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 Map of the campus
 Table of Contents
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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00270
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1943
Copyright Date: 1946
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00270
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
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    Map of the campus
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    Table of Contents
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    Main
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Full Text




The University Record
*'

of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of

%he Unieversity Summer Session

1943

First Term-June 3 to July 16
Second Term-July 15 to August 27


IMPORTANT


The time required for registration may be reduced
considerably by mailing the application blank on the
back cover prior to June 1. There will be no registra-
tion by mail.


Vol. XXXVIII, Series I


No. 5


May 1, 1943


Published monthly by the University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida


-




























The Record Comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the bulletins
of information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and
reports of the University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what in-
formation is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida





__ ,_I __ \ ___._I v---------


BUILDING
Administration Building
Law Building
Language Hall
Library
Peabody Hall
Engineering Building
Benton Hall and Shops


BUILDING
Auditorium
Horticultural Building
Campus Post Office
Agricultural Building
Chemistry Building
Science Hall
Fletcher Hall


BUILDING
Buckman Hall
Florida Union
Experiment Station
Storage Building
Barracks
Cafeteria
Sledd Hall


BUILDING
Thomas Hall
Murphree Hall
Basketball Court
Infirmary
Gymnasium
"F" Club
Swimming Pool


I _





TABLE OF CONTENTS


M ap of the C am pus .... ... ......... ........ .............. .. .
Summer Session Calendar. ........................
Officers of Administration ..... ... ................
A accelerated P program ........... .. ............. .... ....................
A dm mission .. ....... ............. .. ................. .....
E expenses ...........................................................................
C afeteria .................................................
R oom ing F facilities ......................... ......... .....................................
General Inform ation ...... ............ ........ ..... ........ ...... .....................
A c tiv ities .... ................. ................... ..............
P lacem ent B ureau ....................... .. ... ....... .........
Laboratory School ........... ..... .... ......... ...
Extension of Certificates and Certification ..................................
G general R regulations ............ .............................................
C colleges and Schools .......................... ................. ............. ... .. . ....
G graduate School .......... .......................... ..............................
College of A agriculture .................... ........... .......... ................
School of Architecture and Allied Arts ... .........
College of A rts and Sciences ................ ..................................
College of Business Administration ...................................... .
C college of E education .......................................... ......
C college of Engineering ............................................. ....
General College ........................................ .
C college of L aw ......................................... ............
School of P harm acy ............ .................. ............................................. .. ............
G uide to C ourses ...... ...... ..... ... ... ....... . ...... ........ .............................. ........
Departments of Instruction (Courses and Schedules)
First Term .. ........... ....................... .............................................
Second T erm ............................................. .................................................................
R evidence A application Blanks .................................................... ...............
A application B lanks ............................................................................ ...................................


....... 14
....... 16
....... 22
.. 25
....... 25
. 25
.. 26
..... 26
. 27
.. 28
... 30
....... 30
..... 33
........ 33
........ 34


.67,





IMPORTANT NOTICE TO SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS

SAVE TIME-Each student who expects to attend the 1943
Summer Session must fill out the Application Blank on page
71. Previous attendance at the University of Florida does
NOT waive this requirement. Fill out the Blank and send it
to the Office of the Registrar if there is any possibility of your
attending the 1943 Summer Session. Sending in the Blank
involves no obligation on your part, but it will considerably
reduce the time it takes to register, if you do decide to come.

Upon request, additional blanks will be supplied by the
Registrar.

There will be no registration by mail.





IMPORTANT INFORMATION

After arriving at the University:
1. If room assignment has been made in University-operated housing units, check in at
the Office of the Director of Residence, Section F, Fletcher Hall. If you have not yet
made a reservation, but wish to do so, call at this same Office.
2. For information concerning off-campus rooming accommodations, see Dean of Students,
105 Language Hall.
3. For information concerning social activities among women students, or on any matter
of interest to women, see the Dean of Women, 105 Language Hall.





SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR

1943 FIRST SUMMER TERM

June 2, Wednesday, 1 p.m. .......... Placement Tests, Room 205, Peabody Hall.
June 3-June 4 ............................ Registration for First Summer Term.
June 5, Saturday, 7 a.m............. Classes begin. Late registration fee of $5 for registering
on this date.
June 8, Tuesday, 4 p.m............... Last day for registration for the First Summer Term, and
for adding courses.
June 19, Saturday, noon .............. Last day for making application for a degree that is to be
awarded at the end of the First Summer Term.
June-28, Monday ......................... Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end of
the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
July 3, Saturday ........................ Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at end
of term to complete correspondence courses.
July 8, Thursday, 4 p.m. ............. Last day for filing application for extension of certificate.
Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade of E.
July 14, Wednesday, 4 p.m ........ Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at end
of term are due in the Office of the Registrar.
July 15-July 16 ........................ Registration for Second Summer Term.
July 15, Thursday ...................... Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees.
July 16, Friday, noon ................. First Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the Office
of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
July 16, Friday, 8 p.m. ................ Conferring of degrees.

SECOND SUMMER TERM

July 15-July 16 ......................... Registration for Second Summer Term.
July 17, Saturday, 7 a.m ............. Classes begin. Late registration fee of $5 for registering
on this date.
July 20, Tuesday, 4 p.m ............. Last day for registration for the Second Summer Term,
and for adding courses.
July 31, Saturday, noon ............... Last day for applications to take Comprehensive Examina-
tions in Second Summer Term.
July 31, Saturday, noon ................ Last day for making application for a degree that is to be
awarded at the end of the Second Summer Term.
August 7, Saturday, noon .......... Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end of
the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
August 14, Saturday .................... Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at end
of term to complete correspondence courses.
August 19, Thursday, 4 p.m........ Last day for filing application for extension of certificate.
Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade of E.
August 25, Wednesday, 4 p.m. .... Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at end
of term are due in the Office of the Registrar.
August 26, Thursday .................... Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees.
August 27, Friday, noon ............. Second Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the
Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
August 27, Friday, 8 p.m ............ Commencement Convocation.



















OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION


JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University

JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Dean of the Summer Session

ROBERT COLDER BEAT, M.A., Dean of Students

PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D.. Director of the School of Pharmacy

KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, LL.D., Business Manager

WALTER BARNARD HILL, B.A. in L.S., M.A., Librarian

H. HAROLD HUME, D.Sc., Dean of the College of Agriculture

JOHN EVANDER JOHNSON, M.A., Acting Director of Florida Union

RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.P., Registrar

TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., D.Sc., Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, First Term

WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A., LL.D., Dean of the College of Business Administration
and Acting Dean of the General College

CARL BRADEN OPP, B.A., Acting Director of Residence

GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education

THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, First Term

GEORGE CLARENCE TILLMAN, M.D., F.A.C.S., University Physician

HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.D., Dean of the College of Law

RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., F.A.I.A., Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts

JOSEPH WEIL, M.S., Dean of the College of Engineering

WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Second
Term





8 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ACCELERATED PROGRAM

The acceleration of an individual student's program for a degree will be possible if he
attends a three-month Summer Session as well as the regular nine-month session during
each school year, thus completing in three calender years (less in some cases) the work of
four nine-month years. Fortunately the University has had several years experience in
operating on virtually a year round basis. Since 1935 there has been a two term Summer
Session in which it has been possible for a superior student to complete practically a
semester's work. Additional adjustments are being made for the 1943 Summer Session
which are outlined under the heading, The General College, in this bulletin.

Another opportunity for reducing the time spent in meeting degree requirements is
available in the General College which from its beginning has provided for earning college
credit by passing comprehensive examinations. For some courses students may, through
independent study, prepare for these examinations. This plan has been operating since
1936, but in the past only a relatively few students have applied for this privilege. The
examinations are not easy and cannot be passed without serious preparation, but superior
students are encouraged to consider this as one of the ways in which they may accelerate
their college education.


ADMISSION

Students who give evidence of being able to profit by college work will be admitted
to the University of Florida Summer Session. It should be noted, however, that NO
CREDIT will be allowed unless our specific admission requirements are satisfied. These
requirements are:

1. For students who are entering college for the first time.
See Admission to the General College.

2. For students who are transferring from another institution and who expect
to receive a degree from the University of Florida.
Official transcripts sent directly to the Registrar from all institutions
previously attended. (Teachers' certificates or transcripts presented
by students will not suffice.)

3. For students who wish to enter the College of Law.
See Admission to the College of Law.

4. For students who wish to enter the Graduate School.
See Admission to the Graduate School.

5. For students who regularly attend another college or university and who
are attending the University of Florida Summer Session only for the purpose
of securing credits to be transferred to the institution regularly attended.
See Admission of Unclassified Students.

6. For students attending the University of Florida Summer Session only for
the purpose of meeting teacher certification requirements, taking refresher
courses, etc.
See Admission of Unclassified Students.





ADMISSION


It is the student's responsibility to supply the proper credentials as outlined in num-
bers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 above. NO TRANSCRIPTS FOR COLLEGE CREDIT WILL BE
ISSUED FOR ANY PERSON FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE ABOVE.

Students who have previously attended the University of Florida may continue in
the college in which they were registered. Transfer students with at least 64 acceptable
semester hours of advanced standing may be admitted to one of the colleges or professional
schools of the University.

ADMISSION TO THE GENERAL COLLEGE

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the General
College:

1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required, although
no specific high school units are required.
2. Consistency of the high school record.
3. Achievement in high school.
4. Personal qualities.
5. Recommendation of high school principal.
6. Standing on Placement Tests.

All applicants should submit the Application Blank at the back of this bulletin, and
in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent to the Registrar. The
latter may be secured from high school principals of the State. Applicants for admission
from other states may secure an Application for Admission blank by writing the Registrar.

The Placement Tests will be given at 1 P. M., Wednesday, June 2, in 212 Science Hall.
All applicants for admission to the General College are required to take these tests before
registration.
ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW

Applicants for admission to the College of Law for the duration of the war must have
credit for at least two years of academic college work meeting the requirements of the
Association of American Law Schools. Evidence of this work must be presented to the
Registrar of the University on or before the date on which the applicant wishes to register.

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of a standard
college or university and have a foundation in the major subject sufficient in quantity and
quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student proposes to major.
A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be transmitted to
the Office of the Registrar before the date of registration.

ADMISSION OF UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS

To be admitted as an unclassified student (see page 23, nos. 5 and 6) the applicant
must submit a statement of honorable dismissal from the institution last attended.





10 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

THE CLASSIFICATION IN WHICH YOU SHOULD REGISTER

1. If you are entering college directly from high school, or if you have less than two years
college work and wish to earn a degree at the University of Florida, you will register
in the General College.
2. If you have more than two years college work but have not received the Bachelor's
degree and you wish to earn a degree at the University of Florida, you will register in
one of the colleges of the Upper Division. See pages 25 to 30.
3. If you have received the bachelor's degree and you wish graduate credit (credit that
may apply on the master's or doctor's degree either at the University of Florida or else-
where) you will register in the Graduate School.
4. If you do not wish to earn a degree at the University of Florida, but wish to attend
the Summer Session to meet some specific need such as to satisfy teacher certification
requirements or take refresher courses, you will register as an unclassified student.


EXPENSES

GENERAL FEES
T tuition ............................................. ..................................................... ................... .. N one
Registration Fees (Florida Students) ................................... ..................................... ............$20.00
Registration Fees (Non-Florida Students) ................................................. ......... .. .. 30.00
Registration Fees, College of Law (load of six credits ........................ .......... ......... 28.00
-load of less than five credits $6.00 per credit and $3.00
Late Registration Fee ...................................................................... .... ........... 5.00
Breakage Fee for Biology and Chemistry (unused portion refunded) ................................ 5.00
Diploma Fee ........................................................ ...................................... ........................... 5.00

EXAMINATION FEES FOR GENERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS

A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for each
application for a comprehensive ,examination. Applications are necessary only in case
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned.

REFUND OF FEES

Fees paid in advance for room reservations will be refunded up to and including, but
not after June 1, for first term reservations, or July 10 for second term reservations.
If before 4 P. M. on Wednesday of the first week of each term students for any reason
wish to withdraw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded.
No refunds will be made after this date.


P. K. YONGE SCHOOL CAFETERIA

The P. K. Yonge School Cafeteria will be open to University students for the entire
Summer Session. It is under the direction of an experienced dietitian and a high quality
of food will be furnished at reasonable prices.
All service is cafeteria style, affording individual selections. The policy is to furnish
well-prepared food at actual cost. Coupon books containing tickets with a monetary value
will be sold at a discount sufficient to warrant their purchase.





ROOMING FACILITIES FOR MEN AND WOMEN 11

ROOMING FACILITIES FOR MEN AND WOMEN

Director of Residence: All correspondence and inquiries concerning rooming facilities
and all room reservation fees should be sent to the Director of Residence, University of
Florida, Gainesville.

Facilities: Details are being worked out to bring certain off-campus fraternity facilities
into the University Housing Program, since the University Residence Halls (Buckman,
Thomas, Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree) will be occupied by war training detachments.
These off-campus facilities, when incorporated in the University Housing Program, will be
operated on the same basis as the Residence Halls proper.

Equipment and Services: In general, equipment of rooms in the houses under considera-
tion will approximate the equipment and facilities of the Residence Halls, and in most
cases more lounging and recreational space will be available. However, each student will
be required to furnish study lamp, linens, pillows, and other items required for personal
convenience and comfort.

Details of unit locations and individual furnishings will be announced later, as necessary
preliminary arrangements and surveys are completed.

Policies and Regulations: The same regulations as have governed the Residence Halls
will be in effect in the houses incorporated in this plan. These regulations are based on
those principles of individual conduct necessary to obtain maximum benefit and comfort
for all residents. A copy of specific regulations will be posted in each room and residents
will be expected to observe them without exception.

All students with less than one year of college work shall be required to room in Uni-
versity operated units as long as rooms are available for assignment to them. However,
students whose parents are residents of the City of Gainesville shall not be subject to this
regulation.

All women students must have their residence approved before registration can be com-
pleted.

No student may move from a room in the University units to other quarters without
the consent of the Committee on Residence.

A monitor or preceptress will be assigned to each unit and will be responsible through
the Director of Residence to the Committee on Residence for the maintenance of proper
conduct-in keeping with Residence Hall regulations-by all students housed in his or her
particular unit.
Rooms will be rented for one or both terms of the Summer Session. All assignments
will be subject to cancellation or change at the discretion of the University in the interest
of the housing needs of any war training groups.
The room rent is due and must be paid in advance at the beginning of each term.
University registration may be cancelled because of failure to pay rent as required. Checks
or money orders should be made payable to the University of Florida.
Rates: Rates for rooms in the newly-incorporated units will range from $8.00 to $15.00
per month per student, according to the quality and location of the rooms. Detailed
schedules of rates will be announced as soon as such rates are worked out and approved
by the Committee on Residence.





12 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Applications and Reservations: Each person wishing to reserve a room in the University
housing facilities should complete the application form on page 71 and forward it to the
Director of Residence together with the room reservation fee of five dollars per person.
Check or money order for this fee should be made payable to the University of Florida.

All applications validated by the room reservation fee will be acted upon as soon as the
details of the housing program are arranged, and the applicants will he notified of their
assignments or other dispositions of their applications.

In the event that applicants cannot be placed in University operated units they will be
referred to privately run housing units on the approved list and allowed to complete in-
dividual arrangements.

Room reservation fees will be refunded on request to all applicants who cannot lie ac-
commodated in the spaces available.

Dates: Applications should be made and reservation fees posted as soon as possible in
order to insure consideration.

Refunds will be made on reservations cancelled by or before June 1 (for the first term)
and July 10 (for the second term). Refunds will not be made on reservations cancelled
after those dates, unless applicant can show sufficient cause for delay.

Rooms will be available for occupancy not earlier than June 2 for the first term and
July 14 for the second term. Applicants who will arrive before those dates or after the
day classes begin for each term should notify the Director of Residence in advance.

Check-Ins: Students assigned to rooms in University operated units will check in at
the Office of the Director of Residence, Section F, Fletcher Hall. The services of a cashier
will be available there for payment of rents only.

Luggage: Persons desiring to send heavy luggage ahead of their arrival may address
it to Sledd Hall Archway or, if they have received a definite advance assignment, to the
address of the unit to which they are assigned. No responsibility will be accepted by the
University for such advance shipments.

Room Lists: Lists of rooms available in privately operated off-campus homes will be
compiled by the Office of the Dean of Students and will be available from that office on
request.





