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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00331
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: February 1937
Copyright Date: 1939
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00331
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Full Text




The University Record

of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of the

graduate School
With Announcements for the Year
1937-38


Vol. XXXII, Series 1


No. 2


February 1, 1937


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida




















The Record comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the Bulletins of
Information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of
the University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The appli-
cant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired. Address

THE REGISTRAR, University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of research work.
Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in several series.

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions are
arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges should
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The
issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on Publica-
tions. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional
exchanges, should be addressed to the University Library, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
THE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida







CONTENTS


Graduate School Calendar ......................................
Instructions for Graduate Students ........................................
Administrative Officers ..................... ........ ....... ....
The G graduate Council ................................ ........... ... .. ....
T teaching Faculty .................................................
G general Inform ation ................................ .............................
Graduate Assistantships and Graduate Scholarships ..............
Requirements for the Master's Degree ............................. ......
Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy ..............
Departments of Instruction, Graduate Courses .............................
A agricultural Econom ics .............................................................
Agricultural Engineering ...................................
A gronom y .....................................................
A nim al H usbandry ........................................................
A architecture .................. ........... ....................
B iolog y .................................................... .... .
Botany and Bacteriology ................... ..................
C hem istry .......... ... ............................
E conom ics .......................................... .
E education ............................................
E engineering ... .......................................
E n glish .................................................
Entom ology ......... .......... ................ ...........
F rench ........................ ............................
G reek ..............................................................
H history ............. ............... ........- . ..... .....
H orticulture ......................... ......... ....................
Journalism ......................... .......................................................
L atin ............................................................... ......
Mathematics ......... .................


Page
...... .. .............. 40
................................. ....... 41
. ........................................ 42
........................................ 42
. ..... ....... ....... ............. 42
......................................... 46
......... ................................ 47
........................................ 48
............... . ................ 50
.......................................... 52
................. ...................... 52
....................................... 52
......... ..... ......... ................ 53
......................................... 53
.....-................................. 54
. ......................................... 55
.......................................... 56
......................................... 57
........................................... 59
............. .......................... 61
...... ....................... ..... 63
-................ .........-............. 66
..........-.................... -......... 66
...................---............-...--......-- 67

.......................................... 67
......................................... 68
......--........................---.....--.....- 68
....-...-.......-.... .......... ....... 68
......................................... 69


Painting ................. .. ............................................................................. 70
Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology ...... .................... ......... ........... ......- 70
Pharm acy ........................................ .......... .. .... .... ....... ....... ... ... .... 71
Philosophy -.......................... .. ....................... ........... 71
Physics 7........-... ......................2..... ............ .......... . ......... .... ...- 72
Political Science ................ ..--............................. ... ..... .... .............. 73
P psychology ................................................................. .......... ............................... ........... 73
Sociology ....................................................... ............................. 74
Spanish .................................... ...... .............. ....... ......... .... 74
Graduate Assistants, 1936-1937 .............................. .. ..... .. .. . .......... ................. 75
Graduate Scholars, 1936-1937 ..................................................... ................... 76
Recipients of Graduate Degrees ........................................ ........... ................... 76
Sum m ary .................. .......-. ............ ... ...................... ....... ... ... . .. ................................. 78


[39]


_I-






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

GRADUATE SCHOOL CALENDAR


SECOND TERM, 1936-37

February 4, Thursday.................................... Registration for second term.
February 11, Thursday, 5 p. m................... Last day for registration for second term.
February 27, Saturday, 12 noon.................. Last day for making application for a degree
at the end of the second term.
March 15, Monday ............. ........................ Last day for resident students to satisfy the
language requirements if they wish to be can-
didates for the Master's degree at the end of
the First Summer Term.
April 19, Monday. ............-- .......... .... Last day for resident students to satisfy the
language requirements if they wish to be can-
didates for the Master's degree at the end of
the Second Summer Term.
May 1, Saturday.................................... Last day for students graduating at the end of
the term to submit theses to the Dean.
June 5-7, Saturday-Monday..................... Commencement Exercises.

SUMMER SESSION, 1937

FIRST SUMMER TERM

June 14, M onday.................... ............... Registration.
June 21, Monday, 12 noon............................ Last lay for registration for the First Summer
Term, and for adding courses.
June 26, Saturday, 12 noon.......................... Last day for making application for a degree
at the end of the First Summer Term.
July 3, Saturday...................... ................. Last day for students graduating at the end of
the First Summer Term to submit theses to
the Dean.
July 23, Friday, 12 noon................. ..... ...... First Summer Term ends.
July 24, Saturday, 10 a. m........................... Conferring of degrees.

-ECOND SUMMER TERM

July 26, M onday ................... .......... Registration.
July 28, Wednesday ............-................. Last day for registration for the Second Summer
Term, and for adding courses.
July 31, Saturday, 12 noon......................... Last day for making application for a degree
at the end of the Second Summer Term.
August 7, Saturday .............................. Last day for students graduating at the end of
the Second Summer Term to submit theses to
the Dean.






INSTRUCTION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 41

August 27, Friday. 12 noon.......................... Second Summer Term ends.

August 28. Saturday. 10 a. m. ................... Commencement Convocation.

REGULAR SESSION. 1937-38

FIRST TERM

September 18, Saturday, 8-12 a. m ............ Registration.

October 2, Saturday, 12 noon.................. Last day for registration for the first term, and
for adding courses.

October 16, Saturday. 12 noon................. Last day for making application for a degree at
the end of the first term.

November 24, Wednesday, 5 p. n.............. Thanksgiving recess begins.

November 29, Monday, 8 a. m..................... Thanksgiving recess ends.

December 18. Saturday. 12 noon............... Christmas recess begins.

1938-

January 3. Monday, 8 a. m........................... Christmas recess ends.
Last day for students graduating at the end of
the first term to submit theses to the Dean.

January 31, Monday. 10 a. m............... First term ends. Conferring of degrees.


INSTRUCTIONS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

1. Correspond with the Dean and if necessary with the head of the department in
which you propose to take your major work.
2. If you are found eligible and decide to come to the University of Florida, have the
Registrar of your school send a transcript of your work to the Dean of the Graduate School.
This should be in the hands of the Dean at least a month before the date for registration.
3. At the proper time, register with the Dean. He will give you blank form No. 1
to take to your department head. Either the head of the department or some other
professor in this department will become the professor of your major subject and will
suggest courses for which you should register for the session. Take this blank to the Dean
and complete your registration.
4. See that the language requirements are satisfied at the proper time.
5. Early in your last term before graduation, notify the Registrar by the time indicated
in the calendar that you are a candidate for a degree.
6. When you are ready to put the thesis in final form, get instructions at the Dean's
office. Watch your time. Consult the calendar.
7. Look to the professor of your major subject and your special supervisory committee
for guidance.
8. Always feel free to seek information at the Dean's office if you have any doubt in
regard to requirements.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
LILLIAN WOOD, B.A., Secretary to the Dean

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
THE DEAN
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, Ph.D., Professor of Economics
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agronomy
H. HAROLD HUME, M.S., Assistant Dean of the College of Agriculture and Director of
Research of the Experiment Station
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Professor of Secondary Education and High School Visitor,
Associate Dean of the General College
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Education and Dean of the College of
Education
BLAKE RAGSDALE VAN LEER, M.S. in M.E., M.E., Professor of Engineering and Dean of the
College of Engineering

TEACHING FACULTY
Those offering courses listed in this bulletin

CHARLES ELLIOTT ABBOTT, M.S., Assistant Professor of Horticulture
JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Ancient Languages and Dean of the
Graduate School
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D., Professor of Business Statistics and Economics
WILLIAM TOBIAS ARNETT, M.A.Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture
ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D., Head Professor of French
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Professor of Economic Geography
ROBERT MARLIN BARNETTE, Ph.D., Chemist, Experiment Station
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A., Associate Professor of Sociology
RAYMOND BROWN BECKER, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Dairy Husbandman,
Agricultural Experiment Station
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, D.Sc., Professor of Chemical Engineering
EDWARD W. BERGER, Ph.D., Entomologist, Florida State Plant Board
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, Ph.D., Professor of Economics
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, Ph.D., Professor of Physics
Lucius MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D., Head Professor of Sociology
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French
OLLIE CLIFTON BRYAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agronomy
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology
HENRY HOLLAND CALDWELL, M.A., Assistant Professor of English
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
JAMES EDWARD CHACE, JR., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics and Realty Manage-
ment






TEACHING FACULTY


BERNARD VICTOR CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D.. Head Professor of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology,
and Director of the School of Pharmacy
MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Head Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
ALFRED CRAGO. Ph D., Professor of Educational Psychology and Tests and Measurements
JOHN THOMAS CREIGHTON, Ph.D., Assis:ant Professor and Acting Head of Department of
En:omology and Plant Pathology
CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, Ph.D., Head Professor of Spanish and German
MANNING JULIAN DAUER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science
SICISMOND DE RHUDESHEIM DIETTRICH, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economic Geography
HARWOOD BURROWS DOLBEARE, B.A., Associate Professor of Economics
WARREN FORD DOOLITTLE JR, B.F A., Instructor in Drawing and Painting
NEWTON CROMWELL EBAUCH, B.E. in M. and E.E.. MI.E., \ S., Head Professor of Mechani-
cal Engineering
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Associate Professor of Economics
MARK WIRTH EMIMEL, D.V.M., M.S., Professor of Veterinary Science and Veterinarian,
Agricultural Experiment Station
ELMER JACOB EMIc, M.A., Head Professor of Journalism
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D., Head Professor of Philosophy
ROLAND BYERLY EUTSLER, Ph.D.. Professor of Economics and Insurance
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., Associate Professor of English
WILLIAM WARRICK FINEREN, M.E., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
ELIOT CHAPIN FLETCHER, M.F.A. Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture
WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S., Head Professor of Horticulture and Assistant Dean of the
College of Agriculture
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy
ROWLAND BARNES FRENCH, Ph.D., Associate Chemist, Experiment Station
JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D., Professor of Public School Administration
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education
HALLETT HUNT GERMOND, Ph D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, Ph.D, Associate Professor of History
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing Agricultural Products
FREDERICK T. HANNAFORD, B.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, Ph.D., Instructor in Spanish
JOHN ERSKINE HAWKINS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry
WILLIAM TROTTER HICKS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics and Marketing
THOMAS JEFFERSON HIGGINS, M.A., Instructor in Spanish
ELMER DUMNOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Head of Department of Psychology
THEODORE HUNTINGTON HUBBELL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, M.A., LLB., Associate Professor of Business Law and Economics
WILLIAM JOHN HUSA, Ph.D., Head Professor of Pharmacy
EDWARD JOSEPH IRELAND, Ph.D., Instructor in Pharmacognosy and Pharm.cology
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry
FRANK STOVER JAMISON, Ph.D., Truck Horticulturist, Experiment Station
WILLIAMI GORDON KIRK, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry and Assistant
Animal Husbandman, Agricultural Experiment Station
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics
JAMES _MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D., Head Professor of History and Political Science






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences
WALTER ANTHONY LEUKEL, Ph.D., Agronomist, Experiment Station
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Professor of Secondary Education and High School Visitor,
Associate Dean of General College
THOMAS MARVEL LOWE, S.B., M.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
CLIFFORD PIERSON LYONS, Ph.D., Head Professor of English
JESSE WILFORD MASON, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head Professor of Economics, Acting Dean of the
General College, Dean of the College of Business Administration
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D., Professor of Supervised Teaching and Director of Educa-
tional Research
NORMAN RIPLEY MEHRHOF, M.S., Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Poultry Husbandman,
Agricultural Experiment Station
GEORGE B. MERRILL, B.S., Associate Entomologist, Florida State Plant Board
WAYNE MILLER NEAL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Nutrition and Associate in
Nutrition, Agricultural Experiment Station
CLARENCE VERNON NOBLE, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agricultural Economics
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Education and Dean of the College of
Education
ANCIL NEWTON PAYNE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History and Political Science
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S., Associate Professor of Physics
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry
PERCY LAWRENCE REED, C.E., M.S., Head Professor of Civil Engineering
JULIUS WAYNE REITZ, M.S., Associate Professor of Agricultural Economics
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., Professor of English
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Head Professor of Agricultural Engineering
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D., Head Professor of Biology and Geology
RUDOLPH WILLIAM RUPRECHT, Ph.D., Chemist, Experiment Station, Head of Department
Louis LEON RUSOFF, M.S., Instructor in Animal Nutrition and Assistant in Animal Nutri-
tion, Agricultural Experiment Station
ELLIS BENTON SALT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Health and Physical Education
STEPHEN PENCHEFF SASHOFF, M.S., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Farm Crops and Genetics
ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY, B.S., D.V.M., Head Professor of Animal Husbandry and Animal
Husbandman
HARLEY BAKWEL SHERMAN, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biology
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Assistant Dean in Charge of
Laboratory School
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Mathematics
BUNNIE OTHANEL SMITH, M.A., Assistant Professor of Curriculum Revision
HERMAN EVERETTE SPIVEY, Ph.D., Instructor in English
OSWALD C. R. STAGEBERG, B.S. Arch., Assistant Professor of Architecture
ARTHUR Louis STAHL, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist, Experiment Station
ROBERT ALDEN THOMPSON, B.S.M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering
LLOYD MASSENA THURSTON, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Dairy Technologist
ARCHIE NEWTON TISSOT, Ph.D., Associate Entomologist, Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station
FRANK WALDO TUTTLE, Ph.D.. Assistant Professor of Economics



























