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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00308
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1939
Copyright Date: 1939
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00308
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Full Text




The University Record

of the


University of Florida


Bulletin of the
Graduate School
With Announcements for the Year
1939-40


Vol. XXXIV, Series I


No. 5


May 1, 1939


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida











The Record comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the bulletins of
information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of
the University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The appli-
cant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired. Address

THE REGISTRAR, University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of research work.
Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in several series.

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions are
arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges should
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The
issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on Publications.
Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges,
should be addressed to the University Library, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

THE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


[206]






CONTENTS


Graduate School Calendar ......... -------
Instructions for Graduate Students --... ---
Administrative Officers ......- ...-- -----
The Graduate Council .- .....-- -----
Teaching Faculty .. .............----------..
General Information--
Graduate Assistantships and Graduate Scholarships .
Requirements for the Master's Degree ..-----
Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Departments of Instruction, Graduate Courses -- -.
Agricultural Chemistry ----------
Agricultural Economics
Agricultural Engineering
Agronomy -.. ....-........ --.- ---------
Animal Husbandry ---
Architecture ....-----------
Biology --- --------... ... ---
Botany and Bacteriology
Chemical Engineering ...... ----------.. ----
Chemistry -.......... .. .---------- --.-----
Civil Engineering ...-.. ----... --.. --.
Economics -- ---.......-- -.---------
Education -........--.. ---------------
Electrical Engineering ..... ------
English ----. ..-- -------
Entomology ..- ---------
French .... ------. ------
History .. ..--- ---------
Horticulture ...--- ---------
Industrial Engineering --------
Journalism ----... .--- ------.--
Mathematics ....-- ..----.
Mechanical Engineering -- -- ----
Painting .....-- -------- -- -
Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology ....-------.--.-.
Pharmacy -- .. ----------
Philosophy .. -------------
Physics .--------- ------
Political Science .....----------.... .... ....--..-..--.--- ----
Psychology ..--. ------------
Sociology .......- .------- ... ----....-...--.. ----
Spanish ---.-------............... .. --
Graduate Assistants, 1938-1939 ..-..-............ ------
Graduate Scholars, 1938-1939 -- ------
Recipients of Graduate Degrees -------
Summary ----.----------


... .-----... ---. 208
.--........----- 210
- .. ---. 211
211
--- 211
215
-- ...--- 216
..-.-..-------.. 217
219
221
221
221
222
-----.--- 222
223
----- 224
-- 225
--- --227
.......-------.... 228
...-.-------. 229
..-..-.--------... 231
------231
---------------- 233
........------- 237
..----....-.. 237
....----- 238
-------------- 239
.......------ 239
-------- 240
..-.....------- 241
.... ...-------.. 241
.--- 241
-.-....-..------ 243
-........------- 244
.-.......------- 244
..........------ 245
-- 245
.-.----- 246
---- 247
-....... .2-------248
...--------.--.. 249
.-.-.-.------.249
.-------..... 250
.------ 251
.-.....--- ----.... 251
.--------....-- 256


[207]






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


GRADUATE SCHOOL CALENDAR

SUMMER SESSION, 1939

FIRST SUMMER TERM


June 5-June 10, and June 13, Monday.- Registration.

June 13, Tuesday, 7 A. M. -----.. Classes begin; late registration fee $5.

June 14, Wednesday, 4 P. M..-...-- Last day for registration for the First Summer
Term, and for adding courses.

June 17, Saturday, 12 noon -. --- Last day for making application for a degree to
be awarded at the end of the First Summer
Term.

July 1, Saturday ---- -- Last day for students graduating at the end of
the First Summer Term to submit theses to the
Dean.

July 4, Tuesday --... ----- Holiday.

July 17-20 -....- -- Registration for Second Summer Term.

July 21, Friday, 12 noon .- . First Summer Term ends.

July 22, Saturday, 10 A. M. Conferring of degrees.

SECOND SUMMER TERM


July 24, Monday, 8-12 A. M..

July 26, Wednesday..-----.


July 29, Saturday, 12 noon -



August 5, Saturday, 12 noon



August 25, Friday, 12 noon

August 26, Saturday, 10 A. M





September 6-16 ---....-...


September 18, Monday, 8 A. 1


----.-.-.-... ... Registration.

--- Last day for registration for the Second Summer
Term, and for adding courses.

.-----.......... Last day for making application for a degree to
be awarded at the end of the Second Summer
Term.

Last day for students graduating at the end of
the Second Summer Term to submit theses to
the Dean.

Second Summer Term ends.

SCommencement Convocation.

REGULAR SESSION, 1939-40

FIRST SEMESTER

..-..-.... Registration, (Registration closes at 12 noon, Sep-
tember 16).

4..-...--...-.... Classes for 1939-40 session begin; late registration
fee of $5 for all students.













CALENDAR


September 23, 12 noon ......--


October 14, Saturday, 12 noon -


November 29, Wednesday, 5 P. M.

December 4, Monday, 8 A. M. ...

December 16, Saturday, 12 noon

1940-

January 3, Wednesday, 8 A. M...

January 3, Wednesday, 5 P. M.


January 22, Monday ---......---


February 2, Friday, 10 A. M. .



February 5, Monday ... -.. .


February 10, Saturday, 12 noon


February 24, Saturday, 12 noon .-.


April 10, Wednesday, 5 P. M. .--

April 15, Monday, 8 A. M. ---.

May 1, Wednesday --.------.


May 27, Monday.


Last day for registration for the first semester,
and for adding courses.

-.... Last day for making application for a degree to
be awarded at the end of the first semester.

Thanksgiving recess begins.

Thanksgiving recess ends.

.. Christmas recess begins.



.....- Christmas recess ends.

Last day for students graduating at the end of the
first semester to submit theses to the Dean.

... Second semester registration begins for students
registered the first semester.

First semester ends. Conferring of degrees.

SECOND SEMESTER

.-- Registration for the second semester for new stu-
dents only.

.... Last day for registration for second semester and
for adding courses.

...- Last day for making application for a degree to
be awarded at the end of the second semester.

SSpring recess begins.

SSpring recess ends

Last day for students graduating at the end of
the second semester to submit theses to the
Dean.

-- Commencement Convocation.














BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


INSTRUCTIONS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

1. Correspond with the Dean and if necessary with the head of the department in which
you propose to take your major work.

2. If you are found eligible and decide to come to the University of Florida, have the
Registrar of your school send a transcript of your work to the Dean of the Graduate School.
This should be in the hands of the Dean at least a month before the date for registration,
and it must be in the hands of the Dean before the student will be allowed to register.

3. At the proper time, register with the Dean. He will give you blank form No. 1 to
take to your department head. Either the head of the department or some other professor
in this department will become the professor of your major subject and will suggest courses
for which you should register for the session. Take this blank to the Dean and complete your
registration.

4. See that the language requirements are satisfied at the proper time.

5. Early in your last term before graduation, notify the Registrar that you are a can-
didate for a degree. See calendar for "Last day for making application for a degree".

6. When you are ready to put the thesis in final form, get instructions at the Dean's
office. Watch your time. Consult the calendar.

7. Look to the professor of your major subject and your special supervisory committee
for guidance.

8. Always feel free to seek information at the Dean's office if you are not certain as
to the interpretation of any requirement.


210






TEACHING FACULTY


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., D.Litt., L. H. D., President of the
University
JAMES NESBIT ANDERSON, Ph.D., Dean Emeritus
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the Graduate School
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
PENELOPE GRIFFIN, B.A., Secretary

THE GRADUATE COUNCIL
THE DEAN
H. HAROLD HUME, D.Sc., Dean of the College of Agriculture
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.S., Professor of Secondary Education and High School Visitor,
Dean of the General College
CLIFFORD PIERSON LYONS, Ph.D., Head Professor of English
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D., Head Professor of Biology and Geology
ROBERT CROZIER WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Physics

TEACHING FACULTY

Those Offering Courses Listed in This Bulletin

CHARLES ELLIOTT ABBOTT, M.S., Assistant Professor of Horticulture
ROBERT VERRILL ALLISON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agronomy; Agronomist, Experiment
Station
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D., Professor of Business Statistics and Economics
ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D., Head Professor of French
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Professor of Economic Geography
RAYMOND BROWN BECKER, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Dairy Husbandman,
Experiment Station
DAVID MIERS BEIGHTS, Ph.D., C.P.A., Professor of Accounting
WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, D.Sc., Professor of Chemical Engineering
EDWARD W. BERGER, Ph.D., Entomologist, Florida State Plant Board
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, Ph.D., Professor of Economics
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Chemistry
ARTHUR AARON BLESS, Ph.D., Professor of Physics
LucIus MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D., Head Professor of Sociology
ARTHUR C. BROWN, M.S., Florida State Plant Board, Special Lecturer, Plant Quarantine and
Inspection
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D., Associate Professor of French
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology
ARCHIE FAIRLY CARR., JR., Ph.D., Instructor in Biology
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
JAMES EDWARD CHACE, JR., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics and Realty Management
BERNARD VICTOR CHRISTENSEN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology,
and Director of the School of Pharmacy
MADISON DERRELL CODY, M.A., Head Professor of Botany and Bacteriology
BEN COGBURN, M.S., Assistant Professor of Accounting
JAMES E. CONGLETON, Ph.D., Instructor in English






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


ALFRED CRAGO, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology and Measurements
JOHN THOMAS CREIGHTON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Entomology and Plant Pathology
MANNING JULIAN DAUER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Political Science
SIGISMOND DE RHUDESIIEIM DIETTRICH, D.Sc., Assistant Professor of Economic Geography
HARWOOD BURROWS DOLBEARE, B.A., Associate Professor of Economics
NEWTON CROMWELL EBAUGH, B.E. in M. and E.E., M.E., M.S., Head Professor of Mechanical
Engineering
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Professor of Economics
NORMAN E. ELIASON, Ph.D., Acting Professor of English
MARK WIRTH EMMEL, D.V.M., M.S., Professor of Veterinary Science and Veterinarian,
Experiment Station
ELMER JACOB EMIG, M.A., Head Professor of Journalism
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D., Head Professor of Philosophy
ROLAND BYERLY EUTSLER, Ph.D., Professor of Economics and Insurance
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., Associate Professor of English
WILLIAM WARRICK FINEREN, M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacy
ROWLAND BARNES FRENCH, Ph.D., Associate Chemist, Experiment Station
LEONARD WILLIAM GADDUM, Ph.D., Bio-chemist, Experiment Station
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D., Professor of Agricultural Education
HALLETT HUNT GERMOND, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics
JAMES DAVID GLUNT, Ph.D., Professor of History
J. C. GOODWIN, M.S., Florida State Plant Board, Special Lecturer, Plant Quarantine and
Inspection
JOHN Louis ROCHON GRAND, M.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing Agricultural Products
FREDERICK T. HANNAFORD, B.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Acting Head of the Department
of Spanish and German
JOHN ERSKINE HAWKINS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry
JAMES DOUGLAS HAYGOOD, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry
JOSEPH RUSSELL HENDERSON, M.S.A., Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station
OSCAR E. HESKIN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics and Marketing
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Head Professor of Psychology
HOMER HIXSON, Ph.D., Instructor in Entomology and Plant Pathology
HORTON HOLCOMB HOBBS, M.S., Instructor in Biology
HOLLIS HOWARD HOLBROOK, B.F.A., Instructor in Drawing and Painting
THEODORE HUNTINGTON HUBBELL, Ph.D., Professor of Biology and Geology
H. HAROLD HUME, D.Sc., Dean of the College of Agriculture
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, M.A., LL.B., Associate Professor of Business Law and Economics
WILLIAM JOHN HUSA, Ph.D., Head Professor of Pharmacy
EDWARD JOSEPH IRELAND, Ph.D., Instructor in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry
FRANK STOVER JAMISON, Ph.D., Truck Horticulturist, Experiment Station
WILLIAM GORDON KIRK, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry and Assistant
Animal Husbandman, Experiment Station
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics
ANGUS MACKENZIE LAIRD, M.A., Assistant Professor of English






TEACHING FACULTY


JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D., Head Professor of History and Political Science
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences
WALTER ANTHONY LEUKEL, Ph.D., Agronomist, Experiment Station
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Professor of Secondary Education and High School Visitor,
Dean of the General College
CLIFFORD PIERSON LYONS, Ph.D., Head Professor of English
JOHN MILLER MACLACHLAN, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Head Professor of Economics and Dean of the College
of Business Administration
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD, Ph.D., Professor of Supervised Teaching and Director of Educa-
tional Research
NORMAN RIPLEY MEHRHOF, M.S., Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Poultry Husbandman,
Experiment Station
J. H. MONTGOMERY, M.D., Assistant Plant Commissioner, Florida State Plant Board, Special
Lecturer, Plant Quarantine and Inspection
RALPH A. MORGEN, Ph.D., Professor of Chemical Engineering
CHARLES I. MOSIER, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology
CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, M.A., Assistant Professor of English
WAYNE MILLER NEAL, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Animal Nutrition and Associate in
Nutrition, Experiment Station
CLARENCE VERNON NOBLE, Ph.D., Head Professor of Agricultural Economics
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Head Professor of Education and Dean of the College of
Education
ANCIL NEWTON PAYNE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History and Political Science
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S., Associate Professor of Physics
GEORGE OSBORN PHELPS, M.S. in Engineering, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics
ZAREH M. PIRENIAN, M.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry
EDWARD S. QUADE, Ph.D., Instructor in Mathematics
KEITH GRAHAM REEVE, M.A. in Architecture, Associate Professor of Architecture
JULIUS WAYNE REITZ, M.S., Professor of Agricultural Economics
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., Professor of English
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Head Professor of Agricultural Engineering
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D., Head Professor of Biology and Geology
LEWIS HENRY ROGERS, M.S., Associate Professor of Soils
Louis LEON RussorF, M.S., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry and Assistant in Animal
Nutrition, Experiment Station
ELLIS BENTON SALT, Ed.D., Professor of Health and Physical Education
STEPHEN PENCHEFF SASHOFF, M.S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering
WILLIAM LINCOLN SAWYER, M.S. in Engineering, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering
PETTUS HOLMES SENN, Ph.,D., Associate Professor of Farm Crops and Genetics
ARTHUR LISTON SHEALY, B.S., D.V.M., Head Professor of Animal Husbandry and Animal Hus-
bandman, Experiment Station
HARLEY BAKWEL SHERMAN, Ph.D., Professor of Biology
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Assistant Dean in Charge of
Laboratory School
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Mathematics and Acting Dean of the
Graduate School





















BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


FREDERICK B. SMITH, Ph.D., Professor of Agronomy
HERMAN EVERETTE SPIVEY, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of English
ARTHUR Louis STAHL, Ph.D., Associate Horticulturist, Experiment Station
GRACE ADAMS STEVENS, M.A., Instructor in Education
THOMAS B. STROUP, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English
DANIEL C. SWANSON, Ph.D., Instructor in Physics
ROBERT ALDEN THOMPSON, M.S. in Engineering, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer-
ing.
LLOYD MASSENA THURSTON, Ph.D., Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Dairy Technologist
ARCHIE NEWTON TISSOT, Ph.D., Associate Entomologist, Experiment Station
FRANK WALDO TUTTLE, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Economics
HOWARD KEEFER WALLACE, Ph.D., Instructor in Biology
JOHN VERTREES WATKINS, M.S. in Agriculture, Assistant Professor of Horticulture
JOSEPH RALPH WATSON, M.A., Entomologist, Experiment Station
RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., F.A.I.A., Head Professor of Architecture and Director of the School
of Architecture and Allied Arts
JOSEPH WEIL, B.S.E.E., M.S., Head Professor of Electrical Engineering, Dean of the College of
Engineering
FRANCIS DUDLEY WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physical Science
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology
ROBERT CROZIER WILLIAMSON, Ph.D., Head Professor of Physics
CLAUDE HOUSTON WILLOUGHBY, M.S., Professor of Animal Husbandry
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D., Professor of Education and Chairman, Comprehensive Course,
Reading, Speaking and Writing
HERBERT SNOW WOLFE, Ph.D., Head Professor of Horticulture
PHILIP OSBORNE YEATON, B.S., S.B., Head Professor of Industrial Engineering






GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL INFORMATION

ADMINISTRATION

The affairs of the Graduate School are administered by the Graduate Council, which
consists of the Dean as ex-officio chairman, and certain members of the faculty, who are
appointed annually by the President.

ADMISSION

To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of a standard
college or university and have a foundation in the major subject sufficient in quantity and
quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student proposes to major. Each
department offering graduate work shall file with the Dean of the Graduate School a statement
of its requirements for publication in the Graduate Bulletin or for other use by him.
If the student cannot meet these two requirements, he may nevertheless be permitted to
register provisionally, and demonstrate by a qualifying examination and a semester's work,
his preparation for and his ability to do graduate work. Such students often will be required
to spend longer than the prescribed time in completing the requirements for the degree. It is
permissible for well-qualified students to take courses in the Graduate School without be-
coming candidates for an advanced degree.

REGISTRATION

All graduate students, old or new, are required to register in the Office of the Dean on the
regular registration days as indicated in the bulletin. The student should consult in advance
the Dean and the head of the department in which he proposes to major, and inquire if he is
eligible to register for this work. A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate
work should be transmitted to the Dean of the Graduate School, at least one month before the
beginning of the session, by the Registrar of the institution in which the credits have been
earned.
The transcript must be in the Dean's hands before the student will be allowed to register.
If the student seems eligible, he will be referred by the Dean to the head of the department
concerned. Either the head of the department or some professor in that department will be-
come the professor of the major subject for the student, and will plan the courses for which
he is to register. A blank form is furnished at the Dean's office.

