance. The dormitories
will be open from June 12 to noon August 28.
Rooms may be reserved at any time by application to the Business Manager. A deposit
of $5 is required with each reservation, payable on or before May 1 for reservations for
the first term, and on or before June 5 for the second term. This deposit is held as
a breakage fee, to be returned at the close of the term if no damage to the room has
been reported.
All bedrooms are furnished with single beds and mattresses, chifforobes or dressers,
study tables and chairs. Students must furnish linen and other things they may require
for their own special comfort and convenience. Easy chairs may be secured at a rental
charge of 50c per term.
Students are not permitted to cook in the dormitories.
Students who are assigned rooms in the dormitories may secure special rates, listed
below, if they purchase at least one cafeteria meal ticket per term. These tickets carry
a monetary value of $15.00 and are sold for $14.25. A student is permitted to use them
as he sees fit. Under ordinary circumstances these coupon books will purchase meals
for a period of three to four weeks. The University is maintaining cafeteria service under
new management, which is proving most satisfactory to the students.
A description of accommodations in the several dormitories, with rates per student,
follows.






ROOMING FACILITIES


NEW DORMITORY

The New Dormitory is of strictly fireproof construction. Rooms are arranged in suites,
consisting of study and bedroom, and accommodating two students. A limited number
of single rooms and several suites accommodating three students are available. All rooms
are equipped with lavatories and built-in chifforobes. A bathroom with hot and cold
showers, and lavatories, is located on each floor of each section. Thus bathroom facilities
are made available for every four rooms.


RATES


Single rooms
Single rooms
Two room suites-
Two room suites-


-First, Second and Third floors
-Fourth floor........ ... ...
-First, Second and Third floors.
-Fourth floor ... -


When cafeteria book
is not secured
1st term 2nd term
15.75 13.25
15.00 12.50
15.00 12.50
12.75 10.75


When cafeteria book
is secured
1st term 2nd term
10.50 9.80
7.50 6.25
10.00 8.35
6.50 5.50


THOMAS HALL

Sections C, D and E have been remodeled throughout. Both single and double rooms
are available. All rooms in Section C and E and the single rooms in Section D are
equipped with lavatories. The rooms in other sections are arranged in suites consisting
of study and bedroom, accommodating three students. A bathroom with hot and cold
showers, and lavatories, is located on each floor of each section. Thus bathroom facilities
are made available for every four rooms.

RATES


*Single rooms, Sections C, D and E
*Double rooms, Section D .. ....
*Double rooms, Sections C and E .
Rooms in Section B ................
*Remodeled Sections.


When cafeteria book
is not secured
1st term 2nd term
14.25 12.00
11.25 9.50
12.00 10.00
9.00 7.50


When cafeteria book
is secured
1st term 2nd term
9.50 8.00
7.50 6.35
8.00 6.65
6.00 5.00


Sections A and F will be under rehabilitation during this period.


BUCKMAN HALL

Rooms in Buckman Hall are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom, and
accommoda ing three students. A bathroom with hot and cold showers, and lavatories, is
located on each floor of each section. Thus bathroom facilities are made available for
every four rooms.
RATES


When cafeteria book
is not secured
1st term 2nd term


When cafeteria book
is secured
1st term 2nd term


All rooms, exclusive of Section A* ......................... 9.00 7.50 6.00
*Section A is used for classrooms.

There will be no change made in dormitory rates, under any conditions.

SEE PAGE 133 FOR APPLICATION FOR ROOM RESERVATION.


5.00












BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA

The Cafeteria is now under the direction of Miss Dorothy Gaunt, a graduate dietitian,
and offers to Summer Session students high quality food at reasonable prices. The
meals are carefully planned, offering a pleasing variety of foods attractively served.
Many innovations have been made in equipment and methods, resulting in a service
as complete and modem as that found in any school cafeteria in the south.
All service is cafeteria style, affording individual selections. Our policy is to furnish
well prepared food at actual cost. Coupon books containing tickets with a monetary value
will be sold at a discount sufficient to warrant their purchase.
Meals may be obtained at the University Cafeteria at the following rates:
$15.00 monetary value coupon ticket ........................................ $14.25
5.00 monetary value coupon ticket ...........------------....................... 4.75

OFF CAMPUS ROOMING ACCOMMODATIONS

ROOMING REQUIREMENTS FOR WOMEN STUDENTS

1. In order to complete registration all women students must have a place of residence
approved by the Dean of Students.
2. All women students will live in the dormitories, with the exceptions that graduate
students and others over 21 years of age who have been self-supporting may be permitted
to live in approved rooming houses after making proper arrangements with the Office
of the Dean of Students.
3. Request to live off campus should be made to the Office of the Dean of Students, on
form provided by that office, and will contain the following information: age, record
of employment for past year, address of rooming house in which student wishes to
reside, and reasons why rooming off campus will be of advantage to the student.
4. A list of approved rooming houses will be available at the Office of the Dean of
Students. In order to avoid inconvenience and possible unpleasantness students are
urged to consult this list before making any definite arrangements for a place of resi-
dence off campus.
5. Approved rooming houses will not be allowed to house both men and women except
in the case of married couples, and for these a special list of approved places will
be made.
SEE PAGE 134 FOR APPLICATION WHICH MUST BE FILLED OUT, AND
MAILED TO THE DEAN OF STUDENTS.





GENERAL REGULATIONS


GENERAL REGULATIONS
The student is advised to procure the University bulletin entitled By-Laws and acquaint
himself with all general regulations. Particular attention is invited to the following items:

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two regular
terms, or one regular term and three summer terms, or five summer terms. New students
offering advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the University.
Students who break their residence at the University by attending another institution for
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University.
2. For the master's degree two regular terms or six summer terms are necessary to
satisfy the residence requirements.
3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (27 for the Normal
Diploma; 28 in the College of Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during
regular residence in the college from which the student is to be graduated. Exception
to this regulation may be made only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the
college concerned, but in no case may the amount of' extension work permitted exceed
more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required for a baccalaureate degree.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED
No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree
by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be allowed to take
more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's degree by correspondence
study or extension class work. No person will be allowed to take more than 9 credits by
correspondence during the summer vacation period. While in residence, a student will
not be allowed to take work by correspondence without the consent of the dean. Tins will
be granted only in exceptional cases. Candidates for the Normal Diploma may not take
more than 16 credits by correspondence and extension.
MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
The minimum load of any student in a summer term is four hours.
The maximum load, including work by correspondence and extension, shall be regulated
according to the following schedule:
Maximum Load
Honor Point Average for Previous Term Summer Term
Below 1 .............................. ..--......--............................................. 6 hours
1 or above ........... ... .................. ............................................. 9 hours
For students who have not previously attended the University of Florida the maximum
load is nine hours, provided the previous record is satisfactory.
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dean of their
college, regarding choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to this,
juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which they expect
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be
dropped or changed only through the office of the dean of the college in which the student
is registered.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The major courses are regularly numbered above 500 and the minors between 300 and
500, but there is no objection to counting a course above 500 in one department as a minor
in another. On the other hand, there are courses numbered 300 and 400 which are not
acceptable as minors.
As a general practice, undergraduate students are not permitted to register for courses
numbered above 500.
A number of courses have already been arranged that may count as majors. Efforts
will be made to arrange still others upon request. If the major work wished is not listed,
requests for it should be made at an early date.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

A candidate for the master's degree must be in residence for at least one scholastic year,
devoting his entire time during this period to study and research. The Summer Session of
eleven weeks will count as one-third of a year. One-half of this term will be one-sixth
of a year.
Work Required.-The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program with a
definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester hours or the equivalent, at least half
of which shall be in a single field of study and the remainder in related subject matter as
determined by the student's Supervisory Committee. The principal part of the course
work for the master's degree shall be designated strictly,, for graduates. However, in the
case of related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be offered upon the
approval of the Supervisory Committee.
In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em-
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer.
A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely allied to the major
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. The
thesis itself should be completed and submitted in time to allow an interval of three
full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the summer term.
The requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the discretion
of the Student's Supervisory Committee.
The passing grade for graduate students is B.
The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from the time
of first registering for graduate work. For summer session students this means seven
summers.
For requirements for the Ph.D. degree and other information in regard to graduate work
see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

The courses offered by the College of Agriculture are given the first term only. Special
emphasis is placed on technical agricultural subjects. Non-agricultural subjects required
for the above degrees may be taken in departments of other colleges.





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

The College of Arts and Sciences operates in every term. During the Summer Session
most of its departments offer basic courses, and many offer advanced courses. Inasmuch
as most of the subjects taught in the public schools are continued on the college level
by departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, this college is of particular service
to the teachers of the State. Others who profit particularly by the operation of the College
of Arts and Sciences in the Summer Session are students of the College who wish either
to make up deficiencies or to hasten graduation, students of other collegiate institutions
and of other colleges of the University who wish to complete basic arts and sciences
requirements or electives, and men and women who spend their vacations in attendance
at the University for the purpose of securing new points of view and renewed intellectual
vigor.
HONORS GRADUATION

For information concerning graduation with Honors or graduation with High Honors,
see the Bulletin of By-Laws.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS

In the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts special emphasis is placed
upon the humanities and the social sciences. Requirements for the degree of Bachelor
of Arts include at least two years of college foreign language work beyond the level of
the basic year-course; English composition and rhetoric; a survey of the literature of the
Western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance; one year of college mathematics;
a full year-course in a laboratory science; a major in one of the subject-matter fields of
French, German, Greek, Latin, Spanish, Bible, Economics, English, History, History and
Political Science, Journalism, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Speech,
Mathematics; and two minors or a double minor. For complete information concerning
the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, see the Bulletin of Information for
the Colleges and Professional Schools of the Upper Division.

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Students interested primarily in the sciences should select the curriculum leading
to the degree of Bachelor of Science. Requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science
include basic year-courses in two laboratory sciences; basic mathematics through analytic
geometry; a major in one of the subject-matter fields of Bacteriology, Biology, Botany,
Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology; two minors or a double minor; English
composition and rhetoric; and at least one year of college foreign language work beyond
the level of the basic year-course. For complete information concerning the requirements
for the degree of Bachelor of Science, see the Bulletin of Information for the Colleges
and Professional Schools of the Upper Division.

THE PRE-LAW COURSE

In cooperation with the College of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences offers the
pre-law course. This course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or to the degree
of Bachelor of Science upon completion of the first full year of the law course (28 semester
credit hours and 28 honor points), and to the degree of Bachelor of Laws upon completion
of the law course. For students who make adequate scholastic progress it is possible to
earn the academic and law degrees in six years, of which two years are spent in the
General College, one in the College of Arts and Sciences, and three in the College of Law.







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES

Students who upon graduation from the General College have not completed require-
ments for admission to the medical and dental schools may continue and complete their
pre-professional training in the College of Arts and, Sciences. The student should select
courses in accordance with requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes
to enter, and should correspond with the dean of that school for information and advice.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The College of Business Administration will operate during the Summer Session as during
the regular terms. The courses offered will appeal to students attending the regular terms
who wish to return during the Summer Session, and to teachers and others who wish to take
courses to prepare for teaching commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare for
teaching social sciences.
Attention of teachers attending the first term is especially invited to Bs. 285, Principles
of Human Geography.
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

DEGREES OFFERED
Students completing any of the prescribed four-year courses may obtain the respective
degree: i.e., Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Education, Bachelor of
Science in Agricultural Education, Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education,
or Bachelor of Arts in Health and Physical Education.
Students completing the prescribed course may obtain the Normal Diploma.

MAJORS AND MINORS

In the following discussion a major is defined to consist of 18 credit hours above the
elementary year-course in a subject other than Education. A minor is ordinarily defined
to consist of 9 credit hours above the elementary year-course in a subject other than
Education, but in case the number of hours thus specified is not sufficient to meet the
requirements necessary for certification, the student should take enough additional hours
to meet these requirements.
One major and two minors or one major and a double minor are required of students
in the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education or Bachelor of
Science in Education.