TEACHING FACULTY 45

BLAKE RAGSDALE VAN LEER, B.S. in E.E., M.S. in M.E., M.E., Professor of Engineering
and Dean of the College of Engineering
JOSEPH RALPH WATSON, M.A., Entomologist, Florida Experiment Station
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S.. F.A.I.A., Head Professor of Architecture and Director of the School
of Architecture and Allied Arts
JOSEPH WEIL, B.S.E.E., M.S., Head Professor of Electrical Engineering, Head of Engi-
neering Division, State Radio Station WRUF
FRANCIS DUDLEY WILLIAMS. Ph.D.. Instructor in Physics
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology
ROBERT CROZIER WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Physics
CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, M.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D., Professor of Education
PHILIP OSBORNE YEATON. B.S.. S.B.. Head Professor of Industrial Engineering






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMINISTRATION

The affairs of the Graduate School are administered by the Graduate Council, which
consists of the Dean as ex-officio chairman, and certain members of the faculty, who are
appointed annually by the President.

ADMISSION

For admission to the Graduate School, two things are needed: (1) Graduation from
a standard college or university; (2) foundation in the major subject sufficient in quantity
and quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student proposes to major.
Each department offering graduate work shall file with the Dean of the Graduate School
a statement of its requirements for publication in the Graduate Bulletin or for other use
by him.
If the student cannot meet these two requirements, he may nevertheless be permitted
to register provisionally, and demonstrate by a qualifying examination and a semester's
work, his preparation for and his ability to do graduate work. Such students often will
be required to spend longer than the prescribed time in completing the requirements for
the degree. It is permissible for well-qualified students to take courses in the Graduate
School without becoming candidates for an advanced degree.

REGISTRATION

All graduate students, old or new, are required to register in the Office of the Dean
on the regular registration days as indicated in the bulletin. The student should consult
in advance the Dean and the head of the department in which he proposes to major, and
inquire if he is eligible to register for this work. A complete transcript of all undergraduate
and graduate work should be sent direct to the Dean of the Graduate School from the
institution in which the credits have been earned.
This transcript should be in the Dean's hands at least one month before the beginning
of the session. If the student seems eligible, he will be referred by the Dean to the head
of the department concerned. Either the head of the department or some professor in
that department will become the professor of the major subject for the student, and will
plan the courses for which he is to register. A blank form is furnished at the Dean's Office.

FEES

A registration fee of $15 for each semester is required of all students; for the summer
session this fee is $15 for each term. All students pay a diploma fee of $5 before
graduation.
Students from other states or countries who have not established residence in the
State of Florida are required to pay an additional fee of $50 for each semester of the
regular session and an additional fee of $10 for each term of the summer session.
Holders of graduate assistantships and graduate scholarships are exempt from the tuition
fee for non-Florida students, but not from breakage fees.
Some fees are optional: for instance, the student activity fee and the infirmary fee.
If a student wishes the privileges that go with these fees, he must pay the fees in advance.











GENERAL INFORMATION


GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AND GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS

With the Annual Stipend
AGRICULTURE:
Agricultural Economics-One Graduate Assistant in Farm Management
Agronomy-
One Graduate Assistant at $450 .. .. ................................
One Graduate Assistant (% time) at $750 .................................
Botany and Bacteriology-
One Graduate Assistant in Bacteriology at $450 ..........................
One Graduate Assistant in Botany at $450 .........................................
Entomology and Plant Pathology-
One Graduate Assistant at $450 ................ ...... .................................
One Graduate Fellow at $600 .....................................
Horticulture- One Graduate Assistant ...................................
(Agricultural Chemistry is included in Chemistry)

ARCHITECTURE:
One Graduate Assistant ........ .......

BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY:
Three Graduate Assistants at $450 each .....................

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS:
Two Graduate Assistants at $405 each ................. ........................

CHEMISTRY:


......... ......... 450


.................... 450
..................... 750


..................... 150
..................... 450


.. ................ 450
..................... 600
..................... 450


....... 1,350



........ 810


.. ....... 450
.. .... 450
..... ................... 1,800
. .... 2,400


One Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry ...
One Graduate Assistant in Chemical Engineering .........
Four Graduate Assistants in Chemistry at $450 each
Four Research Assistants in Naval Stores at $600 each

ENGINEERING :
Civil Engineering-One Graduate Assistant .............
Mechanical Engineering-One Graduate Assistant ..........
(Chemical Engineering is included in Chemistry)

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY:
Two Graduate Assistants at $450 each ...................

PHARMACY:
Three Graduate Assistants at $450 each .............

PHYSICS:
Three Graduate Assistants at $360 each ....

PSYCHOLOGY :
One Graduate Assistant at $450 .......................

GENERAL:
Ten Graduate Scholarships at $300 each ......


.360
.... 500


1,080


3,000


(The Graduate Scholarships may be in any department that offers major work for a
Master's degree. Application must be filed not later than March 15. Students accepting
these scholarships are not permitted to take other remunerative positions.)






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

Degrees Offered.-Master of Arts; Master of Arts in Architecture; Master of Arts in
Education; Master of Science; Master of Science in Agriculture; Master of Science in
Engineering; and Master of Science in Pharmacy.
Residence Requirement.-The student must spend at least one entire academic year at
the University as a graduate student devoting his full time to the pursuit of his studies.
If there is a break in the student's work, his whole course must be included within a period
of seven years, unless the Supervisory Committee recommends otherwise.
Transfer of Credits.-Under certain conditions transfer of a limited amount of credits
to the University will be allowed; but the final acceptance of credits from other institutions
is subject to the approval of the student's Supervisory Committee. When a transfer of
credits is permitted it may reduce the course requirement but not the residence, and shall
be included in the final examination.
Work Required.-The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program with a
definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester hours or the equivalent, at least half
of which shall be in a single field of study and the remainder in related subject matter as
determined by the student's Supervisory Committee. The principal part of the course
work for the master's degree shall be designated strictly for graduates. However, in the
case of related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be offered upon the
approval of the Supervisory Committee.
In addition to the course work, the student will be required to prepare and present a
thesis (or equivalent in creative work) acceptable to the Supervisory Committee. The
thesis shall be submitted to the Dean or the Graduate Council for approval. The student
should consult the Dean's office for instructions concerning the form of the thesis. Two
copies of this thesis shall be in the hands of the Dean not later than May 1. If the student
expects to graduate at the end of the first term the thesis must be submitted by January 3.
These copies are deposited in the Library if the thesis is accepted.
Grades.-To obtain credit for a graduate course the student must attain a grade not
lower than B in both major and minor work. Re-examinations are not permitted.

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT.-
1. Foreign Language.-A reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the
discretion of the student's Supervisory Committee. When a foreign language is required
the examination will be conducted by the language department concerned. The require-
ment must be satisfied before the beginning of the last semester. A student in the regular
session must pass the language examination by March 15 if he expects to graduate at
the end of the first summer term of that year, and by April 20 if he expects to graduate
at the end of the second summer term. In case the student is completing all his work in
the summer terms, the foreign language requirement must be satisfied before the beginning
of the fourth short summer term. If the student is majoring in a foreign language, that
language cannot be used to satisfy this requirement.
2. English Language.-The effective use of the English language of an order suitable
to the master's level, as determined by the student's Supervisory Committee, is required of
all candidates for the master's degree.
Admission to Candidacy.-Whether an applicant has been provisionally admitted or
regularly admitted, his Supervisory Committee shall review his entire academic record
at the end of his first semester or summer session of residence work. Upon recommenda-
tion of the committee a formal vote of the principal department concerned will be neces-






REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES


sary to admit the applicant to candidacy, to fix definitely the additional residence and
course requirements, and to approve the program the applicant has submitted.
Supervisory Committee.-The Dean shall appoint a special Supervisory Committee for
each student consisting of not less than three members. The professor of the principal
subject will be chairman of this committee. The Dean is an ex-officio member of all Super-
visory Committees. The many important duties of the Supervisory Committee will be
given under several of the items relating to the requirements for the master's degree.
General Examination.--It will be the duty of the Special Supervisory Committee, when
all work is complete or practically complete, including the regular courses and the thesis,
to conduct a general examination, either written or oral, or both, to embrace: first, the
thesis; second, the major subject; third, the minor or minors; fourth, questions of a general
nature pertaining to the student's field of study. The Committee shall report in writing
to the Dean not later than one week before the time for the conferring of the degree if
all work has been completed in a satisfactory manner and the student is recommended
for the degree.
Work Done in Absentia.-Credit is not given for work done in absentia. No courses
may be taken for credit by extension or correspondence. Under the following conditions,
however, the Graduate Council may vote to allow the student to finish and submit his thesis
when not in residence:
(1) If he has completed his residence requirement.
(2) If he has completed his course requirements.
(3) If he has submitted while in residence a draft of his thesis and obtained the
approval of his supervisory committee as to the substance of his thesis.
(4) If the Supervisory Committee recommends to the Graduate Council that the student
be given the privilege of finishing the thesis in absentia and submitting it later.
In case this privilege is granted and the final draft of the thesis is approved, it will be
necessary for the student to appear and stand the final examination. His presence will
also be necessary at Commencement if the degree is conferred.
Training for Government Service.-In view of the increasing importance of training
for the public service at the present time, the University of Florida offers the following
program for the University of Florida students who are interested in pursuing graduate
work in public administration:
(1) Training in public administration should be accompanied by specific work in public offices
under recognized supervision. Accordingly, the University of Florida has arranged a program
which will enable the student to avail himself of facilities and specialized courses offered by
approved institutions in Washington, D. C., which give such training. The procedure necessary
is that the student make application by February 1, if he intends to pursue such graduate
training the following fall. In February the Graduate Council of the University of Florida will
consider his application. If the application is viewed favorably, the student may be permitted
to register for the following year at the University of Florida, although he will pursue his
scholastic work at Washington in absentia from the University of Florida. The Graduate Council
will approve the studies he undertakes in Washington, and the topic for his thesis. The student
will be encouraged to take courses in public administration in Washington, and to avail himself
of the use of facilities which are offered for the pursual of training in government departments.
The credit earned by the student during this year's work may not exceed one-half of a full
year's graduate work.
(2) Upon return of the student to the University of Florida, he will be required to complete
the remaining one-half of the credit necessary for earning the Master's degree. Likewise, he
will be required to write his thesis under the supervision of his major professor at the University
of Florida. Finally, he will remain in residence at the University of Florida for a period of
at least nine months. During these nine months, however, he may take as little as one-half of
a full graduate load; the rest of his time may be devoted to work on the campus, as a graduate
assistant, teaching fellow. etc., if he has secured such an award.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


