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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00292
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: April 1940
Copyright Date: 1946
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00292
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 107
    Main
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
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        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
Full Text
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fThe University Record
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l ..University of Florida

,":i.Unive rsit y of Florid a


Bulletin


School


the


of


Trade


and


Industrial


Education


1940


Sponsored jointly by the


State


University of


Department


Florida and the


Education


First Term-June


12 to July


Second Term--July 3 to July 24


Third


Term-July 24


to August 14


Vol.


XXXV, Series I


No.


April


1, 1940

















The Record Comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the
bulletins of information, announcements of special courses of
instruction, and reports of the University Officers.


These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply
for them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or
what information is desired. Address


THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida


Research Publications.-Research publications contain results of
research work. Papers are published as separate monographs num-
bered in several series.


There is no free mailing list of these publications.


Exchanges


with institutions are arranged by the University Library. Corre-
spondence concerning such exchanges should be addressed to the
University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The
issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the
Committee on Publications. Requests for individual copies, or for
any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should be
addressed to the University Library, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, Florida.


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TuE COMMnTEsE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Calendar


Administrative


Faculty .
Advisory
General
Fees .......
Expenses


Library ....
Recreation
Admission
Residence


Officers


Committee
Information


- -......-- .-.........--.. 121
................... ........ 122
-..-.- ..- ..-.....------------... 122


Requirements


............ 123


General


Comprehensive


Bachelor's
Graduate


College


Examinations


Degree
School


Registration


Master's


............ 129


Degree


Curricula


Time


Schedule


First Term
Distributive


Trade
Trade
Second


Occupations
Distributive


Industrial


Education
Education


Education


Term


Distributive


Occupations


Education


Trade
Trade


and
and


Distributive
Industrial


Education
Education


Guidance


Third


Term


Distributive


Trade
Trade


Occupations


Distributive
Industrial


Education


e Education
Education .


Guidance


School


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UNIVERSITY


IMPORTANT


prospective students who plan


OF FLORIDA


T NOTICE


to enroll at the Summer School


of Trade and Industrial Education should fill out the application


blanks


found on pages 145 and 147
trar, University of Florida,


of this


bulletin and mail


them to the Regis-


Gainesville, Florida, before June 1.


Previous


attendance does not waive this requirement.


Report upon arrival


to the Seabreeze High School for all informa-


tion relative to registration


rooms,


or apartment


The Seabreeze


High


School is located at the corner of


Grandview


Avenue and Earl Street on


the Peninsula.


For further information,


write to Robert D.


Dolley


Director of the


School of Trade and Industrial Education,


Florida,
Florida.


or to


Dean


Norman,


Capitol Building,


University


Florida,


Tallahassee,
Gainesville,


CALENDAR


1940


FIRST TERM


June
June
June


, Wednesday
, Thursday,


, Friday


8 a.m .......
a.m ........


Registration


Classes begin.


for the


First


Term.


Late registration fee $5.


Last day for registration for the First Term,


changing schedules,


or for adding courses.


June
June


, Saturday


, Friday


8:30 a.m.....


Placement


Tests-Room


Last day for dropping courses without receiving
grade of E and being assessed failure fee.


'. W







SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


SECOND TERM


July


, Wednesday, 8 a.m.......Registration for the Second Term.


July


, Friday,


8 a.m............. ...Classes begin.


Late registration fee $5.


July


5, Friday .................... Last day for registration for the Second Term,


for changing schedules,


July


or for adding courses.


6, Saturday, 8:30 a.m.....Placement Tests-Room 11.


July 12,


Friday


Last day for dropping courses without receiving
grade of E and being assessed failure fee.


July


, Wednesday


...-............ Last


application


removal


deficiencies,


or for


extension


Trade


Industrial Education Certificates.


July 24,


Wednesday


..................Second


Term ends.


All grades are due in


office of the Registrar by 5 p.m.




THIRD TERM


July 24,


Wednesday,


8 a.m.. ... Registration for the Third Term.


July 25,


Thursday


8 a.m........... Classes begin.


Late registration fee $5.


July 26,


Friday ......... .............. ... Last day for registration for the Third Term, for


changing schedules,


or for adding courses.


July 27,

August


Saturday,

2, Friday


8:30 a.m.....Placement Tests-Room


......................Last day for dropping courses without receiving







UNIVERSITY


OFFICERS


FLORIDA


ADMINISTRATION


JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.CL., DJil
the University
COLIN ENGLISH, MA., LL.D., Ed.D., State Superintendent
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Director of the Summer
ROBERT D. DOLLEY, M.S., Director of the School of
Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M. S., Registrar and Dean (
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, Business Manager
MARY M. KARL, Principal, Demonstration School
WINSTON W. LITTLE, M.A., Dean of the General College,


tt., L.H.D., President of


of Public Instruction
Session
Trade and Industri


Graduate School
of the University


Gainesville


Assistants in Administration


LEWIS F. BLALOCK, M.A., Director of Admissions
RICHARD S. JOHNSON, B.S.P., Assistant Registrar
ANNITA WILSON JONES, BSA., Transcript Clerk, Office of the Registrar, Gainesville
JOHN V. MCQUTnTY, M.A., Examiner, Gainesville
IRENE ERSKINE PERRY, B.S., Administrative Assistant, Gainesville
JEAN BRADLEY HAMNER, B.S., Administrative Assistant
LUCILLE T. MOORE, B.S., Librarian
HERMAN F. HINTON, B.E., Supervisor Instruction
EDITH CORRY WEBB, B.A., Secretary of Examinations, Gainesville
MAUDE GRIFFITH WOODS, Supervisor Practice Teaching
BRUCE V. DAVIS, Supervisor of Student Activities
HELEN SNYDER, Supervisor Duplicating Bureau


FACULTY


E. W. ALEXANDER, M.E., Assistant Principal, Hadley Vc
Louis, Missouri
ARDA TALBOT ALLEN, M.A., Consultant in Vocational Gum
Public Schools, Texas
ROBERTA ASHFORD, Commercial Education, Vocational
Florida
P. E. BABCOCK, M.A., Assistant State Supervisor of Trade
cation, Georgia
W. P. BOYD, M.A., School of Business Administration,
A q.n44.'J.S^ mthwlnrn


icational

idance,

School,


School,


San


Antonio


Jacksonville,


and Industrial Edu-


University


al


Texas,








SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


PAUL


CHAPMAN, D.SC.,


Dean of Agricultural


College,


University of


Georgia,


Athens, Georgia


COMSTOCK


College,


E. F. DANIEL


ROBERT D. DOLLEY


, B.S.Ed., Professor


of Trade


and Industrial


Education


Trinidad, Colorado


., State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education


M.S


, State


Missouri


., State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education


Florida


CHARLES M.


EDWARDS


, Professor


Retail


Advertising,


New


York


University


ANNE H.


FRANZ


Coordinator, Diversified


, B.A.,


Cooperative


Training,


Jackson-


ville, Florida


BEN E. HARRIS


M.E.


, Assistant State Supervisor


Trade and Industrial Educa-


tion


HERMAN


Alabama
HINTON,


B.E.


, State Coordinator,


Trade and


Industrial


Education,


Florida


ILA MAE


HOBSON


Department


Home


Economics


, Emily


Griffith


Oppor-


tunity School,


Denver, Colorado


BRIANT HOBSON


, A. B., Head,


Secretarial Training Department,


Drake School,


New


York City


WALTER E. KEYES


M.S.


, Coordinator of Industrial Education


Tulsa


, Oklahoma


HAROLD J


KIHL


, Director, Display Department,


R. H. Macy & Co.,


New York City


I. M. MCALPIN


., Coordinator, Diversified Cooperative Training, Plant City,


Florida


R. B. MCHENRY, M.S., Director of Vocational Education,


Tulsa


, Oklahoma


FRED


M. MADDEN


B.F.A.