GENERAL INFORMATION


GENERAL INFORMATION

ACTIVITIES
ENTERTAINMENTS AND PLAYS
Adequate facilities for entertainments and plays are provided in the University Audi
torium, which has a seating capacity of approximately 1800. In addition to the main
University Auditorium, the auditoriums in Florida Union and in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School will be available. Stress is placed upon performances by the students in plays
and musical entertainments being produced from time to time by the staffs of the depart-
ments of Speech and Music.
RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The moral and religious atmosphere of the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading
religious denominations have attractive places of worship, and students are welcomed at
every service. Transportation to and from church is provided for students who will
attend. Frequent devotional services are held in the University Auditorium in connection
with the Student Assembly.
THE FLORIDA UNION BUILDING
The Florida Union is operated as an official social center for the campus. Reading,
recreation, and lounging rooms will supply adequate facilities for social activities and for
comfortable relaxation.
THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
All students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly, which
will be held in the University Auditorium at hours scheduled below. Important announce-
ments will be made at the General Assembly, for the observance of which students will
be held responsible.
8:00 A.M. Wednesday, June 9
10:00 A. M. Wednesday, June 23
8:00 A.M. Wednesday, July 21
10:00 A.M. Wednesday, August 4
SWIMMING POOL
The facilities of the swimming pool will be available, without charge to students reg-
istered in the Summer Session. Those interested should see Mr. Genovar, Gymnasium. The
pool will be open daily, except Monday, from 1:00 to 6:00 P.M.

PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University in
1912. To be eligible for membership, a student must previously have earned at the Uni-
versity at least thirty semester hours credit, must have been guilty of no serious breaches of
discipline, and must stand among the upper tenth of all candidates for degrees. Candidates
for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor point average of at least 3.00
(B) on all scholastic work. If a student comes within the quota for his college, an average
of 3.00 assures his eligibility, but if he does not come within the quota, it is necessary that
he have an average of 3.30 or higher. Graduate students are also eligible for membership.

KAPPA DELTA PI
Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was established at the University of Florida in 1923.
Kappa Delta Pi has as its purpose the encouragement of high intellectual and scholastic
standards and the recognition of outstanding contributions in education. In general, the





14 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

scholarship requirement for members in Upsilon Chapter is a scholastic average of 3.00 (B).
High scholarship alone, however, will not guarantee election to membership. Other qual-
ities which the person must possess are: desirable personal-social qualities, leadership
abilities, worthy educational ideals, and continued interest in education.
PHI BETA KAPPA
Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the University of Florida in 1938.
It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in 1776. In conformity with the national
objectives of the society, the University of Florida chapter restricts election to the College
of Arts and Sciences. Not more than 15% of the senior class graduating in each semester,
including both graduating classes of summer session, is eligible for election.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Florida Union, Peabody
Hall and Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are responsible for
all announcements made in the General Assembly, on the official bulletin boards, and in
the Orange and Blue Bulletin.
ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN
An official mimeographed bulletin is published every other day during the Summer
Session. It appears on all bulletin boards and carries notices of changes in schedule,
meetings, lost and found articles, etc. Students and faculty members are responsible for
observance of all official notices published in the Bulletin.

THE PLACEMENT BUREAU

The Placement Bureau of the College of Education attempts to render a public service
This is not mere mechanical routine of finding teaching positions for graduates; the Bureau
considers the welfare of the school concerned, and tries to get the right person in the right
teaching position.
There is no service fee for University graduates. Students who wish the help of the
Bureau may arrange an interview with the Director and submit complete credentials. On
request, this information is sent to school officials of the State.
Many specific requests are received from district trustees and county school boards.
Every effort is made to furnish these officials with information that will enable them to
select the teachers most likely to succeed in the schools concerned.
Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the Director of
the Teachers' Placement Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville.

LABORATORY SCHOOL
The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School will conduct demonstration classes in the Kinder-
garten, Elementary and Secondary School Grades during the first term of the Summer
Session from 9:00 A. M. to 12:00 Noon. Provision will he made for seven groups: Kinder-
garten, combined first and second grades, combined third and fourth grades, combined fifth
and sixth grades, combined seventh and eighth grades, combined ninth and tenth grades,
combined eleventh and twelfth grades.
Application for enrollment should be made to the Director of the Laboratory School
as soon as possible since the number who may be accommodated is limited.
Pupils will register on Saturday, June 5, in Room 230. Yonge Building, from 8:30 to
12:00. There are no registration fees for the demonstration school. Classes will begin
Monday, June 7, at 8:45 A.M.





GENERAL INFORMATION


P. K. YONGE SCHOOL LIBRARY
The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Library will be open for use of teachers attending
the Summer Session. This library contains about 6000 books for boys and girls from the
kindergarten through the twelfth grade. These books are available for use in the library
only and may not be checked out.
The library will be open during the following hours: 8:30 A. M. to 12:00 noon and
1:30 P. M. to 5:00 P.M.; Saturdays: 9:00 A. M. to 12:00 noon.
The librarian will post hours when she will be available for conference on individual
library problems. Teachers and principals are invited to ask for whatever help they
may need.
FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY
The Florida Curriculum Laboratory is located on the third floor of the P. K. Yonge
Building. This Laboratory is made possible by the cooperation of the Florida State Depart-
ment of Education, the College of Education, and the Laboratory School of the University
of Florida. Books and other curriculum materials used in the Florida Program for the
Improvement of Instruction are available here.

DOE MUSEUM
The Doe Museum connected with the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School is located on the
third floor of the P. K. Yonge Building. The Museum will be open from 9:00 A.M. to
4:00 P.M. daily, except Saturday, and from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 noon on Saturday, from
June 7 through July 17. This Museum houses a unique collection prepared by the Curator,
Charles E. Doe.
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
Four libraries on the campus make up the University Library system-the Main Library,
the libraries of the Experiment Station, the Law College, and the P. K. Yonge School.
The Main Library building houses over 150,000 books. It has two large reading rooms.
Those books assigned for reading in the General College and for Upper-Division students
are in the Reading Room on the ground floor. In the Reading Room on the second floor
are the current magazines, the books of reference, and the card catalog. In the book stack
there are forty-eight carrels for the use of graduate students in their research work.

STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY
For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University, funds
may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of twenty-five cents is made on each
account, per term.
LOAN FUNDS
The Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of women students
through the establishment of certain loan funds-the Florida State Scholarship Fund, the
College Girls' Cub Scholarship Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan Fund, the
R. A. Gray Loan Fund, the Doyle E. Carlton Loan Fund, the W. N. Sheats Memorial Loan
Fund, and the Harold Colee Loan Fund. Loans are governed by the following regulations.
(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school.
(3) Applicant must be in need of aid.
(4) Applicant must apply for loan at least two weeks before opening of a Summer Term.
(5c Application must be made directly to the Dean of the Summer Session.
(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in which she is
teaching at the time of application.





16 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at the University of Florida Summer Session.
(8) Loans are made for a period not to exceed nine months.
(9) Loans bear interest at the rate of 6%, which is added to the principal fund.
Upon application to the Dean of the Summer Session, blank forms for application for
a scholarship loan will be furnished.

KAPPA DELTA PI LOAN FUND
Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi has established a loan fund available for small loans
to graduate and undergraduate students who are preparing for the teaching profession.
Among other eligibility requirements, a student desiring a loan must be a member of
Kappa Delta Pi and must have a scholarship average of not less than B. Application
should be made to the Chairman of the Committee on Loan Funds of Upsilon Chapter.
Further information concerning this loan fund and forms for making application for a
loan may be secured from the Secretary of the College of Education, Room 120. Yonge
School, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES
The following more important items govern the granting of extension certificates:
1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended
and at the time formal application for extension is made.
2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no grade is
below a "C".
3. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply for
the same. In case the student fails to apply on the Registration Card at
time of registration, request may be made to the Registrar, Room 110, Lan-
guage Hall, to have his application for extension properly recorded. A list
of those who have applied will be posted on the bulletin boards in Language
Hall and Peabody Hall not later than July 1 for the First Term and August
10 for the Second Term. In case of error in this list, students should report
to the Registrar. No student will be recommended for extension whose
name does not appear on this list by July 8 for the First Term or August
19 for the Second Term. Students should indicate exactly the name that
appears on the certificate which they wish to have extended.
4. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to Colin English,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida, within a
year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension will not be
granted.

CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS
Persons desiring information concerning the certification of teachers are advised to write
the State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida, requesting Bulletin A on Cer-
tification of Teachers. This booklet gives all requirements for Graduate and Undergraduate
Certificates in the various fields as well as instructions concerning applications for cer-
tificates.
As a matter of information to students (and with emphasis on the point that certificates
are granted by the State Department of Education, not by the University) some of the
requirements listed in the Certificate Bulletin A, April, 1942, of the State Department
of Education are repeated below with the numbers of the courses offered by the University
which are designed to meet these requirements.





GENERAL INFORMATION 17


REQUIREMENTS

For All Certificates:
Constitution

General Preparation
Health Education
Physical Education

For Elementary Certificates:
Child Development
Educational Psychology
History and Principles or Introduction
to Education
Elementary School Curriculum or
Methods of Teaching in the
Elementary School
Principles and Methods of Teaching
Reading
Children's Literature
Methods of Teaching Science in
Elementary School
Methods in Arithmetic
Methods in Social Studies
Geography
Observation and Practice Teaching
Public School Music
Public School Art
Health Education in Elementary Grades
Physical Education in Elementary
Grades
Penmanship

For Secondary Certificates:
English
Mathematics
Physical Education
Science:
Physical Sciences
Biological Sciences
Conservation

Social Studies:
History
Political Science
Economics
Sociology
Geography
Conservation
General


*UNIVERSITY COURSES MEETING THE
REQUIREMENTS


Two of the following: Hy. 301, 302, 303, 304,
331, 332; CPI. 13; Pcl. 313, 314
C-1 and C-3 and C-2 or C-6
HP1. 387 (or En. 387 or En. 103)
HPl. 363, 364, 373


En. 385 (or En. 203 or En. 319)
En. 386 (or En. 207)

CEn. 13 (or En. 101 or 102)


En. 471 (or En. 308)

En. 471 (or En. 221)
Eh. 391

G1. 301 or G1. 302 (or En. 209 or 222)
En. 471 (or En. 124)
Scl. 301 or 302 (or En. 201)
C-2 or Courses in Gpy.
En. 405 or En. 421-2 (or En. 253)
Msc. courses
Pc. courses
HPI. 387

HPI. 373
BEn. 97 (or Hg. 101)


C-3 and courses in CEh. and Eh.
C-42, C-421 and courses in CMs. and Ms.
Courses in HP1.

C-2, Gl. 317, Courses in Ps. and Cy.
C-6, G1. 318, Courses in Bly. and Bty.
C-1 or C-2 or C-6 or Gpy. 385 or Gpy. 387
or Es. 381 or Es. 382

Courses in CHy. and Hy.
Courses in CPI. and Pcl.
Courses in CEs. and Es.
Courses in CSy. and Sy.
Courses in Gpy. and Es. 381, 385
See Science
C-1 will be counted as 8 of the total hours
required but will not reduce the specific
requirements.


Some of the certification requirements listed in the literature of the State Department
may not be represented by the same titles in this catalogue. To facilitate finding the
proper course descriptions for such fields, guide is provided (see page 34).

*Based upon present offerings. Discontinued courses which will meet the requirements are
shown in parentheses.





18 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


INFORMATION REGARDING ISSUANCE OF WAR

PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATES

(The following is a statement of the regulations relating to war provisional teaching
certificates, reproduced here with the permission of the State Department of Education.
The War Provisional Certificate is being issued during the war emergency in order to
increase the supply in certain subject fields where a critical shortage of teachers exists.
The requirements for this type of certificate will be in accordance with those established
for regular teaching certificates issued upon the basis of college work as defined in Certifi-
cate Bulletin A except where changes have been expressly authorized.
The authorized changes are of two types: (1) general changes approved by action of
the State Board of Education (2) other changes in regulations governing general back-
ground, general professional preparation, and specialization made by the State Department
of Education as authorized in Section 3, Item (g) of the State Board Regulations.
War Provisional Certificates will be as acceptable for accreditation purposes as any
other regular type of Florida certificate based on college training. Since this type of cer-
tificate is valid for the duration of the war only with the exception noted in Section 1,
Item (i), extensions will not be necessary. Teachers holding this type of certificate should,
however, be encouraged to .secure additional training through summer courses or corre-
spondence study whenever feasible.

SECTION I

General Changes in Certification Regulations Approved by the State Board of Education
Affecting the Issuance of War Provisional Certificates.

1. The State Superintendent of Public Instruction shall be authorized to establish (1) a
War Provisional Certificate for Graduates and (2) a War Porvisional Certificate for
U undergraduates.

2. An applicant shall be granted a War Provisional Certificate for Graduates or a War
Provisional Certificate for Undergraduates upon meeting satisfactorily the requirements
for these certificates as set forth by the State Department of Education under regulations
prescribed by the State Board of Education.

3. The following policies shall be observed by the State Department of Education in work-
ing out the details connected with the issuance of War Provisional Certificates:

a. Regulations governing the age, citizenship, health certificate, moral character cer-
tificate, and Constitution requirement of the applicant shall be the same as for
obtaining other regular teaching certificates in Florida.

b. Regulations regarding recency-of-credit shall be waived for all applicants for the
War Provisional Certificate.

c. Persons who have held Florida certificates which expired more than ten years prior
to the date of present application and which were based on two or four years of
college training shall be entitled to a War Provisional Certificate covering the fields
in which they meet the professional and special field requirements for this type of
certificate as set forth by the State Department of Education under regulations
prescribed by the State Board.





WAR PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATES


d. Persons who have held Florida certificates which expired not less than one full year
nor more than ten years prior to the date of present application and which were based
on two or four years of college training, without further review of college transcripts.
shall be entitled to a War Provisional Certificate covering the same subjects and
teaching range as the original certificate which has expired.

e. Persons having a total of 60 semester hours credit at any standard institution of higher
learning as defined in Certificate Bulletin A shall be eligible for the War Provisional
Certificate for Undergraduates, provided they meet the other general and special field
requirements set forth by the State Department of Education for this type of certifi-
cate under regulations prescribed by the State Board.

f. Persons having a total of 120 semester hours credit earned at the institutions de-
scribed in Section (e) above shall be eligible for the War Provisional Certificate for
Graduates, provided they meet the other general and special field requirements for
this type of certificate set forth by the State Department of Education under regula-
tions prescribed by the State Board.

g. The requirements for specialization in the subject fields in which a teacher shortage
exists may be reduced not more than fifty percent. The State Department of Educa-
tion is hereby authorized to vary the exact percentage of reduction in the various
subject fields in accordance with teacher supply, provided the percentages established
shall be applied consistently.

h. The fee to be paid by an applicant for a War Provisional Certificate shall be the
same as that paid by applicants for other regular teaching certificates in Florida.

i. War Provisional Certificates shall be valid for the duration of the present war not
exceeding two years. Should hostilities cease within less than two years from the
date of issuance of the certificate and within the limits of a school year, such certifi-
cates may remain valid until the close of that session of school. War Provisional
Certificates are valid until the close of the present war only if the war ends within
two years from the date of issuance of such certificates. If the war continues for a
period greater than two years, the phrase "not exceeding two years" shall take effect
and the certificate will become invalid following the expiration of the two-year period
unless extended in the same manner as that prescribed for extending other regular
teaching certificates.

4. Two new fields of specialization shall be added to those which may be covered by the
War Provisional Certificates: Pre-School Education and Pre-Induction Training. Pend-
ing the development of requirements for certification in these fields on a long-range
basis. Pre-School Education and Pre-Induction Training may be placed on the face
of the War Provisional Certificate in accordance with the following regulations:

a. Pre-School Education: Persons who meet the requirements prescribed above for the
War Provisional Certificate for Graduates or the War Provisional Certificates for
Undergraduates and who have completed a two weeks' training course in pre-school
education and/or have completed a three semester hour course in the care and pro-
tection of pre-school children shall have entered upon the faces of their War Pro-
visional Certificates "Pre-School Education."

b. Pre-Induction Training: Persons who meet the requirements prescribed above for
the War Provisional Certificate for Graduates or the War Provisional Certificate for





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Undergraduates and who present evidence of having passed satisfactorily pre-
induction courses offered by the Armed Services, by defense training centers operated
under federal direction, by Civil Aeronautics Administration, and by organizations
of equal standing shall have written upon the faces of their War Provisional Certifi-
cates "Pre-Induction Training."

SECTION II

Other Changes in Certification Regulations Contained in Certificate Bulletin A Made by
State Department of Education Through Authority Granted by the State Board of Educa-
tion. (Effective April 1, 1943.)

1. Change Item G, Page 4, so that eighteen semester hours credit shall be earned in
general background courses which should include credit in at least two of the following
fields: science, English, social studies, and mathematics.