At the time the student is preparing to make application to the Graduate Council, he is
urged to secure information about the programs of the institutions at Washington, and to make
application with them for such fellowships as may be available. These fellowships are entirely
under the control of the institutions in question. The program of the National Institute of Public
Affairs in Washington, while limited to fifty students selected by the Institute each year, offers
particular advantage to students who contemplate graduate training in public administration.
Summer Terms.-Three complete summer sessions, or six short summer terms, devoted
entirely to graduate work, will satisfy the time requirement. The terms need not be
consecutive, but the work must be completed within seven years. The thesis must be
completed and submitted to the Dean not later than three weeks before the end of the
summer term in which the student expects to receive his degree.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered only in the departments of Animal
Biology, Chemistry, Pharmacy, and Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology. It is expected that
other departments will be added from year to year as facilities are increased.
Time and Residence.-A minimum of three academic years of resident graduate work.
of which at least the last year must be spent at the University of Florida, is required
of all candidates for the Doctor's degree. In many cases, it will be necessary to remain
longer than three years, and necessarily so when the student is not putting in his full time
in graduate work.
Distribution of Work.-Two-thirds of the student's time is expected to be spent upon
his major subject and the dissertation, and about one-third on his minor or minors. The
student will be guided by the professor of his major subject and by his special committee
in regard to his whole course of study. The Graduate Council does not specify just what
courses or how many courses will be required. The work is now mainly research, and
the student will be thrown largely upon his own responsibility. He is expected to familiarize
himself thoroughly with his field of study, and as a result of his studies and investigations,
to produce a work which will add something to human knowledge.
Minors.-The student must take one minor and may not take more than two minors.
In general, if two minors are taken, the second minor will require at least one year. The
first minor will require twice as much work as the second, and if only one minor is take
it will require as much work as two minors.
Special Committee.-When the student has advanced sufficiently towards his degree,
a special committee will be appointed by the Dean, of which committee the professor of
the major subject will be chairman. This committee will direct, advise, and examine the
student. The Dean is ex-officio a member of all supervisory committees.
Language Requirement.-A reading knowledge of both French and German is required
of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. The examinations in the languages are held by
the language departments concerned. These requirements should be removed as early as
possible in the student's career, and must be satisfied before the applicant can be admitted
to the qualifying examination.
Qualifying Examination.-A qualifying examination is required of all candidates for
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. This examination may be held during the second
term of the second year of residence. The examination is both written and oral and
covers both major and minor subjects. It will be conducted by his Special Supervisory
Committee. After passing the qualifying examination the student must put in one full
academic year of residence before he comes up for the degree. If the student fails in
his qualifying examination, he will not be given another opportunity unless for special





















REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES


reasons a re-examination is recommended by his special committee and approved by the
Graduate Council.
Dissertation.-A satisfactory dissertation showing independent investigation and research
is required of all candidates. Two typewritten copies of this dissertation must be presented
to the Dean not later than May 1 of the year in which the candidate expects to receive
his degree. If the student should be a candidate for the degree in a summer term, the
thesis must be completed and submitted to the Dean not later than three weeks before
the end of the term in which the student expects to receive his degree.
Printing of Dissertation.-One hundred printed copies of the dissertation must be
presented to the University within one year after the conferring of the degree. After
the dissertation has been accepted, the candidate must deposit with the Business Manager,
not later than one week before the degree is conferred, the sum of $50 as a pledge that
the dissertation will be published within the prescribed time. This sum will be returned
if the printed copies are received within the year.
Final Examination.-After the acceptance of the dissertation and the completion of all
the work of the candidate, he will be given a final examination, oral or written, or both,
by his Special Supervisory Committee.
Recommendation.-If the final examination is passed, the Special Committee will report
to the Dean in writing not later than one week before the time for conferring the degree
that the student has met all requirements for the degree, and that he is presented to the
Graduate Council for recommendation to the Board of Control for the degree of Doctor
of Philosophy.








BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Graduate Courses.-Only strictly graduate courses are listed in this bulletin. For other
courses in the various departments, see the Bulletin of Information for the Colleges and
Professional Schools of the Upper Division.
The courses are arranged alphabetically. Not all the courses will be given in 1937-38.
In some cases the courses not offered for that year are indicated. In other cases the courses
actually given will be determined by the demand.

GRADUATE COURSES

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

Prerequisites: The student as a rule will have received his B.S. degree in agriculture
from a college of recognized standing. The student must next satisfy one or more pro-
fessors in each subject which he has chosen for major and minor study that lie has ihe
necess ry preparation to pursue graduate work in that subject.
As. 501-502.-Agricultural Economics Seminar. 2 hours. 4 credits. NOBLE
and the Agricultural Economics STAFF.
A study of recent literature and research work in agricultural economics. (An entire change
of subject matter will be made.)
As. 505-506.-Research Problems.-Farm Management. Hours to be arranged
by the Head of the Department. NOBLE, REITZ.
As. 508.-Land Economics. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
HAMILTON.
Rural taxation, colonization, and adjustment of rural lands to their best uses.
As. 509.-Citrus Grove Organization and Management. 1 hour and 2 hours
laboratory. 2 credits. REITZ.
The organization and management of successful citrus properties in Florida.
As. 510.-Organization and Management of Truck Farms. 1 hour and 2 hours
laboratory. 2 credits. NOBLE.
The economic organization and management of successful truck farms in Florida.
As. 511-512.-Research Problems-Marketing Agricultural Products. Hours
and credit to be arranged and approved by the Head of the Department. HAM-
ILTON.
As. 514.-Advanced Marketing of Agricultural Products. 2 hours and 2 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. HAMILTON.
Study of private and cooperative agencies marketing agricultural products and commodities.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree in Agriculture. A minimum of ten semester hours in
Agricultural Engineering.
Ag. 501-502.-Seminar. 2 hours. 4 credits. ROGERS.
Discussion of agricultural engineering problems and review of literature. Required of all
graduate students registered in the department.
Ag. 503-504.-Research. 6 hours. 12 credits. ROGERS.
Special problems in agricultural engineering.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


AGRONOMY

Prerequisites: A student who expects to pursue graduate work in Agronomy should
present the Bachelor's degree from a recognized College of Agriculture. with a major in
Agronomy, or the equivalent in o:her sciences. This would ordinarily mean at least eighteen
hours, or its equivalent, of undergraduate work in the department. The student will be
held responsible for such basic undergraduate courses as are deemed necessary for the
pursuit of his special project.
Ay. 500.-Advanced Plant Genetics. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. Prerequisite:
Ay. 309 (Principles of Genetics). (Offered in even years.)
Variation and inheritance in plants and the application of genetic principles to plant improve-
ment. Sterility, hybrid vigor, inbreeding, pure lines, disease resistance, chromosomal variations,
and the newer cytological approach to genetical investigations.
Ay. 501-502.-Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. BRYAN and SENN.
Discussion and review of current literature dealing with soils and crops.
Ay. 504.-Soil Development and Classification. 2 hours and 2 hours laboratory.
3 credits. BRYAN. Prerequisite: Ay. 301 (Soils).
Origin, nomenclature, and classification of soil materials; effect of climate, vegetative cover,
and parent material on development of the soil profile; basis of soil classification, mapping and
utilization; soil groups and genetic types of the world.
Ay. 505-506.-Special Problems in Soils and Crops. 2 to 5 credits. BRYAN,
SENN, RUPRECHT, BARNETTE.
Ay. 508.-Methods of Crop Investigation. 2 hours. 2 credits. SENN. Pre-
requisites: Ay. 301 (Soils), 309 (Principles of Genetics). (Offered in odd
years.)
Field plot technic, statistical analysis of data based on biometrical methods; environmental
factors influencing experimental results.
Ay. 511.-Soil Analysis. 1 hour and 5 hours laboratory. 3 credits. BARNETTE.
Prerequisites: Ay. 301 (Soils), Cy. 201 (Analytical Chemistry).
Methods of total and partial analysis of soils and technic in soil research; physical, chemical
and biological principles involved; quantitative methods of measuring soil reaction, replaceable
bases and carbon.
Ay. 514.-Advanced Soils. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. BRYAN.
Prerequisite: Ay. 511 (Soil Analysis).
Organic and inorganic components of the soil and their physico-chemical properties, including
the origin, nature, and significance of soil colloids, replaceable bases; reaction and solubility of
minerals as related to plants.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
(Including Dairying, Poultry Husbandry and Veterinary Science)

Prerequisites: Twenty-four hours or equivalent of approved undergraduate work in
Animal Husbandry.

ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND NUTRITION
Al. 501-502.-Animal Production. 3 hours. 6 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
Problems in the production of domestic animals; development of types and breeds; manage-
ment of herds; research on selected topics.
Al. 503-504.-Animal Nutrition. 3 hours. 6 credits. BECKER and RUSOFF.
Prerequisites: Cy. 262 (Organic Chemistry), or Al. 309 (Fundamentals of Animal
Husbandry) and Al. 312 (Feeds and Feeding).
Relative composition of feeds; digestion in ruminants; development of feeding standards;
protein, energy, vitamins, and mineral elements in nutrition.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Al. 505-506.-Live Stock Records. 2 hours. 4 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
History of live stock in the South; methods of breed associations; research on selected topics.
Al. 508.-Methods in Animal Research. 2 hours. 2 credits. BECKER.
Methods employed in nutritional, feeding and management investigations with farm animals.
Al. 509-510.-Problems in Animal Nutrition. 2 to 5 credits. BECKER, NEAL,
RUSOFF.
Al. 511-512.-Problems in Swine Production. 2 to 5 credits. KIRK and
SHEALY.
Al. 513-514.-Problems in Beef Production. 2 to 5 credits. KIRK and
SHEALY.
DAIRYING

Dy. 520.-Advanced Dairy Technology. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 3
credits. THURSTON.
Advanced laboratory methods and their application in chemical and bacteriological control
of milk and milk products; also assigned references.
Dy. 521-522.-Problems in Milk and Milk Products. 2 to 5 credits. THURSTON.
Dy. 523-524.-Problems in Dairy Production. 2 to 5 credits. BECKER.

POULTRY

Py. 531-532.-Advanced Poultry Management. 3 hours. 6 credits. MEHRHOF.
The economic organization and management of poultry farms in Florida; a study and analysis
of poultry farm records.
Py. 533-534.-Poultry Research Problems. 2 to 5 hours credit. MEHRHOF.

VETERINARY

Vy. 543-544.-Problems in Animal Pathology. 2 to 5 credits. EMMEL.

ARCHITECTURE

Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in Architecture.
Ae. 501-502.-Architectural Design. 18 hours design and research. 12 credits.
WEAVER, ARNETT. Prerequisite: Ae. 21 B (Architectural Design).
Research on a special phase of architectural design, selected by the student with approval of
the Director.
Ae. 521-522.-Advanced Freehand Drawing. 6 hours studio. 4 credits.
DOOLITTLE. Prerequisite: Ae. 31 B (Freehand Drawing and Water Color).
Ae. 525-526.-Advanced Water Color. 6 hours studio. 4 credits. STAGEBERG.
Prerequisite: Ae. 31 B (Freehand Drawing and Water Color).
Outdoor sketching from nature. Advanced architectural rendering.
Ae. 531-532.-Historical Research. 2 hours. 4 credits. FLETCHER, STAGEBERG.
Prerequisite: Ae. 41 C (Decorative Arts).
Research on some historical phase or phases of architecture and allied arts, determined by the
student in consultation with his advisers.
Ae. 551-552.-Building Construction. 2 hours. 4 credits. HANNAFORD. Pre-
requisite: Ae. 51 A (Materials and Methods of Construction).
Research on various types of building materials, their methods of and fitness for use in various
parts of the country, with advancement of some original theories in connection with such subjects.
Ae. 553-554.-Structural Design of Buildings. 2 hours. 4 credits. HANNA-
FORD. Prerequisite: Ae. 61 B (Structural Design of Buildings).
Research on a special phase of reinforced concrete or steel design and construction of buildings.
with advancement of some original theories in connection with such subjects.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


