• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Map of the campus
 Table of Contents
 Summer session calendar
 Officers of administration
 Admission
 General information
 Special courses for agricultural...
 Expenses
 Rooming facilities
 General regulations
 Colleges and schools
 Departments of instruction
 Questions and answers
 Mail registration
 Dormitory information
 Application














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00306
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1939
Copyright Date: 1939
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00306
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Page 102
    Map of the campus
        Page 103
    Table of Contents
        Page 104
        Page 105
    Summer session calendar
        Page 106
    Officers of administration
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
    Admission
        Page 112
    General information
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    Special courses for agricultural teachers, school of trade and industrial education, Daytona Beach, Florida
        Page 117
    Expenses
        Page 118
    Rooming facilities
        Page 119
        Page 120
    General regulations
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Colleges and schools
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Departments of instruction
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Questions and answers
        Page 162
        Page 163
    Mail registration
        Page 164
    Dormitory information
        Page 165
        Page 166
    Application
        Page 167
        Page 168
Full Text




The University Record

of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of

%he 'Unieversity Summer Session

1939
First Term-June 12 to July 21
Second Term-July 24 to August 25


IMPORTANT
It is possible to avoid the tedious waiting in long lines
on registration day if you carefully read this bulletin and
follow the directions for registration by mail as given on
page 164.


Vol. XXXIV, Series I


No. 3


March 1, 1939


Published Monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla.















The Record Comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the bulletins of
information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of
the University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The appli-
cant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired. Address

THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida


Research Publications.-Research publications contain results of research work. Papers
are published as separate monographs numbered in several series.

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions are
arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges should
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The
issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on Publica-
tions. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional
exchanges, should be addressed to the University Library, University of Florida, Gainesville,
Florida.
THE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


[102 ]



















































[103 ]





TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
M ap of the Cam pus .....................1... .. ....... ..... .... ................ ................................................. 103
Sum m er Session Calendar ............................... .. ................... .. ................. .................................... 106
O officers of A dm inistration ...................... ... ........-- .. .... ...................................................... 107
Faculty ................................................................................................................................................. 108
A dm mission ..................--.---................... ...........................-- .. ....--.--... ............................................. 112
G general Inform ation ......................................................................................................................... 113
Special Conferences in A dm inistration ................................................................................ 113
Societies and Clubs ......................... .... .............. ..... ..... .......................................................... 114
Em ploym ent Bureau ................................................................................................................. 114
Laboratory School ..................................................................................................................... 115
Students' Depository ................................................................................................................ 115
Loan Funds ............................................................................................................................... 115
Certificates and Extension of Certificates ............................................................................ 116
Special Courses for A agricultural Teachers .................................................................................. 117
School of Trade and Industrial Education, Daytona Beach .................................................... 117
Expenses .............................................................................................................................................. 118
R oom ing Facilities ............................................................................................................................ 119
G general R regulations ................................................................................. ................................... 121
Colleges and Schools ....................... .............................................................................................. 123
G graduate School .......... ...................................1......................................................... 123
College of A agriculture .............................................................................................................. 123
College of A rts and Sciences ...................-- ... ............ ................................... ..... ........ 124
College of Business A dm inistration ...................................................................................... 125
College of Education ...... -.... ............... ............................................................................. 127
G general College ................................... ...... ........................................................................ 129
College of Law ........................................................................................ .................................. 131
School of Pharm acy .................................................................................................................. 131
D epartm ents of Instruction ...........-............ ... ..... -................ ...................................................... 132
General College ........................................ ........... ....................................................... 132, 151
A agricultural Econom ics .................... ......................... ................... .............................. 134, 152
A nim al H usbandry .,............................................................................................................... 134
Bacteriology ...................................... ......... ........................................................................... 134
Bible ......................................................................--------.................................................................. 134
Biology ........................................................................... .................................................... 134, 152
Botany .................... .. ........... .................................. .. ..................................................... 135
Business Education ....................................................................................................... 135, 152
Chem istry ..................................... ..... .. ..................................... ..... 135, 153
Civil Engineering ...........-------- -- --............... .......... ............... ............... ..................................... 136
Econom ics and Business A dm inistration .................................................................... 136, 153
Education ....................................... ................ ................ ... .................. .................... 138, 155
English ............. ..... ....................... ...................... ..... ....... ......... .............. 141, 156
Entom ology .........................................-.... ...-- ............ ........ .............. ...... ....................... ..... 142
French ............... .............................................................. .................................................. 142, 157
Geography ................................................................................................................................... 143
H andw writing ....................-------------.................. ........ ............................................................ 143, 158
H health and Physical Education ............................................................................................ 143
H history ............................... ............ ......... ................ ........ ............................................. 144, 158
Law ....---------.............................................................................................................................................. 145
M them atics ..................................................................................................................... 145, 158
Philosophy .......................................................... ............................ ............................................. 146
Physics .......................... ................................................. ................................................... 146, 158
Political Science ................................................................................................................ 147, 159
Poultry H usbandry ..................................... ..- ........ .. ........................................................... 147
Psychology ........................................................................................................................... 147, 159
Public School A rts and Crafts ..................................................................................... 148, 159
School M usic ......................................................... ........................................................... 148, 160
Sociology ..................- - --.................... ..................................................................................... 149, 160
Spanish ............................. ............... ............ .................... ............................................... 149, 160
Speech ........................................................ ........ ................................................................. 149, 161
Q questions and A nsw ers ............--.... -.. ........................................................................................... 162
Mail Registration ..........................................---------...........----------............................................................. 164
D orm itory Inform ation Blank ............................ ......................................................................... 165
A application Blank .............................. ................................................................................................ 167
[ 104 ]











IMPORTANT NOTICE TO SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS

All who expect to attend the 1939 Summer Session at the
University of Florida must fill out the Application Blank on
page 167 and mail it to the Registrar, University of Florida,
Gainesville. Previous attendance at the University of Florida
does not waive this requirement.

Upon receipt of this questionnaire, the Registrar will send
registration blanks for the 1939 Summer Session if the appli-
cation is received before June 1. In order to save time and
confusion during registration, each person who expects to
register should mail in this questionnaire before June 1, 1939.

Upon request, blank questionnaires will be supplied by the
Registrar.

READ QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON PAGES 162-163.




IMPORTANT DIRECTIONS
TO STUDENTS
After arriving at the University:
1. If dormitory room assignment has been made, secure keys from the Head Janitor's
Office in Thomas Hall near the archway joining the latter to the New Dormitory. If
no reservation has been made, call at Office of the Business Manager, 102 Language Hall.
2. For outside rooming accommodations, see Dean of Students, 105 Language Hall.
3. Cafeteria meal tickets may be purchased from the Cashier, 102 Language Hall, or
at the cigar counter, Cafeteria.
4. For information concerning social activities among women students, or any matter of
interest to women, see the Dean of Women, 105 Language Hall or 144 New Dormitory.


[ 105 ]






SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR
1939 FIRST SUMMER TERM
June 5-June 10 .................................... Registration for First Summer Term.
June 10, Saturday, 1 p.m. ................ Placement Tests (Room 106 Agriculture Building).
June 12, Monday, 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m..... Registration for First Summer Term.
June 13, Tuesday, 7 a.m. ...... ......... Classes begin. Late registration fee $5.
June 14, Wednesday, 4 p.m. .......... Last day for registration for the First Summer Term,
and for adding courses.
June 17, Saturday, noon ................. Last day for making application for a degree or
diploma that is to be awarded at the end of the
First Summer Term.
June 24, Saturday ............................. Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be
designated as Honor Students.
July 1, Saturday ............................. Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end
of the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
Last day for applications to take Comprehensive Ex-
aminations in July and August.
July 4, Tuesday ............................. Holiday.
July 6, Thursday ............................. Last day for students expecting to receive degrees
or diplomas at end of term to complete corre-
spondence courses.
July 12, Wednesday ......................... Last day for filing application for extension of cer-
tificate.
Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade
of E and being assessed failure fee.
July 17-July 20 .................................... Registration for Second Summer Term.
July 19, Wednesday, noon ............. Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees
or diplomas at end of term are due in the Office
of the Registrar.
July 20, Thursday ......................... Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees
and diplomas.
July 21, Friday, noon ....... .......... First Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the
Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
July 22, Saturday, 10 a.m. .............. Conferring of degrees and diplomas.

SECOND SUMMER TERM
July 24-August 3 ..... ... ...... Short course on land use at Camp O'Leno.
July 24, Monday, 8 a.m .... ......... Placement Tests (Room 106 Agriculture Building).
July 24, Monday, 8-12 a.m. ................ Registration for Second Summer Term.
July 25, Tuesday, 7 a.m ..... ........ Classes begin. Late registration fee $5.
July 26, Wednesday, 4 p.m. ............... Last day for registration for the Second Summer Term,
and for adding courses.
July 29, Saturday, noon ...... ....... Last day for making application for a degree or
diploma that is to be awarded at the end of the
Second Summer Term.
August 3, Thursday ....................... Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be
designated as Honor Students.
August 5, Saturday ...................... Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end
of the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
August 10, Thursday ........ ........... Last day for students expecting to receive degrees or
diplomas at end of term to complete correspondence
courses.
August 16, Wednesday, 5 p.m. .......... Last day for filing application for extension of cer-
tificate. Last day for dropping courses without re-
ceiving grade of E and being assessed failure fee.
August 23, Wednesday, noon ............ Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees
or diplomas at end of term are due in the Office of
the Registrar.
August 24, Thursday ..................... Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees
and diplomas.
August 25, Friday, noon ....... ...... Second Summer Term ends. All grades are due in
the Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
August 26, Saturday, 10 a.m. ........... Commencement Convocation.
[106]





OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Acting Vice-President of the University; Dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences, First Term
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Director of the Summer Session
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A., Dean of Students, Second Term
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Registrar
ROLAND BYERLY EUTSLER, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Business Administration,
Second Term
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, Business Manager
H. HAROLD HUME, D.Sc., Dean of the College of Agriculture
ELIZABETH SKINNER JACKSON, B.A., Dean of Women, First Term
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Dean of the General College
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Dean of the College of Business Administration, First
Term
DONALD RAY MATTHEWS, B.A., Director of Florida Union
ZENA MORRELL, Assistant to the Dean of Women, First Term; Acting Dean of Women,
Second Term
JOSEPH EDWIN PRICE, B.A.E., Acting Dean of Students, First Term
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education
THOMAS -MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the Graduate School
GEORGE CLARENCE TILLMAN, M.D., F.A.C.S., University Physician
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.D., Dean of the College of Law
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S., Dean of the College of Engineering
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Second
Term

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION

MADGE FORSYTH BAKER, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Business Manager
LEWIS F. BLALOCK, M.A., Director of Admissions
HELEN WATSON CARSON, Secretary to the Business Manager
BARBARA CROSLAND, B.A., Secretary, General College
JOHN BROWARD CULPEPPER, M.A.E., Acting Principal, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
DOROTHY WILSON GAUNT, Dietitian, University Cafeteria
J. B. GOODSON, Cashier
ELIZABETH VIRGINIA GLOVER, B.A., Secretary, College of Arts and Sciences
PENELOPE GRIFFIN, B.A., Secretary, Graduate School
ROSA GRIMES, R.N., Head Nurse
MINNA DUNN HARRELL, B.A., Personnel Secretary
JEANETTE B. JERNIGAN, Secretary, College of Engineering
RICHARD S. JOHNSON, B.S.P., Assistant Registrar
ANNITA WILSON JONES, B.A., Transcript Clerk, Office of the Registrar
PRISCILLA MCCALL KENNEDY, Chief Clerk, College of Arts and Sciences
JOHN V. McQuiTTY, M.A., Examiner
KATHERINE ELSING MORAN, B.A., Secretary to the President
CLAUDE L. MURPHREE, B.A., F.A.G.O., University Organist
BURTON J. OTTE, M.S., Curator, Chemistry Department
MARGARET PEELER, Housekeeper





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


IRENE ERSKINE PERRY, B.S., Administrative Assistant, Office of the Summer Session
EDITH PATTI PITTS, Administrative Assistant to the President
THOMAS JAMES PRICE, Auditor
ILA ROUNTREE PRIDGEN, Secretary and Librarian, College of Law
NAOMI PRITCHETT, Secretary, University Library
HAROLD CLARK RIKER, M.A., Assistant to the Director, Florida Union
ELEANOR GWYNNETH SHAW, Secretary, College of Agriculture
CATHRYN SMITH, B.A., Secretary, College of Business Administration
HELOISE BOWYER TOLBERT, Administrative Assistant, Office of the Dean of Students
EDITH CORRY WEBB, B.A., Secretary of Examinations, Office of the Registrar
HOMER D. WINGATE, B.S.B.A., Auditor, Custodian Funds
MARTHA A. WOOD, Secretary, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School

UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

EFFIE MIMS DAVIS, B.S., B.A. in L.S., Document Librarian and Assistant in Circulation
Department
HENRIE MAY EDDY, B.A., M.S. in L.S., Acting Librarian
AMY STEEN FETZER, B.A. in Journalism, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Head of Order Department
ELIZABETH THORNE JERNIGAN, B.A., Head of Catalog Department
EUNICE ELIZABETH KEEN, A.B., B.A. in L.S., Assistant Cataloger
GLADYS O'NEAL LAIRD, B.A.E., Acting Librarian, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
(Second Term)
JEAN HASELTON LENKERD, B.A., Assistant in Catalog and Reference Departments
D. GWENDOLYN LLOYD, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Periodicals and Binding Librarian
CHARLOTTE NEWTON, B.A., M.A. in L.S., Head of Circulation Department
ANNE FRANCES RICHARDSON, A.B., B.S. in L.S., Acting Reference Librarian
EULA MAE SNIDER, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Librarian, P. K. Yonge Laboratory School

FACULTY 1939 SUMMER SESSION

MARIE ALEXANDER, Ed.D., Elementary Education
MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, Ph.D., Economics and Business Statistics
ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D., French
JAMES OSLER BAILEY, Ph.D., English
TOMPSIE BAXTER, M.A., Elementary Education
DAVID MIERS BEIGHTS, Ph.D., Accounting
GEORGE ROBERT BENTLEY, M.A., History, Comprehensive Course C-l, Man and the Social
World
TRUMAN C. BIGHAM, Ph.D., Economics
ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D., Chemistry
JACK BOHANNON, M.A., Public School Arts and Crafts
MARGARET WHITE BOUTELLE, M.A., Education
Lucius MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D., Sociology
NORMA SMITH BRISTOW, M.A., Elementary Education
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D., French
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World;
Biology
ARCHER STUART CAMPBELL, Ph.D., Public Finance and Foreign Trade
WILLIAM GRAVES CARLETON, M.A., J.D., History





FACULTY


MILTON W. CAROTHERS, M.A., Education
ARCHIE FAIRLY CARR, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D., Bacteriology
CLEVA JOSEPHINE CARSON, M.S., School Music
WILLIAM STANMORE CAWTHON, M.A., Political Science
JAMES EDWARD CHACE, JR., M.B.A., Economics; Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the
Social World
DUDLEY M. CLEMENTS, M.A., Vocational Agriculture
JAMES EDMUND CONGLETON, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing; English
FREDERICK WILLIAM CONNER, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities
HENRY PHILIP CONSTANT, M.A., Speech
JAMES DEWBERRY COPELAND, Ed.D., Business Education
EUNICE K. CRABTREE, Ph.D., Elementary Education
RAYMOND MERCHANT CROWN, B.S.A., Animal Husbandry
JOHN BROWARD CULPEPPER, M.A.E., Education
CARROLL FLEMING CUMBEE, M.A.E., Education
MANNING JULIAN DAUER, Ph.D., Political Science
JAMES WESTBAY DAY, M.A., J.D., Law
FRANCIS MARION DEGAETANI, B.A.E., Spanish
SIGISMOND DER. DIETTRICH, Ph.D., Geography; Economics
JAMES CLYDE DRIGGERS, B.S.A., Poultry Husbandry
CHARLOTTE DUNN, B.S., Kindergarten Education
WILLIAM THOMAS EDWARDS, Ph.D., Education
WINSTON WALLACE EHRMANN, Ph.D., Sociology; Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the
Physical World
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Economics
NORMAN ELLSWORTH ELIASON, Ph.D., English
NICKOLAUS Louis ENGELHARDT, JR., M.A., Education
HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D., Philosophy
ROLAND BYERLY EUTSLER, Ph.D., Economics
RICHARD ALLEN FOSTER, Ph.D., English; Education
LEONARD N ILLIAM GADDUM, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical World
HALLET HUNT GERMOND, Ph.D., Mathematics
WILLIAM Louis GOETTE, M.A.E., Education
HENRY C. GROSECLOSE, M.S., Agricultural Education
JOE HALL, M.A., Health and Physical Education
HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D., Agricultural Economics
CHARLES MARLOWE HAMPSON, M.S., Agricultural Economics
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTMANN, Ph.D., Spanish
JAMES DOUGLAS HAYGOOD, Ph.D., Education
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., Chemistry
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Psychology
HOMER HIXSON, Ph.D., Entomology
ARTHUR ARIEL HOPKINS, M.A., Speech
LILLIAN PAGE HOUGH, M.A., Elementary Education
THEODORE HUNTINGTON HUBBELL, Ph.D., Biology
ARTHUR PALMER HUDSON, Ph.D., English
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, M.A., LL.B., Business Law





