• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Table of Contents
 Main














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00269
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: April 1943
Copyright Date: 1946
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00269
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Main
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
Full Text



The University Record
of the
University of Florida


Bulletin of the

School of

Trade and Industrial Education

1943

Sponsored Jointly by the University of Florida and the
State Department of Education


First Term-June 21 to July 10
Second Term-July 12 to July 31


Vol. XXXVIII, Series I


No. 4


April 1, 1943


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida





















The Record Comprises:

The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the
bulletins of information, announcements of special courses of
instruction, and reports of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply
for them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin
or what information is desired. Address
THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida

Research Publications.-Research publications contain results of
research work. Papers are published as separate monographs num-
bered in several series.

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges
with institutions are arranged by the University Library. Corre-
spondence concerning such exchanges should be addressed to the
University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
The issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of
the Committee on Publications. Requests for individual copies, or
for any other copies not included in institutional exchanges, should
be addressed to

THE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida





TABLE OF CONTENTS


School Calendar
Administrative Officers
Faculty .
Advisory Committee
General Information
Fees
Expenses
Library
Recreation
Admission
Residence Requirements
The General College
Comprehensive Examinations
The Bachelor's Degree
The Graduate School
Registration
The Master's Degree
Curricula .
Time Schedule and Description of Courses

First Term
Distributive Occupations Education
Trade and Distributive Education
Trade and Industrial Education
Guidance
Special Courses for Defense Training

Second Term
Distributive Occupations Education
Trade and Distributive Education
Trade and Industrial Education
Guidance .
Special Courses for Defense Training

Application for Admission


Page
5
6
6
8
9
12
. 12
S13
13
14
15
15
17
18
S19
S20
S20
S22
S27


S 27
S 27
S 27
S 28
S 29
S 29


S30
S30
S30
S32
33
S33

35, 37


I 1 I





4 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


IMPORTANT NOTICE


1. All prospective students who plan to enroll at the Summer School of
Trade and Industrial Education should fill out the application blanks found on
pages 35 and 37 of this bulletin and mail them to the Registrar, University of
Florida, Gainesville, Florida, before June 1. Previous attendance does not waive
this requirement.

2. Report upon arrival to the Seabreeze High School for all information
relative to registration, rooms, or apartments.

3. For the benefit of those who wish to arrive on Saturday, June 19, in
order to select living quarters, the school office will be open and a clerk will be
on duty to give information and other assistance.

Registration will begin on Monday morning, at 8 o'clock. Arrival on Satur-
day will facilitate registration on Monday.

4. For further information, write to Robert D. Dolley, Director of the
School of Trade and Industrial Education, Capitol Building, Tallahassee, Florida,
or to Dean J. W. Norman, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

5. The usually broad and comprehensive curriculum of the school has been
somewhat curtailed this year because of the exigencies of war, but the courses
which have been withdrawn will be restored as soon as it is feasible to do so.





CALENDAR 5


CALENDAR


1943

June

June
June


Monday, 8 a.m ....

Tuesday, 8 a.m ....

Wednesday ........


June 30, Wednesday ........


July 7, Wednesday ..........



July 10, Saturday ..........


July

July
July


Monday, 8 a.m. .....

Tuesday, 8 a.m ....
Tuesday, 4 p.m ....


July 20, Tuesday ...........


July 26, Monday ............



July 31, Saturday ..........


First Term

Registration for the First Term.

Classes begin.

Last day for registration for the First Term, for
changing schedules, or for adding courses.
Late registration fee $5.
Last day for dropping courses without receiving
grade of E and being assessed failure fee.

Last day to file application for removal of de-
ficiencies, or for extension of Trade and Indus-
trial Education Certificates.

First Term ends. All grades are due in office of
the Registrar by 5 p.m.


Second Term

Registration for the Second Term.

Classes begin. Late registration fee $5.
Last day for registration for the Second Term,
for changing schedules, or for adding courses.

Last day for dropping courses without receiving
grade of E and being assessed failure fee.

Last day to file application for removal of de-
ficiencies, or for extension of Trade and Indus-
rtial Education Certificates.

Second term ends. All grades are due in the
office of the Registrar by 5 p. m.





6 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

JOHN J. TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President
of the University
COLIN ENGLISH, M.A., LL.D., Ed.D., State Superintendent of Public In-
struction
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Dean of the Summer Session
ROBERT D. DOLLEY, M.S., Director of the School of Trade and Industrial Ed-
ucation
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School
RICHARD S. JOHNSON, B.S.P., Registrar
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, LL.D., Business Manager
G. B. SIMMONS, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education, Gainesville

Assistants in Administration

EMMA WISE, B.S., Administrative Assistant, Gainesville
JEAN BRADLEY HAMNER, B.S., Administrative Assistant
LUCILLE T. MOORE, B.S., Librarian
CHARLES R. HALE, Supervisor of Instruction
MAUDE GRIFFITH WOODS, Supervisor Continuation Education
HELEN SNYDER, Supervisor Duplicating Bureau

FACULTY

RAY ABRAMS, M.A., Principal, Joseph Maybin School for Graduates, New Or-
leans, Louisiana
J. MARION ADAMS, M.A., State Supervisor for Distributive Education, Ar-
kansas
E. W. ALEXANDER, M.E., Assistant Principal, Hadley Technical High School,
St. Louis, Missouri
ARDA TALBOT ALLEN, M.S., Consultant in Vocational Guidance, San Antonio
Public Schools, San Antonio, Texas
AUGUST R. ANDERSON, B.S., Director of Vocational Education, Sarasota,
Florida
VERNON BRONSON, B.S., Consultant, Employer-Employee Relations, Talla-
hassee, Florida
PAUL M. CLYDE, B. S., Supervisor of Instruction, Pensacola Trade School,
Pensacola, Florida
TOM COOPER, B.S., Supervisor of Instruction, Palm Beach Vocational School,
West Palm Beach, Florida
F. DON DILLMAN, B.S., Director of Vocational Education, Ocala, Florida
CHARLES M. EDWARDS, JR., D.C.S., Professor of Retail Advertising, New
York University, New York City
ANNE H. FRANZ, B.A., Head Coordinator, Diversified Cooperative Training,
Jacksonville, Florida





FACULTY 7


CHARLES R. HALE, State Coordinator of Trade and Industrial Education, Tal-
lahassee, Florida
HERMAN F. HINTON, B.E., Director Vocational Education, West Palm Beach,
Florida
W. BRIANT HOBSON, A.B., Head, Secretarial Training Department, Drake
School, Inc., New York City
HELEN M. ISOM, M.A., Related Subjects Instructor, Technical High School,
Miami, Florida
F. E. LLOYD, B.A., Director Summer School, Society of Four Arts, Palm Beach,
Florida
BYRON J. NELMS, B.S., DCT Coordinator, Ketterlinus High School, St. Augus-
tine, Florida
VIOLETT O'REILLY, M.S., Principal, L. E. Rabouin Vocational School, New
Orleans, Louisiana
R. ROBERT ROSENBERG, C.P.A., Ed.D., Principal Public School 34, Jersey
City, New Jersey
C. J. SCHOLLENBERGER, B.E., Coordinator, West High School, Des Moines,
Iowa
JOHN J. SEIDEL, M.A., State Director Vocational Education, Maryland
ELEANOR SKIMIN, Head, Commercial Department, Northern High School,
Detroit, Michigan
BETTY W. STARBUCK, B.S., Coordinator, Diversified Cooperative Training,
Jacksonville, Florida
NAOMI VAN HORN, M.S., Training Director, Burdine's, Miami, Florida
CHARLES W. WHITNEL, M.A., Conference Leader, War Production Training
Program, Tampa, Florida
ARTHUR B. WRIGLEY, M.A., State Supervisor Trade and Industrial Education,
New Jersey