BIOLOGY

Prerequisites: Approximately thirty hours of approved undergraduate courses in Animal
Biology, including at least a one-semester course in each of the following: General or
Invertebrate Zoology, Comparative Vertebrate Morphology, Embryology and Genetics.
Students not meeting the above requirements will be required to make up any deficiency
early in their graduate work.
In addition, it is strongly advised that the student have completed at least three semester
courses in two of the following fields: Botany, Chemistry, Forestry, Geology, Physics,
Psychology and Soil Science.
The Department of Biology plans to retain the foreign language requirements for all
graduate degrees.
Bly. 505.-History of Biology. 2 hours. 2 credits. ROGERS. Prerequisite:
An undergraduate major in biology. Required of all graduate majors in the
department.
Bly. 506.-Biological Literature and Institutions. 2 hours. 2 credits. STAFF.
Required of all graduate majors. Prerequisite: Bly. 505 (History of Biology).
A review of the compendia, journals, and bibliographic sources in the various fields of biology
and a survey of the workers, collections, and special fields of research of some of the more
important laboratories and museums of zoology. Considerable emphasis will be placed upon
the preparation of reports and digests and the use of bibliographic sources.
Bly. 507-508.-Taxonomic Studies. 1 hour and 6 or 12 hours laboratory.
3 or 5 credits per term. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS.
The detailed classification of a selected group of animals, well represented in the local fauna.
Bly. 509.-Zoogeography. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUBBELL.
Bly. 510.-Animal Ecology. 2 hours and 1 or 2 half days of field or labora-
tory. 3 or 4 credits. ROGERS. Ordinarily Bly. 509 and 510 should be taken in
sequence.
Lectures and discussions on the principles and methods of ecology with special reference
to animals; field and laboratory work on the ecological measurements of the physical factors
and observations on the biota of representative Florida habitats.
Bly. 513-514.-Vertebrate Morphology. 1 hour and 6 or 12 hours laboratory.
3 or 5 credits each term. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: An undergraduate major in
biology, including Bly. 210 (Vertebrate Embryology).
Bly. 515-516.-Invertebrate Morphology. 1 hour and 6 or 12 hours laboratory.
3 or 5 credits each term. HUBBELL or BYERS. Prerequisite: An undergraduate
major in biology, including a course in Invertebrate Zoology.
Bly. 519-520.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Hours to be arranged.
Thesis required. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS. Prerequisite: an ap-
proved major in biology.
All applicants for the Master's degree are required to undertake an approved individual problem
in biology, the results of which will be embodied in a Master's thesis. Such problems will be
carried out under direction of a member of the staff. Problems may be chosen from one of the
following fields: vertebrate or invertebrate morphology or embryology; classification or taxonomy
of certain approved groups; natural history or distribution of a selected group of local animals;
investigations of animal habitats in the Gainesville area.
Bly. 521-522.-Natural History of Selected Animals. 1 hour and 6 or 12
hours laboratory or field work. 3 or 5 credits. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or
BYERS. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Bly. 510 (Animal Ecology).
A detailed study of the life history or life histories and ecological relationships of some species
or natural group of local animals.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Bly. 523-524.-Natural History of Selected Animals. A second year continua-
tion of Bly. 521-522. Hours and credits to be arranged.
Bly. 533-534.-Problems and Concepts of Taxonomy and Nomenclature. 2
hours. 2 credits per term. STAFF. Prerequisites: Bly. 325 (Genetics and
Evolution) and Bly. 507-508 (Taxonomic Studies).
A critical study of selected taxonomic synopses, revision and monographs with special refer-
ence to the bearing of the principles and concepts of distribution, genetics, ecology on taxonomic
problems.
Bly. 539-540.-Graduate Seminar. 1 hour. 1 credit per term. STAFF.
Bly. 651-652.-Research. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS.
Open to students who have completed the equivalent of the Master's work and are prepared
to carry on partially independent work on approved phases of animal ecology, ecological or
geographical distribution, life history studies, or morphological investigations on the local fauna.
Required of all applicants for the Ph.D. in Animal Biology.

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

BOTANY
Prerequisites:
1. Bachelor's degree.
2. At least twenty semester hours in botany.
Bty. 500-0500.-Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. CODY, CARROLL.
Review and discussion of current literature on problems of botany and bacteriology. Required
of all graduate students majoring in botany or bacteriology.
Bty. 501-502.-Problems in Taxonomy. 8 hours field or laboratory. 8 credits.
CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 308 (Taxonomy), or its equivalent; desirable pre-
requisite: Bty. 401 (Plant Ecology).
An assignment to a special problem, or a critical study of a specific plant family or genus;
plant surveys with special emphasis on predominating flora of a community.
Bty. 503-504.-Problems in Plant Physiology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory.
8 credits. CODY. Prerequisites: Bty. 311 (Plant Physiology), Cy. 0262 (Organic
Chemistry), or equivalent.
Special physiological processes of plants; principles and methods of nutrition, respiration, etc.
Bty. 505.-Problems in Plant Histology. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 431 (Plant Histology), or its equivalent.
Comparative methods in histological technique.
Bty. 506.-Research in Plant Histology. 8 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY.
Prerequisites: Bty. 431 (Plant Histology), Bty. 505 (Problems in Plant Histol-
ogy), or equivalents.
Bty. 507.-Advanced Plant Anatomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. Prerequisites: Bty. 431 (Plant Histology), 432 (Plant Anatomy),
or equivalents.
Special problems in plant anatomy. A prerequisite to Bty. 508.
Bty. 508.-Problems in Plant Anatomy. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 507 (Advanced Plant Anatomy).
Research or a critical study of certain plant tissues and organs.
Bty. 509-510.-Research. Hours to be arranged. No credit in hours. Thesis
required. CODY. Prerequisites: An approved major in botany or bacteriology.
Applicants for a Master's degree with a major in botany are required to undertake an approved
problem, the results of which are to be included in a thesis. The problem may be elected in
morphology, physiology, histology, anatomy or taxonomy.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


BACTERIOLOGY
Prerequisites:
1. Bachelor's degree.
2. At least twenty semester hours in bacteriology.
3. The student should have a reading knowledge of French or German.
Bcy. 500-0500.-Seminar. See Botany 500.
Bcy. 501-502.-Problems in Soil Bacteriology. 8 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 8 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bcy. 301 (General Bacteriology);
desirable prerequisite: Cy. 0262 (Organic Chemistry), or its equivalent.
Special problems on isolation, cultivation and identification of certain micro-organisms of the soil.
Bcy. 503-504.-Problems in Dairy Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory, or
its equivalent. 6 or 8 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisites: Bcy. 301-302 (General
and Agricultural Bacteriology) or 304 (Pathogenic Bacteriology); desirable
antecedent: Cy. 0262, or its equivalent.
Assignment to a special phase of research pertaining to dairy problems involving activities
of micro-organisms; sanitation of dairy products, etc.
Bcy. 505-506.-Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory
or its equivalent. 6 or 8 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisites: Bcy. 301 (General
Bacteriology), 304 (Pathogenic Bacteriology), or equivalents.
Research.
Bcy. 507-508.-Problems in Water Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory, or its
equivalent. 6 to 8 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bcy. 301 (General Bacteri-
ology), or its equivalent.
Research.
Bcy. 509-510.-Problems in Industrial Bacteriology. 2 hours laboratory work
a week for each semester hour credit desired. A minimum of 4 credits allowed.
CARROLL.
NOTE: In the above courses a graduate student requiring more than 2 terms to complete a
major or minor in an elected field will use the letters, a, b, c, for respective additional terms.
Bcy. 519-520.-Research. Hours to be arranged. No credit in hours. Thesis
required. CARROLL. Prerequisites: An approved major or minor in bacteriology.
Applicants for the Master's degree with a major in bacteriology are required to undertake an
approved problem, the results of which are to be included in a thesis. Problems may be elected in
(1) Soil, (2) Dairy, (3) Food, (4) Industrial, (5) Sanitary and (6) Pathogenic Bacteriology,
and may be pursued year after year in accordance with the need of each candidate.

CHEMISTRY

Prerequisites: The following courses or their equivalents: General chemistry-eight
semester hours; Analytical chemistry-eight semester hours; Organic chemistry-eight
semester hours; Physical chemistry-four to eight semester hours; Chemical literature-one
semester hour.
Each graduate student, registering for the first time, must take comprehensive written
examinations over the fields of inorganic, analytical, organic and physical chemistry. These
examinations are given during registration week. The results of these examinations are
utilized by the Special Supervisory Committees in arranging the student's study program.
**Cy. 501.-Organic Preparations. 9 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 3
credits. POLLARD.
The preparation of some typical compounds, with discussion of principles and theories. A
reading knowledge of French and German is desirable.

**Not offered in 1938-39.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations. 9 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 3
credits. LEIGH.
Laboratory work involving preparation of a number of typical inorganic compounds in addition
to collateral reading and discussion. A reading knowledge of French and German is desirable.
**Cy. 0505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
POLLARD.
Special lectures and collateral reading relative to the electronic and other theoretical concep-
tions of organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives, pseudo-acids, certain dyes, alkaloids,
proteins, etc.
*Cy. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Lectures and collateral reading. In general, topics to be studied will be chosen from the
following list: stereochemistry, tautomerism, acetoacetic ester syntheses, malonic ester syntheses,
the Grignard reaction, benzene theories, diazo compounds, and indicators.
*Cy. 0508.-Synthesis and Structure of Organic Compounds. 3 hours. 3 credits.
POLLARD.
Study of fundamental reactions for synthesizing organic compounds and proving their structures.
*Cy. 0509.-Electrochemistry. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. JACKSON.
A theoretical and laboratory study of the applications of electrochemical principles.
**Cy. 510.-The Phase Rule. 3 hours. 3 credits. JACKSON.
A study of the application of the phase rule to heterogeneous equilibria.
Cy. 0512.-Applications of Physical Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAWKINS.
A study of ideal and real gases, conductance, reaction rates, equilibrium, and distillation.
**Cy. 0513.-Colloid Chemistry. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
BEISLER.
The theories, practice, and applications of colloid chemistry.
"*Cy. 515.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. HEATH.
This course covers recent theories and progress in inorganic chemistry.
*Cy. 0516.-Chemistry of the Rare Elements. 3 hours. 3 credits. HEATH.
Deals with the mineral occurrences, preparation, properties, and uses of the rarer elements
and their compounds. Relations to the more common elements will be clearly shown as well as
methods for separation and purification.
Cy. 525.-Chemistry of the Terpenes. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
HAWKINS.
A study of hydroaromatic compounds, including the terpenes and their derivatives.
Cy. 526.-Chemistry of the Terpenes. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
HAWKINS.
A continuation of Cy. 525.
"*Cy. 0531.-Advanced Qualitative Analysis. 3 hours laboratory or its equiva-
lent. 3 credits. JACKSON.
Systematic laboratory study of the qualitative reactions for the detection and confirmation
of rare and precious metals. Use of the spectroscope as a means of qualitative tests is stressed.
"Cy. 533.-Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory.
3 credits. BLACK.
Application of physico-chemical methods to quantitative analysis. Electrometric titrations.
Colorimetry. Nephelometry.
Cy. 534.-Advanced Sanitary Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLACK.
A study of the applications of physico-chemical principles to water and sewage treatment.
Cy. 537.-Qualitative Organic Chemistry. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory.
3 credits. POLLARD.
Methods of identifying organic compounds.


*Not offered in 1937-38.
**Not offered in 1938-39.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Cy. 538.-Quantitative Organic Chemistry. 9 hours laboratory or its equiva-
lent. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Ultimate analysis of organic compounds.
*Cy. 542.-Catalysis. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEISLER.
Theories and applications of catalysis with special reference to use of catalytic agents in
industry.
*Cy. 545.-Chemical Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAWKINS.
The fundamental principles of thermodynamics which are particularly applicable to chemistry.
*Cy. 561.-Bio-Chemistry. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. FRENCH.
A general course in Bio-Chemistry.
**Cy. 563.-Plant Bio-Chemistry. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
LEUKEL.
The chemistry of plant growth and metabolism.
*Cy. 581.-Chemical Technology. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. MASON.
Special problems and topics in industrial chemistry.
""Cy. 583.-Distillation. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEISLER.
Theory and practice of distillation processes.
*Cy 586.-Chemical Engineering Processes. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3
credits. MASON.
An advanced course in certain of the unit processes of chemical engineering.
**Cy. 588.-Heat Transmission. 3 hours. 3 credits. MASON.
Industrial applications of flow of heat.
Cy. 601-602.-Chemical Research. No credit in hours. The STAFF.
Required of all students majoring in chemistry or chemical engineering.

ECONOMICS

Prerequisites: See the prerequisites for the various courses offered.
Es. 501-502.-Seminar in Economic Principles and Problems. 3 hours. 6
credits. STAFF. Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems),
or equivalent.
Es. 505.-The Development of Economic Thought. 3 hours. 3 credits.
ELDRIDGE. Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems), or
equivalent.
Development of Economic Thought; analysis of theories of various schools of economic
thought; a study of the Physiocrats, Mercantilism, the Classical Economists; the leading eco-
nomists of the Austrian School, and a brief survey of the beginning of Socialism; the development
of theoretical background for research and graduate work of an advanced nature. Required of
all candidates for the Master's degree in this department.
Es. 506.-The Development of Economic Thought, continued. 3 hours. 3
credits. ELDRIDGE. Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Prob-
lems), or equivalent.
Analysis of the thought of the followers and defenders on the one hand and of the abler
critics on the other hand of the Classical Economists; appraisals of recent contributions of the
various schools in formulating a system of economic analysis. Required of all candidates for
the Master's degree in this department.