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA AND TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
t (Discontinued after August, 1937)

Lower Division

Leading to the Normal Diploma. For Those Who Expect to Teach in First Six Grades

CREDITS
Education ..................--............-.......... -----. ............- ........-...... 20

tStudents who have started this curriculum may continue it. Adult students upon request
may register for this curriculum.


102





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


This must include:
En. 103-Health Education, or equivalent.
SEn. 121-Language Arts Teaching in the Elementary School
or
En. 124-Mathematics Teaching in the Elementary School
En. 122-The Techniques of Teaching Reading.
En. 201-The Teaching of the Social Sciences in the Intermediate Grades
or
En. 221-Remedial and Directed Reading.
En. 207-Educational Psychology.
En. 209-The Teaching of Sciences in the First Six Grades.
I En. 253-Observation of Teaching.
or
En. 308-The Elementary School Curriculum.
General Natural Science 101-102, or C-2, or C-6 ............................... ................. 8
Sociology 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies, or C-I ....-................... 6 or 8
English 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition, or C-3 ........--.....- ..-..........-.........-.. 6 or 8
Public School A rt...................................... ......................................... ...................... 4
School M music ..... ................... ... ........- .........- ...- ..- .... -.. -...... ................ 4
Handwriting 101 .......... ................................ ... ................ 0
M major and M inors -.............. ... ..... ...-- ... .... .... ........... ............. 14

Total credits needed ............................................._. 66

Upper Division
Education ............................................. ........... ............................................... 12
This must include:
En. 308*-The Elementary School Curriculum.
En. 319 -Child and Adolescent Psychology.
Complete one major** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives
approved by the Dean....................................... .......................................... 54

Total credits needed in upper division............................................................. 66
Total credits and Honor Points................................................................................... 132

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
t (Discontinued after August, 1937)
For Those Who Expect to Teach in the Junior and Senior High School

Lower Division
CREDITS
Education ......... ................................................................... ... ....... ...... 6
This must include:
En. 101-Introduction to Education.
En. 207-Educational Psychology.
English 101-102-Rhetoric and Composi.ion, or C-3 ............. ......-.. --- 4,5, or 6
English 103-104-Introduction to Literature................. ................................. 4,5, or 6
General Natural Science 101-102, or C-2, or C-6 .......-----.......... ................. 8
Sociology 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies, or C-1 ................. .... ...... 4,5,6, or 8
Speech 201-Public Speaking, or C-3H ........... ............... -----.... .......... 2,3, or 4
Major and minors and electives approved by the Dean ......................................... 31-40

Total credits and honor points needed in Lower Division........ .......... 66
*En. 808 is required of all students who have not taken En. 200. Students who have taken
En. 200 will not be permitted to take En. 308.
**For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the natural
sciences.
tStudents who have started this curriculum may continue it. Adult students upon request
may register for this curriculum.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Upper Division
Education ......................................-----------------------..............................................................------------.................. 21
*This must include:
En. 319-Child and Adolescent Psychology.
En. 323-General Methods.
En. 403-Problem-Project Method.
Supervised Student Teaching (two courses).
Complete one major** and two minors (or a double minor) and electives
approved by the Dean............................................................................................... 45

Total credits and honor points needed in Upper Division............................. 66
Total Credits and Honor Points s...................................................................................... 132

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA
t(Discontinued after August, 1937)
If, while the student is working on the curriculum leading to a bachelor's degree, he
desires to secure the Normal Diploma, he may do so when he has satisfactorily completed
the following work:
E education ............................................................... --................... ......................................... 12
This must include:
En. 101-Introduction to Education.
En. 207-Educational Psychology.
En. 323-General Methods in the Secondary School.
Supervised Teaching (one course)
English 101-102-Rhetoric and Composition, or C-3 ............................................... 6 or 8
English 103-104- Introduction to Literature ............................................................... 4,5, or 6
$General Natural Science 101-102, or C-2, or C-6 .........------------......................................... 8
Sociology 111-112-Introduction to Social Studies, or C-1 ...................................... 4,5,6, or 8
M ajor and m inors............................................................................................................ 28- 34

Total credits and honor points needed for Normal Diploma............................ 66
For the curriculum in Health and Physical Education, the student is referred to the
Bulletin of Information for the Colleges and Professional Schools of the Upper Division.

NEW CURRICULA
(Effective September 1, 1937)
CURRICULA IN THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
EDUCATION AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
For admission to the College of Education all students will be required to present a
certificate of graduation from the General College, or its equivalent, and have the approval
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTAIN GROUPS
Certain additional requirements for admission are specified for admission to the curricula
in Health and Physical Education, Agricultural Education, and Industrial Arts Education.
For these requirements, see page 187 of the Bulletin of Information for the General College.

*In addition to the courses listed above, students preparing to become principals must take
En. 305, 817, and 401, or 406 or 408.
**For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the
natural sciences.
These two courses must be selected in accordance with the major and two minors in which
the student is working.
tStudents who have started this curriculum may continue it. Adult students upon request
may register for this curriculum.
$Students who major or minor in natural science are not required to take Gl. 101-102. It
may be taken as an elective.






COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


DECREES

Only two degrees are offered in the College of Education-Bachelor of Arts in Education
and Bachelor of Science in Education.* The former degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor
of Science in Health and Physical Education, Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education,
and Bachelor of Science in Industrial Arts Education are incorporated in these two degrees.
For either degree the student is required to complete 60 semester hours, with 60 honor
points, at least 18 resident hours of which must be in Education and the remaining hours ol
which will be elected by the student in conference with his advisory committee. In every
case, the student must complete at least 24 semester hours in a subject or field of concern
tration, to be eligible for graduation.
All students except those whose fields of concentration are Health and Physical Education,
Agricultural Education, or Industrial Arts Education, will be graduated upon completion
of the following curriculum:

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
IN EDUCATION

(For those who expect to teach in the junior and senior high school)


First Semester


Credits Courses
Junior Year


En. 375 -Directed Observation and
Teaching ..................... .... 3
En. 385 -The Indivi'ual and Education 2
E lectives ... ....... ........... ...... 10


Second Semester


Credits


En. 376 -Directed Observation and
Teaching .................................. 3
En. 386 -The Individual and Education 2
Electives ...................---- -----............... 10


En. 421 -Directed Teaching ...
En. 491 -Education and the
Social Order ........
Electives .....................


Senior Year
.............. 2 En. 422 -Directed Teaching ................... 2
En. 492 -Educational Conceptions ........ 2
............. 2 E lectives ..................................... 11
11


CURRICULUM FOR THOSE WHOSE FIELD OF CONCENTRATION IS HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Junior Year


En. 375
En. 385
HP1. 315
HPI. 321
HPI. 353


-Directed Observation and
Teaching ................................
-The Individual and Education
-Administration of Health and
Physical Education ..............
-The Physical Education
Program in Schools ............
-Practice in Conducting an
Intramural Program ............
Electives ........................


En. 376 -Directed Observation and
Teaching .................. ........
En. 386 -The Individual and Education
HPI. 316 -Principles of Health Educa-
tion ............. ...................
HPI. 322 -The Physical Education
Program in Schools .............
E lectives ......................................


Senior Year


En. 421 -Directed Teaching ..................
En. 0492 -Educational Conceptions .......
HPI. 401 -Principles of Athletic Coach-
ing ........................ ..................
Electives ...................................


En. 0491
En.
HPl. 341
HPI. 402


-Education and the Social
Order ... ........... ..............
Electives ..........-- ................
-Principles of Physical
Education ...........................
-Principles of Athletic
Coaching ......................
Electives ..------------ ..........-------------


*F'or the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the Natural
Sciences.
tDirected Observation and Teaching in the junior year to be in student's minor field.


Courses






i BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CURRICULUM FOR THOSE WHOSE FIELD OF CONCENTRATION IS AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION

Junior Year


-Farm Management ............. 3
-Farm Shop ................................ 3
-Soils .......................................... 3
-Methods of Teaching Agricul-
ture .......................................... 3
-The Individual and
Education .............................. 2
-Poultry Practices .................... 1


Senior Year
-Supervised Teaching in As.
Vocational Agriculture ...... 3 Ay.
-Plant Materials ...................... 3 En.
-Poultry Management ............. 3
-Livestock Diseases and Py.
Farm Sanitation .................... 2
*E lectives .......... .......................... 4


-Methods of Teaching
Agriculture .-....-.. ... -
-Vocational Education ..
-The Individual and Education
-Olericulture .. ...............
-Poultry Practices ................
Electives .....-. .......




-Marketing .........................
-Fertilizers and Manures ........
-Supervised Teaching in
Vocational Agriculture ...
-Poultry Management ..............
*Electives ...................---- .. ..


CURRICULUM FOR THOSE WHOSE FIELD OF CONCENTRATION IS INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION


First Semester
Credits Courses
Junior Year
-Directed Observation and En. 3'
Teaching .............................. 3
-The Inaividual and Education 2 En. 3:
-Design and Construction in In. 3S
Sheet M etal ............................ 3 In. 3
-General Machine Shop and
Metal Work .................... 3
E lectives ..................................... 5
16
Senior Year
-Directed Teaching ................... 2 En. 4'
-Education and the En.
Social Order .......................... 2 In. 4
-Architectural Drawing for In. 4
Industrial Arts Teachers.... 3
-Design and Construction in
Wood and Concrete .............. 3
E lectives ............ ....................... 4


Second Semester


Credits


-Directed Observation and
Teaching ........... ..............
-The Individual and Education
-General Shop ..-..........
-History of Industrial Arts
Education ....--..-....- .......
E lectives ................ --..... -..




-Educational Conceptions ...
Electives ........................
-Methods and Organization ..
-Advanced Industrial Arts ....
Electives .. ....... ...............


THE NORMAL DIPLOMA

For the Normal Diploma a student will be required to complete 30 semester hours, at
least 9 resident hours of which must be in Education and the remaining hours of which
will be determined by the student in conference with his advisory committee.


COLLEGE OF LAW

Since 1909 the purpose of the College of Law has been to impart a thorough scientific
and practical knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the
opportunities in this field. Since 1927 the College has operated during the Summer Session.
Requirements and standards of the regular terms have been maintained. Courses offered
during the regular terms are rotated. Some courses not given during the regular terms
are offered in the Summer Session. The variety of courses is sufficient to enable students
of different types to carry a full load, and appeal to a wide range of students.

*To be approved by the Professor of Agricultural Education and the Dean.
tDirected Observation and Teaching in the junior year to be in student's minor field.


Courses

















COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


THE GENERAL COLLEGE

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT

The General College has been organized to administer the work of the freshman and
sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning students will register in
this College.
The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College in two
years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter time, and others
may find it necessary to remain in the General College for a longer period.
A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this program the
University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all students alike. On this
foundation that has meaning and significance to the student, he may add the special
training of the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, or drop out of
the University with something definite and helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen.
The purposes of the General College are:
1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the guidance
needed by all students.
2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing for ad-
vanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division.
3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give to
college training, and consequently should concern themselves with general *
viewpoints and major understandings.
4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general edu-
cation incident to the changing conditions of modern life.

NOTICE TO PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS
The comprehensive courses of the General College are of special significance and value
to the public school teachers. Every teacher is invited to plan for one or more of these
general courses.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

All classes, unless otherwise indicated, meet for one hour and twenty minutes. In the
first term classes scheduled to meet daily meet Monday through Friday; in the second term
such classes meet Monday through Saturday. Hours indicated are A.M. unless otherwise
noted. Course descriptions given in the first term write up are not repeated in the second
term write up.
Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with no
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule.