8 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


Special Lecturers

J. F. CANNON, B.S., State Supervisor Industrial and Distributive Education,
Georgia
LAYTON S. HAWKINS, M.S., Chief, Trade and Industrial Education, U. S.
Office of Education, Washington, D. C.
E. G. LUDTKE, Southern Regional Agent, Trade and Industrial Education, U.
S. Office of Education, Washington, D. C.
M. D. MOBLEY, Ph.D., State Director Vocational Education, Georgia
C. E. RAKESTRAW, B.S., Consultant, Employer-Employee Relations, U. S. Of-
fice of Education, Washington, D. C.
JOHN J. SEIDEL, M.A., State Director Vocational Education, Maryland


Advisory Committee

E. G. LUDTKE, Southern Regional Agent, U. S. Office of Education
W. J. BREIT, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Arkansas
J. F. CANNON, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Georgia
G. W. COGGIN, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, North
Carolina
L. K. COVELLE, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Oklahoma
J. R. D. EDDY, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Texas
E. R. PLOWDEN, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Alabama
W. A. SEELEY, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Tennessee
B. R. TURNER, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, South
Carolina

B. H. VAN OOT, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Virginia





GENERAL INFORMATION 9

GENERAL INFORMATION
Nature and Purpose of School
The University of Florida in cooperation with the State Department of Public
Instruction will open the sixth annual session of the School of Trade and Indus-
trial Education at Daytona Beach, June 21.
With the advice and counsel of the State Supervisors, the School is planned
to serve the entire Southern Region. A comprehensive curriculum especially
designed to meet the needs of teachers of Trade and Industrial Education and
Distributive Occupations leading to a bachelor's or master's degree is offered.
Many vocational teachers with short vacations will find convenient the
schedule arrangement of two terms of three weeks each: June 21 to July 10,
and July 12 to July 31. Students may attend one or both terms as they desire.
Classes are held in the Seabreeze High School Building and meet two hours a
day, six days a week, during each term.
Advisory Committee
The State Supervisors of Trade and Industrial Education in the Southern
Region, headed by Mr. E. G. Ludtke, Southern Regional Agent of the United
States Office of Education, serve as an advisory committee for the School of
Trade and Industrial Education. The University is fortunate in having them
as advisors, and their willingness to serve in this capacity affords a most direct
means of making courses immediately applicable to local conditions.
Instructional Staff
The faculty is selected from the outstanding leaders in vocational education.
Many are from the neighboring southern states, and are fully acquainted with
southern problems, hence find it easy to make their courses fit southern needs.
Others come from more distant states and possess exceptional knowledge of the
specific fields which they teach. Those attending the school have the opportunity,
not only of receiving instruction from able men and women, but also of conferring
with them personally about problems of interest. Members of the faculty devote
their time while on the campus to the discussion of the problems brought before
them. It is from such personal contacts that the full benefit of the school is
realized.
For Whom the School Is Intended
Admission is limited to the following classes of students:
1. Those engaged in teaching Trade and Industrial and Distributive Edu-
cation or courses subsidized from Smith Hughes or George Deen funds.
2. Novice or apprentice teachers meeting all the requirements for certifi-
cation in accordance with the provisions of the Florida State Plan for
Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education with the exception of
the required teacher training courses.
3. Superintendents or school officials exercising control over a subsidized
program of Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education.
4. Directors, Supervisors and Coordinators of Trade and Industrial and
Distributive Education or other subsidized vocational services.
5. Those employed in industrial or distributive occupations who wish to
take technical courses and who are not particularly interested in college
credit or teaching.





10 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


6. Those engaged in teaching or supervising any phase of the National
Defense Training Program.
To offer educational opportunity to these groups of students is the sole
purpose of the School,, and the courses have been planned especially to take
care of their needs. Teachers and students interested in other branches of learn-
ing should attend the regular Summer Session at the University of Florida in
Gainesville.
Courses

Realizing that there is a wide difference in the type of work performed by
personnel engaged in the various branch services of Trade and Industrial and
Distributive Education, the University is of the conviction that in order to
accomplish the objectives of the School with the greatest effectiveness, the
course content must be based upon the needs and requirements of the personnel
engaged in the respective branch services. The courses are, therefore, organ-
ized in groups under the following classifications: Trade and Industries--
For Day Trade School Teachers; For Evening School Teachers; For Coordina-
tors and Related Teachers of Diversified Cooperative Training; For General
Continuation Teachers; For Directors, Supervisors and Coordinators, and Gen-
eral Subjects. Distributive Education-For Evening School Teachers; For Day
Part-Time Teachers; For Coordinators and Related Teachers Part-Time Co-
operative Training; Technical Subjects and General Subjects.
Students will avoid mistakes and errors in selecting courses by studying
carefully the course descriptions and noting the group classification under which
the courses are listed. To derive the greatest immediate benefit from summer
school, students should, before selecting other courses, exhaust the course offer-
ings planned for the service in which they are employed.

Specially Designed National Defense Courses
Specially designed short intensive courses for those engaged in National
Defense Training will be offered throughout the entire summer session. These
courses will be particularly appropriate for pre-employment and supplementary
teachers, Army and Navy instructional personnel, and supervisors of defense
training programs.

Societies and Clubs
T. & I. Club
The T. & I. Club is a student organization composed of both men and women
engaged in Trade and Industrial Education. Its purpose is to promote good
fellowship among its members and the student body. The club sponsors a
dance and an outing regularly once a week throughout the session along with
numerous other social functions.
State Clubs
There are a number of state clubs the membership of which is composed of
students from the various states. These clubs are very active during the entire
summer session in the promotion of activities of all kinds calculated to help
students to become better acquainted and stimulate a friendly hospitable atmos-
phere about the school.





GENERAL INFORMATION 11


An interesting feature of the State Clubs' activities is an informal All-States
dinner held on the second Friday of the second term, in which all faculty and
student personnel participate.
Iota Lambda Sigma
Iota Lambda Sigma is a national honorary professional fraternity for persons
serving with distinction in Trade and Industrial or Industrial Arts Education.
To be eligible for membership in the Kappa Chapter of the University of Florida
one must be outstanding in one of these two vocational fields with a scholastic
average of B or better.
Tau Gamma Sigma
Tau Gamma Sigma is a professional honorary Industrial Education fraternity
for women. Both the Grand and Alpha chapters are located at the University
of Florida. The purpose of this fraternity is to recognize high scholastic ability
and professional attainment in the field of Industrial Education.
Eta Mu Pi
Eta Mu Pi is a National Honorary Retailing Fraternity. It is the only re-
tailing fraternity in existence. Membership to the Gamma Chapter of the Uni-
versity of Florida is limited to men and women attaining a high scholastic record
in Retailing and Distributive Education courses.
Assemblies
All students and faculty members are expected to attend the general
assemblies which are held once a week throughout the summer session. Import-
ant announcements are made at the general assemblies for the observance of
which students will be held responsible.
Announcements
Important announcements will be posted on the school bulletin board. Stu-
dents should read the notices on the bulletin board daily. Students are held
responsible for all announcements made in the General Assembly, posted on the
official bulletin board, or printed in the school newspaper.
School News
The official news of the School of Trade and Industrial Education is published
twice a week in a special edition of one of the Daytona Beach daily papers.
Special news items, notices, and announcements reach the students and faculty
through this official publication.
Employment
The School of Trade and Industrial Education does not maintain an employ-
ment bureau as such. It does, however, interest itself in finding employment
for capable qualified individuals and in recommending suitable personnel when
requested to do so. The School has placed nearly one hundred per cent of the
students trained.
Duplicating Bureau
The School maintains a duplicating bureau, well equipped with duplicating
and bindery equipment and managed by expert operators. Clerical work and
duplicating for the school and faculty members is done on short notice. Stu-
dent publications, committee reports, class reports and term reports or syllabi
are reproduced at cost.