FEES

A registration fee of $15 for each semester is required of all students; for the summer
session this fee is $15 for each term. All students pay a diploma fee of $5 before graduation.
At the time when the thesis is submitted to the Dean, the student will also have to pay $4 for
binding two copies of the thesis or the dissertation.
Students from other states or countries who have not established residence in the State
of Florida are required to pay an additional fee of $50 for each semester of the regular session
and an additional fee of $10 for each term of the summer session.
Holders of graduate assistantships and graduate scholarships are exempt from the fee for
non-Florida students, but not from breakage fees.
Some fees are optional: for instance, the student activity fee and the infirmary fee. If a
student wishes the privileges that go with these fees, he must pay the fees in advance.







216 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


PHYSICAL EXAMINATION

Students enrolling in the University for the first time are furnished by the Registrar's
Office a physical examination form which is to be completed by the family physician and
returned to the Office of the Registrar. On admission, the student is given a careful physical
examination by the University physician.


GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AND GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS

With the Annual Stipend
AGRICULTURE:
Agricultural Economics-One Graduate Assistant in Farm Management ...$..... $ 450
Agronomy- One Graduate Assistant -.. .......----------- -....-........ ....------ 450
Botany and Bacteriology-
One Graduate Assistant in Bacteriology .......-..-- --- --.................---.. 450
One Graduate Assistant in Botany ....------.... -------- --...........- -- 450
Entomology and Plant Pathology-
One Graduate Assistant .... --- -................... ..... -- ... . ....... 450
One Graduate Fellow (Rohm and Haas) ~........................-........-- ...-.... ---.- 600
One Graduate Assistant in Pest Control ....-..- ........-- ......... .... .......... .. 540
One Graduate Assistant in Pest Control ...............--...--..... ..--.-... ------- 420
Horticulture-One Graduate Assistant ..- -.................----.....- ...----- -- .. 450
(Agricultural Chemistry is included in Chemistry)
ARCHITECTURE:
One Graduate Assistant -. ......... ----.............-... .. ..... ~.~ .........-.....--...... ... 450
BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY:
Three Graduate Assistants at $450 each 1--.......-...-.... ....- ...... .. ... 1,350
CHEMISTRY:
One Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry ......- .... .. .................... ............-- .. 450
Three Graduate Assistants in Chemistry at $450 each .....--................. .... ........ 1.350
Four Research Assistants in Naval Stores at $600 each .............................- ............. 2.400
ECONOMICS:
One Graduate Assistant ................ ......... .. ............ ............ ..... .... 350
ENGINEERING:
One Graduate Assistant in Chemical Engineering ...........................................-- 450
Civil Engineering- One Graduate Assistant ......... .................. .-.. ... ....... ..... ... .. 450
Mechanical Engineering-Two Graduate Assistants at $450 each ................. ................ 900
ENGLISH:
One Graduate Assistant ..-..-....... ----. --.....- ....--....--..... .. .. 450
MTAIHEMATICS:
One Graduate Assistant ............. ------- ---...........-........ .. 450
PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY:
Two Graduate Assistants at $450 each -...... ... .. .... .... .. ...--.............. ... ..... ..._.- 900
PHARMACY:
Two Graduate Assistants at $450 each ........................ ...... ..-. .......... ....-- .... 900
PHYSICS:
Three Graduate Assistants at $450 each ...-... ----...... --....................-.... ..... 1,350
PSYCHOLOGY:
One Graduate Assistant ....-- ................-- .....-.........-. .-- ... ....-.- 450
GENERAL:
Ten Graduate Scholarships at $300 each ........ -.... -----.-...............-..- ..... 3.000

The Graduate Scholarships may be in any department that offers major work for a
master's degree. Application must be filed not later than March 15. Students accepting
these scholarships are not permitted to take other remunerative positions.

Graduate Scholarships are administered by the Office of the Dean. Graduate Assistantships
are handled by the departments.






REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

Degrees Offered.-Master of Arts; Master of Arts in Architecture; Master of Arts in
Education; Master of Science; Master of Science in Agriculture; Master of Science in
Engineering; and Master of Science in Pharmacy.
Residence Requirement.-The student must spend at least one entire academic year at the
University as a graduate student devoting his full time to the pursuit of his studies. If there
is a break in the student's work, his whole course must be included within a period of seven
years, unless the Supervisory Committee recommends otherwise.
Transfer of Credits.-Under certain conditions transfer of a limited number of credits to
the University will be allowed; but the final acceptance of credits from other institutions is
subject to the approval of the student's Supervisory Committee. Transferred credits may
reduce the course requirement but not the residence, and work they represent shall be included
in the final examination.
Work Required.-The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program with a
definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester hours or the equivalent, at least half of
which shall be in a single field of study and the remainder in related subject matter as
determined by the student's Supervisory Committee. The principal part of the course work
for the master's degree shall be designated strictly for graduates. However, in the case of
related subject matter courses numbered 300 and above may be offered upon the approval of
the Supervisory Committee.
In addition to the course work, the student will be required to prepare and present a thesis
(or equivalent in creative work) acceptable to the Supervisory Committee. The thesis shall
be submitted to the Dean or the Graduate Council for approval. The student should consult
the Dean's office for instructions concerning the form of the thesis. Two copies of this thesis
shall be in the hands of the Dean not later than May 1. If the student expects to graduate
at the end of the first term the thesis must be submitted by January 3. These copies are
deposited in the Library if the thesis is accepted.
Grades.-Passing grades for students registered in the Graduate School are A and B. All
other grades are failing.

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT.-
1. Foreign Language.-A reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the discretion
of the student's Supervisory Committee. When a foreign language is required the examination
will be conducted by the language department concerned. The requirement must be satisfied
before the beginning of the last semester. A student in the regular session must pass the
language examination by March 15 if he expects to graduate at the end of the first summer
term of that year, and by April 20 if he expects to graduate at the end of the second summer
term. In case the student is completing all his work in the summer terms, the foreign language
requirement must be satisfied before the beginning of the fourth short summer term. If the
student is majoring in a foreign language, that language cannot be used to satisfy this
requirement.
2. English Language.-The effective use of the English language as determined by the
student's Supervisory Committee is required of all candidates for the master's degree.
Admission to Candidacy.-Whether an applicant has been provisionally admitted or
regularly admitted, his Supervisory Committee shall review his entire academic record at the
end of his first semester or summer session of residence work. In addition to the approval of
the committee, a formal vote of the principal department concerned will be necessary to admit






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


the applicant to candidacy, to fix definitely the additional residence and course requirements,
and to approve the program the applicant has submitted.

Supervisory Committee.-The Dean shall appoint a special Supervisory Committee for each
student consisting of not less than three members. The professor of the principal subject will
be chairman of this committee. The Dean is an ex-officio member of all Supervisory Commit-
tees. The many important duties of the Supervisory Committee will be given under several of
the items relating to the requirements for the master's degree.

General Examination.-It will be the duty of the Special Supervisory Committee, when all
work is complete or practically complete, including the regular courses and the thesis, to
conduct a general examination, either written or oral, or both, to embrace: first, the thesis;
second, the major subject; third, the minor or minors; fourth, questions of a general nature
pertaining to the student's field of study. The Committee shall report in writing to the Dean
not later than one week before the time for the conferring of the degree if all work has been
completed in a satisfactory manner and the student is recommended for the degree.
Work Done in Absentia.-Credit is not given for work done in absentia. No courses may
be taken for credit by extension or correspondence. Under the following conditions, however,
the Graduate Council may vote to allow the student to finish and submit his thesis when not
in residence:
(1) If he has completed his residence requirement.
(2) If he has completed his course requirements.
(3) If he has submitted while in residence a draft of his thesis and obtained the approval
of his Supervisory Committee as to the substance of his thesis.
(4) If the Supervisory Committee recommends to the Graduate Council that the student
be given the privilege of finishing the thesis in absentia and submitting it later.
In case this privilege is granted and the final draft of the thesis is approved, it will be
necessary for the student to appear and stand the final examination. His presence will also
be necessary at Commencement if the degree is conferred.
Training for Government Service.-In view of the increasing importance of training for the
public service at the present time, the University of Florida offers the following program for
the University of Florida students who are interested in pursuing graduate work in public
administration:
(1) Training in public administration should be accompanied by specific work in public offices under
recognized supervision. Accordingly, the University of Florida has arranged a program which will enable
the student to avail himself of facilities and specialized courses offered by approved institutions in Washing-
ton, D. C., which give such training. The procedure necessary is that the student make application by
February 1, if he intends to pursue such graduate training the following fall. In February the Graduate
Council of the University of Florida will consider his application. If the application is viewed favorably, the
student may be permitted to register for the following year at the University of Florida, although he will
pursue his scholastic work at Washington in absentia from the University of Florida. The Graduate
Council should approve both the studies he undertakes in Washington and the topic for his thesis. The
student will be encouraged to take courses in public administration in Washington, and to avail himself of
the use of facilities which are offered for the pursual of training in government departments. The credit
earned by the student during this year's work may not exceed one-half of a full year's graduate work.
(2) The student upon his return to the University of Florida will be required to complete the remain-
ing one-half of the credit necessary for earning the Master's degree. Likewise, he will be required to write
his thesis under the supervision of his major professor at the University of Florida. Finally, he will remain
in residence at the University of Florida for a period of at least nine months. During these nine months,
however, he may take as little as one-half of a full graduate load; the rest of his time may be devoted to
work on the campus, as a graduate assistant, teaching fellow, etc., if he has secured such an award.
At the time the student is preparing to make application to the Graduate Council, he is urged to secure
information about the programs of the institutions at Washington, and to make application with them for
such fellowships as may be available. These fellowships are entirely under the control of the institutions
in question. The program of the National Institute of Public Affairs in Washington, while limited to fifty






REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREES


students selected by the Institute each year, offers particular advantages to students who contemplate graduate
training in public administration.

Training in Trade and Industrial Education.-The University of Florida in cooperation
with the State Department of Public Instruction offers work on the graduate level in Trade
and Industrial Education in the summer at Daytona Beach. Students interested should consult
the Bulletin of the School of Trade and Industrial Education.

Summer Terms.-Three complete summer sessions, or six short summer terms, devoted
entirely to graduate work, will satisfy the time requirement. The terms need not be consecu-
tive, but the work must be completed within seven years. The thesis must be completed and
submitted to the Dean not later than three weeks before the end of the summer term in which
the student expects to receive his degree.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered only in the departments of Animal Hus-
bandry (Animal Nutrition), Biology (Zoology), Chemistry, Pharmacy, and Pharmacognosy
and Pharmacology. It is expected that other departments will be added from year to year
as facilities are increased.

Time and Residence.-A minimum of three academic years of resident graduate work, of
which at least the last year must be spent at the University of Florida, is required of all
candidates for the Doctor's degree. In many cases, it will be necessary to remain longer than
three years, and necessarily so when the student is not putting in his full time in graduate
work.

Distribution of Work.-Two-thirds of the student's time is expected to be spent upon his
major subject and the dissertation, and about one-third on his minor or minors. The student
will be guided by the professor of his major subject and by his special committee in regard
to his whole course of study. The Graduate Council does not specify just what courses or how
many courses will be required. The work is now mainly research and the student will be thrown
largely upon his own responsibility. He is expected to familiarize himself thoroughly with his
field of study, and as a result of his studies and investigations, to produce a work which will
add something to human knowledge.

Minors.-The student must take one minor and may not take more than two minors. In
general, if two minors are taken, the second minor will require at least one year. The first
minor will require twice as much work as the second, and if only one minor is taken it will
require as much work as two minors.

Special Committee.-When the student has advanced sufficiently towards his degree, a
special committee will be appointed by the Dean, of which committee the professor of the
major subject will be chairman. This committee will direct, advise, and examine the student.
The Dean is an ex-officio member of all supervisory committees.

Language Requirement.-A reading knowledge of both French and German is required
of all candidates for the Ph.D. degree. The examinations in the languages are held by the
language departments concerned. These requirements should be removed as early as possible
in the student's career, and must be satisfied before the applicant can be admitted to the
qualifying examination.

Qualifying Examination.-A qualifying examination is required of all candidates for the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. This examination may be held during the second term of



















BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


the second year of residence. The examination is both written and oral and covers both major
and minor subjects. It will be conducted by his Special Supervisory Committee. After passing
the qualifying examination the student must put in one full academic year of residence before
he appears for the degree. If the student fails in his qualifying examination, he will not be
given another opportunity unless for special reasons a re-examination is recommended by his
special committee and approved by the Graduate Council.

Dissertation.-A satisfactory dissertation showing independent investigation and research
is required of all candidates. Two typewriten copies of this dissertation must be presented
to the Dean not later than May 1 of the year in which the candidate expects to receive his
degree. If the student should be a candidate for the degree in a summer term, the thesis must
be completed and submitted to the Dean not later than three weeks before the end of the
term in which the student expects to receive his degree.

Printing of Dissertation.-One hundred printed copies of the dissertation must be presented
to the University within one year after the conferring of the degree. Reprints from reputable
scientific journals may be accepted upon the recommendation of the Special Supervisory
Committee. After the dissertation has been accepted, the candidate must deposit with the
Business Manager, not later than one week before the degree is conferred, the sum of $50 as a
pledge that the dissertation will be published within the prescribed time. This sum will be
returned if the printed copies are received within the year.

Final Examination.-After the acceptance of the dissertation and the completion of all the
work of the candidate, he will be given a final examination, oral or written, or both, by his
Special Supervisory Committee.

Recommendation.-If the final examination is passed, the Special Committee will report to
the Dean in writing not later than one week before the time for conferring the degree that
the student has met all requirements for the degree, and that he is presented to the Graduate
Council for recommendation to the Board of Control for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

Graduate Courses.-Only strictly graduate courses are listed in this bulletin. For other
courses in the various departments, see the Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division.
The courses are arranged alphabetically. Not all the courses will be given in 1939-40.
Seminars, Conferences and Research: Each student in the Graduate School should ac-
quaint himself with the requirements of the various departments as to attendance upon,
and participation in seminars, conferences, and research. While the student does not
formally register for these projects, he will be required by most of the departments to
participate, and make regular reports.

GRADUATE COURSES

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY

Prerequisites: See Department of Chemistry.

Acy. 561.-Animal Bio-Chemistry. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
FRENCH.
The chemistry of animal tissues and metabolism.
Acy. 563.-Plant Bio-Chemistry. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits.
LEUKEL.
The chemistry of plant growth and metabolism.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

Prerequisites: The student as a rule will have received his B.S. degree in Agriculture
from a college of recognized standing. The student must next satisfy one or more profes-
sors in each subject which he has chosen for major and minor study that he has the neces-
sary preparation to pursue graduate work in that subject.
As. 501.-Agricultural Economics Seminar. 2 hours. 2 credits. NOBLE and
the Agricultural Economics STAFF. The first half of the course As. 501-502.
As. 501-502 is a study of recent literature and research work in agricultural economics.
As. 502.-Agricultural Economics Seminar. 2 hours. 2 credits. NOBLE and
the Agricultural Economics STAFF. The second half of the course As. 501-502.
As. 505.-Research Problems in Farm Management. Hours to be arranged by
the Head of the Department. NOBLE, REITZ.
As. 506.-Research Problems in Farm Management. Hours to be arranged by
the Head of the Department. NOBLE, REITZ.
As. 508.-Land Economics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
HAMILTON.
Rural taxation colonization, and adjustment of rural lands to their best uses.
As. 509.-Citrus Grove Organization and Management. 1 hour, and 2 hours
laboratory. 2 credits. REITZ.
The organization and management of successful citrus properties in Florida.
As. 510.-Organization and Management of Truck Farms. 1 hour, and 2
hours laboratory. 2 credits. NOBLE.
The economic organization and management of successful truck farms in Florida.
As. 511.-Research Problems in Marketing Agricultural Products. Hours and
credit to be arranged and approved by the Head of the Department. HAMILTON.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


As. 512.-Research Problems in Marketing Agricultural Products. Hours and
credit to be arranged and approved by the Head of the Department. HAMILTON.
As. 514.-Advanced Marketing of Agricultural Products. 2 hours, and 2 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. HAMILTON.
Study of private and cooperative agencies marketing agricultural products and commodities.


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree in Agriculture. A minimum of ten semester hours in
Agricultural Engineering.
Ag. 501.-Seminar. 2 hours, 2 credits. ROGERS. The first half of the course
Ag. 501-502.
Ag. 501-502 is a study of agricultural engineering problems with a review of the literature. Required
of all graduate students registered in the department.
Ag. 502.-Seminar. 2 hours. 2 credits. ROGERS. The second half of the course
Ag. 501-502.
Ag. 503.-Research. 3 to 6 hours. 3 to 6 credits. ROGERS. The first half of
Ag. 503-504.
Ag. 503-504 consists of special problems in agricultural engineering.
Ag. 504.-Research. 3 to 6 hours. 3 to 6 credits. ROGERS. The second half
of Ag. 503-504.