Instructor


Commercial


Technical


High


School,


Miami


Florida


GLADYS


MILLER, M


., Decorating


Editor,


Mademoiselle;


Instructor,


School


Retailing, New York


University


President


, Service Programs,


ROLLAND


NORRIS


., Coordinator, Diversified


Cooperative Training,


Day-


tona Beach


Florida


VIOLET O'REILLY


MS


., Principal,


L. E. Rabouin Vocational School, New Orleans,


Louisiana


ELLEN


PATTON


B.S.C


., Instructor, Dobbins


Vocational


High


School.


Phila-


delphia, Pennsylvania


ADELLE PENNINGTON


B.A.


, Principal,


Vocational School


Jacksonville


Florida


FRANK A.


PETRIE, B.S.,


E. R. PLOWDENN


B.S.


Director of Vocational Education


, Orlando, Florida


, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education,


Ala-


bama


JOHN B.


POPE, M.B.A., Special Agent, Distributive Education,


United States Of-


fice of Education


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116 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

B. H. VAN OOT, Ph.D., State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education,
Virginia
G. Gur VIA, B.S., Director of Training, Newport News Ship Building and Dry
Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia
ETHEL WALLACE, B.A., Adult Education Division, Omaha Public Schools, Omaha,
Nebraska
GEORGE E. WALLACE, M.A., Professor of Industrial Education, Mississippi State
College
WALTER F. WHITE, BA., Pacific Coast Manager, H. M. Rowe Company, San
Francisco, California

Special Lecturers

M. D. MOBLEY, Ph.D., State Director, Vocational Education, Georgia
RALL I. GRIGSBY, M.A., Educational and Technical Consultant, Curriculum
Problems, United States Office of Education
GEORGE P. HAMBRECHT, Ph.D., State Director, Vocational Education, Wisconsin

Advisory Committee

C. E. RAKESTRAW, Southern Regional Agent, U. S. Office of Education
W. J. BREIT, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Arkansas
W. D. GARDNER, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Mississippi
J. F. CANNON, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Georgia
G. W.: COGGIN, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, North
Carolina
L. K. COVELLE, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Oklahoma
J. R. D. EDDY, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Texas
E. G. LUDTKE, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Louisiana
E. R. PLOWDEN, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Alabama
W. A. SEELEY, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Tennessee
B. R. TURNER, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, South
Carolina
B. H. VAN OOT, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Virginia








SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


GENERAL INFORMATION

Nature and Purpose of School

The University of Florida in cooperation with the State Department of Public
Instruction, will open the third annual session of the School of Trade and
Industrial Education at Daytona Beach, June 12.
With the advice and counsel of the State Supervisors, the School is planned
to serve the entire Southern Region. A comprehensive curriculum especially
designed to meet the needs of teachers of Trade and Industrial Education and
Distributive Occupations, leading to a bachelor's or master's degree is offered.


Many
schedule
July 3 to
all three
Building


vocational teachers with short vacations will find convenient the
arrangement of three terms of three weeks each: June 12 to July 3,
July 24, and July 24 to August 14. Students may attend any one or
terms as they desire. Classes are held in the Seabreeze High School
and meet two hours a day, six days a week during each term.


Advisory Committee


The State Supervisors of Trade and Industrial Education in the Southern
Region headed by Mr. C. E. Rakestraw, Southern Regional Agent of the United
States Office of Education, serve as an advisory committee for the School of
Trade and Industrial Education. The University is fortunate in having them
as advisors, and their willingness to serve in this capacity affords a most
direct means of making courses immediately applicable to local conditions.


Instructional Staff


The faculty is selected from the outstanding leaders in vocational education.
Many are from the neighboring southern states, and are fully acquainted with


southern problems, hence find it easy to
Others come from more distant states
the specific fields which they teach.
opportunity, not only of receiving instru
also of conferring with them personally
of the faculty devote their time while o0
problems brought before them. It is f
full benefit of the school is realized.


make their courses fit southern needs.
and possess exceptional knowledge of
Those attending the school have the
action from able men and women, but
about problems of interest. Members
n the campus to the discussion of the


such


personal


contacts


that


For Whom the School Is Intended
S








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


Superintendents or school officials exercising control over a subsidized
program of Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education.
Directors, Supervisors and Coordinators of Trade and Industrial and
Distributive Education or other subsidized vocational services.
Those employed in industrial or distributive occupations who wish to
take technical courses and who are not particularly interested in college
credit or teaching.


To offer educational opportunity
pose of the School, and the courses
of their needs. Teachers and student
should attend the regular Summer
Gainesville.


to these groups of students is the sole pur-
have been planned especially to take care
its interested in other branches of learning
Session at the University of Florida in


Courses

Realizing that there is a wide difference in the type of work performed by


personnel engaged in the various branch ,
Distributive Education, the University is
accomplish the objectives of the School
course content must be based upon the nee
engaged in the respective branch services.


services of Trade and Industrial and
of the conviction that in order to
with the greatest effectiveness, the
ds and requirements of the personnel
The courses are, therefore, organized
usre-o a


in groups under the following classifications: Trade and Indl
Trade School Teachers; For Evening School Teachers; For C
Related Teachers of Diversified Cooperative Training; For Ge
tion Teachers; For Directors, Supervisors and Coordinators, ai
jects. Distributive Education-For Evening School Teachers;


ustries-For Day
:oordinators and
!neral Continua-
id General Sub-
For Day Part-


Time Teachers; For Coordinators and Related Teachers Part-Time Cooperative
Training; Technical Subjects and General Subjects.
Students will avoid mistakes and errors in selecting courses by studying
carefully the course descriptions and noting the group classification under
which the courses are listed. To derive the greatest immediate benefit from
summer school, students should before selecting other courses exhaust the
course offerings planned for the service in which they are employed.


Demonstration School

Through a cooperative arrangement the Daytona Beach Vocational School
is operated in conjunction with the summer session and used by the University
for its practice teaching courses.


t








SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


social and recreational activities of the organization are held. The club spon-
sors a dance and an outing regularly once a week throughout the session along
with numerous social functions.

State Clubs


There are a number of state clubs the membership of which is composed
of students from the various states. These clubs are very active during the
entire summer session in the promotion of activities of all kinds calculated
to help students to become better acquainted and stimulate a friendly hospitable
atmosphere about the school.


Iota


Lambda


Sigma


Iota Lambda Sigma is a national
serving with distinction in Trade ar
To be eligible for membership in
Florida one must be outstanding in
scholastic average of B or better.


honorary professional fraternity for persons
id Industrial or Industrial Arts Education.
the Kappa Chapter of the University of
one of these two vocational fields with a


Tau Gamma Sigma


Tau Gamma Sigma
ternity for women. Bo
University of Florida.
scholastic ability and
Education.


is a professional honorary Industrial
th the Grand and Alpha chapters are
The purpose of this fraternity is to
professional attainment in the field


Education fra-
located at the
recognize high
of Industrial


Assemblies


All students
blies which are
of the assembly
announcements
students will be


and faculty members are expected to attend the general assem-
held once a week throughout the summer session. A schedule
es will be supplied each student upon registering. Important
are made at the general assemblies for the observance of which
held responsible.


Announcements

Important announcements will be posted on the school bulletin board. Stu-
dents should read the notices on the bulletin board daily. Students are held
ooann nahia f- r oil onnriintrmn nft morla in the mflrna .l ARTqnmhlv. rnnsft. nn








UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


Employment


The School of Trade and Industrial Education does not maintain an employ-
ment bureau as such. It does, however, interest itself in finding employment
for capable qualified individuals and in recommending suitable personnel when
requested to do so. The School has placed nearly one hundred per cent of the
students trained.


Students' Depository

For the convenience of students while in residence at Daytona Beach, funds
may be deposited with the cashier. A nominal service charge will be made.

Duplicating Bureau


The School maintains a duplicating bureau, well equipped with duplicating
and bindery equipment and managed by expert operators. Clerical work and
duplicating for the school and faculty members is done on short notice. Stu-
dent publications, committee reports, class reports and term reports or syllabi
are reproduced at cost.