12 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


Credits
Students who qualify for entrance in the School of Trade and Industrial
Education in accordance with the provisions limiting classes of students to be
served, may take the courses offered for college credit or to satisfy certification
requirements, or both, or for no credit at all.
Credits earned in the School of Trade and Industrial Education will apply
as residence credit at the University towards the degree of Bachelor of Science
in Education, with a major in Trades and Industries or Distributive Education.
Students who have attended another institution and now wish to work towards
this degree at the University of Florida should see the requirements for ad-
mission to advanced standing.
The maximum number of credits a student may earn in a single term is four
for undergraduate students, and three for graduate students. All students
including those not desiring college credit must comply with the requirements
listed on pages 14 and 15 of this bulletin.
Certification
All courses have been approved by the Florida State Board for Vocational
Education and may be used towards satisfying teacher-training requirements
for certification or for extension of certificates.
Florida teachers who have certification deficiencies or who wish to satisfy
certification extension requirements should study the bulletin of certification
requirements for Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education before regis-
tering. Teachers from other states should consult their State Supervisors
concerning certification regulations.
Fees
A registration fee of $14 a term will be charged each student whether he is
from Florida or from another state. There is no tuition charge.
There is a failure fee of $2.50 per semester hour for any course failed* during
the last period of attendance. This fee must be paid before the student is
permitted to reregister in the University. A late registration fee of $5 is
charged students registering late. See calendar, page 5.
Auditors:-Auditor permits may be secured for $5 entitling the holder to
attend 18 regular class periods of any class in the school subject to the approval
of the respective instructors. Auditor permits are valid throughout the session.
Individuals will be limited to one auditor permit per term.
Expenses
Housing accommodations are ample at Daytona Beach this year, despite
wartime conditions. Rental rates are practically the same as those in effect
last year, for both apartments and rooms.
Food costs are the same as those prevailing throughout the state, and are
certainly no higher than in other cities in Florida.
Listings are being made of all available rooms, apartments, and hotel
accommodations, and will be supplied to all those who desire assistance in
finding living accommodations. These listings will be available at Seabreeze
High School from June 18 on.

*i. e. Courses not passed with a mark A, B, C or D for undergraduates, or courses not passed
with a mark A or B for graduate students.





RECREATION


It is suggested that those who wish apartments come to Daytona Beach a
day or two in advance.
A cafeteria is maintained in the school building for the convenience of
students.
Library
The library of the School contains over 6000 volumes including reference
books, encyclopedias, dictionaries, year books, periodicals, and government pub-
lications. These volumes are supplemented with a complete library of reference
material on Trade and Industrial, Distributive and General Vocational Educa-
tion. The advantages of the library are made readily accessible through a
complete card catalog and the assistance of a librarian.
Hours:-The Library will open Monday through Saturday at 8:00 a.m. and
close at 7:00 p.m. except on Friday when it will close at 6:00 p.m., and on
Saturday when it will close at 12:00 noon.
Training Schools
A series of three one-week technical courses for peace officers, firemen, and
hotel managers is usually conducted by the State Department of Public Instruc-
tion through its vocational division and in conjunction with the School of Trade
and Industrial Education. These courses are taught by nationally recognized
specialists and are often of interest to summer school students.
Special Lecturers
A series of special lectures by national authorities in Vocational Education
will be given at convenient intervals during the six weeks' session. The topics
to be discussed by these lecturers will follow a planned sequence calculated to
integrate their observations with the current subject matter under considera-
tion in a number of the courses offered.

RECREATION

Because the enrollment in the School for Trade and Industrial Education
is drawn largely from persons employed twelve months in the year, every effort
has been made to select a place offering not only the facilities for study but
those for spending an ideal vacation. Daytona Beach meets these requirements.
Recreational possibilities abound at Daytona. There is the beach with its
motoring length of twenty-three miles and low tide width of five hundred feet
for those who enjoy surf bathing and beach activities. Fishing is excellent
from the pier, or by boat on the Halifax, or in the inland lakes a short drive
from Daytona. Golf, tennis, handball, lawn bowling ,shuffle board, trap and
skeet shooting may be enjoyed by those who prefer these sports.
A number of points of interest, such as St. Augustine, the oldest city in
the United States-Silver Springs, the largest spring in the world-Tropical
Jungles-the old mission ruins-the Florida Cypress Gardens-Bok Tower-and
the Fountain of Youth, are only a few miles from Daytona Beach and can be
reached by bus in a very short time over some of Florida's most scenic highways.
In view of the social functions students may be invited to attend, it is sug-
gested that women bring one or two cotton evening dresses and one afternoon
dress, and that men bring one white or other light suit. The average summer
temperature at Daytona Beach is 79 degrees.





14 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


ADMISSION
A. Students wishing to receive college credit must meet the entrance require-
ments of the University of Florida. The requirements are:
1. For students who are entering college for the first time.
See Admission to the General College.
2. For students who are transferring from another institution and .who ex-
pect to receive a degree from the University of Florida.
Official transcripts sent directly to the Registrar from all institutions
previously attended. (Teachers' certificates or transcripts presented
by students will not suffice.)
3. For students who regularly attend another college or university and who
are attending the University of Florida School of Trade and Industrial
Education only for the purpose of securing credits to be transferred to
the institution regularly attended.
A statement of Honorable Dismissal from the institution last attended.
(Blanks for this purpose may be secured from the Office of the
Registrar.)

It is the student's responsibility to supply the proper credentials as outlined
in numbers 1, 2, or 3 above. NO TRANSCRIPTS FOR COLLEGE CREDIT
WILL BE ISSUED FOR ANY PERSON FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE
ABOVE.
The standing of each student entering the School of Trade and Industrial
Education with advanced standing will be considered individually, with the best
interests of the student always in mind. A program for the completion of the
work for a degree either through the General College, or in the College of Edu-
cation, will be determined at a conference with the Board of University Exam-
iners, and the Director of the School of Trade and Industrial Education.
B. Students not wishing to work toward a degree and who do not desire a
transcript of work completed must present evidence of their eligibility for ad-
mission in accordance with one of the provisions limiting the class of students
to be served by the School (see page 9).

Admission to the General College
The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the
General College:
1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required,
although no specific high school units are required.
2. Consistency of the high school record.
3. Achievement in high school.
4. Personal qualities.
5. Recommendation of high school principal.
6. Standing on Placement Tests.
All applicants should submit the Application Blanks at the back of this
bulletin, and in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent
to the Registrar. The latter may be secured from high school principals of
the State. Applicants for admission from other states may secure an Applica-
tion for Admission blank by writing the Registrar.





THE GENERAL COLLEGE 15


The Placement Tests will be given once during each term in the Seabreeze
High School Building. All applicants for admission to the General College are
required to take these tests. Students will be notified of the time and place
at which these tests will be given.
Residence Requirements
1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two
regular semesters, or one regular semester and four three-week summer terms
or nine three-week summer terms. New students offering advanced standing
must meet this requirement after entrance to the University. Students who
break their residence at the University by attending another institution for
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the
University.
2. For the master's degree a minimum of one academic year, or 33 weeks
in summer sessions, is necessary to satisfy the residence requirement.
3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours applied
towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the college from
which the student is to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be
made only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the college con-
cerned, but in no case may the amount of extension work permitted exceed
more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required for a baccalaureate
degree.
Amount of Extension Work Permitted
No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward
a degree by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be
allowed to take more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's
degree by correspondence study or extension class work. No person will be
allowed to take more than 9 credits by correspondence during the summer
vacation period.
Student Responsibility
Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper
courses and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should con-
fer with the Director of the school several days before registration regarding
choice of courses.
Seniors must file in the Office of the Registrar formal application for a degree
and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to
receive the degree.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses
can be dropped or changed only with the approval of the Director of the school
and by presentation of the cards authorizing the change at the Office of the
Registrar.

THE GENERAL COLLEGE

The General College has been organized to administer the work of the
freshman and sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning
students will register in this college.
The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College
in two years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter





16 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


time, and others may find it necessary to remain in the General College for a
longer period.