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES

Comprehensive examinations for General College students in C-1, C-2, C-3, and C-6
will not be given until the end of the second term and will cover the work of both terms.
Credits are indicated for the benefit of Upper Division students who elect these courses.
The letters "a" and "h" are used to indicate the first half and the second half of a com-
prehensive course.
First Term
C-la.-Man and the Social World. 4 credits.
Lecture: 8:30 M. W. F. A-106. ATWOOD, MATHERLY.
Recitation Sections: 11 8:30 T. Th. and 2:30 W. L-204. ATWOOD.
12 8:30 T. Th. and 2:30 W. L-201. MATHERLY.
13 8:30 T. Th. and 2:30 W. L-314. CHACE.
14 7:00 T. Th. and 2:30 Th. L-314. CHACE.
Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems of the
modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in education,
in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective
coordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny is made
of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that a
consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved.
C-lDa.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life (See Business Administration).
C-1H.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life (See Sociology).
C-1J.-Elementary Statistics (See Business Administration).
C-lKa.-Elementary Accounting (See Business Administration).
C-2a.-Man and the Physical World. 4 credits.
Lecture: 7 M. W. and 7:30 P.M. Th. B-203. DIETTRICH, GAUTIER, KUSNER.
Discussion Sections: 21 7:00 T. Th. F. B-205. GAUTIER.
22 7:00 T. Th. F. B-208. DIETTRICH.
23 7:00 T. Th. F. B-210. KUSNER.
24 8:30 T. Th. F. B-210. KUSNER.
25 11:30 T. Th. F. B-210. KUSNER.
An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular reference to
man's immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to explain the
more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of
them; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon and ability to utilize physical
materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry,
astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential
unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


C-2Da.-Basic Mathematics (See Mathematics).

C-3a.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits.
Lecture: 7-8 T. Th. F. A-106. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 31 8-10 T. Th. F. L-212. MORRIS.
32 10-12 T. Th. F. L-314. WISE.
33 10-12 T. Th. F. L-311. LITTLE, W. A.
34 1- 3 T. Th. F. P-201. LEATHERWOOD.
Writing Laboratory: I 8-10 M. W. L-209. MORRIS, LEATHERWOOD, CLARK.
SII 10-12 M. W. L-209. MORRIS, LEATHERWOOD.
III 1- 3 M. W. L-209. CLARK, LEATHERWOOD.
Designed to furnish the training in reading, speaking, and writing necessary for the student's
work in college and for his life thereafter. This training will be provided through practice and
counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking, in fundamentals of form and style,
in extension of vocabulary, and in control of the body and voice in speaking. Students will be
encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their interests and increasing their apprecia-
tion of literature. It is felt that if the student reads widely and well, much of the English work
that is sometimes considered technical and formal, will have a new and significant meaning
to him.

C-3D.-Effective Writing. 4 credits.
Lecture: 10:00 M. W. F. L-314. CLARK.
Writing Laboratory: 4-5:30 T. Th. L-209.
Conference and Demonstration: 2 hours. To arrange.
Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and
clear but which is pleasing and attractive to the reader. Special emphasis will be placed upon
creative work.

C-3Fa.-Reading of French (See French).

C-3H.-Effective Speaking (See Speech).

C-3Sa.-Reading of Spanish (See Spanish).

C-4A.-Man and His Thinking. 10 daily. L-203 and additional library
work. 4 credits. W. W. LITTLE.
Both in private life and in vocational life man is faced with the necessity of making decisions
and of solving problems. The principal aims are: (1) to develop ability to think with greater
accuracy and thoroughness, and (2) to develop ability to evaluate the thinking of others. The
material used applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is used to insure
practice, and numerous exercises are assigned.
C-5a.-The Humanities. B-209. 4 credits. MILLIGAN.
Recitation Sections: 51 8:30 daily and additional library work.
52 10:00 daily and additional library work.
An attempt is made to help the student lay a broad foundation for cultured living. While
it is impossible to provide an adequate survey of the broad field, immediate help is given in
attaining desirable understandings, attitudes, and dispositions. Students react every day to all
culture; material is therefore presented from this and past civilizations to condition this reaction.
Even though culture is thought of as timeless, ageless, and not belonging to any particular period
or people, the course concerns itself largely with the culture of the Western World.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


C-6a.-Man and the Biological World. 4 credits.
Recitation Sections: 61 7:00 daily. S-101. SENN.
Quiz-To be arranged.
62 10:00 daily. S-101. SHERMAN.
Quiz-To be arranged.
Designed to give the student a general knowledge and appreciation of the world of living
things-of the life that goes on around and within him and of man's place in the organic world.
General concepts from the fields of botany, zoology, and psychology are brought together into
an integrated treatment. Significant principles, consideration of the methods by which such
principles have been determined, and an account of the application of biological principles to
human problems, all find proper place in the course.
Second Term
C-la.-Man and the Social World. 4 credits.
Lecture: 10:00 M. W. F. A-106. EUTSLER, PRICE.
Recitation Section: 11 10:00 T. Th. S. and 2:30 Th. L-204. PRICE.
C-lb.-Man and the Social World. 4 credits.
Lecture: 8:30 M. W. F. A-106. EUTSLER, PRICE.
Recitation Section: 11 10:00 T. Th. S. and 2:30 Th. L-204. PRICE.
13 8:30 T. Th. S. and 2:30 W. L-204. PRICE.
C-lDb.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life (See Business Administration).
C-1H.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life (See Sociology).
C-lKb.-Elementary Accounting (See Business Administration).
C-2b.-Man and the Physical World. 4 credits.
Lecture: 7 M. W. F. B-203. SASHOFF, GAUTIER.
Discussion Sections: 21 7 T. Th. S. and 7:30 P.M. Th. B-205. GAUTIER.
22 7 T. Th. S. and 7:30 P.M. Th. B-210. SASHOFF.
23 8:30 T. Th. S., B-210, SASHOFF and 7:30 P.M. T., B-210,
GAUTIER.
24 11:30 T. Th. S. and 7:30 P.M. T. B-205. SASHOFF.
C-2Db.-Basic Mathematics (See Mathematics).
C-3b.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits.
Lecture: 7-8 T. Th. S. A-106. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 31 8-10 T. Th. S. L- 10. MORRIS.
32 10-12 T. Th. S. L-203. WISE.
33 10-12 T. Th. S. L- 10. MORRIS.
Writing Laboratory: I 8-10 M. W. L-209. MORRIS, SKAGGS.
II 1- 3 M. W. L-209. SKAGGS, WISE.
C-3E.-Reading for Leisure. 4 credits.
Lecture: 10 daily. L-201. SKAGGS.
Conference: 2 hours. To arrange.
Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded leisure-reading program,
which will serve to keep him abreast of the best in contemporary thought and literature.
C-3H.-Effective Speaking (See Speech).
C-4B.-General Mathematics. 8:30 daily and additional problem work. P-2.
4 credits. KOKOMOOR.
Designed to acquaint the student with the general nature of mathematics, the manner in
which the mathematical mode of thought is used in the world of today, and the role which it
has occupied in the development of that world. A survey of some of the fundamental principles
and methods of procedure in the main branches of elementary mathematics, with considerable
attention being given to the utilization and cultural importance of the subject and its relations
to other branches of knowledge.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


C-5b.-The Humanities. P-206. 4 credits. CARLETON.
Recitation Sections: 51 8:30 daily and additional library work.
52 10:00 daily and additional library work.
C-6b.-Man and the Biological World. 4 credits.
Recitation Section: 61 11:30 daily. S-101. SENN.
Quiz-To be arranged.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

First Term
Ag. 302.-Farm Motors. 8:30 daily. A-206a. 3 credits. ROGERS.
The sources of power on the farm.
Ag. 303.-Farm Shop. 10:00 daily. A-206a. 3 credits. ROGERS.
Carpentry, concrete construction, power transmission, soldering and other farm shop operations.
Especially useful for students intending to teach agricultural engineering in vocational schools.
Ag. 504.-Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering. A-205. Hours and
credit to be arranged. ROGERS.

AGRONOMY

First Term
Ay. 301.-Soils. 8:30 daily. A-205. 3 credits. BRYAN. Prerequisite: Cy.
101-102.
An introductory course dealing with the nature and properties of soils as related to plant
growth. Lyon and Buckman, Nature and Properties of Soils.
Ay. 302.-Fertilizers and Manures. 10 M. T. W. Th. A-205. 2 credits. BRYAN.
Prerequisite: Ay. 301.
Composition, nature and source of fertilizer materials; their influence on crops and soils;
calculating fertilizer formulas. Van Slyke, Fertilizers and Crop Production; Bear, Theory and
Practice in the Use of Fertilizers.

Ay. 306.-Laboratory Problems in Fertilizers and Manures. 1-5 M. W. F.
A-203. 2 credits. BRYAN.
A series of laboratory exercises in fertilizers and manures, to parallel the work in Ay. 302.
Ay. 505.-Special Problems in Soils and Crops. Hours and credits to arrange.
BRYAN.
BACTERIOLOGY AND BOTANY

First Term
Bey. 301.-General Bacteriology. 8:30 M. T. Th. F. S-101. Laboratory 1-4
M. T. Th. F. S-104. 4 credits. CARROLL, LIPSCOMB.
Morphology, physiology, cultivation and identification of bacteria, yeasts and molds. Applica-
tion to health problems.
*Bcy. 304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology. 10 T. W. Th. F. S-111. Laboratory
1-4 M. T. W. F. S-2. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: General Bacteriology.
Isolation, cultivation of disease producing micro-organisms; special technique for diagnostic
tests ; theories and principles of immunity.
*Bty. 102.-General Botany. 10 T. W. Th. F. S-111. Laboratory 1-4 M. T.
W. F. S-102. 4 credits. CARROLL.
Morphology, structure and habits of the seed bearing plants.

*If the demand tor Bty. 102 is greater than that for Bey. 304, it will be offered instead.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BIOLOGY

First Term

Bly. 102.-Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. 7 M. T. W. Th. S-111.
Laboratory 1-5 M. T. W. Th. S-107. 4 credits. BYERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 101.
The morphology and classification of chordate animals.

Bly. 210.-Vertebrate Embryology. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. S-111. Laboratory
1-5 M. T. W. Th. S-106. 4 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly. 102.
The principles of general embryology, early development of chordate animals, and the special
development of vertebrates.

Bly. 316.-Animal Parasitology. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. S-12. Laboratory 1-5
M. T. W. Th. S-106. 4 credits. BYERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 102.
The animal organisms, especially the protozoa and worms, producing disease in man and
the higher vertebrates.
Provision will be made for properly qualified graduate students to carry on individual problems
as listed in the Bulletin of the Graduate School.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS

First Term

*C-1Da.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 7:00 daily. L-204. 3 credits.*
MATHERLY. Prerequisite: C-1.
Emphasis on the functioning of the economic system. Economic organization and institutions
as parts of the economic order in their functional capacities. The understanding of economic
principles and processes, especially those relating to value, price, cost, rent, wages, profits, and
interest, insofar as such knowledge is necessary in understanding the economic situation of the
present day. The evaluation of economic forces and processes in terms of their contribution to
social well being. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.

*C-lKa.-Elementary Accounting. 8:30 daily. S-202. 3 credits.* BEIGHTS.
Designed to provide the basic training in accounting.

C-1J.-Elementary Statistics. 11:30 daily. L-10. 3 credits. GERMOND.
The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with such
fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology,
sociology, etc.; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics. Prerequisite
for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.

Bs. 285.-Principles of Human Geography. 10:00 daily. L-204. 3 credits.
ATWOOD.
Basic principles underlying the study and teaching of modern geography; the earth as a
planet; wind systems; seasons, elements of meteorology; weather and climate; land forms. How
peoples have adjusted life and work to changing world environment. Correlations between
geography and history are stressed. Opportunity given students who wish to carry on special
studies relating to any specific part of the course.