AGRONOMY


Prerequisites: A student who expects to pursue graduate work in Agronomy should
present the Bachelor's degree from a recognized College of Agriculture, with a major in
Agronomy, or the equivalent in other sciences. This would ordinarily mean at least eighteen
hours, or its equivalent, of undergraduate work in the department. The student will be held
responsible for such basic undergraduate courses as are deemed necessary for the pursuit of his
special project.
Ay. 500.-Advanced Soil Fertility. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits.
ALLISON.
Soil and plant relationships especially from the standpoint of normal growth under field conditions;
interrelationships of chemistry, physics and microbiology; mineral and organic balance, the role of trace
elements; deficiency symptoms; quality production; fertilizer materials; placement and cultural relationships.
Ay. 502.-Soil Chemistry. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. GADDUM
and ROGERS.
Analysis of soils and related materials in terms of common and trace elements in relation to various
conditions; related composition of plants, composition of fertilizers and fertilizer materials; chemical behavior
of soil components; methods of analysis and study.
Ay. 503.-Soil Microbiology. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. SMITH.
SMITH.
Qualitative, quantitative and functional studies of the soil microflora under field and laboratory conditions
on both mineral and organic soils including virgin soils, in relation to type, conditions of cultivation, and
fertility; elemental metabolism of the more important organisms, especially in terms of trace elements;
climatic influences.
Ay. 505.-Advanced Soils. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. HEN-
DERSON.
Soil genesis, morphology and classification including mapping; physical and chemical composition and
reactivity of the important soils of Florida and of the United States in relation to their proper management
as land surface units.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ay. 520.-Advanced Plant Genetics. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. Prerequisites:
Ay. 329 (Principles of Genetics).
Variation and inheritance in plants and the application of genetic principles to plant improvement.
Sterility, hybrid vigor, inbreeding, pure lines, disease resistance, chromosomal variations, and the newer
cytological approach to genetical investigation.
Ay. 528.-Methods of Crop Investigations. 2 hours. 2 credits. SENN. Pre-
requisities: Ay. 301 (Soils), Ay. 329 (Principles of Genetics).
Field plot technic, statistical analysis of data based on biometrical methods; environmental factors
influencing experimental results.
Ay. 601.-Research in Soil Fertility. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. ALLISON.
Ay. 602.-Research in Soil Fertility. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. ALLISON.
Ay. 605.-Research in Soil Chemistry. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. GADDUM.
Ay. 606.-Research in Soil Chemistry. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. GADDUM.
Ay. 607.-Research in Soil Microbiology. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. SMITH.
Ay. 608.-Research in Soil Microbiology. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. SMITH.
Ay. 611.-Research in Land Use. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. HENDERSON.
Ay. 612.-Research in Land Use. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. HENDERSON.
Ay. 621.-Conference in Soil Fertility. 1 hour. 1 credit. ALLISON.
Ay. 622.-Conference in Soil Fertility. 1 hour. 1 credit. ALLISON.
Ay. 625.-Conference in Soil Chemistry. 1 hour. 1 credit. GADDUM.
Ay. 626.-Conference in Soil Chemistry. 1 hour. 1 credit. GADDUM.
Ay. 627.-Conference in Soil Microbiology. 1 hour. 1 credit. SMITH.
Ay. 628.-Conference in Soil Microbiology. 1 hour. 1 credit. SMITH.
Ay. 631.-Conference in Land Use. 1 hour. 1 credit. HENDERSON.
Ay. 632.-Conference in Land Use. 1 hour. 1 credit. HENDERSON.
Ay. 641.-Research in Plant Breeding. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. SENN.
Ay. 642.-Research in Plant Breeding. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. SENN.
Ay. 643.-Research in Crop Production. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. SENN.
Ay. 644.-Research in Crop Production. 1 to 6 hours. 1 to 6 credits. SENN.
Ay. 651.-Conference in Plant Breeding. 1 hour. 1 credit. SENN.
Ay. 652.-Conference in Plant Breeding. 1 hour. 1 credit. SENN.
Ay. 653.-Conference in Crop Production. 1 hour. 1 credit. SENN.
Ay. 654.-Conference in Crop Production. 1 hour. 1 credit. SENN.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
(Including Dairying, Poultry Husbandry and Veterinary Science)

Prerequisites: Twenty-four hours or equivalent of approved undergraduate work in
Animal Husbandry.
ANIMAL PRODUCTION AND NUTRITION
Al. 501.-Advanced Animal Production. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLOUGHBY.
The first half of the course Al. 501-502.
Al. 501-502 consists of problems in the production of domestic animals; development of types and
breeds; management of herds; research on selected topics.
Al. 502.-Advanced Animal Production. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLOUGHBY. The
second half of the course Al. 501-502.
Al. 503.-Animal Nutrition. 3 hours. 3 credits. NEAL and RUSOFF. The
first half of the course Al. 503-504. Prerequisites: Al. 311 (Elementary Nutrition)
and Al. 312 (Feeds and Feeding).
Al. 503-504 deals with relative composition of feed; digestion In ruminants; development of feeding
standards; protein, energy, vitamins, and mineral elements in nutrition.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Al. 504.-Animal Nutrition. 3 hours. 3 credits. NEAL and RUSOFF. The
second half of the course Al. 503-504.
Al. 505.-Live Stock Records. 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY. The first
half of the course Al. 505-506.
Al. 505-506 is a history of live stock in the South; methods of breed associations; research on selected
topics.
Al. 506.-Live Stock Records. 2 hours. 2 credits. WILLOUGHBY. The second
half of the course Al. 505-506.
Al. 508.-Methods in Animal Research. 2 hours. 2 credits. BECKER.
Methods employed in nutritional, feeding and management investigations with farm animals.
Al. 509.-Problems in Animal Nutrition. 1 to 4 credits. NEAL and RUSOFF.
Al. 510.-Problems in Animal Nutrition. 1 to 4 credits. NEAL and RUSOFF.
Al. 511.-Problems in Swine Production. 1 to 4 credits. KIRK and SHEALY.
Al. 512.-Problems in Swine Production. 1 to 4 credits. KIRK and SHEALY.
Al. 513.-Problems in Beef Production. 1 to 4 credits. KIRK and SHEALY.
Al. 514.-Problems in Beef Production. 1 to 4 credits. KIRK and SHEALY.

DAIRYING
Dy. 520.-Advanced Dairy Technology. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3
credits. THURSTON.
Advanced laboratory methods and their application in chemical and bacteriological control of milk and
milk products; also assigned references.
Dy. 521.-Problems in Milk and Milk Products. 1 to 4 credits. THURSTON.
Dy. 522.-Problems in Milk and Milk Products. 1 to 4 credits. THURSTON.
Dy. 523.-Problems in Dairy Production. 1 to 4 credits. BECKER.
Dy. 524.-Problems in Dairy Production. 1 to 4 credits. BECKER.

POULTRY
Py. 531.-Advanced Poultry Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEHRHOF. The
first half of the course Py. 531-532.
Py. 531-532 is a study of the economic organization and management of poultry farms in Florida; a
study and analysis of poultry farm records.
Py. 532.-Advanced Poultry Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEHRHOF. The
second half of the course Py. 531-532.
Py. 533.-Poultry Research Problems. 1 to 4 credits. MEHRHOF.
Py. 534.-Poultry Research Problems. 1 to 4 credits. MEHRHOF.

VETERINARY
Vy. 543.-Problems in Animal Pathology. 1 to 4 credits. EMMEL.
Vy. 544.-Problems in Animal Pathology. 1 to 4 credits. EMMEL.

ARCHITECTURE

Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree in Architecture.
Ae. 501.-Architectural Design. 18 hours design and research. 6 credits.
WEAVER, REEVE. The first half of the course Ae. 501-502. Prerequisite: Ae. 21B
(Architectural Design).
Ae. 501-502 is a research course on a special phase of architectural design, selected by the student
with approval of the Director.
Ae. 502.-Architectural Design. 18 hours design and research. 6 credits.
WEAVER, REEVE. The second half of the course Ae. 501-502.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ae. 521.-Advanced Freehand Drawing. 6 hours studio. 2 credits. HOLBROOK.
The first half of the course Ae. 521-522. Prerequisite: Ae. 31B (Freehand Drawing
and Water Color).
Ae. 522.-Advanced Freehand Drawing. 6 hours studio. 2 credits. HOLBROOK.
The second half of the course Ae. 521-522. Prerequisite: Ae. 521.
Ae. 525.-Advanced Water Color. 6 hours studio. 2 credits. GRAND. The
first half of the course Ae. 525-526. Prerequisite: Ae. 31B (Freehand Drawing
and Water Color).
Ae. 525-526 is a course in outdoor sketching from nature and advanced architectural rendering.
Ae. 526.-Advanced Water Color. 6 hours studio. 2 credits. GRAND. The
second half of the course Ae. 525-526.
Ae. 531.-History Research. 2 hours. 2 credits. REEVE, GRAND. The first
half of the course Ae. 531-532. Prerequisite: Ae. 41C (Decorative Arts).
Ae. 531-532 consists of research on some historical phase or phases of architecture and allied arts, deter-
mined by the student in consultation with his advisers.
Ae. 532.-Historical Research. 2 hours. 2 credits. REEVE, GRAND. The
second half of the course Ae. 531-532.
Ae. 551.-Building Construction. 2 or 3 hours. 2 or 3 credits. HANNAFORD.
The first half of the course Ae. 551-552. Prerequisite: Ae. 51A (Materials and
Methods of Construction). Corequisite: Ae. 501-502.
Ae. 551-552 is a research course on various types of building materials, their methods of and fitness for
use in various parts of the country, with advancement of some original theories in connection with such
subjects.
Ae. 552.-Building Construction. 2 or 3 hours. 2 or 3 credits. HANNAFORD.
The second half of the course Ae. 551-552.
Ae 553.-Structural Design of Buildings. 2 or 3 hours. 2 or 3 credits. HAN-
NAFORD. The first half of the course Ae. 553-554. Prerequisite: Ae. 61B (Struc-
tural Design of Buildings. Corequisite: Ae. 501-502.
Ae. 553-554 is a research course on a special phase of reinforced concrete or steel design and construction
of buildings, with advancement of some original theories in connection with such subjects.
Ae. 554.-Structural Design of Buildings. 2 or 3 hours. 2 or 3 credits. HAN-
NAFORD. The second half of the course Ae. 553-554.

BIOLOGY
Prerequisites: Approximately thirty hours of approved undergraduate courses in Animal
Biology, including at least a one-semester course in each of the following: General or In-
vertebrate Zoology, Comparative Vertebrate Morphology, Embryology and Genetics. Stu-
dents not meeting the above requirements will be required to make up any deficiency early in
their graduate work.
In addition, it is strongly advised that the student have completed at least three semester
courses in two of the following fields: Botany, Chemistry, Forestry, Geology, Physics, Psy-
chology and Soil Science.
The Department of Biology has retained the foreign language requirements for all
graduate degrees.
Bly. 505.-History of Biology. 2 hours. 2 credits. ROGERS. Prerequisite: An
undergraduate major in biology. Required of all graduate majors in the depart-
ment.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Bly. 506.-Biological Literature and Institutions. 2 hours. 2 credits. STAFF.
Required of all graduate majors. Prerequisite: Bly. 505.
A review of the compendia, journals and bibliographic sources in the various fields of biology and a survey
of the workers, collections, and special fields of research of some of the more important laboratories and
museums of zoology. Considerable emphasis will be placed upon the preparation of reports and digests
and the use of bibliographic sources.
Bly. 507.-Taxonomic Studies. 1 hour, and 6 or 12 hours laboratory. 3 to 5
credits. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, BYERS, WALLACE, or CARR. The first half
of the course Bly. 507-508.
Bly. 507-508 is a detailed classification of a selected group of animals, well represented in the local fauna.
Bly. 508.-Taxonomic Studies. 1 hour, and 6 or 12 hours laboratory. 3 to 5
credits. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, BYERS, WALLACE, or CARR. The second half
of the course Bly. 507-508.
Bly. 509.-Zoogeography. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUBBELL.
Bly. 510.-Animal Ecology. 2 hours, and 1 or 2 half days of field or laboratory.
3 or 4 credits. ROGERS. Ordinarily Bly. 509 and 510 should be taken in sequence.
Lectures and discussions on the principles and methods of ecology with special reference to animals; field
and laboratory work on the ecological measurements of the physical factors and observations on the biota of
representative Florida habitats.
Bly. 511.-Florida Wild Life. 2 hours, and 6 hours field and laboratory work.
3 credits. STAFF. The first half of the course Bly. 511-512. Prerequisite: Bly.
225-226 (Animal Life of Northern Florida) and permission.
Bly. 511-512 covers studies in the application of ecological principles to specific wild-life research and
to the practice of wild-life conservation.
Bly. 512.-Florida Wild Life. 2 hours, and 6 hours field and laboratory work.
3 credits. STAFF. The second half of the course Bly. 511-512.
Bly. 513.-Vertebrate Morphology. 1 hour, and 6 or 12 hours laboratory. 3
or 5 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: An undergraduate major in biology, includ-
ing Bly. 210 (Vertebrate Embryology).
Bly 514.-Vertebrate Morphology. 1 hour, and 6 or 12 hours laboratory. 3
or 5 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly. 513.
Bly. 515.-Invertebrate Morphology. 1 hour, and 6 or 12 hours laboratory. 3
or 5 credits. HUBBELL or BYERS. Prerequisite: An undergraduate major in bi-
ology, including a course in Invertebrate Zoology.
Bly. 516.-Invertebrate Morphology. 1 hour, and 6 or 12 hours laboratory. 3
or 5 credits. HUBBELL or BYERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 515.
Bly. 519.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Hours and credits to be
arranged. Thesis required. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS. The first
half of the course Bly. 519-520. Prerequisite: An approved major in biology.
Bly. 519-520 is required of all applicants for the master's degree. Each applicant undertakes an approved
individual problem in biology the results of which will be embodied in a master's thesis. Such problems will
be carried out under direction of a member of the staff. Problems may be chosen from one of the following
fields: vertebrate or invertebrate morphology or embryology; classification or taxonomy of certain approved
groups; natural history or distribution of a selected group of local animals; investigations of animal habitats
in the Gainesville area.
Bly. 520.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. Hours and credits to be
arranged. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS. The second half of the course
Bly. 519-520.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Bly. 521.-Natural History of Selected Animals. 1 hour, and 6 or 12 hours
laboratory or field work. 3 or 5 credits. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS.
The first half of the course Bly. 521-522. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Bly. 510.
Bly. 521-522 is a detailed study of the life history or life histories and ecological relationships of some
species or natural group of local animals.
Bly. 522.-Natural History of Selected Animals. 1 hour, and 6 or 12 hours
laboratory or field work. 3 or 5 credits. ROGERS, HUBBELL, SHERMAN, or BYERS.
The second half of the course Bly. 521-522.
Bly. 523.-Natural History of Selected Animals. A second year continuation
of Bly. 521-522. Hours and credits to be arranged.
Bly. 524.-Natural History of Selected Animals. Hours and credits to be
arranged. Prerequisite: Bly. 523.
Bly. 533.-Problems and Concepts of Taxonomy and Nomenclature. 2 hours.
2 credits. STAFF. The first half of the course Bly. 533-534. Prerequisites: Bly.
325 (Genetics and Evolution) and Bly. 507-508.
Bly. 533-534 is a critical study of selected taxonomic synopses, revisions and monographs with special
reference to the bearing of the principles and concepts of distribution, genetics, and ecology on taxonomic
problems.
Bly. 534.-Problems and Concepts of Taxonomy and Nomenclature. 2 hours.
2 credits. STAFF. The second half of the course Bly. 533-534.

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY

BOTANY
Prerequisites:
1. Bachelor's degree.
2. At least twenty semester hours in botany.
Bty. 501.-Problems in Taxonomy. 8 hours of field or laboratory. 4 credits.
CODY. The first half of the course Bty. 501-502. Prerequisite: Bty. 308 (Tax-
onomy), or its equivalent; desirable prerequisite: Bty. 401 (Plant Ecology).
Bty. 501-502 covers an assignment to a special problem, or a critical study of a specific plant family
or genus; plant surveys with special emphasis on predominating flora of a community.
Bty. 502.-Poblems in Taxonomy. 8 hours of field or laboratory. 4 credits.
CODY. The second half of the course Bty. 501-502.
Bty. 503.-Problems in Plant Physiology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. The first half of the course Bty. 503-504. Prerequisites: Bty.
311 (Plant Physiology), Cy. 262 (Organic Chemistry), or equivalent.
Bty. 503-504 is a study of special physiological processes of plants; principles and methods of nutrition,
respiration, etc.
Bty. 504.-Problems in Plant Physiology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. The second half of the course Bty. 503-504.
Bty. 505.-Problems in Plant Histology. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 431 (Plant Histology), or its equivalent.
Comparative methods in histological technique.
Bty. 506.-Research in Plant Histology. 8 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY.
Prerequisites: Bty. 431 (Plant Histology). Bty. 505 or equivalents.
Bty. 507.-Advanced Plant Anatomy. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODy. Prerequisites: Bty. 431 (Plant Histology), 432 (Plant Anatomy),
or equivalents.
Special problems in plant anatomy. A prerequisite to Bty. 508.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Bty. 508.-Problems in Plant Anatomy. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4
credits. CODY. Prerequisite: Bty. 507.
Research or a critical study of certain plant tissues and organs.