A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this
program the University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all
students alike. On this foundation that has meaning and significance to the
student, he may add the special training of the colleges and professional schools
of the Upper Division, or drop out of the University with something definite and
helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen. The purposes of the General
College are:

1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the
guidance needed by all students. Thus the choice of professional work is
postponed until the student is better acquainted with his capacity and
disposition to undertake work that will be profitable to himself and society.

2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing
for advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper
Division, thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization.
3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give
to college training, and consequently should concern themselves with gen-
eral viewpoints and major understandings, instead of with introductions
to special subject matter fields which they may never enter.

4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher gen-
eral education incident to the changing conditions of modern life. The
subject matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation
are to be constantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the student,
to stimulate his intellectual curiosity, to encourage independent study,
and to cultivate the attitudes necessary for enlightened citizenship.

5. Guidance. Every part of the General College program is designed
to guide students. It was felt that too much of the freshman and sopho-
more work of former years had little meaning and significance to the
vast majority. The material studied was preparatory and foundational,
and became meaningful only when the student pursued additional courses
in the junior and senior years. The material of the comprehensive
courses is selected and tested with guidance as a primary function.
While, of necessity, we must look forward to distant goals, the General
College is trying to present materials that are directly related to life
experiences and will immediately become a part of the students thinking
and guide him in making correct "next steps". Thus the whole program
-placement tests, progress reports, vocational aptitude tests, selected
material in the comprehensive courses, student conferences, provisions
for superior students, adjustment for individual differences, election
privileges, and comprehensive examinations-are all part of a plan
designed to guide students.

Thus guidance is not attempted at one office by one individual with a
small staff. The whole drive of the General College program is one of
directing the thinking of the student.





THE GENERAL COLLEGE 17


Comprehensive Examinations
The student must successfully pass comprehensive course examinations-
eight or more-to complete the work of the General College. These examina-
tions, administered by the Board of University Examiners, will be given in
January, May and August of each year. General College students who are not
enrolled in a course at the time the examination is given and who wish to take
any comprehensive examination, must apply in writing to the Board of Uni-
versity Examiners for permission at least one month before the announced date
for the examination. Before the application is accepted, the applicant will be
required to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof that this privilege has
not been used to avoid the payment of the usual University fees. A student
must be familiar with the work of the various courses and be able to think in
the several fields in a comprehensive way in order to pass these examinations.
Six hours time, divided into equal parts, will be required for each examination
covering a full year course.
Should a student fail a comprehensive course examination, he may qualify
to repeat the examination by repeating the course, or by further study. Evi-
dence of additional preparation must be submitted to the Board of University
Examiners with an application in writing to repeat the examination.

Graduation

When a student has completed his program in the General College and has
passed the comprehensive examinations and met the other requirements of the
General College curriculum, he will be granted the Associate of Arts Certificate.
Students who pass three-fourths of the comprehensive examinations with the
standing "Excellent" will, on graduation from the General College, receive the
certificate of Associate of Arts, With High Honors.

Notice to All Vocational Teachers

The comprehensive courses of the General College are of special significance
and value to the vocational teacher. For the teacher entering college for the
first time, the General College affords an excellent means of expediting the
conclusions of the first two years of college study.
The vocational teacher will find his progress through the General College
greatly accelerated due to his background of practical work and teaching ex-
periences. Syllabi on all General College courses are available to students.
A complete set may be found in the Library of the School of Trade and Indus-
trial Education.
Students entering the School of Trade and Industrial Education may com-
plete their major in Trades and Industries or Distributive Education before
registering for General College courses or they may apply for examinations on
General College courses any time after registration in the School of Trade and
Industrial Education.
Students interested in the General College should consult the Registrar for
further information during the first week after registration in the School of
Trade and Industrial Education at Daytona Beach.





18 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE
Requirements:
1. Must be regularly admitted to the University.
2. Must have completed one year of successful teaching experience in an
approved program of Trade and Industrial Education. This experience
may be acquired after the student has become a candidate for the degree.
3. Must have satisfied the residence and other routine requirements of the
University.
4. Must have an average of "C" or higher in all work counted toward the
degree.
5. Must satisfactorily complete the curriculum requirements outlined below.

PROGRAM OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

I. For those students graduating from the General College of the University of
Florida, completion of A and B listed below:
A. General College Program:*
C-1 Man and the Social World
C-2 Man and the Physical World
C-3 Reading, Speaking and Writing
C-41 Man and His Thinking
C-42 General Mathematics
C-5 The Humanities
C-6 Man and the Biological World
C-7 Electives in Education ........ 6 semester hours
**C-8 Electives ..................... 5 semester hours
**C-9 Electives ...................... 5 semester hours
B. Upper Division Program:
Education .......................... 9 semester hours
Trade and Industrial Education ...... 22 semester hours
**Approved Electives .................. 29 semester hours

Total .................. 60 semester hours in the
Upper Division.
II. For those students who do not graduate from the General College of the
University of Florida (Note: The following program is outlined for the
convenience of transfer students. The Board of University Examiners may
waive certain of the following requirements if the record of the student
warrants special consideration):
Physical and Biological Science .....
English Composition ...............
Literature ........................ 48 semester hours
Social Studies ....................
Psychology or Philosophy ..........
Mathematics ......................
Education .................... 15 semester hours
Trade and Industrial Education ..... 22 semester hours
**Approved Electives ................ 39 semester hours

Total .................124 semester hours

*Deviations from this program may be permitted by the Board of Examiners.
**A minimum of 22 semester hours is required in Trade and Industrial Education for a major. For
C-8, C-9 and approved electives in the Upper Division a person may take additional work in Trade
and Industrial Education, but not to exceed 18 semester hours, since not over 40 semester hours of the
entire four-year program can be in Trade and Industrial Education.





THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 19


PROGRAM OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
EDUCATION WITH A MAJOR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION

Note: The same provisions relating to the bachelor's degree with a major in
Trade and Industrial Education will apply to the degree with a major in
Distributive Education except that the major study shall be in Distribu-
tive Education courses and the experience requirements shall be in the
Distributive Education field.
PLANNING PROGRAM OF STUDY
Procedure:
1. Become regularly admitted to the University.
2. Consult the Director of the School about selection of courses.
3. Secure through the Director a list of courses, approved by the Dean, lead-
ing to the degree.
4. In case advanced standing is wished, the applicant should have tran-
scripts of credit evaluated by the Registrar before consulting the Director
about list of courses to be pursued.
Note: Transcripts of credit must be sent directly to the Registrar from the
Institution in which the credit was earned.

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

All graduate study in all of the colleges and schools of the University is
administered by the Graduate Council.

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN THE SCHOOL OF TRADE
AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

1. A bachelor's degree from a standard college or university.

2. At least one year's continuous employment in an approved Trade and
Industrial program for those wishing to major in Trade and Industrial
Education, or one year's continuous employment in an approved Distribu-
tive Education program for those wishing to major in Distributive
Education. The programs in which the experience is secured must meet
all the requirements of the State Plan for Trade and Industrial or Dis-
tributive Education for the state in which the applicant was employed.

3. Eight semester hours in approved teacher training courses in Trade and
Industrial Education of which two semester hours shall be in Supervision,
two semester hours in survey procedures, and four semester hours in
courses covering curriculum construction in and bearing directly upon
the branch of service in which the applicant has been employed.

4. Three or more years of continuous employment in an approved Trade
and Industrial or Distributive Education program may upon the discre-
tion of the head of the department be accepted in lieu of part of the eight
semester hour requirement.

5. Presentation of satisfactory evidence that graduate study may be
pursued with advantage to the University and the applicant.





20 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


6. Candidates must have completed three years of successful experience in
an approved program of Trades and Industries or Distributive Education
before a degree can be conferred.