110 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

PAUL IRVINE, Ph.D., Curriculum Construction
VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D., Chemistry
WILLIAM F. JACOBS, M.S., Agricultural Education
JOSEPH BLISS JAMES, M.A., History
JOHN EVANDER JOHNSON, B.D., M.A., Bible
KATHLEEN TENILLE KING, M.A., Elementary Education
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Physics
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D., Mathematics
ANGUS MCKENZIE LAIRD, M.A., Education; Political Science
LILLIAN MAGDALEN LAWRENCE, B.M.E., School Music
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Chemistry
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Education; Comprehensive Course C-41, Man and His
Thinking
WILLIAM FRANCIS LOCKWOOD, M.A.E., Public School Art
CLIFFORD PIERSON LYONS, Ph.D., English
SAMUEL JOSEPH McALLISTER, A.B., Health and Physical Education
CAROLYN BOWERS MCCLURE, B.A.E., Handwriting
JOHN BERRY MCFERRIN, Ph.D., Economics
CHARLES ADDIS McGLON, B.A.E., Speech
IDA RUTH McLENDON, B.A.E., Elementary Education
MALCOLM MACLEOD, Ph.D., English; Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing
JOHN MILLER MACLACHLAN, Ph.D., Sociology; Comprehensive Course C-l, Man and the
Social World
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., Economics; Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the
Social World
OLIVE MENZ, B.M., School Music
INGORIE VAUSE MIKELL, B.M., Kindergarten Education
RUSSELL ELLIOTT MILLER, B.A.E., Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the Social World
EDGAR LEE MORPHET, Ph.D., Education
ZENA MORRELL, Health and Physical Education
ALTON CHESTER MORRIS, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-3. Reading. Speaking and Writing
CHARLES ISAAC MOSIER, Ph.D., Psychology
CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, M.A., English
ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, B.A. (Oxon), English; Comprehensive Course C-3. Reading,
Speaking and Writing
CLAUDE LEON MURPHREE, B.A., F.A.C.O., Comprehensive Course C-5, The lHumanities;
Music
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Education
CLARA McDONALD OLSON, M.A.E., Education
MARION OSTRANDER, M.A., Education
JOHN H. PAUSTIAN, M.A., Public School Arts and Crafts
RUTH BEATRICE PEELER, M.A., Elementary Education
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D., Mathematics
EUNICE JEAN PIEPER, B.S., Elementary Education
ZAREH MEGUERDITCH PIRENIAN, M.S., Mathematics
EDWARD SCHAUMBERG QUADE, Ph.D., Mathematics
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., English
ELLIS BENTON SALT, Ed.D., Health and Physical Education





FACULTY


WILLIAM LINCOLN SAWYER, B.S., Civil Engineering
HARLEY BAKWEL SHERMAN, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World
EDNA SIMMONS, M.A., Elementary Education
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Mathematics
LILA SINCLAIR, A.B., Public School Art
KENNETH GORDON SKAGGS, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking and
Writing
DEAN SLAGLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
HERMAN EvERETTE SPIVEY, Ph.D., English
OSWALD C. R. STAGEBERG, B.S. in Arch., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities
BILLIE KNAPP STEVENS, M.A., Health and Physical Education
GRACE ADAMS STEVENS, M.A., Education
LILIAN STEVENS, M.A., Elementary Education
MODE L. STONE, M.A., Curriculum Construction
THOMAS BRADLEY STROUP, Ph.D., English; Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking
and Writing
DANIEL CRAMER SWANSON, Ph.D., Physics
WALTER FULLER TAYLOR, Ph.D., English
CLARENCE JOHN TESELLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
RoY EDWARD TEW, B.A.E., Speech
W. J. B. TRUITr, M.A., Education
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.B., Law
FRANK WALDO TUTTLE, Ph.D., Economics
HOWARD KEEFER WALLACE, M.S., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World
FRANCIS DUDLEY WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical World
OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Psychology
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Education
COMER VANN WOODWARD, Ph.D., History
DEAN AMORY WORCESTER, Ph.D., Education

STUDENT ASSISTANTS

LEWIS BNERNE, M.S., Biology
THOMAS BYRD FOARD, JR., B.S., Bacteriology
JOHN HALLIDAY, B.S., Physics
ERNEST MATELLE HODNETT, M.S., Chemistry
KENNETH HORTON, A.B., English
HALLEY B. LEWIS, B.S., Library
MANUEL DIAZ RAMIREZ, B.A., Education
KARL ZINK, A.B., English





112 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADMISSION

Students who give evidence of being able to profit by college work will be admitted
to the University of Florida Summer Session. It should be noted, however, that NO
CREDIT will be allowed unless our specific admission requirements are satisfied. These
requirements are:
1. For students who are entering college for the first time.
See Admission to the General College.
2. For students who are transferring from another institution and who expect
to receive a degree or diploma from the University of Florida.
Official transcripts sent directly to the Registrar from all institutions
previously attended. (Teachers' certificates or transcripts presented
by students will not suffice.)
3. For students who regularly attend another college or university and who
are attending the University of Florida Summer Session only for the purpose
of securing credits to be transferred to the institution regularly attended.
A statement of Honorable Dismissal from the institution last at-
tended. (Blanks for this purpose may be secured from the Office
of the Registrar, 110 Language Hall.)
4. For students who wish to enter the College of Law.
See Admission to the College of Law.
It is the student's responsibility to supply the proper credentials as outlined in num-
bers 1, 2, 3, or 4 above. NO TRANSCRIPTS FOR COLLEGE CREDIT WILL BE
ISSUED FOR ANY PERSON FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE ABOVE.
Students who have previously attended the University of Florida may continue in
the college in which they were registered. Transfer students with at least 64 acceptable
semester hours credit of advanced standing may be admitted to one of the colleges or
professional schools of the University.
All other students register regularly in the General College.

ADMISSION TO THE GENERAL COLLEGE

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the General
College:
1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required, although
no specific high school units are required.
2. Consistency of the high school record.
3. Achievement in high school.
4. Personal qualities.
5. Recommendation of high school principal.
6. Standing on Placement Tests.
All applicants should submit the Application Blank at the back of this bulletin, and
in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent to the Registrar. The
latter may be secured from high school principals of the State. Applicants for admission
from other states may secure an Application for Admission blank by writing the Registrar.
The Placement Tests will be given at 1 P.M., Saturday, June 10, in 106 Agriculture
Building. All applicants for admission to the General College are required to take these
tests before registration.





GENERAL INFORMATION


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW
Applicants for admission to the College of Law must be eighteen years of age and
must have received a bachelor's degree in a college or university of approved standing,
or must have fully satisfied the academic requirements for a degree in a combined course
at the University of Florida. The College of Arts and Sciences and the College of
Business Administration offer such a course. Evidence of this work must be presented
to the Registrar of the University on or before the date on which the applicant wishes
to register.
During the summer session, students in good standing in any member school of the
Association of American Law Schools will be admitted as students but not as candidates
for degrees unless our entrance requirements are met.


GENERAL INFORMATION
SPECIAL CONFERENCES IN ADMINISTRATION
The annual summer conference for county superintendents will be held Mon-
day, Tuesday, and Wednesday, June 19, 20, and 21.
A special summer conference for all high school and elementary principals
and others interested in school administration in Florida will be held Monday,
Tuesday, and Wednesday, June 19, 20, and 21.
A number of prominent speakers will appear on both conference programs
and topics of immediate interest to school people of the state are being scheduled
for discussion.
ENTERTAINMENTS AND PLAYS
Adequate facilities for entertainments and plays are provided in the University Audi-
torium, which has a seating capacity of approximately 1800. In addition to the main
University Auditorium, the auditoriums in Florida Union and in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School will be available. Stress is placed upon performances by the students in plays
and musical entertainments being produced from time to time by the staffs of the depart-
ments of Speech and Music.
RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The moral and religious atmosphere of the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading
religious denominations have attractive places of worship, and students are welcomed at
every service. Transportation to and from church is provided for students who will
attend. Frequent devotional services are held in the University Auditorium in connection
with the Student Assembly.
THE FLORIDA UNION BUILDING
The Florida Union is operated as an official social center for the campus. Reading,
recreation, and lounging rooms will supply adequate facilities for social activities and for
comfortable relaxation.
THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
All students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly, which
will be held in the University Auditorium at hours scheduled below. Important announce-
ments will be made at the General Assembly, for the observance of which students will
be held responsible. 8:30 A.M. Wednesday, June 14
8:30 A.M. Wednesday, June 14
10:00 A.M. Wednesday, June 28
8:30 A.M. Wednesday, July 26
10:00 A.M. Wednesday, August 9





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SOCIETIES AND CLUBS
PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University
in 1912. To be eligible for membership, a student must previously have earned at the
University at least thirty semester hours credit, must have been guilty of no serious
breaches of discipline, and must stand among the upper tenth of all candidates for degrees.
Candidates for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor point average
of at least 2.00 on all scholastic work. If a student comes within the quota for his college,
an average of 2.00 assures his eligibility, but if he does not come within the quota, it is
necessary that he have an average of 2.30 or higher.

KAPPA DELTA PI
Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary education fraternity, in which only juniors and seniors
in the College of Education are eligible for membership.

KAPPA PHI KAPPA
Kappa Phi Kappa is an honorary professional education fraternity for men. Students
enrolled in the College of Education with an honor point average of 1.5 are eligible for
membership.
PHI BETA KAPPA
Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the University of Florida in 1938.
It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in 1776. In conformity with the national
objectives of the society, the University of Florida chapter restricts election to the College
of Arts and Sciences. Not more than 10% of the senior class graduating in each semester,
including both graduating classes of summer session, is eligible for election.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Florida Union,
Peabody Hall and Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are
responsible for all announcements made in the General Assembly, on the official bulletin
boards, and in the Orange and Blue Bulletin.

ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN
An official mimeographed bulletin is published each day during the Summer Session.
It appears on all bulletin boards and carries notices of changes in schedule, meetings,
lost and found articles, etc. Students and faculty members should read the Bulletin daily.

THE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU
The Employment Bureau of the College of Education attempts to render a public ser-
vice. This is not mere mechanical routine of finding teaching positions for graduates;
the Bureau considers the welfare of the school concerned, and tries to get the right person
in the right teaching position.
There is no service fee for University graduates. Students who wish the help of the
Bureau may arrange an interview with the Director and submit complete credentials. On
request this information is sent to school officials of the State.
Many specific requests are received from district trustees and county school boards.
Every effort is made to furnish these officials with information that will enable them
to select the teachers most likely to succeed in the schools concerned.
Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the Director of
the Teachers' Employment Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville.





GENERAL INFORMATION


LABORATORY SCHOOL

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School will conduct demonstration classes in the elementary
grades and the kindergarten during the first term of the Summer Session. Provision will
be made for four groups: kindergarten, combined first and second grades, combined third
and fourth grades, combined fifth and sixth grades. Application for enrollment should
be sent to the Director of the Laboratory School as soon as possible, since the number
who may be accommodated is limited.
Registration of pupils will be held in Room 120 Yonge Building, Monday morning,
June 12 from 8:30-12:00. Classes will begin Tuesday, June 13, at 9 A.M.
There are no fees charged for registration.

P. K. YONGE SCHOOL LIBRARY
The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School library will be open both terms for use of teachers
attending the Summer Session. This library contains about 4,000 books for boys and girls
from the kindergarten through the twelfth grade. These books are available for use in
the library and may not be checked out.
In the room adjoining the library is a collection of books known as the Library, Florida
State Department of Public Instruction. These books have been donated by publishers
and include texts, professional books, and library books. Many new and useful books are
available to teachers for examination.
The materials from both collections may be examined at the following hours: 8:30 A.M.
to 12:00 noon, 1:30 to 5:00 P.M., daily except Saturday, and 9 A.M. to 12 noon Saturday.
The librarian will post hours when she will be available for conferences on individual
library problems. Teachers and principals are invited to ask for whatever help they
may need.
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
Four libraries on the campus make up the University Library system-the Main Library,
the libraries of the Experiment Station, the Law College, and the P. K. Yonge School.
The Main Library building houses over 100,000 books. It has two large reading rooms.
Those books assigned for reading in the General College and for Upper-Division students
are in the Reading Room on the ground floor. In the Reading Room on the second floor
are the current magazines, the books of reference, and the card catalog. In the book stack
there are forty-eight carrels for the use of graduate students in their research work.

STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY

For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University,
funds may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of twenty-five cents is made
on each account, per term.

LOAN FUNDS

The Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of women students
through the establishment of certain loan funds-the Florida State Scholarship Fund, the
College Girls' Club Scholarship Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan Fund, the
R. A. Gray Loan Fund, the Doyle E. Carlton Loan Fund, and the Harold Colee Loan Fund.
Loans are governed by the following regulations.
(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school.
(3) Applicant must be in need of aid.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


(4) Applicant must apply for loan at least two weeks before opening of a Summer Term.
(5) Application must be made directly to the Director of the Summer Session.
(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in which she is
teaching at the time of application.
(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at the University of Florida Summer Session.
(8) Loans are made for a period not to exceed nine months.
(9) Loans bear interest at the rate of 6%, which is added to the principal fund.
Upon application to the Director of the Summer Session, blank forms for application
for a scholarship loan will be furnished.

CERTIFICATES

GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES
Graduates of the University are granted Graduate State Certificates without further
examination, provided that three-twentieths of their work has been devoted to professional
training and provided that they have satisfied the requirement of the law as to familiarity
with the Constitution of the United States. It is well for the student to note that a
Graduate State Certificate permits him to teach only those subjects that are listed on
such certificate, and that only those subjects will be placed on his certificate in which
he has specialized in his college course. This will ordinarily mean that a subject must
have been pursued for at least three years in college, in addition to credit for all high
school courses offered in that subject by a standard high school, before a certificate to
teach such subject will be granted. The student who expects to meet the requirements
for specialization should familiarize himself with the regulations regarding specialization
as printed in the Handbook for Teachers, Section 1, latest edition, published by the State
Department of Public Instruction. Applicants for the Graduate State Certificate must
apply to Superintendent Colin English, Tallahassee, for application blanks and further
information.
Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by "presenting
satisfactory evidence of having taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under
a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of three holders of Life State,
Life Graduate State, or Life Professional Certificates". Application for a Life Graduate
State Certificate must be filed before the expiration of the Graduate State Certificate.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES

The following more important items govern the granting of extension of certificates:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended
and at the time formal application for extension is made.
2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no grade
is below a "C". At least one-third of this work must be in professional
subjects.
3. Courses in Education and all other courses which definitely apply toward
meeting the requirements for a diploma or a degree are counted as profes-
sional subjects.
4. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply
for the same on the student Registration Card. In case the student fails to
apply on the Registration Card at time of registration, request may be made
to the Registrar, Room 110, Language Hall, to have his application for
extension properly recorded. A list of those who have applied will be





TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 117

posted on the bulletin boards in Language Hall and Peabody Hall not later
than July 1 for the First Term and August 10 for the Second Term. In
case of error in this list, students should report to the Registrar. No student
will be recommended for extension whose name does not appear on this
list by July 13 for the First Term or August 17 for the Second Term. Stu-
dents should indicate exactly the name that appears on the certificate which
they wish to have extended.
5. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to Colin
English, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida,
within a year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension
will not be granted.


SPECIAL COURSES FOR AGRICULTURAL TEACHERS

The following special courses are to be offered at Camp O'Leno during the first three
weeks of the Second Summer Term:
As. 414-Land Use Planning and Program Development
En. 565-Problems in Agricultural Education
En. 566-Problems in Agricultural Education
En. 567-Problems in Agricultural Education

These courses are open only to those students who have a bachelor's degree in Agricul-
tural Education, or its equivalent. Registration for these courses will be at the University
of Florida on the morning of July 24 and students are expected to report that afternoon
for class work at Camp O'Leno.


COURSES IN TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL AND
DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION, DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA

Under the joint sponsorship of the University of Florida and the State Department of
Public Instruction of Florida, a group of undergraduate and graduate courses leading
to a major in Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education will be offered, as an
integral part of the Summer Session, at the Seabreeze High School, Daytona Beach,
Florida.
These courses will be conducted in three terms of three weeks each: June 14 to July 5,
July 5 to July 26, and July 26 to August 16. Classes will meet six days a week two
hours a day. The maximum load a student will be permitted to carry is four semester
hours.
This service is offered primarily for Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education
teachers and only the following classes of students will be admitted:
1. Those actually engaged in teaching Trade and Industrial and Distributive Educa-
tion or vocational courses subsidized from Smith-Hughes or George-Deen funds;
2. Novice or apprentice teachers meeting all requirements of the State Plan for
Trade and Industrial and Distributive teachers with the exception of the required
amount of teacher training;
3. County superintendents or school administrators exercising control over a sub-
sidized vocational program;





118 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

4. Directors, supervisors, and coordinators of vocational programs subsidized from
Smith-Hughes and George-Deen funds.

No courses other than those technical subjects of value to Trade and Industrial and
Distributive Education teachers will be offered and persons not falling in one of the above
groups will not be admitted.
To receive credit for these courses the regular admission requirements of the University
must be met and the approval of the State Supervisor of Trades and Industrial Education
secured.
Persons interested should request the Bulletin of the School of Trade and Industrial
Education.

EXPENSES

GENERAL FEES
T u ition .................................................................................................. ................................... N one
Registration Fees (Florida Students, load of six credits or less) ......... ..............................$17.50
Registration Fees (Non-Florida Students, load of six credits or less) ........................... 27.50
Registration Fees, College of Law (Florida Students, load of six credits ..................... 27.50
-load of less than six credits $6.00 per credit and $2.50)
Registration Fees, College of Law (Non-Florida Students, load of six credits ................ 37.50
-load of less than six credits $6.00 per credit and $10.00 Non-Florida
Fee and $2.50)
Late R registration Fee ......................... ............................ ............ ..... ............... .......... .... 5.00
Breakage Fee for Biology and Chemistry (unused portion refunded) ................................ 5.00
Extra Hour Fee- for each credit carried above six ...................................... ..................... 1.00
Failure Fee, per credit hour (for General College students see paragraph below) ........ 2.50
(For any course failed since last time registration fees were paid)
Diploma Fee (for candidates for Normal Diploma, Bachelor's, Master's, or
Doctor's degree) ... -.... -.. ....................................... . . .. ........ .............. ..... 5.00

FAILURE FEES AND EXAMINATION FEES FOR GENERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS

In lieu of a reexamination fee, a failure fee is charged for each failing grade a General
College student has received since he last paid registration fees. This fee is assessed
according to the following schedule and must be paid before the student is permitted to
continue in the University:

Each failing grade in C-1, C-2, C-3, C-41, C-42, C-5, or C-6 ................ $5.00
Each semester hour failed in all other courses ...................................... 2.50

A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for each
application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary only in case
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned.
These fees were assessed for the first time beginning with the 1937 Summer Session
and will be assessed at all subsequent registrations.

REFUND OF FEES

Fees paid in advance for room reservations will be refunded up to and including, but
not after June 1, for first term reservations, or July 1 for second term reservations.





ROOMING FACILITIES


If by Wednesday of the first week of each term students for any reason wish to with-
draw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded. No refunds
will be made after this date.