BACTERIOLOGY

Prerequisites:
1. Bachelor's degree.
2. At least twenty semester hours in bacteriology.
3. The student should have a reading knowledge of French or German.
Bey. 501.-Problems in Soil Bacteriology. 8 hours laboratory or its equivalent.
4 credits. CARROLL. The first half of the course Bcy. 501-502. Prerequisite: Bey.
301 (General Bacteriology); desirable prerequisite: Cy. 262 (Organic Chemistry),
or its equivalent.
Bey. 501-502 is a study of special problems on isolation, cultivation and identification of certain micro-
organisms of the soil.
Bcy. 502.-Problems in Soil Bacteriology. 8 hours laboratory or its equivalent.
4 credits. CARROLL. The second half of the course Bcy. 501-502.
Bcy. 503.-Problems in Dairy Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory, or its
equivalent. 3 or 4 credits. CARROLL. The first half of the course Bey. 503-504.
Prerequisites: Bey. 301-302 (General and Agricultural Bacteriology) or Bcy. 304
(Pathogenic Bacteriology); desirable antecedent: Cy. 262 (Organic Chemistry) or
its equivalent.
Bcy. 503-504 covers an assignment to a special phase of research pertaining to dairy problems involving
activities of micro-organisms; sanitation of dairy products, etc.
Bey. 504.-Problems in Dairy Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory, or its
equivalent. 3 or 4 credits. CARROLL. The second half of the course Bcy. 503-504.
Bcy. 505.-Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 or 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisites: Bey. 301 (General Bac-
teriology), Bey. 304 (Pathogenic Bacteriology), or equivalents.
Bey. 506-Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory or its
equivalent. 3 to 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 505.
Bey. 507.-Problems in Water Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory, or its
equivalent. 3 to 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bcy. 301 (General Bacteri-
ology), or its equivalent.
Bcy. 508.-Problems in Water Bacteriology. 6 to 8 hours laboratory, or its
equivalent. 3 to 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 507.
Bcy. 509.-Problems in Industrial Bacteriology. 2 hours laboratory work a
week for each semester hour credit desired. A minimum of 4 credits allowed.
CARROLL.
Bey. 510.-Problems in Industrial Bacteriology. 2 hours laboratory work a
week for each semester hour credit desired. A minimum of 4 credits allowed.
CARROLL.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Requirements for admission to graduate work for those students holding the degree of
B.S. in Chemical Engineering, or its equivalent, who desire to major in chemical engineering:
1. Such students may become candidates for the degree of Master of Science or the degree
of Master of Science in Engineering.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


2. The following courses, or their equivalents, are required for unconditional entrance
to graduate work in chemical engineering. Courses in each of the four fundamental branches
of chemistry (inorganic, analytical, organic and physical); one hour of chemical literature;
six hours of chemical engineering thermodynamics; four hours of chemical engineering design;
ten hours of unit operations, including laboratory work.
3. Each graduate student, registering for the first time, must take comprehensive written
or oral examinations over the field of chemical engineering. These examinations are
given during registration week. The results of these examinations are utilized by the Special
Supervisory Committee in arranging the student's study program.
Cg. 511.-Advanced Chemical Engineering. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
BEISLER or MORGEN.
The fundamental principles involved in the manufacture of Organic Compounds.
Cg. 512.-Advanced Chemical Engineering. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
BEISLER or MORGEN.
Problems and discussions on unit operations of chemical engineering including the application of economic
balance to design and operation.
Cg. 521.-Special Topics in Chemical Engineering. 3 hours or its equivalent.
3 credits. BEISLER or MORGEN. The first half of the course Cg. 521-522.
Cg. 521-522 is an intensive and critical study of certain chemical engineering operations and processes.
Cg. 522.-Special Topics in Chemical Engineering. 3 hours or its equivalent.
3 credits. BEISLER or MORGEN. The second half of the course Cg. 521-522.

CHEMISTRY

Prerequisites: The following courses or their equivalents: General Chemistry-eight
semester hours; Analytical chemistry-eight semester hours; Organic chemistry-eight se-
mester hours; Physical chemistry eight semester hours; Chemical literature one
semester hour. Any deficiency in the prerequsites must be satisfied as soon as possible after
entering the Graduate School.
Each graduate student, registering for the first time, must take comprehensive written
examinations over the fields of inorganic, analytical, organic and physical chemistry. These
examinations are given during registration week. The results of these examinations are
utilized by the Special Supervisory Committees in arranging the student's study program.
Cy. 501.-Organic Preparations. 9 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 3
credits. POLLARD.
Cy. 504.-Inorganic Preparations. Offered only in the first semester. 9 hours
laboratory or its equivalent. 3 credits. LEIGH.
Laboratory work involving preparation of typical inorganic compounds in addition to collateral reading
and discussion. A reading knowledge of French and German is desirable.
Cy. 505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds. Offered only in the second semester.
3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Special lectures and collateral reading relative to the electronic and other theoretical conceptions of
organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives, pseudo-acids, certain dyes, alkaloids, proteins, etc.
Cy. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. POL-
LARD.
Lectures and collateral reading. In general, topics to be studied will be chosen from the following list:
stereochemistry tautomerism, acetoacetic ester syntheses, malonic ester syntheses, the Grinard reaction, benzene
theories, diazo compounds, and indicators.
Cy. 515.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. HEATH.
Discussion of Crystallography, Fire-Assay, the Goniometer, Radioactivity, Atomic Structure, Isotopes,
and Isobars. The less common compounds of Phosphorus, Sulfur. Nitrogen and Silicon.









230 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Cy. 516.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. Offered only in the first semester.
3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. HEATH.
A systematic discussion of the Rarer Elements, considered by Periodic Group relations to each other and
to the common elements. Uses of the Rarer Elements and their compounds.
Cy. 517.-Advanced Organic Chemistry. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Typical reactions which are utilized in the synthesis and proof of structure of organic compounds; quanti-
tative determination of carbon and hydrogen in simple organic compounds and the determination of various
characteristic groups.
Cy. 518.-Advanced Organic Chemistry. 1 hour lecture and 6 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. POLLARD.
The identification of organic compounds.
Cy. 521.-Advanced Physical Chemistry. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
HAWKINS. Prerequisites: one year of physical chemistry and differential and
integral calculus.
Energetics, States of Aggregation, Molecular Theory, Properties of Mixtures, Theory of dilute solutions,
Homogeneous Equilibrium.
Cy. 522.-Advanced Physical Chemistry. continued. 3 hours or its equivalent.
3 credits. HAWKINS. Prerequisites: one year of physical chemistry, differential
and integral calculus and either Cy. 521 or a course in chemical thermodynamics.
Electrolytes, Reaction Kinetics, Electrochemistry, Affinity, Surface and Colloid Chemistry.
Cy. 523.-Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3
credits. JACKSON or HAWKINS.
The material will be selected from the following: Catalysis; Chemical Thermodynamics; Colloids;
Electrochemistry; Phase Rule; Physico-Chemical Calculations; Physico-Chemical Measurements; Solutions.
Cy. 524.-Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3
credits. JACKSON or HAWKINS.
The subject matter will be selected from material listed under Cy. 523 but not covered during the
first term.
Cy. 525.-Chemistry of the Terpenes. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
HAWKINS.
The monocyclic terpenes and related hydroaromatic compounds.
Cy. 526.-Chemistry of the Terpenes. 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits.
HAWKINS.
The dicyclic terpenes and their derivatives.
Cy. 533.-Advanced Analytical Chemistry. Offered only in the second semester.
2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. BLACK.
Applications of physico-chemical principles to analytical chemistry. Electrometric titrations. Colori-
metry. Nephelometry.
Cy. 534.-Advanced Sanitary Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLACK.
The applications of physico-chemical principles to water and sewage treatment.
Cy. 536.-Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 3
credits. BLACK.
Selected methods for the detection and determination of a number of elements not covered in elementary
courses.
Cy. 538.-Quantitative Organic Chemistry. Offered only in the first semester.
9 hours laboratory or its equivalent. 3 credits. POLLARD.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


CIVIL ENGINEERING

Prerequisites: See the prerequisites for the various courses offered.

Cl. 521.-Advanced Work in Steel Structures. 3 hours, and 6 hours laboratory.
3 credits. SAWYER. The first half of the course Cl. 521-522. Prerequisite: Cl.
435-436 (Structural Engineering).
Cl. 521-522 consists of advanced work in the theory, design, and drawing of steel structures, particularly
in connection with bridges and buildings.
Cl. 522.-Advanced Work in Steel Structures. 3 hours, and 6 hours laboratory.
3 credits. SAWYER. The second half of the course Cl. 521-522.
Cl. 523.-Advanced Work in Concrete Structures. 3 hours, and 6 hours labora-
tory. 3 credits. SAWYER. The first half of the course Cl. 523-524. Prerequisite:
Cl. 432-435-436 (Concrete Design and Structural Engineering).
Cl. 523-524 consists of advanced work in the theory, design and drawing of concrete structures, particularly
in connection with bridges and buildings.
Cl. 524.-Advanced Work in Concrete Structures. 3 hours, and 6 hours lab-
oratory. 3 credits. SAWYER. The second half of the course Cl. 523-524.
Cl. 527.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours, and 6 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. The first half of the course Cl. 527-528. Prerequisite: Cl.
425-426 (Water and Sewerage).
Cl. 527-528 is a study of action and operation of Imhoff sewage disposal plant of the University.
Physical, biological, bacteriological, and chemical observations to determine efficiency and economy of
various methods of operation and improvements in operation to increase the same.
Cl. 528.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours, and 6 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. The second half of the course Cl. 527-528.
Cl. 529.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours, and 6 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. The first half of the cousre Cl. 529-530. Prerequisite:
Cl. 527-528.
Cl. 529-530 supplements Cl. 527-528 and covers similar investigations in connection with other types of
sewage disposal plants.
Cl. 530.-Advanced Work in Municipal Engineering. 3 hours, and 6 hours
laboratory. 3 credits. The second half of the course Cl. 529-530.
CL. 533.-Similarity and Model Applications to Beach and Shore Erosions Prob-
lems. 3 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. The first half of the course
Cl. 533-534. Prerequisite: Cl. 431 (Hydrology).
Cl. 533-534 is a study of laws of similarity, use of Reynolds Number, effects of density, viscosity,
friction and actual model studies with practical applications.
Cl. 534.-Similarity and Model Applications to Beach and Shore Erosions Prob-
lems. 3 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. The second half of the course
C1. 533-534.

ECONOMICS

Prerequisites: See the prerequisites for the various courses offered.

Es. 501.-Seminar in Economic Principles and Problems. 3 hours. 3 credits.
STAFF. Prerequisite. Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems), or equiv-
alent.
Es. 502.-Seminar in Economic Principles and Problems. 3 hours. 3 credits.
STAFF. Prerequisite: Es. 501.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Es. 505.-The Development of Economic Thought. 3 hours. 3 credits. ELD-
RIDGE. The first half of the course Es. 505-506. Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Eco-
nomic Principles and Problems), or equivalent.
Development of economic thought: analysis of theories of various schools of economic thought: a study
of the Physiocrats, Mercantilism, the Classical Economists; the leading economists of the Austrian School.
and a brief survey of the beginning of Socialism; the development of theoretical background for research and
graduate work of an advanced nature. Required of all candidates for the master's degree in this department.
Es. 506.-The Development of Economic Thought. 3 hours. 3 credits. ELD-
RIDGE. The second half of the course Es. 505-506. Prerequisite: Es. 505 or equiva-
lent.
Analysis of the thought of the followers and defenders on the one hand and of the abler critics on the
other hand of the Classical Economists; appraisals of recent contributions of the various schools in formulating
a system of economic analysis. Required of all candidates for the master's degree in this department.
Es. 509.-The Development of Economics Institutions. 3 hours. 3 credits.
TUTTLE. Prerequisite: Es. 467 (Economic History), or equivalent.
An intensive study of the development of the fundamental institutions of the existing economic order,
including the price system-money, credit, and banking; business enterprise- types of industrial organization,
industrial organization, industrial combination, the business cycle: machine technique-the machine and
its effects, mining, agriculture, manufacturing and transportation.
Bs. 511.-Accounting Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEIGHTS. The first half of
the course Bs. 511-512. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Bs. 511-512 is a critical analysis and study of existing practices and principles of accounting in the fields
of general accounting, auditing, and cost accounting. Consideration will be given to the mathematical and
statistical aspects of accounting; theories of valuation, cost, and income determination; legal aspects of
accounting emphasizing surplus and capital stock problems; and methods of statement analyses and their
uses and limitations.
Bs. 512.-Accounting Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEIGHTS. The second half
of the course Bs. 511-512. Prerequisite: Bs. 511.

Bs. 513.-Seminar in Accounting Principles and Problems. 3 hours. 3 credits.
BEIGHTS, COGBURN. The first half of the course Bs. 513-514. Prerequisite: Per-
mission of instructors.
Bs. 513-514 is designed for those students who desire to continue their advanced work in the following
fields: auditing; state and federal taxation; cost accounting: and governmental accounting.
Bs. 514.-Seminar in Accounting Principles and Problems. 3 hours. 3 credits.
BEIGHTS, COGBURN. The second half of the course Bs. 513-514. Prerequisite: Bs.
513.

Es. 524.-Corporation Finance and Investments. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER.
Prerequisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society), or equivalent.
A study and analysis of the corporation as an institution making use of society's savings; the processes,
practices and problems; the social responsibilities of the corporation: the nature of the capital market and the
practices,.and institutions involved in the acquisition of capital funds, with an evaluation of corporation
sources of capital funds; factors influencing the accumulation and distribution of capital funds: and the inter-
national flow of capital.
Es. 528.-Problems in Money and Banking. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOLBEARE.
Prerequisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society), or equivalent.
Critical analysis of monetary standards and central banking control of credit, especially as they are related
to price and business fluctuations.
Es. 530.-Problems in Taxation. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM. Prerequisite:
Es. 327 (Public Finance), or equivalent.
An intensive study of the problems of taxation primarily related to the following taxes: general property,
incomes, business, inheritance, and commodity.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Es. 531.-Economics Functions of Middlemen. 3 hours. 3 credits. HESKIN.
Prerequisite: Es. 335 (Economics of Marketing), or equivalent.
The significance of middlemen and of the functions performed by them in the economic organization of
society will be covered, with chief emphasis upon the social viewpoint. Attention will be given to some of the
social problems arising to the consumer, and to the role played by middlemen in the functional distribution of
income.
Es. 556.-Problems in Public Service Industries. 3 hours. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
Prerequisite: Es. 351 (Transportation Principles), or equivalent.
An intensive study of the more important problems raised in the introductory courses in transportation and
public utilities.
Es. 565.-Problems in Social Security. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER. Pre-
requisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems), or equivalent.
An analysis of the meaning and nature of social security, especially as related to economic security; the
distinctions between social and private insurance; the hazards of low income groups; an evaluation of projects
and methods for eliminating, reducing, or indemnifying these hazards; the problems of social security in the
United States, especially concerning experiences with relief measures, the development of legislation, the
problems of financing and administering security programs, and the relationship between economic planning and
security.
Es. 569.-Problems in Statistics and Business Forecasting. 3 hours. 3 credits.
ANDERSON. The first half of the course Es. 569-570. Prerequisite: Es. 469-470
(Business Forecasting), or equivalent.
Es. 569-570 is a critical study of special problems in statistics and business forecasting.
Es. 570.-Problems in Statistics and Business Forecasting. 3 hours. 3 credits.
ANDERSON. The second half of the course Es. 569-570. Prerequisite: Es. 569.
Es. 572.-Problems in Labor Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. CHACE. Pre-
requisite: Es. 372 (Labor Economics), or equivalent.
Insecurity, wages and income, sub-standard workers, the strike, graft vs. industrial unionism; labor and
government, wage legislation, hours legislation, protective legislation.
Es. 585.-International Economics Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATWOOD.
Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems), or equivalent.
An historical study of the development of international economic policies; geographic, economic, social,
and political factors underlying contemporary international problems; economic and political methods employed
by the leading commercial nations to expand their economic interests.
Es. 589.-Problems in Economic Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATWOOD,
DIETTRICH. Prerequisite: Es. 381 (Economic Geography of North America), or
equivalent; Es. 385 (Economic Geography of South America), or equivalent.
A lecture and research course analyzing the geographic and economic factors affecting the industrial and
commercial development of the leading countries of the world. Students will be required to make intensive
individual studies of selected subjects.


EDUCATION


Prerequisite: A student who expects to pursue graduate work in Education should
present a Bachelor's degree with a minor in Education or the equivalent. The equivalent
must be approved by the Department of Education upon recommendation of the student's
Supervisory Committee. (See Admission to Candidacy, page 217.)

En. 500.-Introduction to Educational Research. 2 hours. 2 credits. HAYGOOD.
Designed primarily to help graduate students in Education in writing their theses. Open to all graduate
students.
En. 501.-Elementary School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD.
Intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary school curriculum, including the
kindergarten; selection and evaluation of material.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


En. 503.-Educational Measurements. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of educational problems involving measurement, diagnostic and
remedial measures. This course is primarily for graduate students with experience in residence or in the field.
Prerequisite: En. 317, or permission of instructor.
En. 504.-School Survey. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO, SIMMONS.

En. 506.-Teaching Farm-Shop Work. 2 hours, 2 credits. GARRIS.
Selection and organization of subject matter, selection of equipment, and methods of teaching farm-shop
jobs. Offered as demands arise and during the summer session.
En. 507.-Educational Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems in directed learning, individual differences, and
adjustment of problem children. Primarily for graduate students with experience in residence or in the field.

En. 508.-Democracy and Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. NORMAN.
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual, society, sociali-
zation, social control, dynamic and static societies, education its own end.