Registration

A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be
transmitted directly to the Registrar's office by the Registrar of the institution
in which the credits have been earned. Transcripts presented by students can-
not be accepted.
The transcript should be in the Registrar's office at least one month before
the opening of the school. If it appears from the student's record that he is
eligible for graduate study he will be referred to the Director of the School of
Trade and Industrial Education who will become the professor of the major
subject and will plan the courses the student is to take.
Students are urged to file transcripts ahead of the beginning of the school.
Under no circumstances will students be permitted to register who have not
fully complied with this request. Transcripts submitted directly by students
are not acceptable. Transcripts must be transmitted by the registrars of the
institutions in which the credits were earned.

Requirements for the Master's Degree with Major in Trade and
Industrial Education

Degree offered.-Master of Arts in Education.

Residence Requirements.-See residence requirements page 15 this bulletin.
Transfer of Credits.-Under certain conditions transfer of a limited number
of credits to the University will be allowed. Transferred credits may reduce
the course requirements but not the residence, and work they represent shall
be included in the final examination.

Grades.-Passing grades for students registered in the Graduate School are
A and B. All other grades are failing.

Work Required.-Twenty-four semester hours are required for the degree
at least one half of which shall be in Trade and Industrial Education and the
remainder in related subject matter fields. The major study shall be in courses
numbered 500 and designated strictly for graduates. However, in case of
related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be taken upon
the approval of the Director of the School and the Dean of the Graduate School.
The student shall be guided entirely in the research procedure, preparation,
organization and form of the thesis by the Supervisor of Research. The student
should consult the Supervisor of Research immediately after admittance to the
Graduate School concerning these matters. The thesis problem should be
selected as soon as possible and be approved by the major professor. A state-
ment of the problem, the reason for its selection and an outline of the procedure
to be followed in its solution shall be submitted to the Student's Advisory Com-
mittee for the committee's consideration and approval All Graduate students
are required to register for TDE. 508, Research in Industrial and Distributive
Education, before or by the time they have completed twelve semester hours of





THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 21


graduate study. This course carries no credit and may be carried in addition to
the regular schedule of work.

Admission to Candidacy

Whether the student has been provisionally admitted or regularly admitted
to graduate study, the Supervisory Committee shall review his entire academic
record at the end of the first semester or summer session of residence work and
fix definitely the additional residence or course requirements. Upon ratification
of the action of the Supervisory Committee by a formal vote of the faculty, the
student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree subject to the approval
by the Supervisory Committee of the thesis problem selected.
Supervisory Committee.-The Supervisory Committee shall consist of the
Director of the School of Trade and Industrial Education, the Dean of the
Graduate School and the Supervisor of Research.
General Examinations.-It will be the duty of the Supervisory Committee,
when all work is complete or practically complete, including the regular courses
and the thesis, to conduct a general examination, either written or oral, or both,
to embrace: first, the thesis; second, the major subject; third, the minor or
minors; fourth, questions of a general nature pertaining to the student's field
of study. The Committee shall report in writing not later than one week before
the time for the conferring of the degree if all work has been completed in a
satisfactory manner and the student is recommended for the degree.
Work Done in Absentia.-Credit is not given for work done in absentia. No
courses may be taken for credit by extension or correspondence.

GRADUATE COURSES REQUIRED FOR MAJOR IN TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

TIE. 512.-Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Trade and In-
dustrial Education
TIE. 501.-Industrial and Economic Development in the South
TDE. 502.-Organization and Administration of Adult Extension Training
TIE. 503.-Administration of Vocational Education
TDE. 504.-Philosophy of Vocational Education
TIE. 505.-Technical Schools-Their Organization and Control
TIE. 506.-Apprenticeship and Labor Relations
TDE. 507.-Administration of Diversified Cooperative Training
TDE. 508.-Research in Industrial and Distributive Education

Recommended Minors

DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION

DOE. 500.-Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Distributive
Occupations
DOE. 508.-Retail Buying and Marketing
DOE. 509.-Retail Merchandising
DOE. 510.-Sales and Merchandise Promotion
DOE. 511.-Store Management and Operation





22 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


GUIDANCE
GU. 400.-Organization and Administration of Guidance
GU. 401.-Local Guidance Program in the School and Community
GU. 402-3.-Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN
DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION
The same provisions relating to the Master's degree with a major in Trade
and Industrial Education will apply to the degree with a major in Distributive
Education, except that the major study shall be in Distributive Education
courses and the experience requirement shall be in the Distributive Education
field.

GRADUATE COURSES REQUIRED FOR A MAJOR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION
DOE. 500.-Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Distributive
Occupations
TDE. 502.-Organization and Administration of Adult Extension Training
TDE. 504.-Philosophy of Vocational Education
TDE. 507.-Administration of Diversified Cooperative Training
DOE. 508.-Retail Buying and Marketing
DOE. 509.-Retail Merchandising
DOE. 510.--Sales and Merchandise Promotion
DOE. 511.-Store Management and Operation
TDE. 508.-Research in Industrial and Distributive Education

Recommended Minors
TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
TIE. 512.-Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Trade and
Industrial Education
TIE. 501.-Industrial and Economic Development in the South
TIE. 503.-Administration of Vocational Education
TIE. 505.-Technical Schools-Their Organization and Control
TIE. 506.-Apprenticeship and Labor Relations

GUIDANCE

GU. 400.-Organization and Administration of Guidance
GU. 401.-Local Guidance Program in the School and Community
GU. 402-3.-Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance

CURRICULA

The courses have been designed for the particular needs of teachers in the
various fields of trade and industrial education. These are listed below, along
with the time these courses will be available during the summer session. For
detailed information concerning the course, see the Time Schedule on pages 28
to 39. The Time Schedule for the first term will be found on pages 27-29;
for the second term on pages 30-33.






Department FIRST TERM SECOND TERM
Number TITLE Time Room Instructor Time Room Instructor


TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION



For Day Trade School Teachers


Organization of Specific
Subject Content ...... ................... 10:00 to 12:00
Teaching Methods and
Devices ......................................................... 8:00 to 10:00
Organization for Individual Instruction
and Progression ............................................ 12:30 to 2:30
Trade Shop Planning, Organization
and Control ... ............................................ 2:30 to 4:30
Day Trade Related
Instruction -----............--.... ..... ....-- ........... 10:00 to 12:00


Hale

Anderson

Anderson

Nelms

Isom


10:00 to 12:00

2:30 to 4:30

12:30 to 2:30

8:00 to 10:00

10:00 to 12:00


For Evening School Teachers

T D E. 211 .......................................................................... ............................ ......................10:00 to 12:00


For Coordinators and Related Teachers, D. C. T.


Clyde

Cooper

Cooper

Bronson -

Hinton


14 Adams


Organization for Diversified
Cooperative Training .................................... 8:00 to 10:00
Occupational Surveys ......................................... 10:00 to 12:00
Student Counseling and
Selection ......................... ........................... 12:30 to 2:30
Industrial Plant Job
Analysis ...... ............. ............ ..........................
Related Study Material ........................................ ..........................
Coordination of D.C.T. .................... ..................


Franz
Franz ..........................


Starbuck .........................
Starbuck

..................... 2:30 to 4:30
................... 8:00 to 10:00
......................10:00 to 12:00


TDE. 221

TDE. 222
TDE. 223

TDE. 224

TDE. 225
TDE. 226


Franz
Starbuck
Dillman






FIRST TERM
Room Instructor


SECOND TERM
Room Instructor


For General Continuation Teachers


Business English for
Transcription Teachers ................................. 10:00 to 12:00
Curriculum Construction and
Schedule Planning ....................-..-...-........... 12:30 to 2:30
Dictation and Transcription ...........................................
Organization of Instructional
Material in Shorthand .............................. 8:00 to 10:00
Organization of Instructional
Material in Typewriting .........................................
Organization of Instructional
Material in Arithmetic ................................. ............
Organization of Instructional
Material in Bookkeeping ................ .......................