BEs. 311.-Principles of Accounting. 7:00 daily. S-202. 3 credits. BEIGHTS.
Prerequisite: C-1K.
Lectures, discussions, and problems. A study of principles underlying the preparation of
financial statements; brief consideration of the problems of valuation; analysis and interpretation
of financial statements; internal check; financial budgets; and other accounting problems of
interest to management.

*This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required. Students
may not take the second term without having had the first term. When the course is completed
in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may secure six semester hours
credit.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bs. 321E.-Financial Organization of Society. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
BEIGHTS. Prerequisite: C-1D.
An introduction to the field of finance; a study of the institutions providing monetary,
banking and other financial services; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institu-
tions; central banking; government control of finance; significance of financial organization to
the economic system as a whole.

Bs. 335E.-Economics of Marketing. (Formerly Bs. 431E.) 8:30 daily. L-210.
3 credits. HICKS.
The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular attention
given to interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages, and
comparative disadvantages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying on
trading operations; retail and wholesale agencies; elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of
marketing; price maintenance; unfair competition; the relation of the government to marketing.

Bs. 361.-Property Insurance. Seminar Method. 3 credits. CHACE.
Fire and Marine Insurance.

Bs. 372E.-Labor Economics. 11:30 daily. Bu.-101. 3 credits. CHACE.
Labor problems: insecurity, wages and income, hours, sub-standard workers, industrial con-
flict; attempts to solve labor problems by employees: unionism in its structural and functional
aspects; attempts to solve labor problems by employers: personnel management, employee represen-
tation, employers' associations; attempts to solve labor problems by state: protective labor legisla-
tion, laws relating to settlement of industrial disputes.

Bs. 381E.-Economic Geography of North America. Seminar Method. 3
credits. DIETTRICH.
The principal economic activities in each of the major regions of North America, involving
analysis of these activities from the standpiont of their relation to the natural environment.

Bs. 432.-Market Management. Seminar Method. 3 credits. HICKS. Pre-
requisite: Bs. 335E.
Marketing problems from the viewpoint of an administrative head of a business unit; sales
administration; purchasing administration; credit administration. Topics covered include pro uct
analysis, sales planning, selection of channels of distribution, pricing policy, sales programs, sales
organization, supervision of sales force, purchasing procedure, sources of supply, the place of
price in the purchasing function, speculative purchasing, purchasing efficiency, credit management,
delivery problems.

Bs. 438.-Problems in Sales and Market Management. Seminar Method. 3
credits. HICKS. Prerequisite: Bs. 335E.
Methods used in analyzing the selling, advertising, and merchandising problems of manu-
facturers, wholesalers, and retailers; the use of market research; the objective of market in-
vestigations; planning market investigations ; sales survey methods; preparation of reports; quan-
titative analysis; measurement of market conditions and their effects on sales; market trends.

Bs. 440.-Trade Horizons in Caribbean America. 7 daily. Bu.-201. 3 credits.
HICKS.
A regional trade course covering the West Indies, Mexico, Central America, Columbia, and
Venezuela. The commercial importance of each republic and island as a market for American
goods and as a source of raw materials and foodstuffs; Florida's commercial position in such
trade as a result of its geographical proximity to this area.

Bs. 465.-Realty Principles. Seminar Method. 3 credits. CHACE.
Fundamentals of realty economics.

Bs. 468E.-Economic History in the Making. 10:00 daily. L-201. 3 credits.
DIETTRICH.
The era of industrialism; contemporary economic organization in the leading European coun-
tries; types of economic reform; capitalism, socialism, communism; fascism; special consideration
of current social and economic problems in England, France, Germany, Soviet Russia, and the
United States.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Second Term

*C-lDb.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 7:00 daily. L-204. 3 credits.*
ELDRIDGE. Prerequisite: C-1.

*C-1Kb.-Elementary Accounting. 8:30 daily. L-201. 3 credits.* BEIGHTS.

Bs. 312.-Accounting Principles. 7:00 daily. L-201. 3 credits. BEIGHTS.
A continuation of Bs. 311. An intensive and critical study of the valuation of balance sheet
items and problems incident thereto; tangible and intangible assets, funds, reserves, capital and
capital stock, dividends, and other problems.

Bs. 322E.-Financial Organization of Society. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
TUTTLE. Prerequisite: Bs. 321E.
An introduction to the field of finance: a study of the institutions providing monetary, bank-
ing and other financial services; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institutions;
central banking; government control of finance; significance of financial organization to the eco-
nomic system as a whole.

Bs. 327E.-Public Finance. (Formerly 429E.) 10:00 daily. Bu.-204. 3 credits.
ELDRIDGE.
Principles governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems
of leading countries.

Bs. 351E.-Transportation Principles. 11:30 daily. L-201. 3 credits.
EUTSLER.
The economics of transportation, including railroads, inland waterways, highways, airways,
pipe lines, and communications, specifically with reference to development of facilities and service,
contribution to the economic and social process, characteristic, including competition and monopoly,
rates ; regulation; and problems of valuation, discrimination, accounting, finance, service, co-
ordination.

Bs. 408E.-Economic Principles and Problems. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
ELDRIDGE.
An advanced course in economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic mal-
adjustments arising from the operation of economic forces.

Bs. 422.-Investments. 7:00 daily. Bu.-204. 3 credits. TUTTLE. Prere-
quisite: Bs. 321E-322E.
The nature of investments; investment policies and types of securities; analysis of securities;
the mechanics an I mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements of
security prices.

Bs. 433.-Advertising. 8:30 daily. Bu.-204. 3 credits. TUTTLE.
The rela ion of the principles of advertising to economic theory; psychology of advertising;
a study of agencies, media and methods.

Bs. 446E.-Economic Principles of Consumption. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
TUTTLE.
An economic analysis of the problem of determining the extent and trends of consumer demand.
A study of the adjustment of the conditions of demand.

Bs. 463E.-Problems in Social Security. Seminar Method. 3 credits. EUTSLER.
An analysis of the meaning and nature of social security, especially as related to economic
security; the distinctions between social and private insurance; the hazards of low income groups;
an evaluation of projects and methods for eliminating, reducing, or indemnifying these hazards;
the problems of social security in the United States, especially concerning experiences with relief
measures, the development of legislation, the problems of financing and administering security
programs, and the relationship between economic planning and security.

*This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required. Stu-
dents may not take the second term without having had the first term. When the course is
completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may secure six semester
hours credit.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bs. 530.-Problems in Local and State Taxation. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
ELDRIDGE.
An intensive study of the problems of state and local taxation primarily related to the following
taxes: general property, income, business, inheritance, and commodity.

CHEMISTRY

First Term

Cy. 101.--General Chemistry. 8:30 daily. C-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. W.
C-230. 4 credits. LEIGH.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and preparation and properties of the common
non-metallic elements and their compounds.
Cy. 201.-Qualitative Analysis. 10 M. T. W. F. C-110. Laboratory 1-5 M.
T. W. F. C-230. 4 credits. HEATH.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection of the
common metals and acid radicals.
*Cy. 262.-Organic Chemistry. 10 daily. C-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. T. W. F.
C-230. 5 credits. LEIGH and HEATH.
The more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds, chiefly for students in applied biologi-
cal fields. Suitable for premedical students who desire only five hours of organic chemistry.
*Cy. 301.-Organic Chemistry. 10 daily. C-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. W. C-230.
4 credits. LEIGH.
Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic compounds.
**Cy. 462.-Photographic Chemistry. To be arranged. 3 credits. HEATH.
Theory and practice of photographic processes and materials, and their uses.
**Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations. To be arranged. 3 credits. HEATH.
Cy. 601.-Chemical Research. No credit. LEIGH and HEATH.

Second Term

Cy. 102.-General Chemistry. 8:30 daily. C-212. Laboratory 1-4 M. W. F.
C-114. 4 credits. JACKSON.
Metallic elements and their compounds.
*Cy. 202.-Quantitative Analysis. 10 M. T. W. F. C-212. Laboratory 1-5
M. T. W., 1-4 Th. F. C-114. 4 credits. JACKSON and POLLARD.
Theoretical principles an I laboratory technique involved in the quantitative determination of
the common metals and acid radicals.
**Cy. 505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds. To be arranged. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Special lectures and collateral reading relative to the electronic and other theoretical con-
ceptions of organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives, pseudo-acids, certain dyes, alka-
loids, proteins, etc.
**Cy. 508.-Synthesis and Structure of Organic Compounds. To be arranged.
3 credits. POLLARD.
Study of fundamental reactions for synthesizing organic compounds and proving their structure.
*Cy. 510.-The Phase Rule. 10 daily. C-212. 3 credits. JACKSON.
A study of the applications of the phase rule to heterogeneous equilibria.
*Cy. 513.-Colloid Chemistry. 10 M. T. W. F. C-212. Laboratory 1-4 M. W. F.
C-114. 3 credits. JACKSON.
The theories, practice and applications of colloid chemistry.
Cy. 601.-Chemical Research. No credit. JACKSON and POLLARD.

Only one of these courses will be offered each term, contingent upon which has the greatest
demand.
**Only one of these courses will be offered each term, contingent upon which has the greater
demand.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CIVIL ENGINEERING

First Term

Cl. 229.-Higher Surveying. 8-9 M. W. F. B-104. Laboratory, B-104: 9-12
and 1-5 M. W. F., 8-12 and 1-5 T. Th., 8-11 S. 6 credits. SAWYER. Prerequisite:
Cl. 226.
Field astronomy and hydrugraphic surveying. Field work: the making of a complete topo-
graphical survey; tests and adjustments of instruments; precise leveling; base line work;
determination of time, latitude, and azimuth; triangulation and traverse; hydrographic surveying
and stream gauging. Drawing room work on balancing surveys, reducing field notes, map
drawing, triangulation, and computations. LABORATORY FEE: $6. Students registering for this
course may not register for any other course.

ECONOMICS

Courses in Economics are scheduled under Business Administration and are
marked E.

BUSINESS EDUCATION

Note: The professionalized subject matter courses in shorthand and typewriting are open
only to students preparing to be commercial teachers. They are not counted as
electives in education.

First Term

En. 83a.-Typewriting. 8:30 daily. Y-241. 1 credits. BENSON.
Continuous for both terms. Introduction to touch typewriting; problems of teaching type-
writing.

En. 85a.-Shorthand. 10:00 daily. Y-236. 1 credits. BENSON.
Continuous for both terms. Knowledge and skill of Gregg principles developed through exten-
sive reading and writing practice according to the functional method; problems of teaching short-
hand.

En. 86.-Advanced Shorthand. 11:30 daily. Y-236. 3 credits. BENSON.
Minimum skill for credit: dictation rate of 80 words per minute; transcription rate of 25
words per minute with 95 per cent accuracy.

Second Term

En. 83b.-Typewriting. 8:30 daily. Y-241. 1 credits. BENSON.
Continued from first term. Minimum skill for credit: 25 net words per minute with 98
per cent accuracy.