En. 509.-School Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMMONS. Prerequisite:
En. 401 (School Administration) or its equivalent, or administrative experience.
Problems selected to meet individual needs; each student selects some problem for special study and
presents the results of his study in the form of a thesis.
En. 510.-Foundations of Modern Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. LITTLE.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-teacher, student, curriculum,
and educational plant, control and support-back to their beginning; and to point out present tendencies and
possible developments.
En. 511.-Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours. 3 credits. GARRIS.
Methods and Materials: Selection and organization of subject matter from the vocational point of view.
Offered when demand arises and during the summer session.
En. 512.-Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 3 hours. 3 credits. GARRIS.
A continuation of Education 511.

En. 516.-Character and Personality Development. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
A study of methods used in development of character and personality, together with an evaluation of them
for use in public schools.
En. 517.-Educational Statistics. 2 hours. 2 credits.
To acquaint students with statistical methods as applied to Education. It is recommended that this course
be taken before En. 503.

En. 518.-High School Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits. LITTLE. Pre-
requisite: En. 408 (High School Administration).
This course will consist of an intensive study of specific problems in organizing and administering the
modern high school. Special reference will be made to Florida.
En. 519.-High School Curriculum. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD.
Problems of the curriculum of the high school in its organization; standards for selection of the curriculum;
factors to be considered-age of pupils, social standing, probable school life, probable vocation; traditional
subjects and their possible variations; new subjects and their values, systems of organization, election, and
prescription; problems of articulation with the elementary school, the college, the vocational school, and the
community.

En. 521.-Business Administraton of a School System. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: Wide administrative experience.
Problems concerned with the procuring and spending of revenue; a thesis on a special problem.

En. 523.-Introduction to the Graduate Study of Education. 6 hours. 6 credits.
NORMAN.
Intended to give a basic understanding and a common outlook of education and its relation to history,
philosophy, sociology, psychology, and economics. A general course on the graduate level, recommended as
the first course for all students working for the degree, Master of Arts in Education.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


En. 524.-Major Sequence in Secondary Education. 6 hours. 6 credits. HAY-
GOOD.
Designed to to give a thorough over-view of: (1) the needs of adolescents in our present social order, (2)
changes in the high school program designed to meet these needs, (3) values on the basis of which present high
school curricula may be judged.
En. 525.-Major Sequence in Childhood Education. 6 hours. 6 credits. GRACE
A. STEVENS.
Designed to give a unified and thorough discussion of: (1) the needs of children between infancy and
adolescence, (2) changes in the elementary school program designed to meet these needs, and (3) ways and
means whereby efforts at curriculum reconstruction may be evaluated in the light of sound social and
psychological bases.
En. 528.-Supervision of Instruction. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD.
A course dealing with objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in elementary and
secondary schools, and in preparation of teachers. Each student completes a minor research.
En. 529.-Florida Workshop: Cooperating Schools Division. 6 hours. 6 credits.
STONE, BOUTELLE, CUMBEE and others; IRVINE, Consultant.
Designed to provide an organization, materials, and assistance for principals and teachers of the cooperat-
ing schools in the Florida Program for Improvement of Instruction. Participants will be responsible for
the production of programs that can be used in their school situations beginning in September 1939. Offered
only the first term, this workshop may be taken as a "course" or workers need not be registered for credit.
Membership is limited to the faculties of the cooperating schools.
En. 531.-Guided Professional Development in Health and Physical Education.
3 hours. 3 credits. SALT. The first half of the course En. 531-532.
En. 531-532 is designed to give teachers, supervisors, and administrators a broad understanding of the field
of health and physical education. At the beginning of the course the student and instructor will outline a
program of professional development in keeping with the needs and interests of the student. Credit will
depend upon evidence of professional growth on the part of the student in accord with his program. This will
be tested in any manner which the instructor deems valid.
En. 532.-Guided Professional Development in Health and Physical Education.
3 hours. 3 credits. SALT. The second half of the course En. 531-532.

En. 533.-Problems of Physical Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. SALT. The
first half of the course En. 533-534.
En. 533-534 is designed to give the student an understanding of the contemporary problems in physical
education. It forms the basis for the organization of research projects together with an analysis of the
techniques used in problem solving.
En. 534.-Problems of Physical Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. SALT. The
second half of the course En. 533-534.

En. 539.-Exceptional Children. 3 hours. 3 credits. CRAGO.
Methods of finding, diagnosing and educating children who find difficulty in adjusting to the usual public
school environment. Open to graduate students with background work in education and others with permission
of instructor.
En. 541.-Control and Support of Public Education. 3 hours. 3 credits.
State, federal and other agencies of control and support of education in the United States; world-history
background; present tendencies and possible developments. Saturday class; planned primarily for teachers in
service.

En. 542.-The Curriculum and the Educational Plant. 3 hours. 3 credits.
Present status of curriculum and plant and their relation in all types of schools, viewed in the light of
their historical development; a world view with emphasis on present tendencies in the United States.
En. 544.-School Legislation. 2 hours. 2 credits. SIMMONS.
Special emphasis will be given to Florida conditions, school laws, constitutional provisions, judicial
decisions, Attorney General's rulings, and regulations of the State Board of Education. Students will be
required to prepare a term report dealing with some special field of school law. Only graduate students with
experience in administration and supervision will be admitted.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


En. 555.-Florida Workshop: Bulletin Series Division. 6 hours. 6 credits.
The first half of the course En. 555-556. STONE, EDWARDS, OLSON, and others.
En. 555-556: Designed to provide an organization, materials, and assistance for a group of principals and
teachers engaged in the preparation of bulletins for professional and lay groups for use in the Florida Program
for the Improvement of Instruction.
En. 556.-Florida Workshop: Bulletin Series Division. 6 hours. 6 credits.
The second half of the course En. 555-556. STONE, EDWARDS, OLSON, and others.

En. 562.-Guidance and Counseling. 2 hours. 2 credits. GARRIS.
Study of guidance and counseling of high school students. Educational and vocational guidance and
problems of personality adjustment. Offered only in the summer session.
En. 565.-Problems in Agricultural Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. GARRIS.
The first half of the course En. 565-566.
En. 565-566 is designed for graduate students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced problems.
Problems will be selected to suit individual needs and the results of the study will be reported in the form of
term papers. The class will meet for three hours every other Saturday during both semesters.
En. 566.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GARRIS. The second half of the course En. 565-566.

En. 567.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GARRIS. The first half of the course En. 567-568.
En. 567-568 is similar to En. 565-566 in organization and offered in alternate years with it.
En. 568.-Problems in Agricultural Education. Seminar. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GARRIS. The second half of the course En. 567-568.

En. 569.-Problems in Part-time and Evening Classes. 6 hours. 3 credits.
GARRIS.
The class will organize and teach a part-time or evening class in vocational agriculture in the Alachua
community. Offered only in the summer session.
En. 581.-Reorganization of Secondary School English. 2 hours. 2 credits.
WISE.
A study of the objectives, methods and materials of secondary school English organized in the light of the
findings of research and with a view to assisting pupils to make a satisfactory adjustment to a desirable social
order.

En. 597.-Elementary School Administration. 2 hours. 2 credits. SIMMONS.
The administration of the elementary school; a study of problems of elementary school principals such as:
supervision, professional growth, selection of teachers, relation of administrative officers, discipline, child
health, attendance, etc.
En. 603.-Foundations of Method. 3 hours. 3 credits. NORMAN.
Improvement of college and high school teaching. Open to graduate students and members of the
University faculty who care to enroll.
En. 605.-Public School Administration. (Special Problems). 3 hours. 3
credits. SIMMONS.
The first half of the course En. 605-606. Prerequisites: En. 504 or 521 and En. 509 or 518 or permission
of instructor.
En. 606.-Public School Administration. (Special Problems). 3 hours. 3
credits. SIMMONS. The second half of the course En. 605-606. Prerequisite: En.
504 or 521 and En. 509 or 518, or permission of instructor.

En. 619.-Child Growth and Development. 3 hours. 3 credits. MEAD.
Research studies which have been made showing changes in child growth and development in their
physical, mental, emotional and social status, together with the study of the means of measuring or evaluating
such changes. It is also concerned with the development of new tools for evaluation. Open to graduate
students with background training in education and others with the consent of the instructor.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Radio courses in the Department of Electrical Engineering are given in cooperation with
State Radio Station WRUF. Students can secure practical experience in radio station operation.
Prerequisites: A college course in Physics, Differential and Integral Calculus and a
minimum of thirty-six credits, or the equivalent in courses in the general field of electrical
engineering, together with special prerequisites stated for individual courses.
El. 541.-Advanced Experimental Electrical Engineering. Variable credit.
WEIL and STAFF. The first half of the course El. 541-542.
El. 541-542 is an experimental investigation of electrical apparatus.
El. 542.-Advanced Experimental Electrical Engineering. Variable credit.
WEIL and STAFF. The second half of the course El. 541-542.
El. 543.-Advanced Electric Circuit Theory. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL and
SASHOFF.
Laws of electric and magnetic circuits; transcient phenomena.
El. 545.-Advanced Course in Communication Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits.
WEIL, SASHOFF. The first half of the course El. 545-546.
El. 545-546: Theory of high frequency circuits and apparatus.
El. 546.-Advanced Course in Communication Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits.
WEIL, SASHOFF. The second half of the course El. 545-546.
El. 547.-Advanced Communications Laboratory. 4 hours. 2 credits. SASHOFF.
The first half of the course El. 547-548.
El. 547-548: Laboratory work to accompany El. 545-546.
El. 548.-Advanced Communications Laboratory. 4 hours. 2 credits. SASHOFF.
The second half of the course El. 547-548.
El. 549.-Electrical Engineering Research. Variable credit. WEIL, SASHOFF.
El. 550.-Electrical Engineering Research. Variable credit. WEIL, SASHOFF.
El. 551.-Symmetrical Components. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF.
The theory of symmetrical components applicable to unbalanced currents and voltages.
El. 552.-Theory of Vacuum Tubes. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF.
Emission of electrons; theory of diodes and triodes; theory of multi-element tubes.

ENGLISH

Prerequisites: A University of Florida undergraduate major in English or its equivalent.
Such a major requires at least twenty-four semester hours of English in the Upper Division
and includes courses in important periods of English literary history, American literature,
and the history of the English language. Such a major presupposes, furthermore, adequate
preparation in such important related fields as history, philosophy, and foreign language.
Seminar: All graduate majors are expected to attend a two-hour non-credit seminar
the purpose of which is to provide an introduction to the problems and methods of graduate
study in the field of English.
(See note, page 221)
Eh. 501.-American Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
Eh. 502.-American Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
A study of American literature and literary movements from Whitman to the present. Extensive readings
and reports as directed.
Eh. 505.-Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. 3 hours. 3
credits. ROBERTSON.
The English stage from Drvden to Sheridan.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Eh. 506.-Modern Drama. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
Recent and contemporary dramatists, from Isben to Shaw and O'Neill.
Eh. 509-Chaucer. 3 hours; second semester. 3 credits. ELIASON.
A thorough study of the Canterbury Tales; collateral readings (in translation) of important medieval
writings.
Eh. 510.-Chaucer. 3 hours. 3 credits. LYONS.
Eh. 511.-Old English. 3 hours. 3 credits. ELIASON.
Old English grammar and reading from selected monuments. A linguistic rather than literary course.
Eh. 512.-Middle English. 3 hours. 3 credits. ELIASON.
Eh. 513.-The Renaissance in England. 3 hours. 3 credits. STROUP.
A consideration of the Italian origins of the movement and a study of the development of English drama.
Extensive readings and reports.
Eh. 514.-The Renaissance in England. 3 hours. 3 credits. STROUP.
A study of the lyric and epic poetry and the prose masterpieces to 1660. Extensive readings and reports.
Eh. 515.-Milton. 3 hours. 3 credits. STROUP.
Eh. 517.-Spenser. 3 hours. 3 credits. MOUNTS.
Eh. 518.-Studies in American Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
The particular field varies from year to year. In the first semester, 1939-40, Southern literature will be
studied.
Eh. 530.-Individual Work. Credit arranged. STAFF.
Provision will be made for students who desire to supplement the regular courses by individual reading or
investigation under guidance. Students will be helped to plan a definite program, and will meet a number of
the department staff in frequent conferences.
Eh. 533.-English Classicism. 3 hours. 3 credits. CONGLETON.
A study of English prose and poetry from Dryden through Pope.
Eh. 534.-English Literature of the 18th Century, (1744 to 1800). 3 hours. 3
credits. SPIVEY.
A detailed study of Dr. Johnson and his associates in the Literary Club.
Eh. 541.-Beowulf. 3 hours. 3 credits. ELIASON.
Eh. 543.-The Romantic Movement. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS.
Eh. 544.-The Romantic Movement. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS.

ENTOMOLOGY

Prerequisites: A Bachelor of Science degree or its equivalent. The student should have
thirty semester hours in the biological sciences, with twelve or more hours in the field of
Entomology or Plant Pathology. Should he be deficient in this respect the student will be
expected to fulfil these requirements during the time that he is pursuing work that will lead
to the Master of Science degree. This work will be taken as foundation work with no
graduate credit.
Ey. 501.-Methods of Research in Entomology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CREIGH-
TON, HIXSON, WATSON, BERGER. The first half of the course Ey. 501-502.
Ey. 501-502: Special laboratory, insectary, and field methods. A survey of the leading problems and
methods in certain laboratories; practice in the more complicated methods of research will be undertaken.
Ey. 502.-Methods of Research in Entomology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CREIGH-
TON, HIXSON, WATSON, BERGER. The second half of the course Ey. 501-502.
Ey. 503.-Problems in Entomology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CREIGHTON, WATSON,
TISSOT, MONTGOMERY, HIXSON. The first half of the course Ey. 503-504.
Ey. 503-504 consists of problems in the various phases of entomology, as selected on approval of the
instructor. Required of graduate students registered for a degree in the department.
Ey. 504.-Problems in Entomology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CREIGHTON, WATSON,
TISSOT, MONTGOMERY, HIXSON. The second half of the course Ey. 503-504.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ey. 506.-Advanced Insect Histology. 6 hours. 3 credits. CREIGHTON.
The outstanding histological methods used in the handling of insect tissues.
Ey. 507.-Advanced Insect Taxonomy. 3 hours. 3 credits. TISSOT.
Ey. 508.-Advanced Insect Taxonomy. 3 hours. 3 credits. TISSOT.
Ey. 509.-Advanced Insect Embryology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CREIGHTON.
Ey. 510.-Advanced Insect Embryology. 3 hours. 3 credits. CREIGHTON.
Ey. 513.-Advanced Insect Morphology. 6 hours. 3 credits. CREIGHTON.
Ey. 515.-Biological Control. 4 hours. 3 credits. CREIGHTON.
Ey. 516.-Insect Ecology. 4 hours. 3 credits. WATSON.

FRENCH

Prerequisites: Twenty-four hours, or the equivalent, of undergraduate work in French.
This must include a year-course in French composition and one in French literature. The
student should also have a reading knowledge of one foreign language other than French.
Fh. 505.-French Novel. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Fh. 506.-French Novel. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Fh. 507.-Special Study in French. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN, BRUNET. The
first half of the course Fh. 507-508.
Fh. 507-508 consists of individual reading and reports under supervision of the instructor, on selected topics
in the field of French literature and language.
Fh. 508.-Special Study in French. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN, BRUNET. The
second half of Fh. 507-508.
Fh. 513.-Eighteenth Century French Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRUNET.
Literary expression of the movement of ideas, studied in representative works of the period.
Fh. 517.-Old French. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRUNET. The first half of the
course Fh. 517-518.
Fh. 517-518 is a study of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of Old French; reading of selected texts.
Fh. 518.-Old French. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRUNET. The second half of the
course Fh. 517-518.
Fh. 520.-Contemporary French Civilization. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Fh. 521.-Contemporary French Civilization. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Fh. 527.-French-English Word Study. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Fh. 528.-French-English Word Study. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN.

HISTORY

Prerequisites: An undergraduate major of twenty-four semester hours or equivalent.
It is very desirable that the student should begin his graduate work with a reading knowledge
of one foreign language, preferably French or German, especially if he intends to go on to the
work for the Ph.D. degree.
Hy. 501.-American History, 1492-1776. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The
first half of the course Hy. 501-502.
Hy. 502.-American History, 1776-1830. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The
second half of the course Hy. 501-502.
Hy. 503.-American History, 1830-1876. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The
first half of the course Hy. 503-504.
Hy. 504.-American History, 1876 to the Present. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE.
The second half of the course Hy. 503-504.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Hy. 505.-English History to 1485. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The first
half of the course Hy. 505-506.
Hy. 506.-English History from 1485-1688. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The
second half of the course Hy. 505-506.
Hy. 507.-Renaissance and Reformation. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The
first half of the course Hy. 507-508.
Hy. 508.-Renaissance and Reformation. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The
second half of the course Hy. 507-508.
Hy. 509.-Seminar in American History. 3 credits. LEAKE. The first half
of the course Hy. 509-510.
Hy. 510.-Seminar in American History. 3 credits. LEAKE. The second half
of the course Hy. 509-510.
Hy. 511.-English History, 1688-1815. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The first
half of the course Hy. 511-512.
Hy. 512.-English History, 1815-1939. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The
second half of the course Hy. 511-512.
Hy. 515.-Latin American History, to 1850. 3 hours. 3 credits. GLUNT. The
first half of the course Hy. 515-516.
Hy. 516.-Latin American History, to 1850. 3 hours. 3 credits. GLUNT. The
second half of the course Hy. 515-516.
Hy. 517.-Latin American History, 1850-1900. 3 hours. 3 credits. GLUNT.
The first half of the course Hy. 517-518.
Hy. 518.-Latin American History, 1900-1939. 3 hours. 3 credits. GLUNT
The second half of the course Hy. 517-518.
Hy. 601.-Ancient Civilizations. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The first half
of the course Hy. 601-602.
Hy. 602.-Ancient Civilizations. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The second
half of the course Hy. 601-602.
Hy. 603.-History of Europe, 1648-1714. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The
first half of the course Hy. 603-604.
Hy. 604.-History of Europe, 1714-1789. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The
second half of the course Hy. 603-604.