ROOMING FACILITIES

UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES

The University dormitories are reserved for women students during the Summer Ses-
sion. Rooms are rented for the term or session, payable in advance. The dormitories
will be open from June 10 to noon August 27.
Rooms may be reserved at any time by application to the Business Manager. A deposit
of $5 is required with each reservation, payable on or before May 1 for reservations for
the first term, and on or before June 4 for the second term. This deposit is held as
a breakage fee, to be returned at the close of the term if no damage to the room has
been reported.
All bedrooms are furnished with single beds and mattresses, chifforobes or dressers,
study tables and chairs. Students must furnish linen and other things they may require
for their own special comfort and convenience. Easy chairs may be secured at a rental
charge of 50c 1st term, 35c 2nd term.
Students are not permitted to cook in the dormitories.
Students who are assigned rooms in the dormitories may secure special rates, listed
below, if they purchase at least one cafeteria meal ticket per term. These tickets carry
a monetary value of $15.00 and are sold for $14.25. A student is permitted to use them
as he sees fit. Under ordinary circumstances these coupon books will purchase meals
for a period of three to four weeks. The cafeteria rates are the same as those of last
summer notwithstanding the increase in cost of food stuffs.
A description of accommodations in the several dormitories, with rates per student,
follows.
NEW DORMITORY

The New Dormitory is of strictly fireproof construction. Rooms are arranged in suites,
consisting of study and bedroom, and accommodating two students. A limited number
of single rooms and several suites accommodating three students are available. All rooms
are equipped with lavatories and built-in chifforobes. A bathroom with hot and cold
showers, and lavatories, is located on each floor of each section. Thus bathroom facilities
are made available for every four rooms. Rooms in Sections A and G of this dormitory
have been reserved for students under 21 years of age.

RATES
When cafeteria book When cafeteria book
is not secured is secured
1st term 2nd term 1st term 2nd term
Single rooms -First, Second and Third floors.... 15.75 13.25 12.60 10.60
Single rooms -Fourth floor ................................ 15.00 12.50 12.00 10.00
Two room suites-First, Second and Third floors.... 15.00 12.50 12.00 10.00
Two room suites- Fourth floor................................ 12.75 10.75 10.20 8.60





120 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

THOMAS HALL

Sections A, C, D, E, and F have been remodeled throughout. Both single and double
rooms are available. All rooms in Sections A, C, E, and F and the single rooms in
Section D are equipped with lavatories. The rooms in other sections are arranged in
suites consisting of study and bedroom, accommodating three students. A bathroom
with hot and cold showers, and lavatories, is located on each floor of each section. Thus
bathroom facilities are made available for every four rooms.

RATES
When cafeteria book When cafeteria book
is not secured is secured
1st term 2nd term 1st term 2nd term
*Single rooms, Sections C, D, E and F ............... 14.25 12.00 11.40 9.60
*Double rooms, Section D ......................-................... 11.25 9.50 9.00 7.60
*Double rooms, Sections A, C, E and F ............... 12.00 10.00 9.60 8.00
Rooms in Section B ............ ....... ....... .. ...... 9.00 7.50 7.20 6.00
*Remodeled Sections.

Section F will be under rehabilitation during this period.

BUCKMAN HALL

Rooms in Buckman Hall are arranged in suites, consisting of study and bedroom, and
accommodating three students. A bathroom with hot and cold showers, and lavatories, is
located on each floor of each section. Thus bathroom facilities are made available for
every four rooms. Rooms in Section D of this dormitory have been reserved for students
under 21 years of age.
RATES

When cafeteria book When cafeteria book
is not secured is secured
1st term 2nd term 1st term 2nd term
All rooms, exclusive of Section A** ......................... 9.00 7.50 7.20 6.00
**Section A of this dormitory is used for classrooms.

There will be no change made in dormitory rates, under any conditions.

SEE PAGE 165 FOR APPLICATION FOR ROOM RESERVATION.

UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA

The Cafeteria is under the direction of a graduate dietitian, and offers to Summer
Session students high quality food at reasonable prices. The meals are carefully planned,
offering a pleasing variety of foods attractively served.
Many innovations have been made in equipment and methods, resulting in a service
as complete and modern as that found in any school cafeteria in the south.
All service is cafeteria style, affording individual selections. The policy is to furnish
well prepared food at actual cost. Coupon books containing tickets with a monetary value
will be sold at a discount sufficient to warrant their purchase.
Meals may be obtained at the University Cafeteria at the following rates:
$15.00 monetary value coupon ticket ......................................$14.25
5.00 monetary value coupon ticket .................................. 4.75





GENERAL REGULATIONS


OFF CAMPUS ROOMING ACCOMMODATIONS
ROOMING REQUIREMENTS FOR WOMEN STUDENTS

1. In order to complete registration all women students must have a place of residence
approved by the Dean of Students.
2. All women students will live in the dormitories, with the exceptions that graduate
students and others over 21 years of age who have been self-supporting may be permitted
to live in approved rooming houses after making proper arrangements with the Office
of the Dean of Students. Sections A and G of the New Dormitory and Section D of
Buckman Hall have been reserved for students under 21 years of age.
3. Request to live off campus should be made to the Office of the Dean of Students, on
form provided by that office, and will contain the following information: age, record
of employment for past year, address of rooming house in which student wishes to
reside, and reasons why rooming off campus will be of advantage to the student.
4. A list of approved rooming houses will be available at the Office of the Dean of
Students. In order to avoid inconvenience and possible unpleasantness students are
urged to consult this list before making any definite arrangements for a place of resi-
dence off campus.
5. Approved rooming houses will not be allowed to house both men and women except
in the case of married couples, and for these a special list of approved places will
be made.


GENERAL REGULATIONS

The student is advised to procure the University bulletin entitled By-Laws and acquaint
himself with all general regulations. Particular attention is invited to the following items:

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two regular
terms, or one regular term and three summer terms, or five summer terms. New students
offering advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the University.
Students who break their residence at the University by attending another institution for
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University.
2. For the master's degree two regular terms or six summer terms are necessary to
satisfy the residence requirements.
3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (27 for the Normal
Diploma; 28 in the College of Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during
regular residence in the college from which the student is to be graduated. Exception
to this regulation may be made only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the
college concerned, but in no case may the amount of extension work permitted exceed
more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required for a baccalaureate degree.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED

No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree
by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be allowed to take
more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's degree by correspondence
study or extension class work. No person will be allowed to take more than 9 credits by





122 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

correspondence during the summer vacation period. While in residence, a student will
not be allowed to take work by correspondence without the consent of the dean of the
college concerned. This will be granted only in exceptional cases. Candidates for the
Normal Diploma may not take more than 16 credits by correspondence and extension. In
the College of Arts and Sciences no extension work is permitted in the last thirty hours,
except by special permission.

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
1939 SUMMER SESSION
The minimum load of any student in a summer term is four hours.
The maximum load, including work by correspondence and extension, shall be regulated
according to the following schedule:
Maximum Load
Honor Point Average for Previous Term Summer Term
B elow 1 ....................................................... ................................ 6 hours
1 or above ......... ......... ........... ....- -.... ............. ....................... 9 hours
For students who have not previously attended the University of Florida the maximum
load is nine hours.
MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
1940 SUMMER SESSION
Beginning with the 1940 Summer Session:
A. The maximum load for students attending the University of Florida for the
first time shall be six hours, or two courses not to exceed seven hours.
B. The maximum load for students who have previously attended the University of
Florida shall be:
1. For those students who made an honor point average below 3.00 (B) during
their last term in residence at the University, a maximum of six hours, or
two courses not to exceed seven hours.
2. For those students who made an honor point average of 3.00 (B) or higher
during their last term in residence at the University, a maximum of eight
hours, or three courses not to exceed nine hours.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dean of their
college, regarding choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to this,
juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which they expect
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be
dropped or changed only with the approval of the dean of the college in which the student
is registered and by presentation of the cards authorizing the change at the office of the
Registrar.
GRADUATION WITH HONORS
For regulations in the various colleges covering graduation with Honors, see the
Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division.





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The major courses are regularly numbered above 500 and the minors between 300 and
500, but there is no objection to counting a course above 500 in one department as a minor
in another. On the other hand, there are courses numbered 300 and 400 which are not
acceptable as minors.
As a general practice, undergraduate students are not permitted to register for courses
numbered above 500.
A number of courses have already been arranged that may count as majors. Efforts
will be made to arrange still others upon request. If the major work desired is not listed,
requests for it should be made at an early date.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

A candidate for the master's degree must be in residence for at least one scholastic year,
devoting his entire time during this period to study and research. The Summer Session oul
eleven weeks will count as one-third of a year. One-half of this term will be one-sixth
of a year.
Work Required.-The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program with a
definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester hours or the equivalent, at least half
of which shall be in a single field of study and the remainder in related subject matter as
determined by the student's Supervisory Committee. The principal part of the course
work for the master's degree shall be designated strictly for graduates. However, in the
case of related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be offered upon the
approval of the Supervisory Committee.
In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em-
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer.
A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely allied to the major
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. The
thesis itself should be completed and submitted in time to allow an interval of three
full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the summer term.
The requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the discretion
of the student's Supervisory Committee.
The passing grade for graduate students is B.
The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from the time
of first registering for graduate work. For summer session students this means seven
summers.
For requirements for the Ph.D. degree and other information in regard to graduate work
see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

A few courses will be offered by the College of Agriculture each term. Special emphasis
is placed on technical agricultural subjects. Non-agricultural subjects required for the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture may be taken in departments of other colleges.





124 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Bible, biology, chemistry, English, French, geology, German, Greek, history, journalism,
Latin, mathematics, pharmacy, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, sociology,
Spanish and speech are the subject matter fields of the College of Arts and Sciences. The
College operates in each term. Most of the departments offer basic courses in the Summer
Session, and many of them offer advanced courses. In addition to work in the fields named
above, students enrolled in the College may study courses in bacteriology, botany, eco-
nomics and education.
Inasmuch as most of the subjects taught in the public schools are continued on the
college level by departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, this college is of particular
service to teachers of the State. Others who profit particularly by the operation of the
College of Arts and Sciences in the Summer Session are students of the College who wish
either to make up deficiencies or to hasten graduation, students of other collegiate institu-
tions and of other colleges of the University who wish to complete basic arts and sciences
requirements or electives, and men and women who spend their vacations in attendance
at the University for the purpose of securing new points of view and renewed intellectual
vigor.
Students who do not intend to earn degrees in this college may enroll subject to the
University Admission Regulations (p. 112). Every effort will be made to cooperate with
such students in arranging programs of study which will be of greatest advantage and
help to them.
CURRICULA IN ARTS AND SCIENCES
The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, and Bachelor of Science in
Pharmacy. The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy
is administered by the Director of the School of Pharmacy. (See School of Pharmacy
below.) The other curricula are administered by the Dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences. Only students who have completed the General College or its equivalent (as
determined by the Board of Examiners and approved by the Dean of the College) are
eligible to enter the curricula and become candidates for degrees.

MAJORS

The College offers two kinds of majors in the curricula leading to the degrees of
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. All majors include the requirement of a read-
ing knowledge of a foreign language or 6 semester credit hours in a foreign language in
courses numbered above 100.
One of the two kinds of majors is called a Departmental Major. A departmental
major includes a concentration of not less than 24 and not more than 32 semester credit
hours in one subject-matter field.* It also includes such subsidiary courses from other
subject-matter fields as are essential to thoroughness and comprehension.
The other type of major is called a Group Major. A group major includes, in
addition to the foreign language, courses from related subject-matter fields with at least
4 semesters of creditable work in one of the fields and not more than 6 semesters in any
single field.
The student's major now includes the essential related subjects, and he is not required
to earn separate minors.

*No courses will be counted toward fulfillment of this requirement in which the grade earned
is below C.





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Every student who wishes to be a candidate for one of these degrees should read
carefully the description of requirements on pages 317-319 of the Bulletin of Information
for the Upper Division 1938-39.
The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the specified
requirements and whose majors center in one or more of the fields of ancient languages,
bible, English. French, German, history, journalism, philosophy, political science, sociol-
ogy, Spanish and speech. Similarly, the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred
upon those who fulfill the specified requirements and whose majors center in one or more
of the fields of biology, botany, chemistry and physics. Some students who major in
mathematics or in psychology receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts while others receive
the degree of Bachelor of Science, the degree being determined by the direction of the
student's interests and accomplishments in his major work.

THE PRE-LAW COURSE

In cooperation with the College of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences offers the
pre-law course. This course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or to the degree
of Bachelor of Science upon completion of the first full year of the law course (28 semester
credit hours and 28 honor points), and to the degree of Bachelor of Laws upon completion
of the law course. For students who make adequate scholastic progress it is possible to
earn the academic and law degrees in six years, of which two years are spent in the
General College, one in the College of Arts and Sciences, and three in the College of Law.

PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES

Students who upon graduation from the General College have not completed require-
ments for admission to the medical and dental schools may continue and complete their
pre-professional training in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student should select
courses in accordance with requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes
to enter, and should correspond with the dean of that school for information and advice.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The College of Business Administration operates during the Summer Session as during
the regular terms. The courses offered appeal to students attending the regular terms
who wish to return during the Summer Session, and to teachers and others who wish to
take courses to prepare for teaching commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare
for teaching social sciences.
DEGREES AND CURRICUL

The College of Business Administration offers two types of curricula leading to the
degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration: the Curriculum in Business
Administration Proper, and the Curriculum in Combination with Law.

ADMISSION

To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for the Curriculum in
Business Administration Proper, or the Curriculum in Combination with Law, students are
required to present a certificate of graduation from the General College and to have com-
pleted the following courses:





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CEs. 13.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life
CEs. 15.-Elementary Statistics
CBs. 14.-Elementary Accounting
One additional half-year elective course in the General College.
These courses may be taken for C-7, C-8, and C-9 electives in the General College during
the second year.

THE CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR
OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The maximum credit load of all students registered for the curriculum in Business
Administration proper during each of their first two semesters (first year) shall be 15
academic semester hours (6 in summer session) to which advanced military science may
be added. However, these students may increase their credit loads to 18 academic semester
hours (9 in summer session) during their first semester, to which advanced military science
may be added, provided they have graduated from the General College with honors; like-
wise, they may increase their credit loads to 18 academic semester hours (9 in summer
session) during their second semester, to which military science may be added, provided
they have attained an honor point average of 2 or more in the preceding semester. The
maximum credit load of all students after their first two semesters is limited to 18 academic
semester hours to which military science may be added. The minimum requirement for
graduation from the College of Business Adiministration is 66 semester hours with 66 honor
points. To graduate with honors, a student must have graduated from the General College
with honors and completed 66 semester hours on which he has earned 132 honor points,
or in lieu of graduation from the General College with honors, have completed 66 semester
hours on which he has earned 165 honor points. To graduate with high honors, a student
must meet the requirements for graduation with honors and, in addition, demonstrate his
ability to do independent work and to pass satisfactorily a comprehensive examination on
all his courses in business administration. A copy of detailed regulations governing grad-
uation with high honors may be obtained from the Office of the Dean.
Of the 66 semester credit hours required for graduation, not more than six semester
credit hours may be earned by correspondence or extension study. Such credit hours,
furthermore, must be approved for each individual student in advance by the Committee
on Curricular Adjustments.

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER

Junior Year
Courses First Semester Credits Courses Second Semester Credits
Bs. 311 -Accounting Principles ............ 3 Es. 322 -Financial Organization of
Es. 321 Financial Organization of Society .... ............................. 3
Society .................................. 3 Es. 335 Economics of Marketing ........ 3
Es. 327 Public Finance .......................... 3 Es. 351 -Transportation Prin. .......... 3
Bs. 401 Business Law ........................ 3 Bs. 402 Business Law ............. ............ 3
*Electives ............ .... ................... 3 *E lectives .... ....... . ... ......... 3
15 15
Senior Year
Es. 407 -Economic Principles and Es. 408 --Economic Principles and
Problem s .................................. 3 P problem s .............. ...... ........... 3
*E lectives .................................... 15 *Electives ............ .............. 15
18 18
*Electives are limited to courses in business administration and six semester hours in advanced
military science.





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 127

THE CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The College of Business Administration combines with the General College and the
College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately
to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first two years in the General
College and the third year in the College of Business Administration. When they have
fully satisfied the academic requirements of the College of Business Administration, they
are eligible to register in the College of Law and may during their last three years com-
plete the course in the College of Law. When students have, after entering the College
of Law, completed one year's work in law (28 semester hours and 28 honor points), they
may offer this year's work as a substitute for the fourth year in the College of Business
Administration and receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.
The maximum credit load for all students registered for the curriculum in combination
with law is 18 academic semester hours (9 in summer session), to which may be added
advanced military science. To graduate with honors, a student must have graduated from
the General College with honors and completed 70 semester hours on which he has earned
140 honor points, or in lieu of graduation from the General College with honors, complete
70 semester hours on which he has earned 175 honor points.
The curriculum in business administration in combination with law consists of 30
semester hours of required courses and 12 hours of elective courses. The requirements
are as follows:
Course Credits
Bs. 311 Accounting Principles ............................................................. 3
Es. 321-322 -Financial Organization of Society ............................... 6
Es. 327 Public Finance ......................................................................... 3
Es. 335 Economics of Marketing .............. --.................... .................. 3
Es. 351 Transportation Principles ..................................................... 3
Es. 407-408 -Economic Principles and Problems ..................................... 6
Es. 404 -Government Control of Business ......................................... 3
Es. 454 -Principles of Public Utility Economics ............................. 3
*E lectives ..................................................................................... 12
42

*Electives are limited to courses in business administration and six semester hours in advanced
military science.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
For admission to the College of Education all students will be required to present a
certificate of graduation from the General College, or its equivalent, and have the approval
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division will, according to the
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of
graduation With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors,
the student should consult the Dean of the College.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA
Only two degrees are offered in the College of Education-Bachelor of Arts in Education
and Bachelor of Science in Education.*

*For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the major must be in one of the Natural
Sciences.





128 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

For either degree the student is required to complete 60 semester hours, with 60 honor
points. In every case, the student must complete at least 24 semester hours in a subject
or field of concentration, to be eligible for graduation.
Students completing the prescribed course may obtain the Normal Diploma.

CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA
Graduation from the General College.
A total of 30 credits in the College of Education including:
{En. 121-Language Arts
or
En. 124-Teaching of Arithmetic
En. 122-Teaching of Reading
{En. 201-Teaching of Social Sciences
or
En. 221-Remedial and Directed Reading
{En. 207-Educational Psychology
or
En. 385-The Individual and Education
En. 209--Teaching of Elementary Science
SEn. 253-Directed Observation
or
En. 308-Elementary School Curriculum
En. 387-Health Education
Methods and Materials in Physical Education ................ 2 credits
Public School A rt ................................ ... ...................................... 4 credits
School Music .................................. 4 credits
Handwriting 101 ........................ ..... ................ 0 credits

CURRICULUM IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
Graduation from the General College.
A total of 60 credits in the College of Education including:
{En. 121-Language Arts
or
En. 124-Teaching of Arithmetic
En. 122-Teaching of Reading
{En. 201-Teaching of Social Sciences
or
En. 221-Remedial and Directed Reading
{En. 207-Educational Psychology
or
En. 385-The Individual and Education
En. 209-Teaching of Elementary Science
{En. 253-Directed Observation
or
En. 308 -Elementary School Curriculum
En. 387-Health Education

Methods and Materials in Physical Education ............................. 2 credits
Public School A rt ............................................................ 4 credits
School M usic ........................ ........................... ...... ... ............... 4 credits
H handwriting 101 ................. .....................- ..... ........................ .... 0 credits

Elective to make a grand total of 60 credits in the Upper Division.