Credits

Students who qualify for entrance in the School of Trade and Industrial
Education in accordance with the provisions limiting classes of students to be
served, may take the courses offered for college credit or to satisfy certification
requirements, or both, or for no credit at all.
Credits earned in the School of Trade and Industrial Education will apply
as residence credit at the University towards the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Education, with a major in Trades and Industries or Distributive Education.
Students who have attended another institution and now wish to work towards
this degree at the University of Florida should see the requirements for admis-
sion to advanced standing.
The maximum number of credits a student may earn in a single term is
four for undergraduate students, and three for graduate students. All students
including those not desiring college credit must comply with the requirements
listed on pages of this bulletin.

Certification









SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 121

Fees

A registration fee of $12 a term will be charged each student whether he is
from Florida or from another state. There is no tuition charge.
There is a failure fee of $2.50 per semester hour for any course failed* during
the last period of attendance. This fee must be paid before the student is per-
mitted to reregister in the University. A late registration fee of $5 is charged
students registering late. See Calendar, pages 112, 113.
AUITroRS:-Auditor permits may be secured for $5 entitling the holder to
attend 18 regular class periods of any class in the school subject to the ap-
proval of the respective instructors. Auditor permits are valid throughout the
session. Individuals will be limited to one auditor permit per term.

Expenses

Living expenses are moderate in Daytona Beach. Rooms may be had from
three dollars to six dollars per week and meals from twenty-five cents. The
city is amply provided with hotels, apartment houses, boarding houses, res-
taurants, and cafeterias.
It is suggested that those who wish apartments come a day or two in
advance as it will be more satisfactory to inspect accommodations of this kind
personally.
Modern, up-to-date tourist and trailer camps are numerous and accommo-
dations in these camps may be secured at nominal rates.
A lounge and lunch room in which light meals and confections are served is
maintained in the school building for the convenience of students.

Library

The library of the School contains over 6000 volumes including reference
books, encyclopedias, dictionaries, year books, periodicals, and government pub-
lications. These volumes are supplemented with a complete library of reference
material on Trade and Industrial, Distributive and General Vocational Educa-
tion. The advantages of the library are made readily accessible through a
complete card catalog and the assistance of a librarian.
Hours:- The library will be open Monday through Saturday at 8:00 a.m. and
close at 9:00 p.m. except on Friday when it will close at 6:00 p.m., and on
Saturday when it will close at 12:00 noon.
MM ^- .. _. ST. _








UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


Special Lecturers

A series of special lectures by national authorities in Vocational Education
will be given at convenient intervals during the nine weeks session. The topics
to be discussed by these lecturers will follow a planned sequence calculated
to integrate their observations with the current subject matter under con-
sideration in a number of the courses offered.

RECREATION


Because the enrollment in the School for Trade and Industrial Education is
drawn largely from persons employed twelve months in the year, every effort
has been made to select a place offering not only the facilities for study but
those for spending an ideal vacation. Daytona Beach meets these requirements.
The authorities have made available the plant of the Seabreeze High School,
with its modern equipment, one block from the ocean.
Recreational possibilities abound at Daytona. There is the beach with
its motoring length of twenty-three miles and low tide width of five hundred
feet for those who enjoy surf bathing and beach activities. Fishing is excellent


from
from
hand
may
A


the pier,
Daytona.
ball, lawn
be enjoye'
number o


United States-
Jungles--Marir
Bok Tower-ar


or by boat on the Halifax, or in the inland lakes a short drive
Deep sea fishing boats leave the city docks daily. Golf, tennis,
bowling, shuffle board, speed boating, trap and skeet shooting
d by those who prefer these sports.
f points of interest such as, St. Augustine, the oldest city in the
--Silver Springs, the largest spring in the world-Tropical
te Studios-the old mission ruins-the Florida Cypress Gardens-
Id the Fountain of Youth, are only a few miles from Daytona


Beach and can be reached by car in a
most scenic highways.


very short time over some of Florida's


The average summer temperature at Daytona Beach is 79 degrees.

ADMISSION


Students


quirements of
1. For stu
See
2. For stu
pect to


wishing to receive college credit


the Unive
dents who
Admission
dents who
receive a


must meet


rsity of Florida. The requirements are:
are entering college for the first time.
to the General College.
are transferring from another institution
degree from the University of Florida.


entrance re-


n and who ex-


Official transcripts sent directly to the Registrar


from all institu-








SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


It is the student'
in numbers 1, 2, or
WILL BE ISSUED
ABOVE.
The standing of


Education with
interests of the
work for a deg
Education, will
Examiners, and


s responsibility to supply the proper credentials as outlined
3 above. NO TRANSCRIPTS FOR COLLEGE CREDIT
FOR ANY PERSON FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE


I


3ach student


advanced standing


student always
ree either thro
be determined
the Director of


in
ugh
at
the


entering the School of Trade and Industrial
will be considered individually, with the best
mind. A program for the completion of the
the General College, or in the College of
a conference with the Board of University
School of Trade and Industrial Education.


B. Students not wishing to work toward a degree and who do not desire a
transcript of work completed must present evidence of their eligibility for
admission in accordance with one of the provisions limiting the class of stu-


dents to be served by the School


(see page 117).


Admission to the General College

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the
General College:
1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required,
although no specific high school units are required.
2. Consistency of the high school record.
3. Achievement in high school.
4. Personal qualities.
5. Recommendation of high school principal.
6. Standing on Placement Tests.
All applicants should submit the Application Blanks at the back of this
bulletin, and in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent
to the Registrar. The latter may be secured from high school principals of
the State. Applicants for admission from other states may secure an Applica-
tion for Admission blank by writing the Registrar.
The Placement Tests will be given at 8:30 a.m. June 15, July 6, and July 27,
Saturday, in Room 11, Seabreeze High School Building. All applicants for
admission to the General College are required to take these tests.


Residence Requirements


1. The minimum residence requirement
two regular semesters, or one regular seme
terms or nine three-week summer terms.
Cfn IASw -4 naf4 kIS e.nrt i w t.nAn .4,.aw an+- a


t for the baccalaureate degree is
aster and four three-week summer
New students offering advanced
an +trn n na ta Hi a TThI YTOPai tir fil l-


v








OF FLORIDA


made only upon written petition approved by the faculty of
cerned, but in no case may the amount of extension work
more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required for
degree.


Amount of Extension


the college con-
permitted exceed
a baccalaureate


Work Permitted


Ne person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward
a degree by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be
allowed to take more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's
degree by correspondence study or extension class work. No person will be
allowed to take more than 9 credits by correspondence during the summer
vacation period.

Student Responsibility

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper
courses and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should
confer with the Director of the School several days before registration regarding


choice of courses.
Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar,
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in
expect to receive the degree.
Each student is responsible for every course for wi
can be dropped or changed only with the approval of
and by presentation of the cards authorizing the oh
Registrar.

THE GENERAL COLLEGE


formal application for a
L the term in which they

which he registers. Courses
the Director of the School
ange at the Office of the


The General College has been organized to administer the work of the
freshman and sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning
students will register in this College.
The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College
in two years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter
time, and others may find it necessary to remain in the General College for a
longer period.
A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this
program the University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all
students alike. On this foundation that has meaning and significance to the


UNIVERSITY








SCHOOL


OF TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing
for advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper
Division, thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization.
3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give
to college training, and consequently should concern themselves with
general viewpoints and major understandings, instead of with introduc-
tions to special subject matter fields which they may never enter.
4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general
education incident to the changing conditions of modern life. The sub-
ject matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation are
to be constantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the student,
to stimulate his intellectual curiosity, to encourage independent study,
and to cultivate the attitudes necessary for enlightened citizenship.


5.
to gz
more
vast
and
in t


Guidance. Every part of the General College program is designed
ide students. It was felt that too much of the freshman and sopho-
s work of former years had little meaning and significance to the
majority. The material studied was preparatory and foundational,
became meaningful only when the student pursued additional courses
ie junior and senior years. The material of the comprehensive


courses is selected and tested with guidance as a primary function.
While, of necessity, we must look forward to distant goals, the General
College is trying to present materials that are directly related to life
experiences and will immediately become a part of the student's thinking
and guide him in making correct "next steps." Thus the whole pro-


gram-placement tests, progress reports, vocational aptitude tests
elected material in the comprehensive courses, student conferences,
visions for superior students, adjustment for individual differe
election privileges, and comprehensive examinations-are all parts
plan designed to guide students.