*Not offered in 1937-38.
**Not offered in 1938-39.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Es. 509.-The Development of Economic Institutions. 3 hours. 3 credits.
TUTTLE. Prerequisite: Es. 305 (Development of Modern Capitalism), or equiv-
alent.
An intensive study of the development of the fundamental institutions of the existing economic
order, including the price system-money, credit, and banking; business enterprise-types of
industrial organization, industrial combination, the business cycle; machine technique-the machine
and its effects, mining, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation.
Es. 522.-The Law of Corporation Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits. HURST.
Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems), or equivalent.
Es. 524.-Corporation Finance and Investments. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER.
Prerequisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society), or equivalent.
A study and analysis of the corporation as an institution making use of society's savings;
the processes, practices, and institutions involved in the acquisition of capital funds, with an
evaluation of corporation practices and problems; the social responsibilities of the corporation;
the nature of the capital market and the sources of capital funds; factors influencing the ac-
cumulation and distribution of capital funds; and the international flow of capital.
Es. 528.-Problems in Money and Banking. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOLBEARE.
Prerequisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society), or equivalent.
Critical analysis of monetary standards and central banking control of credit, especially as
they are related to price and business fluctuations.
Es. 530.-Problems in Taxation. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM. Prerequisite:
Es. 327 (Public Finance), or equivalent.
An intensive study of the problems of taxation primarily related to the following taxes:
general property, income, business, inheritance, and commodity.
Es. 531.-The Economic Functions of Middlemen. 3 hours. 3 credits. HICKS.
Prerequisite: Es. 335 (Economics of Marketing), or equivalent.
The significance of middlemen and of the functions performed by them in the economic
organization of society will be covered, with chief emphasis upon the social viewpoint. Attention
will be given to some of the social problems arising to the consumer, and to the role played by
middlemen in the functional distribution of income.
Es. 556.-Problems in Public Service Industries. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
Prerequisite: Es. 351 (Transportation Principles), or equivalent.
An intensive study of the more important problems raised in the introductory courses in
transportation and public utilities.
Es. 565.-Problems in Social Security. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER. Pre-
requisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems), or equivalent.
An analysis of the meaning and nature of social security, especially as related to economic
security; the distinctions between social and private insurance; the hazards of low income groups:
an evaluation of projects and methods for eliminating, reducing, or indemnifying these hazards;
the problems of social security in the United States, especially concerning experiences with relief
measures, the development of legislation, the problems of financing and administering security
programs, and the relationship between economic planning and security.
Es. 569-570.-Problems in Statistics and Business Forecasting. 3 hours. 6
credits. ANDERSON. Prerequisite: Es. 469-470 (Business Forecasting), or equiv-
alent.
Critical study of special problems in statistics and business forecasting.
Es. 572.-Problems in Labor Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. CHACE. Pre-
requisite: Es. 372 (Labor Economics), or equivalent.
Insecurity, wages and income, sub-standard workers, the strike, graft vs. industrial unionism;
labor and government, wage legislation, hours legislation, protective legislation.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Es. 585.-International Economic Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATWOOD.
Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems), or equivalent.
An historical study of the development of international economic policies; geographic, eco-
nomic, social, and political factors underlying contemporary international problems; economic
and political methods employed by the leading commercial nations to expand their economic
interests.
Es. 589.-Problems in Economic Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATWOOD,
DIETTRICH. Prerequisite: Es. 381 (Economic Geography of North America),
or equivalent; Es. 385 (Economic Geography of South America), or equivalent.
A lecture and research course analyzing the geographic and economic factors affecting the
industrial and commercial development of the leading countries of the world. Students will be
required to make intensive individual studies of selected subjects.

EDUCATION

Prerequisite: A student who expects to pursue graduate work in Education should
present a Bachelor's degree with a minor in Education or the equivalent. The equivalent
must be approved by the Department of Education upon recommendation of the student's
Supervisory Committee. I See Admission to Candidacy, page 48.)
En.-Sa.-Graduate Seminar for Administrators. 3 hours. No credit. SIM-
MONS.
Recommended for students majoring in administration.
En-Srt.-Graduate Seminar for Minor Research and Thesis Work. 3 hours.
No credit. MEAD.
Introduction to investigations, consideration of possible thesis problems, minor researches
and actual thesis work. Recommended for those preparing to teach.
En. 500.-An Introduction to Educational Research. 2 hours. 2 credits. SMITH.
Designed primarily to help graduate students in Education in writing their theses. Required
of all students majoring in Education; open to all graduate students.
En. 501.-The Elementary School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH.
Intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary school curriculum,
including the kindergarten; selection and evaluation of material.
En. 503.-Seminar in Educational Measurements. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of educational problems involving measurement,
diagnostic and remedial measures. This course is primarily for graduate students with experience
in residence or in the field.
En. 504.-The School Survey. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK, CRAGO, SIMMONS.
En. 505.-The Organization and Administration of Extra-Curricular Activities
in Junior and Senior High Schools. 2 hours. 2 credits. WISE.
An attempt will be made to work out constructive school policies having to do with the
developing of the pupil's initiative, leadership, cooperation, etc.
En. 506.-Methods of Teaching Farm-Shop Work. 2 hours. 2 credits. GARRIS.
Selection and organization of subject matter, selection of equipment, and methods of teaching
farm-shop jobs. Offered as demands arise and during the summer session.
En. 507.-Seminar in Educational Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems in directed learning, individual
differences, and adjustment of problem children. Primarily for graduate students with experience
in residence or in the field.
En. 508.-Democracy and Education Seminar. 3 hours. 3 credits. NORMAN.
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual.
society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, education its own end.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


En. 509.-Problems in the Administration of a School System. 3 hours. 3
credits. SIMMONS. Prerequisite: En. 401 or its equivalent, or administrative
experience.
Problems selected to meet individual needs; each student selects some problem for special
study and presents the results of his study in the form of a thesis.
En. 510.-The History of Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-teacher, student,
curriculum, and educational plant, control and support-back to their beginnings; and to point
out present tendencies and possible developments.
En. 511.--Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GARRIS.
Selection and organization of subject matter from the vocational point of view. Offered when
demand arises and during the summer session.
En. 512.-Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GARRIS.
A continuation of Education 511.
En. 514.-Problems in Adolescence. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO. Prerequisite:
En. 319 (Child and Adolescent Psychology), or equivalent.
Students will be guided in tho investigation of problems peculiar to the period of adolescence.
En. 516.-Character and Personality Development. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
A study of methods used in development of character and personality, together with an
evaluation of them for use in public schools.
En. 517.-Educational Statistics. 2 hours. 2 credits.
To acquaint students with statistical methods as applied to Education. It is recommended
that this course be taken before En. 503.
En. 518.-Special Problems in High School Organization and Administration.
3 hours. 3 credits. SIMMONS. Prerequisite: En. 408 (High School Administra-
tion).
This course will consist of an intensive study of specific problems in organizing and administer-
ing the modern high school. Special reference will be made to Florida.
En. 519.-High School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH.
Problems of the curriculum of the high school in its organization; standards for selection of
the curriculum; factors to be considered-age of pupils, social standing, probable school life,
probable vocation; traditional subjects and their possible variations; new subjects and their values,
systems of organization, election, and prescription; problems of articulation with the elementary
school, the college, the vocational school, and the community.
En. 521.-Business Administration of a School System. 3 hours. 3 credits.
FULK. Prerequisite: Wide administrative experience.
Problems concerned with the procuring and spending of revenue; a thesis on a special problem.
En. 528.-Supervision of Instruction. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD.
A course dealing with objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in
elementary and secondary schools, and in preparation of teachers. Each student completes a
minor research.
En. 531-532.-Guided Professional Development in Health and Physical Ed-
ucation. 3 hours. 6 credits. SALT.
Designed to give teachers, supervisors, and administrators a broad understanding of the field
of health and physical education. At the beginning of the course the student and instructor
will outline a program of professional development in keeping with the needs and interests of
the student. Credit will depend upon evidence of professional growth on the part of the student
in accord with his program. This will be tested in any manner which the instructor deems valid.
En. 534.-Problems of Physical Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. SALT.
Designed to give the student an understanding of the contemporary problems in physical
education. It forms the basis for the organization of research projects together with an analysis
of the techniques used in problem solving.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 541.-Control and Support of Public Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
State, federal and other agencies of control and support of education in the United States;
world-history background; present tendencies and possible developments. Saturday class; planned
primarily for teachers in service.
En. 542.-The Curriculum and the Educational Plant. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
Present status of curriculum and plant and their relation in all types of schools, viewed in
the light of their historical development; a world view with emphasis on present tendencies in
the United States.
En. 543.-The Teacher and the Educand. 3 hours. 3 credits. FULK.
Some outstanding teachers, including educational theorists, philosophers, reformers, statesmen,
and administrators, and their students; the training and professionalizing of the teacher; the
spread, compulsion, and extension of education and its relation to world revolutions.
En. 544.-Constitutional and Legal Basis of Public School Administration.
2 hours. 2 credits. SIMMONS.
Special emphasis will be given to Florida conditions, school laws, constitutional provisions,
judicial decisions, Attorney General's rulings, and regulations of the State Board of Education.
Students will be required to prepare a term report dealing with some special field of school
law. Only graduate students with experience in administration and supervision will be admitted.
En. 562.-Guidance and Counseling. 2 hours. 2 credits. GARRIS.
Study of guidance and counseling of high school students. Educational and vocational guidance
and problems of personality adjustment. Offered only in the summer session.
En. 565-566.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours. 6
credits. GARRIS.
Designed for graduate students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced problems.
Problems will be selected to suit individual needs and the results of the study will be reported in
the form of term papers. The class will meet for three hours every other Saturday during both
semesters.
En. 567-568.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours. 6
credits. GARRIS.
Similar to En. 565-566 in organization and offered in alternate years with it.
En. 569.-Problems in Organizing Part-time and Evening Classes. 6 hours.
3 credits. GARRIS.
The class will organize and teach a part-time or evening class in vocational agriculture in
the Alachua community. Offered only in the summer session.
En. 603.-Foundations of Method. 3 hours. 3 credits. NORMAN.
Improvement of college and high school teaching. Open to graduate students and members
of the University faculty who care to enroll.
En. 605-606.-Seminar in Public School Administration. 3 hours. 6 credits.
FULK. Prerequisites: En. 504 or 521 and En. 509 or 518, or permission of
instructor. Each term's work is a complete course and gives 3 credits.


ENGINEERING

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Listed under that name.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Requirements for admission to graduate work for those students holding the degree
of B.S. in Chemical Engineering, or its equivalent, who desire to major in chemical
engineering:
1. Such students may become candidates for the degree of *Master of Science or the
degree of Master of Science in Engineering,

*For the M.S. requirements see Chemistry.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


2. The following courses, or their equivalents, are required for unconditional entrance
to graduate work in chemical engineering: Courses in each of the four fundamental
branches of chemistry (inorganic, analytical, organic and physical); one hour of chemical
literature; six hours of industrial chemistry; six hours of unit operations, including
laboratory work.
3. Each graduate student, registering for the first time, must take comprehensive written
examinations over the fields of chemistry and chemical engineering. These examinations
are given during registration week. The results of these examinations are utilized by the
Special Supervisory Committee in arranging the student's study program.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Prerequisites: See the prerequisites for the various courses offered.
Cl. 621-622.-Advanced Work in Steel Structures. 3 hours and 6 hours lab-
oratory. 6 credits. REED. Prerequisite: Cl. 535-536 (Structural Engineering).
Advanced work in the theory, design, and drawing of steel structures, particularly in connection
with bridges and buildings.
Cl. 623-624.-Advanced Work in Concrete Structures. 3 hours and 6 hours
laboratory. 6 credits. LOWE. Prerequisite: Cl. 532-535-536 (Concrete Design
and Structural Engineering).
Advanced work in the theory, design, and drawing of concrete structures, particularly in
connection with bridges and buildings.
Cl. 627-628.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours and 6 hours
laboratory. 6 credits. LOWE. Prerequisite: Cl. 525 (Water and Sewerage).
Study of action and operation of Imhoff sewage disposal plant of the University. Physical,
biological, bacteriological, and chemical observations to determine efficiency and economy of various
methods of operation and improvements in operation to increase the same.
Cl. 629-630.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours and 6 hours
laboratory. 6 credits. LOWE. Prerequisite: Cl. 627-628.
Supplementing Cl. 527-528, which covers similar investigations in connection with other types
of sewage disposal plants.
Cl. 633-634.-Similarity and Model Applications to Beach and Shore Erosions
Problems. 3 hours and 6 hours laboratory. 6 credits. VAN LEER. Prerequisite:
Cl. 431 (Hydrology).
A study of laws of similarity, use of Reynolds Number, effects of density, viscosity, friction
and actual model studies with practical applications.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Radio courses in the Department of Electrical Engineering are given in co-operation
with State Radio Station WRUF. Students can secure practical experience in radio station
operation and should be able to qualify as first-class radio telephone operators on com-
pletion of the elementary courses listed in the Bulletin of Information for the Colleges
and Professional Schools of the Upper Division.
Prerequisites: A college course in Physics, Differential and Integral Calculus. and a
minimum of thirty-six credits, or the equivalent, in courses in the general field of electrical
engineering, together with special prerequisites stated for individual courses.
El. 601-602.-Advanced Experimental Electrical Engineering. Variable credit.
WEIL and STAFF.
Experimental investigation on electrical apparatus.
"El. 603.-Advanced Electrical Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL.
Laws of the electric and magnetic circuit; transient phenomena.