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 129

CURRICULUM IN SECONDARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE NORMAL DIPLOMA

Graduation from the General College.
A total of 30 credits in the College of Education, including:

CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
SEn. 207-Educational Psychology
or
En. 385-The Individual and Education
En. 305-Development and Organization of Education
En. 317-Tests and Measurements
{En. 319-Child and Adolescent Psychology
or
En. 386-The Individual and Education
*Directed Observation (6 credits)
En. 401-School Administration

CURRICULUM IN SECONDARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

Graduation from the General College.
A total of 60 credits in the College of Education, including:

CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
{En. 207-Educational Psychology
or
En. 385-The Individual and Education
En. 305-Development and Organization of Education
En. 317-Tests and Measurements
{En. 319-Child and Adolescent Psychology
or
En. 386-The Individual and Education
*Directed Observation (6 credits)
En. 401-School Administration
Electives to make a grand total of 60 credits in the Upper Division.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTAIN GROUPS

For additional admission requirements and curricula in Health and Physical Education,
Agricultural Education, and Industrial Arts Education, see the Bulletin of Information
for the General College and Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division.

THE GENERAL COLLEGE

The General College has been organized to administer the work of the freshman and
sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning students will register in
this College.
The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College in two
years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter time, and others
may find it necessary to remain in the General College for a longer period.

*En. 323 may count for 3 credits for graduation but will not be counted as directed observation
for purposes of certification.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this program the
University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all students. To this founda-
tion that has meaning and significance to the student, he may add the special training of
the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, or drop out of the University
with something definite and helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen. The purposes
of the General College are as follows:

1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the guidance
needed by all students. Thus the choice of professional work is postponed
until the student is better acquainted with his capacity and disposition to
undertake work that will be profitable to himself and society.
2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing for
advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division,
thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization.
3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give to
college training, and consequently should concern themselves with general
viewpoints and major understandings, instead of with introductions to special
subject matter fields which they may never enter.
4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general
education incident to the changing conditions of modern life. The subject
matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation are to be con-
stantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the student, to stimulate his
intellectual curiosity, to encourage independent study, and to cultivate the
attitudes necessary for enlightened citizenship.
5. Guidance. Every part of the General College program is designed to
guide students. It was felt that too much of the freshman and sophomore
work of former years had little meaning and significance to the vast majority.
The material studied was preparatory and foundational, and became mean-
ingful only when the student pursued additional courses in the junior and
senior years. The material of the comprehensive courses is selected and
tested with guidance as a primary function. While, of necessity, we must
look forward to distant goals, the General College is trying to present
materials that are directly related to life experiences and will immediately
become a part of the student's thinking and guide him in making correct
"next steps". Thus the whole program-placement tests, progress reports,
vocational aptitude tests, selected material in the comprehensive courses,
student conferences, provisions for superior students, adjustment for individual
differences, election privileges, and comprehensive examinations-are all parts
of a plan designed to guide students.
Thus guidance is not attempted at one office by one individual with a
small staff. The whole drive of the General College program is one of direct-
ing the thinking of the student. While the necessary correlation and unifica-
tion is attempted at the General College Office, throughout the General College
period students consult upper division deans and department heads to discuss
future work. During the last month of each school year these informal con-
ferences are concluded by a scheduled formal conference, at which each
student fills out a pre-registration card for the coming year.





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 131

COLLEGE OF LAW

The purpose of the College of Law is to impart a thorough scientific and practical
knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the opportunities in
this field. Since 1927 the College has operated during the Summer Session. Courses
offered during the regular terms are rotated. Some courses not given during the regular
terms are offered in the Summer Session. The variety of courses is sufficient to enable
students of different types to carry a full load, and appeal to a wide range of students.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

Professional courses are offered by the School of Pharmacy every alternate summer
session. It is intended that these may be so rotated that courses of major interest are
offered during the course of several summers.
While professional courses will not be offered during the summer of 1939, foundation
courses required for admission to the pharmacy curriculum and related courses such as
bacteriology, biology and chemistry may be taken during the summer session.
Graduate students may find courses available in minor fields such as biology, bacteri-
ology and chemistry. Consult the Director of the School of Pharmacy for further
information.





132 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

First Term

All classes ordinarily meet for one hour and twenty minutes. Classes scheduled to
meet daily meet Monday through Friday.
Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with no
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule.

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES

Comprehensive examinations for General College students in C-1. C-2, C-3, C-5, and
C-6 will be given and will cover the work of both terms. Students should consult official
announcements of the Board of University Examiners for details. Credits are indicated
for the benefit of Upper Division students who elect these courses.

C-11.-Man and the Social World. 4 credits. (Designated as C-la, 1937.)
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 M. W. F. Sc-211. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 8:30 T. Th. and 2:30 W. La-201. MATHERLY.
11 8:30 T. Th. and 2:30 W. Pe-101. CHACE.
12 8:30 T. Th. and 2:30 W. Pe-4. MACLACHLAN.
13 8:30 T. Th. and 2:30 W. Pe-2. MILLER.
14 8:30 T. Th. and 2:30 W. Pe-10. BENTLEY.
Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems of the
modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in education,
in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective
coordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny is made
of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that a
consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved.
CEs. 13.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life (See Economics).
CHy. 13.-History of the Modern World (See History).
CPI. 13.-Political Foundations of Modern Life (See Political Science).
CBs. 14.-Elementary Accounting (See Economics).
CEs. 15.-Elementary Statistics (See Economics).
C-21.-Man and the Physical World. 4 credits. (Designated as C-2a, 1937.)
Lecture Section 1: 7 T. Th. and 1 W. Bn-203. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 7:00 M. W. F. Bn-205. WILLIAMS.
11 7:00 M. W. F. Bn-201. EHRMANN.
12 8:30 T. Th. F. Bn-205. WILLIAMS.
An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular reference to
man's immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to explain the
more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of
them; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize physical
materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry,
astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential
unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 133

CMs. 23.-Basic Mathematics (See Mathematics).
C-31.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits. (Designated as C-3a, 1937.)
Lecture Section 1: 7 M. W. F. Sc-208. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 2:30 Daily. La-203. MORRIS.
11 2:30 Daily. La-210. STROUP.
12 2:30 Daily. La-212. CONGLETON.
Writing Laboratory: 101 8:30 M. W. F. La-209. MORRIS,
102 10:00 M. W. F. La-209. A.A.MURPHREE,-- .
103 11:30 M. W. F. La-209. MORRIS, A. A. MURPHREE.
Designed to furnish the training in reading, speaking, and writing necessary for the student's
work in college and for his life thereafter. This training will be provided through practice and
counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking, in fundamentals of form and style,
in extension of vocabulary, and in control of the body and voice in speaking. Students will be
encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their interests and increasing their apprecia-
tion of literature.
CEh. 33.-Effective Writing. 3 credits. (Designated as C-3D, 1937.) 10
daily. La-311. SKAGGS. (Conference to be arranged.) Prerequisite: C-3, or
permission of C-3 Course Chairman. Open to Upper Division students.
Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and
clear but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Students are encouraged to do creative work.
CFh. 33.-Reading of French (See French).
CSh. 33.-Reading of Spanish (See Spanish).
CSc. 33.-Effective Speaking (See Speech).
C-41.-Man and His Thinking. 3 credits. (Designated as C-4A, 1937.) 10
daily. La-201. LITTLE.
Both in private life and vocational life man is faced with the necessity of making decisions
and of solving problems. The principal aims are (1) to develop ability to think with greater
accuracy and thoroughness, and (2) to develop ability to evaluate the thinking of others. The
material used applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is used to insure
practice, and numerous exercises are assigned.
C-51.-The Humanities. 4 credits. (Designated as C-5a, 1937.)
Lecture Section 1: 7 M. W. F. and 1 T. Th. Auditorium. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 8:30 M. W. F. Ag-104. C. MURPHREE.
11 10:00 M. W. F. Ag-104. C. MURPHREE.
An attempt is made to help the student lay a broad foundation for cultured living. While
it is impossible to provide an adequate survey of the broad field, immediate help is given in attain-
ing desirable understandings, attitudes, and dispositions. Students react every day to all culture;
material is therefore presented from this and past civilizations to condition this reaction. Even
though culture is thought of as timeless, ageless, and not belonging to any particular nation or
people, the course concerns itself largely with the culture of the Western World.
C-61.-Man and the Biological World. 4 credits. (Designated as C-6a, 1937.)
Lecture Sections: 1 7 M. T. Th. F. and 7 P.M. T. Sc-101. SHERMAN.
2 10 T. W. Th. F. and 7 P.M. T. Sc-101. SHERMAN.
Discussion Sections: 10 11:30 T. Th. Sc-101. WALLACE.
11 2:30 T. Th. Sc-101. WALLACE.
20 8:30 M. W. Sc-201. WALLACE.
21 2:30 M. W. Sc-101. WALLACE.
Designed to give the student a general knowledge and appreciation of the world of living
things. The biological problems and principles that are associated with the organism's role as:
(1) a living individual, (2) a member of the race. (3) a product of evolutionary processes,
and (4) a member of a socially and economically interrelated complex of living organisms, supplies
the main sequence and material of the course. Especial attention is given to man's place in the
organic world and to human qualities that have a biological basis.





134 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

As. 308.-Marketing. 7 daily. Ht-215. (Laboratory to be arranged.) 3
credits. HAMILTON.
Principles of marketing agricultural commodities; produce exchanges and future trading;
auction companies; market finance; market news; marketing of cattle, hogs, milk, cotton and
tobacco. One or two field trips at an estimated cost of $4 each, to be paid by the student at
the time trips are made.
As. 405.-Agricultural Prices. 10 daily. Ht-215. (Laboratory to be ar-
ranged.) 3 credits. HAMILTON.
Prices of farm products and the factors affecting them.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

Al. 314.-Livestock Judging. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. and 3-5 M. W. Nutrition
Laboratory. 3 credits. CROWN.
Special training in livestock judging; show ring methods; class contests in judging.

BACTERIOLOGY

Bcy. 301.-General Bacteriology. 8:30 M. T. Th. F. Sc-101. Laboratory 1-4
M. T. Th. F. Sc-104. 4 credits. CARROLL.
Morphology, physiology, cultivation and identification of bacteria, yeasts and molds. Applica-
tion to health problems.
*Bcy. 304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology. 10 T. W. Th. F. Sc-111. Laboratory 1-4
M. T. W. F. Sc-2. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: General Bacteriology.
Isolation, cultivation of disease producing micro-organisms; special technique for diagnostic
tests; theories and principles of immunity.

BIBLE

Be. 305.-How to Understand the Bible. 8:30 daily. Sc-206. 3 credits.
JOHNSON.
The development of Biblical literature and the evolution of six fundamental ideas; God, Man,
Right and Wrong, Suffering, Fellowship, Immortality, as seen in the Bible.
Be. 404.-The Prophets of Israel. 7 daily. Sc-206. 3 credits. JOHNSON.
The background and message of the creative personalities in Hebrew and Jewish religious
life; the relation of prophetic thought to present day problems; the study of a great religious
movement and how it affected ethics, morality and religion.

BIOLOGY

Bly. 33.-The Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 8:30 daily. Sc-12. 3
credits. HUBBELL.
Designed to provide a recognition of and an acquaintance with some of the more common
animals and plants of Florida. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question,
"What animal-or what plant-is this ?".
Bly. 61.-Laboratory in General Biology. 1-5 daily. Sc-10. 2 credits. HUB-
BELL.
Elective for students who are taking or have taken C-6 in the General College. Satisfactory
completion of Bly. 61 together with a final standing in the upper half of C-6 will be accepted
as a satisfactory prerequisite for second year courses in Biology.


*Either Bcy. 304 or Bty. 102 will be offered depending upon the demand.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 135

Bly. 209.-Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Sc-111.
Laboratory 1-5 M. T. W. Th. Sc-107. 4 credits. HUBBELL. Prerequisite: Bly.
61 or Bly. 101.
The morphology and classification of chordate animals.
Bly. 411.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. 2, 3, or 5 credits. HUB-
BELL, BYERS. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.
Qualified students may choose a topic or problem for study.

BOTANY

"Bty. 102.-General Botany. 10 T. W. Th. F. Sc-111. Laboratory 1-4 M. T.
W. F. Sc-2. 4 credits. CARROLL.
Morphology, structure and systematic study of the common flowering plants. Suited to the
needs of science and nature-study teachers.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Courses in Business Administration are listed under Economics and are marked Bs.

BUSINESS EDUCATION

Note: The professionalized subject matter courses in shorthand and typewriting are open
only to students preparing to be commercial teachers. They are not counted as
electives in Education. No one will be permitted to audit these courses.

Business English.-Students who need this requirement for certification in
commercial subjects should take CEh. 33.
BEn. 91.-Elementary Shorthand. 2:30 daily. Yn-232. 2 credits. COPELAND.
Introduction to Gregg shorthand by the functional method. This course cannot be taken
simultaneously with BEn. 93.
BEn. 93.-Stenography. 10-1 daily. Yn-232 and Yn-241. 3 credits. COPE-
LAND. Prerequisite: BEn. 82 and BEn. 92, or ability to type at 30 gross words
per minute with 98% accuracy and to take dictation from introductory material
at 60 words per minute.
Review of shorthand principles; development of shorthand vocabulary; development of skill
in dictation and transcription; problems in typing letters and business forms; filing; introduction
to operation of office appliances.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 10 daily. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. W. F.
Ch-230. 4 credits. LEIGH.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and preparation and properties of the common
non-metallic elements and their compounds.
Cy. 201.-Analytical Chemistry. 10 M. T. W. F. Ch-110. Laboratory 1-5
M. T. W. F. Ch-230. 4 credits. HEATH.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection of the
common metals and acid radicals.
*Cy. 262.-Organic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. T.
W. F. Ch-230. 5 credits. LEIGH.
The more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds, chiefly for students in applied biologi-
cal fields. Suitable for premedical students who desire only five hours of organic chemistry.

*Either Bty. 102 or Bey. 304 will be given depending upon the demand.





136 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

*Cy. 301.-Organic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. W.
Ch-230. 4 credits. LEIGH.
Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic compounds.
**Cy. 462.-Photographic Chemistry. To arrange. 3 credits. HEATH. Pre-
requisites: Cy. 262 or 302, college physics or suitable photographic experience.
Theory and practice of photographic materials, processes, and their uses.
**Cy. 516.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. To arrange. 3 credits. HEATH.
Mineral occurrences, preparation, properties, and uses of rare elements, and of their compounds.
Cy. 601.-Chemical Research. No credit. LEIGH and HEATH.


CIVIL ENGINEERING

Cl. 329.-Higher Surveying. 8-9 M. W. F. Hl-302. Laboratory 9-12 and 1-5
M. W. F., 8-12 and 1-5 T. Th. Hl-301. 5 credits. SAWYER. Prerequisite:
Cl. 226.
Field astronomy and hydrographic surveying. Field work: the making of a complete topo-
graphical survey; tests and adjustments of instruments; precise leveling; base line work;
determination of time, latitude, and azimuth; triangulation and traverse; hydrographic surveying
and stream gauging. Drawing room work on balancing surveys, reducing field notes, map
drawing, triangulation, and computations. Students registering for this course may not register
for any other course.

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Note: Courses designated by the letters Es. are Economics courses, those designated by
the letters Bs. are Business Administration courses.

tCEs-131.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 10 daily. Pe-206. 3
credits. TUTTLE. Prerequisite: C-1.
Emphasis on the functioning of the economic system. Economic organization and institutions
as parts of the economic order in their functional capacities. The understanding of economic
principles and processes, especially those relating to value, price, cost, rent, wages, profits, and
interest, insofar as such knowledge is necessary in understanding the economic situation of the
present day. The evaluation of economic forces and processes in terms of their contribution to
social well being. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.
tCBs-141.-Elementary Accounting. 8:30 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. BEIGHTS.
Designed to provide the basic training in accounting.
CEs-15.-Elementary Statistics. 11:30 daily. La-204. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with
such fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture,
psychology, sociology, etc.; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics.
Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.
Bs. 311.-Accounting Principles. 7 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. BEIGHTS.
Prerequisite: CBs-14.
Lectures, discussion, and problems. Principles underlying the preparation of financial state-
ments; brief consideration of the problems of valuation; analysis and interpretation of financial
statements; internal check; financial budgets; and other accounting problems of interest to
management.

*That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand.
**That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand.
tThis course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required.
Students may not take the second term without having had the first term. When the course is
completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may secure six semester
hours credit.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 137

Es. 321.-Financial Organization of Society. 8:30 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits.
TUTTLE.
The field of finance; the institutions providing monetary, banking and other financial services;
interrelationships and interdependence of financial institutions; central banking; government
control of finance; significance of financial organization to the economic system as a whole.