En. 85b.-Shorthand. 10:00 daily. Y-236. 11/ credits. BENSON.
Continued from first term. Minimum skill for credit: dictation rate of 60 words per minute
with 95 per cent accuracy on transcript.
En. 84.-Advanced Typewriting. 8:30 daily. Y-241. 3 credits. BENSON.
Skill development drills and secretarial problems in business letters, tabular material, legal
documents, invoices, and other business papers. Problems in teaching advanced typewriting and
office practice. Minimum skill for credit: 40 net words per minute with 99 per cent accuracy.
En. 391.-Principles and Problems of Business Education. 11:30 daily. Y-236.
3 credits.
The expanding scope of business education; trends in developing social business education;
improvements of vocational courses; development of education for distributive occupations; cur-
riculum construction; testing; teacher preparation.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


EDUCATION

First Term

En. 101.-Introduction to Education. 7 daily. L-311. 3 credits. W. A. LITTLE.
An attempt is made to foreshadow the field of Education so that the student may see the
whole field before he studies its detailed and technical parts.
En. 121.-Language Arts Teaching in the Elementary School. 11:30 M. T.
W. Th. Y-140. 2 credits. KING.
The teaching of written and spoken expression in the light of experimental findings and
modern practice.
En. 122.-The Techniques of Teaching Reading. 3 credits.
Section 1. 10 daily. Y-140. HOUGH.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. Y-138.
Designed primarily to help teachers with reading instruction in the first three grades. The
mechanics of reading will be explained. The methods of approach to reading, remedial measures,
types of materials and methods of evaluation will be treated.
En. 124.-Mathematics Teaching in the Elementary Grades. 11:30 M.
T. W. Th. Y-134. 2 credits. HOUGH.
A study of the techniques of teaching those aspects of arithmetic which require more or less
formal study and practice beyond the integrated program.
En. 201.-The Teaching of Social Sciences in the Intermediate Grades. 7 M.
T. Th. F. Y-138. 2 credits. PIEPER.
A course in methods of teaching geography, history, and civics from the standpoint of
human relationships.
En. 207.-Educational Psychology. 7 daily. L-203. 3 credits. WISE.
Psychology applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc.
En. 209.-The Teaching of Sciences in the First Six Grades. Y-142. 2 credits.
GOETTE.
Section 1. 7 M. T. W. Th.
Section 2. 11:30 M. T. W. Th.
A study of the content of elementary science together with its organization for use both
in the integrated program and in the departmentalized school.
En. 221.-Remedial and Directed Reading. 8:30 daily. Y-140. 3 credits.
STEVENS.
Designed primarily for intermediate grade teachers. A study of the techniques of remedial
teaching of those pupils who have found their way into the intermediate grades without the read-
ing adaptation. Work in directed reading for intermediate grade pupils will be outlined and
discussed.
En. 253.-Observation of Teaching. 8:30 daily. Y-134. 4 credits. KING and
STAFF.
Designed for students who desire to study the actual process of teaching an elementary class.
Enrollment will be limited to the number which the laboratory school can adequately accommodate.
En. 305.-Development and Organization of Education. 11:30 daily. B-208.
3 credits. HOWARD.
An attempt to interpret and evaluate present-day education, and to point out possible develop-
ments.
En. 308.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 7 daily. P-206. 3 credits.
STEVENS.
A laboratory course in which the construction and continuity of activity units, utilizing the
projects, will be studied. Each student will be expected to organize materials about activities
appropriate to his particular needs.
En. 313.-The Integrated Program in the Secondary School. 7 M. T. Th. F.
B-209. 2 credits.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 318.-Audio-Visual Education. 2:30 M. T. Th. F. Y-142. 2 credits.
GOETTE.
Designed to aid teachers and administrators in the use of the phonograph, radio, sound and
silent films, prints, slides, and film slides.

En. 319.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. 8:30 daily. P-205. 3 credits.
CRAGO.
The nature and development of the child from birth to adolescence with reference to Education.
En. 323.-General Methods in the Secondary School. 8:30 daily. E-202. 3
credits. HOWARD. Prerequisite: En. 207. Corequisite: En. 319.
Current conceptions of secondary school procedures.
En. 401.-Administration and Supervision of Village and Consolidated Schools.
10 daily. B-208. 3 credits. GARRIS, SIMMONS.
Problems peculiar to schools in Florida; the supervising principal, qualifications, relation to
superintendent, boards, teachers, pupils, patrons, and community; adapting the school to the
child's needs; business practices.
En. 403.-The Problem-Project Method. 8:30 daily. P-4. 3 credits. NORMAN.
ECucational objectives, methods, and organization; the nature of the individual and society. In-
cludes course formerly listed as En. 404.
*En. 500.-An Introduction to Educational Research. To arrange. 2 credits.
MORPHET.
Designed primarily to help graduate students in Education in writing theses. Required
of all students majoring in Education; open to all graduate students.
En. 501.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 10 daily. P-109. 3 credits.
MEAD.
Intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary school curriculum,
including the kindergarten; selection and evaluation of material.
En. 503.-Seminar in Educational Measurements. 11:30 daily. P-109. 3
credits. CRAGO. Prerequisite: En. 317, or permission of instructor.
Students will be guided in the investigation of educational problems involving measurement,
diagnostic and remedial measures. This course is primarily for graduate students with experi-
ence in residence or in the field.
En. 509.-Problems in the Administration of a School System. 8:30 daily.
B-208. 3 credits. SIMMONS.
Problems selected to meet individual needs; each student selects some problem for special
study and presents the results of his study in the form of a thesis.
En. 518.-Special Problems in High School Organization and Administration.
7 daily. L-210. 3 credits. W. W. LITTLE.
This course will consist of an intensive study of specific problems in organizing anti admin-
istering the modern high school. Special reference will be made to Florida.
En. 519.-High School Curriculum. 10 daily. P-109. 3 credits. MEAD.
Problems of the curriculum of the high school in its organization; standards for selection
of the curriculum; factors to be considered-age of pupils, social standing, probable school life,
probable vocation; traditional subjects and their possible variations; new subjects and their values,
systems of organization, election, and prescription; problems of articulation with the elementary
school, the college, the vocational school, and the community.
*En. 521.-Business Administration of a School System. To arrange. 3 credits.
MORPHET. Prerequisite: Wide administrative experience.
Problems concerned with the procuring and spending of revenue; a thesis on a special problem.


*This course may be offered in the second term instead of in the first term.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 531.-Guided Professional Development in Health and Physical Education.
Hours to be arranged. Y-151. 3 credits. SALT.
Designed to give teachers, supervisors, and administrators a broad understanding of the
field of health and physical education. At the beginning of the course the student and instructor
will outline a program of professional development in keeping with the needs and interests of
the student. Credit will depend upon evidence of professional growth on the part of the student
in accord with his program. This will be tested in any manner which the instructor deems valid.
En. 534.-Problems of Physical Education. Hours to be arranged. Y-151.
3 credits. SALT. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor.
Designed to give the student an understanding of the contemporary problems in physical
education. It forms the basis for the organization of research projects together with an analysis
of the techniques used in problem solving.
En. 562.-Guidance and Counseling. 8:30 daily. Y-150. 3 credits. GARRIS.
Problems of guidance and personality adjustments for high school workers.
Graduate Seminar for Administrators. 4 M. W. F. P-102. No credit. GARRIS,
SIMMONS.
Required of graduate students majoring in administration.
Graduate Seminar for Teachers. 4 M. W. F. P-112. No credit. MEAD.
Introduction to investigations, consideration of possible thesis problems, minor researches and
actual thesis work. Primarily for teachers. Required.

Second Term

En. 101.-Introduction to Education. 7 daily. P-1. 3 credits. HOWARD.
En. 122.-The Techniques of Teaching Reading. 10 daily. P-2. 3 credits.
En. 124.-Mathematics Teaching in the Elementary Grades. 11:30 M. T. W.
Th. P-208. 2 credits.
En. 207.-Educational Psychology. 8:30 daily. A-205. 3 credits. WILSON.
En. 209.-The Teaching of the Sciences in the First Six Grades. Y-142. 2
credits. GOETTE.
Section 1. 7 M. T. W. Th.
Section 2. 11:30 M. T. W. Th.
En. 221.-Remedial and Directed Reading. 8:30 daily. P-11. 3 credits.
STEVENS.
En. 308.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 7 daily. P-206. 3 credits.
STEVENS.
En. 317.-Tests and Measurements. 10 daily. P-102. 3 credits. CRAGO.
An elementary course to aid the teacher in the use of tests in improvement of instruction
and solution of school problems. One hour of laboratory work per week is required.
En. 318.-Audio-Visual Education. 2:30 M. T. Th. F. Y-142. 2 credits.
GOETTE.
En. 323.-General Methods in the Secondary School. 8:30 daily. P-205. 3
credits. HOWARD. Prerequisites: En. 207 and En. 319.
En. 401.-Public School Administration. 10 daily. P-109. 3 credits. SIMMONS.
En. 408.-High School Administration. 8:30 daily. L-210. 3 credits. W. W.
LITTLE. Prerequisites: En. 323 and one supervised teaching course.
Practical management and administration of the modern high school.
En. 510.-The Foundations of Modern Education. 7 daily. L-210. 3 credits.
W. W. LITTLE.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-teacher,
student, curriculum, and educational plant, control and support-back to their beginnings; and
to point out present tendencies and possible developments.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 516.-Character and Personality Development. 11:30 daily. P-109. 3
credits. CRAGO.
A study o: me hods used in development or character and personality, together with an
evaluation of them or use in public schools.
En. 517.-Educational Statistics. 10 M. T. W. Th. L-210. 2 credits. WILSON.
The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with statistical methods as applied to
Education. It is recommended that this course be taken before En. 503.
En. 521.-Business Administration of a School System. 8:30 daily. P-109.
3 credits. SIMMONS.
Problems concerned with the procuring and spending of revenue; a thesis on a special problem.
En. 567.-Problems in Agricultural Education (Seminar: July 26 to August 14).
9-12 and 1-4 daily. Y-150. 3 credits. GARRIS.
The course is designed for graduate students who are qualified to pursue advanced problems.
Problems, so far as possible, will be selected to meet the individual needs of each student.
En. 581.-The Reorganization of Secondary School English. 7:30 M. T. Th. F.
L-203. 2 credits. WISE.
A study of the objectives, methods and materials of secondary school English organized
in th2 light of the findings of research and with a view to assisting pupils to make a satisfactory
adjustment to a desirable social order.

ENGLISH

First Term

Eh. 103.-Introduction to Literature. 3 credits.
Section 1. 10 daily. L-10. MURPHREE.
Section 2. 1 daily. L-210. MOUNTS.
This course and Eh. 104 give an introduction to the literature of the Western world from
the beginnings to the Renaissance.
Eh. 104.-Introduction to Literature. 2:30 daily. L-210. 3 credits. MOUNTS.
A continuation of English 103.
Eh. 201.-History of English Literature to 1600. 8:30 daily. P-201. 3 credits.
CONNER.
A basic course in the historical development of English Literature. Stress will be laid on
the interpretation of representative writers.
Eh. 202.-History of English Literature from 1600 to 1900. 11:30 daily. L-201.
3 credits. MURPHREE.
A continuation of English 201.
Eh. 301.-Shakespeare and the English Drama to 1640. 10:00 daily. L-212.
3 credits. CALDWELL.
In this term Shakespeare's comedies and history plays will be stressed. The origin and
development of English drama will be reviewed.
Eh. 305.-Introduction to the Study of the English Language. 11:30 daily.
L-212. 3 credits. ELIASON.
Descriptive and historical study of English.
Eh. 402.-American Literature. 7:00 daily. P-201. 3 credits. CONNER.
A survey of American Literature from Emerson to the present time.
Eh. 407.-The Modern Novel. 8:30 daily. L-10. 3 credits. RANSOM.
Chief emphasis on the contemporary novel in England and America.
Eh. 409.-Chaucer. 11:30 daily. L-210. 3 credits. LYONS.
Intensive study of the Canterbury Tales.
Eh. 414.-The Renaissance in England. 2:30 daily. L-212. 3 credits. CALD-
WELL.
A study of sixteenth and seventeenth century literature as influenced by the Renaissance.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Eh. 427.-Imaginative Writing. 10:00 daily. L-306. 3 credits. RANSOM.
Designed for students of marked ability in creative writing. Taken only with permission of
the instructor.
Eh. 511.-Old English. 8:30 daily. L-311. 3 credits. ELIASON.
A study of the language and the reading of representative selections.
Eh. 529.-Introduction to the Methods and Problems of Graduate Study in
English. 10:00 daily. L-210. 3 credits. LYONS.
Required of all graduate majors in English.