For Directors, Supervisors, and


Conference Methods .................. .....................................
Vocational School Organization ............................ 10:00 to 12:00
Training of Women for
Industrial Production .................................... 8:00 to 10:00


General Subjects


Graphic Analysis .........................................
Advanced Graphic Analysis .........-..-...............
History and Development of Vocational Educa-
tion in the United States ............................
Principles and Purposes of the
Vocational Acts ...........................................
Safety Education ......................................
Applied Vocational Psychology ..........................


12:30 to 2:30


2:30 to 4:30


5

4



3


Hobson ..................

Abrams ........................
......................10:00 to 12:00

Hobson .......................

......................12:30 to 2:30

......................10:00 to 12:00

...................... 8:00 to 10:00


SCoordinators


......................12:30 to 2:30
Alexander ........................

O'Reilly ..................





......................10:00 to 12:00
.....................10:00 to 12:00

...................... 8:00 to 10:00

W rigley ........................
. .................12:30 to 2:30
Allen ....... .....


Department
Number


TITLE


TDE. 244
TIE. 247
TIE. 268


TDE. 205
TDE. 206
TDE. 241

TDE. 248

TDE. 249
-TDE. 256


Skimin



Skimin

Rosenberg

Rosenberg




Whitnel








Meredith
Meredith

Alexander



O'Reilly
......................


Time






Department FIRST TERM SECOND TERM
Number TITLE Time Room Instructor Time Room Instructor


Guidance


Organization and Administration
of Guidance ......... ...... ... .......... ...... ..................
Local Guidance Program in
School and Community ......................... 10:00 to 12:00
Research Practices, Tests and
Measurements in Guidance ......................... 12:30 to 2:30


... .................... 2:30 to 4:30

18 O 'Reilly ........................
9 Allen ..............


15 O'Reilly


DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION

Basic Courses for Retailers, Supervisors, Teachers of Distributive Education


Advertising for Retailers .................................... 8:00 to 10:00
T extiles .................................. ........................... .......... ... ..
Color, Line, and Design ................................ 10:00 to 12:00
Applied Art in Window Display ................... 8:00 to 10:00
N on-Textiles .. ........................... ... ............


Edwards
-...................10:00 to 12:00
Lloyd ........................
Lloyd .......................
Lloyd
.............. ... 8:00 to 10:00


For Supervisors and Coordinators


DOE. 200 Store Employment andTraining Methods .................. ....


......................10:00 to 12:00


15 Van Horn


For Coordinators of Cooperative Training


Organization for Diversified
Cooperative Training ................................... 8:00 to 10:00
Occupational Surveys ......................................... 10:00 to 12:00
Student Counseling and Selection ...................... 12:30 to 2:30
Industrial Plant Job Analysis ............................ ...................
Related Study Material ............................................................
Coordination of D.C.T. ....................................... ................


9 Franz .........................
11 Nelms ...... ......
8 Starbuck
.... ................... 2:30 to 4:30
.... ...................... 8:00 to 10:00
.... ......................10:00 to 12:00


For Evening School Coordinators and Teachers
.............................. .. ........ .. ..... ......................10:00 to 12:00


General Subjects
Graphic Analysis ............................................ ....................
Advanced Graphic Analysis .............................. ..................
History and Development of Vocational Educa-
tion in the United States ........................ ............
Principles and Purposes of the
Vocational Acts ............................................ 12:30 to 2:30
Safety Education ................................................ ..................
Applied Vocational Psychology ......................... 2:30 to 4:30


.... ......................10:00 to 12:00
.... ......................10:00 to 12:00
.. ...................... 8:00 to 10:00

15 Wrigley
.................12:30 to 2:30
16 Alen ...... .............


Franz
Starbuck
Dillman


GU. 400

GU. 401
GU. 402


DOE. 205
DOE. 208
DOE. 210
DOE. 216
DOE. 219


TDE. 211


TDE. 205
TDE. 206
TDE. 241

TDE. 248
TDE. 249
TDE. 256


14 Adams


20 Meredith
20 Meredith
9 Alexander

14 O'Reilly


......................
-------- I .............
......................
---------------
......................






FIRST TERM
Room Instructor


TITLE


SECOND TERM
Room Instructor


DOE.

TIE.

TIE.

TDE.

TDE.

DOE.





TIE.

TIE.
TIE.

TIE.

TIE.
TIE.


For Graduate Students Only

Sales and Merchandising
Promotion ................................................ 10:00 to 12:00 14 Edwards ..... .....
Administration of Vocational
Education ....................................... ........ 2:30 to 4:30 9 W rigley ........................
Technical Schools: Their Organization
and Control ................................... ..... 8:00 to 10:00 11 Alexander .......................
Philosophy of Vocational
Education .................... ...... ............................................... .... .. ........ 10:00 to 12:00
Administration of Diversifed
Cooperative Training ................. ............... ............. .... ...................... 8:00 to 10:00
Store Management and Operation. ...................... ...... .... ......................12:30 to 2:30


SPECIALLY DESIGNED NATIONAL DEFENSE COURSES

Organization of Specific
Subject Content ................................ 10:00 to 12:00 16 Hale 10:00 to 12:00
Teaching Methods and Devices .......................... 8:00 to 10:00 16 Anderson 2:30 to 4:30
Organization for Individual
Instruction and Progression .......................... 12:30 to 2:30 11 Anderson 12:30 to 2:30
Trade Shop Planning, Organization
and Control ................................ ...... 2:30 to 4:30 15 Nelms 8:00 to 10:00
Day Trade Related Instruction .......................... 10:00 to 12:00 8 Isom 10:00 to 12:00
Training of Women for
Industrial Production ................................... 8:00 to 10:00 18 O'Reilly ........................


Department
Number


Alexander

Adams
Van Horn






Clyde
Cooper

Cooper

Bronson
Hinton





BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 27


DESCRIPTION OF COURSES

TIME SCHEDULE

FIRST TERM

DISTRIBUTIVE OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION
DOE. 205.-Advertising for Retailers... 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily.
Room 14. EDWARDS.
Special problems in retail advertising; advertising limitations; organization of the advertisement
department; preparation of advertising for publication; formulation of an advertising plan; writing and
the displaying of selling messages.
DOE. 210.-Color, Line and Design. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 15.
LLOYD.
Principles of color and design and their relation to styling; merchandising, customer decoration,
window and interior display.
DOE. 216.-Applied Art in Window Display. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily.
Room 15. LLOYD.
The practical application of artistic treatment in display of all types of merchandise. Repetitive
training in arranging the window display. A full-sized display window in the school will be used by
students taking this course.
DOE. 510.-Sales and Merchandise Promotion. 11 credits. 10:00 to 12:00
daily. Room 14. EDWARDS.
This course is designed to give a dear understanding of the scope and activities of sales promo-
tion. Attention is directed especially to the methods of determining what to promote; to the procedure
of formulating a sales-promotion plan; to an examination of the uses of numerous external and internal
sales-promotion media and devices; and to the means of coordinating sales-promotion activities.

TRADE AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION

TDE. 221.-Organization for Diversified Occupational Training. 2 credits.
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 9. FRANZ.
Objectives to be attained, organization to attain these objectives, Federal and State requirements,
social security, insurance, compensation and labor laws involved will be studied.
TDE. 222.-Occupational Surveys. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 11.
NELMS.
A study of procedure in making community industrial surveys and of individual industrial plants
or business concerns to determine community training needs and acceptable industrial concerns in
which to give training.
TDE. 223.-Student Counseling and Selection. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily.
Room 8. STARBUCK.
The procedure to be followed in securing applicants for training, factors involved in selection
of students, occupational counseling, training, assignments, compensation, and work contracts.
TDE. 248.-Principles and Purposes of the Vocational Acts. 2 credits. 12:30
to 2:30 daily. Room 15. WRIGLEY.
Congressional and legislative acts providing for vocational education of all kinds; the principal
purposes and influences involved in the formulation of these acts; the extent and scope of vocational
service provided by means of them.
TDE. 256.-Applied Vocational Psychology. 2 credits. 2:30 to 4:30 daily.
Room 16. ALLEN.
The application of fundamental principles of psychology in the solution of human relation
problems of the director, supervisor, or coordinator of vocational education.