*Not offered in 1936-37.









DEPART:MENTS OF INSTRUCTION


El. 605-606.-Advanced Course in Communication Engineering. 3 hours. 6
credits. WEIL and SASHOFF.
High frequency circuits and apparatus.
El. 607-608.-Radio Engineering Laboratory. 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
WEIL and SASHOFF.
Laboratory work to accompany El. 605-606.
El. 609.-Electric Power Plant Design. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL. Pre-
requisites.
The relation of various machines in the power plant to one another, switch-gear, control
apparatus, selection of types of units, construction problem. A part of this course includes the
design of the electrical end of a power plant.
El. 611-612.-Electrical Research. Variable credit. WEIL, SASHOFF.

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Prerequisites: Thorough foundation work in Differential and Integral Calculus, Applied
\Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Plant Layout and Design, Human Engineering, Engineering
Practice, and Business Administration, or equivalent foundation course work of about
forty semester credits including experience in industry.
Ig. 661-662.-Advanced Shop Layout and Design. 6 credits. YEATON. Pre-
requisites: Ig. 469-470 (Plant, Shop, Layout, and Design).
Ig. 663-664.-Management Training. 6 credits. VAN LEER and YEATON. Pre-
requisites: Ig. 472 (Human Engineering), Ig. 560 (Engineering Practice).

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Prerequisites: See the prerequisites for the various courses offered.
MI. 680.-Thesis Research. No credit in hours. EBAUGH, VAN LEER and STAFF.
Arranged for graduate students majoring in Mechanical Engineering.
MI. 681-682.-Advanced Mechanical Design. 6 credits. EBAUGH, VAN LEER
or FINEREN. Prerequisite: Ml. 491 (Machine Design).
This course is arranged to permit advanced students to pursue design projects in the Mechan-
ical Engineering field.
Ml. 683-684.-Mechanical Research. 6 credits. EBAUGH, VAN LEER, YEATON
and STAFF. Prerequisite: Ml. 583-584 (Mechanical Laboratory).
This course is arranged to permit advanced students to pursue research projects in the
Mechanical Engineering field.
Ml. 685.-Advanced Air Conditioning. 3 credits. EBAUGH. Prerequisite:
Ml. 582 (Refrigeration and Air Conditioning).
A continuation of Ml. 582 with emphasis on design and estimation of systems.
Ml. 686.-Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 credits. EBAUGH. Pre-
requisite: Ml. 485 (Thermodynamics).
A stu y of the general equations of thermodynamics and their applications and advanced
s'udy of combustion processes.
Ml. 689-690.-Advanced Mechanical Laboratory. 6 credits. EBAUGH or STAFF.
Prerequisites: Ml. 583-584 (Mechanical Laboratory).
This course is arranged to permit advanced students to pursue experimental projects in the
Mechanical Engineering field.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


ENGLISH

Prerequisites: A University of Florida undergraduate major in English or its equivalent.
Such a major requires at least thirty semester hours of English in the Upper Division and
includes courses in important periods of English literary history, American literature, and
the history of the English language. Such a major presupposes, furthermore, adequate
preparation in such important related fields as History, Philosophy, and foreign language.
Eh. 509-510.-Chaucer. 3 hours. 6 credits. LYONS.
A thorough study of the Canterbury Tales; collateral readings (in translation) of important
medieval writings.
Eh. 511-512.-Old English. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON.
A study of the language and of selected writings, including selections from the Beowulf.
Eh. 519-520.-The English Drama. 3 hours. 6 credits. ROBERTSON.
Studies in particular phases. In 1937-38 medieval and classical elements in sixteenth-century
drama will be studied.
Eh. 520-521.-The Renaissance in England. 3 hours. 6 credits. CALDWELL.
A study of sixteenth and seventeenth century literature as directly and indirectly influenced
by the Renaissance.
Eh. 521-522.-English Classicism. 3 hours. 6 credits. SPIVEY.
Neo-classicism in the literature of the late seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries.
Eh. 523-524.-The Romantic Movement. 3 hours. 6 credits. FARRIS.
The roots of the Romantic Revival; the work of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and
Keats.
Eh. 525-526.-Studies in American Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. LYONS,
SPIVEY.
The first semester the rise of romanticism will be studied; the second, the New England
transcendental movement.
Eh. 527-528.-Imaginative Writing. 2 hours. 4 credits. LYONS, FARRIS.
Group conferences and individual conferences. Well-known writers will participate. Taken
only with permission of the instructors.
Eh. 529.-Introduction to the Problems and Methods of Investigation. No
credit in hours. STAFF.
Required of all majors. The chief purpose of this course is to assist the student in the
preparation of a thesis.
Eh. 530.-Individual Work. Credit arranged. STAFF.
Provision will be made for students who desire to supplement the regular courses by in ividual
reading or investigation under guidance. Students will be helped to plan a definite program,
and will meet a member of the departmental staff in frequent conference.
Eh. 531-532.-The English Conference. No credit in hours.
A bi-monthly meeting of all members of the staff and the graduate students to discuss prob-
lems of current interest in the field of English and American language and literature. The
presentation of papers and reviews is followed by open discussion.
Note: Advanced undergraduate courses may, under certain conditions, be taken for graduate
credit. See Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division.

ENTOMOLOGY

Prerequisites: A Bachelor of Science degree or its equivalent. The student should have
thirty semester hours in the biological sciences, with twelve or more hours in the field
of Entomology or Plant Pathology. Should he he deficient in this respect the student will
be expected to fulfill these requirements during the time that he is pursuing work that
will lead to the Master of Science degree. This work will he taken cs foundation work
with no graduate credit.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


**Ey. 501-502.-Methods of Research in Entomology. 3 hours. 6 credits.
CREIGHTON, WATSON, MERRILL, BERGER.
Special laboratory, insectary, and field metho's. A survey of the leading problems and methods
in certain laboratories; practice in the more complicated methods of research will be undertaken.
Ey. 503-504.-Problems in Entomology. 3 hours. 6 credits. CREIGHTON and
STAFF.
Problems in the various phases of entomology, as selected on approval of the instructor. Re-
quired of graduate students registered for degrees in the department.
**Ey. 506.-Advanced Insect Histology. 6 hours. 3 credits. CREIGHTON.
The outstanding histological methods used in the handling of insect tissues.
Ey. 507-508.-Advanced Insect Taxonomy. 3 hours. 6 credits. TISSOT.
"*Ey. 509-510.-Advanced Insect Embryology. 3 hours. 6 credits. CREIGHTON.
Ey. 511-512.-Thesis Research. No credit in hours. CREIGHTON and STAFF.
Required of all students majoring in Entomology.
*Ey. 513.-Advanced Insect Morphology. 6 hours. 3 credits. CREIGHTON.
*Ey. 516.-Insect Ecology. 4 hours. 3 credits. WATSON.

FRENCH

Prerequisites: Twenty-four hours, or the equivalent, of undergraduate work in French.
This must include a year-course in French composition and one in French literature. The
student should also have a reading knowledge of one foreign language other than French.
Fh. 505-506.-The French Novel. 3 hours. 6 credits. ATKIN.
Fh. 507-508.-Special Study in French. 3 hours. 6 credits. ATKIN, BRUNET.
Individual reading and reports under supervision of the instructor, on selected topics in the
field of French literature and language.
Fh. 517-518.-Old French. 3 hours. 6 credits. BRUNET.
A study of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Old French; reading of selected texts.

GREEK

Prerequisite: An undergraduate major of not less than twenty-four hours or equivalent
of approved college courses in Greek, including a course in prose composition and
grammar.
Gk. 501-502.-Homer-Iliad and Odyssey. 3 hours. 6 credits. ANDERSON.
All the Iliad and Odyssey and selections from allied poets.
Gk. 503-504.-Historians, Herodotus and Thucydides. 3 hours. 6 credits.
ANDERSON.
HISTORY

Prerequisites: An undergraduate major of twenty-four semester hours or equivalent.
It is very desirable that the student should begin his graduate work with a reading knowl-
edge of one foreign language, preferably French or German, especially if he intends to
go on to the work for the Ph.D. degree.
Hy. 501-502.-American History, 1492-1830. 3 hours. 6 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. 503-504.-American History-1830 to the Present. 3 hours. 6 credits.
LEAKE.


*Given alternate years. Offered 1937-38.
**Not offered 1937-38.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Hy. 505-506.-English History to 1688. 3 hours. 6 credits. PAYNE.
Hy. 507-508.-The Renaissance and the Reformation. 3 hours. 6 credits.
LEAKE.
Hy. 509-510.-Seminar in American History. 6 credits. LEAKE.
Hy. 511-512.-English History-1688 to the Present. 3 hours. 6 credits.
PAYNE.
Hy. 515-516.-Latin American History to 1850. 3 hours. 6 credits. GLUNT.
Hy. 517-518.-Latin American History, 1850 to the Present. 3 hours. 6
credits. GLUNT.
Hy. 601-602.-Ancient Civilizations. 3 hours. 6 credits. PAYNE.

HORTICULTURE

Prerequisites: Eighteen hours of satisfactory work in horticulture and six hours of
satisfactory work in botany.
He. 503-504.-Horticulture Seminar. 1 hour. 2 credits. FLOYD, ABBOTT.
A study of current horticultural literature and practice; assigned topics and discussion.
He. 505-506.-Horticultural Problems. 2 hours. 4 credits. ABBOTT.
A critical study of advanced problems in horticulture as given in recent literature; methods
used in experimental horticulture; results of experiments and their application.
He. 507-508.-Problems in Subtropical Fruits and Flowers. 3 hours. 6 credits.
FLOYD and ABBOTT.
He. 509-510.-Research in Fruit and Vegetable Refrigeration. 3 hours. 6
credits. A. L. STAHL.*
He. 511-512.-Research in Vegetable Production. 3 hours. 6 credits. F. S.
JAMISON.*

JOURNALISM

Prerequisites: Eighteen hours of approved undergraduate courses in Journalism.
Jm. 503-504.-Special Studies in Newspaper Production. 3 hours. 6 credits.
No credit toward a degree allowed until entire 6 credits are earned. EMIG.
Jm. 505-506.-Special Studies in Public Opinion. 3 hours. 6 credits. No
credit toward a degree allowed until entire 6 credits are earned. EMIG.

LATIN

Prerequisite: An undergraduate major of not less than twenty-four hours or equivalent
of approved college courses in Latin, including a course in prose composition and
grammar.
Ln. 501-502.-Cicero and the Ciceronian Age. 3 hours. 6 credits. ANDERSON.
Based mainly on the Ciceronian Correspondence.
Ln. 505.-Virgil. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Mainly the Bucolics and Georaics.
Ln. 507.-Ovid. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Mainly Heroides and Fasti.
Ln. 508.-The Roman Satire. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Mainly Horace and Juvenal.