2. Change Item H, Page 4, for secondary school certification so as to require 12 semester
hours in Education; provided that in lieu of the three plans set forth for obtaining class-
room experience the State Superintendent may at his discretion recognize the practical
experience presented by mature persons seeking certification in instrumental music,
industrial arts, commercial subjects, science, pre-induction training, and other critical
fields and provided, further, that persons coming under the provisions of Section I,
Items 3c and 3d, above can use past teaching experience without adhering to the three-
year period limitation set forth in Certificate Bulletin A.

3. Change Item 5b, Page 6, referring to Stenography to read as follows: "Twelve semester
hours in commercial subjects including a one-year course in typewriting and a one year
course in Gregg Shorthand OR a one semester course in typewriting and a one semester
course in Gregg Shorthand above the high-school level where the applicant has earned
two high school units in typewriting and one unit in shorthand."

4. Change Item 5c, Page 6, referring to Bookkeeping to read as follows: "Twelve semester
hours in commercial subjects including six semester hours (first year) course in account-
ing at the college level OR twelve semester hours in commercial subjects including a
three semester hour course in bookkeeping at the college level in addition to two high
school units in bookkeeping."

5. Change Item 6, Page 6, referring to Elementary School Course to read as follows: "A
total of eighteen semester hours credit in the field of elementary education including:
six semester hours in background of elementary education; three to six semester hours
in practice teaching or some other plan for securing actual classroom teaching experi-
ence approved by the State Department of Education; six to nine semester hours in
elementary school methods including work in the teaching of reading.

6. Change Item 10, Page 8, referring to Industrial Arts so that the requirements shall be
fifty percent of the hours now required.

7. Change Item 11, Page 8, referring to Languages Other than English to read as follows:
"Twelve semester hours in the language to be covered must be earned above the intro-
ductory level of two high school units or the initial six semester hours college course.
Two languages will be entered where the applicant presents six semester hours in the
one language and twelve semester hours in the other language above the introductory
level defined above."





WAR PROVISIONAL CERTIFICATES 21

8. Change Item 14, Page 9, referring to Mathematics to read as follows: "Twelve semester
hours in mathematics."

9. Change Item 15, Page 9, "Instrumental Music will be entered upon the face of a certifi-
cate when evidence is presented to show that the applicant has the necessary technical
information and skill for directing school band and/or orchestra work, said evidence to
consist of a statement from the director of any music clinic which is approved by a recog-
nized institution of higher learning or by the examining committee of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Bandmasters.
The applicant must also show familiarity with the psychology of youth and the place
of music in the modern school program. This requirement may be satisfied by submitting
at least three semester hours credit in one or more courses in education which deal with
the purposes of the school and the nature and needs of the adolescent."

10. Change Item 16, Page 9, referring to Physical Education to read as follows: "Twelve
semester hours in health education and physical education of which not more than six
may be coaching courses."

11. Change Item 17, referring to Science so that the requirements shall be fifty percent of
the hours now required.

12. Change Item 19, referring to Social Studies so that the requirements shall be two-thirds
of the number of semester hours required at present.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GENERAL REGULATIONS

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dean of their
college, regarding choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to this,
juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which they expect
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be
dropped or changed only with the approval of the dean of the college in which the student
is registered and by presentation of the cards authorizing the change at the office of the
Registrar. Unclassified students must secure the approval of the Dean of the Summer
Session for this purpose.
The student is advised to procure a copy of Student Regulations, Part I, and acquaint
himself with all general regulations. Particular attention is directed to the following items:

CREDITS

The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one semester
hour.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two regular
terms, or one regular term and three summer terms, or five summer terms. New students
offering advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the University.
Students who break their residence at the University by attending another institution for
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University.
2. For the master's degree two regular terms or six summer terms are necessary to
satisfy the residence requirements.
3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (28 in the College of
Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the college from
which the student is to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be made only upon
written petition approved by the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case may the
amount of extension work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours
required for a baccalaureate degree.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED
No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree
by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be allowed to take
more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's degree by correspondence
study or extension class work. No person will be allowed to take more than 9 credits by
correspondence during the summer vacation period. While in residence, a student will
not be allowed to take work by correspondence without the consent of the dean of the
college concerned. This will be granted only in exceptional cases. In the College of Arts
and Sciences no extension work is permitted in the last thirty hours, except by special
permission.





GENERAL REGULATIONS


MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD

Maximum load is nine semester hours per term in all undergraduate schools and colleges.
Maximum load is six semester hours per term in the Graduate School and seven hours
in the College of Law.
Minimum load is four semester hours. At the time of registration loads of less than
four hours may be approved by the Dean concerned. After registration, loads of less than
four hours can be approved only by the Sub-Committee of the University Senate.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS

For regulations in the various colleges covering graduation with Honors, see the
Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division.

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS

1. This group will include (a) students from other colleges and universities earning
credits to be transferred eventually to their respective institutions, (b) students with
degrees taking refresher courses, and (c) other students not candidates for degrees.

2. In the event any student who has attended a Summer Session as an unclassified
student later wishes to become a candidate for a degree in one of the colleges or schools
of the University, it will be necessary for such student to regularize his admission to the
University (present all the credentials required) and meet the requirements (in effect at
the time of application for candidacy) for admission to the college or school of his choice.

3. If such a student is admitted to candidacy for a degree, credits earned while an
unclassified student will be accepted in so far as they apply toward the degree requirements
(in effect at the time he is admitted to candidacy) of the college or school chosen by the
student. A student must have been registered as a regular student in the college or school
from which he expects to receive a bachelor's degree for at least three summer terms and
in the Graduate School for at least five summer terms for the master's degree. The residence
requirement of at least five summer terms in the University will not be waived in any case.

4. Students regularly enrolled during the academic year cannot become unclassified
students during the Summer Session.

5. Each student registered as an unclassified student will be given a definite statement
of the policies governing the application for admission to candidacy in the various colleges
and schools. This statement will make clear that credits earned while a student is regis-
tered as an unclassified student can be applied toward a degree in the college of his choice
only if under regular procedure this credit will apply toward that degree.

6. The registration blanks for unclassified students will be approved by the Dean of
the Summer Session and assistants chosen by him from the faculty.

ADJUSTMENTS FOR STUDENTS CALLED INTO ARMED FORCES
DURING A TERM OR SEMESTER

Each case is handled individually by the University Senate Sub-Committee on student
petitions. If a student has actually received orders to report for military duty or other
war activity, this committee will endeavor to make such adjustments as are possible. Such
a student should consult the Dean of the College in which he is registered, the Dean of





24 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Students, or the Registrar for additional information or assistance in presenting his case.
Committee action may authorize instructors to give examinations early or to make other
adjustments. The committee does not give grades or grant credit. If a student leaves
before it is possible to take examinations, information on his standing is collected and filed
as a part of his record so that it may be used to adjust his program in case he later returns
to the University. Only rarely and upon the unqualified recommendation of the instructor
is credit granted in such cases.


REQUIRED PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAM

The problem of physical fitness is one of the major problems of the war emergency.
Because of this the University of Florida has constructed a physical fitness program to be
required of all male students under 45 during their stay at the University. It should be
emphasized that this program, while adopted as a part of the University's complete coopera-
tion toward winning the war, is at the same time, of importance in a sound educational
program. It should lead to better work in the classrooms of the University as well as to
better health and living for the individual student.

PHYSICAL EXAMINATION

Each male student under 45 will be required to furnish a report of physical examination
on the form provided for this purpose by the University Physician before registration for the
1943 Summer Session can be completed. (This requirement will not apply to those students
who were in attendance at the University of Florida during either semester of the 1942-43
academic year.) Additional physical examinations will be made by the University Physician
when, in his opinion, such examinations are necessary.

THE PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAM REQUIRED OF ALL MALE STUDENTS UNDER 45

The program will be conducted in regularly scheduled sections meeting three periods
per week. The registration forms for a male student under 45 cannot be accepted until he
has arranged his schedule to include one of the regular sections. It is not possible to choose
one section for one day and another for the other days. Students certified for restricted
activity by the University Physician will be given special programs designed to fit their
physical condition. Such students register for that section which fits their academic
schedule and will meet at the time scheduled for the special program assigned for them.

ATTENDANCE REQUIRED

The following regulation concerning absences from scheduled meetings of the Physical
Fitness Program will apply:

When a student has accumulated four absences which are not properly accounted for
the student shall be on probation. When the student accumulates six absences unaccounted
for the student may be reported to the Committee on Discipline with the recommendation
that he be dropped from the University.





GENERAL REGULATIONS 25


COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The major courses are regularly numbered above 500 and the minors between 300 and
500, but there is no objection to counting a course above 500 in one department as a minor
in another. On the other hand, there are courses numbered 300 and 400 which are not
acceptable as minors.
A number of courses have already been arranged that may count as majors. Efforts
will be made to arrange still others upon request. If the major work desired is not listed,
requests for it should be made at an early date.
Passing grades for students registered in the Graduate School are A and B. All other
grades are failing.
For requirements for the Ph.D. degree and other information in regard to graduate work
see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

A candidate for the master's degree must be in residence for at least one scholastic year,
devoting his entire time during this period to study and research. The Summer Session of
twelve weeks will count as one-third of a year. One summer term will be one-sixth of
a year.
Work Required.-The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program with a
definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester hours or the equivalent, at least half
of which shall be in a single field of study and the remainder in related subject matter as
determined by the student's Supervisory Committee. The principal part of the course
work for the master's degree shall be designated strictly for graduates. However, in the
case of related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be offered upon the
approval of the Supervisory Committee.
In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em-
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer.
A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely allied to the major
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. The
thesis itself should be completed and submitted in time to allow an interval of three
full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the summer term.
The requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the discretion
of the student's Supervisory Committee. If it is required the examination should be passed
by the end of the third summer term, or when the work is half completed.
The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from the time
of first registering for graduate work. For summer session students this means seven
summers.
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

The College of Agriculture offers a number of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Agriculture. For complete information on the requirements for the various
curricula the student should consult the Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division





26 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


are selected from as many fields as possible with the view of:
1. making available some of the basic courses required in several curricula
for those beginning their Upper Division work in the College,
2. providing some advanced courses which will enable students now enrolled
in the College to speed their individual programs and graduate earlier,
3. offering several courses in agricultural fields which will be of real value
to teachers and others engaged in agricultural aspects of the war effort.


SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

This division of the Summer School offers in Architecture the following professional
courses: Ae. 11A, Fundamentals of Architecture; Ae. 51A, Mechanical Equipment o
Buildings; Ae. 61A and Ae. 61B, Structural Design of Buildings.
These subjects are taught by the project method in which the student progresses in
dividually according to his ambition, previous preparation, natural ability and application
Credits are given on acceptable work completed.
Credits obtained may be applied toward the degrees in Architecture and Building Con-
struction. For detailed requirements for the several degrees offered by the School the
student should consult the Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division.


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Inasmuch as most of the subjects taught in the public schools are continued on the
college level by departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, this college is of particular
service to teachers of the State. Others who profit particularly by the operation of the
College of Arts and Sciences in the Summer Session are students of the College who wish
either to make up deficiencies or to hasten graduation, students of other collegiate institu-
tions and of other colleges of the University who wish to complete basic arts and sciences
requirements or electives, and men and women who spend their vacations in attendance
at the University for the purpose of securing new points of view and renewed intellectual
vigor.
CURRICULA IN ARTS AND SCIENCES

The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, Bachelor of Science in
Chemistry, and Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy. The curriculum leading to the degree
of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy is administered by the Director of the School of
Pharmacy. (See School of Pharmacy.) The other curricula above are administered by
the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Only students who have completed the
General College or its equivalent (as determined by the Board of Examiners and approved
by the Dean of the College) are eligible to enter the curricula and become candidates
for degrees.
THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Every student who wishes to be a candidate for one of these degrees should read
carefully the description of requirements under the heading College of Arts and Sciences
in the Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division.





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the specified
requirements and whose majors center in one or more of the fields of ancient languages,
3ible, economics, English, French, geography, German, history, journalism, philosophy,
politicall science, sociology, Spanish and speech. Similarly, the degree of Bachelor of
science will be conferred upon those who fulfill the specified requirements and whose
najors center in one or more of the fields of biology, botany, chemistry, geology, and
physics. Some students who major in mathematics or in psychology receive the degree
f Bachelor of Arts while others receive the degree of Bachelor of Science, the degree being
determined by the direction of the student's interests and accomplishments in his major
vork.
THE PRE-LAW COURSE
In cooperation with the College of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences offers com-
bined academic-law curricula. For students who make adequate scholastic progress it is
possible to earn the academic and law degrees in six years, of which two years are spent
in the General College, one in the College of Arts and Sciences, and three in the College
of Law.
PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES
Students who upon graduation from the General College are eligible for admission to
the College of Arts and Sciences and who have not completed requirements for admission
to the medical and dental schools should continue and complete their pre-professional
training in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student should select courses in accord-
ance with requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes to enter, and
should correspond with the dean of that school for information and advice.


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The College of Business Administration operates during the Summer Session as during
the regular terms. The courses offered appeal to students attending the regular terms
who wish to return during the Summer Session, and to teachers and others who wish to
take courses to prepare for teaching commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare
for teaching social sciences.
DEGREES AND CURRICULA
The College of Business Administration offers two degrees: The Bachelor of Science in
Business Administration and the Bachelor of Science in Public Administration. To secure
the first degree students must complete either the Curriculum in Business Administration
Proper or the Curriculum in Combination with Law. To secure the second degree they
must complete the Curriculum in Public Administration. The Bulletin of Information for
the Upper Division should be consulted for admission and curriculum requirements.

CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
The College of Business Administration combines with the General College and the
College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately
to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first two years in the General
College and the third year in the College of Business Administration. When they have
fully satisfied the academic requirements of the College of Business Administration, they
are eligible to register in the College of Law and may during their last three years com-
plete the course in the College of Law.





28 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
For admission to the College of Education all students will be required to present a
certificate of graduation from the General College, or its equivalent, and have the approve
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS
For graduation With Honors, a student must earn an honor point average of at least 3.2
in the work of the Upper Division. For graduation with High Honors, a student must meet
the following requirements: (1) attain an honor point average of at least 3.5 in the work
of the Upper Division; (2) obtain the recommendation of the Faculty Committee which has
supervised a special project or program of work for the student. A copy of detailed regula-
tions governing graduation With High Honors may be obtained from the office of the Dean.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA
Only two degrees are offered in the College of Education-Bachelor of Arts in Education
and Bachelor of Science in Education. For either degree the student is required to com-
plete 60 semester hours, with an average of "C" or higher, after graduation from the
General College.
CURRICULA IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
I. For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit.
Graduation from the General College.
Professionalized Subject Matter: Credits
Children's Social Studies ................... - .................................. ......... ............ 3
C children's Science ...................................... .... ... .............................................. 2
C children's Literature ............................................................. ..... ............................ 3
Health and Physical Education ................. ......................................................... 2
H health E education ............................... .................................................................. 3
Public School A rt .................................................................................................. 4
Public School M usic ........................................... ........... ........................... 4
H andw writing .................................................................................... .......................0 or 1
Education:
CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
En. 385-Child Development
En. 386-Educational Psychology
En. 421-422-Student Teaching
En. 406-Elementary School Administration
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Elementary School)
*English ................................................................................... 15 credits
Total of at least 66 credits in the Upper Division.
II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years'
college credit.
General Background: Credits
C-1 .................................................. ................. ......................... 8
C -2 or C -6 .............................................................................................................. 8 or 6
C -3 ................................................ ....................................................................... 8
C-41 .................. .. ...... ............ ......................4 or 3
*By permission of the Dean of the College of Education, these hours may be completed in
other areas.





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 29

rofessionalized Subject Matter: Credits
Children's Social Studies .................. ............................ ............................... 3
Children's Science ..................................... ..... ..................................... ............. 2
Children's Literature ................................ ........................... ........................... 3
Health and Physical Education .............................................................................. 2
H health E education ................... ............................................................ ...................... 3
Public School Art .................----------------------------.............................................................................. 4
Public School M music ................................................................................................. 4
H andw writing ....................... -................... ...............................-........................ ...... 0 or 1
education:
CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
En. 385-Child Development
En. 386-Educational Psychology
En. 421-422-Student Teaching
En. 406-Elementary School Administration
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Elementary School)
E english .................................. ....... .....- ... ........ ................ ..... 15 credits
Social Studies .......................... ..... ................. ....... ........ .... 15 credits
enough electives to make a total of .................. -..................... ................ 132 credits

CURRICULA IN SECONDARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS OR
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION
.For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit.
Graduation from the General College.
Health Education ........................................... 3 credits
Health and Physical Education .............................. ................................................ 2 credits
Education:
CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
En. 385-Child Development
En. 386-Educational Psychology
En. 401-School Administration
En. 421-422-Student Teaching
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Secondary School)
Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 16.)
Electives, if needed, to make a total of 66 semester hours completed in the Upper Division.
II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years'
college credit.
General Background: Credits
C -1 ...................................................... ................ ..... .... ............. ................ 8
C -2 or C -6 .... .................................... ......... ................................... 8 or 6
C -3 ....................... ................................ ........... ....... .................. 8
C -4 1 ................ ............... .. .. .................................................................... 4 or 3
Speech ....................................................... .............................................................. 3 or 4
H health E education .............................. .. ................... ......... ................ ..................... 3
H health and Physical Education ............................................................................... 2
Education:
CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
En. 385-Child Development
En. 386-Educational Psychology
En. 401-School Administration
En. 421-422-Student Teaching
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Secondary School)
Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 16.1
Electives, if needed, to make a total of ................... ......................... .................132 credits
*By permission of the Dean of the College of Education, these hours may be completed in
other areas.