Second Term
Eh. 104.-Introduction to Literature. 1:00 daily. L-210. 3 credits. MOUNTS.
Eh. 202.-History of English Literature from 1600 to 1900. 8:30 daily. L-314.
3 credits. MOORE.
Eh. 221.-Types of Humorous Literature. 11:30 daily. L-210. 3 credits.
MOORE.
An approach to the masterpieces of humorous literature, with some attention to the nature
and function of humor and its various types.
Eh. 302.-Shakespeare and the English Drama to 1640. 10:00 daily. L-212.
3 credits. ROBERTSON.
The tragedies and later comedies. The Elizabethan drama.
Eh. 303.-English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. 10:00 daily. L-311.
3 credits. FARRIS.
The roots of the romantic revival; the work of Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, and Keats.
Eh. 401.-American Literature. 7:00 daily. L-212. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
The first half of the survey course in American literature.
Eh. 408.-Contemporary Poetry. 8:30 daily. L-311. 3 credits. FARRIS.
Eh. 410.-Chaucer. 11:30 daily. L-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
Completion of the Canterbury Tales; the reading of the Troilus and some of the minor poetry.
Eh. 411.-English Literature from 1660 to 1744. 8:30 daily. L-212. 3 credits.
SPIVEY.
Stress will be lai 1 on the major writers of this period.
Eh. 0515.-Milton. 2:30 daily. L-210. 3 credits. MOUNTS.
An intensive study of Milton's most important works.

FRENCH

First Term
C-3Fa.-Reading of French. 7 daily. 3 credits. P-11. BRUNET.
A beginning course, basic for further study. The main objective is reading ability; grammar
and pronunciation are subordinated. Reading of easy texts is begun at once.
[C-3Fb.-Reading of French. A continuation of the preceding. Not given in
summer 1937; to be given in summer 1938.]
Fh. 101.-Second-Year French. 8:30 daily. 3 credits. P-11. BRUNET. Pre-
requisite: C-3F, or the equivalent (one year of college French or two years of
high school French).
The first half of second year college French. Reading; oral and written practice.
[Fh. 102.-Second-Year French. A continuation of the preceding. Not given
in summer 1937; to be given in summer 1938.]
Fh. 207.-Survey of French Literature. 7 daily. P-2. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Prerequisite: Fh. 101-102 or permission of instructor.
A basic course in the historical development of French literature; reading of representative
selections from important authors. The period covered is from the origins to 1800.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


[Fh. 208.-Survey of French Literature. A continuation of the preceding,
from 1800. Not given in summer 1937; to be given in summer 1938.]
*Fh. 509.-French Classicism. 8:30 daily. P-2. 3 credits. ATKIN. Prere-
quisite: Fh. 207-208 or permission of instructor.
Reading and interpretative criticism of representative seventeenth-century works.
*Fh. 511.-Teachers' Course in French. 8:30 daily. P-2. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Careful study of French sounds and connected speech, to secure intelligent handling of
pronunciation difficulties and to perfect the student's accent; intensive study of selected readings
(explication de textes) ; practice in writing French. Designed primarily for teachers and prospec-
tive teachers of French.
*Fh. 513.-Eighteenth-Century French Literature. 8:30 daily. P-2. 3 credits.
ATKIN. Prerequisite: Fh. 207-208 or permission of instructor.
Reading and interpretative criticism of representative selections from the literature of
the period.
GEOGRAPHY

Bs. 285.-Principles of Human Geography. 10 daily. L-204. 3 credits. ATWOOD.
For course description, see Business Administration.
This course may be used to satisfy the Conservation certificate requirement.

HANDWRITING

First Term

Hg. 101.-Handwriting. No credit.
Section 1. 10 daily. A-104. MCCLURE.
Section 2. 4 daily. A-104. MCCLURE.
Section 3. 7 P.M. daily. A-104. MCCLURE.
Students enrolling for this course will have opportunity not only to improve their own hand-
writing, but to learn by instruction and demonstration the correct presentation of handwriting in
all grades of the elementary school. The value of measuring diagnostic and remedial teaching will
be emphasized. The State-adopted text, Progressive Handwriting, will be used.
NOTE: A course in penmanship is required for a certificate in subjects of the Elementary School
Course.
Second Term

Hg. 101.-Handwriting. No credit.
Section 1. 10 daily. A-104. MCCLURE.
Section 2. 4 daily. A-104. McCLURE.
Section 3. 7 P.M. daily. A-104. MCCLURE.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

First Term

tHPl. 311.-Administration of Physical Education. Hours to be arranged.
Y-151. 3 credits. SALT. (Open to men and women.)
Physical education in the public schools: playgrounds, gymnasium, swimming pool, service
unit, physical education class, intramural program, and interscholastic athletics.
tHPI. 312.-Administration of Health Education. Hours to be arranged. Y-151.
3 credits. SALT. (Open to men and women.)
The public school health education program; principles, methods, and materials in health
education.

*Only one of these courses will be given, contingent upon which has the greatest demand.
tGiven as a regular class or by conference, depending upon enrollment.


122





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 123

fHPI. 321.-The Physical Education Program in Schools. Hours to be arranged.
Y-151. 3 credits. SALT. (Open to men only.)
An evaluation and analysis of the physical education curriculum in elementary and secondary
schools.
fHPI. 341.-Principles of Physical Education. Hours to be arranged. Y-151.
3 credits. SALT. (Open to men and women.)
Fundamental principles upon which the natural program of physical education is based;
history, aims, objectives, and contemporary trends in this field. This course should be completed
as soon as possible by students majoring in this field.

HISTORY

First Term
Hy. 301.-American History, 1492-1776. 8:30 daily. P-112. 3 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. 304.-American History, 1876 to the Present. 10 daily. P-112. 3 credits.
LEAKE.
Formerly Hy. 205.
Hy. 306.-English History to 1688. 7 daily. P-1. 3 credits. JAMES.
2nd Semester of Hy. 305-306.
Hy. 313.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 11:30 daily. P-4. 3 credits.
GLUNT.
Formerly Hy. 101.
Hy. 317.-Latin American History, 1850 to 1890. 10 daily. P-11. 3 credits.
GLUNT.
Formerly Hy. 205.
Hy. 319.-Modern European History, 1815 to 1870. 11:30 daily. P-1. 3
credits. JAMES.
Formerly Hy. 201.
Hy. 509.-Seminar. Hours to be arranged. 3 credits. LEAKE.

Second Term
Hy. 302.-American History, 1776 to 1830. 8:30 daily. P-112. 3 credits.
LEAKE.
Hy. 303.-American History, 1830 to 1876. 10 daily. P-112. 3 credits.
LEAKE.

Hy. 311.-English History, 1688 to 1815. 11:30 daily. P-1. 3 credits. JAMES.
First semester of Hy. 311-312.
Hy. 314.-Europe During the Middle Ages. 11:30 daily. P-4. 3 credits.
GLUNT.
Formerly Hy. 102.
Hy. 318.-Latin American History, 1870 to the Present. 10 daily. P-4. 3
credits. GLUNT.
Formerly Hy. 206.
Hy. 320.-Modern European History, 1870 to the Present. 10 daily. P-11. 3
credits. JAMES.
Formerly Hy. 202.
Hy. 510.-Seminar. To be arranged. 3 credits. LEAKE.

fGiven as a regular class or by conference, depending upon enrollment.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION
(See also Public School Arts and Crafts)

First Term
In. 111S.-Industrial Arts Mechanical Drawing. 7 M. W. F. Y-Shop. 2
credits. BOHANNON.
Freehand sketching, lettering, orthographic projections, geometric construction, working draw-
ings, and blue printing, care and use of instruments. Given in units such that students may be
able, in turn. to teach it.
In. 211S.-Industrial Arts General Shop. 1-4 T. Th. Y-324. 2 credits.
BOHANNON.
Practice in use of hand tools commonly found in school shops; types of joints, design, wood-
finishing; block-printing. Analysis of logical teaching units in projects and problems in the
various phases of industrial arts.

Second Term
In. 112S.-Industrial Arts Mechanical Drawing. 1:00 M. W. F. Y-324. 2
credits. BOHANNON. Prerequisite: In. 111.
Perspective rendering, tracings and blue prints for a small building: different types of
letters, machine sketchings, and conventions. Suggestions ani plans as to the most effective way
of teaching a course of this type.
In. 212S.-Industrial Arts General Shop. 4-6 M. W. F. Y-Shop. 2 credits.
BOHANNON. Prerequisite: In. 211.
Use of hand-tools and power-machines, with special emphasis on the speed-lathe; use, parts,
and care of machines: shop equipment and construction. In addition to the development of
manipulative skills, special emphasis is given to selecting projects, and writing the various types
of instruction sheets.

LAW

The Law Summer Session extends through the first term. six weeks, from June 14
to July 23. Classes scheduled daily meet six days a week. Each period is one hour and
fifteen minutes long.
Lw. 320.-Workmen's Compensation Law. 7:15-8:30 W. S. Law-204. 1 credit.
TRUSLER.
Scope, construction, beneficiaries, injuries compensated, defenses, and proceedings for adjust-
ment of compensation, with special reference to the Florida statute. Workmen's Compensation
Acts in Ruling Case Law and the Florida Act.
Lw. 402.-Evidence. 11:15-1 daily. Law-204. 4 credits. TESELLE.
Judicial notice; kinds of evidence; burden of proof; presumption of law and fact; judge
and jury; admissions; confessions; exclusions based on public policy and privilege; corroboration;
witnesses; examination, cross examination, privilege; public documents; records and judicial
writings; private writings. Morgan and Maguire, Cases on Evidence.
Lw. 417.-Sales. 7:15-8:30 M. T. Th. S. Law-202. 2 credits. DAY.
Sale and contract to sell; statute of frauds; illegality; conditions and warranties; delivery;
acceptance and receipt; vendor's lien; stoppage in transit; bills of lading; reme-lies of seller
and buyer. Void on Sales.
Lw. 419.-Air Law. 8:35-9:50 W. S. Law-204. 1 credit. TESELLE.
Aviation ; air space rights ; interstate commerce; airports ; insurance; carriers; treatment of
torts, contracts, and crimes in relation to aviation. Zollman, Cases on Air Law.
Lw. 422.-Banks and Banking. 11:15-12:30 W. S. 1 credit. DAY.
Kinds of banks; deposits; checks; clearing houses; collections; loans and discounts; bank
notes; banking corporations; representation of bank by officers; insolvency; national banks;
savings banks. Tiffany, Banks and Banking.
Lw. 430.-Bailments. 8:35-9:50 M. T. Th. F. Law-202. 2 credits. SLAGLE.
Mandates; deposits ; pledges; custody and use; delivery and redelivery; innkeepers; carriers
rights and duties of parties; termination of relation. Elliott on Bailments, 2nd edition.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


125


Lw. 502.-Damages. 7:15-8:30 M. T. Th. F. Law-204. 2 credits. TRUSLER.
General principles; sorts; measure in contract and tort actions; avoidable consequences;
value; interest; death by wrongful act. Trusler, Florida Cases on Damages.
Lw. 522S.-Admiralty. 9:55-11:10 W. S. Law-202. 1 credit. SLAGLE.
Jurisdiction; contracts; torts, crimes; maritime liens, ex contract, ex delicto, priorities,
discharge; bottomry and respondentia obligations; salvage; towage; general average. Lord and
Sprague, Cases on Admiralty.
Lw. 525.-Trade Regulations. 9:55-11:10 M. T. Th. F. 2 credits. SLAGLE.
Trade contracts; privilege of competing; intimidating and molesting; disparaging competitor's
goods; appropriating competitor's trade values ; boycotting; unfair price practices; unfair adver-
tising; combinations; anti-trust legislation. Oliphant, Cases on Trade Regulations.