28 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

TIE. 201.-Organization Specific Subject Content. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00
daily. Room 16. HALE.
The methods of making occupational studies to determine jobs or operations and functioning
related information in which instruction should be given and the procedure in organization for teaching
purposes. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and
Part-Time Preparatory Teachers.

TIE. 202.-Teaching Methods and Devices. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily.
Room 16. ANDERSON.
The methods used in preparing instructional material for teaching purposes and the use of such
methods and aids as demonstrations, illustrations, lectures, conference, instruction sheets, charts, films,
slides, and models in demonstration teaching. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers,
Part-Time Preparatory Teachers, and Trade Shop Related Teachers.

TIE. 203.-Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 2 credits.
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 11. ANDERSON.
Means of providing and carrying on individual instruction for students at various attainment
levels and progression records and forms for recording individual progress. Designed to meet the
needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers.

TIE. 204.-Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control 2 credits.
2:30 to 4:30 daily. Room 15. NELMS.
Items for consideration in planning shops, management and control with respect to floor space,
light, equipment, supplies, inventories, Federal and State regulations, and record keeping devices.
Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers.

TIE. 228.-Business English. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 5.
HOBSON.
Instruction in special methods of organizing material for and teaching business English in correla-
tion with transcription.

TIE. 230.-Curriculum Construction and Schedule Planning. 2 credits. 12:30
to 2:30 daily. Room 4. ABRAMS.
Designed for general continuation school principals and teachers.
Methods used in constructing commercial curriculum and planning commercial schedules to
meet present needs.

TIE. 238.-Organization of Instructional Material in Shorthand. 2 credits.
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 3. HOBSON.
Methods of organizing material for effective teaching of shorthand, subject outline and substance,
what to stress, objective, time schedules, and presentation.
TIE. 247.-Vocational School Organization. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily.
Room 12. ALEXANDER.
The characteristics and functions of the vocational school; the groups to be served and the pro-
visions, organization and plan necessary to render this service.
TIE. 257.-Day Trade Related Instruction. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily.
Room 8. ISOM.
The fundamental purposes and objectives of related instruction. Sources of material, organization
and methods to be employed in teaching related material.
TIE. 268.-Training of Women for Industrial Production. 2 credits. 8:00
to 10:00 daily. Room 18. O'REILLY.
Methods of determining industrial areas in which training can be given; prerequisite require-
ments for employment; training prcoedure; effect on the economic and social status of the worker.
For Directors, Coordinators and Supervisors.





TIME SCHEDULE FIRST TERM


TIE. 503.-Administration of Vocational Education. 1% credits. 2:30 to
4:30 daily. Room 9. WRIGLEY.
National, State and local administrative organization, and controls for vocational education.
Sources and means of procuring and estimating revenue and laws, regulations, principles and plan to
be followed in spending, a systematic and detailed study of vocational education administrative
personnel duties and responsibilities.

TIE. 505.-Technical Schools-Their Organization and Control. 1% credits.
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 11. ALEXANDER.
The purpose and limitations of the various types of technical schools, their curricula, organiza-
tion, management, control devices, and desirability from the standpoint of scope in satisfying typical
community training requirements.


GUIDANCE

GU. 401.-Local Guidance Program in the School and Community. 1%
credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 18. O'REILLY.
The functions and the objectives of a guidance program calculated to serve individual, school
and community. Special emphasis on such aspects of the guidance procedure as individual functions,
materials, personnel, practices and coordinated school activities.

GU. 402.-Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance. 1%
credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 9. ALLEN.
Securing, analyzing, and using occupational information. Making industrial, occupational,
vocational, and educational surveys for guidance purposes. Evaluation and measuring of tests and
devices in guidance for the individual, school, and community.


SPECIAL COURSES FOR DEFENSE TRAINING

TIE. 201.-Organization Specific Subject Content. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00
daily. Room 11. HALE.

TIE. 202.-Teaching Methods and Devices. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily.
Room 7. ANDERSON.

TIE. 203.-Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 2 credits.
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 11. ANDERSON.

TIE. 204.-Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 2 credits.
2:30 to 4:30 daily. Room 7.

TIE. 257.-Day Trade Related Instruction. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily.
Room 8. ISOM.

TIE. 268.-Training of Women for Industrial Production. 2 credits. 8:00
to 10:00 daily. Room 14. O'REILLY.





30 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION





DESCRIPTION OF COURSES


TIME SCHEDULE


SECOND TERM


DISTRIBUTIVE OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION

DOE. 200.-Store Employment and Training Methods. 2 credits. 10:00 to
12:00 daily. Room 15. VAN HORN.
The procedures and methods used by retail organizations in the selection of employees, in
handling employees' grievances, promotions, supervision and discipline, store training programs for
novices and up-grading employees.

DOE. 208.-Textiles. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30. Room 15.
Textile designs; finishing processes; suitability, durability and stability of cloth; analysis and
identification of textile fabrics; textile fibers and processes used in grading fabrics.

DOE. 219-Non-Textiles. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 18.
The consideration of the following types of merchandise: leather, metals, stones, jewelry, cosmetics,
glass, rubber, paper, ceramics and silverware.

DOE. 511.-Store Management and Operation. 1% credits. 12:30 to 2:30
daily. Room 18. VAN HORN.
Modem methods of successful retail-store management. The subject matter includes organization
and functions of the store manager's division, analysis of operating expenses, wage plans, methods of
controlling departmental selling costs, receiving procedures, floor supervision, delivery methods,
handling adjustments, granting and following up credit and controlling workrooms and supplies.
Special emphasis is placed on methods of expense control.


TRADE AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION

TDE. 205.-Graphic Analysis...2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 20.
MEREDITH.
The formulating of abstract and statistical materials into charts and graphs for rapid assimilation.
The types of material suited to this analysis, the methods of presenting the material and the prepara-
tion of material for display. (A set of drawing instruments will be of value to the student in this work.)

TDE. 206.-Advanced Graphic Analysis. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily.
Room 20. MEREDITH.
Prerequisite requirements TDE. 205. A continuation of TDE. 205.

TDE. 211.-Evening Schools-Their Organization and Control. 2 credits.
10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 14. ADAMS.
The development of a knowledge and understanding of the value, possibilities, and limitations
of evening schools and classes to the end that the evening school teacher will understand clearly his
place in such a program. A thorough study of methods and procedures in organization, selection of
students, Federal, State, and local laws and regulations governing the conduct of evening schools and
classes. Designed to meet the needs of Extension Teachers.





TIME SCHEDULE SECOND TERM 31


TDE. 224.-Industrial Plant Job Analysis. 2 credits. 2:30 to 4:30 daily.
Room 11. FRANZ.
The student must make a complete schedule of work processes iii an individual plant. Also
based upon these processes he must make a schedule of student training, related study, and
compensation.

TDE. 225.-Related Study Material. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 8.
STARBUCK.


TDE. 226.-Coordination of Diversified Cooperative Training. 2 credits.
10:00 to 12:00 daily. Room 9. DILLMAN.
Coordination aims, purposes, methods of promotion, community and industrial relationships,
advisory committee organization and function, research problems, trainee follow-up and placement.

TDE. 241.-History and Development of Vocational Education in the United
States. 2 credits. 8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 9. ALEXANDER.
The development of Vocational Education by stages from its beginning to the present time.

TDE. 244.-Conference Methods. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 8.
WHITNEL.
Methods and devices that can be used successfully in leading and managing foremen conferences
and in the selection of problems affecting vocational courses. Designed for Directors, Supervisors,
Superintendents and Principals.

TDE. 249.-Safety Education. 2 credits. 12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 14.
O'REILLY.
A general overview of various safety programs including industrial, home, school and recrea-
tional safety; the need and justification of safety education; its promotion; material for instruction;
organization methods and administration.