30 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
The College of Engineering is making available courses in each department during tl
Summer Session, so that students can graduate in minimum time.
Unless engineering students take full advantage of course offerings in order to accelerate
their program, and so graduate within minimum time, they will not be eligible for defe:
ment by Selective Service Boards in accordance with Occupational Bulletin No. 11.
Students already enrolled in the College of Engineering and others who contemplate
doing so at a later date, are urged to confer with the Dean of the College or the various
department heads, in arranging their schedules.

THE GENERAL COLLEGE
INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT*
The old plan, common in university education under the free elective system, of having
a freshman register in a particular professional school or college on matriculation da
created many problems and left others unsolved. A majority of students were not able t
choose, so they were forced to guess. Indoctrination of a most undesirable type followed
in many cases. Some departments tried to keep the chance entrant and gave him little hell
in getting correctly placed in another field. Even regulations were adopted that force
the student to lose ground if he changed. Narrow specialization followed, and the student
who continued until graduation had little opportunity to make an intelligent choice of his
life's work or to explore his interests and abilities in other fields. Thus while such a
program was undesirable even from the standpoint of those who continued until graduation,
it was infinitely worse for those who dropped out before graduation (in American univer-
sities, about two-thirds of all who enter). This great group carried away fragments and
foundations of advanced material which remained unknown to them.
Thus to the administration and the governing board of the University of Florida it
appears highly desirable that beginning students be given an opportunity to look about,
explore interests, test capabilities, verify tentative choices, and above all, to get that common
body of knowledge needed by all citizens of the Republic whether they be doctors, lawyers,
business men, or engineers. The General College,was organized as the university college
to administer this work for freshmen and sophomores.
In a recent survey from the United States Office of Education, Higher Education,
the University of Florida is named along with the University of Wisconsin, the University
of Minnesota, and the University of Chicago as being ". . key institutions that have had
great influence on the development of the general college." In the same bulletin, the
University of Florida, the University of Southern California, and the University of Chicago
are listed as "typical" of one of the six general patterns now being followed in college and
university reorganization. It is pointed out further that more than fifty-three colleges and
universities now have a program of general education; fifty-two per cent of the state uni-
versities are divided into upper divisions (juniors and seniors) and lower divisions (fresh-
men and sophomores).
PROGRAMS AND COURSES
The program of general education may follow any one of several patterns. There is a
core of comprehensive areas to be studied by all. These are generally referred to as
C-courses. Even from the beginning while a student is working in the comprehensive
fields, he may elect departmental courses to test and discover interest, explore capacities,
*During the war emergency general education is most vital. It still takes at least four years
for colleges to train engineers, chemists, or other technicians. Preceding its long range objectives,
general education takes present day ideas and materials to enable one to make desirable next steps.
The present complexity demands constant appraisal and adjustment.





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 31

nd in a very definite way find evidence to guide his future steps. Many departments
nd colleges have made adjustments and worked out introductory courses which are in
Reality connectives between the C-courses and the highly specialized work of the several
apartments. These introductory courses add to the usual foundations material that ex-
lains, evaluates, and indicates the significance of what is being studied.
There is no attempt to survey for freshmen and sophomores these great areas of human
knowledge and understanding. This would give a very thin spread. However, it is possible
o use illustrative material, pick out meaningful ideas, and give the student something very
definite to guide his next steps, whether they be away from the University or deeper into
professional foundations. These areas are:
1. Government, Economics, Sociology, and History (known hereafter as C-l).
2. The Utilization and Understanding of the Physical World (C-2).
3. Communication: Reading, Speaking, and Writing (C-3).
4. Straight Thinking, Propaganda Analysis, Mathematics (C-4).
5. The Humanities: The Culture of Races, the Building of Civilization (C-5).
6. Fundamental Principles of Biological Development (C-6).
7. Elective subjects from Upper Division departments of the field or fields
under consideration for advanced work (total, 22 semester hours).
The average student, with due provision for individual differences, follows the general
plan above. Every spring the University is privileged to give placement tests in every high
school of the State to all seniors. Since many high schools are also trying to acquaint the
student with the common body of knowledge so needed by all, their records along with
the placement test results indicate the variation that should be made in the program
followed by a student at the University. Additional placement tests, similar to the final
comprehensive examinations required in each of the areas mentioned above, are being
worked out at the University to be used as a further aid in determining the pattern a
freshman's program should take.
GUIDANCE
Since the purpose of general education is to replace fragmentation, our program absorbs
much of the responsibility for guidance. Every subject or course of the General College
program is designed to guide the student. During the time he is studying the several great
areas of human understanding and achievement, he is also taking special subjects to test
aptitude, interests, and ability. The program is adjusted to the individual, but there must
be a more substantial basis for adjustment than just a chance whim of the moment. The
material of the comprehensive courses is selected and tested with guidance as a primary
function. While, of necessity, we must look forward to distant goals, the General College
is trying to present materials that are directly related to life experiences and which will
immediately become a part of the student's thinking and guide him in making correct next
steps. Thus the whole program-placement tests, progress reports, vocational aptitude tests,
selected material in the comprehensive courses, student conferences, provisions for'superior
students, adjustment for individual differences, election privileges, and comprehensive ex-
aminations-all are parts of a plan designed to guide students.
Thus guidance is not attempted at one office by one individual with a small staff.
The whole drive of the General College program is one of directing the thinking of the
student. While the necessary correlation and unification is attempted at the General College
Office, throughout the General College period, students consult Upper Division deans and
department heads to discuss future work. During the last month of each school year these
informal conferences are concluded by a scheduled formal conference at which each student
fills out a pre-registration card for the coming year.





32 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

BEGINNING STUDENTS

Freshmen will be able to complete nearly half of the program for the first year b
attending the entire twelve weeks of the Summer Session. Suggestions as to Summei
Programs are listed below. These should be used in conjunction with the regular University
Bulletins and after consulting the Dean of the General College or a member of the Advisors
Group.
1. For the majority of students-any combination of the following 3 and 4 hour courses
totalling not more than nine hours per term.
First Term- Second Term-
C-11 Man and the Social World C-12 Man and the Social World
(cont'd)
C-21 Man and the Physical World C-22 Man and the Physical World
(cont'd)
C-31 Reading, Speaking and Writing C-32 Reading, Speaking and Writing
(cont'd)
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics C-41 Man and His Thinking
C-421 Trigonometry
C-61 Man and the Biological World C-62 Man and the Biological World
(cont'd)
(See description of courses, page 35, for number of hours' credit.)
2. For deviations from the regular program, see Program of Studies, page 20 of the Bulletin
of Information for the General College, 1942-43. For certain special groups the following
courses of study are suggested.
A. Students considering Pre-Medical or Pre-Dental Programs:
First Term- Second Term-
C-11 Man and the Social World C-12 Man and the Social World
(cont'd)
or or
C-31 Reading, Speaking and Writing C-32 Reading, Speaking and Writing
(cont'd)
or or
C-61 Man and the Biological World C-62 Man and the Biological World
(cont'd)
And one or two of the following each term to make a total of not more than nine hours.
C-42 Fundamental Mathematics C-41 Man and His Thinking
C-421 Trigonometry
Cy. 101 General Chemistry Cy. 102 General Chemistry (cont'd)
Bly. 101 General Animal Biology Bly. 102 General Animal Biology
B. Students considering Engineering who have completed three or four years of high
school mathematics:
First Term- Second Term-
CMs. 23 Basic Mathematics CMs. 24 Basic Mathematics (cont'd)
And one of the following:
C-11 Man and the Social World C-12 Man and the Social World
(cont'd)
C-31 Reading, Speaking and Writing C-32 Reading, Speaking and Writing
(cont'd)
These are not inflexible programs; they may be varied upon consultation with the Dean
or an Advisor if there is a particular need or evidence of ability to carry more advanced
courses.
TEACHERS WHO EXPECT TO TEACH IN GRADES 1-6
The following courses are required to complete the program of the General College and
to meet the requirements of the State Department of Education for an Undergraduate





COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 33

Certificate in Elementary Education, as stated in the State Department's 1942 Bulletin A,
Certification of Teachers.
Completion of the basic comprehensive courses and at least twenty-two semester hours
from the other courses will entitle the student to the Certificate of Associate of Arts and
admission to the College of Education, where the remainder of the courses may be com-
pleted for the Undergraduate Certificate and also apply on the Bachelor's degree.
Basic Comprehensive Program Minimum Credit
(Required at University of Florida to meet certificate
requirements as stated in I, E (page 5) of Bulletin A)
M an and the Social W orld, C-1 ................................................--------.......-.--.-- 8
M an and the Physical W world, C-2 ............ ............................ ............... ...... 6
Reading, Speaking, and Writing, C-3 .....-- .. .......----.......-- ....................... 8
M an and H is Thinking, C-41 ............................................. ....... ....................... 3
General M mathematics, C-42 ....-.........-...---------------- ... .... ..... .......- .... 3
The H um anities, C-5 ....................................... .... ... ...... ........ .................. 8
M an and the Biological W orld, C-6 ................................ ............ .. ................ 6
Courses meeting additional requirements for certification
as stated in I, G, 6 (pages 7-8) of Bulletin A
Introduction to Education, CEn. 13 ................................................ ..... 3
Child Development, En. 385
o r .... ......... . .......... ..... ..................... 3
Educational Psychology, En. 386
*Problems of Instruction, En. 471 ..-- --.......... ....--------..--....- -................ 6
Student Teaching, En. 405 or En. 421-2 .. .........................-- ........ ...... 6
Children's Science, Gl. 301 or GI. 302 ........ ................................ ......... 2
Children's Literature, Eh. 391 ................................... ........................................... 3
Children's Social Studies, Scl. 301 or Scl. 302 ........ ................... ............ 3
Public School M music ..............-.._ ................... ......... 6
Public School Art ...........................-----...... ... .......... .................- -- 4
H andw writing ............................ ... ..-. ...... --- ..................... 1
Health Education, HPI. 387 ....-- ................ -.....- ....... ...- ................................ 3
Health and Physical Education, HPl. 373, or HPI. 372, or HPI. 371 .............. 2
Geography ...................................... ................... .................................................... 3
**H history or Political Science ............................................ ... .. .. ......... 6

COLLEGE OF LAW
The purpose of the College of Law is to impart a thorough scientific and practical
knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the opportunities in
this field. Since 1927 the College has operated during the Summer Session. Courses
offered during the regular terms are rotated. Some courses not given during the regular
terms are offered in the Summer Session. The variety of courses is sufficient to enable
students of different types to carry a full load, and appeal to a wide range of students.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
Professional courses are offered occasionally by the School of Pharmacy in the summer
session. It is intended that these may be so rotated that courses of major interest are
offered during the course of several summers.
Two professional courses will be offered during the summer of 1943 and foundation
courses required for admission to the pharmacy curriculum and related courses such as
bacteriology, biology and chemistry may be taken during the summer session.
Graduate students will find courses available in minor fields such as biology, bacteri-
ology and chemistry.
*Includes Elementary Curriculum, Elementary Methods, and Teaching of Reading, and Methods
in Arithmetic.
**In order to secure an Undergraduate Certificate the student must complete two of the follow-
ing courses: CP1. 13, Pcl. 313, Pel. 314, Hy. 301, Hy. 302. Hy. 303, Hy. 304, Hy. 331. or Hy. 332,
or must take an examination on the Constitution of the United States.





34 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


A GUIDE TO COURSES LISTED IN THIS CATALOGUE
The course offerings are listed separately for each term, the General College Courses
first, followed by the departmental courses in alphabetical order by department name.
In registration the student should always use the departmental abbreviation and course
number, not abbreviations of the course title.
Some of the certification requirements listed in the literature of the State Department
may not be represented by the same titles in this catalogue. To facilitate finding the
proper course descriptions for such fields, the following guide is provided:

Elementary Teachers

General Preparation-the basic comprehensive courses of the General College (C-l, C-2,
C-3, C41, C-42, C-5, and C-6)
Elementary Science-listed under General Science (Gl. 301)
General Psychology-C-41 listed under General College courses and CPs. 43 listed under
Psychology
Child and Educational Psychology-listed under Education (En. 385, En. 386)
Children's Literature-listed under English (Eh. 391)
Social Studies in Elementary Grades-listed under Social Studies (Scl. 301 and Sol. 302)
Handwriting-listed under Business Education (BEn. 97)
Health Education-listed under Health and Physical Education (HPl. 387)

Secondary Teachers

Commercial Subjects-listed under Business Education and under Economics and Busi-
ness Administration
English-C-3 and courses listed under English and Speech
Mathematics-C-42, C-421, and courses listed under Mathematics
Science-C-2, C-6, and courses listed under Astronomy, Chemistry, Biology, Bacteriology,
and Physics
Social Studies-C-l and courses listed under Geography, History, Political Science,
Economics, Social Studies, and Sociology
Conservation requirement may be met with any of the following courses: C-l, C-2,
C-6 (listed under General College courses), Gpy. 385 or Gpy. 387 (not offered 1943
Summer Session), or Es. 382 (listed under Economics).





GUIDE TO COURSES LISTED 35



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

First Term

All classes ordinarily meet for fifty minutes. Classes scheduled to meet daily meet
Monday through Saturday.
Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with rw
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule.
Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to register foi
graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean of the Graduate School
and the instructor concerned.


GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES

Comprehensive examinations for General College students in C-l, C-2, C-3, C-5, and
C-6 will be given and will cover the work of both terms. Students should consult official
announcements of the Board of University Examiners for details. Credits are indicated
for the benefit of Upper Division students who elect these courses.
C-11.-Man and the Social World. 4 credits.
(Register for one section only.)
Section 10 7:00 daily and 1:00 M. T. Th. F. Pe-112. BENTLEY.
Section 11 9:00 daily and 3:00 M. T. W. Th. La-203. PRICE.
Adapted to include the rise of the Orient in world affairs, new Western Hemisphere relation,
ships, and the social implications of total war.
Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems of the
modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in education,
in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective co-
ordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny is made
of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that a
consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved.
C-21.-Man and the Physical World. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bn-209. GADDUM.
An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular reference to
man's immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to explain the
more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of
them; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize physical
materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry,
astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential
unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized.

C-31.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits.
(Register for one Discussion Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Discussion Sections:
10 8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-209. MORRIS.
11 9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-209. WISE.





36 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Writing Laboratory Sections:
101 3:00 to 5:00 M.W. La-209. FARRIS, TEW.
102 1:00 to 3:00 W. F. La-209. MAY, CLARK.
Effective English-Designed to furnish the training in reading, speaking and writing necessary
for the student's work in college and for his life thereafter. This training will be provided through
practice and counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking, in fundamentals or
form and style, in extension of vocabulary and in control of the body and voice in speaking.
Students will be encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their interests and increas-
ing their appreciation of literature.

C-32.-Reading, Speaking, and Writing. 4 credits.
(Register for Discussion Section and Laboratory Section.)
Discussion Section 20: 11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-209. CONSTANS.
Writing Laboratory 120: 1:00 to 3:00 M. S. La-209. CONGLETON.

C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-11. KOKOMOOR.
A practical treatment covering the fundamentals of manipulation and analysis in algebra,
geometry and related fields. The development of computational skills especially recommended by
both Army and Navy for aviation cadets. Not open to students who have completed General
Mathematics, Trigonometry, or Basic Mathematics.

C-51.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
(Register for Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 12:00 M. T. W. F. Aud.

Discussion Sections:
10 8:00 daily. Bu-101. GLUNT.
11 9:00 daily. Bu-101. GLUNT.
Our heritage; the World Conflict of Philosophies and Cultures.
A study of man as he has expressed himself in literature, philosophy, the graphic and plastic
arts, and music. Objectives--that the student shall increase his understanding and enjoyment of
the arts, learn something of the methods of serious and systematic thinking, gain a more thorough
understanding of the world in which he lives and of the rich and abundant experience it has to
offer, and evolve for himself a serviceable philosophy of life. The main body of the course is
devoted to a consideration of the basic ideas which have been most significant in man's cultural
development (classicism, romanticism, realism and idealism) as expressed in drama, poetry, fiction,
music and the graphic and plastic arts. The course is open to all second-year students in the
General College and to all Upper D'ivision students with the permission of the Dean of the General
College.