MATHEMATICS

First Term
Before registering for any course, the student should ascertain the prerequisites. Stu-
dents desiring courses other than those listed below should write to the Department of
Mathematics, or make inquiry immediately upon arrival at the University.
Ms. 85.-Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms. 7 daily. P-102. 3 credits.
QUADE.
Functions of angles; logarithms; solution of triangles. Simpson, Plane Trigonometry and
Logarithms.
Ms. 102.-Analytic Geometry. 8:30 daily. P-102. 3 credits. MCINNIs.
The algebraic study of the figures of geometry and the plane sections of a cone. The course
deals mainly with two problems: Given an equation, to find its graph; and given a graph to
find its equation. A good knowledge of high school algebra is the best prerequisite for this
course. Love, Elements of Analytic Geometry.
C-2Da.-Basic Mathematics. 10 daily and additional problems. P-102. 4
credits. SIMPSON.
In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession,
this course offers a completely new sequence of topics including the above plus a liberal amount
of calculus. Teachers of high school mathematics who wish to advance in technical command
of the subject matter should elect both parts of the course C-2D. This is also designed for those
who plan to major in mathematics or to elect courses above the freshman level. Milne and Davis,
Introductory College Mathematics.
C-1J.-Elementary Statistics. (See Business Administration.)
Ms. 253.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 8:30 daily and additional prob-
lems. P-1. 4 credits. QUADE.
Beginning calculus course. Differentiation, one of the most important and practical fields
of mathematics, is treated in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse
operation of differentiation. Granville, S-ith, Longley, Differential and Integral Calculus.
Ms. 311.-Advanced College Algebra. 10 daily. P-1. 3 credits. GERMOND.
Further treatment of some of the material and processes of Ms. 101, and introduction to more
advanced topics. Valuable to teachers of algebra and to students of actuarial science. Hall and
Knight, Higher Algebra.
Ms. 575.-Fundamental Concepts of Modern Mathematics. 11:30 daily. P-102.
3 credits. SIMPSON.
Introduction to such topics as the number system of algebra, sets of points, group theory,
theories of integration, postulational systems, and non-Euclidean geometry. No textbook is used
but many references are assigned.
Second Term
C-4B.-General Mathematics. (See General College Courses.)
Ms. 101.-College Algebra. 7 daily. P-102. 3 credits. PIRENIAN.
The quadratic equation, proportion, progressions, the binomial theorem, functions, graphs,
-theory of equations, permutations, combinations, probability and determinants. Hart, Brief
College Algebra.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


C-2Db.-Basic Mathematics. 10 daily and additional problems. P-1. 4 credits.
PHIPPS.
A continuation of C-2Da.
Ms. 254.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 8:30 daily and additional prob-
lems. P-102. 4 credits. PIRENIAN.
Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas,
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems. Granville, Smith, Longley, Differential
and Integral Calculus.
Ms. 331.-College Geometry. 8:30 daily. P-1. 3 credits. PHIPPS.
A continuation of high school plane geometry, making use of elementary methods in the
advanced study of the triangle and circle. Emphasis on solving original exercises. Valuable
to prospective high school geometry teachers. Altshiller-Court, College Geometry.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 11:30 daily. P-102. 3 credits.
KOKOMOOR.
A survey of the development of mathematics through calculus, with special emphasis on the
changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching. No specific text is followed but
numerous works are used as references.
NOTE: In either term, by consulting the instructor, well qualified students may arrange to take,
on a project basis, one of the courses listed in the Bulletin of Information for the Colleges and
Professional Schools of the Upper Division.

PHILOSOPHY

First Term

Ppy. 301.-Ethics. 10 daily. P-209. 3 credits. ENWALL.
Principles of ethics. Study of such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty, freedom,
progress, et cetera. Dewey and Tuft, Ethics.
Ppy. 409.-History of Ancient Philosophy. 11:30 daily. P-209. 3 credits.
ENWALL.
Special attention given to the work of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Rogers, A Student's
History of Philosophy.
Ppy. 503.-Advanced History of Ancient Philosophy. 11:30 daily. P-209. 3
credits. ENWALL.
Readings from original sources, papers on special topics, group discussions.

PHYSICS

Students in the College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in Physics may enroll
in the courses outlined below. Additional problem work and subject matter will be
assigned, and substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher is made.

First Term

Ps. 101.-Elementary Theory of Mechanics, Heat and Sound. 8:30 daily. B-203.
3 credits. PERRY.
Ps. 103.-Elementary Laboratory to Accompany Ps. 101. 1-4 M. W. F. B-306.
1 credit. PERRY.
Second Term
Ps. 102.-Elementary Theory of Magnetism, Electricity and Light. 8:30 daily.
B-203. 3 credits. KNOWLES.
Ps. 104.-Elementary Laboratory to Accompany Ps. 102. 1-4 M. W. F. B-306.
1 credit. KNOWLES.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


POLITICAL SCIENCE

First Term
Pcl. 310.-International Relations. 8:30 daily. P-206. 3 credits. LAIRD.
Pcl. 311.-American State Administration. 10 daily. P-206. 3 credits. LAIRD.
Formerly Pel. 203.
Pcl. 314.-American Government and Politics. 1 daily. P-206. 3 credits.
HUGHES.
Formerly Pel. 101.
Pcl. 513.-Seminar. To be arranged. 3 credits. LAIRD.

Second Term
Pcl. 309.-International Relations. 8:30 daily. P-201. 3 credits. LAIRD.
Pcl. 312.-American Municipal Administration. 10 daily. P-201. 3 credits.
LAIRD.
Formerly Pel. 204.
Pcl. 313.-American Government and Politics. 1 daily. P-201. 3 credits.
HUGHES.
Formerly Pel. 102.
Pcl. 514.-Seminar. To be arranged. 3 credits. LAIRD.

PSYCHOLOGY
First Term
Psy. 201.-General Psychology. 10 daily. P-10. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Facts and theories current in general psychological discussion ; sensation, perception, learning,
retention, emotion, volition, and the self.
Psy. 309.-Theories of Personality. 8:30 daily. P-10. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
The more inevitable problems of human life and their normal and abnormal solutions; critical
consideration of the most important explanations of these adjustments; development and organiza-
tion of the self.
Psy. 509.-Studies in Personality. To be arranged. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Experimental studies of personality. Special attention will be given to problems of motivation.

Second Term
Psy. 201.-General Psychology. 10 daily. P-10. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Psy. 305.-Social Psychology. 8:30 daily. P-10. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Influence of the social environment upon the mental, social, moral and emotional development
of the child, adolescent, and the adult.
Psy. 312.-Psychology of Problem Children. Seminar. To be arranged. P-114.
3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Individual trait differences, measurement of intelligence, feeble-mindedness, backward and
gifted children, emotional maladajustment, delinquency, and other types of exceptional and mentally
peculiar children.
PUBLIC SCHOOL ARTS AND CRAFTS
(Men, please see Industrial Arts Education)

First Term
Pc. 101.-Elementary School Art. 1 credit.
Practice in the use of varied materials; methods of preparation and presentation; training in
classroom practice; objectives in teaching art.
Section 1. 2:30-4:30 T. Th. P-302. MITCHELL.
Section 2. 4:00-6:00 T. Th. P-302. MITCHELL.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Pc. 104.-Interior Decorating. 4:00-6 W. F. P-302. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
A study of interior decoration, house-planning, furnishing, equipping, and care from the
standpoint of modern materials and methods.
Pc. 201.-Creative Design. 2:30-4:30 M. W. P-302. 1 credit. MITCHELL.
Creative problems in two and three dimensional design embodying form, pattern and color
directly related to craft courses offered in public school art.
Pc. 209.-Creative Arts and Crafts. 1% credits. BOHANNON.
Section 1. 2-4 M. W. F. Y-324 and Y-Shop.
Section 2. 4-6 M. W. F. Y-324 and Y-Shop.
Craft-work materials, leather work, block-printing, carving, metal, etching, art-metal, basketry,
projects in woodwork, etc. Contribution of this type of work to curriculum of different grades.

Second Term
Pc. 101.-Elementary School Art. 2:30-4:30 T. Th. P-302. 1 credit. LOCK-
WOOD.
Pc. 102.-Frieze Development. 2:30-4:30 M. W. P-302. 1 credit. LOCKWOOD.
Projects embo ying design and composition of simple decorative friezes and panels for the
schoolroom; emphasis upon integration of these projects with other school activities.
Pc. 123.-Industrial Arts for Elementary Grades. 2:30-4:30 M. W. F. Y-324
and Y-Shop. 1 credits. BOHANNON.
Pottery, weaving, bead work, hectography, book-binding. Arts of typical peoples: American
colonial life. Contribution of art to elementary activity curriculum: organization of materials,
equipment, etc.
Pc. 220.-Puppetry. 4-6 T. Th. Y-324 and Y-Shop. 1 credit. BOHANNON.
Puppetry design and creative writing as related to staging and presentation of marionette
plays for school children. This to be correlated with almost all departments, as English, art,
history, social sciences, music, woodworking, and household arts.

SCHOOL MUSIC

First Term
Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 10 daily.
Auditorium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE.
Study of the child voice ; rote songs; the toy symphony; art and rhythm songs ; sight singing
from rote to note; appreciation work for primary grades.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 8:30 daily.
Auditorium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE. Prerequisite: Msc. 103.
Development of sight singing; study of problems pertaining to intermediate grades; part
singing; song repertoire; appreciation work suitable for intermediate grades.
Msc. 105.-Materials and Methods for Junior and Senior High Schools. 2:30
daily. Auditorium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE. Prerequisite: Msc. 103 or 104.
Sight singing; study of the changing voice and voice classification; chord formation and
theory work pertaining to high school work; appreciation suitable for adolescent pupils.
Msc. 110.-Music Appreciation. 4 T. Th. Auditorium. 1 credit. C. MURPHREE.
Development of a better understanding and enjoyment of good music through listening inten-
sively to compositions of the masters. Illustrated lectures. Collateral reading. No previous
musical knowledge required.
Second Term
Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 10 daily.
Auditorium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 8:30 daily.
Auditorium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE. Prerequisite: Msc. 103.
Msc. 105.-Materials and Methods for Junior and Senior High Schools. 2:30
daily. Auditorium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE. Prerequisite: Msc. 103 or 104.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Msc. 110.-Music Appreciation. 4 T. Th. Auditorium. 1 credit. C. MURPHREE.

SOCIOLOGY

First Term
C-1H.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life. 7 daily. P-4. Laboratory
to be arranged. 4 credits. WELD. Prerequisite: C-1 or consent of instructor.
Meaning and scope of sociology; relation to other social fields; the individual and various
social groups and processes; types of communities; social disorganization and reorganization;
social planning. A prerequisite for advanced work in sociology.
Sy. 303.-Cultural Development of the United States. 8:30 daily. P-109. 3
credits. WELD. Prerequisite: C-1 or consent of instructor.
Indian cultures of the 15th century; contrasted cultures in the colonies with causal explana-
tions; influence of the Industrial and Political Revolutions on social institutions and life. Special
emphasis given to a study of various social institutions and their development.
Sy. 316.-The Field of Social Work. 2-4 T. Th. P-1. 2 credits. HILL, and
MINTON.
Administrative and promotional social work. Case work (child welfare, family, medical,
psychiatric, probation and parole, school, protective). Group social work (boys' and girls' clubs,
recreational, social settlement, scouting, etc.). Social Research and Investigation. Conferences
and some trips.
Sy. 323.-Social Pathology. 10 daily. P-4. 3 credits. BRISTOL. Prerequisite:
C-1H or equivalent.
A case method of approach to the study of problems connected with the social inadequate,
together with a consideration of approved methods of social action.
Sy. 363.-Introduction to Social Case Work. 7-9 P.M. T. Th. and Personal
Conferences. P-4. 2 credits. HILL and MINTON. Prerequisite: One course
in Sociology or consent of instructor.
Changing trends in social work; social philosophy and social case work. Causes of maladjust-
ment. Factors in human relationships of case work significance. Social diagnosis. Records
and record writing. Treatment. Large use will be made of case records.
Sy. 523.-Social Pathology. 10 daily. P-4. 3 credits. BRISTOL. To be taken
with Sy. 323 with extra reading and reports. For graduate majors in sociology.
Sy. 531.-Development of Social Thought. 2 daily. P-4. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
Seminar for advanced students in sociology in the development of social thought beginning
with Comte.