HORTICULTURE
Prerequisites: Eighteen hours of satisfactory work in Horticulture and six hours of
satisfactory work in Botany.
He. 503.-Horticulture Seminar. 1 hour. 1 credit. WOLFE.
He. 504.-Horticulture Seminar. 1 hour. 1 credit. WOLFE.
He. 505.-Horticultural Problems. 2 hours. 2 credits. WOLFE. The first
half of the course He. 505-506.
He. 505-506 is a critical review of important recent work in horticulture, with special attention to
methods of research and to interpretations of results.
He. 506.-Horticultural Problems. 2 hours. 2 credits. WOLFE. The second
half of the course He. 505-506.
He. 507.-Research in Subtropical Fruits and Flowers. 3 hours. 3 credits.
WOLFE, ABBOTT, or WATKINS.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


He. 508.-Research in Subtropical Fruits and Flowers. 3 hours. 3 credits.
WOLFE, ABBOTT, or WATKINS.
He. 509.-Research in Fruit and Vegetable Refrigeration. 3 hours. 3 credits.
STAHL.
He. 510.-Research in Fruit and Vegetable Refrigeration. 3 hours. 3 credits.
STAHL.
He. 511.-Research in Vegetable Production. 3 hours. 3 credits. JAMISON.
He. 512.-Research in Vegetable Producton. 3 hours. 3 credits. JAMISON.
He. 514.-Advanced Citriculture. 3 hours. 3 credits. ABBOTT.
Advanced course emphasizing the problems offered by varying sites, soils, climates, stocks and varieties.
He. 515.-Advanced Olericulture. 3 hours. 3 credits. WOLFE.
A study of the literature in plant physiology, morphology, and genetics as related to the production of
truck crops.
He. 518.-Advanced Floriculture. 3 hours. 3 credits. WATKINS.
A critical survey of the literature and problems of floriculture and ornamental horticulture.

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Prerequisites: Thorough foundation work in Differential and Integral Calculus, Applied
Mechanics. Thermodynamics. Plant Layout and Design, Human Engineering, Engineering
Practice, and Business Administration, or equivalent foundation course work of about forty
semester credits including experience in industry.
Ig. 561.-Advanced Shop Layout and Design. 3 credits. YEATON. The first
half of the course Ig. 561-562. Prerequisites: Ig. 469-470 (Plant, Shop, Layout
and Design).
Ig. 562.-Advanced Shop Layout and Design. 3 credits. YEATON. The second
half of the course Ig. 561-562. Prerequisite: Ig. 561.
Ig. 563.-Management Training. 3 credits. YEATON, PHELPS. The first half
of the course Ig. 563-564. Prerequisites: Ig. 472 (Human Engineering), Ig. 460
(Engineering Practice).
Ig. 564.-Management Training. 3 credits. YEATON, PHELPS. The second half
of the course Ig. 563-564. Prerequisite: Ig. 563.

JOURNALISM

Prerequisites: Eighteen hours of approved undergraduate courses in Journalism.
Jm. 503.-Special Studies in Newspaper Production. 3 hours. 3 credits.
LOWRY. The first half of the course Jm. 503-504.
Jm. 504.-Special Studies in Newspaper Production. 3 hours. 3 credits.
LOWRY. The second half of the course Jm. 503-504.
Jm. 505.-Special Studies in Public Opinion. 3 hours. 3 credits. EMIG. The
first half of the course Jm. 505-506.
Jm. 506.-Special Studies in Public Opinion. 3 hours. 3 credits. EMIG. The
second half of the course Jm. 505-506.

MATHEMATICS

Prerequisites: A student must have an undergraduate major in Mathematics or its equiv-
alent as determined by the department.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Not all courses are given each year. Prerequisites to the courses should be determined by
consultation with the instructor.
Ms. 511.-Introduction to Higher Algebra. 3 hours. 3 credits SIMPSON.
The first half of the course Ms. 511-512.
Ms. 511-512: An introduction to the theory of matrices, linear dependence, linear transformations, bilinear
and quadratic forms.
Ms. 512.-Introduction to Higher Algebra. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMPSON.
The second half of the course Ms. 511-512.
Ms. 518.-Theory of Groups of Finite Order. 3 hours. 3 credits. PIRENIAN.
Introduction to the group concept, a treatment of the pure group-theory, and numerous examples and
applications.
Ms. 519.-Theory of Probability and Theory of Sampling. 3 hours. 3 credits.
GERMOND.
Theory of probability. Frequency distributions. Normal and other frequency curves. Inverse pro-
bability. Method of least squares. Measures of reliability. Theory of sampling. Theory of small samples.
Ms. 520.-Advanced Statistics. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND.
Various measure of correlation. Tetrachoric r. Curvilinear correlation. Partial and multiple correlation
Regression surfaces. Normal surfaces. Derivation of formulas. The Gram-Charlier series. Measures of
reliability. Analysis of variance. Design of experiments.
Ms. 521.-Empirical Analysis and Curve Fitting. 3 hours. 3 credits. GER-
MOND.
Determination of equation from graphical analysis. Use of logarithmic and other special types of graphs.
Method of least squares; application to residuals; application to numerical differentiation. "Curve smoothing"
or regraduation of data. Gram polynomials. Numerical harmonic analysis. Periodgram analysis. Illustrated
with the problems from the fields of botany, engineering, chemistry, physics. The student is advised but is not
required to take Ms. 522 before taking this course.
Ms. 522.-Finite Differences and Interpolation. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND.
The elements of the calculus of finite differences. Interpolation formulas. Inverse interpolation. Sub-
tabulation of data. Numerical differentiation. Numerical integration. Summation in terms of integration
and differentiation. Derivaiton of formulas from functional or recurrence relations. The student should have
a knowledge of calculus through Taylor's series.
Ms. 524.-Synthetic Projective Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
Pure geometry dealing primarily with properties unaltered by the processes of projection and section;
principal theorems involved; theory of poles, polars, involution, and kindred topics.
Ms. 525.-Econometrics. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND. The first half of
the course Ms. 525-526.
Ms. 525-526: The mathematical interpretation of economic hypotheses. Conclusions reached by
mathematical treatment and procedure. Mechanism for the comparison of conclusions with observations. This
couse is concerned with the method of dealing mathematically with the material of economics, rather than with
the validity of the hypotheses and laws involved.
Ms. 526.-Econometrics. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND. The second half of
the course Ms. 525-526.
Ms. 529.-Biometrics. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND. The first half of the
course Ms. 529-530.
Ms. 529-530: Frequency distributions encountered in biology. Statistical measure and treatments
peculiar to biology. Mathematical treatment of such topics as: rate of growth of a population; rate of growth
of an organism; life spans; symbiosis; parasitism; structural problems; genetics. Considerable attention will
be paid to recent literature in this field.
Ms. 530.-Biometrics. 3 hours. 3 credits. GERMOND. The second half of the
course Ms. 529-530.
Ms. 536.-Foundations of Geometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKOMOOR.
An investigation of the assumptions of geometry; the parallel postulate; steps leading to non-Euclidean
geometrics; consequent development of modern branches of the subject; elements of non-Euclidean plane
geometry.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 243

Ms. 551.-Advanced Topics in Calculus. 3 hours. 3 credits. QUADE. The
first half of the course Ms. 551-552.
Ms. 551-552: Topics of advanced nature selected from the calculus, including partial differentiation,
Taylor's theorem, infinite series, continuation of simple multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, Green's
theorem, etc.
Ms. 552.-Advanced Topics in Calculus. 3 hours. 3 credits. QUADE. The
second half of the course Ms. 551-552.
Ms. 555.-Functions of a Complex Variable. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMPSON.
The first half of the course Ms. 555-556.
Ms. 555-556. Fundamental operations with complex numbers; differentiation and integration theorems;
mapping; transformations; series.
Ms. 556.-Functions of a Complex Variable. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMPSON.
The second half of the course Ms. 555-556.
Ms. 559.-Functions of Real Variables. 3 hours. 3 credits. PHIPPS. The
first half of the course Ms. 559-560.
Ms. 559-560: The real number system; theory of point sets; rigorous investigation of many questions
arising in the calculus; Lebesque integral; infinite series.
Ms. 560.-Functions of Real Variables. 3 hours. 3 credits. PHIPPS. The
second half of the course Ms. 559-560.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits. KOKO-
MOOR.
A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special emphasis on the changes
of the processes of operations and methods of teaching. No specific text is followed, but numerous works are
used as references.
Ms. 575.-Fundamental Concepts of Modern Mathematics. 3 hours. 3 credits.
SIMPSON.
An introduction to such topics as the number system of algebra, sets of points, group theory, theories of
integration, postulational systems, and non-Euclidean geometry. No textbook is used, but many references are
assigned.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Prerequisites: See the prerequisites for the various courses offered.
Ml. 581.-Advanced Mechanical Design. 3 credits. EBAUGH or FINEREN.
First half of the course Ml. 581-582. Prerequisite: M1. 491 (Machine Design).
Ml. 581-582 is a course arranged so as to permit advanced students to pursue design projects in the
Mechanical Engineering field.
Ml. 582.-Advanced Mechanical Design. 3 credits. EBAUGH or FINEREN. The
second half of the course Ml. 581-582. Prerequisite: Ml. 581.
Ml. 583.-Mechanical Research. 3 credits. EBAUGH and STAFF. The first half
of the course Ml. 583-584. Prerequisite: Ml. 483-484 (Mechanical Laboratory).
Ml. 583-584 is a course arranged so as to permit advanced students to pursue research projects in the
Mechinical Engineering Field.
Ml. 584.-Mechanical Research. 3 credits. EBAUGH and STAFF. The second
half of the course Ml. 583-584. Prerequisite: Ml. 583.
MI. 585.-Advanced Air Conditioning. 3 credits. EBAUGH. Prerequisite: Ml.
482 (Refrigeration and Air Conditioning).
A continuation of Ml 482 with emphasis on design and estimation of systems.
Ml. 5'86.-Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 credits. EBAUGH. Pre-
requisite: Ml. 385 (Thermodynamics).
A study of the general equations of thermodynamics and their applications and advanced study of com-
bustion processes.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Ml. 589.-Advanced Mechanical Laboratory. 3 credits. EBAUGH and STAFF.
The first half of the course Ml. 589-590. Prerequisites: Ml 483-484 (Mechanical
Laboratory).
Ml. 589-590 is a course arranged so as to permit advanced students to pursue experimental projects in the
Mechanical Engineering field.
Ml. 590.-Advanced Mechanical Laboratory. 3 credits. EBAUGH and STAFF.
The second half of the course Ml. 589-590.

PAINTING
At present no Master's degree is offered in this department.
Pg. 501.-Pictorial Composition. 9 to 18 hours studio. 3 to 6 credits. HOL-
BROOK. The first half of the course Pg. 501-502. Prerequisite: Pg. 61A (Thesis).
Pg. 501-502 is designed for students who are qualified to select and pursue advanced problems in pictorial
composition.
Pg. 502.-Pictorial Composition. 9 to 18 hours studio. 3 to 6 credits. HOL-
BROOK. The second half of the course Pg. 501-502.
Pg. 523.-Oil Painting. 9 to 18 hours studio. 3 to 6 credits. HOLBROOK.
The first half of the course Pg. 523-524. Prerequisite: Pg. 61A (Thesis).
Pg. 523-524 is designed for students who are qualified for advanced work in oil painting.
Pg. 524.-Oil Painting. 9 to 18 hours studio. 3 to 6 credits. HOLBROOK.
The second half of the course Pg. 523-524.

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY
PHARMACOGNOSY
Prerequisites:
1. Graduation from a standard College of Pharmacy.
2. A minimum of four hours of foundation work in General Botany or equivalent.
3. A minimum of six hours of foundation work in Practical Pharmacognosy or equiv-
alent.
4. An additional minimum of four hours of foundation work in any or all of the fol-
lowing or equivalents: Plant Histology; Plant Microscopy; Plant Physiology;
Plant Classification.
Pgy. 501.-Advanced Histology and Microscopy of Vegetable Drugs. 2 hours,
and 4 hours laboratory and field work. 4 credits. IRELAND.
Plant tissues and cell inclusions of importance as diagnostic characters. Detection of adulterations and
substitutions and pharmacognostical description of new plants.
Pgy. 521.-Special Problems in Pharmacognosy. 4 hours laboratory or field
work. 2 credits. IRELAND. The first half of the course Pgy. 521-522.
Pgy. 521-522: Identification, classification and qualitative determination of constituents and properties
of drug plants; special experiments in the propagation, cultivation, harvesting and curing of native and exotic
plants; field work in the collecting of drug plants native to Florida. Either half of the course may be taken
for credit without the other half.
Pgy. 522.-Special Problems in Pharmacognosy. 4 hours laboratory or field
work. 2 credits. IRELAND. The second half of the course Pgy. 521-522.
Pgy. 525.-Drug Plant Analysis. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory and field
work. 2 to 4 credits. CHRISTENSEN. The first half of the course Pgy. 525-526.
Pgy. 525-526: Special problems in drug culture and in the isolation and identification of plant con-
stituents. The effect of climatic and soil features on plant constituents. Pharmacognostical characteristics
of new plants. Either half of the course may be taken for credit without the other half.
Pgy. 526.-Drug Plant Analysis. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory and field
work. 2 to 4 credits. CHRISTENSEN. The second half of the course Pgy. 525-526.


244






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


PHARMACOLOGY
Prerequisites:
1. Graduation from a standard College of Pharmacy.
2. A minimum of four hours of foundation work in each of the following or equiv-
alents: Biology; Bacteriology.
3. A minimum of five hours of foundation work in Pharmacology or equivalent.
4. An additional minimum of four hours of foundation work in any or all of the fol-
lowing or equivalents: Biologicals; Gland Products; Physiology; Anatomy.
Ply. 512.-Advanced Pharmacology. 2 hours. 2 credits. CHRISTENSEN.
Theories of drug action. A comparison of methods of physiological assaying with applications to evalua-
tion of drugs and medicines.
Ply. 514.-Advanced Pharmacology Laboratory. 4 hours. 2 credits. CHRIS-
TENSEN.
Designed to supplement Ply 512. Required for majors.
Ply. 517.-Clinical Methods. 1 hour and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. IRE-
LAND.
Modern methods employed in clinical procedure. A detailed study of normal and abnormal metabolism
with emphasis on blood and urine analysis.
Ply. 551.-Special Problems in Pharmacology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. CHRISTENSEN. The first half of the course Ply. 551-552.
Ply. 551-552: A comparison of methods of biological assaying. Special lectures and collateral reading,
laboratory experiments, oral and written reports.
Ply. 552.-Special Problems in Pharmacology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory.
4 credits. CHRISTENSEN. The second half of the course Ply. 551-552.


PHARMACY

Prerequisite: Graduation from a standard College of Pharmacy with the degree of B.S.
in Pharmacy or its equivalent.
Phy. 502.-Selected Topics in Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A general study of the newer types of pharmaceuticals, such as vitamin preparations, newer solvents, etc.,
with assigned readings on selected problems of current interest.
Phy. 503.-Advanced Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
Lectures and assigned readings on important pharmaceutical preparations, particularly those involving
chemical changes.
Phy. 504.-Advanced Galenical Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A detailed study of the fundamental research work on which formulas for various galenicals are based.
Phy. 541.-Manufacturing Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. HUSA.
A general study of the apparatus and processes used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a factory
scale. A detailed study of selected technical problems of current interest to those engaged in pharmaceutical
manufacturing.
Phy. 553.-Synthetic Pharmaceuticals. 2 hours. 2 credits. FOOTE. Pre-
requisite: Phy. 354 (Organic and Analytical Pharmacy).
The preparation and chemotherapy of the more complex synthetic remedies
Phy. 554-Advanced Pharmacy. 2 hours. 2 credits. FOOTE.
Lectures and assigned reading on the pharmacy and chemistry of vegetable drugs.