C-61.-Man and the Biological World. 3 credits.
(Register for Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)
Lecture Section 1: 11:00 daily. Sc-101. BYERS.

Discussion Sections:
10 5:00 T. Th. Sc-101. BYERS.
11 1:00 M. W. Sc-101. BYERS.
12 2:00 W. F. Sc-101. BYERS.
The biological problems and principles associated with the organism's role as: (1) a living
individual, (2) a member of a race, (3) a product of evolutionary processes, and (4) a member
of a socially and economically inter-related complex of living organisms, supply the main sequence
and material of the course.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 37

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

201.-Agricultural Economics. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Ag-210. REITZ.
An introduction to the field of agricultural economics; principles of economics as applied
agriculture; economic problems of the agricultural industry and the individual farmer.

s. 421.-Problems in Agricultural Economics. 3 credits.
To arrange. REITZ.
Assigned readings and problems for students primarily interested in farm management and
e marketing of agricultural products. For students who have not had the introductory courses
these two branches of agricultural economics the readings and problems will be selected and
ganized to fill the needs of either a beginning course in farm management or marketing. Fre-
ent conferences will be held with the instructor.

ANIMAL PRODUCTION

I. 309.-Fundamentals in Animal Husbandry. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Ag-102. WILLOUGHBY.
Types and breeds of farm animals; principles of breeding, selection and management.

1. 425.-Problems in Animal Industry. 1 to 3 credits.
To arrange. WILLOUGHBY.
Studies in feeding, care and management of various classes of farm animals.

ARCHITECTURE

Courses in the Department of Architecture are carried on by means of the problem or
project method, and accomplishment is the sole criterion for advancement.
Credits will depend upon the number of projects completed. Laboratories will be con-
ducted seven hours daily and will remain open for additional hours for those who desire
to use them. All courses except Ae. 11A are coordinated courses.
Students in the Upper Division who desire to hasten their graduation but need certain
work not offered in this summer school curriculum may petition the Architectural faculty
and, if possible, the work will be offered.

Ae. 11A.-Fundamentals of Architecture. HANNAFORD.
A creative introductory course for beginners.

Ae. 51A.-Materials and Methods of Construction. HANNAFORD.
For students in Architecture and Building Construction.

Ae. 61A.-Structural Design of Buildings. HANNAFORD.
Wood, steel, and reinforced structures, correlated with design projects.

Ae. 61B.-Structural Design of Buildings. HANNAFORD.
A continuation of Ae. 61A for students in Architecture.

ASTRONOMY

Aty. 302.-Air Navigation. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-10. BLANTON.
The geographical, mathematical, and astronomical principles involved in determination of
position and in guidance of aircraft. Aeronautical instruments, facilities, and procedures of
navigation and their uses.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BACTERIOLOGY

Bey. 301.-General Bacteriology. 4 credits.
10:00 daily. Sc-201. CARROLL.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 3:00 M. W. F. Sc-104.
Bcy. 304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology. 4 credits.
9:00 daily. Sc-111. CARROLL.
Laboratory: 3:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. Sc-104.
Recognition, culture, and special laboratory technique of handling pathogens and virus
theories and principles of immunity and infection. Stitt, Practical Bacteriology, Parasitology, a ,
Blood Work.
GRADUATE COURSE

Bcy. 500.-Advanced Bacteriology. Variable credit.
To arrange. CARROLL.

BIOLOGY

Bly. 101.-General Animal Biology. 3 credits. Corequisite or presequisite: C-
11:00 daily. Sc-111. HOBBS and GOIN.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. W. Sc-10.
An introduction to vertebrate zoology with special emphasis on the morphology, physiology an
embryology of the frog.

Bly. 133.-Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Sc-101. HUBBELL and GOIN.
Designed to provide a recognition of and an acquaintance with some of the more common
animals and plants of Florida. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question
"What animal-or what plant-is this?". Individual work in the field and the making of persona
reference collections of plants and animals are encouraged.

Bly. 210.-Vertebrate Embryology. 4 credits. Prerequisite: Bly. 209.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Sc-111. SHERMAN.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. W. Sc-107.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

(See Economics and Business Administration)


BUSINESS EDUCATION

Note: These courses do not count as credit in Education.

BEn. 81.-Introductory Typewriting. 2 credits.
To arrange. Yn-305. MOORMAN.
Introduction to touch typewriting: practice upon personal and business problems.

BEn. 91.-Introductory Shorthand. 2 credits.
To arrange. Yn-306. MOORMAN.
Introduction to Gregg Shorthand by the functional method.

BEn. 97.-Handwriting. 1 credit.
7:00 M. T. W. F. Yn-306. MOORMAN.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 39

n. 151.-Teaching of Accounting. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Lw-202. BEIGHTS.
A survey of the methods of teaching accounting and bookkeeping in the secondary schooL
A critical study will be made of the various methods of presenting specific accounting topics
Problems, after a preliminary survey of the field of accounting, accounting curricula, and
counting objectives has been made.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

449.-Unit Processes. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cg. 448 and Cy. 302.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Bn-104. BEISLER.
An introduction to the unit processes. Groggins, Unit Processes.
457.-Chemical Engineering Design. 2 credits. The first half of the course
Cg. 457-458.
1:00 to 6:00 M. W. Bn-207. MORGEN.
The design of chemical plants and equipment. Vilbrandt, Chemical Engineering Plant Design;
ler, Chemical Engineering Economics.
g. 467.-Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 credits. The first half of
the course Cg. 467-468. Prerequisites: Cy. 402, calculus.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bn-104. MORGEN.
Fundamental applications of thermodynamics to chemistry and chemical engineering.

CHEMISTRY

y. 101.-General Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 101-102.
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Ch-212. JACKSON.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-130.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and preparation and properties of the common
on-metallic elements and their compounds.
y. 201.-Analytical Chemistry. 4 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Ch-212. HEATH.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-230.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection of the
common metals and acid radicals.
y. 301.-Organic Chemistry. 4 credits. The first half of the course Cy. 301-302.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Ch-212. LEIGH.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-230.
Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic compounds.

GRADUATE COURSES
Cy. 572.-Research in Organic Chemistry. 2 to 6 hours credit.
Cy. 574.-Research in Naval Stores. 2 to 6 hours credit.

CIVIL ENGINEERING
Cl. 327.-Hydraulics. 4 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Hl-101. STAFF.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. F. HI-101.
The principles underlying the behavior of fluids at rest and in motion. The transportation
and measurement of fluids.





40 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Cl. 329.-Higher Surveying. 12 weeks. 5 credits. Prerequisite: C1. 226.
1:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. and 8 other hours per week to arrange.
This course runs throughout the 12 weeks, and no credit will be giv
unless the entire course is completed.
H1-303. KEITH.
Field and office practice in traverse, topographic mapping, base line measurement, triang
tion, practical astronomy, stream gauging and hydrographic surveying, precise leveling and adju
ments of instruments. Breed and Hosmer, The Principles and Practice of Surveying, Volume

Cl. 433.-Theory of Reinforced Concrete. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Cl. 326.
10:00 daily. H1-301. KEITH.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. W. H1-301.
Theory and design of slabs, beams, girders, columns. Resistance to flexure shear, diagon
tension, bond, compression.

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Note: Courses designated by Es. are Economics courses, those designated by the letter
Bs. are Business Administration courses.

*CEs. 131.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. Prerequisite
Sophomore standing.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-112. ELDRIDGE.
Emphasis on the functioning of the economic system. Economic organization and institution
as parts of the economic order in their functional capacities. The understanding of economic
principles and processes, especially those relating to value, price, cost, rent, wages, profits, an,
interest, insofar as such knowledge is necessary in understanding the economic situation of th
present day. The evaluation of economic forces and processes in terms of their contribution
social well being. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration

CBs. 141.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits.
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Lw-202. BEIGHTS.
Designed to provide the basic training in business practice and in accounting. A study of
business papers and records; recording transactions; preparation of financial statements and re-
ports. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.
CEs. 15.-Elementary Statistics. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-209. ANDERSON.
The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with
such fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture,
psychology, sociology, etc.; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics.
Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economies and Business Administration.
Es. 240.-The Economic Problems of War. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-210. MATHERLY.
The nature of war, economic causes of war, manpower requirements of total war, the price
system under the impact of war, control of production and consumption, the supply of strategic
materials, foodstuffs and war. war finance, the aftermath of war.
Bs. 311.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CBs. 141-142.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Lw-202. BEIGHTS.
A study of the mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting; books of record; accounts;
fiscal period and adjustments; working papers; form and preparation of financial statements:

*This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required. Students
may take the second term without having had the first term only with consent of the instructor.
When the course is completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may
secure six semester hours credit.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 41

followed by an intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the
preparation of the balance sheet and income statements.

Es. 327.-Public Finance. 3 credits.
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Pe-206. BIGHAM.
Principles governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue: public credit:
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal systems
of leading countries.

Es. 382.-Utilization of Our Resources. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-212. EUTSLER.
A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed
by an intensive study of the wise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these
resources. A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation
with special reference to Florida.

Courses by Project Method. BIGHAM, BEIGHTS, EUTSLER, and MATHERLY.
Students may register for certain upper division courses and complete them by the individual
project method. Information about these courses may be obtained from the office of the Dean
of the College of Business Administration.


EDUCATION

CEn. 13.-Introduction to Education. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-210. NORMAN.
Principles upon which present day education is based.

En. 305.-Development and Organization of Education. 3 credits.
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Yn-134. CUMBEE.
An attempt to interpret the role of the public school in our rapidly changing society.

En. 317.-Measurement and Evaluation. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-218. CRAGO.
A study of the basic principles and methods of measurement and evaluation of school practices.

En. 385.-Child Development. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Yn-218. CUMBEE.
Designed to acquaint the student with the growth and development of children into mature
personalities. The findings of recent research will be studied through outside reading, class dis-
cussion and observation. Methods of evaluation of child growth will be included.

En. 401.-School Administration. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Yn-134. SIMMONS.
Problems peculiar to schools in Florida; the supervising principal, qualifications, relation to
superintendent, boards, teachers, pupils, patrons, and community; adapting the school to the child's
needs; business practices.

En. 421.-Student Teaching. 3 credits. The first half of the course En. 421-422.
To arrange. HOUGH.
En. 421-422: The student is given practice in the art of teaching by actually taking over re-
sponsibility for the teaching-learning situation and putting into operation under direction and
supervision the theories, methods, materials, and teaching techniques acquired during his junior
year through observation and participation.

En. 422.-Student Teaching. 3 credits. The second half of the course En. 421-422.
To arrange. HOUGH.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 471.-Problems of Instruction. 6 credits.
9:00 to 11:00 daily and 3:00 to 5:00 T. Th. Yn-315. McLENDON.
An opportunity will be given the teacher for studying curriculum practices and developing
tentative plans for classroom experience in the community of the particular teachers. Evaluation
in various fields will be studied. Problems in teaching reading and the language arts will be
stressed.
En. 472.-Methods and Organization in Industrial Arts. 3 credits.
Project method. Yn-316. BOHANNON.
Organization of industrial arts materials for the various grades and schools; planning courses
of study, selecting equipment and supplies; study of aims and objectives of industrial arts. A study
of the utilization of current acceptable teaching techniques and devices.

GRADUATE COURSES
All graduate students majoring in Education must register through the General Directing
Committee of the College of Education. This Committee will assist such students, beginning
and advanced in matters pertaining to their graduate work. Communications should be
addressed to the Acting Dean of the College of Education, University of Florida. Each
student beginning graduate work is required to take En. 500-Beginning Seminar.

Suggested Courses for Majors

School Administration: Educational Psychology: Instruction:
En. 503 or En. 517 En. 503 En. 503 or En. 507
En. 508 or En. 510 En. 507 En. 508 or En. 510
En. 518 or En. 597 En. 508 or En. 510 En. 516 or En. 562
En. 521 En. 516 En. 524 or En. 525
En. 528 or En. 536 En. 517
En. 544 En. 539
En. 562 En. 562
En. 500.-Beginning Seminar. 1 credit.
2:00 to 5:00 W. Yn-132. MEAD.
This course is intended for all students doing graduate study in the field of professional educa-
tion. It should come early in the student's program and prior to his beginning a research project.
The course deals particularly with the following aspects of educational research: the place and
history of research in education; the nature and objective of educational research; the selection
of problems for research; the location of educational research materials and the use of the library;
the formulation and outlining of the research problem; the various methods and techniques used
in educational research; acquaintance with general research procedures; and the evaluation of
educational research.
En. 503.-Measurement and Evaluation. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-218. CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of educational problems involving measurements,
diagnostic and remedial measures. This course is primarily for graduate students with experience
in residence or in the field.

En. 508.-Democracy and Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-203. NORMAN.
The nature of experiences, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual
society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, education its own end.

En. 518.-High School Administration. 3 credits.
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Yn-132. MORPHET.
This course will consist of an intensive study of specific problems in organizing and admiaister-
ing the modern high school. Special reference will be made to Florida.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 43

En. 519.-High School Curriculum. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Yn-132. WILLIAMS, WALTER R.
A course dealing with high school curriculum problems.

En. 536.-Elementary School Supervision. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Yn-209. STEVENS, GRACE A.
The objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in elementary schools: the
preparation of teachers.

En. 597.-Elementary School Administration. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Yn-132. MORPHET.
The administration of the elementary school; a study of problems of elementary school princi-
pals such as: supervision, professional growth, selection of teachers, relation of administrative
officers, discipline, child health, attendance, etc.


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Radio courses in the Department of Electrical Engineering are given in cooperation
with Radio Station WRUF. Qualified students can secure practical experience in station
operation.

El. 341.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The first half of course
El. 341-342. Prerequisites: One year of college physics, including electricity
and magnetism; differential and integral calculus; Ml. 182.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Eg-202. SMITH, E. F.
Electric and magnetic circuits; electrostatics; electro-magnetics; representation of alternating
currents by vectors and complex quantities; measurement of power in single phase and polyphase
circuits; generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy; characteristics of apparatus;
selection, testing, and installation of electrical equipment.
El. 349.-Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The first half of the course El. 349-350.
Corequisite: El. 341.
1:00 to 3:00 M. W. F. Bn-106. SMITH, E. F.
Experimental studies and tests on direct current and alternating current apparatus.

El. 465.-Radio Engineering. 5 credits. The first half of the course El. 465-466.
Prerequisite: El. 346.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Eg-213. MORENO.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. Se-11th floor.
The function of high frequency networks; network theorems, resonance; the infinite line;
reflection; filters; coupled circuits; impedance transformation; inductive interference; vacuum
tubes; modulation and demodulation; vacuum tube detectors; audio video and radio frequency
amplifiers; oscillators; antennas and radiation. Terman, Radio Engineering.


ENGLISH

The courses in English, advanced as well as introductory, have one common purpose:
to enrich the student's experience by intimate association with those writings in our
language, past and present, which contribute most to meaningful living. The central aim
is to help persons of all vocations acquire some appreciation of our literary heritage,
essential to a cultivated outlook on life, and to help persons of all vocations acquire greater
facility in the knowledge and use of our language. The aim is thus twofold: education
for enlightened leisure and for enlightened labor.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Suggestions to Teachers: The Department recommends as the best possible preparation
for the teaching of English the following fundamental courses, or their equivalents, and
urges all who have not had equivalent courses to take them at the earliest opportunity:
CEh. 37-38 or CEh. 313-314, Eh. 301-302, Eh. 305, Eh. 399 and Eh. 401-402. In all courses
intended primarily for teachers, special consideration will be given to appropriate topics
and problems relating to the teaching of English in public schools. (See the course
descriptions below.)

For elementary school teachers the Department suggests Eh. 391, at least one semester
of CEh. 35-36, CEh. 37-38, or CEh. 313-314, and Eh. 399.

For any advanced student, Eh. 430 will provide opportunity to study in fields not
represented specifically in the other courses offered this summer.

CEh. 35.-Literary Masters of America. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-314. FARRIS.
The writers emphasized are selected from the most eminent American authors between Irving
and Frost, such writers as everyone should or would like to know, regardless of his intended voca-
tion. For teachers, particular attention will be devoted to those writers whose work is stressed
in junior and senior high school courses, and to methods of presentation.

CEh. 37.-Literary Masters of England. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-314. CONNER.
The most interesting and significant English writers from the beginning to the 19th century
are read and discussed primarily for an appreciation of their art and their outlook on life. For
teachers, particular attention will be devoted to writers and works stressed in junior and senior
high school English courses, and to methods of presentation.