, se-
pro-
nces,
of a


Thus guidance is not attempted at one office by one individual with
a small staff. The whole drive of the General College program is one
of directing the thinking of the student.

Comprehensive Examinations

The student must successfully pass comprehensive course examinations-
eight or more-to complete the work of the General College, These examina-
tions, administered by the Board of University Examiners, will be given in
January, May and August of each year. General College students who are not
enrolled in a course at the time the examination is given and who wish to take
snv Pnnrshi iflni17 orm inrinrnQSn nnizt snnhr in urritincr t-n tht flnart ad TThL.








UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


Should a student fail a comprehensive course examination, he may qualify
to repeat the examination by repeating the course, or by further study. Evi-
dence of additional preparation must be submitted to the Board of University
Examiners with an application in writing to repeat the examination.


Graduation

When a student has completed his program in the General College and has
passed the comprehensive examinations and met the other requirements of the
General College curriculum, he will be granted the Associate of Arts Certificate.
Students who pass three-fourths of the comprehensive examinations with the
standing "Excellent" will, on graduation from the General College, receive the
certificate of Associate of Arts, With High Honors.

Notice to All Vocational Teachers


The comprehensive courses of the General College are of
and value to the vocational teacher. For the teacher ente
first time, the General College affords an excellent means of
clusions of the first two years of college study.
The vocational teacher will find his progress through t
greatly accelerated due to his background of practical
experiences. Syllabi on all General College Courses are ai
A complete set may be found in the Library of the Sc]


special significance
ring college for the
expediting the con-


,he General College
work and teaching
rallable to students.
hool of Trade and


Industrial Education.


Students entering the School of Trade and Industrial Education may com-
plete their major in Trades and Industries or Distributive Education before
registering for General College Courses or they may apply for examinations on
General College Courses any time after registration in the School of Trade
and Industrial Education.
Students interested in the General College should consult the Registrar for
further information during the first week after registration in the School of
Trade and Industrial Education at Daytona Beach.

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE


Requirements:


Must be regularly admitted


to the


University.








SCHOOL OF


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


PROGRAM OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


For those students graduating from


the General


College of the


University


of Florida,


completion of A and B listed below


General College Program: *


C- 2
C- 3
C-41
C-42
C- 5
C- 6
C- 7


**C- 8
**C- 9


Man and the Social World
Man and the Physical World


Reading,


Speaking


Writing


Man and His Thinking
General Mathematics
The Humanities
Man and the Biological World


Electives
Electives
Electives


in Education.


................................


6 semester
5 semester
5 semester


hours
hours
hours


Upper Division Program:


Education


9 semester


Trade and Industrial Education.... 22 semester


* *Approved


Electives


hours
hours


29 semester hours


Total ................. .... .


60 semester hours in


Upper


Division.


For those students who do not graduate from the General


College of the


University


Florida


(Note:


The


following


program


outlined


convenience of transfer students.


The Board of University Examiners may


waive certain


of the


following


requirements if


record


the student


warrants


special


consideration):


Physical and Biological Science. ...... ..


English C
Literature


composition


48 semester


hours


Social


Studies


Psychology or Philosophy
athematics .....................


Education


15 semester hours


Trade and Industrial
**Approved Electives ...


22 semester
39 semester


hours
hours


Education............








OP FLORIDA


PROGRAM OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF BOCIMBE IN
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION


The same provisions relating to
Trade and Industrial Education
in Distributive Education except
tributive Education courses and
the Distributive Education field.


the bachelor's degree with a major in
will apply to the degree with a major
that the major study shall be in Dis-
the experience requirements shall be in


PLANNING PROGRAM OF STUDY


Procedure:


1.
2.
3.

4.


Note:


Become regularly admitted to the Universil
Consult the Director of the School about sa
Secure through the Director a list of course
ing to the degree.
In case advanced standing is wished, the
scripts of credit evaluated by the Registrar
about list of courses to be pursued.
Transcripts of credit must be sent direct
Institution in which the credit was earned.


y.
election of courses.
as approved by the Dean lead-

applicant should have tran-
before consulting the Director


ly to


Registrar


from


THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


All graduate study in all of the colleges and schools
administered by the Graduate Council.


University


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN THE SCHOOL OF
TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


A bachelor's degree from a standard college or university.
At least one year's continuous employment in an approved Trade and
Industrial program for those wishing to major in Trade and Industrial
Education, or one year's continuous employment in an approved Dis-
tributive Education program for those wishing to major in Distributive
Education. The programs in which the experience is secured must meet
all the requirements of the State Plan for Trade and Industrial or
Distributive Education for the State in which the applicant was employed.
Eight semester hours in approved teacher training courses in Trade and
Industrial Education of which two semester hours shall be in Super-
>rOTalnn finnanmr aa haQtti iinn aitr ii Qnrtrair nrntodir@ ani/ firm- tomn ..r hni


Note:








SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


Candidates must have completed three years of successful experience in
an approved program of Trades and Industries or Distributive Education
before a degree can be conferred.

Registration


A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be
transmitted directly to the Registrar's office by the Registrar of the institution
in which the credits have been earned. Transcripts presented by students can-
not be accepted.
The transcript should be in the Registrar's office at least one months before
the opening of the school. If it appears from the student's record that he is
eligible for graduate study he will be referred to the Director of the School of
Trade and Industrial Education who will become the professor of the major
subject and will plan the courses the student is to take.
Students are urged to file transcripts ahead of the beginning of the school.
Under no circumstances will students be permitted to register who have not
fully complied with this request. Transcripts submitted directly by students
are not acceptable. Transcripts must be transmitted by the registrars of the
institutions in which the credits were earned.

Requirements for the Master's Degree With Major in Trade and
Industrial Education

Degree Offered.-Master of Arts in Education.
Residence Requirements.-See residence requirements page 123 this bulletin.
Transfer of Credits.--Under certain conditions transfer of a limited number
of credits to the University will be allowed. Transferred credits may reduce
the course requirements but not the residence, and work they represent shall
be included in the final examination.


Grades.-Passing grades for students registered in the Graduate School are
A and B. All other grades are failing.
Work Required.-Twenty-four semester hours are required for the degree
at least one half of which shall be in Trade and Industrial Education and the
remainder in related subject matter fields. The major study shall be in courses
numbered 500 and designated strictly for graduates. However, in case of
related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be taken upon
the approval of the Director of the School and the Dean of the Graduate School.
The student shall be guided entirely in the research procedure, preparation,
organization and form of the thesis by the Supervisor of Research. The student
should consult the Supervisor of Research immediately after admittance to the


Graduate Schobl concerning these matters. The thesis problem should be








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


Admission to Candidacy

Whether the student has been provisionally admitted or regularly admitted


to graduate studs
record at the end
fix definitely the
tion of the action
the student will


r, the Supervisory Committee shall review his entire a
of the first semester or summer session of residence w
additional residence or course requirements. Upon
of the Supervisory Committee by a formal vote of the
be admitted to candidacy for the degree subject to


academicc
rork and
ratifica-
faculty,
the ap-


proval by the Supervisory Committee of the


thesis problem selected.


Supervisory Committee.-The Supervisory Committee shall consist of the
Director of the School of Trade and Industrial Education, the Dean of the
Graduate School and the Supervisor of Research.
General Examinations.--It will be the duty of the Supervisory Committee,
when all work is complete or practically complete, including the regular courses
and the thesis, to conduct a general examination, either written or oral, or
both, to embrace: first, the thesis; second, the major subject; third, the minor
or minors; fourth, questions of a general nature pertaining to the student's
field of study. The Committee shall report in writing not later than one week
before the time for the conferring of the degree if all work has been completed
in a satisfactory manner and the student is recommended for the degree.
Work Done in Absentia.-Credit is not given for work done in absentia. No
courses may be taken for credit by extension or correspondence.


GRADUATE COURSES REQUIRED FOR MAJOR IN TRADE AND
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


TIE.