PHILOSOPHY

Prerequisites: Twenty-four hours in philosophy and related fields, of which at least
twelve semester hours must be in philosophy.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Ppy. 501.-Advanced Logic Seminar. 2 hours. 3 credits. ENWALL. The
first half of the course Ppy. 501-502. Prerequisites: Ppy. 409-410. (History of
Philosophy).
Ppy. 501-502: Theories of thought and knowledge. Readings from the original sources. Papers for
discussion.
Ppy. 502.-Advanced Logic Seminar. 2 hours. 3 credits. ENWALL. The
second half of the course Ppy. 501-502.
Ppy. 503.-Advanced History of Philosophy. 3 hours. 3 credits. ENWALL.
The first half of the course Ppy. 503-504. Prerequisites; Ppy. 301 (Ethics), Ppy.
302 (Philosophy of Religion).
Ppy. 503-504: The problems of philosophy in their historical development. Special readings from the
original sources.
Ppy. 504.-Advanced History of Philosophy. 3 hours. 3 credits. ENWALL.
The second half of the course Ppy. 503-504.
Ppy. 505.-Philosophy of Nature Seminar. 2 hours. 3 credits. ENWALL.
The first half of the course Ppy. 505-506. Prerequisites: Ppy. 409-410. (History
of Philosophy).
Ppy. 505-506: Readings from the original sources. Papers for discussion. Man's relation to nature; the
various philosophical doctrines; animism, pantheism, materialism, realism, agnosticism, humanism, idealism, etc.
Ppy. 506.-Philosophy of Nature Seminar. 2 hours. 3 credits. ENWALL.
The second half of the course Ppy. 505-506.
Ppy. 507.-Hume and Kant Seminar. 2 hours. 3 credits. ENWALL. The first
half of the course Ppy. 507-508. Prerequisites: Ppy. 301 (Ethics), Ppy. 302
(Philosophy of Religion), Ppy. 409-410 (History of Philosophy).
Ppy. 508.-Hume and Kant Seminar. 2 hours. 3 credits. ENWALL. The
second half of the course Ppy. 507-508. Prerequisite: Ppy. 507.


PHYSICS

Prerequisites. A candidate showing proper aptitude and adequate preparation (ordinarily
equivalent to an undergraduate major) will be admitted as a candidate for the Master's
degree.
A knowledge of the differential and integral calculus is prerequisite to all the following
courses, together with Physics 321-322 or the equivalent.
Upon entering graduate study in Physics, the student should possess a reading knowledge
of German and French.

Ps. 503-Kinetic Theory of Gases. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON.
The elements of the kinetic theory, the application of the theory to gases and liquids, the electrical and
magnetic properties of the molecules from the standpoint of the theory.
Ps. 505.-Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
Statics of systems of rigid bodies. Motions of particles and of rigid bodies under constant and variable
forces. Assigned reading, problems, and reports.
Ps. 506.-Advanced Theoretical Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
A continuation of Ps. 505. Introduction to vector analysis and generalized coordinates.
Ps. 508.-Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS.
The laws of Thermodynamics, chemical reactions from the thermodynamical standpoint, Electrochemistry,
and the Nernst Heat Theorem.
Ps. 510.-Physical Optics. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON.
Prerequisite: Ps. 309 or equivalent.
The electro-magnetic theory of light applied to reflection, refraction, dispersion, and polarization.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Ps. 512.-Elements of Quantum Mechanics. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON.
Introduction to the theory of Quantum Mechanics, for students of Physics and Chemistry. It will follow
the text by Dushman, which includes such mathematical material in the development as is necessary for
students who have not had intensive mathematical training beyond the Calculus.
Ps. 513.-Advanced Experimental Physics. 6 or 8 hours laboratory. 3 or 4
credits. WILLIAMSON, BLESS, PERRY, KNOWLES, SWANSON, WILLIAMS. The
first half of the course Ps. 513-514.
Ps. 513-514: A series of experiments on a particular topic of physics, a review of classical experiments,
or the development of an assigned experimental problem. The work will be assigned to meet the needs and
interests of the particular student.
Ps. 514.-Advanced Experimental Physics. 6 or 8 hours laboratory. 3 or 4
credits. WILLIAMSON, BLESS, PERRY, KNOWLES, SWANSON, WILLIAMS. The
second half of the course Ps. 513-514.
Ps. 517.-Modern Physics. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMSON. The first half
of the course Ps. 517-518.
Ps. 517-518: The electronic theory of atomic structure, the interpretation of the properties of matter and
radiation from the standpoint of this theory, and spectroscopy.
Ps. 518.-Modern Physics. 3 hours, 3 credits. WILLIAMSON. The second
half of the course Ps. 517-518.
Ps. 521.-X-Rays. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS. The first half of the course
Ps. 521-522.
The work is devoted to classroom discussion of the theoretical aspects of X-rays. The following topics
are treated: The passage of electricity through evacuated tubes, the photoelectric effect, the Bohr Theory,
the production and properties of X-rays, and the applications of X-rays to physics, chemistry and biology.
Ps. 522.-X-Rays. 3 hours. 3 credits. BLESS. The second half of the course
Ps. 521-522.
The work is chiefly experimental. The laboratory work is designed to suit the interests of the individual
student.
Ps. 523.-Seminar in Modern Theory. 2 or 3 hours. 2 or 3 credits. STAFF.
The first half of the course Ps. 523-524.
Ps. 523-524: Some particular phase of the most recent developments in theoretical physics is taken up
in detail.
Ps. 524.-Seminar in Modern Theory. 2 or 3 hours. 2 or 3 credits. STAFF.
The second half of the course Ps. 523-524.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Prerequisites: An undergraduate major of twenty four semester hours or equivalent. It
is very desirable that the student should begin his graduate work with a reading knowledge
of one foreign language, preferably French or German, especially if he intends to go on to the
work for the Ph.D. degree.
Pcl. 501.-American Constitutional Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The
first half of the course Pel. 501-502.
Pcl. 502.-American Constitutional Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The
second half of the course Pel. 501-502.
Pcl. 503.-International Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. DAUER. The first half of
the course Pcl. 503-504.
Pcl. 504.-International Law. 3 hours. 3 credits. DAUER. The second half
of the course Pcl. 503-504.
Pcl. 505.-Political Theories. 3 hours. 3 credits. DAUER. The first half of
the course Pel. 505-506.






BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Pcl. 506.-Political Theories. 3 hours. 3 credits. DAUER. The second half
of the course Pcl. 505-506.
Pcl. 507.-Comparative Government. 3 hours. 3 credits. DAUER. The first
half of the course Pcl. 507-508.
Pcl. 508.-Comparative Government. 3 hours. 3 credits. DAUER. The
second half of the course Pcl. 507-508.
Pcl. 509.-International Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. DAUER. The first
half of the course Pcl. 509-510.
Pcl. 510.-International Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. DAUER. The second
half of the couse Pcl. 509-510.
Pcl. 511.-American State and Municipal Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits.
The first half of the course Pcl. 511-512.
Pcl. 512.-American State and Municipal Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits.
The second half of the course Pel. 511-512.
Pcl. 513.-Seminar. 2 hours. 3 credtis. DAUER. The first half of the course
Pel. 513-514.
Pcl. 514.-Seminar. 2 hours. 3 credits. DAUER. The second half of the
course Pel. 513-514.
Pcl. 611.-Public Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits. LAIRD. The first half
of the course Pel. 611-612.
Pcl. 612.-Public Administration. 3 hours 3 credits. LAIRD. The second
half of the course Pel. 611-612.

PSYCHOLOGY
Prerequisites: Twenty-four semester hours in psychology and related fields, of which at
least twelve semester hours must be in psychology.
Psy. 501.-Readings in Experimental Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
HINCKLEY. The first half of the course Psy. 501-502.
Psy. 501-502: Lectures and assigned readings in some of the more important fields of psychological
research.
Psy. 502.-Readings in Experimental Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
HINCKLEY. The second half of the course Psy. 501-502.
Psy. 505.-Advanced Statistical Methods in Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits.
HINCKLEY, MOSIER.
Studies in correlation, regression, and prediction, as applied to psychological measurement.
Psy. 506.-Psycho-physical Theory in the Construction of Tests. 3 hours. 3
credits. HINCKLEY, MOSIER.
Application of psycho-physical theory in the measurement of psychological and social values. Critical
discussion of Weber's Law, Fechner's Law, and the Law of Comparative Judgment. Special attention is given
to the problems of psychological scale construction and attitude measurement.
Psy. 508.-Advanced Comparative Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
A study of the intelligence and learning capacity of animals, with an attempt to formulate and explain
the psychological concepts of reflex, conditional reflex, instinct, learning, memory, intelligence, thinking, and
motivation as problems primarily in nerve physiology.
Psy. 509.-Human Motivation. 3 hours. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
A detailed account of the factors underlying human motivation approached from both the physiological and
psychological viewpoint.
Psy. 510.-Social Psychiatry. 3 hours. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Lectures and readings on the various forms of mental disease, with attention to causes, diagnosis, symptoms,
and treatment. Psychiatric information for social workers and school psychologists.






DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION


Psy. 512.-Psychology of Problem Children. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Psy. 514.-History and Systems of Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
A critical survey of the historical development of psychology with special emphasis on representative
writers and the more recent systems and programs.
Psy. 515.-Social Psychology. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.

SOCIOLOGY
Prerequisites (or corequisites in part): Twenty-four hours in Sociology or related
fields, of which at least twelve must be in sociology.
Sy. 511.-Problems of Child Welfare. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
Sy. 515.-Social Legislation. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
Sy. 521.-Rural Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. MACLACHLAN.
Sy. 523.-Social Disorganization. 3 hours. 3 credits BRISTOL.
Sy. 526.-Urban Sociology. 3 hours. 3 credits. MACLACHLAN.
Sy. 531.-Development of Social Thought. 21/ hour seminar. 3 credits
BRISTOL.
Emphasis on the relation of social theory to educational theory.
Sy. 542.-Applied Sociology. 2 hour seminar. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
For the year 1939-1940 special emphasis will be given to the application of sociology to the teaching
of the social studies in high school.
Sy. 590.-The South (Regional Resources and Culture). 3 hours. 3 credits.
MACLACHLAN.
SPANISH
Prerequisites: Twenty-four hours, or equivalent, of undergraduate work in Spanish.
This must include a year-course in composition and one in Spanish literature.
Sh. 501.-Old Spanish. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. The first half of
the course Sh. 501-502. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Sh. 501-502: Spanish Historical Grammar. Readings from 12th, 13th, and 14th centuries.
Sh. 502.-Old Spanish. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. The second half
of the course Spanish 501-502.
Sh. 503.-Golden Age. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. The first half of the
course Sh. 503-504. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Sh. 503-504: Lectures, readings, reports in 17th century literature.
Sh. 504.-Golden Age. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. The second half
of the course Sh. 503-504.
Sh. 505.-Contemporary Spanish Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAUPT-
MANN. The first half of the course Sh. 505-506. Prerequisite: consent of in-
structor.
Sh. 505-506: A study of the generation of '98 and their predecessors. Lectures, readings, reports.
Sh. 506.-Contemporary Spanish Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAUPT-
MANN. The second half of the course Sh. 505-506.
Sh. 509.-Contemporary Latin-American Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits.
DEGAETANI.
Lectures an' readings on principal literary figures and movements in Spanish America; primarily con-
cerned with mutual influences operative in the Western Hemisphere.
Sh. 511.-Advanced Reading. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. The first
half of the course Sh. 511-512. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
Sh. 511-512: Readings in the field chosen by the student.
Sh. 512.-Advanced Reading. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. The second
half of the course Sh. 511-512.







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


GRADUATE ASSISTANTS, 1938-1939

WALLACE F. ARMSTRONG, B.S. in Chemical Engineering,
University of Florida, 1938 ..............-- ..- ------.. ..... Graduate Assistant in Chemical Engineering
JOSEPH P. BAIN, Bachelor of Science,
University of Florida, 1935 ...........-........ --.... ---. .. ----. Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
CLARENCE E. BARNES, Bachelor of Philosophy, Xavier University, 1930 .........- Teaching Fellow in Education
CHARLES H. BECKER, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Illinois, 1937 ........- Graduate Assistant in Pharmacy
LEWIS BERNER, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1937 ................. Graduate Assistant in Biology
R. GERARD BROWN, B.S. in Business Administration,
University of Florida, 1938 --...-.---------- ---.....-..... -.... .------- Graduate Assistant in Economics
KENNETH A. BRYANT, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1938 .-. Graduate Assistant in Mathematics
WILLIAM T. BRYANT, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1936 .......................-..-...- ...... Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Economics
THOMAS D. CARR, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1937 .........-... Graduate Assistant in Physics
CHARLES K. CLARK, Bachelor of Arts, 1928; Engineer in Chemistry, 1929,
Stanford University ..........................---- --... ....-....-- ..... Research Assistant in Naval Stores
ARNOLD W. DEAN, Bachelor of Science, 1929; Master of Science, 1930;
University of Florida --..... ... ----------- Research Assistant in Naval Stores
WAYNE P. DEAN, B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1938 .--.--_...-... Graduate Assistant in Entomology and Plant Patholgy
R. STANLEY DYAL, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1937 ............. Graduate Assistant in Agronomy
THOMAS B. FOARD, Bachelor of Science, Mississippi State College, 1938 ... Graduate Assistant in Bacteriology
ROBERT EUGENE FUGATE, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1937 Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
JOHN H. GIRARDEAU, JR., Bachelor of Science, Clemson Agricultural College, 1937
Graduate Fellow (Rohm and Haas) in Entomology and Plant Pathology
JOHN HALLIDAY, Bachelor of Science, Hampden-Sydney College, 1938 ......--.. Graduate Assistant in Physics
BENJAMIN HINTON, Bachelor of Science, University of Miami, 1937 ............ Graduate Assistant in Physics
ERNEST MI. HODNETT, Bachelor of Science, 1936; Master of Science, 1938
University of Florida ---... .....- --.-..- ----- -- ......-- -- Graduate Assistant in Chemistry
PATRICK T. HUNTER, Bachelor of Science,
Mississippi State College, 1938 .... ....................--------------- Graduate Assistant in Horticulture
DALE L. KINSLEY, B.S. in Pharmacy, Ohio State University, 1938 ..... Graduate Assistant in Pharmacognosy
JAMES T. LEGGETT, B.S. in Mechanical Engineering,
University of Florida, 1938 _....-..... ----------- Graduate Assistant in Mechanical Engineering
THOMAS J. MACEK, B.S. in Pharmacy, Rutgers University, 1938 .............- Graduate Assistant in Pharmacy
JOHN W. NELSON, B.S. in Pharmacy, Purdue University, 1938 -........... Graduate Assistant in Pharmacology
JOSEPH S. PECK, Bachelor of Science, 1934; Master of Science, 1935,
Stetson University .-............-- .. -.. ----. Graduate Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry
MANUEL D. RAMIREZ, Bachelor of Arts, Universtiy of Florida, 1937 .................. Graduate Assistant in Spanish
JOHN M. REDGRAVE, JR., B.S. in Mechanical Engineering,
University of Florida, 1938 - _.. -- -- Graduate Assistant in Mechanical Engineering
JAMES F. SHIVLER, JR., B.S. in Civil Engineering,
University of Florida, 1938 ...~.--.~..-............-- ........ Graduate Assistant in Civil Engineering
WILLIAM KENNETH SMITH, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1937 ... Graduate Assistant in Biology
WILLIAM DAVID STALLCUP, Bachelor of Science, 1934; Master of Science, 1938;
University of Florida ......-.....- ....- -.... --- ..-..-... Research Assistant in Naval Stores
CHARLES R. STEARNS, JR., B.S. in Agriculture,
University of Florida, 1935 ...-------...... ----- Research Assistant in Naval Stores
ORVILLE W. STRUTHERS, B.S. in Forestry, University of Florida, 1938 ................ Graduate Assistant in Botany
LEONIDAS C. SWORDS, Bachelor of Fine Arts, University of Florida, 1938 .....--.. Graduate Assistant in Painting
STANLEY E. WIMBERLY, Bachelor of Arts, University of Florida, 1938 ........ Graduate Assistant in Psychology
FRANK N. YOUNG, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1938 ...........--.. Graduate Assistant in Biology






RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES


GRADUATE SCHOLARS, 1938-1939

GEORGE W. ANDERSON, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1935 Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
OTIS BELL, B.S. in Agricultural Education,
University of Florida, 1938 .. ...--.......-.............------------------- Graduate Scholar in Education
*HAZEL L. BOWMAN, Bachelor of Arts, Florida State College for Women, 1937 ... Graduate Scholar in English
TED EVERETT CALMES, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1937 ...--.. Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
JOHN ROLAND DEBRUYN, Bachelor of Arts, University of Florida, 1938, ......-.. Graduate Scholar in English
*RALPH W. HARMON, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1938 .........- Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
DUFAE WARREN LEE, B.S. in Pharmacy,
Indianapolis College of Pharmacy, 1938 ........................... .-..--..... Graduate Scholar in Pharmacy
WILLIAM J. McGUIRE, Bachelor of Arts, University of Florida, 1938, .......... Graduate Scholar in English
*EMORY LOWE PIERCE, JR., Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1935; Master of
Science, University of Liverpool, 1938 .... ... --~.... ..--..-~......... Graduate Scholar in Biology
ROBERT C. STOKES, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Nebraska, 1935 ...... Graduate Scholar in Pharmacognosy
*NATHAN A. SUMNER, B.S. in Education, University of Florida. 1939 ........ Graduate Scholar in Education
HALVER C. VAN DAME, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1937 ...... Graduate Scholar in Chemistry
*Second Semester only.

RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES

February 4, 1938
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE

WILLIAM J. PLATT, JR., B.S. in Agriculture University of Florida. 1933 --. ................... Bushnell
Animal Husbandry
THESIS: "A Study of the Breeding, Management, Feeding and Marketing, of Swine in Sumter County,
Florida"

May 30, 1938

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY


FRED W. ELLIS, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, 1936..... ..
Pharmacology
THESIS: "A Pharmacological Investigation of Certain Benzyl Alcohols"


..Heath Springs, S. C.


MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING

SAM PAUL GOETHE, B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Florida, 1936 ....-..-.......... -- Jacksonville
Mechanical Engineering
THESIS: "The Economic Possibilities of Reversed Cycle Refrigeration for Heating in Florida"

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE

HAMLIN L. BROWN, JR., B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1936 ......-....-- ... Gainesville
Agricultural Economics
THESIS: "Marketing Florida Tomatoes"
MERRILL CHARLES FUTCH, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1936 ......... ......-......... Starke
Animal Husbandry
THESIS: "The Vitamin A Assay of One Type of Dried Citrus Pulp"
PAUL ROBERT SEILER, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1937 .......................-..-. Jacksonville
Agricultural Economics
THESIS: "Production Loans Made by Florida Farmers' Cooperative Associations"

MASTER OF SCIENCE

FITz J. BARTLETT, Bachelor of Science, University of Maryland, 1936..-...-....----- -.....Gainesville
Entomology
THESIS: "The Efficacy of Certain Insecticidal Materials for Ornamental Insect Control"






252 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

JOHN MILTON BROWNLEE, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1935 .......------.~......-...-. --.... Starke
Entomology
THESIS: "Investigations of the Efficacy of Aliphatic Thiocyanates and Red Copper Oxide as Control
Sprays for Insects and Diseases of Ornamentals"
MIARTHA HARRIET FOSTER, Bachelor of Science, Florida State College for Women, 1936 ..-..................Quincy
Entomology
THESIS: "Anastrepha of Florida with Special Reference to Wing Pattern Variation in 'Anastrepha
mombinpraeoptans' Sein"
WILLIAM PUTNAM HUNTER. Bachelor of Science, Clemson Agricultural College, 1933 .................O--rlando
Entomology
THESIS: "Aliphatic Thiocyanate Investigations"
CARL HENRY LAUFFER, Bachelor of Science. Franklin and Marshall College, 1935 ...--....... St. Petersburg
Entomology
THESIS: "The Comparative External Anatomy of the Hemipterous Head"
EDWARD VAN LAER LIPSCOMB. Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1936 .... .--.......Pensacola
Bacteriology
THESIS: "Brucella Injections in Man and Animals in Florida"
PAUL TRUMAN RIHERD, B.S. in Agriculture, A. and M. College of Texas, 1936 ......---.... -.......... Gainesville
Entomology
THESIS: "Mosquitoes Breeding Near the University Campus-Their Habitats, Seasonal Occurrence, and
Habits"
RICHARD TASCHEK, Bachelor of Arts, University of Wisconsin, 1936 .........................Darlington, Wisconsin
Physics
THESIS: "The Near Infrared Spectra of Some Anisotropic Liquids"
JOE H. WILKINS, B.S. in Agriculture. The University of Tennessee, 1936 ......................-......-- ..........Leesburg
Entomology
THESIS: "The External Anatomy of 'Chelinidea Vittiger' Uhler"

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
DORCAs E. CARVER, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1937.......- ...-...................-...... Gainesville
Education
THESIS: "A Study of the Growth in Reading as Shown by Tests"
CARROLL FLEMING CUMBEE. B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1935 ................................. Gainesville
Education
THESIS "A Study of the Reading Tendencies of a Selected Group of Children"
VICTOR THOMAS KONOPKA, Bachelor of Arts. University of Florida, 1936 --....-..-... ...Paterson, New Jersey
Education
THESIS: "The Use of Motion Picture in the Accredited Public High Schools of Florida"
HAL GRAHAM LEWIS, Bachelor of Arts, The University of Georgia, 1930 ..---.........................-- Gainesville
Education
THESIS: "A Study of the Out-of-School Activities of High School Pupils in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School"
WILLIAM T. LOFTEN, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1931 ... -......--..................... Gainesville
Education
THESIS: "Part-Time Class in Vocational Agriculture for Farm Boys in Alachua High School Community"
NOBIE HIGDON STONE, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1935 ..........--.......--........-- ..Port St. Joe
Education
THESIS: "A Study of Final Authority in the High Schools of Florida"
HORACE F. ZETROUER, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1917 .------... ....................... Gainesville
Education
THESIS: "A Study of the Special Tax School Districts in Alachua County"

MASTER OF ARTS
GEORGE R. BENTLEY, B. A. in Education, University of Florida, 1937 ........ .-.....................- Miami
History
THESIS: "Amos Kendall: A Power in Jacksonian Politics"
ROBERT C. LEE, Bachelor of Arts, Ouachita College, 1936 .......-.............-- ...-............ Florence, South Carolina
English
THESIS: "The Treatment of Religion in the Novels of Sinclair Lewis"







RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES 253

GORDON W. LOVEJOY. B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1935 _........ ........... Gainesville
Sociology
THESIS: "The Greeks of Tarpon Springs, Florida"
HAROLD C. RIKER, Bachelor of Arts. University of Florida, 1936 ...........---.............. ......... St. Petersburg
English
THESIS: "Imagery in the Canterbury Tales"
HENRY Y. WILSON. B.S. in Education, Ohio University, 1929 ..........-................. ..... Tampa
Spanish
THESIS: "Nietzschean Influence in Baroja"
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
GEORGE R. JONES, B.S. in Pharmacy. 1934, M.S. in Phamracy, 1936; University of Florida ......-....... Archer
Pharmacy
DISSERTATION: "The Effect of Reduced Pressure on the Extraction of Drugs"
HOWARD K. WALLACE, B.S., University of Florida, 1929; M.S., University of Pittsburgh, 1932 ..... Gainesville
Biology
DISSERTATION: "The Habitat Distribution of the Spiders of the Family 'Lycosidae' in the Gainesville
Region"
July 23, 1938
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY
ROBERT B. SMITH. JR., B.S. in Pharmacy, Medical College of Virginia, 1937 .....-..~.- .... Petersburg, Va.
Pharmacology
THESIS: "The Deterioration of Digitalis Leaves"
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE
VICTOR F. NETTLES, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1936................------- Gainesville
Horticulture
THESIS: "A Study of the Effects of Several Methods of Applying Fertilizer on Certain Vegetable Crops"
MASTER OF SCIENCE
NELS BENSON, B.S. in Agriculture, University of Florida, 1936 ------...........- -........ ....-. Lake Hamilton
Chemistry
THESIS: "The Leaching of Nitrogen from Certain Florida Soils After the Application of Nitrogen
Fertilizers"
WALTER HAYDEN BYERS, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1936 .........--.........-.Johnstown, Penna.
Physics
THESIS: "The Electric Moment of Cellosolves"
CALVIN M. TIDWELL, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Georgia School of Technology, 1936 ........ Orlando
Chemistry
THESIS: "Studies of the Direct Nitration of Benzonitrile"
MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
HARVEY DRENNEN BROWNE. B.A. in Health and Physical Education, University of Florida, 1933 ....Leesburg
Education
THESIS: "A Study of Florida High School Athletic Directors"
LLOYD M. CHEW, A.B., Miami University, 1918, B.S. in Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1926 .Jacksorville
Education
THESIS: "A Factual Study of Grouping in John Gorrie Junior High School"
JULIAN E. MARKHAM, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1931 ------.......... ..-.......... .Lake City
Education
THESIS: "An Analysis of the Vocational Education Situation in Lake County, Florida"
WILLIAM HAROLD ROBERTS, A. B., 1930; B.S. in Agriculture, 1931; University of Florida............ Miami
Education
THESIS: "The Hy-Y, An Extra-Curricula Activity in Preparation for Leadership"
HERBERT JAMES WILKINSON, JR., Bachelor of Arts, Duke University, 1938 ................-- ...-......... .... Jupiter
Education
THESIS: "A Suggested Program for the Teaching of Human Relations in the Public Schools of Florida"
MASTER OF ARTS
EDWARD LORING MILLER, Bachelor of Arts, Stetson University, 1929 ...-................ --- -........... Miami
Sociology
THESIS: "Negro life in Gainesville; A Sociological Study"







254 BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

EDWARD FRANCIS NOLAN, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1937 ...... ..................- Fernandina
English
THESIS: "Verdi's Operatic Adaptations of Shakespearean Drama"
JOHN ALBERT ROBBINS, JR., Bachelor of Arts, University of Florida, 1937 .... .................. St. Petersburg
English
THESIS: "Native Elements in Selected American Plays to 1820"
VIRGINIA DELAND VAGTS, Bachelor of Arts, Coker College, 1936 --..-------...... ... ...... .. ........ Gainesville
English
THESIS: "The Blake and Stothard Illustrations of Chaucer's 'Canturbury Tales' "

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
LOVELL DAVID HINER, B.S., South Dakota State College, 1929; M.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Florida, 1931 -................ ... ................ .... ... ... Brookings. S. D.
Pharmacognosy
DISSERTATION: "The Cultivation of Ephedra Sinica in South Dakota"

August 27, 1938

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING
CHARLES A. POEKEL, B.S. in Electrical Engineering, University of Florida, 1937 ...........- -.... Gainesville
Electrical Engineering
THESIS: "A Study on the Design of Floodlighting for Football Stadia"

MASTER OF SCIENCE
RAY C. HUGHES, Bachelor of Science University of Florida, 1933 ...........-..- -.........-.... Gainesville
Chemistry
THESIS: "A Study of the Deternination of Calcium in Plant Tissues"
CHARLES M. JONES, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida. 1937 ...... ........ -...... Gainesville
Chemistry
THESIS: "The Desgin of an Experimental Vacuum Evaporator"
ROBERT D. SPECHT, Bachelor of Arts, University of Florida, 1936 --- ...........................- Miami
Mathematics
THESIS: "Groups and Their Matrix Representation"
WILLIAM D. STALLCUP, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1934 ................... St. Petersburg
Chemistry
THESIS: "Fluoborates, Their Preparation and Uses"

MASTER OF ARTS IN EDUCATION
ASHER E. BLEWETT, Bachelor of Arts, Western Kentucky Teachers College, 1929 .......... Ocala
Education
THESIS: "Policies in the Administration of a 16MM Motion Picture Program for Florida Public Schools"
RALPH N. BROWN, B.S. in Education, Central Missouri State Teachers College, 1926 .......... Jacksonville
Education
THESIS: "A Study of Professionalization Among Elementary Principals of Florida"
THEODORE H. CAMPBELL, Bachelor of Arts, Wofford College, 1911 ................................. Jacksonville
Education
THESIS: "Financial Reserves of the White Teachers of Florida and their Effects"
LYNNE B. DEW, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1925 ...........................-..... -.. Alachua
Education
THESIS: "The Relation of Home Reading Materials and School Grades"
RUSSELL R. DUGAN, Bachelor of Arts, Florida Southern College, 1929 ........................... ... Arcadia
Education
THESIS: "A Study of the Official and Community Relationship of the Florida Supervising Principal"
HENRY C. Fox, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1935 ...................- ... ..-.--........... Miami
Education
THESIS: "Physical Education in the Elementary Schools of Dade County"
CHARLES J. GANTT, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1936 -----...... ..... ....-...._......... .. Sanford
Education
THESIS: "A Four Year Study of Behavior Problems and Problem Tendencies Among Elementary School
Children of the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School"







RECIPIENTS OF GRADUATE DEGREES


LAFAYETTE GOLDEN, Bachelor of Arts, Mercer University, 1912 __ ------._____.. Gainesville
Education
THESIS: "Administrative Problems in Interscholastic High School Athletics: Proposed Regulations for
Their Simplification and Solution"
LEON A. GRAY, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1922 -_ _........ Starke
Education
THESIS: "Some Adjustment Problems of Seventh and Eighth Grade Pupils"
ROBERT E. HARRIS, Bachelor of Arts, Ogden College, 1923 --......_- .. ---.............-.... ............. Orlando
Education
THESIS: "An Investigation into the Personality Problem of the Boys in the Orlando Senior High
School, Orlando, Florida"
J. CLARENCE HILL, B.C.S. New York University, 1931 -- .--_... ---- _..-............... ........ Newberry
Education
THESIS: "A Study of Certain Children of the Newberry, Florida High School"
N. BROWARD LOVELL, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1930 ............-..-... ._ .___._._ Ocala
Education
THESIS: "History of Public School Education in Marion County, Florida"
HORACE F. MITCHELL, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1931 ------..... -....._- __. Homestead
Education
THESIS: "Some Administrative Problems Arising from the Education of Tourist or Transient Pupils in
the White Public Schools of Dade County, Florida"
BESSIE A. NORTON, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1930 --_.... --..............._-.. .._-.. Panama City
Education
THESIS: "The Development of the Library in the Secondary Schools of Florida"
EUGENE G. RABORN, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1934 -_..... ... .... ... _..___ Gainesville
Education
THESIS: "A Study of the Preparation of Students to Do Eleventh Grade Work in Daytona Mainland
High School"
MAMIE L. RENCHER, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1933 ..........-.... Winter Park
Education
THESIS: "An Improvement Program in Junior High Arithmetic"
H. JENNINGS Rou, Bachelor of Arts, Florida Southern College, 1931 ..... ..--.. --.......-....-- _...... Weirsdale
Education
THESIS: "A Study of Insurance Plans for Schools and Other Public Buildings"
CARL P. SCHILLER, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1930 .. .... -...--- ...-..__ ... ....... -_ Bell
Education
THESIS: "A Study of the Qualifications of Teachers and Principals in Holmes and Walton Counties"
B. DONALD STEWART, Bachelor of Arts, Ohio Wesleyan University, 1932 -.. -... .._-...... Portsmouth, Ohio
Education
THESIS: "The Professional and Academic Qualifications of the County Superintendents in Ohio"
GLOVER E. TULLY, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1936 -.__ _.__ Tallahassee
Education
THESIS: "Pupil Transportation in Alachua County"
DWIOHT L. WILSON, B.S. in Education, University of Florida, 1933 .--.._ ... .. Jacksonville Beach
Education
THESIS: "School Attendance Codes and Regulations for Their Enforcement, with Special Emphasis to
the State of Florida"


MASTER OF ARTS

CHARLES C. BERNARD, Bachelor of Arts, University of Florida, 1937 .. ..._____ Tampa
History
THESIS: "Our 'Quasi-War with France': The Story of an Undeclared War"
ISHAM P. BYRON, JR., B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1937 -._-... .... --_........... St. Petersburg
English
THESIS: "The Rise and Growth of the Elizabethan Dumb-Show as a Factor Contributing to an Inter-
pretation of Shakespeare's Hamlet"







BULLETIN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


FREDERICK E. COOK, Bachelor of Arts, University of Florida, 1930 ..._.--.. ---.. West Palm Beach
Psychology
THESIS: "Influence of a Special Training Period on Individual Differences in Arithmetic Ability"
VIRGINIA L. CRATER, Bachelor of Arts, Queens-Chicora College, 1929 -..--..- ---- --.-..- Charlotte, N. C.
English
THESIS: "Morphological and Semasiological Aspects of the Diminutive in English"
RONALD J. CUTLER, B.A. in Education, University of Florida, 1932 ---..-..Nam- __-- Haines City
English
THESIS: "Ideas in the Poetry of Robert Frost"
AUGUSTA W. DURRANCE, Bachelor of Arts, University of Kentucky, 1923 .... --....--- .. Kissimmee
English
THESIS: "The Origin and Function of the Soliloquy with Especial Reference to the Elizabethan Drama"
ALVIN P. PIERSON, Bachelor of Arts, University of Nevada, 1922 ..... .-.........._-- .....- Hastings
History
THESIS: "Strike Policies of Two Presidents: A Study in Contrasts"
ALBERT C. VAN DUSEN, Bachelor of Science, University of Florida, 1937 ..--.-.. ....-- _- ----....- Tampa
Psychology
THESIS: "Permanence of Vocational Interests"
WILMA R. WATSON, Bachelor of Arts Florida State College for Women, 1925 _-....--- __ Gainesville
History
THESIS: "Taft and Roosevelt-A Broken Friendship"

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
LEA G. GRAMLING, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1935; M.S. in Pharmacy, 1936, University of Florida ..... Gainesville
Pharmacology
DISSERTATION: "Biological Assay of Gelsemium"
ANDREW P. McLEAN, B.S. in Pharmacy, 1933; M.S. in Pharmacy, 1935,
University of Florida ...._-... -- -- -...-...-..-.. ... ........... Oklahoma City, Okla.
Pharmacology
DISSERTATION: "The Assay of Veratrum Viride"
JESS A. REESE, B.S. in Pharmacy, Medical College of Virginia, 1930; M.S. in Pharmacy,
University of Florida, 1936 -_-.......... ... ........ ---- ....-...------- .......... St. Charles, Va.
Pharmacognosy
DISSERTATION: "Changes in Ergot with Various Moisture Contents under Different Conditions of Storage"

SUMMARY

Number of Master's Degrees Granted in Regular Session 1937-38 27
Number of Master's Degrees Granted in Summer Session 1938 ...---.. .. ------ 49

Total for the Year --------------- 76

Number of Doctor of Philosophy Degrees Granted in Regular Session 1937-38 ..-- 2
Number of Doctor of Philosophy Degrees Granted in Summer Session 1938 ---- 4

Total for the Year ... ----------------- 6

Number of Students Registered in the Graduate School, 1938 Summer Session,
First Term -..--........-------- --------- -..---..- 266
Number of Students Registered in the Graduate School, 1938 Summer Session,
Second Term -------- ----------------------..... ..........-232
Number of Students Registered in the Graduate School, First Term, 1938-39 ---------_-. 159
Number of Students Registered in Graduate School, Second Term, 1938-39 -__ .. --159


Grand Total (Not excluding duplicates)




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