Eh. 302.-Shakespeare. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-314. ROBERTSON.
The primary design is to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciation of the plays.
Devoted chiefly to the great tragedies, including Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Anthony
and Cleopatra. Eh. 301 and 302 may be taken in reverse order, or either one without the other.

Eh. 380.-English in the Secondary Schools. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-311. CONGLETON.
Designed to help teachers of English by (1) a review of the contents, both the language and
the literature, of high school English, (2) an evaluation of some of the methods widely used in
high school English courses, and (3) a study of both the ultimate and the immediate objectives
of the high school English program.

Eh. 391.-Children's Literature. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-203. WISE.
Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart from school
textbooks, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and to make
him more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form.

Eh. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-311. HAINES.
An opportunity to study various fields of literature for which there are no special course
offerings. Through this means a student can secure a desired elective in English, or complete an
undergraduate major or graduate minor. The course will consist of directed reading and frequent
individual or group conferences with the instructor. Students should secure the approval of the
Department.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSE

Eh. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. STAFF.
Provision will be made for students who desire work in fields not covered by the current
course offerings. Such work will consist of directed readings supplemented by frequent individual
conferences.
FRENCH

Fh. 201.-Second-Year French. 3 credits. The first half of the course Fh. 201-
202. Prerequisite: One year of college French, or two years of high school
French.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Bu-101. ATKIN.
Reading from modern French authors; translation of simple English into French.

GRADUATE COURSE

Fh. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. ATKIN.
Fh. 530 offers graduate students an opportunity to study, for credit, certain phases of French
literature, language, and civilization for which there are no regular course offerings. Such in-
dividual work may be elected for additional credit in subsequent sessions. Students will be helped
to plan a definite program, and will meet the instructor for conferences.

GENERAL SCIENCE

GL 105.-Pre-Flight Aeronautics Course for Teachers. 3 credits.
8:00 to 12:00 daily and 2:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. for 3 weeks beginning
June 5. Yn-Ag. Shop.
Introduction to Pre-Flight Aeronautics; General Servicing and Operation of Aircraft; Meteor-
ology; Navigation; Civil Air Regulations; Pre-Flight Aeronautics in the Secondary Schools. A
total of 64 hours of classroom instruction will be provided. Students enrolled in this course are
not permitted to register for other courses.

Gl. 301.-Children's Science. 2 credits.
7:00 daily. Yn-142. GOETTE.
The content of elementary science, together with its organization for use both in the integrated
program and in the departmentalized school. Consideration given to the interests and experiences
of children. Investigation of instructional aids that will assist teachers of the elementary school
to meet the needs of individual children.

GEOGRAPHY

Gpy. 201.-Geography of the Americas. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-212. DIETTRICH.
A regional survey of the lands and peoples of Anglo and Latin America; location, surface
features, climate, ancient civilizations, European settlement, natural resources and economic develop-
ment; an analysis of the growth of present-day nations and their economic, political and social
interdependence. Introductory to study of geography, history, languages and Inter-American affairs.



HANDWRITING

(See Business Education)





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GERMAN
Gn. 201.-Second-Year German. 3 credits. The first half of the course Gn. 201-
202.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bu-305. JONES.
Reading of prose of moderate difficulty. Grammar review. Conversation.

Gn. 430.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange. JONES.
Readings in special fields. The course may be repeated without duplication of credit.

GRADUATE COURSE
Gn. 530.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange. JONES.
Readings and reports in fields chosen by the individual student. Mainly designed for graduate
students desiring to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors. The course
may be repeated without duplication of credit.

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HPI. 363.-Teaching Physical Education in the Sdcondary School. 3 credits.
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Yn-138. SALT.
The program of physical education activities for the secondary school involving team games,
rhythm, gymnastics activities, individual and dual sports; together with appropriate procedures
and methods for conducting such a program.
HPI. 373.-Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Yn-138. SALT.
The program of physical education activities for the elementary school including small group
play, large group play, directed play, team game units; together with appropriate procedures
and methods for conducting such a program.
HP1. 387.-Health Education. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-138. SALT.
A consideration of the principles underlying health education, together with the organization
and administration of such a program; the role of the teacher in health instruction, who shall
teach health, the organization of materials for instructional purposes, criteria for the evaluation
of health materials and methods, the role of local, state and national non-official organizations
in health teaching programs.
GRADUATE COURSE
HPI. 533.-Problems of Physical Education. 3 credits. The first half of the
course HP1. 533-534.
To arrange. SALT.
Designed to give the student an understanding of the contemporary problems in physical educa-
tion. It forms the basis for the organization of research projects together with an analysis of the
techniques used in problem solving.
HISTORY
The prerequisites for all Upper Division courses in History are:
(1) For students whose Freshman and Sophomore work is taken under the curriculum
of the General College, satisfactory completion of C-1.-Man and the Social World,
followed by CHy. 13.-History of the Modern World.
(2) For students who have not completed the above, Hy. 313-314. (Formerly Hy.
101-102.) Europe During the Middle Ages.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


CHy. 13.-History of the Modern World. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-112. PATRICK.
A study of the modern world from the Congress of Vienna to the present time.

Hy. 301.-American History, 1492-1776. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-112. LEAKE.
The Colonial Period up to 1776.

Hy. 361.-English History to 1688. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-209. PAYNE.
A survey of English History from the Anglo-Saxon settlements to the Glorious Revolution.

GRADUATE COURSE

Hy. 509.-Seminar in American History. 3 credits.
To arrange. LEAKE.


HORTICULTURE

GRADUATE COURSE

He. 570.-Research in Horticulture. 3 credits.
To arrange. WOLFE.


INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION

Courses in Industrial Arts Education will be conducted by the project method. Arrange-
ments will be made for students to register for any of the courses in Industrial Arts Educa-
tion regularly offered in the fall and spring semesters if such courses are needed to meet
certification requirements this summer.

In. 111.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 credits.
Project method. Yn-316. BOHANNON.
For industrial arts students. Freehand sketching, lettering, orthographic projection, geometric
construction, working drawing and blue printing, care and use of instruments.

In. 112.-Mechanical Drawing. 3 credits.
Project method. Yn-316. BOHANNON.
For industrial arts students. Perspective rendering, tracings and blue prints for a small
building; different types of letters, machine sketching, and conventions. Suggestions and plans
as to the most effective way of teaching a course of this type.

In. 211.-General Shop. 3 credits.
Project method. Yn-316. BOHANNON.
For industrial arts students. Practice in use of hand tools commonly found in school shops;
types of construction, design, woodfinishing; block-printing. Analysis of logical teaching units
in projects and problems in the various phases of industrial arts.

In. 401.-Architectural Drawing. 3 credits. Prerequisite: In. 111-112.
Project method. Yn-316. BOHANNON.
Designed for industrial arts teachers. Study made of building materials, sources and prices;
landscaping as to orientation; plans, elevations, sections, details, conventions; types and styles of
domestic architecture, and a review of the history of architecture.





48 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Ig. 365.-Engineering Mechanics-Statics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 205,
Ms. 353, Ml. 182.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Eg-209. YEATON.
Principles of statics; resolution and equilibrium of concurrent forces; numerical and graphical
solution of trusses and hinged frames; couples; centers of gravity; forces in space; and moments
of inertia. Timoshenko and MacCullough, Enaineering Mechanics.
Ig. 367.-Strength of Materials. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ig. 365.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Eg-209. YEATON.
Tension, compression, shear, stress and strain; combined stresses; riveted joints for pressure
vessels and structural work; torsion; bending moments; stresses and deflection of simple, canti-
lever, and continuous beams; concrete beams; curved beams and hooks; eccentric loading columns;
and elastic strain energy. Timoshenko and MacCullough, Elements of Strength of Materials.

LAW

Lw. 307.-Legal Institutions. 1 credit.
11:15-12:30 M. W. Lw-111. SLAGLE.
Origin and growth of the Common Law; Development of Equity; Background of the Bill of
Rights; The Jury System; Development and Use of Administrative Tribunals. Plucknett, Concise
History of the Common Law.
Lw. 310.-Judicial Administration. 1 credit.
11:15-12:30 T. Th. Lw-111. TESELLE.
Venue; Jurisdiction; Local and Transitory Actions; Process; Summons, Personal Service,
Appearance and Waiver of Process, Immunity; Service for Personal Judgments also in Rem;
Return. McBaine, Cases on Trial Practice (2nd ed.).
Lw. 311.-School Law. 2 credits.
10:00-11:15 M. W. Th. S. Lw-111. DAY.
Authority and responsibility of teachers; rights and duties of students; rules and regulations;
incidental fees; contracts of teachers; pensions; private schools; illegal expenditures of school
money; illegal uses of school property; school contracts and torts; diplomas and degrees; exemp-
tion of school property from taxation.
Lw. 320.-Workmen's Compensation. 1 credit.
8:45-10:00 T. F. Lw-111. TRUSLER.
Scope, construction, beneficiaries, injuries compensated, defenses, and proceedings for adjust-
ment of compensation, with special reference to the Florida statute. Workmen's Compensation
Acts in Ruling Case Law and the Florida Act.
Lw. 422.-Banks and Banking. 1 credit.
10:00-11:15 T. F. Lw-111. DAY.
Kinds of banks; deposits; checks; clearing houses; collections; loans and discounts; bank
notes; banking corporations; representation of bank by officers; insolvency; national banks; savings
banks. Tiffany, Banks and Banking.
Lw. 502.-Damages. 2 credits.
8:45-10:00 M. W. Th. S. Lw-111. TRUSLER.
General principles; sorts; measure in contract and tort actions; avoidable consequences; value;
interest: death by wrongful act. Trusler, Florida Cases on Damages.

MATHEMATICS

Before registering for any course, the student should ascertain the prerequisites.
C-42.-Fandamental Mathematics. (See General College Courses.)





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 49


CMs. 23.-Basic Mathematics. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-11. PIRENIAN.
In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession,
this course offers a sequence of topics including the above plus a liberal amount of calculus.
Teachers of high school mathematics who wish to advance in technical command of the subject
matter should elect both CMs. 23 and CMs. 24. This is also designed for those who plan to major
in mathematics or to elect courses above the freshman level.

Ms. 117.-Refresher Course. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-10. KOKOMOOR.
A refresher course designed particularly for those people who have not been teaching mathe-
matics but who will be expected to do so. A review of the fundamental processes of arithmetic,
algebra, and practical geometry, together with teaching methods and applications.

Ms. 226.-Algebra for Teachers. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-11. PIRENIAN.
The materials of first and second year high school algebra. A study of the State adopted
text with supplementary and illustrative material. Methods of presentation. Functional relation-
ships. Construction and interpretation of graphs.

Ms. 325.-Advanced General Mathematics. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-206. PHIPPS.
Designed for high school teachers. Selected topics having a direct and significant bearing upon
the teaching of mathematics in high school. Consideration of the subject matter itself and its
relation to adequate reorganization programs, both in the light of general modern objectives and
experience obtained in the teaching of mathematics in the General College. Ms. 325 is concerned
with the teaching of general (practical) mathematics and algebra in high schools.

Ms. 353.-Differential Calculus. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-11. SIMPSON.
Beginning calculus course. Differentiation, one of the most important and practical fields
of mathematics, is treated in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse
operation of differentiation.

Ms. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-10. PHIPPS.
An opportunity to register for work in any phases of mathematics for which there are no
courses listed. Students may consult the list of departmental offerings on pages 166-168 of the
Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division for the year 1942-1943. Students will be given
adequate guidance.

GRADUATE COURSE

Ms. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To be arranged. PHIPPS.


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Ml. 181.-Engineering Drawing. 2 credits.
1:00 M. W. Eg-202. FRASH.
Drawing: 2:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. Eg-304.
Designed to teach the student how to make and how to read engineering drawing. French,
Engineering Drawing. A prerequisite for practically all engineering courses.
Equipment costing about thirty dollars is required but will be used extensively in later work.





50 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

M1. 281.-Elementary Design. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ml. 182.
9:00 daily. Eg-209. FINEREN.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. W. Eg-300.
The size and proportions of standard machine parts, screws, threads, bolts, nuts, pipe, pipe
fittings, shafts, bearings, tolerances and allowances, riveted and welded joints, springs, lubrica-
tion, and design of simple machine parts. French, Engineering Drawing.

Ml. 385.-Thermodynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ms. 353-354, Ps. 205-206,
Cy. 101-102.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Eg-202. LEGGETT.
Energy equations and availability of energy; gases, vapors, and mixtures; engineering applica-
tions in flow of fluids, vapor power cycles, gas compression and refrigeration. Ebaugh, Engineering
Thermodynamics.
ML. 491.-Machine Design. 4 credits. Prerequisites: Ml. 281, Ig. 361, Ig. 365,
366, 367.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Eg-213. FINEREN.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. W. Eg-300.
The calculation, proportioning and detailing of machine parts, shop and mill layout, and the
design of machines to perform certain functions.


MUSIC

Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 2 credits.
1:00 to 3:00 M. W. F. Aud. CARSON.
The child voice; rote songs; development of rhythm; sight-singing from rote to note; develop-
ment of skills necessary for teaching primary music.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 2 credits.
3:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. Aud. CARSON.
Development of sight-singing; study of problems pertaining to intermediate grades: part sing-
ing; song repertoire; appreciation work suitable for intermediate grades.


PHARMACOLOGY

Ply. 455.-New Remedies. 3 credits. The first half of the course Ply. 455-456.
10:00 to 12:00 daily. Ch-316. FOOTE.
A study of the most important non-official remedies currently found in modern prescription
practice and over-the-counter sales. More than twelve hundred remedies are available for study.


PHARMACY

Phy. 402.-Pharmaceutical Arithmetic. 2 credits.
9:00 daily. Ch-316. FOOTE.
Calculations used in pharmaceutical work with emphasis on practical problems.


PHYSICAL FITNESS

PFP. Section 1. 7:00 M. W. F. Fleming Field.
PFP. Section 2. 10:00 M. W. F. Fleming Field.
PFP. Section 3. 11:00 M. W. F. Fleming Field.
PFP. Section 4. 3:00 M. W. F. Fleming Field.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


PHYSICS

Students in the College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in Physics may enroll
in the courses outlined below. Additional problem work and subject matter will be
assigned, and substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher is made.
Ps. 101.-Elementary Physics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-2 or consent of in-
structor.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Bn-209. PERRY.
A course in general physics for science students.
Ps. 103.-Elementary Physics Laboratory. 2 credits. Corequisite: Ps. 101.
7:00 to 10:00 P.M. M. and 1:00 to 5:00 F. Bn-307. PERRY.
Laboratory for Physics 101.

PLANT PATHOLOGY

Pt. 434.-Mycology. 3 credits.
9:00 M. W. and 1:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. Ht-407. WEBER.
The classification of saprophytic and parasitic fungi based on their structure and form.

GRADUATE COURSE

Pt. 523.-Advanced Plant Pathology. Variable credit.
To arrange. WEBER.
A study of the diseases of crop plants and the organisms causing them.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

The prerequisites for the Upper Division courses in Political Science are: C-1 and
CPI. 13; or Pel. 313-314. (Formerly Pcl. 101-102.)
Pcl. 309.-International Relations. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-311. LAIRD.
First half of the year course on International Relations. World politics and the policies of
the great powers. Underlying factors in international affairs: economic problems, nationalism,
imperialism. The causes of the present war. The conduct of international affairs and diplomacy.
World organization and peace movements.
Pcl. 313.-American Government and Politics. (Formerly Pel. 101.) 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-209. PAYNE.
The Federal Government, its philosophy, organization and functions.

PSYCHOLOGY

CPs. 43.-Psychological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-114. WIMBERLY.
The social and personal implications of psychology to every day living. An understanding
of human motivation and one's own personality. How the individual acquires and organize
sensory experiences and how these are used in the guidance of effective thinking and behavior.
Psy. 309.-Personality Development. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-114. HINCKLEY.
The mechanism of personality formation, with special emphasis upon the varieties of human
adjustment. Particular attention is given to the personality development of the school child
and the ways by means of which proper adjustment can be guided by the teacher.





52 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Psy. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. HINCKLEY, WIMBERLY.
Provision will be made for students who desire work in fields not covered by the current course
offerings. Such work will consist of directed study supplemented by frequent individual conferences.

GRADUATE COURSE

Psy. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. HINCKLEY, WIMBERLY.
Provision will be made for students who desire work in fields not covered by the current course
offerings. Such work will consist of directed study supplemented by frequent individual conferences.