TIE.
TDE.
TIE.
TDE.
TIE.
TIE.
TDE.
TDE.


512.-Colloquium in Administration and Organ
Industrial Education
501.-Industrial and Economic Development in 1
502.-Organization and Administration of Adult
503.-Administration of Vocational Education.
504.-Philosophy of Vocational Education.
505.-Technical Schools-Their Organization a
506.-Apprenticeship and Labor Relations.
507.-Administration of Diversified Cooperative


508.-Research


Industrial


Distributive


ization


the South.
Extension


Trade


Training.


Control.


Training.
Education.


Recommended Minors








SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


GUIDANCE


GU.
GU.
GU.


400.-Organization and Administration of Guidance
401.-Local Guidance Program in the School and Community
402-3.-Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN
DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION

The same provisions relating to the Master's degree with a major in Trade
and Industrial Education will apply to the degree with a major in Distributive
Education, except that the major study shall be in Distributive Education
courses and the experience requirement shall be in the Distributive Education
field.

GRADUATE COURSES REQUIRED FOB A MAJOR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION


DOE. 500.-Colloquium in Administration and


Organization


of Distributive


TDE.
TDE.
TDE.
DOE.
DOE.
DOE.
DOE.


Occupations
502.-Organization and Admi
504.-Philosophy of Vocations
507.-Administration of Dive,
508.-Retail Buying and Marl
509.-Retail Merchandising
510.-Sales and Merchandise
511.-Store Management and


nistration of
1l Education
rsified Coope
keting


Promotion
Operation


Adult

rative


Extension


Training


Training


TDE. 508.-Research in Industrial and Distributive Education

Recommended Minors
TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


TIE.

TIE.
TIE.
TIE.
TIE.


512.---Colloquium in Administration and Org
Industrial Education
501.-Industrial and Economic Development
503.-Administration of Vocational Education
505.-Technical Schools--Their Organization
506.-Apprenticeship and Labor Relations


ranization


of Trade


South


Control


GUIDANCE


GU.
GU.
GU.


400.-Organization and Administration of Guidance
401.-Local Guidance Program in the School and Community
402-3.-Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance


rt_









UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


Trade and Industrial Education


Department
Number


First
Title Term


Time Offered
Second
Term


Third
Term


FOR DAY TRADE SCHOOL


TEACHERS


Organization Specific Subject Content..---...--..
Teaching Methods and Devices---------.--
Organization for Individual Instruction and Pro-
gression --.-...
Trade Shop Planning Organization and Control ...
Day Trade Related Instruction..-...-------------..


3to 5


8 to 10


Ito 3

10 to 12


10 to 12


10 to 12
Ito3


FOR EVENING SCHOOL


TEACHERS


TDE.
TDE.

TDE.


Evening Schools-Their Organization and Control..-
Organization of Subject Matter for Evening School
Classes ------..----- .-.----------
Teaching Methods and Devices for Evening School
Teachers -- -.......


8 to 10


10 to 12


10 to 12


FOR COORDINATORS AND RELATED TEACHERS,
DIVERSIFIED COOPERATIVE TRAINING


TDE.
TDE.
TDE.
TDE.
TDE.
TDE.


Organization for Diversified Occupational Training-
Occupational Surveys --.-----------
Student Counseling and Selection ..-. _.--
Industrial Plant Job Analysis ....-.. ---
Related Study Material ...... ...-.-
Coordination of Diversified Cooperative Training....


8 to 10
10 to 12
3to 5

ito 3


10 to 12


3 to 5


10 to l2
lto 3
8 to 10


8to 10
lto 3

8 to 10


FOR GENERAL CONTINUATION TEACHERS


General
Practlve
Practice
Practice
Practice
Practice
Practice


Continuation School Organization l--.
Teaching Office Practice and Filing_-.
Ieaching Shorthand -.... ... ...
Teaching Typewriting -------....................
Teaching Machine and Pen Bookkeeping.._
Teaching Academic Subjects-.-.-.......
Teaching Business English---...-------.


3to5


Ito 3
8 to10


8 to 10


10 to 12
8to 10


10 to 12


Practice Teaching Dictation and Transcription.--......


Ito 3


FOR DIRECTORS, SUPERVISORS AND COORDINATORS


8 to 10


10 to 12









SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


Department
Number


Time Offered
First Second Third
Term Term Term


Title


GENERAL SUBJECTS


TDE.
TDE.
TDE.

TDE.
TDE.
TDE.
TDE.
TDE.
TIE.


Graphic


Advanced Graphic Analysis ............_.........
History and Development of Vocational Education
in the United States-.... -.._... _.-....._--
Vocational Psychology __-.... __.-... -.....
Principles and Purposes of the Vocational Acts ... ..-
Safety Education .....
Advanced Vocational Psychology ....... ..... .
Applied Vocational Psychology --...-.-.. ............._
Tests and Measurements in Vocational Education.__


8 to 10
8 to 10


1to 3
ito 3


10 to 12
Ito 3


3to 5


lto 3


10 to 12


10 to 12


8 to 10


Guidance


Organization and Administration of Guidance........
Local Guidance Program in the School and Com-
munity .-.-......- ..... ..--_----.. ..__
Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in
Guidance ___....-_ .......


10 to 12


10 to 12

lto3


Distributive Education

BASIC COURSES FOR RETAILERS, SUPERVISORS AND
TEACHERS OF DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION


DOE.
DOE.
DOE.
DOE.
DOE.
DOE.
DOE.
DOE.
DON.
DOE.
DOE.


Retail Organization and Managementn ..-.-. .......-
Pashions . . ...... . ..... ... .
Textiles -_._ .....- -...-
Color, Line and Design_ s-..
Store Selling ____-_____.____.
Retail Copy Writing -_______
Interior Decorating --.........
Applied Art in Window Display -....----.--
Fashions in Men's Apparel_.. -...-....-......
Problems in Merchandising .-. _- --- --.--
Non-Textiles ____.._________


10 to 12


10 to 12
8 to 10


lto 3


lto3


Ito 3
Ito 3
8 to 10
3 to 5


10 to 12


1to 3


FOR SUPERVISORS AND COORDINATORS


DOE.
DOE.

DOE.
TDE.


Store Employment and Training Methods... -- ........
Promotional Methods in Part Time Distributive
Education ...........___.._-....
Methods in Distributive Education__ ..._-----.....
Conference Methods _.-....-....---


10 to 12

8 to 10


3to 5


3to 5


8 to 10


Analysis -....-..._.._......__._. .___ ....__.__....









UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


Department
Number


First
Title Term


Time Offered
Second
Term


Third
Term


FOR EVENING SCHOOL COORDINATORS
AND TEACHERS


TDE.
TDE.

TDE.


Evening Schools-Their Organization and Control.._
Organization of Subject Matter for Evening School

Teaching Methods and Devices for Evening School
Teachers ...... -- -- ......... .... -...


8 to 10


10 to 12


10 to 12


8 to 10


GENERAL SUBJECTS


TDE.
TDE.
TDE.

TDE.
TDE.
TDE.
TDE.


Graphic Analysis ...................-... ... .. ............ ----..-..............
Advanced Graphic Analysis ......................-..........------.........
History and Development of Vocational Education In
the United States ... .............--.... ...........
Vocational Psychology -.....-.-------------.-.-. .. -.--.-. -.
Principles and Purposes of the Vocational Acts _-
Safety Education -----.--.....--.----.....-...........--- .-
Advanced Vocational Psychology.............
Applied Vocational Psychology ..-....-............ .......


8 to 10
8 to 10

10 to 12
1ito 3


3to 5


1to 3


10 to 12


10 to 12


(For Graduate Students Only)


DOE.
DOE.
DOE.
DOE.
DOE.

TDE.

TDE.
TDE.
TDE.
TIE.
TIn.
TIE.
TIE.