Es. 351.-Transportation Principles. 10 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
The economics of transportation, including railroads, inland waterways, highways, airways,
and pipe lines, specifically with reference to the development of facilities and service; contribu-
tion to social welfare; economic characteristics; regulation; rate principles and structures;
valuation and fair return; discrimination; service; coordination.
Bs. 361.-Property Insurance. Seminar Method. 3 credits. CHACE.
Fire and Marine Insurance.
Es. 372.-Labor Economics. 11:30 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits. CHACE.
Labor problems; insecurity, wages and income, hours, sub-standard workers, industrial con-
flict; attempts to solve labor problems by employees; unionism in its structural and functional
aspects; attempts to solve labor problems by employers; personnel management, employee repre-
sentation, employers' associations; attempts to solve labor problems by state; protective labor
legislation, laws relating to settlement of industrial disputes.
Es. 404.-Government Control of Business. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
ANDERSON.
The control between government and business; history, theory, purposes, extent, policy and
legality of government control, services and agencies which modern governments undertake to
provide for business enterprises.
Es. 407.-Economic Principles and Problems. 8:30 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits.
ELDRIDGE.
Advanced economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic maladjustments
arising from the operation of economic forces.
Bs. 411.-Advanced Accounting. Problems. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
BEIGHTS. Prerequisite: Bs. 312.
Specialized accounting problems; mathematics of accounting; statement of affairs; consign-
ments; installments; ventures; insurance; and other related subjects.
Bs. 422.-Investments. 11:30 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. ELDRIDGE. Pre-
requisite: Es. 321-322.
The nature of investments; investment policies and types of securities; analysis of securities:
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements of
security prices.
Bs. 426.-Banking Systems. Seminar Method. 3 credits. TUTTLE. Prere-
quisite: Es. 321-322.
A study of the development of central banking and its functions; the relationships existing
between central banks and (1) the government, (2) other banks; and an analysis of the banking
systems of the United States, England, France, Germany and Canada in the light of central
banking functions.
Es. 446.-The Consumption of Wealth. 10 daily. La-203. 3 credits. MATH-
ERLY.
An economic analysis of the problems involved in determining the extent and trends of
consumer demand and in the adjustments of productive processes to that demand. Open to
Sophomores.
Es. 454.-Principles of Public Utility Economics. 7 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits.
BIGHAM.
The nature, place and development of public service corporations; types of public control,
valuation and rate making; regulation of service, accounts, reports, and securities; combinations;
public relations; public ownership.





138 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Es. 470.-Business Forecasting. 8:30 daily. La-204. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Prerequisite: CEs-15.
The application of statistical techniques and economic principles to specific problems of
business forecasting. Seasonal variation, trend lines, and multiple correlation analysis. Methods
of forecasting the stock market and the price of important commodities.
Es. 501.-Seminar in Economic Principles and Problems. Seminar Method.
3 credits. MATHERLY. Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and
Problems), or equivalent.
Es. 528.-Problems in Money and Banking. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
TUTTLE. Prerequisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society), or
equivalent.
Critical analysis of monetary standards and central banking control of credit, especially as
they are related to price and business fluctuations.
Es. 530.-Problems in Taxation. Seminar Method. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
Prerequisite: Es. 327 (Public Finance), or equivalent.
The problems of taxation primarily related to the following taxes: general property, income,
business, inheritance, and commodity.
Es. 570.-Problems in Statistics and Business Forecasting. Seminar Method.
3 credits. ANDERSON. Prerequisite: Es. 469-470 (Business Forecasting), or
equivalent.
Critical study of special problems in statistics and business forecasting.

EDUCATION

CEn. 13.-Introduction to Education. 2:30 daily. Sc-205. 3 credits. CUL-
PEPPER.
An attempt is male to foreshadow the field of Education so that the student may see the
whole field before he studies its detailed and technical parts.
En. 121.-Language Arts. 11:30 M. T. W. Th. Bn-208. 2 credits. CRAB-
TREE.
The teaching in the elementary school of written and spoken expression in the light of
experimental findings and modern practice.
En. 122.-Teaching of Reading. Bn-209. 3 credits.
Section 1. 10:00 daily. HOUGH.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. BRISTOW.
Designed primarily to help teachers with reading instruction in the first three grades. The
mechanics of reading. The methods of approach to reading, remedial measures, types of materials
and methods of evaluation.
En. 124.-Teaching Arithmetic. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Bn-209. 2 credits.
HOUGH.
The techniques of teaching those aspects of arithmetic which require more or less formal
study and practice beyond the integrated program.
En. 201.-Teaching of Social Sciences. 7 M. T. Th. F. Bn-208. 2 credits.
CRABTREE.
Methods of teaching geography, history, and civics from the standpoint of human relation-
ships. Designed for the elementary grades.
En. 207.-Educational Psychology. 7 daily. Sc-211. 3 credits. -
Psychology applied to education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc.
En. 209.-Teaching Elementary Science. Yn-142. 2 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 M. T. W. Th. GOETTE.
Section 2. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. GOETTE.
The content of elementary science together with its organization for use both in the integrated
program and in the departmentalized school.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


139


En. 221.-Remedial and Directed Reading. Sc-205. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8:30 daily. BAXTER.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. BAXTER.
Designed primarily for intermediate grade teachers. The techniques of remedial teaching of
those pupils who have found their way into the intermediate grades without the reading adapta-
tion. Work in directed reading for intermediate grade pupils will be outlined and discussed.
En. 253.-Directed Observation. Yn-134. 3 credits. KING and STAFF.
Section 1. 8:30 daily.
Section 2. 10:00 daily.
The flexible organization of this course is designed to meet the individual needs of students
through conferences and directed observation during the class period.
En. 254.-Directed Observation. 11:30 M. F. Yn-134. 1 credit. KING.
Planned for students of En. 253 who desire more intensive work in the same field.
En. 305.-Development and Organization of Education. 7 daily. Sc-205. 3
credits. CULPEPPER.
An attempt to interpret and evaluate present-day education, and to point out possible develop-
ments.
En. 308.-Elementary School Curriculum. 3 credits. Sc-201. LILIAN STEVENS.
Section 1. 10:00 daily.
Section 2. 11:30 daily.
A laboratory course in which the construction and continuity of activity units, utilizing the
projects, will be studied. Each student will be expected to organize materials about activities
appropriate to his particular needs.
En. 317.-Tests and Measurements. 10 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. WOR-
CESTER.
An elementary course to aid the teacher in the use of tests in improvement of instruction
and solution of school problems. One hour of laboratory work per week is required.
En. 318.-Audio-Visual Education. 2:30 M. T. Th. F. Yn-142. 2 credits.
GOETTE.
Designed to aid teachers and administrators in the use of the phonograph, radio, sound and
silent films, prints, slides, and film slides.
En. 319.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. 8:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits.
WORCESTER.
The nature and development of the child from birth to adolescence with reference to Education.
En. 323.-General Methods in High Schools. 11:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits.
HAYGOOD. Prerequisite: En. 207. Corequisite: En. 319.
Current conceptions of secondary school procedures.
En. 371.-The Teaching of Business Education. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Yn-232.
One hour observation M. T. W. to arrange. 3 credits. COPELAND.
Directed observation and interpretation. Objectives, methods, and trends in the teaching of
business education as formulated from observation, reading, and discussion.
En. 500.-Introduction to Educational Research. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Eg-213.
2 credits. MORPHET.
Designed primarily to help gra-'uate students in Education in writing theses. Required
of all students majoring in Education; open to all graduate students.
En. 510.-Foundations of Modern Education. 7 daily. La-201. 3 credits.
W. W. LITTLE.
An attempt to evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors-teacher,
student, curriculum, and educational plant, control and support-back to their beginnings; and
to point out present tendencies and possible developments.
En. 518.-High School Administration. 10 M. T. W. Th. Bn-210. 2 credits.
CAROTHERS.
An intensive study of specific problems in organizing and administering the modern high
school. Special reference will be made to Florida.





140 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

En. 523.-An Introduction to the Graduate Study of Education. 7-10 daily.
Ag-205. 6 credits. NORMAN, OSTRANDER, GRACE A. STEVENS, A. M. LAIRD.
Intended to give a basic understanding and a common outlook of education and its relation
to history, philosophy, sociology, psychology, and economics. A general course on the graduate
level, recommended as the first course for all students working for the degree, Master of Arts in
Education.
En. 528.-Supervision of Instruction. 11:30 M. T. W. Th. Bn-210. 2 credits.
CAROTHERS.
The objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in secondary schools;
the preparation of teachers. Each student completes a minor research.
En. 529.-Florida Workshop: Cooperating Schools Division. To arrange. 6
credits. STONE, BOUTELLE, CUMBEE and others; IRVINE, Consultant.
Designed to provide an organization, materials, and assistance for principals and teachers
of the cooperating schools in the Florida Program for the Improvement of Instruction. Partici-
pants will be responsible for the production of programs that can be used in their school situa-
tions beginning in September 1939. Offered only the first term, this workshop may be taken
as a "course" or workers need not be registered for credit. Membership is limited to the
faculties of the cooperating schools.
En. 533.-Problems in Health and Physical Education. 8:30 daily. Yn-151.
3 credits. SALT.
Conducted on a workshop basis. The student will build a program of health education
or physical education especially adapted to and suitable for use in his own particular school.
Consultants will be available to assist the student in the planning and building such a program.
En. 534.-Problems in Health and Physical Education. 10 daily. Yn-151.
3 credits. SALT.
Conducted on a workshop basis. The student will build a program of health education or
physical education especially adapted to and suitable for use in his own particular school.
Consultants will be available to assist the student in planning and building such a program
En. 544.-School Legislation. 11:30 M. T. W. Th. Eg-213. 2 credits.
MORPHET.
Special emphasis will be given to Florida conditions, school laws, constitutional provisions,
judicial decisions, Attorney-General's rulings, and regulations of the State Board of Education.
Students will be required to prepare a term report dealing with some special field of school law.
Only graduate students with experience in administration and supervision will be admitted.
En. 555.-Florida Workshop: Bulletin Series Division. To arrange. 6 credits.
STONE, EDWARDS, OLSON, and others.
Designed to provide an organization, materials, and assistance for a group of principals
and teachers engaged in the preparation of bulletins for professional and lay groups for use
in the Florida Program for the Improvement of Instruction. Offered both terms, this workshop
may be taken as a "course" or workers need not be registered for credit. Membership is limited
to a selected group, except in special cases which may be considered if formal application is
made prior to June 1, 1939, to the Dean of the College of Education.
En. 597.-Elementary School Administration. 10 M. T. W. Th. Bn-208. 2
credits. BRISTOW.
The administration of the elementary school; a study of problems of elementary school
principals such as: supervision, professional growth, selection of teachers, relation of administra-
tive officers, discipline, child health, attendance, etc.
Graduate Seminar for Administrators. 4 M. W. F. Pe-102. No credit.
ENGELHARDT, SIMMONS.
Required of graduate students majoring in administration.
Graduate Seminar for Teachers. 4 M. W. F. Pe-112. No credit. WOR-
CESTER, HAYGOOD.
Introduction to investigations, consideration of possible thesis problems, minor researches
and actual thesis work. Primarily for teachers.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


Graduate Seminar in Elementary Education. 4 M. W. F. Pe-101. KING,
BRISTOW, BAXTER, GRACE A. STEVENS, HOUGH, CRABTREE, GOETTE.
Required of graduate students majoring in Elementary Education.


ENGLISH

CEh. 37.-Literary Masters of England. (Formerly Eh. 201.) 11:30 daily.
La-201. 3 credits. CONGLETON.
Interesting and significant English writers are read and discussed, primarily for an apprecia-
tion of their art and outlook on life.
CEh. 313.-Masterpieces of World Literature. (Formerly Eh. 103.) 8:30
daily. La-212. 3 credits. A. A. MURPHREE.
Lectures and reading. Designed to introduce the student to the great literature of the world,
books which every educated person, layman or teacher, should know.
Eh. 301.-Shakespeare. 10 daily. La-210. 3 credits. LYONS.
The primary design is to increase the student's understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment
of Shakespeare's greatest plays. The first term is devoted chiefly to romantic comedies and
history plays, including: A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado
About Nothing, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Henry the Fourth, and Julius Caesar. Special
stress will be laid on those plays most frequently taught in high school.
Eh. 303.-Famous English Writers of the Romantic Period. 10 daily. La-314.
3 credits. HUDSON.
Such writers as Burns, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats are read and
discussed more thoroughly than is possible in an introductory survey course in English literature.
Eh. 305.-Introduction to the Study of the English Language. 7 daily. La-212.
3 credits. ELIASON.
Designed to meet the needs of three types of students: (a) For the general student it offers
a means of improving his written and spoken English by showing him what "good English" is.
(b) For the English teacher in the secondary school it provides an adequate minimum knowledge
o: the English Language. (c) For the English Major and beginning graduate student it serves
as an intro auction to further linguistic study. Primary emphasis is placed, not upon grammatical
rules, but rather upon the most interesting features of our language as written and spoken.
Required of Majors.
Eh. 377.-The English Bible as Literature. 7 daily. La-210. 3 credits.
SPIVEY.
The Bible as a library of literary masterpieces. The influence of the Bible on English and
American writings, and part of the parallel readings consist of such works.
Eh. 391.-Literature for Children. 10 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. FOSTER.
Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart from school
textbooks, to aid students to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and to make
them more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form.
Eh. 399.-Introduction to the Study of Literature. 8:30 daily. La-210. 3
credits. LYONS.
The nature of literature, its types, forms, content, and values. Designed to provide the
student with a better critical understanding of literary art. Lectures, interpretative study of
significant literary selections, and discussion. Required of Majors.
Eh. 401.-American Literature. 1 daily. La-311. 3 credits.
A survey, with the stress on major American writers, literary movements, and literary
forms from Franklin to Whitman.
Eh. 402.-American Literature. 11:30 daily. La-210. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
A continuation of Eh. 401, with emphasis on writers and literary movements from Whitman
to Frost.
Eh. 408.-Contemporary Poetry. 11:30 daily. La-311. 3 credits. -- -
Chief emphasis on Twentieth Century poets in England and America.





142 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Eh. 409.-Chaucer. 10 daily. La-212. 3 credits. ELIASON.
Designed to help the student appreciate Chaucer as a story teller, as a wise, humorous, and
penetrating observer of human life, and as a great poet.
Eh. 414.-The Renaissance in England. 11:30 daily. La-212. 3 credits.
STROUP.
The non-dramatic literature in Shakespeare's day.
Eh. 434.-English Literature of the Eighteenth Century, 1744-1800. 8:30 daily.
La-314. 3 credits. HUDSON.
English writers from Johnson through Burns, with the emphasis on romantic beginnings
and tendencies.
Eh. 501.-American Literature. 1 daily. La-311. 3 credits.
A survey, with the stress on major American writers, literary movements, and literary
forms from Franklin to Whitman. Extensive readings and reports as directed.
Eh. 502.-American Literature. 11:30 daily. La-210. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
A continuation of Eh. 501, with emphasis on writers and literary movements from Whitman
to Frost. Extensive readings and reports as directed.
Eh. 509.-Chaucer. 10 daily. La-212. 3 credits. ELIASON.
A thorough study of the Canterbury Tales; collateral readings (in translation) of important
medieval writings.
Eh. 514.-The Renaissance in England. 11:30 daily. La-212. 3 credits.
STROUP.
A study of the lyric and epic poetry and the prose masterpieces to 1660. Extensive readings
and reports.
Eh. 534.-English Literature of the Eighteenth Century, 1744 to 1800. 8:30
daily. La-314. 3 credits. HUDSON.
English writers from Johnson through Burns, with the emphasis on the romantic beginnings
and tendencies.

ENTOMOLOGY

Ey. 420.-Medical and Veterinary Entomology. 10 M. T. W. Th. and 1-4 Th.
Ag-305. 3 credits. HIXSON.
The Arthropods that are parasitic upon man and domestic animals, including insects and
their near relatives.
Ey. 503.-Problems in Entomology. Hours to be arranged. 3 credits. HIXSON.
Problems in the various phases of Entomology as selected on approval of the instructor.
Required of graduate students registered for degrees in the department.


FRENCH

The Department reserves the right to cancel at the close of registration some of the
courses offered by seminar method if enrollments make it impracticable to continue them.

CFh. 33.-Reading of French. 7 daily. Bu-101. 3 credits. ATKIN.
A beginning course, basic for further study. The main objective is reading ability; grammar
and pronunciation are subordinated. Reading of easy texts is begun at once.
Fh. 201.-Second-Year French. 8:30 daily. Bu-101. 3 credits. ATKIN. Pre-
requisite: CFh. 33-34, or the equivalent (one year of college French or two
years of high school French).
Reading; oral and written practice.
Fh. 420.-Contemporary French Civilization. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
ATKIN. Prerequisite: Fh. 201-202 or permission of the instructor.
Land, people, institutions and culture of present-day France. Reading in both French and
English.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 143

Fh. 423.-Modern French Plays. Seminar Method. 3 credits. ATKIN. Pre-
requisite: Permission of the instructor.
Selected notable plays, beginning with the Romantic Period.
Fh. 428.-French-English Word Study. Seminar Method. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Comparison of the meanings of Fkrench and English words of similar form. Should be useful
to students and teachers of either language. Previous knowledge of Latin not necessary, although
desirable. A continuation of Fh. 427, which was given the summer of 1938.
Fh. 507.-Special Study in French. Seminar Method. 3 credits. ATKIN.
Individual study of selected topics in French language or literature.
Fh. 520.-Contemporary French Civilization. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
ATKIN.
Fh. 528.-French-English Word Study. Seminar Method. 3 credits. ATKIN.

GEOGRAPHY
Gpy. 385.-Principles of Human Geography. 10 daily. La-204. 3 credits.
DIETTRICH.
Basic principles underlying the study and teaching of modern geography in the elementary
school; the earth as a planet; wind systems; seasons, elements of meteorology; weather and
climate; land forms. How peoples have adjusted life and work to changing world environment.
Correlations between geography and history are stressed. Opportunity given students who wish
to carry on special studies relating to any specific part of the course.
Gpy. 387.-Principles of World Geography. 7 daily. La-204. 3 credits.
DIETTRICH.
Economic and cultural geography in its relations to the Social Studies. Basic principles
underlying the study and teaching of modern geography from the world point of view, with
special emphasis on the place and purpose of geography as a social science in junior and senior
high school curricula. Special stress is given to the relations of geography to history and civics.
This course may be used to satisfy the conservation certificate requirement.
NOTE: For other courses in geography see Economics.

HANDWRITING
Note: A course in penmanship is required for a certificate in subjects of the Elementary
School Course.
Hg. 101.-Handwriting. No credit.
Section 1. 8:30 daily. Yn-138. MCCLURE.
Section 2. 4:00 daily. Yn-138. MCCLURE.
Section 3. 7:00 P.M. daily. Yn-138. MCCLURE.
Students enrolling for this course will have opportunity not only to improve their own
handwriting, but to learn by instruction and demonstration the correct presentation of hand-
writing in all grades of the elementary school. The value of measuring diagnostic and remedial
teaching will be emphasized. The State-adopted text, Progressive Handwriting, will be used.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Note: The attention of those qualified is directed to the courses in the Problems in
Health and Physical Education which will be conducted by the workshop method.
These are listed under Education and numbered En. 533 and En. 534.
HPI. 261.-Football. 1 daily. Yn-134. 3 credits. McALLISTER. (Open only
to men.)
Football from the viewpoint of the interscholastic soccer, presenting fundamentals in blocking,
tackling, kicking, passing, individual position play, appropriate offensive formations and plays,
and various defensive formations.





144 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

HPI. 263.-Basketball. 2:30 daily. Yn-138. 3 credits. MCALLISTER. (Open
only to men.)
Fundamentals of basketball for men; dealing with the techniques of shooting, passing,
dribbling, stops, and guarding. A consideration of offensive team play, defensive team play,
signals, scouting, team strategy, training, practice sessions, selection and placing of players.
HPI. 373.-Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits. B. K.
STEVENS.
Section 1. For first, second, and third grade teachers.
Observation 10 M. T. W. Th. Yn-Gym. Lecture 1 M. W.
Yn-150.
Section 2. For fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers.
Observation 10 M. T. W. Th. Yn-Gym. Lecture 1 T. Th.
Yn-150.
The program of physical education activities for the elementary school including small group
play, large group play, directed play, team game units; together with appropriate procedures
and methods for conducting such a program.

HISTORY
The prerequisites for all Upper Division courses in History, except for Hy. 331-332, are:
(1) For students whose Freshman and Sophomore work is taken under the curriculum
of the General College, satisfactory completion of C-i.-Man and the Social World,
followed by CHy. 13.-History of the Modern World.
(2) For students who have not completed the above, Hy. 313-314. (Formerly Hy.
101-102.) Europe During the Middle Ages.
Prerequisites for Hy. 331-332 are C-i.-Man and the Social World, followed by
CHy. 13 or by CPI. 13 or Hy. 313-314. (Formerly Hy. 101-102.)
Students who have had two or more semesters of Advanced American History, Hy. 301,
302, 303 or 304 may not receive credit for the survey course.
CHy. 13.-History of the Modern World. 11:30 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits.
WOODWARD. (Not open to students who have completed Hy. 201-202 or Hy.
219-220.)
The historical background of present day civilization is considered in so far as that back-
ground has been developed in the fabric of historical movements and forces since 1815. The
political, economic, social, religious, artistic, scientific and cultural aspects of the nineteenth
and twentieth centuries are studied.
Hy. 303.-American History, 1830 to 1876. 10 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits.
JAMES.
A thorough and detailed study of American History from 1830 to the present. The period
from the Administration of Andrew Jackson through the Reconstruction.
Hy. 311.-English History, 1688 to 1815. 7 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits. JAMES.
The various phases of British development from the Glorious Revolution to the close of
the Napoleonic period.
Hy. 313.-Europe During the Middle Ages. (Formerly Hy. 101.) 11:30 daily.
Pe-10. 3 credits. BENTLEY.
A study of Europe from 476 to the First Crusade.
Hy. 331.-Survey of American History. 10 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits.
CARLETON.
The first half of a six-hour survey of the entire period of American History. The Colonial
Revolutionary and early Constitutional periods.
Hy. 352.-The New South. 8:30 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits. WOODWARD.
A study of the development of the South from the Civil War to the present: starting with
Reconstruction and examining political, economic, and intellectual trends, together with racial
and cultural problems, and the part Florida played in the period.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 145

LAW

The Law Summer Session extends through the first term, six weeks, from June 12 to
July 21. Each period is one hour and fifteen minutes long.

Lw. 311.-School Law. 10:25-11:40 M. T. Th. F. Law-204. 2 credits.
TRUSLER.
Authority and responsibility of teachers; rights and duties of students; rules and regulations:
incidental fees; contracts of teachers; pensions; private schools; illegal expenditures of school
money; illegal uses of school property; school contracts and torts; diplomas and degrees; exemption
of school property from taxation. Trusler, Essentials of School Law.
Lw. 312.-Property II. 7:45-9:00 M. T. Th. F. Law-204. 2 credits. DAY.
Introduction to the law of conveyancing; rights incident to ownership of land and estates
therein, including the land itself, air, water, fixtures, emblements, waste; profits; easements;
licenses; covenants running with the land. Warren, Cases on Property; Day, Outline on Property.
Lw. 320.-Workmen's Compensation Law. 10:25-11:40 W. S. Law-204. 1
credit. TRUSLER.
Scope, construction, beneficiaries, injuries compensated, defenses, and proceedings for adjust-
ment of compensation, with special reference to the Florida statute. Workmen's Compensation
Acts in Ruling Case Law and the Florida Act.
Lw. 405.-Equity Pleading. 11:45-1:00 T. W. F. S. Law-204. 2 credits.
TESELLE.
Pleading in equity; parties to, proceedings in a suit in equity; bills in equity; disclaimer;
demurrers and pleas; answer and replication; preparation of bills, demurrers, pleas, answers.
Keigwin, Cases in Equity Pleading, second edition; Rules of the Circuit Court in Chancery in
Florida; Statutes of Florida.
Lw. 422.-Banks and Banking. 7:45-9:00 W. S. Law-204. 1 credit. DAY.
Kinds of banks; deposits; checks; clearing houses; collections; loans and discounts; bank
notes; banking corporations; representation of bank by officers; insolvency; national banks;
savings banks. Tiffany, Banks and Banking.
Lw. 505.-Federal Procedure. 9:05-10:20 M. T. Th. F. Law-204. 2 credits.
SLAGLE.
System of courts created under authority of the United States, jurisdiction and procedure
therein, removal of cases from state courts; substantive law applied by federal courts; appellate
jurisdiction. Dobie, Cases on Federal Procedure.
Lw. 525.-Trade Regulations. 11:45-1:00 M. Th., and 9:05-10:20 W. S.
Law-204. 2 credits. SLAGLE.
Trade contracts; privilege of competing; intimidating and molesting; disparaging competitor's
goods; appropriating competitor's trade values ; boycotting; unfair price practices; unfair adver-
tising; combinations; anti-trust legislation. Oliphant, Cases on Trade Regulations.
Lw. 527.-Suretyship. 7:45-9:00 M. T. Th. F. Law-202. 2 credits. TESELLE.
Statute of Frauds; Surety's Rights and Remedies: Subrogation, Indemnity, Contribution, and
Exoneration; Defenses of the Surety. Langmaid, Cases on Suretyship.

MATHEMATICS

Before registering for any course, the student should ascertain the prerequisites.
Students desiring courses other than those listed below should write to the Department
of Mathematics, or make inquiry immediately upon arrival at the University.

CMs. 23.-Basic Mathematics. 8:30 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits. SIMPSON.
In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession,
this course offers a completely new sequence of topics including the above plus a liberal amount
of calculus. Teachers of high school mathematics who wish to advance in technical command
of the subject matter should elect both CMs. 23 and CMs. 24. This is also designed for those
who plan to major in mathematics or to elect courses above the freshman level. Milne and Davis,
Introductory College Mathematics.





146 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Ms. 225.-Arithmetic for Teachers. 11:30 daily. Pe-2. 3 credits. PIRENIAN.
Meaning and cultural values of arithmetic. Principles, fundamentals, processes, checks and
short cuts. Study of fractions, approximations, percentage, projects and activity programs; and
many other topics so treated as to give the student a connected idea of the subject matter of
arithmetic. Also, treatment of certain advanced notions of arithmetic to throw light upon begin-
ning processes, which many teachers never have the opportunities to investigate. Designed not
only for teachers of arithmetic, but also for teachers of any science in which familiarity with
the number processes is desirable. Glazier, Arithmetic for Teachers.
Ms. 311.-Advanced College Algebra. 10 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits. GER-
MOND.
Further treatment of some of the material and processes of college algebra, and introduction
to more advanced topics. Valuable to teachers of algebra and to students of actuarial science.
Hall and Knight, Higher Algebra.

Ms. 325.-Advanced General Mathematics. 7 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits.
PIRENIAN.
Designed for high school teachers. Selected topics having a direct and significant bearing
upon the teaching of mathematics in high school. Consideration of the subject matter itself
and its relation to adequate reorganization programs, both in the light of general modern objectives
and experience obtained in the teaching of mathematics in the General College. This course,
Ms. 325, is concerned with the teaching of general (practical) mathematics and algebra in high
schools. Ms. 326 deals with the teaching of geometry and trigonometry. Either course may be
taken first.
Ms. 353.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 8:30 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits.
PHIPPS.
Beginning calculus course. Differentiation, one of the most important and practical fields
of mathematics, is treated in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse
operation of differentiation. Smith, Salkover, and Justice, Calculus.

Ms. 500.-Graduate Seminar. 10 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits. PHIPPS.
Students who wish training on a graduate level may register for Ms. 500. Topics studied
will depend upon preparation and needs.

PHILOSOPHY

Ppy. 303.-Introduction to Philosophy. (Formerly CPp. 54.) 11:30 daily.
Pe-209. 3 credits. ENWALL.
A broad survey of philosophic problems, such as evolution, the moral consciousness, progress,
the principles of aesthetics, and the meaning of religion. A foundation course.
Ppy. 409.-History of Ancient Philosophy. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
ENWALL.
Readings from original sources, papers on special topics, group discussions.

PHYSICS

Students in the College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in Physics may enroll
in the courses outlined below. Additional problem work and subject matter will be
assigned, and substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher is made.
In case of students desiring advanced courses in Physics, it may be possible to arrange
for work to be taken in conference. For information consult the Head of the Department.

Ps. 101.-Elementary Physics. 10 daily. Bn-203. 3 credits. SWANSON. Pre-
requisite: C-2, or consent of instructor.

Ps. 103.-Laboratory for Ps. 101. 1-4 M. W. F. Bn-306. 2 credits. SWAN-
SON. Corequisite: Ps. 101.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 147

Ps. 219.-Demonstrations in Physics. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Bn-203. 2 credits.
SWANSON. Prerequisite: C-2 or consent of instructor.
Demonstrations in physics and associated topics in sciences designed for high school teachers
of General Science as well as of Physics. With the view of helping the teacher present clearly
to the high school student some of the most fundamental principles of the Physical Sciences.
Topics having a direct and significant bearing upon the teaching of Physics and General Science
in high school will be selected. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of simple demonstra-
tion apparatus as an aid in clarifying the physical principles.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

The prerequisites for the Upper Division courses in Political Science are: C-l, and
CPI. 13; or Pcl. 313-314. (Formerly Pel. 101-102.)

CPI. 13.-Political Foundations of Modern Life. 1 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits.
DAUER.
The principles and practices of political institutions; how government functions in the United
States; and what information can be drawn from the practices of other countries.
Pcl. 309.-International Relations. 10 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. DAUER.
First half of the year course on International Relations. The nature of international relations,
nationalism, imperialism, militarism, armaments; history of international relations; foreign poli-
cies; functions and problems of diplomacy; international organizations; the League of Nations
and the World Court.
Pcl. 313.-American Government and Politics. (Formerly Pcl. 101.) 7 daily.
Pe-101. 3 credits. CAWTHON.
The Federal Government, its philosophy, organization and functions.
Pcl. 407.-Comparative Government. (Formerly Pcl. 307.) 10 daily. Pe-2.
3 credits. LAIRD.
The first semester's work in the year course on a comparative study of the governments of
England, the British Commonwealth, the Scandinavian countries, France, Italy, Germany, Spain,
Russia, the Balkan states and the central European countries, Japan and China.

POULTRY HUSBANDRY

Py. 301.-Fundamentals in Poultry Production. 7 M. T. W. Th. and 1-3 M. W.
Poultry Laboratory. 3 credits. DRIGGERS.
Breeds and varieties; brooding and housing; feeding; management.

PSYCHOLOGY

CPs. 43.-Psychological Foundations of Modern Life. (Formerly Psy. 201.)
3 credits. MOSIER.
Section 1. 10 daily. Pe-11.
Section 2. 1 daily. Pe-11.
The social and personal implications of psychology to every day living. An understanding
of human motivation and one's own personality. How the individual acquires and organizes
sensory experiences and how these are used in the guidance of effective thinking and behavior.
Psy. 309.-Personality Development. 8:30 daily. Pe-11. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
The mechanism of personality formation, with special emphasis upon the varieties of human
adjustment. Particular attention is given to the personality development of the school child
and the ways by means of which proper adjustment can be guided by the teacher.'
Psy. 310.-Abnormal Psychology. 10 daily. Pe-10. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
The abnormal phases of mental life, and the ways by means of which the individual develops
abnormal habits of thinking and acting. The signs of beginning maladjustment in the school
child and procedures which the teacher should follow to correct these tendencies. Special sugges-
tions are given for the prevention and treatment of mental disease.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Psy. 510.-Social Psychiatry. To be arranged. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
Lectures and readings on the various forms of mental disease, with attention to causes,
diagnosis, symptoms, and treatment. Psychiatric information for social workers and school
psychologists.
PUBLIC SCHOOL ARTS AND CRAFTS

Pc. 101.-Elementary School Art. 1 credit.
Practice in the use of varied materials; methods of preparation and presentation; training
in classroom practice; objectives in teaching art.
Section 1. 1:00 M. W. F. Pe-302. LOCKWOOD.
Section 2. 2:30 M. W. F. Pe-302. LOCKWOOD.
Pc. 104.-Interior Decorating. 1 T. Th. and 4 W. Pe-303. 1 credit. LOCK-
WOOD.
Interior decoration, house-planning, furnishing, equipping, and care from the standpoint
of modern materials and methods.
Pc. 123.-Industrial Arts for Elementary Grades. Yn-Shop. 2 credits.
PAUSTIAN.
Pottery, weaving, bead work, hectography, book-binding. Arts of typical peoples; American
colonial life. Contribution of art to elementary activity curriculum; organization of materials,
equipment, etc.
Section 1. 1:00 M. T. W. F.
Section 2. 2:30 M. T. W. F.
Section 3. 8:30 M. T. W. F.
Pc. 201.-Creative Design. 10 T. W. Th. Pe-302. 1 credit. LOCKWOOD.
Creative problems in two and three dimensional design embodying form, pattern, and color
directly related to craft courses offered in public school art.
Pc. 220.-Puppetry. 4 T. Th. F. Yn-Shop. 1 credit. LOCKWOOD and
PAUSTIAN.
Puppetry design and creative writing as related to staging and presentation of marionette
plays for school children; to be correlated with almost all fields, as English, art, history, social
sciences, music, woodworking, and household arts.

SCHOOL MUSIC

Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. Audi-
torium. 2 credits.
Section 1. 10 daily. LAWRENCE.
Section 2. 4 daily. CARSON.
The child voice; rote songs; development of rhythm; sight-singing from rote to note;
development of skills necessary for teaching primary music.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. Audi-,
torium. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Msc. 103.
Section 1. 8:30 daily. CARSON.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. LAWRENCE.
Development of sight-singing; study of problems pertaining to intermediate grades; part
singing; song repertoire; appreciation work suitable for intermediate grades.
Msc. 105.-Materials and Methods for Junior and Senior High School. 2:30
daily. Auditorium. 2 credits. CARSON. Prerequisite: Msc. 103 or 104.
Sight-sipging; study of the changing voice and classification of the voice; chord formation;
and theory work pertaining to high school work.
Msc. 109.-Music Appreciation for the Grades. 2:30 W. F. Yonge Auditorium.
1 credit. LAWRENCE.
Designed primarily for grade teachers to assist them in their classroom teaching and to
increase their own knowledge of music literature.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


Msc. 110.-Music Appreciation. 1 W. F. Auditorium. 1 credit. C. MUR-
PHREE.
For students who have studied music. Development of better understanding and enjoyment
of good music through listening intensively to compositions of the masters.

SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 301.-Outlines of Sociology. (Equivalent to CSy. 13.) 7 daily. Pe-4.
3 credits. MACLACHLAN. Prerequisite: C-1 or consent of instructor.
Sy. 301 and 302 cover the whole field of sociology in outline form and may be taken simul-
taneously. Prepared with special reference to the needs of teachers of the social studies though
of general value. Consideration of: Persons in the totality of their social relations ; the related
person and personality; the family and home; the community and methods of scientific study
and appraisal. Problems arising out of maladaptations in associational life. Trips to State
Institutions.
Sy. 302.-Outlines of Sociology. 10 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. BRISTOL. Pre-
requisite or corequisite: Sy. 301 or consent of instructor.
Continuation of Sy. 301. The culture stream of American life; processes and principles
growing out of life in association; social values and social progress.
Sy. 311.-Problems of Child Welfare. 8:30 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
Prerequisite: Sy. 301 or consent of instructor.
The problems growing out of physical and social maladjustment of the child with suggested
methods of correction and prevention.
Sy. 511.-Problems of Child Welfare. 8:30 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. BRISTOL.
To be taken with Sy. 311 with extra reading and reports.

SPANISH

Spanish is being offered in both terms of the Summer Session in the effort to offer
students a full year's work. This has necessitated reduction in the number of courses
given concurrently. For those wishing a complete second-year sequence, Sh. 210 and
Sh. 304 may be considered as a year's work.

CSh. 33.-Reading of Spanish. 8:30 daily. Bu-201. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN.
Materials involved in the reading of the Spanish language, with special reference in content
to Latin America.
Sh. 210.-Second-Year Spanish. 11:30 daily. Bu-201. 3 credits. HAUPT-
MANN.
Continuation of Sh. 209. Readings in prose of moderate difficulty; conversation practice;
syntax.
Sh. 512.-Advanced Reading. To be arranged. Bu-302. 3 credits. HAUPT-
MANN. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Readings in the field chosen by the student.

SPEECH

All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have completed C-3 or
Eh. 101.

CSc. 33.-Effective Speaking. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily. 1 T. Th. Pe-205. TEW.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. 1 T. Th. Pe-205. TEW.
Designed to aid the student through lecture, reading, demonstration, and practice to talk
effectively to a group. Individual needs of the student given attention.





150 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Sch. 404.-Dramatic Production. 8:30 daily. Bn-201. 3 credits. CONSTANS.
Prerequisite or corequisite: CSc. 33.
Consideration of the choice of the play, casting the characters, working out the action,
directing the rehearsals. Meeting the problem of stage equipment, costuming, lighting, and
make-up. Observation and participation in the presentation of plays.
Sch. 416.-Correction of Speech Defects. 10 daily. Pe-205. 3 credits. CON-
STANS. Prerequisite: CSc. 33 or teaching experience.
This is a beginning course in the recognition and correction of common speech defects and
is especially designeJ for all teachers in the public schools. The problems of individual language
difficulties will be presented and the actual corrective procedure demonstrated. Correction of
lisping, indistinct enunciation, foreign accent, stuttering, and delayed speech will also be con-
sidered.
Sch. 420.-Teaching of Functional Speech. 11:30 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits.
MCGLON. Prerequisite: CSc. 33 or teaching experience.
A course designed primarily for teachers. The place of speech education in the secondary
school; organization of materials and activities; methods of presentation; analysis of state-
adopted text-book; discussion of specific problems that arise in the teaching of public speaking,
debate, auditorium programs, oral reading, and dramatics.
Speech Clinic. 1 M. W. F. Pe-209. No credit. STAFF.
The Speech Clinic offers without charge individual assistance to students desiring aid in
overcoming their speech defects. Applicants for this service should report as soon as possible
to Peabody 211 at one o'clock on Monday, Wednesday, or Friday.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES
Second Term

All classes ordinarily meet for one hour and twenty minutes. Classes scheduled to'
meet daily meet Monday through Saturday. Course descriptions are not given if the same
course was offered the first term. See appropriate section of the first term schedule for
this information.
Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with no
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule.