*Member Experiment Station Staff.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


MATHEMATICS

Prerequisites: A student must have an undergraduate major in Mathematics or its
equivalent as determined by the department.
Not all courses are given each year. Prerequisites to the courses should be determined
by consultation with the instructor.
Ms. 502.-Vector Analysis. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND.
The algebra and calculus of vectors in two and three dimensions. Applications to problems
in Physics and Engineering.
Ms. 511-512.-Introduction to Higher Algebra. 3 hours. 6 credits. SIMPSON.
An introduction to the theory of matrices, linear dependence, linear transformations, bilinear
and quadratic forms.
Ms. 518.-Theory of Groups of Finite Order. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMPSON.
Introduction to the group concept, a treatment of the pure group-theory, and numerous examples
and applications.
Ms. 521.-Empirical Analysis and Curve Fitting. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND.
Derivation of equation to suit data. "Best fit" under given conditions. Use of various
graphical methods of analysis. Illustrated with problems from fields of botany, physics, chemistry.
Ms. 522.-Method of Least Squares, and Statistics. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND.
Probability; method of least squares; application; normal frequency curves; correlation factors;
handling of data.
Ms. 524.-Synthetic Projective Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
Pure geometry dealing primarily with properties unaltered by the processes of projection and
section; principal theorems involved; theory of poles, polars, involution, and kindred topics.
Ms. 525-526.-Econometrics. 3 hours. 6 credits. GERMOND.
The mathematical interpretation of economic hypotheses. Conclusions reached by mathematical
treatment and procedure. Mechanism for the comparison of conclusions with observations. This
course is concerned with the method of dealing mathematically with the material of economics,
rather than with the validity of the hypotheses and laws involved.
Ms. 534-535.-General Projective Geometry. 3 hours. 6 credits. KUSNER.
Development, from a simple set of very general postulates, of the properties of geometric
configurations which remain invariant under the transformations of projection and section. The
treatment is abstract, and serves as an introduction, both to modern geometry and to the postu-
lational methods of modern mathematics.
Ms. 536.-Foundations of Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
An investigation of the assumptions of geometry; the parallel postulate; steps leading to
non-Euclidean geometries; consequent development of modern branches of the subject; elements of
non-Euclidean plane geometry.
Ms. 551-552.-Advanced Topics in Calculus. 3 hours. 6 credits. KOKOMOOR.
Topics of advanced nature selected from the calculus, including partial differentiation, Taylor's
theorem, infinite series, continuation of simple multiple integrals, line and surface integrals,
Green's theorem, etc.
Ms. 555-556.-Functions of a Complex Variable. 3 hours. 6 credits. SIMPSON.
Fundamental operations with complex numbers; differentiation and integration theorems;
mapping; transformations; series.
Ms. 559-560.-Functions of Real Variables. 3 hours. 6 credits. PHIPPS.
The real number system; theory of point sets; rigorous investigation of many questions arising
in the calculus; Lebesque integral; infinite series.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special emphasis on
the changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching. No specific text is followed,
but numerous works are used as references.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Ms. 575.-Fundamental Concepts of Modern Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
SIMPSON.
An introduction to such topics as the number system of algebra, sets of points, group theory,
theories of integration, postulational systems, and non-Euclidean geometry. No textbook is used.
but many references are assigned.

PAINTING

At present no Master's degree is offered in this department.

Pg. 501-502.-Pictorial Composition. 9 to 18 hours studio. 6 to 12 credits.
DOOLITTLE. Prerequisite: Pg. 61 A (Thesis).
Designed for students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced problems in pictorial
composition.
Pg. 523-524.-Oil Painting. 9 to 18 hours studio. 6 to 12 credits. DOOLITTLE.
Prerequisite: Pg. 61 A (Thesis).
Designed for students who are qualified for advanced work in oil painting.

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY

PHARMACOGNOSY

Prerequisites:
1. Graduation from a standard College of Pharmacy.
2. A minimum of four hours of foundation work in General Botany or equivalent.
3. A minimum of six hours of foundation work in Practical Pharmacognosy or
equivalent.
4. An additional minimum of four hours of foundation work in any or all of the
following or equivalents: Plant Histology; Plant Microscopy; Plant Physiology;
Plant Classification.

Pgy. 501.-Advanced Histology and Microscopy of Vegetable Drugs. 2 hours
and 4 hours laboratory and field work. 4 credits. IRELAND.
Plant tissues and cell inclusions of importance as diagnostic characters. Detection of adultera-
tions and substitutions and pharmacognostical description of new plants. LABORATORY FEE: To be
arranged.
Pgy. 521-522.-Special Problems in Pharmacognosy. 4 hours laboratory or
field work. 2 to 4 credits. Either term may be taken for credit without the
other. IRELAND.
Identification, classification, and qualitative determination of constituents and properties of
drug plants; special experiments in the propagation, cultivation, harvesting and curing of native
and exotic plants; field work in the collecting of drug plants native to Florida.
Pgy. 525-526.-Drug Plant Analysis. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory and field
work. 4 to 8 credits. Either term may be taken for credit without the other.
CHRISTENSEN.
Special problems in drug culture and in the isolation and identification of plant constituents.
The effect of climatic and soil features on plant constituents. Pharmacognostical characteristics
of new plants. LABORATORY FEE: To be arranged.
Pgy. 533-534.-Seminar in Pharmacognosy. 4 credits. Either term may be
taken for credit without the other. CHRISTENSEN.
Sources of information on crude drugs; study of current plant literature. Written and oral
reports.
Pgy. 551-552.-Pharmacognosy Research. No credit in hours. CHRISTENSEN.
Required of those majoring in Pharmacognosy.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


PHARMACOLOGY
Prerequisites:
1. Graduation from a standard College of Pharmacy.
2. A minimum of four hours of foundation work in each of the following or equiv-
alen:s: Biology; Bacteriology.
3. A minimum of five hours of foundation work in Pharmacology or equivalent.
4. An additional minimum of four hours of foundation work in any or all of the
following or equivalents: Biologicals; Gland Products; Physiology; Anatomy.
Ply. 512.-Advanced Pharmacology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
CHRISTENSEN.
Theories of drug action. A comparison of methods of physiological assaying with applications
to evaluation of drugs and medicines. LABORATORY FEE: To be arranged.
Ply. 517.-Clinical Methods. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
IRELAND.
Modern methods employed in clinical procedure. A detailed study of normal and abnormal
metabolism with emphasis on blood and urine analysis. LABORATORY FEE: $3.
Ply. 551-552.-Special Problems in Pharmacology. 2 hours and 4 hours
laboratory. 4 to 8 credits. Either term may be taken for credit without the
other. CHRISTENSEN.
A comparison of methods of biological assaying. Special lectures and collateral rea ing,
laboratory experiments, oral and written reports.
Ply. 571-572.-Pharmacology Research. No credit in hours. CHRISTENSEN.
Required of those majoring in pharmacology.

PHARMACY

Prerequisite: Graduation from a standard College of Pharmacy with the degree of B.S.
in Pharmacy or its equivalent.
Phy. 502.-Selected Topics in Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A general study of the newer types of pharmaceuticals, such as vitamin preparations, newer
solvents, etc., with assigned readings on selected problems of current interest.
Phy. 503.-Advanced Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
Lectures and assigned readings on important pharmaceutical preparations, particularly those
involving chemical changes.
Phy. 504.-Advanced Galenical Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A detailed study of the fundamental research work on which formulas for various galenicals
are based.
Phy. 541.-Manufacturing Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A general study of the apparatus and processes used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on
a factory scale. A detailed study of selected technical problems of current interest to those engaged
in pharmaceutical manufacturing.
Phy. 553.-Synthetic Pharmaceuticals. 2 hours. 2 credits. FOOTE. Pre-
requisite: Phy. 354.
The preparation and chemotherapy of the more complex synthetic remedies.
Phy. 554.-Advanced Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. FOOTE.
Lectures and assigned reading on the pharmacy and chemistry of vegetable drugs.

PHILOSOPHY

Prerequisites: Twenty-four hours in philosophy and related fields, of which at least
twelve semester hours must be in philosophy.
Ppy. 501-502.-Advanced Logic Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. ENWALL.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 409-410 (History of Philosophy).
Theories of thought and knowledge. Readings from the original sources. Papers for discussion.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Ppy. 503-504.-Advanced History of Philosophy. 3 hours. 6 credits. ENWALL.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 301 (Ethics), 302 (Philosophy of Religion).
The problems of philosophy in their historical development. Special readings from the original
sources.

*Ppy. 505-506.-Philosophy of Nature Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. ENWALL.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 409-410 (History of Philosophy).
Readings from the original sources. Papers for discussion. Man's relation to nature; the
various philosophical doctrines; animism, pantheism, materialism, realism, agnosticism, humanism,
idealism, etc.
Ppy. 507-508.-Hume and Kant Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. ENWALL.
Prerequisites: Ppy. 301 (Ethics), 302 (Philosophy of Religion), 409-410 (History
of Philosophy).
PHYSICS

Prerequisites: A candidate showing proper aptitude and adequate preparation (ordinarily
equivalent to an undergraduate major as outlined in the bulletin of undergraduate courses
will be admitted as a candidate for the Master's degree.
A knowledge of the differential and integral calculus is prerequisite to all the following
courses, together with Physics 321-322 or the equivalent.
Upon entering graduate study in Physics, the student should possess a reading knowl-
edge of German and French.

Ps. 503.-Kinetic Theory of Gases. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON.
The elements of the kinetic theory, the application of the theory to gases and liquids, the
electrical and magnetic properties of the molecules from the standpoint of the theory.
Ps. 505.-Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
Statics of systems of rigid bodies. Motions of particles and of rigid bodies under constant
and variable forces. Assigned reading, problems, and reports.

Ps. 506.-Advanced Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
A continuation of Ps. 505. Introduction to vector analysis and generalized coordinates.

Ps. 508.-Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
The laws of Thermodynamics, chemical reactions from the thermodynamical standpoint, Electro-
chemistry, and the Nernst Heat Theorem.

Ps. 510.-Physical Optics and Spectroscopy. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON.
Prerequisite: Ps. 309 or equivalent.
The electro-magnetic theory of light applied to reflection, refraction, dispersion, polarization,
interference, diffraction, and the theory of optical instruments.

Ps. 513-514.-Advanced Experimental Physics. 6 or 8 hours laboratory. 6 or
8 credits. WILLIAMSON, BLESS, PERRY, KNOWLES, WILLIAMS.
A series of experiments on a particular topic of physics, a review of classical experiments,
or the development of an assigned experimental problem. The work will be assigned to meet the
needs and interests of the particular student. LABORATORY FEE: $5 each term.
Ps. 517-518.-Modern Physics. 3 hours. 6 credits. WILLIAMSON.
The electronic theory of atomic structure, the interpretation of the properties of matter and
radiation from the standpoint of this theory, and spectroscopy.

Ps. 523-524.-Seminar in Modern Theory. 2 or 3 hours. 4 or 6 credits.
STAFF.
Some particular phase of the most recent developments in theoretical physics is taken up in
detail.


*Not offered 1937-38.








DEPART ENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ps. 527-528.-Colloquium. No credit. STAFF.
The most interesting papers are selected from the current literature in physics, and these
papers are reported upon by the students.
Ps. 551-552.-Thesis. No credit in hours. WILLIAMSON, BLESS, PERRY,
KNOWLES, WILLIAMS.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Prerequisites: An undergraduate major of twenty-four semester hours or equivalent.
It is very desirable that the student should begin his graduate work with a reading knowl-
edge of one foreign language, preferably French or German, especially if he intends to
go on to the work for the Ph.D. degree.
Pcl. 501-502.-American Constitutional Law. 3 hours. 6 credits. LEAKE.
Pcl. 503-504.-International Law. 3 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.
Pcl. 505-506.-Political Theories. 3 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.
Pcl. 507-508.-Comparative Government. 3 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.
Pel. 509-510.-International Relations. 3 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.
Pcl. 513-514.-Political Science Seminar. 2 hours. 6 credits. DAUER.