Retail Buying and Marketing- -.-.........--..... ....--.
Retail Merchandising ........................ ................-..........
Sales and Merchandise Promotion .... ......
Store Management and Operation ..........--...............
Colloquium in Administration and Organization of
Distributive Education -..---.. .........-.................-.-...
Organization and Administration of Adult Extension
TrIaining. ........-........................... ... -.. ....
Philosophy of Vocational Education ...-..-........
Administration of Diversified Cooperative Training-...
Research in Industrial and Distributive Education..
Industrial and Economic Development in the South..
Administration of Vocational Educationn.......... ...
Apprenticeship and Labor Relations... -......-_
Colloquium in Administration and Organization of
Trade and Industrial Education. .-...........-...--------.--.


8 to 10


8 to 10


10 to l2
Ito 3


3to5


10 to 12


8 to 10


8 to 10


3to5
8 to 10
Ito 3


Ito 3


8 to 10









SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


DESCRIPTION OF COURSES


TIME


SCHEDULE


FIRST


TERM


DISTRIBUTIVE OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION


DOE. 201.-Retail Organization and
2 credits. BRISCO.
The merchandising organization, retail
control plan; case studies in merchandising;
DOE. 214.-Retail Copy Writingr.


Management.


10 to 12 daily. Room 24.


outlets, buying, wholesale
management problems.


daily.


Room


selling

11.


and stock

2 credits.


EDWARDS.
Repetitive practice in writing retail
considered: the purposes and characteristic
selecting theme, customers' point of view
tional, service, prestige, price line, bargain,
tion copy; head lines.
DOE. 215.-Interior Decorating.
The application of principles of color
and designers. The following subjects will
fabrics, historical transition of decoration
problems.


advertising copy. The following factors will be
Lcs, principles of construction, merchandise facts,
, suitable copy approach, the writing of promo-
fashion, utility, human interest, and ratlonaliza-

I to 3 daily. Room 15. 2 credits. MILLER.
and design as employed by decorators, architects
be covered: floors, floor coverings, walls, ceilings,
by periods, contemporary decoration and special


DOE. 216.-Applied Art in Window Display. 8 to 10 daily. Room 7.
credits. KIHL.
The practical application of artistic treatment in display of all types of merchan
Repetitive training in arranging the window display. A full-sized display window in
school will be used by students taking this course.
DOE. 217.-Fashions in Men's Apparel. 3 to 5 daily. Room 7. 2 credit
The origin of men's fashion; fashion cycle, centers and forecast; fashion detail
men's clothes and dress for different occasions.
DOE. 508.-Retail Buying and Marketing. 8 to 10 daily. Room 15.
credits. SCHALLER.
The buying aspects of merchandising, as distinct from its mathematical aspects,
stressed in this course. The subject matter includes: the field of retailing, types of r
outlets, the merchandising organization, market organization, the New York market,
clothing and textile markets, the nontextile markets, resident buying, foreign buying,
buying process, group and hand-to-mouth buying, private brands, exclusive agency.
price maintenance.


dise.
the


Ps.
s ot


DOE.


510.-Sales


Merchandise


Promotion.


daily.


Room


1% credits. EDWARDS.
This course is designed to give a clear understanding of
sales promotion. Attention is directed especially to the me
to promote; to the procedure of formulating a sales-promotion


the scope and activities of
thods of determining what
plan; to an examination of


~1








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


TRADE AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION


TDE.


205.-Graphic


Analysis.


8 to


daily.


Roomm


Annex.


2 credits.


SCHOLLENBERGER.
The formulating of abstract and statistical materials into charts and
assimilation. The types of material suited to this analysis, the methods
material and the preparation of material for display. (A set of drawing
be of value to the student in this work.)


graphs for rapid
of presenting the
instruments will


TDE. 206.-Advanced Graphic
2 credits. SCHOLLENBERGER.
Prerequisite requirement TDE. 205.


Analysis.


8 to


daily.


Room


Annex.


A continuation of TDE. 205.


TDE. 211.-Evening Schools-Their Organization and Control. 8 to 10 daily.
Room 19. 2 credits. DamiELs.
The development of a knowledge and understanding of the value, possibilities, and
limitations of evening schools and classes to the end that the evening school teacher
will understand clearly his place in such a program. A thorough study of methods and
procedures in organization, selection of students, Federal, State, and local laws and regu-
lations governing the conduct of evening schools and classes. Designed to meet the
needs of Extension Teachers.


TDE. 212.-Organization of Subject Matter for Evening School Classes.
12 daily. Room 19. 2 credits. DANIELS.
The development of a knowledge of trade or Job analysis and the ability to u
analysis in the arrangement of subject matter so that teaching may be simplify
learning stimulated. Methods of analysis to determine trade or job content and
of determining student needs. Students will be requested to make a Job analy
organize the content for teaching purposes. Designed to meet the needs of Ex
Teachers.


10 to


se such
led and
means
als and
:tension


TDE. 221.-Organizatio,
daily. Room 20. 2 credits
Objectives to be attained,
requirements, social security,
studied.
TDE. 222.-Occupations


Diversified


Occupational


Training.


8 to


. FRANZ.
organization to attain these objectives, Federal and State
insurance, compensation and labor laws involved will be


l


Surveys.


daily.


Room


2 credits.


CANNON.


A study of procedure in making community indu
industrial plants or business concerns to determine comn
able industrial concerns in which to give training.
TDE. 223.-Student Counseling and Selection.
credits. ALLEN.
The procedure to be followed in securing applicants
selection of students, occupational counseling, training,
work contracts.
TDE. 225.-Related Study Material. 1 to 3


NORRIS.
The source of securing diversified general
ganization of it for teaching purposes, related


strial surveys and of individual
unity training needs and accept-


3 to 5 daily.


Room 24.


for training, factors involved in
assignments, compensation, and

daily. Room 20. 2 credits.


and specific related subject matter. Or-
classroom layout and organization, theory


__


a









SCHOOL


TRADE


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


TDE.


245.-Vocational


Psychology.


daily.


Room


2 credits.


O'REILLY.
A description of fundamental aspects of judgment, such as intelligence, memory, learn-
ing, motivation, imagination, serious thinking; the relation of this knowledge to its
physiological basis and an indication of this knowledge in its application to learning
processes in vocational and technical training.


TDE.
credits.


251.-Supervision
RAKESTRAW.


Coordination.


to 12


daily.


Room


Duties of vocational supervisors and the means and methods to be employed in properly
discharging them; special subjects such as laws, promotional methods, public relations,
surveys, training the teachers in the service placement and supervisory plan organization.


TDE. 502.-Organization and Administration of
to 12 daily. Room 15. 1/2 credits. MCHENRY.
The various types of extension training, the objectives,
financial and administrative controls and the Federal,
conduct of each.


Adult


Extension


Training.


the procedure in organization,
State and local laws governing


TDE. 508.-Administration
daily. Room 13. 11 credits.


of Diversified
McHENRY.


Cooperative


Training.


8 to


Federal and State requirements, cost control, records, insurance, compensation, labor
laws, social security, accrediting agencies, personnel relations and management involved
in administration of cooperative training.


TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


TIE. 201.-Organization Specific Subject Content.
2 credits. HINTON.


3 to 5 daily.


Room


The methods of making occupational studies to determine jobs or operations and
functioning related information in which instruction should be given and the procedure
in organization for teaching purposes. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers,
Trade Shop Related Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers.


TIE. 204.-Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control.
Room 11. 2 credits. SCHOLLENBERGER.


10 to 12 daily.


Items for consideration in planning shops, management and control with respect to
floor space, light, equipment, supplies, inventories, Federal and State regulations, and
record keeping devices. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, and Part-Time
Preparatory Teachers.


TIE. 227.-General Continuation School Organization.
2 credits. BABCOCK.


3 to 5 daily.


Room


The development of a knowledge and understanding of the value, possibilities and
limitations of continuation schools to the end that the continuation school teacher will


AND








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


TIE. 243.-Labor Relations.


to 3 daily.


Room 6.


2 credits.


VIA.


The progression and development of skilled labor from
time. Designed for Directors and Supervisors.


the beginning to the present


TIE.


246.-Apprenticeship


Training.


8 to


daily.


Room


2 credits.


VIA.
The laws affecting apprenticeship training organization of training programs in co-
operation with the Federal Department of Labor's Apprenticeship Committee. Types and
kinds of training services to be given. Designed for Directors and Supervisors.