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES

Students should consult official announcements by the Board of University Examiners
for details concerning comprehensive examinations. Credits are indicated for the benefit
of Upper Division students who elect these courses.

C-12.-Man and the Social World. 4 credits. (Designated as C-lb, 1937.)
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 M. W. F. Sc-211. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 8:30 T. Th. S. and 2:30 Th. Pe-4. MACLACHLAN.
11 8:30 T. Th. S. and 2:30 Th. Pe-11. BENTLEY.
12 8:30 T. Th. S. and 2:30 Th. Pe-2.
CEs. 13.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life (See Economics).
CHy. 13.-History of the Modern World (See History).
CPI. 13.-Political Foundations of Modern Life (See Political Science).
CBs. 14.-Elementary Accounting (See Economics).
C-22.-Man and the Physical World. 4 credits. (Designated as C-2b, 1937.)
Lecture Section 1: 7 T. Th. S. Bn-203. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 7:00 M. W. F. Bn-205. GADDUM.
11 8:30 T. Th. S. Bn-205. EHRMANN.
CMs. 24.-Basic Mathematics (See Mathematics).
C-32.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits. (Designated as C-3b, 1937.)
Lecture Section 1: 7 M. W. F. Sc-208. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 2:30 daily. La-203. MORRIS.
11 2:30 daily. La-201. MACLEOD.
Writing Laboratory: 101 8:30 M. W. F. La-209. MORRIS,
102 10:00 M. W. F. La-209. MORRIS,
CEh. 34.-Reading for Leisure. 3 credits. (Designated as C-3E, 1937.) 10
daily. La-311. SKAGGS. (Conference to be arranged.) Prerequisite: C-3 or
permission of C-3 Course Chairman. Open to Upper Division Students.
Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded leisure-reading program,
which will serve to keep him abreast of the best in contemporary thought and literature.
CFh. 34.-Reading of French (See French).
CSh. 34.-Reading of Spanish (See Spanish).
CSc. 33.-Effective Speaking (See Speech).





152 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

C-42.-General Mathematics. 3 credits. (Designated as C-4B, 1937.) Pe-102.
10 daily. KOKOMOOR.
Designed to acquaint the student with the general nature of mathematics, the manner in
which the mathematical mode of thought is used in the world of today, and the role it has
occupied in the development of that world. A survey of some of the fundamental principles
and methods of procedure in the main branches of elementary mathematics, with considerable
attention being given to the utilization and cultural importance of the subject and its relations
to other branches of knowledge.
C-52.-The Humanities. 4 credits. (Designated as C-5b, 1937.)
Lecture Section 1: 7 M. W. F. and 1 T. Th. Aud. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 8:30 M. T. W. F. Ag-104. CONNER.
11 10:00 M. T. W. F. Ag-104. CONNER.
C-62.-Man and the Biological World. 4 credits. (Designated as C-6b, 1937.)
Lecture Sections: 1 7 M. T. Th. F. S. and 7 P.M. T. Sc-101. BYERS.
2 10 M. T. W. Th. F. and 7 P.M. T. Sc-101. BYERS.
Discussion Sections: 10 11:30 T. Th. Sc-101. CARR.
11 2:30 T. Th. Sc-101. CARR.
20 8:30 M. W. Sc-101. CARR.
21 2:30 M. W. Sc-101. CARR.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

As. 414.-Land Use Planning and Program Development. Camp O'Leno. 3
credits. HAMPSON. (First two weeks of second term.)
Designed primarily for Smith-Hughes students although open to regular students. A study
of the 1939-40 land use program for Florida. This program is designed to effect closer coordination
of all state and federal agricultural resources of the state, to the end of securing a more satis-
factory rural life. Application to the program of individual farmers will be considered, also
application to local and county agricultural programs.

BIOLOGY

Bly. 61.-Laboratory in General Biology. 1-5 daily. Sc-10. 2 credits. BYERS.
Elective for students who are taking or have taken C-6 in the General College. Satisfactory
completion of Bly. 61 together with a final standing in the upper half of C-6 will be accepted
as a satisfactory prerequisite for second year courses in Biology.
Bly. 411.-Individual Problems in Animal Biology. 2, 3, or 5 credits. To be
arranged. BYERS. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.
Qualified students may choose a topic or problem for study.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Courses in Business Administration are listed under Economics and marked Bs.

BUSINESS EDUCATION

Note: The professionalized subject matter courses in shorthand and typewriting are open
to students preparing to be commercial teachers. They are not counted as electives
in Education. No one will be permitted to audit these courses.

BEn. 81.-Elementary Typewriting. 2:30 M. T. W. Th. F. Yn-241. 1 credit.
COPELAND.
Introduction to touch typewriting; practice upon personal and business problems. This
course cannot be taken simultaneously with BEn. 94.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM


BEn. 94.-Stenography, continued. 10-1 daily. Yn-232 and Yn-241. 3 credits.
COPELAND.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 102.-General Chemistry. 10 daily. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. W. F.
Ch-230. 4 credits. BLACK, JACKSON.
Metallic elements and their compounds.
Cy. 202.-Analytical Chemistry. 8:30 M. T. W. F. Ch-110. Laboratory
1-5 M. T. W., 1-4 Th. F. Ch-114. 4 credits. BLACK.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the quantitative determination of
the common metals and acid radicals.
*Cy. 523.-Special Topics in Physical Chemistry. To arrange. 3 credits.
JACKSON.
Material will be selected from the following: Catalysis; Chemical Thermodynamics; Colloids;
Electrochemistry; Phase Rule; Physico-Chemical Calculations or Measurements; Solutions.
*Cy. 533.-Advanced Analytical Chemistry. To arrange. 3 credits. BLACK.
Application of physico-chemical methods to quantitative analysis. Colorimetry. Nephelometry.
Cy. 602.-Chemical Research. No credit. BLACK, JACKSON.

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Note: Courses designated by the letters Es. are Economics courses, those designated by
the letters Bs. are Business Administration courses.

tCEs-132.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 10 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits.
MCFERRIN. Prerequisite: C-1.
tCBs-142.-Elementary Accounting. 8:30 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. BEIGHTS.
Bs. 312.-Accounting Principles. 7 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. BEIGHTS.
A continuation of Bs. 311. An intensive and critical study of the valuation of balance sheet
items and problems incident thereto; tangible and intangible assets, funds, reserves, capital and
capital stock, dividends, and other problems.
Es. 322.-Financial Organization of Society. 8:30 daily. La-204. 3 credits.
EUTSLER. Prerequisite: Es. 321.
An introduction to the field of finance; a study of the institutions providing monetary,
banking and other financial services; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institu-
tions; central banking; government control of finance; significance of financial organization to
the economic system as a whole.
Es. 327.-Public Finance. 10 daily. La-314. 3 credits. CAMPBELL.
Principles governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal
systems of leading countries.
Es. 335.-Economics of Marketing. 11:30 daily. La-314. 3 credits. EUTS-
LER.
The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular attention
given to interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages, and
comparative disadvantages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying on
trading operations; retail and wholesale agencies; elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of
marketing; price maintenance; unfair competition; the relation of the government to marketing.

*That course will be offered for which there is the greater demand.
tThis course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required.
Students may not take the second term without having had the first term. When the course
is completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may secure six
semester hours credit.





154 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Es. 385.-Economic Geography of South America. 10 daily. La-204. 3 credits.
DIETTRICH.
A geographical survey of the continent of South America, organized around the growth of
trade, exports and imports, trade by countries, and general business trends; the economic condi-
tions that influence commercial advance or decline; the major geographic regions; their importance
in supplying export products and in consuming import commodities.
Bs. 401.-Business Law. 10 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. HURST.
Contracts and agency; rights and obligations of the agent, principal, and third party;
termination of the relationship of agency. Conveyances and mortgages of real property; sales
and mortgages of personal property; the law of negotiable instruments; partnership.
Bs. 402.-Business Law. 7 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. HURST.
A continuation of Bs. 401. Students may take this course with Bs. 401.
Es. 408.-Economic Principles and Problems. 8:30 daily. Sc-206. 3 credits.
MCFERRIN.
Advanced economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic maladjustments
arising from the operation of economic forces.

Bs. 414.-Income Tax Procedure. Seminar Method. 3 credits. BEIGHTS.
Prerequisite: Bs. 311.
The Federal Income Tax Law and Regulations, and related accounting problems; preparation
of tax returns for individuals, corporations and fiduciaries.
Bs. 443.-Foreign Trade. 7 daily. La-314. 3 credits. CAMPBELL.
Methods of selling, shipping, and financing foreign sales; tariffs, commercial laws, and trade
practices in foreign countries; business problems encountered by United States exporters and
importers.

Es. 463.-Problems in Social Security. Seminar Method. 3 credits. EUTSLER.
The meaning and nature of social security, especially as related to economic security; the
distinctions between social and private insurance; the hazards of low income groups; and
evaluation of projects and methods for eliminating, reducing, or indemnifying these hazards; the
problems of social security in the United States, especially concerning experiences with relief
measures, the development of legislation, the problems of financing and administering security
programs, and the relationship between economic planning and security.
Es. 468.-Economic History in the Making. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
DIETTRICH.
The era of industrialism; contemporary economic organization in the leading European coun-
tries; types of economic reform; capitalism, socialism, communism, fascism; special consideration
of current social and economic problems in England, France, Germany, Soviet Russia, and the
United States.
Es. 491.-Geographic Foundations of the British Empire. 11:30 daily. La-204.
3 credits. DIETTRICH.
An analytical study of the economic and commercial problems of the world's largest empire;
a study of the basic factors which affected the establishment of the empire; and the geographic
and economic interrelationships influencing its present position in world economy.

Es. 524.-Corporation Finance and Investments. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
EUTSLER. Prerequisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society), or
its equivalent.
A study and analysis of the corporation as an institution making use of society's savings;
the processes, practices, and institutions involved in the acquisition of capital funds, with an
evaluation of corporation practices and problems; the social responsibilities of the corporation;
the nature of the capital market and the sources of capital funds; factors influencing the ac-
cumulation and distribution of capital funds; and the international flow of capital.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM


EDUCATION

CEn. 13.-Introduction to Education. 8:30 daily. Sc-205. 3 credits. CUL-
PEPPER.
En. 121.-Language Arts. 11:30 M. T. W. Th. Bn-208. 2 credits. BRISTOW.
The teaching of written and spoken expression in the light of experimental findings and
modern practice.
En. 122.-Teaching of Reading. 10 daily. Bn-209. 3 credits. HOUGH.
En. 124.-Teaching of Arithmetic. 11:30 M. T. W. Th. Bn-209. 2 credits.
HOUGH.
En. 207.-Educational Psychology. 8:30 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits. WILSON.
En. 209.-Teaching Elementary Science. Yn-142. 2 credits. TRUITT.
Section 1. 7:00 M. T. W. Th.
Section 2. 11:30 M. T. W. Th.
En. 221.-Remedial and Directed Reading. Sc-111. 3 credits. ALEXANDER.
Section 1. 8:30 daily.
Section 2. 11:30 daily.
En. 305.-Development and Organization of Education. 7 daily. Sc-205.
3 credits. CULPEPPER.
An attempt to interpret and evaluate present-day education, and to point out possible
developments.
En. 308.-Elementary School Curriculum. Sc-201. 3 credits. EDNA SIMMONS.
Section 1. 7:00 daily.
Section 2. 8:30 daily.
En. 317.-Tests and Measurements. 10 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. WOR-
CESTER.
En. 318.-Audio-Visual Education. 2:30 M. T. Th. F. Yn-142. 2 credits.
TRUITT.
Designed to aid teachers and administrators in the use of the phonograph, radio, sound and
silent films, prints, slides, and film slides.
En. 319.-Child and Adolescent Psychology. 10 daily. Sc-211. 3 credits.
WILSON. Prerequisite: En. 207.
En. 323.-General Methods in High Schools. 11:30 daily. Eg-209. 3 credits.
Prerequisites: En. 207 and En. 319.
En. 372-The Teaching of Business Education, continued. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. F.
Yn-232. 1 hour observation M. T. W. to arrange. 3 credits. COPELAND.
En. 387.-Health Education. Yn-134. 3 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily.
Section 2. 8:30 daily.
The role of classroom teachers in health instruction in elementary schools; who shall teach
health in the secondary school; the relationship of health examinations, the follow-up program,
and the hygiene of school plants to health instruction; the organization of materials for instruc-
tional purposes; criteria for evaluation of health materials and methods; cooperation of parents
and the local board of health; the role of local, state, and national non-official organizations in
health teaching programs.
En. 401.-School Administration. 8:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. ENGEL-
HARDT.
Problems peculiar to schools in Florida; the supervising principal, qualifications, relation
to superintendent, boards, teachers, pupils, patrons, and community; adapting the school to the
child's needs; business practices.





156 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

En. 507.-Educational Psychology. 11:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. OST-
RANDER.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems in directed learning, individual
differences, and adjustment of problem children. Primarily for graduate students with experience
in residence or in the field.
En. 524.-Major Sequence in Secondary Education. 7-10 daily. Ag-205.
6 credits. OSTRANDER, WORCESTER, FOSTER.
Designed to give a thorough over-view of: (1) the needs of adolescents in our present social
order, (2) changes in the high school program designed to meet these needs, (3) values on the
basis of which present high school curricula may be judged.
En. 525.-Major Sequence in Childhood Education. 7-10 daily. Ag-207.
6 credits. CRABTREE, LILIAN STEVENS.
Designed to give a unified and thorough discussion of: (1) the needs of children between
infancy and adolescence, (2) changes in the elementary school program designed to meet these
needs, and 13) ways and means whereby efforts at curriculum reconstruction may be evaluated
in the light of sound social and psychological bases.
En. 528.-Supervision of Instruction (For Elementary Teachers). 10 M. T.
W. Th. Bn-208. 2 credits. BRISTOW.
Objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in elementary schools, and
in preparation of teachers. Each student completes a minor research.
En. 556.-Florida Workshop: Bulletin Series Division, continued. To ar-
range. 6 credits. STONE, EDWARDS, OLSON, and others.
En. 565.-Problems in Agricultural Education. (Seminar: July 24-August
12), 9-12 and 1-4 daily. Camp O'Leno. 3 credits. CLEMENTS.
Problems relating to the supervised farming programs of students of vocational agriculture
will be considered.
En. 566.-Problems in Agricultural Education. (Seminar: July 24-August
12), 9-12 and 1-4 daily. Camp O'Leno. 3 credits. GROSECLOSE.
Problems in the supervision of F. F. A. activities.
En. 567.-Problems in Agricultural Education. (Seminar: July 24-August
12), 9-12 and 1-4 daily. Camp O'Leno. 3 credits. JACOBS.
Materials and methods of teaching vocational forestry.
Graduate Seminar for Administrators. 4 M. W. F. Pe-102. No credit.
ENGELHARDT, G. B. SIMMONS.
Required of graduate students majoring in administration.
Graduate Seminar for Teachers. 4 M. W. F. Pe-112. WORCESTER.
Introduction to investigations, consideration of possible thesis problems, minor researches
and actual thesis work. Primarily for teachers.

ENGLISH

CEh. 38.-Literary Masters of England. (Formerly Eh. 202.) 11:30 daily.
La-201. 3 credits. SKAGGS.
An introductory survey course, emphasizing the appreciation of representative English writers
from Wordsworth to Galsworthy.
CEh. 314.-Masterpieces of World Literature. (Formerly Eh. 104.) 7 daily.
La-311. 3 credits. MOUNTS.
A continuation of CEh. 313.
Eh. 204.-Exposition. 11:30 daily. La-203. 3 credits. MACLEOD.
A practical course in writing designed to help those who desire additional training in effectively
organizing and expressing facts and ideas.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 157

Eh. 302.-Shakespeare. 10 daily. La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
A continuation of Eh. 301, with the stress on the great tragedies; notably, Hamlet, Othello,
King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra.
Eh. 304.-Famous English Writers of the Victorian Period. 10 daily. La-210.
3 credits. BAILEY.
Such writers as Tennyson, Browning, Swinburne, Morris, Arnold, Dickens, Thackeray, and
other late 19th century English writers are read and discussed.
Eh. 402.-American Literature. 11:30 daily. La-210. 3 credits. TAYLOR.
American writers and literary movements from Whitman to Frost.
Eh. 406.-Recent and Contemporary Dramatists. 8:30 daily. La-212. 3
credits. ROBERTSON.
The drama from Ibsen to Shaw and O'Neill.
Eh. 407.-The Modern Novel. 8:30 daily. La-210. 3 credits. BAILEY.
The development and technique of English and American fiction of the last half century.
Eh. 415.-Milton. 8:30 daily. La-311. 3 credits. MOUNTS.
The poetry of John Milton, designed to be helpful to teachers of high school literature as
well as to majors in English.
Eh. 421.-The Short-Story in American Literature. 10 daily. La-203. 3
credits. TAYLOR.
The rise and development of the short story in America, with wide reading of American
stories from Irving and Poe to the present.
Eh. 502.-American Literature. 11:30 daily. La-210. 3 credits. TAYLOR.
American writers and literary movements from Whitman to Frost. Extensive readings and
reports as directed.
Eh. 506.-Modern Drama. 8:30 daily. La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
The drama from Ibsen to Shaw and O'Neill.
Eh. 515.-Milton. 8:30 daily. La-311. 3 credits. MOUNTS.
The poetry of John Milton, designed to be helpful to teachers of high school literature as
well as to majors in English.

FRENCH

The Department reserves the right to cancel at the close of registration some of the
courses offered by seminar method if enrollments make it impracticable to continue them.

CFh. 34.-Reading of French. 7 daily. Bu-205. 3 credits. BRUNET.
A continuation of CFh. 33, which is prerequisite.
Fh. 202.-Second-Year French. 8:30 daily. Bu-205. 3 credits. BRUNET.
A continuation of Fh. 201, which is prerequisite.
Fh. 421.-Contemporary French Civilization. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
BRUNET. Prerequisite: Fh. 420 or permission of the instructor.
A continuation of Fh. 420.
Fh. 424.-Modern French Plays. Seminar Method. 3 credits. BRUNET.
Prerequisite: Fh. 423 or permission of the instructor.
A continuation of Fh. 423.
Fh. 508.-Special Study in French. Seminar Method. 3 credits. BRUNET.
A continuation of Fh. 507.
Fh. 513.-Eighteenth Century French Literature. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
BRUNET.
Literary expression of the movement of ideas, studied in representative works of the period.
Fh. 521.-Contemporary French Civilization. Seminar Method. 3 credits.
BRUNET.
A continuation of Fh. 520.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


HANDWRITING
Note: A course in penmanship is required for a certificate in subjects of the Elementary
School Course.

Hg. 101.-Handwriting. No credit. MCCLURE.
Section 1. 8:30 daily. Yn-138.
Section 2. 4:00 daily. Yn-138.
Section 3. 7:00 P.M. daily. Yn-138.

HISTORY
For prerequisites see note preceding offerings during the first term.
CHy. 13.-History of the Modern World. 11:30 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits.
(Not open to students who have completed Hy. 201-202 or Hy. 219-220.)
Hy. 304.-American History, 1876 to the Present. 10 daily. Pe-112. 3
credits. JAMES.
The period from the close of the Reconstruction era to the present.
Hy. 312.-English History, 1815 to the Present. 7 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits.
JAMES.
British development from the close of the Napoleonic period to the present.
Hy. 314.-Europe during the Middle Ages. (Formerly Hy. 101-102.) 11:30
daily. Pe-10. 3 credits. BENTLEY.
Europe from the First Crusade to 1500.
Hy. 332.-Survey of American History. 10 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits.
The second half of a six-hour survey of the entire period of American History. The period
from Anirew Jackson to the present.

MATHEMATICS
C-42.-General Mathematics (See General College Courses).
CMs. 24.-Basic Mathematics. 8:30 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits. SIMPSON.
A continuation of CMs. 23.
Ms. 312.-Advanced College Algebra. 11:30 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits.
QUADE.
A continuation of Ms. 311.
Ms. 326.-Advanced General Mathematics. 7 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits.
KOKOMOOR.
A continuation of Ms. 325.
Ms. 354.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 8:30 daily. Pe-1. QUADE.
Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas,
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems.
Ms. 501.-Graduate Seminar. To arrange. 3 credits. QUADE and SIMPSON.
A continuation of Ms. 500. No class meetings. Work will be by the project method.

PHYSICS
Students in the College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in Physics may enroll
in the courses outlined below. Additional problem work and subject matter will be
assigned, and substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher is made.
Ps. 102.-Elementary Physics. 10 daily. Bn-203. 3 credits. KNOWLES.
Prerequisite: Ps. 101-103.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 159

Ps. 104.-Laboratory for Ps. 102. 1-4 M. W. F. Bn-306. 2 credits. KNOWLES.
Corequisite: Ps. 102.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

The prerequisites for the Upper Division courses in Political Science are C-i, and
CPl. 13; or Pcl. 313-314. (Formerly Pcl. 101-102.)

CPl. 13.-Political Foundations of Modern Life. 1 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits.
LAIRD.
The principles and practices of political institutions; how government functions in the United
States; and what information can be drawn from the practices of other countries.
Pcl. 310.-International Relations. 10 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. LAIRD.
Second half of the year course on International Relations. The nature of international
relations, nationalism, imperialism, militarism, armaments; history of international relations;
foreign policies; functions and problems of diplomacy; international organizations; the League
of Nations and the World Court.
Pel. 314.-American Government and Politics. (Formerly Pel. 102.) 7 daily.
Pe-101. 3 credits. CAWTHON.
State, local, and municipal government in the United States.

PSYCHOLOGY

CPs. 43.-Psychological Foundations of Modern Life. (Formerly Psy. 201.)
10 daily. Pe-10. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
The social and personal implications of psychology to every day living. An understanding
of human motivation and one's own personality. How the individual acquires and organizes
sensory experiences and how these are used in the guidance of effective thinking and behavior.
Psy. 305.-Social Psychology. Seminar. To be arranged. Pe-114. 3 credits.
WILLIAMS.
Influence of the social environment upon the mental, social, moral, and emotional development
of the child, the adolescent, and the adult. General orientation, typical and atypical forms of
behavior, social stimulations and responses, social attitudes, social adjustments, language develop-
ment, personality development, and social change.
Psy. 312.-Psychology of Problem Children. 8:30 daily. Pe-10. 3 credits.
WILLIAMS.
Individual differences, intelligence, feeble-mindedness, dull and backward children, superior
and gifted children, speech and motor defects, sensory and neurological disorders, conduct
problems, social and emotional maladjustments, and other types of exceptional and mentally
peculiar children.
Psy. 512.-Psychology of Problem Children. 8:30 daily. Pe-10. 3 credits.
WILLIAMS.
Psy. 515.-Social Psychology. Seminar. To be arranged. Pe-114. 3 credits.
WILLIAMS.

PUBLIC SCHOOL ARTS AND CRAFTS

Pc. 101.-Elementary School Art. 1 M. W. F. Pe-302. 1 credit. SINCLAIR.
Pc. 102.-Frieze Development. 2:30 M. W. F. Pe-302. 1 credit. SINCLAIR.
Projects embodying design and composition of simple decorative friezes and panels for the
school room; emphasis upon integration of these projects with other school activities.
Pc. 104.-Interior Decoration. 1 T. Th. S. Pe-302. 1 credit. SINCLAIR.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Pc. 209.-Creative Arts and Crafts. Yn-Shop. 2 credits. BOHANNON.
Craft-work materials, leather work, block-printing, carving, metal etching, art-metal, basketry.
projects in woodwork, etc. Contribution of this type of work to curriculum of different grades.
Section 1. 1 M. T. W. Th.
Section 2. 4 M. T. W. Th.
Section 3. 10 T. W. Th. F.
Pc. 220.-Puppetry. 2:30 T. Th. S. Yn-Shop. 1 credit. SINCLAIR.

SCHOOL MUSIC

Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. Audi-
torium. 2 credits.
Section 1. 10 daily. LAWRENCE.
Section 2. 4 daily. MENZ.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. Audi-
torium. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Msc. 103.
Section 1. 8:30 daily. MENZ.
Section 2. 11:30 daily. LAWRENCE.
Msc. 105.-Materials for Junior and Senior High Schools. 2:30 daily. Audi-
torium. 2 credits. LAWRENCE. Prerequisite: Msc. 103 or 104.
Msc. 109.-Music Appreciation for the Grades. 1 M. W. F. Auditorium.
1 credit. MENZ.
SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 344.-Marriage and the Family. 7 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. EHRMANN.
While following the general outline of the regular course, special stress will be given to
those aspects of family and home life of most value to teachers of the social studies.
Sy. 490.-The South: Regional Resources and Culture. 10 daily. Pe-4. 3
credits. MACLACHLAN. Prerequisite: Sy. 301, 302, or the consent of the in-
structor.
A survey of the basic social characteristics and resources of the American South, summarizing
recent standard sources and studies concerning the region. The social aspects of regional resources
and technology and the basic viewpoints regarding the southern region are analyzed.
Sy. 590.-The South: Regional Resources and Culture. 10 daily. Pe-4. 3
credits. MACLACHLAN.
To be taken with Sy. 490 with extra reading and reports. For graduate majors in sociology.

SPANISH

CSh. 34.-Reading of Spanish. 8:30 daily. Bu-201. 3 credits. DEGAETANI.
Prerequisite: CSh. 33.
Continuation of CSh. 33. Introduction to study of materials involved in the reading of the
Spanish language, with special reference in content to Latin America.
Sh. 304.-Survey of Spanish Literature. 11:30 daily. Bu-201. 3 credits.
DEGAETANI. Prerequisite: Sh. 210 or permission of instructor. (May be
taken without Sh. 303.)
Continuation of Sh. 303. Lectures and reading on principal literary movements since the
beginning of the 18th century.
Sh. 509.-Contemporary Latin-American Literature. To arrange. 3 credits.
DEGAETANI.
Lectures and readings on principal literary figures and movements in Spanish America;
primarily concerned with mutual influences operative in the Western Hemisphere.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 161

SPEECH

All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have completed Eh. 101
or C-3.

CSc. 33.-Effective Speaking. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1 T. Th. Pe-205. TEW.
Section 2. 8:30 daily and 1 T. Th. Pe-205. HOPKINS.
Sch. 301.-Advanced Public Speaking. 8:30 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits. TEW.
Prerequisite: CSc. 33.
Structure, style, and delivery of speeches for different occasions, with special emphasis on
the psychology of audience persuasion. Considerable practice in speaking.
Sch. 414.-Types of Group Discussion. 10 daily. Pe-205. 3 credits. HOP-
KINS. Prerequisite or corequisite: CSc. 33.
Designed particularly to aid the individual who is called upon to direct or participate in
group discussion. The latest trends in handling various types of group discussion, such as round
table, panel, symposium, forum, and others. The function of the leader and the participant in
public meetings, faculty meetings, and PTA meetings. A brief review of the practical essentials
of parliamentary procedure.
Speech Clinic. 1 M. W. F. Pe-209. No credit. STAFF.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS


1. Will there be a late registration fee charged to students registering after
June 12 for first term or July 24 for second term?
Answer: Yes. A late registration fee of $5 will be charged.

2. What is the last day on which a person may register by paying the late
registration fee?
Answer: First Term: June 14.
Second Term: July 26.

3. What is the maximum load a student may carry?
Answer: A student who in the last term of attendance at the University
of Florida made an honor point average below 1.00 (C) may take
a credit hour load of six. A student who made an honor point
average of 1.00 (C) or above may take a credit hour load of nine.
Transfer students may take nine credit hours of work during
their first term of attendance. See page 122 for a change in this
regulation, beginning with the 1940 Summer Session.

4. How many semester hours of credit may be earned during the summer by
attendance at both terms?
Answer: 12 to 18, depending upon the student's honor point average.

5. May students who expect to receive degrees or diplomas at the end of
either term of the Summer Session be given permission to carry more hours
than provided for in No. 3 above?
Answer: No. Exceptions will not be made under any circumstances.

6. May a student complete a correspondence course while attending the Summer
Session?
Answer: Yes, but the hours carried will count in the regular load.

7. a. Who will submit the grades for students not in the General College who
take comprehensive courses?
Answer: In such cases the grades will be submitted by the instructors
concerned and not by the Board of Examiners.
b. How much credit will a student in such cases be allowed for the comn-
prehensive course?
Answer: The student will be allowed the credit assigned to such a course.
c. May students registered in the Upper Division apply to take compre-
hensive examinations in courses for which the student is not currently
registered?
Answer: No. General College students only are permitted to take com-
prehensive examinations by application.





QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS


8. Is there a graduation at the end of the first term?
Answer: Yes.

9. May one visit the classes in the laboratory school?
Answer: Yes. Application should be made to the Principal, 120 Yonge
Building. (Only kindergarten and the first six grades will be
taught this summer.)

10. To whom should application be made for part-time work?
Answer: Dean of Students.

11. To whom should application be made for Summer Session loans?
Answer: Director of the Summer Session.

12. To whom should application be made for approved room lists?
Answer: Dean of Students.

13. To whom should application be made for a room reservation in the
dormitories?
Answer: Business Manager. (See page 165 for application blank.)

14. Must one rooming in the dormitories eat in the cafeteria?
Answer: No, but see pages 119 and 120 for special rates.

15. May children be registered in the laboratory school and live in the dormi-
tories when the mother is a regularly registered student of the Summer
Session?
Answer: Each case will be acted upon separately. Application should be
made to the Dean of Students.

16. Will there be Saturday classes?
Answer: First Term: No. (Except in the College of Law.)
Second Term: Yes.

17. May one comply with the requirements for extension of certificate during
either term?
Answer: Yes.

18. May one get two extensions on a certificate by attending both terms of the
Summer Session?
Answer: No. Only one extension is given.

19. How can information regarding registration procedure be secured?
Answer: By consulting the bulletin boards in the various buildings on the
morning of registration day. Also see page 164.





164 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


SPECIAL DIRECTIONS FOR MAIL REGISTRATION

Note: If the following directions are carefully followed you will be able to complete
most of your registration by mail and avoid the inconvenience of standing in long lines
on registration day.

1. Fill out the Application Blank found on the last page of this bulletin and mail it
promptly to the Office of the Registrar. If this form is received before June 1 (July 10,
if you expect to attend the second term only) registration blanks will be mailed to you.
These will include your registration permit and fee card. NO REGISTRATION
BLANKS WILL BE MAILED AFTER JUNE 1. Persons not filing the application
before that time will have to register in the usual manner.

2. The registration forms should be carefully and COMPLETELY filled in. All requested
information is SIGNIFICANT.

3. Do not register for more than the maximum load as indicated on the top of your
registration blank.

4. Be sure to fill out the fee card as directed and send a check or money order for the
amount of your fees. To determine what your fees are follow this scale:*
If you are carrying six credits or less your registration fee is ............ $17.50
If you are carrying seven credits your registration fee is ..-.................. $18.50
If you are carrying eight credits your registration fee is ................. $19.50
If you are carrying nine credits your registration fee is ................. $20 50

To the amount of your registration fee add the failure fee that is indicated on YOUR
registration permit, and send remittance to cover the total. If you have not actually
lived in Florida for the entire twelve months preceding June 1, 1938, you must add
another $10.00. NO REGISTRATION WILL BE ACCEPTED UNLESS ACCOM-
PANIED BY FULL REMITTANCE FOR ALL FEES DUE.

5. IF MONEY IS SENT FOR ROOM RENT OR MEAL TICKETS BE SURE TO
ACCOMPANY THIS REMITTANCE WITH A LETTER EXPLAINING JUST
WHAT THE ADDITIONAL REMITTANCE IS TO COVER.

THERE IS NO OBLIGATION TO ATTEND THE SUMMER SESSION AFTER
THIS PRELIMINARY REGISTRATION HAS BEEN MADE, AND A FULL REFUND
OF FEES WILL BE MADE IF PRELIMINARY REGISTRATION IS CANCELLED
BY FRIDAY, JUNE 9.


*For Fees for College of Law see page 118.






DORMITORY INFORMATION


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


To be filled out by each student who is planning to live in the dormitories for the
1939 Summer Session-and mailed to the Business Office, attention Miss Baker.


Mrs.
1. Miss ...................................................................................................................................................1. Miss
Last name First name (in full)


2. A address .. ............................................................................................................ ............................
Street and number City County State


3. I wish assignment for the 1st term-2nd term-both terms.

(Please state if you are planning to attend 1st term only, 2nd term only,
or both terms.)


BUCKMAN HALL

1st floor, Sec.

2nd floor, Sec.

3rd floor, Sec.

Rooms in Section D of this
of age.


THOMAS HALL
Section B

1st floor

2nd floor

3rd floor


Remodeled Sections
A-C-D-E
single or double

1st floor

2nd floor

3rd floor


NEW DORMITORY

1st floor

2nd floor

3rd floor

4th floor

Rooms in Sections A and G
21 years of age.

For rates in the dormitories


......................

............ 1-1 ----- .....

............................

dormitory have been







------------

................. ..........









.......... ......

............................

............................


reserved for students under 21 years


of this dormitory have been reserved for students under



see pages 119 and 120.

[ 165 ]1


.11 ........... I ......... _.

............................

.......................







- .......... I ...............

............... ............

............................


............................

.....................

I ....................







............................

............................

............................





REQUEST FOR PERMISSION TO LIVE OFF CAMPUS


To the Office of the Dean of Students:

I hereby request permission to be allowed to live off campus during first term, second
term, both terms, of the 1939 Summer Session. (Underscore terms desired.)

In support of this request, the following considerations are offered:

1. I am ................. years of age or over.

2. I have already received a .................................................... degree and am now taking
graduate work.

3. I have been self-supporting during the past year through the following employment:





4. If granted permission to live off campus, I will live in the house appearing on the
Approved Rooming House List at the address below:


(address) (householder)

5. Rooming off campus will be of benefit to me because: ..........................................












(S ig n ed ) ..................................................................................

A d d ress ..............................................................................................



D a te ...................................... ....................................


Approved': .............................................

Disapproved: ............................ ....... ................



[166]





APPLICATION BLANK 1939 SUMMER SESSION-UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

(If you wish to attend the first or both terms of the 1939 Summer Session this form
should be filled out completely and mailed to the Registrar before June 1. If you wish
to attend the second term only it should be mailed before July 10.)

Mr.


C L FF


N am e M rs ...............................................................* ....................... .......................... .. *.. ... ......................................... .. ............... ........................
Miss (Last Name) (First Name) (Middle Name) married women
please give
husband's initials
H om e A address ..................................... ... ................. ........ ..... ............. ....... ........... -. .............. ....... ..... ................ .......................................................... .....
St. & No., Box No., or Rural Rt. City County State
I wish to register for the term beginning June 12 July 24 (cross out one) in the college checked below:
.......... College of Agriculture ............College of Business Administration ............School of Forestry .......... College of Law
........... School of Architecture ........... College of Education ........... General College ........School of Pharmacy
............College of Arts and Sciences ............College of Engineering ............ Graduate School
Do you expect to receive a degree or diploma from the University of Florida? ........................ Do you expect to graduate from the University
(yes or no)
of Florida this summer? ..................... If yes, which term? ........................ What degree? ..................
(yes or no) (1st or 2nd)
Have you attended the University of Florida before? .............. Give date of last session you attended here ........................................ Have you
(yes or no)
earned any credit through the General Extension Division of the University of Florida? ...-. --n ..- Have you attended any college
(yes or no)
or University other than the University of Florida? ..................... If the answer is yes, list the institutions attended in chronological order:
(yes or no)
Institution Location Dates of Attendance






Are You a
Date of birth ............................................ Place of birth.................................. Race ............... Religious Preference................................... M em ber? ................
Month Day Year (yes or no)
Father's Occupation (if retired or deceased give occupation while living and active) ............................................................................................
YOUR Occupation last year (Check ONE) ........College Student ........H. S. Student ........Elem. Teacher ........Jr. H. S. Teacher ........H. S.
Teacher ........School Superintendent ........Principal ........College Teacher. If some other occupation, please name: .....................................
*Married women will please use their own first and middle names. If you have been registered at the University of Florida under any other names
please list on back.
THIS FORM IS NOT TO BE USED BY APPLICANTS FOR THE SPECIAL TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION SESSION
TO BE HELD IN DAYTONA BEACH. SEE PAGE 117.




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