SOCIAL STUDIES

Scl. 301.-Children's Social Studies. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Yn-134. STEVENS, GRACE A.
An opportunity will be given to study content material in the social studies field with implica-
tions for the activity program.
SOCIOLOGY
CSy. 13.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. Prerequisite: C-1
or consent of instructor.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-4. THOMASON.
The basic forces in human society. Sociology in creative dependence upon the other sciences.
Social resources and complexities in modern America. The metropolitan environment and the social
institutions. The American regions as social environments and as challenges to citizenship.
Sy. 442.-Applied Sociology. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-4. MACLACHLAN.
Theories developed in previous courses applied to a long-term program of improvement. Social
investigation as the basis of social planning. Outstanding achievements in Europe and America.
Sy. 443.-The American Negro. 2 credits.
11:00 daily. La-314. BEATY.
Social, economic, and political aspects of racial problems in the United States with particular
emphasis on the American negro. Brief history of the negro from early days of slavery to the
present. Contrast between the cultures of the whites and the negroes in the North and South.
Racial segregation and discrimination. The role of the negro in Southern culture today.
Sy. 490.-The South Today. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-4. MACLACHLAN.
Regional resources and cultures. The social resources and challenges of the modern South.
Measures of Southern culture. The place of the South in the nation. Programs and plans for
the region reviewed. A broad view of the foundations of Southern life.

GRADUATE COURSE

Sy. 560.-Special Topics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
To arrange. MACLACHLAN.

SOILS

Sis. 420.-Special Problems in Soils. 1 to 3 credits.
To arrange. SMITH, F. B.
Research problems in soils for qualified students in all departments of the College of Agri-
culture.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSE

Sis. 570.-Research in Soils. 1 to 6 credits.
To arrange. SMITH, F. B.

SPANISH

CSh. 33.-First-Year Spanish. 3 credits. The first half of the course CSh. 33-34.
Open to those students who have had no previous work in Spanish.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bu-201. HAUPTMANN.
Introduction to materials involved in the reading and speaking of Spanish, with special refer-
ence to Latin America.
Sh. 201.-Second-Year Spanish. 3 credits. The first half of the course Sh. 201-
202. Prerequisite: CSh. 33-34 or equivalent.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Bu-201. HAUPTMANN.
Readings in representative Spanish and Latin-American literature of moderate difficulty.
Conversation practice.
Sh. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. HAUPTMANN.
Sh. 430 makes it possible for a student to study, for credit, certain phases of Spanish literature,
language, and civilization for which there are no special course offerings. Through this means a
student can complete an undergraduate major or graduate minor. Sh. 430 may be elected for addi-
tional credit in subsequent sessions. Students will be helped to plan a definite program, and will
meet the instructor for frequent conferences.

GRADUATE COURSE

Sh. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. HAUPTMANN.
Readings and reports in field chosen by individual students. Mainly designed for graduate
students desiring to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors. This course
may be repeated without duplication of credit.

SPEECH

Students taking courses in the Department of Speech must have completed the equivalent
of C-3, or have the consent of their dean.
CSc. 33.-Effective Speaking. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-209. HOPKINS.
Designed to aid the student through lecture, reading, demonstration, and practice in speaking
to learn to talk effectively to a group. The individual needs of the student are given attention.
Sch. 417.-Correction of Speech Defects. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CSc. 33 or
consent of instructor.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-209. HALE.
The recognition and correction of common speech defects; also the problems of individual
language difficulties and of foreign accent. Observing and working with persons in the Speech
Clinic. The course is especially designed to aid teachers, or those planning on entering the teach-
ing profession, in handling cases of speech defects found in the public school classrooms.
Sch. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. HALE, HOPKINS.
By means of projects and conferences the student will be given an opportunity to complete
an undergraduate major or graduate minor in a phase of the field where there are no special
course offerings.
Speech Clinic. No credit. STAFF.
The Speech Clinic offers without charge individual assistance to students desiring aid in
overcoming their speech defects. Applicants for this service should report as soon as possible
to Peabody 210.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

Second Term
All classes ordinarily meet for fifty minutes. Classes scheduled to meet daily meet
Monday through Saturday. Course descriptions are not given if the same course was
offered the first term. See appropriate section of the first term schedule for this informa-
tion.
Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with no
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule.
Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to register for
graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean of the Graduate School
and the instructor concerned.

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES
Students should consult official announcements by the Board of University Examiners
for details concerning comprehensive examinations. Credits are indicated for the benefit
of Upper Division students who elect these courses.
C-12.-Man and the Social World. 4 credits.
Section 10 7:00 daily and 1:00 M. T. Th. F. Pe-112. BENTLEY.
Section 11 9:00 daily and 3:00 M. T. W. Th. La-203. PRICE.
C-22.-Man and the Physical World. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bn-209. GADDUM.
C-32.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits.
(Register for one Discussion and one Laboratory Section.)
Discussion Sections:
10 8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-209. CONSTANS.
11 9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-209. WISE.
Writing Laboratory Sections:
101 3:00 to 5:00 M. W. La-209. WISE.
102 1:00 to 3:00 W. F. La-209. CLARK.
C-41.-Man and His Thinking. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Ch-212. WILSON, W. H.
The straight and crooked thinking of war propaganda will be a major consideration.
Both in private life and vocational life man is faced with the necessity of making decisions
and solving problems. The principal aims are (1) to develop ability to think with greater accuracy
and thoroughness and (2) to develop ability to evaluate the thinking of others. The material used
applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is used to insure practice, and
numerous exercises are assigned.
C-421.-Trigonometry. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-11. MCINNIS.
A treatment of plane trigonometry, logarithms, spherical geometry, and spherical trigo-
nometry. Designed especially to meet the immediate needs of students expecting to enter War
service and lacking in mathematical training. Should not be taken by students who have had,
or intend to take CMs. 23. May be taken by those who have completed C-42 or three years of high
school mathematics.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM


C-52.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 12:00 M. T. W. F. Aud.

Discussion Sections:
10 8:00 daily. Bu-101. HANNA.
11 9:00 daily. Bu-101. HANNA.

C-62.-Man and the Biological World. 3 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 11:00 daily. Sc-101. ROGERS, J. S.

Discussion Sections:
10 5:00 T. Th. Sc-101. ROGERS, J. S.
11 1:00 M. W. Sc-101. ROGERS, J. S.
12 2:00 W. F. Sc-101. ROGERS, J. S.


AGRONOMY

Ay. 321.-Field Crops. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 1:00 to 3:00 M. W. Ag-302. SENN.
An intensive study of field crops. Crops of southeastern United States-cotton, tobacco, the
grains, sweet potatoes, peanuts, sugar cane-soil conservation crops and crop rotation systems are
given special emphasis.

Ay. 426.-Problems in Agronomy. 1 to 3 credits.
To arrange. SENN.
Individual problems selected from the fields of crop production, genetics or plant breeding.


BIOLOGY

Bly. 102.-General Animal Biology. 3 credits.
11:00 daily. Sc-111. HOBBS and GOIN.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. W. Sc-10.
An introduction to the biology of the invertebrates with special reference to their morphology,
life histories and classification. This course in combination with Bly. 101 and C-6 required for
major in Bly. and meets minimum requirement for pre-medical Biology.

Bly. 134.-The Life of the Inland Waters of Florida. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Sc-101. HOBBS and GOIN.
A companion course to Bly. 133 but concerned with the common plant and animal life of our
streams, pools, ponds, lakes and marshes. Particular attention is given to obtaining an ac-
quaintance with those species and groups of organisms that comprise the more important, more
conspicuous, and more interesting members of Florida's rich aquatic biota. Laboratory demonstra-
tions, field trips and individual projects will form an important part of this course.

Bly. 351.-Biological Laboratory Technique. 1 to 3 credits.
To arrange. ROGERS, J. S.
A project course in various phases of technique can be provided for qualified students. Approxi-
mately 6 clock hours per week will be required for each hour's credit. A choice of the following
techniques is available: the preparation of temporary and of permanent microscopic preparations;
the microscope and its accessories for biological use; basic techniques in medical entomology;
microscopic and macroscopic preparations useful for high school and undergraduate college biology
laboratories.





56 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

(See Economics and Business Administration)

BUSINESS EDUCATION

Note: These courses do not count as credit in Education.
BEn. 94.-Stenography. 4 credits. Prerequisites: BEn. 81 and BEn. 91 or per-
mission of the instructor.
To arrange. Yn-305. MOORMAN.
Advanced course in shorthand and typewriting. Designed for those who desire more instruc-
tion than is given in the elementary or introductory courses in shorthand and typewriting for
personal use, as well as for those who desire certification in the commercial subjects.
BEn. 97.-Handwriting. 1 credit.
7:00 M. T. W. F. Yn-306. MOORMAN.

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

Cg. 345.-Industrial Stoichiometry. 3 credits. Prerequisites or corequisites:
Cy. 202, Ms. 354, Ps. 206.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Bn-104. BEISLER.
Industrial processes and calculations. Hougen and Watson, Industrial Chemical Calculations.
Cg. 458.-Chemical Engineering Design. 2 credits. The second half of the course
Cg. 457-458.
1:00 to 6:00 M. W. Bn-207. MORGEN.
Cg. 468.-Chemical Engineering Thermodynamis. 3 credits. The second half of
the course Cg. 467-468.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bn-104. MORGEN.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 102.-General Chemistry. 4 credits. The second half of the course Cy.
101-102.
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Ch-212. BLACK.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-130.
Cy. 202.-Analytical Chemistry. 4 credits. The second half of the course Cy.
201-202.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Ch-212. BLACK.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-230.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the quantitative determination of
the common metals and acid radicals.
Cy. 302.-Organic Chemistry. 4 credits. The second half of the course Cy.
301-302.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Ch-212. POLLARD.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 W. and 7:00 to 10:00 P.M. Th. Ch-230.

GRADUATE COURSES

Cy. 501. Organic Preparations. 3 credits.
To arrange. POLLARD.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 57


Cy. 572.-Research in Organic Chemistry. 2 to 6 credits.
To arrange. POLLARD.

Cy. 574.-Research in Naval Stores. 2 to 6 credits.


CIVIL ENGINEERING

Cl. 329.-Higher Surveying. 5 credits. Prerequisite: Cl. 226. Continued from
1st Term.
1:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. and 8 other hours to arrange. H1-303. KEITH.

Cl. 425.-Water and Sewerage. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cl. 327, Cy. 215,
Bey. 308.
11:00 daily and 1:00 to 5:00 M. W. H1-301. STAFF.
The principles underlying the collection, treatment and disposal of sewage. The design of
collection system and treatment plants. Steel, Water Supply and Sewerage.

Cl. 435.-Structural Engineering. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Cl. 326.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. H1-101. KEITH.
Recitations. lectures, and drawing-room work in the analysis of stresses due to moving loads,
design of mill buildings in wood and steel. Shedd and Vawter, Theory of Simple Structures;
Shedd, Design of Sturctures in Steel.


ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Courses preceded by Es. are courses in Economics and courses preceded by Bs. are
courses in Business Administration.
*CEs. 132.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-112. DOLBEARE.
CBs. 142.-Elementary Accounting. 3 credits.
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Lw-202. BEIGHTS.

Bs. 312.-Accounting Principles. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Lw-202. BEIGHTS.
Consideration is given to the legal aspects of accounting and related problems resulting from
the legal organization form used by businesses: liabilities; proprietorship; partnerships; corpora-
tions: capital stock; surplus; followed by a study of the financial aspects of accounting as disclosed
by an analysis and interpretation of financial statements: financial ratios and standards, their
preparation, meaning, and use.

Es. 446.-The Consumption of Wealth in Time of War. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-314. EUTSLER.
Problems of rationing; use of family budgets; price ceilings; and other problems of interest
to consumers in a war-time economy.

Courses by Project Method. DOLBEARE, EUTSLER and MATHERLY.
Students may register for certain upper division courses and complete them by the individual
project method. Information about these courses may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of
the College of Business Administration.

*This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required. Students
may take the second term without having had the first term only with the consent of the Instructor.
When the course is completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may
secure six semester hours credit.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


EDUCATION

En. 386.-Educational Psychology. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-218. CRAGO.
The individual and education. A study will be made of the physical, emotional, mental, and
social growth of the adolescent. Achievement will be considered in terms of growth.
En. 403.-Principles and Philosophy of Education. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-210. NORMAN.
An examination of the various theories and philosophies of education; their relationships to
education in a democracy.

En. 406.-Administration of the Elementary School. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Yn-134. SIMMONS.
The problems that usually confront the elementary school principal will be stressed in this
course. Reavis, Pierce and Stulken, The Elementary School.
En. 421-Student Teaching. 3 credits. The first half of the course En. 421-422.
To arrange. BOUTELLE.
En. 422.-Student Teaching. 3 credits. The second half of the course En. 421-422.
To arrange. BOUTELLE.

En. 471.-Problems of Instruction. 6 credits.
9:00 to 11:00 daily and 3:00 to 5:00 T. Th. Yn-315. MCLENDON.

GRADUATE COURSES

(See note preceding Graduate Courses listed for the First Term.)

En. 500--Beginning Seminar. 1 credit.
2:00 to 5:00 W. Yn-132. MEAD.

En. 501.-Elementary School Curriculum. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Yn-134. STEVENS, GRACE A.
Intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary school curriculum,
including the kindergarten; selection and evaluation of material.
En. 507.-Educational Psychology. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-218. CRAGO.
Students will be guided in the investigation of problems in directed learning, individual
differences, and adjustment of problem children. Primarily for graduate students with experience
in residence or in the field.

En. 528.-Secondary Supervision. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Yn-138. WILLIAMS, WALTER R.
A course dealing with objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in elemen-
tary and secondary schools, and in preparation of teachers. Each student completes a minor
research.
En. 557.-Work-Conference on School Administrative Problems. 6 credits.
To arrange. MORPHET.
Committees will study special problems in school organization and administration for Florida
and other Southern States and reports will be prepared in the nature of recommended handbooks
or manuals for use in the states concerned. The fields in which handbooks will be prepared will
include the following: continuity of service and ethics for the instructional staff, school trans-
portation, school plant operation and maintenance, textbook administration, responsibilities and
relationships of the county board, school trustees, duties of the county superintendent, responsi-
bilities and relationships of principals, the layman's relationship to the school.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM


En. 592.-Public School Administration. (Special Problems.) 3 credits. The
second hall of the course En. 591-592.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Yn-138. SIMMONS.


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

El. 342.-Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 credits. The second half of the
course El. 341-342.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Eg-202. SMITH, E. F.

El. 346.-Electrical Communications. 4 credits. Corequisite: El. 342.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Eg-202. WILSON, J. W.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. W. Bn-106.
Speech and hearing; receivers and loud speakers; principles of various systems of wire and
radio telegraphy and telephony; elementary tube theory; amplifiers; radio receivers, and trans-
mitters.
El. 350.-Dynamo Laboratory. 1 credit. The second half of the course El. 349-
350. Corequisite: El. 342.
1:00 to 3:00 M. W. F. Bn-106. SMITH, E. F.
El. 466.-Radio Engineering. 5 credits. The second half of the course El. 465-466.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Eg-213. MORENO.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. Se-llth floor.


ENGLISH

(See note preceding First Term English Schedule.)

CEh. 36.-Literary Masters of America. 3 credits. The second half of the course
CEh. 35-36. May be taken for credit without CEh. 35.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-314. HAINES.
CEh. 38.-Literary Masters of England. 3 credits. The second half of the course
CEh. 37-38. May be taken for credit without CEh. 37.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. La-314. MORRIS.
Eh. 380.-English in the Secondary Schools. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. La-311. CONGLETON.
Eh. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-314. MOUNTS.

GRADUATE COURSE

Eh. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. STAFF.

FRENCH

Fh. 202.-Second-Year French. 3 credits. The second half of the course Fh.
201-202. Prerequisite: Fh. 201, or the equivalent (one and one-half years of
college French or three years of high school French).
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Bu-101. ATKIN.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GRADUATE COURSE

Fh. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. ATKIN.


GENERAL SCIENCE

Gl. 302.-Children's Science. 2 credits.
7:00 daily. Yn-142. GOETTE.


HANDWRITING
(See Business Education)

GERMAN

Gn. 202.-Second-Year German. 3 credits. The second half of the course Gn.
201-202.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bu-305. JONES.

Gn. 430.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange. JONES.

GRADUATE COURSE

Gn. 530.-Individual Work. 3 credits.
To arrange. JONES.


HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HPI. 121.-Narcotics Education. 2 credits.
11:00 daily. Yn-140. LITTLE.
A factual, scientific, and unemotional approach to the present-day problem of narcotics. A
study of the nature of alcohol and its relation to the psychological, physical, social, economic, and
educational aspects of the problem will be considered briefly. Suggestive teaching projects, units,
and methods for the various age-grade and subject levels will be explored and developed.
HPI. 373.-Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Yn-138. SALT.
HPI. 387.-Health Education. 3 credits.
7:00 daily and 1:00 T. Th. Yn-138. SALT.
HPI. 411.-Principles and Administration of Physical Education. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-138. SALT.
Fundamental principles upon which the present day program of physical education is based,
together with a study of the history, aims, objectives, and contemporary trends in this field. The
organization and administration of the program pertaining to the playground, gymnasium, swim-
ming pool, service unit, intramural and interscholastic athletics.