TIE.


259.-Public


Service


Training.


3 daily.


Room


2 credits.


DOLLEY.
The classification of qualified groups in need of training and the consideration of
their training needs in the light of training limitations. The sources and dissemination of
instructional material and teachers. Promotional agencies and methods that may be used
in organizing training for public service occupations.









SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


DESCRIPTION OF COURSES


TIME


SCHEDULE


SECOND TERM


DISTRIBUTIVE


OCCUPATIONS


EDUCATION


DOE. 203.--Methods in Distributive Education. 3 to 5 daily. R
2 credits. CANNON.
Preparation of functioning and related instructional material in distribute
patrons; methods of teaching for part-time and extension classes; a study of
to be used in the selection of special training problems.
DOE. 207.-Fashions. 10 to 12 daily Room 16. VAN HORN.
Development of fashion through the ages, its purposes, modification and
present day fashions; influence of historical, political, and economic events on
fashion convention in selling; study of European and American designs.
DOE. 208.-Textiles. 8 to 10 daily. Room 19. 2 credits. WALLACE
Textile designs; finishing processes; suitability, durability and stability
analysis and identification of textile fabrics; textile fibers and processes used in
fabrics.
DOE. 211.-Store Selling. 1 to 3 daily. Room 16. 2 credits. VAN
Analysis of typical selling situations, psychological approach to customer guj
buying; factors in arousing interest, desire and action, basic appeals such a
tendencies and emotions are to be studied from the customer's point of view.
DOE. 218.-Problems in Merchandising. 10 to 12 daily. Room 24. 2


oom


ive occu-
methods


effect on
fashion;


of cloth;
t grading


HORN.


dance in
s inborn

! credits.


SCHALLER.
The merchandise planning, mathematical aspects, expenses, merchandise policies, profit
calculations, problems of the retail method of inventory and expense.
DOE. 509.-Retail Merchandising. 8 to 10 daily. Room 16. 1/2 credits.
SCHALLER.
Deals with the tools that buyers and merchandise managers use daily in manipulating
their purchases to make a profit. The subject matter includes markup, terms and dating,
cost method of figuring profit, retail method of inventory, markdowns and shortages,
invoice and importing mathematics, stockturn, and merchandise planning.


TRADE AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION


TDE.


205.-Graphic


Analysis.


daily.


Room


Annex.


credits.


MADDEN.
TDE. 206.-Advanced Graphic Analysis. 1 to
credits. MADDEN.
nra-----r- rq... r mat. IL_ iL._


3


daily.


Room


Annex.


1R__ -S___ n _J _ -1 '1 ..---- .


rn









FLORIDA


TDE. 226.--Coordination of Diversified Cooperative Training.
Room 24. POPE.
Coordination aima, purposes, methods of promotion, community anc
tionships, advisory committee organization and function, research problem
up and placement.


8 to 10 daily.


I industrial rela-
is, trainee follow-


TDE. 248.-Principles and Purposes of
Room 24. 2 credits. MCHENRY.
Congressional and legislative acts providing
the principal purposes and influences involved
extent and scope of vocational service provided by


the Vocational Acts.


3 to


for vocational education of
in the formulation of these
means of them.


'5 daily.

all kinds;
acts; the


TDE. 250.-Advanced Vocational Psychology.
2 credits. O'REILLY.
Prerequisite required TDE. 245. Physical, biological
tend to slow up or inhibit learning with procedures
elimination of these inhibiting difficulties.


10

and
and


daily.


psychological
methods for


Room


factors which
reduction and


TDE.
Education
The p:
administra
local progr
TDE.


500.--Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Distributive
i. 3 to 5 daily. Room 15. 1iV credits. VAN OOT, POPE, DOLLEY.
revisions and interpretations of the George-Deen Act as they pertain to the
tion and organization for Distributive Occupations, National, State, County and


'ams.
508.-Research in Industrial and Distributive Education.


3 to 5 daily.


Room 11.
To aid students in the proper use of research procedures in the solution of research
problems, analyzing critically objectives and data in the formulation and writing of
reports and thesis. Required of all students majoring in Trade & Industrial and Distributive
Education.


TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


TIE. 202.-Teaching Methods and Devices.


1 to 3 daily.


Room 7.


2 credits.


SCHOLLENBERGER.
The methods used in preparing instructional material for teaching purposes and the
use of such methods and aids as demonstrations, illustrations, lectures, conference, in-
struction sheets, charts, films, slides, and models in demonstration teaching. Designed to
meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Part-Time Preparatory Teachers, and Trade Shop
Related Teachers.


TIE. 203.-Organization for Ind
12 daily. Room 11. 2 credits. HA
Means of providing and carrying on
tainment levels and progression records
signed to meet the needs of Trade Shop
Time Preparatory Teachers.


4 n


lividual Instruction and Progression. 1(
RRIS.
individual instruction for students at various
and forms for recording individual progress.
Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and P


TIE. 231.-Practice Teaching Office Practice and Filing.


1 to 3 daily.


at-
De-
'art-


Room


UNIVERSITY


_


I










SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


TIE. 252.-Surveys.
The factors involved ix
needed in a local community
sources of information and
vidual training requirement
the interpretation of data
of a survey procedure and
TIE. 253.-Placemen
Promotional methods ii
placement methods, follow
determining justification of
TIE. 254.-Tests and
Room 15. 2 credits. S
The various measureme
jectives to be attained and


8 to 10 daily. Room 13. 2 credits. MCHENRY.
1 determining kinds and extent of vocational training service
y in the light of individual and occupational employment needs;
methods of determining labor turnover, employment and indi-
ts; the evaluation and recording statistical facts pertinent for
and the technique of drawing the conclusions; formulation
its actual application in a real situation.
ts. 1 to 3 daily. Room 23. 2 credits. BABCOCK.
n placement; factors involved in the selection of employment;
r-up; records and reports; evaluating devices and means of
f training on the basis of wages earned and individuals placed.


Measure<
CHOLLENBER'
nt tests in v
methods to


rnts in
GER.


Vocational Education.


8 to 10 daily.


vocationall education with special emphasis on ob-
be employed in their use.


TIE. 255.-Problems in Adult Hoon
Room 17. 2 credits. WALLACE.
The purposes and objectives of adult
of instructional possibilities in the light of
community program of training.


ae Economics


Education.


8 to


daily.


home economics education. Making a survey
these objectives and outlining and planning a


TIE. 501.-Industrial and Economic Development in the South.
Room 11. 1 /2 credits. CHAPMAN.
The historical transition of economic and industrial growth in the South.
and industrial development.


TIE. 503.-Administration of Vocational Education. 1 to 3 dai
1V2 credits. VAN OOT.
National, State and local administrative organization, and controls for
cation. Sources and means of procuring and estimating revenue and la
principles and plan to be followed in spending, a systematic and detailed
tional education administrative personnel duties and responsibilities.


8 to 10 daily.

Contemporary


ly.


Room 20.


vocational edu-
ws, regulations,
study of voca-


TIE. 512.-Colloquium
Industrial Education. 8 to
DOLLEY.


in Administration
10 daily. Room


and Organization of Trade and
. 1% credits. VAN OOT, HARRIS,


The
pertain
national,


provisions and interpretations of the Smith Hughes and George Deen Acts as they
to the administration and organization for Trade and Industrial Education,
, state, county and local programs.


GUIDANCE


GIL. 400.-Organization and Administration
Room 15. 11z credits. CHAPMAN.
History and philosophy of the guidance movement.
school functional program. National, state, local and
ance. Practices and techniques employed in active


Guidance.


daily.


Guidance as an ethical part of the
institutional organization for guid-
guidance programs. Methods of









UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


DESCRIPTION OF COURSES


TIME


SCHEDULE


THIRD TERM


DISTRIBUTIVE


OCCUPATIONS


EDUCATION


DOE. 200.-Store Employment and Training Methods.


10 to 12 daily.


Room


credits.