PSYCHOLOGY

Prerequisites: Twenty-four semester hours in psychology and related fields, of which
at least twelve semester hours must be in psychology.
Psy. 501-502.-Readings in Experimental Psychology. 3 hours. 6 credits.
HINCKLEY.
Lectures and assigned readings in some of the more important fields of psychological research.
Psy. 505.-Advanced Statistical Methods in Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
HINCKLEY.
Studies in correlation, regression, and prediction, as applied to psychological measurement.
Psy. 506.-Psycho-physical Theory in the Construction of Tests. 3 hours. 3
credits. HINCKLEY.
Application of psycho-physical theory in the measurement of psychological and social values.
Critical discussion of Weber's Law, Fechner's Law, and the Law of Comparative Judgment. Special
attention is given to the problems of psychological scale construction and attitude measurement.
Psy. 508.-Advanced Comparative Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
A study of the intelligence and learning capacity of animals, with an attempt to formulate
and explain the psychological concepts of reflex, conditioned reflex, instinct, learning, memory,
intelligence, thinking, and motivation as problems primarily in nerve physiology.
Psy. 509.-Studies in Personality. 3 hours. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Lectures and readings in experimental studies of personality. Special attention will be given
to the clinical work of the personnel bureau.
Psy. 510.-Readings in Abnormal Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Lectures and readings on the various forms of mental disease, with special attention to
diagnosis and treatment.
Psy. 514.-History and Systems of Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
A critical survey of the historical development of psychology, with special emphasis on
representative writers and the more recent systems and programs.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


SOCIOLOGY

Prerequisites (or co-requisites, in part): Eighteen hours in Socio!ogy in addition to
the work of the Freshman year in C-1. These eighteen hours include Sociological Founda-
tions of Modern Life IC-1H) or equivalent, Principles of Sociology (Sy. 441), and eleven
hours of approved electives. Students are recommended to have Political Found tions and
Economic Foundations of Modern Life, or equivalent, and General Psychology.
Sy. 503-504.-Cultural Development of the United States. 3 hours. 6 credits.
BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 303-304.
Sy. 521.-Rural Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 321.
Sy. 523.-Social Disorganization. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 323.
Sy. 524.-Criminology. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 324.
Sy. 526.-Urban Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 326.
*Sy. 531-532.-Development of Social Thought. 3 hours. 6 credits. BRISTOL.
*Sy. 541.-Advanced Social Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
Sy. 542.-Applied Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 442.
Sy. 546.-Marriage and the Family. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEATY.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 444.
Sy. 547.-Race Problems. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEATY.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 443.
*Sy. 551.-Social Progress. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken in part in connection with Sy. 351.
"Sy. 571-572.-Social Trends. 21/2 hour seminar. 6 credits. BRISTOL.

SPANISH

Prerequisites: Twenty-four hours, or equivalent, of undergraduate work in Spanish.
This must include a year course in composition and one in Spanish literature.
Sh. 501-502.-Old Spanish. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite:
A reading knowledge of Latin.
Spanish Historical Grammar. Readings from 12th, 13th, and 14th centuries.
Sh. 503-504.-Golden Age. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite:
Consent of instructor.
Lectures, readings, reports.
Sh. 505-506.-Contemporary Spanish Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. HAUPT-
MANN. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
A study of the generation of '98 and their predecessors. Lectures, readings, reports.
Sh. 507-508.-Spanish-American Literature. 3 hours. 6 credits. HIGGINS.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
Special study of Ruben Dario and the most important "Modernist" verse and prose writers.
Lectures. readings, reports.


*Not offered in 1937-38.







GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 75


GRADUATE ASSISTANTS, 1936-1937

BAIN, JOSEPH PAUL, B.S. (University of Florida, 1935) ............. Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
BARDWELL, RICHARD ALFRED. B.S. in Chemical Engineering
(University of Florida, 1936) .......................... National Aluminate Corporation Fellow
BLANDING, SARAH ELIZABETH, B.A. (Florida State College for Women, 1931)
-Teaching Fellow in English, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
BROWN, HAMLIN L., JR., B.S. in Agriculture
(University of Florida, 1936) .................................... Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Economics
BYERS, WALTER HAYDEN, B.S. (University of Florida, 1936) ................ Graduate Assistant in Physics
CARR, ARCHIE FAIRLY, B.S., 1933; M.S., 1934 (University of Florida)-Graduate Assistant in Biology
FREEMAN, KENNETH ALFREY, B.S. (Stetson University, 1934)........Research Assistant in Naval Stores
GANTT, CHARLES JACKSON, B.S. in Education (University of Florida, 1936)
-Teaching Fellow in Science Education, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
GILLIES, DWIGHT BURROWS, B.S. in Agriculture
(University of Florida, 1935) .................. ................... ........... Graduate Assistant in Agronomy
GOETHE, SAM PAUL, B.S. in Mechanical Engineering
(University of Florida, 1936) ................-..- ......... Graduate Assistant in Mechanical Engineering
GRAHAM, BURTON WELLINGTON, B.S. (University of Florida, 1935)....Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
HENDRIX, THOMAS L., JR., B.S. in Chemical Engineering
(University of Florida, 1935) ....................................... Graduate Assistant in Chemical Engineering
HOBBS, HORTON HOLCOMBE, JR., B.S., 1935; M.S., 1936
(University of Florida) ....................................... ...... .... Graduate Assistant in Biology
HODNETT, ERNEST MATELLE, B.S. (University of Florida, 1936) ....... Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
HUNTER, WILLIAM PUTNAM, B.S.
(Clemson Agricultural College, 1933) ...................................... ...... Graduate Fellow in Entomology
JOHNSON, ROBERT MILTON, B.S. in Civil Engineering, 1929; Civil Engineer, 1931
(University of Florida) ..................... .................... ........... Graduate Assistant in Civil Engineering
JONES, GEORGE ROBERT, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1934; M.S. in Pharmacy, 1936
(University of Florida) ........... .............-. ..... ....... -.... ...... Graduate Assistant in Pharmacy
LARRICK, ROSS GOSSETT, B.A. (Phillips University, 1935) .. ............ Graduate Assistant in Physics
LIPSCOMB, EDWARD VAN LATER, B.S.
(University of Florida, 1936) ...........................- ....... .......... Graduate Assistant in Bacteriology
MCLEAN, ANDREW PARKS, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1933; M.S. in Pharmacy, 1935
(University of Florida) ....................... ...... ................ Graduate Assistant in Pharmacology
McVoY, ARTHUR DUBOSE, B.S. in Architecture
(University of Florida, 1933) .................................. --........ Graduate Assistant in Architecture
MEER, ABE, B.S., 1931; M.S., 1935 (Rollins College) ................. Research Assistant in Naval Stores
OVERPECK, BOYD HENRY, JR., B.A. (University of Florida, 1935) .......Graduate Assistant in Psychology
REESE, JESS ALLEN, B.S. in Pharmacy (Medical College of Virginia, 1930);
M.S. in Pharmacy (University of Florida, 1936) ......... Graduate Assistant in Pharmacognosy
RIHERD, PAUL TRUMAN, B.S.
(Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College, 1936) .......... Graduate Assistant in Entomology
STARKE, ALBERT CARL, JR., B.S.
(Florida Southern College, 1936) ..... ... ........... ...... Research Assistant in Naval Stores
STEARNS, CHARLES ROBERT, JR., B.S. in Agriculture
(University of Florida, 1935) ........ ......... Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry
STEWART, VINCENT EVANS, B.S.
(University of Florida, 1934) .... ............ Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
STIRLING, WALTER WILLIAM, B.S. in Agriculture
(University of Florida, 1935) .......... Graduate Assistant in Horticulture
TASCHEK, RICHARD, B.S. (University of Wisconsin, 1936) ...... Graduate Assistant in Physics
WEBB, HERBERT MITCHELL, B.S. in Pharmacy
(University of Florida, 1936) ............ ........... .......... ... Graduate Assistant in Pharmacy
WEBB, SAM GRAHAM, B.S. in Agriculture
(University of Florida, 1927) ........ .... ............... Graduate Assistant in Agronomy







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


GRADUATE SCHOLARS, 1936-1937

ANDERSON, GEORGE W.. B.S. (University of Florida, 1935) ....... Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
GRAMLING, LEA GENE, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1935: M.S. in Pharmacy, 1936
(University of Florida) .. ..... Graduate Scholar in Pharmacology
HAMPTON, BURT LAURENT, l.S. (University of Florida, 1934) .... Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
JONES, WILBUR R., B.S. in Pharmacy
(University of Florida, 1936) ........ .... .. Graduate Scholar in Pharmacology
KONOPKA, VICTOR THOMAS, B.A. (University of Florida, 1936) .... Graduate Scholar in History
LAND, PATTERSON MIDDLE, B.A. in Education
(University of Florida, 1936) ........... ............ ........... Graduate Scholar in Mathematics
LYTLE, ERNEST JAMES, B.S. (University of Florida, 1935) ........... Graduate Scholar in Mathematics
MCVov, EDGAR C., B.A. in Edacation (University of Florida, 1934) ........Graduate Scholar in Sociology
RIKER, HAROLD CLARK, B.A. (University of Florida, 1936) .................... Graduate Scholar in English


RECIPIENTS OF GtRADUATE DEGREES

February 3, 1936

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING

WILSON PAYNE GREEN, B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Florida, 1931 .. Reddick
Mechanical Engineering
THESIS: "The Utilization of Solar En-ery. for Air Condition ling arnd Refrigeration in Florida"

June 8, 1936

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY

LEA GENE GHAMLING, l.S. in Pharmacy, Univeisity of Florida, 1935 ......... Plant City
Pharmacology
THESIS: "Biological Assay of Gelsiut"
GEORGE ROBERT JONES, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1934 ................. .......... Archer
Pharmacy
THESIS: "Drug Extraction. The Siwellinv of Pou'dered Drugs in Liquids"

MASTER OF SCIENCE

HORTON HOLCOMBE HonBs, B.S., University of Florida, 1935 .... ............................... Alachua
Biology
THESIS: "The Crawfishles of the Gai.tesvillU Rcgion w'ith Sperial Referentces to Their Life
Histories and Ecological Distribution"
JOHN DAVIS KILBY, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1934 .................. ......... Quincy
Biology
THESIS: "A Biological Analysis of the Food and Feeding Habits of Rana Sphenocephala
(Cope) and Hyla Cinerea (Schneider)"
LOUISE NORRIS, B.S., Juniata College. 1934 ......... ....... ........ ............... Johnstown, Pa.
Biology
THESIS: "The Proventriculus in Orthoptera, with special reference to the taxonomei siygifi-
cance of its armature in the Ensifera"

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION

WILLIAM THOMAS EDWARDS, B.A. in Education, University of Florida. 1932 ............. .. ... Bartow
Education
THESIS: "An4 Evaluation of MAfrl.ini PIolici-es in Tu'enty Accredited Elementary Schools of
Florida"
TYRE SHEPARD THOMAS, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1932 ............................... Lake Butler
Education
I'HESIS: "A BIudgetary Slytemi for the I'iubtc Schools of Union County, Florida"







RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES 77


MASTER OF ARTS

DONALD FREDERICK ELLIOTT, B.A., Monmouth College, 1931 ........ ...... ............. Penney Farms
French
THESIS: "A Comparison of the Ititeraire de Paris a Jerusalem, by Chateaubriand, and the
Voyage en Orient, by Lamartine"
1OZE HARRIS KITCHENS, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1935 -................... Pine Mount
English
THESIS: "The Scientific Influences in the Work of Thomas Hardy"
SUSAN ALDERMAN MAHORNER, A.B.. Florida Slate College for Women, 1927 ........... ....... Ocala
Psychology
THESIS: "The Emotional Maturity of 208 University Freshmen"
ROBERT MERIWETHER SANFORD, B.A., University of Florida, 1935 .. .. Jacksonville
English
THESIS: "The Literary Elements in the Florida Newspapers of the Civil War Period"
EVALYN MCNIEL SIMMONS, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1924 ............. Gainesville
Psychology
THESIS: "A Sthudy of the Personality Traits of a Grotup of Superior Children"

July 25, 1936

MASTER OF ARTS

JOEL HARRY BENSON, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1935 ............................ Gainesville
English
THESIS: "The EconomLic Views of Winston Churchill, American Novelist"
ERRAH D. SHANNON HEATH, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1933 Gainesville
English
THESIs: "The Philosophy of Edwin Arlinvton Robinson"


August 29, 1936

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY

JESS ALLEN REESE, B.S. in Pharmacy, Medical College of Virginia, 1930 .......... St. Charles, Va.
Pharmacognosy
THESIS: "A Study of the Leares of Ipotioea Pes-Caprae"

MASTER OF SCIENCE

R. EDWARD BELLAMY, H.S., University of Florida, 1935 ...... .. ....... Tallahassee
Biology
THESIS: "A Key for the Determination of Florida Craneflits with Records of Their (eoyraphlic
and Seasonal Distribution"
IRVING FEINBERG, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, 1935 ........ ..... Quincy
Chemistry
THESIS: "A Study of the Rates of Absorption of Carbon Dioxide in the Ethanolanoines"

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION

LONNIE LEE DUGGAR, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 192s ........... .... Macelenny
Education
THESIS: "The Improvement of the Teaching of Math comtics in the First Six Grades with
Special Reference to the Macclenny School"
WILLIAM C. DUNCAN, A.B., Wofford College, 1910 .......... Key West
Education
THESIS: "The History of White Public School Education in Key West, Florida"
CHARLES MONTGOMERY FISHER, B.S., University of Florida. 1908 ... ...... Miami
Education
THESIS: "County School Budect-Making in Dade C'ouity,. Florida"







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