Second Term
C-1H.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life. 7 daily. P-4. Laboratory
to be arranged. 4 credits. WELD. Prerequisite: C-1 or consent of instructor.
Sy. 304.-Cultural Development of the United States Since 1865. 8:30 daily.
P-4. 3 credits. WELD. Prerequisite: Sy. 303 or consent of instructor.

SPANISH

First Term
C-3Sa.-The Reading of Spanish. 7 daily. L-307. 3 credits. HIGGINS. Pre-
requisite to advanced courses in Spanish.
Designed to give students an opportunity of attaining, without stressing formal grammar,
a moderate proficiency in the reading of Spanish.
Sturgis E. Leavitt & Sterling A. Stoudmire, "Elements of Spanish", and "Vamos a Ver 1"






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


*Sh. 22.-Elementary Spanish. 8:30 daily. L-203. 3 credits. DEGAETANI. Pre-
requisite: Sh. 21.
The second half of a year's course in Elementary Spanish.
*Sh. 101.-Second-year Spanish. 8:30 daily. L-307. 3 credits. HIGGINS. Pre-
requisite: Sh. 22 or permission of instructor.
Review of grammar, written and oral exercises, reading of modern texts.
Seymour & Carnaban, "Short Spanish Review Grammar", Pio Baroja, "Zalacain el Aventurero".
Sh. 304.-Survey of Spanish Literature. 10:00 daily. L-307. 3 credits.
DEGAETANI. Prerequisite: Sh. 102 or permission of instructor.
Continuation of Sh. 303: Historical outline of the most important literary movements in
Spanish Literature; study of representative authors of each period.
*Sh. 507.-Spanish-American Literature. 10:00 daily. L-307. 3 credits. HIG-
GINS. Prerequisites: Sh. 303, 304, or permission of instructor.
Study of the leading authors of the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Modern periods.
*Sh. 513.-Phonetics. 11:30 daily. L-203. 3 credits. DEGAETANI. Prerequisite:
Permission of instructor.
T. Navarro Tomas, "Pronunciacion Espanola".

SPEECH

Prerequisite: All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have com-
pleted Eh. 101-102 or C-3.

First Term
C-3H.-Effective Speaking. 7 daily, 1-2 T. Th. P-205. 4 credits. HOPKINS.
The principles used in speaking before a group, with considerable practice in the delivery of
original speeches. Individual improvement is emphasized and encouraged by constructive criticism.
Sch. 301.-Advanced Public Speaking. 8:30 daily. P-209. 3 credits. CON-
STANS. Prerequisite: Sch. 201 or C-3H.
Structure, style and delivery of speeches for informal and formal occasions, with special
emphasis on the psychology of audience persuasion. Considerable practice in speaking.
Sch. 314.-Types of Public Discussion. 11:30 daily. P-208. 2 credits. HoP-
KINS. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-3H.
Study and practice in the methods of group discussion and conference speaking, with special
attention given to panel and open-forum meetings. Practice in parliamentary law and pro-
cedure. (This course was formerly Sch. 214.)
Sch. 403.-One-Act Play. 10 daily. P-208. 3 credits. CONSTANS. Prere-
quisite or corequisite: Sch. 201 or C-3H.
The one-act play as a type of drama; the reading of the best one-act plays by contemporary
writers; actual presentation of plays by members of the class.

Second Term
C-3H.-Effective Speaking. 7 daily, 1-2 T. Th. P-205. 4 credits. CONSTANS.
Sch. 301.-Advanced Public Speaking. 10 daily. P-209. 3 credits. CONSTANS.
Prerequisite: Sch. 201 or C-3H.
Sch. 404.-Dramatic Production. 8:30 daily. P-209. 3 credits. WILLIAN.
Prerequisite or corequisite: Sch. 201 or C-3H.
Consideration of voice, line reading, technique of acting, and principles of character inter-
pretation. The problems of casting, directing, scenery, costuming, lighting, and make-up are
studied with plays in actual rehearsal.


*Of the starred courses only two will be given depending on enrollment.


130





QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS


QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

1. What are the days of registration?
Answer: First Term: June 14, 8-3:30 P.M.
Second Term: July 26, 8-12 noon.

2. Will there be a late registration fee charged to students registering after
the above time?
Anwser: Yes. A late registration fee of $5 will be charged.

3. What is the last day on which a person may register by paying the late
registration fee?
Answer: First Term: June 16.
Second Term: July 28.

4. What is the maximum load a student may carry?
Answer: A student who in the last term of attendance at the University
of Florida made an honor point average below 1.00 (C) may take
a credit hour load of six. A student who made an honor point
average of 1.00 (C) or above may take a credit hour load of nine.
Transfer students may take nine credit hours of work during the
first term, providing their previous record is satisfactory.

5. How many semester hours of credit may be earned during the summer by
attendance at both terms?
Answer: 12 to 18, depending upon the student's honor point average.

6. May students who expect to receive degrees or diplomas at the end of
either term of the Summer Session be given permission to carry more hours
than provided for in No. 5 above?
Answer: No. Exceptions will not be made under any circumstances.

7. May a student complete a correspondence course while attending the Summer
Session?
Answer: Yes, but the hours carried will count in the regular load.

8, a. What courses should a student take in place of required courses no
longer offered, viz., English 101-102, Sociology 111-112, General Natural
Science 101-102?
Answer: For English 101-102 .......................................................... C-3
For Sociology 111-112 ................................... .................. C-1
For General Natural Science 101-102 ............................ C-2 or C-6

NOTE: Those who have taken one-half of any of the former courses
may take either half of the comprehensive course (C-3, C-1,
C-2, or C-6) indicated as a substitute.

b. Who will submit the grades for students not in the General College who
take comprehensive courses?
Answer: In such cases the grades will be submitted by the instructors
concerned and not by the Board of Examiners.






BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


c. How much credit will a student in such cases be allowed for the com-
prehensive course?
Answer: The student will be allowed the credit assigned to such a course.
d. May students registered in the Upper Division apply to take compre-
hensive examinations in courses for which the student is not currently
registered ?
Answer: No. General College students only are permitted to take com-
prehensive examinations by application.
9. Is there a graduation at the end of the first term?
Answer: Yes.
10. May one visit the classes in the laboratory school?
Answer: Yes. Application should be made to the Principal, 120 Yonge
Building. (Only kindergarten and the first six grades will be
taught this summer.)
11. To whom should application be made for part-time work?
Answer: Dean of Students.
12. To whom should application be made for Summer Session loans?
Answer: Dean of Students.
13. To whom should application be made for approved room lists?
Answer: Dean of Students.
14. To whom should application be made for a room reservation in the
dormitories?
Answer: Business Manager. (See page 133 for application blank.)
15. Must one rooming in the dormitories eat in the cafeteria?
Answer: No, but see page 98 for special rates.
16. May children be registered in the laboratory school and live in the dormi-
tories when the mother is a regularly registered student of the Summer
Session?
Answer: Each case will be acted upon separately. Application should be
made to the Dean of Students.
17. Will there be Saturday classes?
Answer: First Term: No. (Except in the College of Law.)
Second Term: Yes.
18. May one comply with the requirements for extension of certificate during
either term?
Answer: Yes.
19. May one get two extensions on a certificate by attending both terms of the
Summer Session?
Answer: No. Only one extension is given.
20. How can information regarding registration procedure be secured?
Answer: By consulting the bulletin boards in the various buildings on the
morning of registration day.





DORMITORY INFORMATION

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


To be filled out by each student who is planning to live in the dormitories for the
1937 Summer Session-and mailed to the Business Office, attention Miss Baker.

Mrs.
1. Miss ...


Last name


First name (in full)


2. A address ..................................
Street and number

3. I wish assignment for the 1st

BUCKMAN HALL

1st floor, Sec.

2nd floor, Sec.

3rd floor, Sec.

THOMAS HALL

Section B

1st floor

2nd floor

3rd floor


City

term-2nd term -both terms.


Remodeled Sections

single or double

1st fl o or ............................ ............................ ..... ..... ..... ...

2n d fl oor ............ -....... ............................ ............................

3rd floor .......- ...-- .... .. ............................ ............................

NEW DORMITORY

1st floor ............... .......... -.......- ..... .. -- ............................

2nd floor ............-.. ..... ........................... ............................

3rd floor ............................ ............................ ......................

4th floor -...........- ....... ...... .................. ............................

Sections A and F under rehabilitation during this session, and therefore will not be
available. Section B will be open, but may not be as desirable as other sections, due to
noise during construction of Section A.

For rates in the dormitories see pages 96 and 97.

[ 133 ]


County State







REQUEST FOR PERMISSION TO LIVE OFF CAMPUS


To the Office of the Dean of Students:

I hereby request permission to be allowed to live off campus during first term, second
term, both terms, of the 1937 Summer Session. (Underscore terms desired.)

In support of this request, the following considerations are offered:

1. I am .................... years of age or over.

2. I have already received a ................................................... degree and am now taking
graduate work.

3. I have been self-supporting during the past year through the following employment:





4. If granted permission to live off campus, I will live in the house appearing on the
Approved Rooming House List at the address below:

(address) (householder)

5. Rooming off campus will be of benefit to me because: ..................-............. .....










(Signed) ................................................................................................

(D ate) ..................................................................... 1937

A approved: ............................ ..........................................

Disapproved: ... ..................... ..... .......................


[ 134 ]






ADMISSION INFORMATION

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
RETURN TO THE REGISTRAR


I C L FF


To be filled out by each student who expects to attend the University of Florida
1937 Summer Session
Mr.
1. M rs........................................... .............................................. ..................... .......... .. .. ................
Miss Last Name First Name (in full) Middle Name Husband's
Initials
2. A address .......................................... ............................................ ............................................ ....................
Street and Number City County State
3. I wish to be admitted for the 1st term-2nd term of the 1937 Summer Session.
(cross out one)
4. I desire to register in the college checked below:
General College............................................. College of Agriculture....................................
College of Arts and Sciences........................ College of Law..... .....................
School of Pharmacy........................................ Graduate School ................................................
r, Graduate School............... .....
College of Business Administration.............
College of Engineering--........................... School of Architecture and Allied
College of. Education ........................................ Arts ................................................................
5. Do you expect to work for a degree or diploma at the University of Florida? ................................
6. Place of college preparation .........................................................................................................---- -.......
(school) (location)
7. List below all institutions of higher learning you have attended and supply the information.
I Would you be allowed to re-
Name of Institution Address register there at any time?



. --..-.-............---...-----------........... -----I---------------------- ----.......................- .....-...

--------------------------- - ---------------------------------

8. Are official transcripts from all the above schools on file in the Registrar's Office at the
University of Florida?.. .......................
9. Give last date of attendance at the University of Florida....................................................................
10. Have you earned any credit by correspondence or extension from the University of
Florida? ...............
11. Have you attended any other college since last attending the University of Florida? ........
12. If the answer to 11 is "yes," have you filed with the Registrar of the University of Florida a
transcript or its equivalent, from the institution last attended? .................................................
13. Your father's occupation while he was living and active..... .....................................................
14. Your birthplace ............................................ 15. Date of birth............................ 16. Age in years.....
17. Religious affiliation or preference....................................................-------- .... Are you a member?................
18. I affirm that the above questions have been answered correctly. If I am admitted upon in-
correct information I understand that my registration will be automatically canceled.

Signed....................................... ............................. ......
[ 135 ]




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