The
ployees;


procedures
in handling


VAN HORN.


methods


employees'


used


grievances,


retail


organizations


promotions, supervision


in the selection


discipline,


em-
store


training programs for novices and up-grading employees.
DOE. 202.-Promotional Methods in Part Time Distributive Education.


8 to


10 daily
The


Room 19.


personnel


needs


2 credits. I
s of retailers,


3ROWN.


distributors


devices for training programs to meet these needs


and se
in view


irvice


occupations;


of seasonal


plans


and-


employment con-


editions;


methods to be employed in promoting and establishing cooperative training pro-


grams for the employed and out of school groups.


DOE.


210.--Color,


Line


Design.


3 daily.


Room


2 credits.


HOBSON.


Principles of color and design and their relation


to styling;


merchandising,


customer


decoration.


window and interior display.


DOE.


219.-Non-Textiles.


consideration


to 3 daily.


of the following


types


Room 20.


of merchandise:


credits.
leathers,


VAN


metals,


HORN.


stones,


jewelry;


cosmetics,


glass,


rubber,


paper,


ceramics and silver ware.


TRADE AND


DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION


TDE.


8 to 10 daily.


213.-Teaching


Room 24.


Methods
2 credits.


Devices


Evening


School


Teachers.


PLOWDEN.


The procedure to be followed in setting up objectives and organizing class work so as


secure


the active interest of


all students.


Teaching


and devices.


The student


must plan
methods a
Extension


a series of
nd devices


lessons


with


a view to exemplifying the


and do demonstration


teaching.


Designed


use of various


to meet


teaching


the needs


Teachers.


TDE.


221.--Organization


Diversified


Occupational


Training.


daily.


Room 24.


KEYES.


TDE. 223.-Student Counseling and Selection.


8 to 10 daily.


Room 13.


credits.


CANNON.


TDE. 224.-Industrial Plant Job Analysis.


1 to 3 daily.


Room 23.


2 credits.


BREIT.


BREIT.










SCHOOL


TRADE


AND


INDUSTRIAL


EDUCATION


TDE. 244.-Conference Methods.


8 to 10 daily.


Room 15.


2 credits.


WALLACE.


TDE. 504.-Philosophy


of Vocational Education.


8 to 10 daily.


Room


1 /2 credits.


BREIT.


Basic principles involved in vocational education and the interpretation and application


of these principles to public education and industrial and
United States.


economic


development in


TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


TIE. 201.-Organization Specific Subject Content.


8 to 10 daily.


Room 23.


2 credits.


BABCOCK.


TIE. 204.-Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control.


10 to


12 daily.


Room 20.


2 credits.


PLOWDEN.


TIE. 234.-Practice Teaching Machine and Pen Bookkeeping.


10 to 12 daily.


Room 1.


credits.


ASHFORD.


TIE. 235.-Practice Teaching


Academic


Subjects.


8 to


daily.


Room


credits.


PENNINGTON.


TIE.


237.-Practice


Teaching


Dictation


Transcription.


daily.


Room 1


HOBSoN.


TIE. 257.-Day Trade Related Instruction.


1 to 3 daily.


Room 13.


2 credits.


SCHISSLER.


The fundamental purposes and objectives of related instruction.


Sources of material,


organization and methods to be employed in teaching related material.


TIE.


258.-Promotion


Organization


Home


Economics


Part-Time


Classes.


10 to


12 daily.


Room 11.


2 credits.


HOBsoN.


Emphasis on


the vocational


aspects


of part-time


home


economics


education.


Con-


sideration of the groups to be served and the objectives to be attained through this type


of training.


The organization of training facilities in


view


of the objectives to be attained.


Management methods and methods of promotion.


TIE.


506.-Apprenticeship


Labor


Relations.


daily.


Room


2 credits.


KEYES.


National,


State and labor organization


laws regulating


and governing apprenticeship


in the skilled crafts.


Aspects


of apprenticeship developments in industrial production and


construction.


Compulsory


public


training


through


craft


unions


and organization


apprentice training.


GUIDANCE


GU. 401.-Local Guidance Program in the School and Community.


10 to 12


daily.


Room 7.


1/2 credits.


BREWSTER.


PWfa 'F,,ionn+4t nA and fi na),an+4rhaeta ni a nsttonnan nr na rae r r. tnrn a aloil and n f i


fATrv7


intYrlvl TiL.































































































































































































'





























































































































































t _




IMPORTANT-Your Application for Admission to the School of Trade and Industrial Education Will Not Be Considered
Unless This Form Is Filled in Completely and Mailed with the Application Blank on Page 147.

Mr.
1. N am e M rs ....................................................... ............... ... ...................................... ...........................
Miss Last Name First Name Middle Name
2. A address ....... .................. ......................... ..... ............ ... ..... ....... ..................... .. .... .... ... ...........................
Street and Number City County State

3. Schools in which'you have taught:


Dates of Service
Name and Location of School I Subjects T
(if none, so state) (from ....... to ........)

......................................................................................................... .................................................................. 1..................................
............................................................................................ ............. ........................... .. ............ .. ................................


................................................... ....................... .-..-..........--------- ............I--..--..-.-----

4. Your present position:
What type of work are you now doing?............................. ............... How long have you been so occupied?
5. If not employed at present or if you are contemplating a change, for what type of work are you preparing?......
6. If you are a college graduate give name of institution and degree held ..........................
7. List below your practical work experience as a wage earner: (If none, so state)


aught


Dates of Employment I
Type of Work Name and Location of Firm Employing You
(from ........ to ........ )






.......... .................................................
D O----------- ---------------- --------- N OT-------------------------------- W RITE IN-
- -. .-.. ....................................................... .......-. .-.................. .-...... ........ . .. ........ ......... ... .- .- -.. .- - - -



DO NOT WRITE IN THIS SPACE




SI

































1















*^i

























































































-Y





Nm Mr.
N am e M rs ............... ........................ ..... ... .. ......................... ............. ................................. ................. ............................
<. Miss (Last Name) *(First Name) *(Middle Name) married women
So please give TIE
husband's initials

S H om e. H om e A ddress..............................................................................................................................
o0 St. & No. Box No., or Rural Rt. City County State
0g I wish to register for the term beginning June 12, July 3, July 24 (encircle one) in the School of Trade and Industrial Edu-
3 0 cation.
Do you expect to receive a degree from the Universtiy of Florida? ...........................
a(Yes or no)
-0
,Q i Have you attended the University of Florida before?................ Give date of last session you attended here......................... FF
E. (yes or no)
So Have you earned any credit through the General Extension Division of the University of Florida? ...................... Have
to4 (yes or no)
l you attended any college or University other than the University of Florida? ........................ If the answer is yes, list the
o 0 g (Yes or no)
o I E institutions attended in chronological order:
SInstitution Location Dates of Attendance






S Date of birth................................... Place of birth........................ R ace.............. Religious Preference................ ........ M ember? .

Month Day Year (Yes or no)
CD Father's Occupation (if retired or deceased give occupation while living and active) ......................................
p YOUR Occupation last year (Check ONE) ......College Student ........H. S. Student ......Elem. Teach ......Jr. H. S. Teacher
......H. S. Teacher ......School Superintendent ......Principal ......College Teacher. If some other occupation, please
...name:... ..------------------------- ------------- -----------






Married women will please use their own first and middle names. If you have been registered at the University of Florida under any other
--------------------------------------- -----------------












P names please list on back.
M0----------------------------- -- we- ee-------------------------------------
_gg_ _Are You a
oDate of birth................................... Place of birth -------....---- ....- -- Race--.-...------. Religious Preference .................. Member?..-..-..........
_Si'3:t- Month Day Year (Yes or no)
SFather's Occupation (if retired or deceased give occupation while living and active) .....................e----

_-V pU YOUR Occupation last year (Check ONE) ......College Student ...-H. S. Student ......Elem. Teach ......Jr. H. S. Teacher
0^"O ......H. S. Teacher ......School Superintendent ......Principal ------College Teacher. If some other occupation, please

TO name: ----- - ------- -- -- ------- .
t" $0 Married women will please use their own first and middle names. If you have been registered at the University of Florida under any other
P names please list on back.
Do not write below this line




!M

'!M
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