GRADUATE COURSE

HPI. 534.-Problems of Physical Education. 3 credits. The second half of the
course HPl. 533-534.
To arrange. SALT.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 61


HISTORY

Hy. 302.-American History, 1776-1830. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-112. LEAKE.
The revolutionary and early constitutional period.

Hy. 362.-English History, 1688 to the Present. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-209. PAYNE.
The second half of a survey course in English History. This half covers the period since 1688.

Hy. 363.-Latin American History to 1850. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Bu-101. GLUNT.
A survey course on the colonization and development of Latin America.

HORTICULTURE

GRADUATE COURSE

He. 570.-Research in Horticulture. 3 credits.
,To arrange. WOLFE.

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION

In. 212.-General Shop. 3 credits.
Project method. Yn-316. BOHANNON.
Designed for industrial arts students. Use of hand tools and power machines, with special
emphasis on the speed lathe; use, parts and care of machines; shop equipment and construction.
In addition to the development of manipulative skills, special emphasis is given to selecting
projects, and writing the various types of instruction sheets.
In. 301.-Sheet Metal. 3 credits.
Project method. Yn-316. BOHANNON.
Design and construction in sheet metal for industrial arts students. Scope of sheet metal,
various methods of drafting and construction, shop arrangements and equipment, methods of
motivation for secondary school students in this phase of work.
In. 401.-Architectural Drawing. 3 credits.
Project method. Yn-316. BOHANNON.
Designed for industrial arts teachers. Study made of building materials, sources and prices;
landscaping as to orientation; plans, elevations, sections, details, conventions; types and styles
of domestic architecture, and a review of the history of architecture.

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Ig. 366.-Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ig. 365.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Eg-209. YEATON.
Principles of dynamics; rectilinear, curvilinear, and harmonic motions; momentum and im-
pulse; work and energy; force, mass, and acceleration; projectiles; simple, torsional, and com-
pound pendulums; balancing of rigid bodies; and relative motion. Timoshenko and MacCullough,
Engineering Mechanics.
Ig. 463.-Specifications, Engineering Relations and Industrial Safety. 3 credits.
Prerequisite: Senior classification.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Eg-209. YEATON.
Specifications for materials and construction of engineering projects; advertising and lettering
contracts; agreements andscontractual relations. Organization of safety work in industry; accident
causes and legal responsibility of employer and employee. Mead, Contracts, Specifications and
Engineering Relations. Pamphlets, posters, magazine, Safety Engineering.





BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


LAW

Lw. 317.-Military Law. 2 credits.
8:45 to 10:00 M. T. Th. F. Lw-111. TESELLE.
Military power; militia; conscription; army of the United States regular: enlistment; com-
missioned officers; reserve officers; military and civil jurisdiction; courts martial; Soldiers and
Sailors Civil Relief. Schiller, Military Law and Defense Legislation.

Lw. 421.-Legislation. 2 credits.
11:15 to 12:30 M. W. Th. F. Lw-111. ALLAN.
The role of legislation in the development of the law ;growth and province of legislation;
forms of legislation; technique of legislative research; procedure and drafting; interpretation and
construction of statutes. Horack, Materials on Legislation.

Lw. 519.-Trial Practice, I. 2 credits.
8:45 to 10:00 W. S. and 10:00 to 11:15 T. Th. Lw-111. TESELLE.
Jurisdiction; process: the jury: instructions; trials; verdicts; judgments. McBaine, Cases on
Trial Practice, 2nd edition.

Lw. 522.-Admiralty. 2 credits.
7:30 to 8:45 T. W. F. S. Lw-111. SLAGLE.
Jurisdiction; contracts; torts, crimes; maritime liens, ex contract, ex delicto, priorities, dis-
charge; bottomry and respondentia obligations; salvage; towage; general average. Lord and
Sprague, Cases on Admiralty.

Lw. 530.-Administrative Law. 2 credits.
10:00 to 11:15 M. W. F. S. Lw-111. SLAGLE.
Creation of administrative tribunals; legislative functions; judicial functions; administra-
tive functions; doctrine of separation of powers; limits upon discretion; securing information;
notice and hearing; enforcement of rules and orders; control of action; judicial relief. Stason,
Cases and Materials on Administrative Tribunals.



MATHEMATICS

C-421.-Plane Trigonometry. (See General College Courses).

CMs. 24.-Basic Mathematics. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-10. DAVIS.
A continuation of CMs. 23.

Ms. 354.-Integral Calculus. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-11. MCINNIS.
Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas,
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems.

Ms. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-10. DAVIS.


GRADUATE COURSE

Ms. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. PHIPPS.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 63

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

MI. 182.-Descriptive Geometry. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Ml. 181.
1:00 M. W. Eg-202. FRASH.
Drawing: 2:00 to 6:00 M. W. F. Eg-304.
The principles of projection and the development of surfaces. Higbee, Drawing Board Geometry.

MI. 282.-Mechanism and Kinematics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CMs. 23-24,
Ps. 205, Ml. 182.
9:00 daily. Eg-209. FINEREN.
Laboratory: 1:00 to 5:00 M. W. Eg-300.
Revolving and oscillating bodies, link work, belts, pulleys, gears, and cams; trains of
mechanisms and the velocity and directional ratio of moving parts. Schwamb, Merrill and James,
Elements of Mechanism.
PHYSICAL FITNESS

PFP. Section 1. 7:00 M. W. F. Fleming Field.
PFP. Section 2. 10:00 M. W. F. Fleming Field.
PFP. Section 3. 11:00 M. W. F. Fleming Field.
PFP. Section 4. 3:00 M. W. F. Fleming Field.

PHYSICS

Ps. 102.-Elementary Physics. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Ps. 101 and 103.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Bn-209. PERRY.
A continuation of Ps. 101.
Ps. 104.-Elementary Physics Laboratory. 2 credits. Corequisite: Ps. 102.
7:00 to 10:00 P.M. M. and 1:00 to 5:00 F. Bn-307. PERRY.
A continuation of Ps. 103.

PLANT PATHOLOGY

GRADUATE COURSE
Pt. 523.-Advanced Plant Pathology. Variable credit.
To arrange. WEBER.
A study of the diseases of crop plants and the organisms causing them.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

The prerequisites for the Upper Division courses in Political Science are C-l, and
CPI. 13; or Pel. 313-314. (Formerly Pcl. 101-102.)
Pel. 310.-International Relations. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. La-311. LAIRD.
A continuation of Pel. 309.
Pcl. 314.-American Government and Politics. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-209. PAYNE.
State, local and municipal government of the United States.

PSYCHOLOGY

CPs. 43.-Psychological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-114. WIMBERLY.





64 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Psy. 312.-Psychology of Exceptional Children. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-114. WILLIAMS, O.
Individual differences, intelligence, feeble-mindedness, dull and backward children, superior
and gifted children, speech and motor defects, sensory and neurological disorders, conduct
problems, social and emotional maladjustments, and other types of exceptional and mentally
peculiar children.
Psy. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. WIMBERLY, WILLIAMS, O.

GRADUATE COURSES

Psy. 512.-Psychology of Exceptional Children. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-114. WILLIAMS, O.
Meeting with Psy. 312 with extra readings and reports for graduate students.
Psy. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. WIMBERLY, WILLIAMS, O.

SCHOOL ART

Pc. 251.-Art for the Primary Grades. 2 credits.
1:00 to 3:00 M. W. F. Yn-Shop. MARTIN.
Activities for the kindergarten, first, second, and third grades that interpret the underlying
philosophy and the skills in art that are basic as a means of expression in large unit teaching.
Pc. 252.-Art for the Elementary Grades. 2 credits.
3:00 to 5:00 M. W. F. Yn-Shop. MARTIN.
Activities for the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades that interpret the underlying philosophy and
the skills in art that are basis as a means of expression in large unit teaching.
Pc. 301.-Creative School Art. 2 credits.
To arrange. Yn-Shop. MARTIN.
A series of original projects based on the fundamental principles and factors of design.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Sdl. 302.-Children's Social Studies. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Yn-134. STEVENS, GRACE A.
A continuation of Scl. 301.

SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 344. Marriage and the Family. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. La-203. BEATY.
The nature and development of domestic institutions, marriage and the family. Problems of
adjustment to modern conditions. Changes in marital and domestic relations with particular em-
phasis on preparation for marriage. The status of women and laws pertaining to marriage in
Florida. Divorce, family disorganization, child training.
Sy. 426.-The City in American Life. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-4. THOMASON.
A study of the rising cities of America in their effects upon individuals and social institutions.
Cultural change in American life as related to the sweep of invention and the dominance of the
metropolitan region. The cities of 1940 are examined as centers of social change and of challenge
to education, government, and other group realities. The principles of city and regional planning
are reviewed via case studies of cities, and criticized in relation to their demands upon citizenship.





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM


Sy. 442.-Applied Sociology. 3 credits.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Pe-4. MACLACHLAN.

Sy. 452.-American Culture Today. 3 credits.
10:00 daily and 4:00 T. Th. Pe-4. MACLACHLAN.
A survey of the greater cultural challenges facing the American people, and of the chief
resources available. Particular attention is paid to the changing resources of and challenges to
the professions, and to the outlook for the social institutions in the world crisis.

GRADUATE COURSE

Sy. 560.-Special Topics. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
To arrange. MACLACHLAN.

SOILS

GRADUATE COURSE

Sis. 570.-Research in Soils. 3 credits.
To arrange. SMITH, F. B.

SPANISH

CSh. 34.-Reading of Spanish. 3 credits. The second half of the course CSh.
33-34.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Bu-201. BRUNET.

Sh. 202.-Second-Year Spanish. 3 credits. Second half of the course Sh. 201-202.
Prerequisite: Sh. 201 or equivalent.
9:00 daily and 3:00 T. Th. Bu-201. BRUNET.

Sh. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. BRUNET.

GRADUATE COURSE

Sh. 530.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. BRUNET.

SPEECH

Students taking courses in the Department of Speech must have completed the equivalent
of C-3, or have the consent of their dean.

CSc. 33.-Effective Speaking. 3 credits.
8:00 daily and 2:00 T. Th. Pe-209. TEW.

Sch. 314.-Types of Public Discussion. 3 credits.
11:00 daily and 5:00 T. Th. Pe-209. HOPKINS.
Sch. 314 deals with the round table, forum, panel and other types of group discussion; the
function of the leader and the participant in public meetings; the practical essentials of parlia-
mentary law.

Sch. 430.-Individual Work. Variable credit.
To arrange. HOPKINS.







;RRF Memo ORC IFF


APPLICATION FOR ROOM RESERVATION IN UNIVERSITY
RESIDENCE HALLS

To be filled out by each person who is planning to live in the University operated
Residence Halls for the 1943 Summer Session and mailed to the Director of Residence,
University of Florida, Gainesville, with check or money order-made payable to the Univer-
sity of Florida-for the Room Reservation Fee of $5.00 per person.

W RITE CLEARLY D ate ..........................................................

CHECK ONE: I plan to attend [ 1st Term Only 2nd Term Only H Both Terms

Mr.
M iss ........................................ ...........................................................
Mrs. (First Name) (Husband's Initials) (Middle Name) (Last Name)

A address ..... ............. ............... ................... .......


(Street and Number) (City) (State)

P re nt M ail A address ......... .. ............... ..................................... ........................ ........ ..
(If differentfrom Home Address)

Have you lived in one of our halls previously? .......... When? .................... Which? ....................

Birthdate .................................. Religious affiliation or preference .........................................
(Month; (Day) (Year)


C college .................. ... .............. ... V ocational Preference ............................................................

In case of accident, N OTIFY ......................................................

A d d ress .......... .................................................................. .


OM PREFERENCES: State clearly below your preferences as to room type, floor, ex-
Iposure, rate, and housing unit (if any). Be clear and concise.



.. . . . . . ..... . . .. . .. . .. - - - - - - -- - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - -- - -- - -- - - - .- . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . ..


...... ... ... .............. . .... --------------------------------------------------------



am e of ROOM -M ATE PREFERRED : ............................................................................................

SA d dress ...............................................................................................................................................
L Address
OTE: Room-mate must file separate application and pay Room Reservation Fee also.)

If this application is accepted and I am assigned to a room in one of the University of
Florida Residence Hall units I agree to abide by the University rules and regulations
governing student life and to cooperate with the Director of Residence in maintaining the
best possible living conditions in the Residence Halls.

Signature of A applicant ..........................................................................................
(Use reverse of this application form to give any further information about yourself which
may affect your residence.)

[67]





REQUEST FOR PERMISSION TO LIVE IN A
PRIVATE ROOMING HOUSE

To the Office of the Dean of Students:

I hereby request permission to be allowed to live in a rooming house not operated by
the University during first term, second term, both terms, of the 1943 Summer Session.
(Underscore terms desired.)

In support of this request, the following considerations are offered:

1. I am ............... years of age or over.


2. I have already received a
graduate work.


... degree and am now taking


3. I have been self-supporting during the past year through the following employment:





4. If granted permission to live in a private rooming house, I will live in the house
appearing on the Approved Rooming House List at the address below:


(address)


(householder)


. I desire to room in a private rooming house for the following reason:












(Signed ) ... ............. ........... ..

A d dress .................................. .........................


Date.


Approved: ...

Disapproved:


[69]







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PART I-TO BE FILLED OUT BY ALL APPLICANTS
Mr.
Nam e M rs. ............................................................................ .......... .................. ................. .. ...... ................
Miss '(Last Name) **(First Name) *(Middle Name) Married Women
please give
husband's initials
M ailing A address until June 1 ................................................................................ ....... ... ..................................................................................................

H om e A address ...............................................................................................................................................................................................
St. & No., Box No., or Rural Rt. City County State

Give YOUR occupation last year (Check ONE) ........H. S. Student; ........College Student; ........Elem. Teacher; ........Jr. H. S. Teacher;
........H. S. Teacher; ........School Superintendent; ........Principal; ........College Teacher. If some other occupation, please name: ........


Are you a regular student at some other college or university who desires to take work at our summer session to transfer to this other
institution? ..................... If your answer is yes, give the name of the other institution .................... .....................
yes or no

I wish to register for the term beginning June 3 July 15 (encircle one)
ADMISSION-Check classification in which you wish to register. (See page 10.)
A. Persons with bachelor's degrees: .......Graduate School; ........UnclaSsified. .
B. Persons with more than two years college credit: ........College of Agriculture; ........School of Architecture; ........College of Arts and
Sciences; ........College of Business Administration; ........College of Education; ........College of Engineering; ........School of Forestry;
........School of Pharmacy; ..-.....College of Law; ........Unclassified.
C. Persons with less than two years college credit: ........General College; ........Unclassified.

Have you earned any credit through the General Extension Division of the University of Florida? ............. ............... ......
yes or no
Have you attended the University of Florida before? ................. (IF YOUR ANSWER IS NO, DISREGARD THE REMAINDER
yes or no
OF PART I BUT FILL OUT ALL OF PART II ON THE BACK OF THIS PAGE.) Give date of last session you attended
here ................................................. Have you attended any other college or university since you last attended the University of Florida?
.................... If your answer is yes, list the institutions you have attended since attending the University of Florida and give dates of
yes or no
attendance .... ........................ ...................... .................... ... --- -----...................... ....
STUDENTS WHO PREVIOUSLY HAVE ATTENDED THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA NEED NOT FILL OUT PART II

*If you have registered at the University of Florida under any other names, please list below.
**Married women will please use their own first and middle names.
Part II on the Back of This Page Must Be Filled Out by All Applicants Who Have Not Attended the University Before


C P FS



ADM


Blanks out 1



Blanks in 1






Blanks out 2



Blanks in 2


C





PART II-TO BE FILLED OUT ONLY BY APPLICANTS WHO HAVE NOT ATTENDED THE

UNIVERSITY BEFORE



D ate of birth .................................................... Place of birth .................... .................... ........................................ R ace .......................................
month day year

Religious preference ................................................................. Are you a m em ber? .............................................. ..............................
yea or no
High School attended .................................... ... .............................. Did you graduate? .................... Date of graduation ..................................
yes or no

Have you attended any college or university? ..................... If the answer is yes, list the institutions you have attended:
yes or no
Institution Location Dates of Attendance





0-


Do you plan to continue your work at the University of Florida until you receive a degree? ......................................................
yes or no
Give your FATHER'S occupation (if retired or deceased give occupation while active and living) ........................................................................




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