TDE. 504.-Philosophy of Vocational Education. 1% credits. 10:00 to 12:00
daily. Room 7. ALEXANDER.
Basic principles involved in vocational education and the interpretation and application of these
principles to public education and industrial and economic development in the United States.

TDE. 507.-Administration of Diversified Cooperative Training. 1% credits.
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 11. ADAMS.
Federal and State requirements, cost control, records, insurance, compensation, labor laws, social
security, accrediting agencies, personnel relations and management involved in administration of
cooperative training.





32 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION


TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

TIE. 201.-Organization Specific Subject Content. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00
daily. Room 16. CLYDE.
The methods of making occupational studies to determine jobs or operations and functioning
related information in which instruction should be given and the procedure in organization for
teaching purposes. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers,
and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers.

TIE. 202.-Teaching Methods and Devices. 2 credits. 2:30 to 4:30 daily.
Room 16. COOPER.
The methods used in preparing instructional material for teaching purposes and the use of such
methods and aids as demonstrations, illustrations, lectures, conference, instruction sheets, charts, films,
slides, and models in demonstration teaching. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers,
Part-Time Preparatory Teachers, and Trade Shop Related Teachers.

TIE. 203.-Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 2 credits.
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 16. COOPER.
Means of providing and carrying on individual instruction for students at various attainment
levels and progression records and forms for recording individual progress. Designed to meet the
needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers.

TIE.204.-Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 2 credits. 8:00
to 10:00 daily. Room 7. BRONSON.
Items for consideration in planning shops, management and control with respect to floor space,
light, equipment, supplies, inventories, Federal and State regulations, and record keeping devices.
Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers.

TIE. 237.-Practice Teaching Dictation and Transcription. 2 credits. 10:00
to 12:00 daily. Room 3. SKIMIN.

TIE. 239.-Organization of Instructional Material in Typewriting. 2 credits.
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 5. SKIMIN.
Methods of organization of material for teaching of typewriting in vocational schools, subject
matter, substance, relation of teaching material, synchronizing instruction with objectives to be
attained.

TIE. 240.-Practice Teaching in Business Arithmetic. 2 credits. 10:00 to
12:00 daily. Room 4. ROSENBERG.
Instruction in special methods of teaching and organization of instructional material for individual
progression, practice, demonstration and observation teaching.

TIE. 242.-Organization of Instructional Material in Bookkeeping. 2 credits.
8:00 to 10:00 daily. Room 4. ROSENBERG.
How to organize teaching material in pen and machine bookkeeping for modem jobs as
distinguished from the traditional; short cuts for achievement of understanding of bookkeeping
principles.

TIE. 257.-Day Trade Related Instruction. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily.
Room 16. HINTON.
The fundamental purposes and objectives of related instruction. Sources of material, organiza-
tion and methods to be employed in teaching related material.





TIME SCHEDULE SECOND TERM


GUIDANCE

GU. 400.-Organization and Administration of Guidance. 1V credits. 2:30
to 4:30 daily. Room 15. O'REILLY.
History and philosophy of the guidance movement. Guidance as an ethical part of the school
functional program. National, State, local and institutional organization for guidance. Practices
and techniques employed in active guidance programs. Methods of initiating, organizing, and
administering a program of guidance at various levels.

SPECIAL COURSES FOR DEFENSE TRAINING

TIE. 201.-Organization Specific Subject Content. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00
daily. Room 7. CLYDE.

TIE.202.-Teaching Methods and Devices. 2 credits. 2:30 to 4:30 daily.
Room 7. COOPER.

TIE. 203.-Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 2 credits.
12:30 to 2:30 daily. Room 11. COOPER.

TIE. 204.-Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 2 credits. 8:00
to 10:00 daily. Room 7. BRONSON.

TIE. 257.-Day Trade Related Instruction. 2 credits. 10:00 to 12:00 daily.
Room 8. HINTON.





IMPORTANT-Your Application for Admission to the School of Trade and Industrial Education Will Not Be Considered
Unless This Form Is Filled in Completely and Mailed with the Application Blank on Page 37.


Mr.
1. Name Mrs.
Miss

I AAA...


Last Name First Name


Street and Number
Street and Number


County


Middle Name


State


3. Schools in which you have taught:

Name and Location of School Dates of Service Su s
Subjects Taught
(if none, so state) (from ........ to .......)












4. Your present position:
W hat tpe of work are you now doing?... ................ ............................. ..... How long have you been so occupied?............................... ... .........

5. If not employed at present or if you are contemplating a change, for what type of work are you preparing?.................................. ....................................

6. If you are a college graduate give name of institution and degree held........................................ .......... ............. ........ -... ......-- .-------..-- ....-

7. List below your practical work experience as a wage earner: (If none, so state)

Type of Work ates o Employment Name and Location of Firm Employing You
(from ........ to ....... )












DO NOT WRITE IN THIS SPACE


.







o



0

a
0




i



P <
00|,


Rw ri.
0















zIl
r n
%*^


PART I TO BE FILLED OUT BY ALL APPLICANTS
Mr.
N am e M rs .................................. .......... .......... ........................................................ ..... . ...............................
Miss *(Last Name) "*(First Name) **(Middle Name) Married women
please give
hus and's initials
Home Address -
H om e A address ...----................... ........................................................... -- - --...........................- ....- ....- ....- ....- ........................... ... .---...........................----------
St. & No., Box., or Rural Rt. City County State
Give YOUR Occupation last year (Check ONE) ................H. S. Student; ................College Student; ................ Elem. Teacher; ................Jr.
H. S. Teacher; ................H. S. Teacher; ................ School Superintendent; ................ Principal; ...............College Teacher. If some other
occupation, please nam e: ........................................................................................... ........ .. ..... .... ............................ ..... .. .........
Are you a regular student at some other college or university who desire to take work at our summer session to transfer to this other institu-
tion?................................ If your answer is yes, give the name of the other institution........ ..................... ... ........................................
yes or no
I wish to register for the term beginning June 21, July 10 (encircle one)

Check one of the following:
............ I wish to register for courses giving credit for the Bachelor's degree.
............ I wish to register for courses giving graduate credit.
............ I am not interested in credit toward any degree.
Have you earned any credit through the General Extension Division of the University of Florida?......................... ...
yes or no
Have you attended the University of Florida before?................. (IF YOUR ANSWER IS NO, DISREGARD THE REMAINDER OF PART I
yes or no
BUT FILL OUT ALL OF PART II ON THE BACK OF THIS PAGE.) Give date of the last session you attended here...............
Have you attended any other college or university since you last attended the University of Florida?........................ If your answer is yes,
yes or no
list the institutions you have attended since attending the University of Florida and give dates of attendance............................................


STUDENTS WHO PREVIOUSLY HAVE ATTENDED THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA NEED NOT FILL OUT PART II

*If you have registered at the University of Florida under any other name, please list below.
**Married women will please use their own first and middle names.

PART II ON THE BACK OF THIS PAGE MUST BE FILLED OUT BY ALL APPLICANTS WHO HAVE NOT ATTENDED THE UNI-
VERSITY BEFORE.


C TIE


FF


C P FS


ADM


NOT


1st


2nd


3rd





PART II TO BE FILLED OUT ONLY BY APPLICANTS WHO HAVE NOT ATTENDED THE UNIVERSITY BEFORE




D ate of birth............................................ ............ ....... Place of birth............................................................... .. .......... R ace....................................
Month-Day-Year

Religious Preference ............................................... ...................... Are you a member?.......................
yes or no

High School attended ......................................... .... ................. Did you graduate?........... .............................. Date of graduation........................................
yes or no

Have you attended any college or university?...........................If the answer is yes, list the institutions you have attended:
yes or no


C Institution Location Dates of Attendance
00











Do you plan to continue your work at the University of Florida until you receive a degree?....... ....................
yes or no

Give your FATHER'S occupation (if retired or deceased give occupation while living and active)................................................... .. ....................




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs