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 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: January 1943
Copyright Date: 1946
Frequency: quarterly
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 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00266
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Matter
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    Title Page
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    Biennial report of the president
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    Reprint from biennial report of the president
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Full Text
Vol. XXXVIII, Series 1


THE UNIVERSITY RECORD

of the

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA







Contents

No. Title

1. Biennial Report of the President
1. Reprint from Biennial Report of the President
2. Schedule of Courses, Second Semester 1942-43
3. Preliminary Announcement, 1943 Summer Session
4. Bulletin of the School of Trade and Industrial
Education, 1943
5. Bulletin of the University Summer Session, 1943
6. Financial Report, June, 1942
7. Catalog, 1943-44
8. Schedule of Courses, First Semester, 1943-44
9. Financial Report, June, 1943
10. University Directory, 1943-44
Part I Students
11. University Directory, 1943-44
Part II Faculty and Employees








The University Record

of the

University of Florida


*


BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT
TO THE BOARD OF CONTROL

For Biennium Ending June 30, 1942


. Vol. XXXVIII


No. 1


January 1, 1943


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida










BIENNIAL REPORT

OF THE PRESIDENT

of the

UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA

to the


BOARD


OF CONTROL


FOR THE BIENNIUM
ENDING JUNE 30
1942


I





TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE

THE PRESIDENT'S REPORT ................ .......- .........-.... --- ----- ....................... 5

REPORTS OF THE DEANS AND ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

The Dean of Students ..-....--.......-....- .. ..--- .. ----.... .....- ..-....... 17

The Dean of the University .......... --...... -- .................. .................... 18

The Business Manager ......----....... -----. ----.. .----....---- ...............--- 19

The Registrar .------- ------............------- ----- -----------......-----................ 32

The Acting Assistant University Examiner ...-----........-------....-------.....-...-..-----...-... 34

The Dean of the Graduate School ...........- .....---.......- .......-.... ...--- 37

The Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences .......................... .................. 38

The Dean of the College of Agriculture (Teaching Division) .................------ 42

The Director of the Experiment Stations ...-..-...-...--..-----..--.--------------.................. 44

The Director of the Agricultural Extension Service ....................-................. 56

The Dean of the College of Business Administration ..---...--...........-------.................. 66

The Dean of the College of Engineering .......-.....--.... ---- ----------............................. 68

The Dean of the College of Law ..... -..-------.... .... ............--...-- 73
The Acting Dean of the College of Education ............... --......--................. 76
The Director of the Summer Session ..................-----.-------- ............------ .........-------. 79

The Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts ....-------------.................... 81

The Dean of the General College -------------------....------..... .... ---.-------................. 82

The Dean of the General Extension Division -----------......----------.....------.......................... 84

The University Librarian ---....-............--------............-- ...... .. -- -------------...... ..........--89

The Professor of Military Science and Tactics ...............--------......--.......... 92
The Acting Director of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs --............... 93

The Director of the Florida State Museum ....-----------................................ 94

The Director of Florida Union ....... ---...--.. ............... .. ............... 95
The Acting Director of the Division of Athletics and Physical Education.... 96

N*The Director of Publicity ..................---.....- ....- ...... ----................... 97

The Director of Radio Station WRUF ........-.....-.. ----.......-............ 97





REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY

To the Honorable Board of Control of
State Institutions of Higher Learning of Florida.
GENTLEMEN:
The last biennial report to the Board of Control was presented shortly after
the defense program of the United States was inaugurated. A critical situation
was already developing in the entire country which essentially effected all institu-
tions including colleges and universities. As long as the American people clung
to the hope of avoiding being plunged into the greatest disaster in human history,
we endeavored to preserve the normal functions of our institution. Two years ago
we still cherished the thought that the primary objectives of education and other
important agencies of civilization could be preserved without involvement in a
global war. These hopes were blasted and any illusions of carrying on as usual
were dispelled early in the biennium which this report covers.
In September, 1940, the Congress of the United States passed the Selective
Service Act providing for the conscription of man power for defense purposes.
Immediately an intensive national program was inaugurated for the defense of
our common country against the bandit nations which were already attacking and
plundering the free peoples of Europe and Asia. While America still prayed for
an escape from the ordeal, the deliberate and unexpected attack by a ruthless
Japanese task force on Hawaii, followed by overt declarations of war on the part
of the Axis powers, plunged us irrevocably into a struggle for the preservation
of all those rights and privileges which have been the birthright of our people,
including their very lives and liberties.
The Board of Control was prompt in offering to the President of the United
States all of the facilities of the institutions under it for the promotion of the war
effort. Immediately, the Administration of the University of Florida began re-
shaping its plans, programs and objectives with the sole purpose of directing all
of these towards a consummation of the war by victory. The adjustments in-
volved many activities including accelerated curricula which would enable students
to complete their work and leave the University for war service in a minimum of
time; modified courses furnishing the maximum of skills and knowledge essential
to war service; a lengthening and expanding of military training at the Uni-
versity; provision for certain specific types of training such as aeronautics, radio,
and civilian defense; and a physical fitness program designed for the hardening
and conditioning of students for participation in the war. The University com-
munity was organized on a pattern set up by the State and local defense councils
for the complete and effective cooperation in the protection of buildings, property
and civilians in case of attack. 'Some of these activities will be touched upon more
fully later on in this report.
As a result of the unpredictable character of our national situation and the
almost certain development of unforeseen factors, it became necessary to make the
plans and services of the University as flexible as possible. The application of
this policy will be obvious as this report proceeds.

ENROLLMENT AND EXTENSION SERVICES
University Enrollment: Contrary to our expectations, the incidence of the
war did not reduce enrollment to a very large extent. This is readily discernable





from a comparison of the registration figures for the 1940-42 biennial period with
those of the year just preceding, which had topped all previous records:
Summer No. Registrations
Regular No. Students Enrolled Session On College Level
Session on College Level (Both Terms)
1939-40 ............ ....... 3,456 1940 ............................. 2,805
1940-41 ........... ......... 3,438 1941 .......................... 2,917
1941-42 ......................... 3,239 1942 ............................... 3,202
P. K. Yonge School-Sub-Collegiate
Level
1939-40 .... .... .......... 454
1940-41 ........... .... ..... .... 472
1941-42 ........................... 485
General Extension Division: The war has greatly increased the demand for
services rendered by the General Extension Division although there has been
some reduction in enrollment in the usual correspondence and extension classes,
and some of the service functions. Cooperation with the State Defense Council
in its training program has created the necessity for rapid planning and for the
serving of large groups immediately. The Governor designated the Dean of the
General Extension Division as Coordinator of Training for the State Defense
Council. The statement of the Dean, included in this report, reveals that 1,751
persons have been enrolled in Defense Council Teacher Training Courses and
that on June 1, 1942, there were 79,974 persons enrolled in the Citizens Defense
Corps, with 27,898 already trained and 38,213 in training.
Agricultural Extension Service: Likewise, war times place much heavier
burdens upon the Agricultural Extension Service. In the final analysis, food pro-
duction will be a decisive factor in the winning of the war. Widespread famine
visited Russia following the other World War. The Germans have penetrated
Russia even further in the present conflict, occupying practically all of the vast
agricultural areas of the Ukraine and the Caucasus. We will not be called upon
to feed adequately our Army and Navy, but to maintain supplies of food for the
imperiled populations of the British Isles, and for Russia and China as well.
Accordingly, the Secretary of Agriculture has set up greatly increased quotas
for food production in cooperation with federal agencies. The obligation for the
production, conservation and distribution of a vastly increased farm output falls
upon the Agricultural Extension Service, through its program of education and
guidance of farm people. This service was created at the beginning of the other
World War and played an indispensable role in it. Apparently it will be needed
even more in the present conflict. The report of the Director of this Service sets
out in clear outline the multiplication of effort which has been precipitated in this
emergency. Meanwhile, the usual benefits to farm people have been provided for
without diminution.
RESEARCH

Concurrently with the assistance which is being carried to the farm home
by the County and Home Agents of the Agricultural Extension Service, the army
of researchers, who are maintained jointly by the government and the State, are
continuing the agricultural research upon which further developments of our
State and, even more, the solution of many problems of production and distribution
precipitated by the war must depend. Later we shall have something to say
regarding the training of technicians for the essential war purposes through the





Engineering Defense Training Program. It should be pointed out that a success-
ful mechanized warfare is dependent upon furnishing trained technicians, but
likewise upon vigorous research along scientific lines. Perhaps at this point, our
enemies have the longest lead which must be overcome for the winning of the war.

BUILDING AND PLANT IMPROVEMENT
During the biennium a number of important building improvements have
taken place, at relatively little expense to the State. Though the last legislature
appropriated funds for the construction of three new buildings at the plant, in
Gainesville, and the rehabilitation of an old one, because of the exigencies of war,
work has actually gone forward only on one of these, the Agricultural Experiment
Station Building. This building was condemned about fifteen years ago. At the
close of the present biennium, rehabilitation had progressed to the point where
nearly half of the building had been completed and it is anticipated that at least
a half or two-thirds will be ready for occupancy by January 1, 1943.
Notable among the buildings undertaken, as state sponsored federal projects,
during the last biennium, but brought to completion in the present biennium, is the
new fire-proof Law Library which, with the rest of the plant of the Law College,
was appropriately dedicated in the fall of 1941 to the memory of Nathan Philemon
Bryan, first Chairman of the Board of Control, United States Senator from
Florida, and United States Judge for the Fifth Judicial Circuit. Though the
Legislature in 1939 appropriated funds for use as a sponsor's contribution on this
project, no part of the appropriation was ever released and the total amount of
$42,657 which was used as a sponsor's contribution, in order to secure a federal
grant of $31,251, was derived from incidental funds and sundry savings from
various departments of the University.
Likewise, the Legislature of 1939 appropriated funds to be used as a sponsor's
contribution for the construction of an addition to the Florida Union Building.
No part of this was released but one floor of the proposed addition has been con-
structed from funds derived from student fees and savings effected. This has
provided badly needed quarters for the University bookstore and has relieved the
congestion in the Cafeteria thereby making it possible to accommodate a much
larger group of students at meal time.
Two additional sections of Buckman Hall have been remodeled, making much
needed dormitory rooms available and reclaiming space that was approaching
uselessness.
Other important additions to the plant in Gainesville are the new Wood Prod-
ucts Laboratory and an Horticultural Greenhouse.
The principal off-campus improvement consist of several buildings erected at
the Range Cattle Station in Hardee County. This branch station was established
in accordance with legislative authority and the buildings provided for by special
appropriations.
The total cost of buildings and plant improvements, as seen from a detailed
list attached, amounted to slightly over $300,000 during the 1940-42 biennium,
'f which approximately $176,764 was derived from State funds, and the balance
of nearly $123,529 from federal funds, gifts, earnings and other sources.
From the outset of the present emergency a policy of economy has been in-
augurated limiting expenditures to the necessities for promoting the war effort,
maintaining the services which could not be abandoned, and preserving the plant.





Therefore, much of the appropriation made by the last Legislature for capitol
improvements has remained unexpended, including funds for three major build-
ing projects, to-wit; (1) the addition of a wing to the Library Building, at a cost
of $150,000, which would relieve the congestion and overflow from the General
Library; (2) the College of Business Administration Building, at a cost of $150,-
000, which would provide for badly needed class rooms and office space; and (3)
the new Dairy Barn for the Experiment Station at a cost of $50,000.00.

GIFTS AND GRANTS

Gifts and grants to the University during the period covered by this report
amounted to approximately $100,000, the largest single contribution coming from
the General Education Board in the amount of $20,000 for the purchase of books
for the General University Library. In addition to this grant, the General Edu-
cation Board also made available three graduate fellowships to members of our
faculty, totalling $4,800.00.
Grants for research in special fields were received totalling $39,360.00 from
the following:

The State Board of Pharmacy for the Bureau of Professional Relations. School of
P harm acy .......................................................................... ...... .............. .... .....................................$10,300.00
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, for continuation of the Sloan Project in Applied Economics.... 18,700.00
Dr. P. Phillips Canning Co. and Florida Citrus Canners Corp .............. .................. .................... 360.00
Florida Limerock Foundation for experimentation with limerock ......................................... 10,000.00

Fellowships and scholarships amounting to $25,562.57 were received as follows:

Florida Federation of Garden Clubs Horticultural Fellowships .................................................... 2,000.00
Rockefeller Foundation, International Health Division Fellowships ......................................... 1,800.00
U. S. Sugar Corporation: Renewals of the Duncan U. Fletcher Scholarship, the Napoleon
B. Broward Fellowship and the James D. Westcott Scholarship .................................... 6,000.00
Renewals of Sears Roebuck Agricultural Scholarships ................................................................ 5,450.00
Burpee Horticultural Fellowship for Latin American Student ................................................ 500.00
Student Body Inter-American Scholarship .................. .......... ..... ................. 800.00
V vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships ............................................ .................................................... 9,512.57

Miscellaneous gifts amounting to $7,981.86 were received including:

A bequest from Mrs. Edith Ramsaur to perpetuate the D. W. Ramsaur Medal for outstand-
ing w ork in P harm acy .................................................................................... ............................... $ 756.96
Contribution from Mr. Louis D. Beaumont "for any needed purposes" .................................... 2,000.00
Donation from Mr. F. R. Parsons for the Doe Collection ............................ ........................... 250.00
Contributions to the W ood Products Laboratory ............................. .................. ................... ....... 2,500.00
Equipm ent for the Engineering College ............................. .................................................................... 1,275.00
Books from M r. Julien Y onge ................................................................................ ............. ................ 500.00
Books from other donors ....-...5..- ..- ...- ...- .........---.....- ..... .. .. .. ...-------- ............--- 500.00

Also, miscellaneous awards, medals and gifts not classified here were received
of an estimated value of $2,000.00.

AID TO STUDENTS

In addition to fellowships and scholarships already mentioned, employment
was provided for a total of 3,264 students during the biennium, with compensation
in the amount of $319,786, and loans were made to 583 students totalling $27,-
200.00.





SCHOLARSHIP

Despite the confusion emanating from the war, there has been no lessening of
studious application on the part of the majority of the student body; in fact, the
war seems to have developed a consciousness of the necessity of doing serious
work and in the shortest possible time. The honor point averages of the student
body as well as the number of students and grades of those qualifying for mem-
bership in honorary societies such as Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and Phi Kappa
Phi, all evidence improvement rather than deterioration in the quality of work
that has been done during the biennium.

RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL LIFE OF STUDENTS
The religious and spiritual life of the student body has been developing in a
gratifying manner. No religious activities can be required at a State institution
but Church attendance is encouraged. The cooperation of the various churches
and the development of student centers, fostered by the several denominations,
have amplified the opportunity of religious development for both faculty and
students. The Catholic, Episcopal, Baptist, Methodist and Presbyterian churches
all have student centers located near the campus and led by student pastors or
chaplains. A majority of the students of the University are affiliated with the
churches and student centers help to deepen their spiritual .life.

HONORARY DEGREES

The University has bestowed Honorary degrees on slightly more than a score
of persons during its history. Four of these were conferred during the present
biennium. In June, 1941, the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters was conferred
upon Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, noted Florida authoress and Pulitzer Prize Win-
ner, and the degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon Raymond Robins,
internationally known social economist, lecturer, author and philanthropist. In
1942, the degree of Doctor of Laws was conferred upon Willis Manville Ball,
dean of Florida journalist and long time editor of the Florida Times-Union;
also upon General Albert Hazen Blanding, distinguished soldier of Florida, mem-
ber of the Board of Control from 1922 to 1936, and in whose honor one of the
nation's largest military training camps has been named.

INAUGURATION OF TEACHER RETIREMENT SYSTEM

Pursuant to an amendment to the Teacher Retirement Act by the 1941 Legis-
lature, retirement benefits became available to the professional staff of the
University of Florida on July 1, 1941. The system is on a contributory basis
one-half of the payments being borne by the State and the other half by the
faculty member. Participation was made optional for persons on the faculty
previous to July 1, 1941, but for those affiliating with the staff after that date,
it is a requirement. At this writing, 218 members of the faculty have asked for
the privileges of the Retirement System, 110 who joined the staff after July 1,
1941, have automatically become members, 21 who had taught previously in
Florida were already members, making a total of 349 of our staff who are now
eligible for the benefits of this system. The inauguration of the Retirement
System is an important step in advance because of the relatively low salaries paid





at the University in comparison to those paid in similar institutions. Retirement
benefits, conditions of tenure and similar items have an important value in at-
tracting and holding desirable members of the faculty.

WAR ACTIVITIES

While continuing many of its peace time functions, the University has made
an all out attempt to adapt its facilities to the promotion of the war effort. We
were among the first to adopt an accelerated program which would enable us to
run our plant continually the year round and make it possible for students to
complete the usual four-year courses in three years or less. This provided an
opportunity for students entering the armed forces to finish their work or at
least to get considerable more of their educational work accomplished than would
have otherwise been possible. Last June 237 freshmen began their University
work who ordinarily would not have entered school until September.
Among our specific war activities, mention might be made of the following:
1. Civilian Protection School. In March, 1942, the University of Florida con-
tracted with the Office of the Chief of the Chemical Warfare Service, War Depart-
ment, for the establishment of a Civilian Defense School here, which would pro-
vide for the training of groups of students in units of fifty men each, for courses
of ten days' duration. This School was one of a number opened in the various
regions. The Florida School served the southeastern states and its chief purpose
was to train teachers and leaders who could, in turn, train others in their home
communities. The University supplied dormitory facilities, mess accommoda-
tions, office space for instructors, class rooms, warehouse space for storage of
supplies and munitions, and an outdoor practice area. The School was officially
opened on June 1, 1942, under the direction of Colonel Thos. H. McHatton.
2. Physical Fitness Program. The national emergency brought into sharp
relief the poor physical condition of our American manhood and, realizing that
physical fitness was one of the major problems confronting us for the winning of
the war, the University inaugurated a compulsory physical fitness program, re-
quiring all able-bodied male students to take part, beginning with the first term
of our 1942 summer session. Such a program, while adopted as a part of the
University's complete cooperation in the war effort, at the same time meets a
fundamental need in a sound educational plan. Students are given careful phy-
sical examination at the Infirmary and periodic check-ups are made from time to
time. The program includes advice on medical and dental care, instruction in the
fields of nutrition, health and hygiene, as well as proper physical exercise. Phy-
sical fitness should improve classroom work as well as increase the health and
vigor of our students.
3. Dissemination of Information Regarding Changing War Rules and Regula-
tions. In order that students and parents might be properly informed regarding
the continuous changes received by the Administration of the University in the
form of directives from Washington, we have issued a number of bulletins from
time to time setting forth pertinent information and pointing out opportunities
for pursuing educational work within the limitations imposed by war-time legisla-
tion. Addresses before the entire student body have been given on two occasions
by the President and on other occasions by the several deans as well as high-
ranking officials of the Army, Navy, Air Service and Marine Corps, to interpret
or explain drastic modifications in the national war program. Among bulletins





sent out are the following: THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA AND THE WAR
EMERGENCY; A STATEMENT OF ADJUSTMENT IN UNIVERSITY POL-
ICY FOR WAR TIME PROCEDURE WITHOUT LOWERING STANDARDS
OF ADMISSION ON GRADUATION: PRELIMINARY PLAN FOR A
HEALTH AND PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA: ARMY, NAVY AND MARINE CORPS RESERVE PROGRAM FOR
COLLEGE STUDENTS: SPECIAL WAR BULLETIN, THE SELECTIVE
SERVICE STATUS OF STUDENTS, and others.
4. Special Lecture Series on War Topics. A series of special lectures on war
problems has been offered University students and members of the University
community during the past year, among which might be mentioned the following:

By MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY STAFF

PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND THE WAR. by Dean W. W. Little. General College.
THE CAUSES OF THE PRESENT WAR, by Dr. John G. Eldridge, Professor of Economics.
THE ORDINARY CITIZEN'S STAKE IN THE WAR, by Dean Walter J. Matherly, College of
Business Administration.
WAR AIMS OF THE UNITED NATIONS VS. WAR AIMS OF THE AXIS, by Dr. James D. Glunt,
Professor of History and Political Science.
ADJUSTMENT TO A WAR ECONOMY, by Dr. C. H. Donovan, Associate Professor of Public
Finance.
HUMAN RESOURCES AND THE WAR, by Dr. John M. Maclachlan, Professor of Sociology.
THE STRATEGY OF THE PRESENT WAR, by Dr. Rembert W. Patrick, Associate Professor of
Social Sciences.
THE APPLICATION OF SCIENCE TO THE WAR, by Dr. Ralph A. Morgan, Professor of
Chemical Engineering.
FOOD: A PRIMARY WEAPON OF OUR DEFENSE, by Dr. Ouida D. Abbott, Head of the De-
partment of Home Economics, Agricultural Experiment Station.
TECHNOLOGY OF MODERN WAR AND SOCIAL CHANGE, by Dr. John M. Maclachlan, Pro-
fessor of Sociology.
HIGHER EDUCATION AND THE WAR, by Associate Dean W. H. Wilson, College of Arts and
Sciences.
WHERE THE LIGHT DWELLETH, by President Jno. J. Tigert (Summer School Commencement
Address relating to educated leadership in post-war adjustments and peace plans).
AFTERMATH OF WAR: SOCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL, by Dr. Harry E. Moore, Professor of
Sociology.
By NON-UNIVERSITY PERSONS

THE CIVILIAN'S PLACE IN THE WAR, by Mr. Charles H. Murchison, Regional Director of
Civilian Defense, Atlanta, Georgia.
AVIATION EDUCATION, by Dr. Ben D. Wood, Civil Aeronautics Administration, Washington, D. C.

5. Engineering, Science, and Management War Training Program. The Uni-
versity of Florida has been designated by the U. S. Office of Education
as its agency in the State of Florida for offering short, intensive, specialized
courses in fields necessary to the war industry to men and women on the college
level. Funds for organizing and teaching these courses and for purchasing neces-
sary equipment are furnished by the Federal Government. Courses have been
offered in Gainesville and in many of the larger centers of industrial and military
activity including Pensacola, Jacksonville, St. Augustine, Daytona Beach, Or-
lando, West Palm Beach, Tampa, and Panama City. The University of Miami
and the University of Tampa have collaborated with the University of Florida
in offering courses in the Miami and Tampa areas respectively. Full-time day
courses are offered for men and women who wish to qualify quickly for specific
types of work while part-time night courses are given to up-grade men and women





who are now employed. Members of the faculty of the University of Florida
prepare the course offerings and do part of the teaching. Other teachers are re-
cruited from various schools and industries in the State. Typical courses include:
Military Drafting and Mapping; Radio Communications for Military Personnel
and Civil Service Employees of the Signal Corps; Aircraft Engineering for Naval
Officers; Mold Loft Procedure and Layoff for Shipyard Employees; Safety En-
gineering Methods as Applied to the Protection of Industrial Plants, etc. Dean
Joseph Weil, of our College of Engineering, has served as the University's In-
stitutional Representative in the handling of this program from the outset. Hav-
ing been recently named a Regional Adviser for the ESMWT national program
by the U. S. Office of Education, he will be succeeded by Professor N. C. Ebaugh
as Institutional Representative. As Head of the Mechanical Engineering Depart-
ment of the College of Engineering, he is ably fitted to carry on the program in
Florida. In 1940-41, approximately 1153 Floridians enrolled for these courses and
funds amounting to $85,114.79 were provided by the Federal Government. In
1941-42, about $125,000.00 was expended for the training of 2,642 students.
6. Civilian Pilot Training Program. Civilian Pilot Training, under the Civil
Aeronautics Administration, has been in progress at the Unversity of Florida for
a number of years. In 1940-41, 150 students received instruction under this pro-
gram and, in 1941-42, 120 were trained. Graduates in the CAA courses have
been used to supply the Army and Navy Air Forces with pilot personnel.
7. ROTC Commissions. The University, as a Land Grant College, continues to
make its largest contribution to the war effort through the training of officer
personnel. In 1940-41, there were 110 ROTC commissions granted University of
Florida graduates and 19 ROTC certificates to men under twenty-one years of
age, who were commissioned immediately upon reaching their majority. In 1941-42,
141 students were granted commissions.
8. Economy and Salvage Campaign. A concerted effort has been made to put
into practice every possible economy during the war period. Memoranda have
been sent to all department heads urging the necessity of conserving electricity,
heat, water, office supplies, laboratory supplies and maintaining properties in
good repair. During the past winter and spring, a very successful drive for metal,
rubber and paper was conducted on the campus in which both faculty and students
fully cooperated. The University's Committee on Conservation and Economy
worked with the faculty group while the students conducted their campaign under
the leadership of a group appointed by the Student Executive Council. Money
derived from the salvage program was invested in war bonds which will be used
to augment the University's scholarship fund.
9. Cooperative Efforts with the State Defense Council. The Administration
of the University has actively cooperated with the State Defense Council in set-
ting up appropriate committees for the handling of important war activities in-
cluding Curricula and Assemblies, Extra Curricular Activities, Physical Fitness,
Emergency and Safety, Public Relations and Publicity, all of which functioned
through a University of Florida Defense Unit. Members of our staff have like-
wise served as chairmen of various important committees of the State Defense
Council at the behest of Governor Spessard L. Holland and Mr. John Kilgore,
Chairman of the Division of Information, Education and Morale. The General
Extension Division has offered civilian defense training in the protection of per-
sonnel and property against war raids in several cities in Florida including Mari-





anna, Jacksonville, Daytona Beach, Miami, Bartow, and Orlando. The President
of the University was invited to serve as Chairman for the State of Florida of the
Committee on Conservation of Cultural Resources and in this connection has re-
ceived the active support of the State Defense Council as well as the Works Prog-
ress Administration and the heads of the several branches of cultural institutions
in the State. The General Extension Division serves as the medium through
which information is distributed to all centers of the State on the care and protec-
tion of cultural resources in the war period.
10. Agricultural Projects. Some noteworthy contributions of the Agricultural
Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension Service in the war effort, in ad-
dition to those already touched upon includes: (a) Experimental growing of
plants for the production of rubber; (b) increasing the yield of important crops,
such as potatoes, corn, oats, Sea Island cotton, etc. by use of improved varieties,
control of pests, and the judicious use of fertilizers; (c) increasing the production
of meats by the control of internal parasites and improved methods of feeding
and breeding of livestock; (d) providing strategic and critical war materials and
experimentation with substitutes to replace shortages; and (e) special instruction
and attention to the planting of Victory gardens, canning of foodstuffs, preserva-
tion of fats and oils, etc. in rural communities.
11. Students and Alumni Serving in the Armed Forces. Thousands of stu-
dents, alumni and former students of the University of Florida have been called
into active service in the various branches of the armed forces such as the Army,
the Navy, the Marine Corps, the Naval Intelligence, the Army Intelligence, the
Federal Bureau of Investigation, the United States Air Corps, and the United
States Civil Service for responsible government assignments. Applications for
commissions require supporting letters of recommendation from the President
of the institution which the applicant attended. This service has necessitated
careful checks through the office of the Registrar and of the Dean of Students
on all student records both from an academic as well as a character standpoint.
Many students and alumni have also been investigated carefully by officers of the
service in which they were seeking commissions, necessitating numerous personal
interviews and long distance telephone calls. Selective Service Boards have been
furnished complete and accurate information regarding students in the University
who have been summoned for service.
Mr. Frank Wright, Alumni Secretary, has set up a splendid method of keep-
ing records of students and alumni serving in the armed forces. Very inadequate
records or information are available concerning Florida men who served in the
last World War and this has been a serious handicap to University officials who
have been asked for specific information relating to war service of alumni, from
time to time, by members of Congress, the Veterans Administration, etc. Fore-
seeing that such information would be invaluable, every attempt has been made
to secure the most up-to-date and accurate information possible regarding active
participation in the war effort of our students and alumni. While the informa-
tion, of course, cannot be wholly complete because of the wide areas over which
Florida men are scattered, it is believed that the records are as nearly complete
as is possible under the circumstances. Approximately 4,000 of our former stu-
dents are now in the service. At least 1,229 of our graduates are commissioned
officers and 66 are non-commissioned officers whereas 578 of our undergraduates
are commissioned officers and 126 are non-commissioned officers. No definite in-
formation has been secured concerning 649 graduates in service and 478 under-





graduates; however, the Alumni Office is in constant correspondence with mem-
bers of families of these men in search of information.
12. University Faculty and Staff. Approximately eighty members of the
faculty and staff of the University have been granted leaves of absence to enter
upon active service in the armed forces, the great majority of whom are com-
missioned officers. A number of them also are serving on important research
projects and in key government positions, their services having been specifically
requested by important officials identified with the national defense. The exit of
such a large percentage of our faculty and staff has added innumerable burdens
to those remaining at the University. In addition to assuming heavier teaching
loads, there is scarcely a member of the staff who is not performing willing and
unstinted service on University as well as local defense committees, councils, or
boards. As pointed out earlier in this report, there has been no appreciable drop
in enrollment, yet many of our best teachers and key men in the administrative
staff have responded to the call of service, making it necessary to continue the
usual functions of the University, plus the many arising from the war, with a
greatly reduced staff and imposing upon those remaining the responsibilities
formerly carried by themselves and their colleagues as well.

ECONOMIES AND REDUCTIONS IN UNIVERSITY BUDGETS
As an aid to the State in meeting its financial obligations, the University
adopted, at the outset of the present conflict, a major policy that no replacement
of personnel would be made for faculty or staff members entering active military
service except where absolutely necessary. It further adopted as a major policy
the limiting of expenditures for purchases to those essential for immediate needs
and keeping in repair and usable condition laboratory facilities already on hand.
Travel of faculty members to scientific meetings or special group meetings, unless
identified with the war effort, was also cut to a minimum.
The State Budget Commission requested the University of Florida, through
the State Board of Control, in June 1942, to cut all of the budgets for the fiscal
year 1942-43 at least ten percent. Because of the aforementioned policy of not
filling vacancies of men on leave, a considerable reserve had already been estab-
lished or was anticipated in the Budget of the University. Due to the need of
vital materials of construction for war purposes and the shortage of labor, it
early became apparent that appropriations for muchly needed building projects at
the University could not be used and that once again provision for additional
classrooms and library space would have to be deferred. Likewise, the Agricul-
tural Extension Service and the Agricultural Experiment Stations, in keeping
with the request of the Budget Commission, reduced their operating budgets and
curtailed to the utmost all extension and experimental work for which need ex-
isted but which might not be considered imperative to the war effort: For many
years the need of adequate engineering research facilities has been keenly felt
in Florida and an attempt was made to meet this growing necessity by the last
session of the Legislature when an annual appropriation of $50,000 was made
for the Engineering Experiment Station. Because of the war crisis, no part of
this appropriation has been sought and once again important research is left to
the future.
It may be interesting to note that the University has, by virtue of the fore-
going economies, been able to report large unexpended sums to the Budget Comn-
14





mission and has refrained from claiming sums appropriated for its use. Some
of these may be mentioned specifically as follows:
Out of a total appropriation of $1,027,250 for salaries, and necessary and
regular expenses in the University proper, a ten percent saving was pledged for
the year 1942-43, or $102,725.00. From a biennial appropriation of $50,000 for
the Radio Station, for general expenses and for the development of a modern
antenna ssytem, only $1,893.25 had been used up to July 1, 1942. Out of building
appropriations totalling $480,000, only $80,000 has been used. The entire appro-
priation of $100,000 for the Engineering Experiment Station is unused. The sav-
ing from these sources for the biennium will amount to approximately $640,000,
or more than a third of the total appropriations.
In the Agricultural Extension Service, a ten percent reduction was affected
in the regular yearly appropriation, and the entire amount of $85,400 of special
continuing appropriations remained unused. A saving of $91,916 was made from
the combined appropriations of $194,200, or 47 percent of the whole.
In the Agricultural Experiment Stations, a saving of 13 percent of $89,454
out of total appropriations in the amount of $671,649 has been made. Also bal-
ances from 1941-42 appropriations for all University purposes, totalling $232,-
216.03, will not be used.
All of these savings have been made by painstaking thought and effort. Needs
of the University resulting from a continuous increase in enrollment for more
than a decade, with no corresponding provision of classroom and laboratory facil-
ities, as well as important agricultural and engineering research in a State whose
development is largely dependent upon an intensified effort in these fields, have
had to yield to the more serious demand of the moment, the winning of the war.
With the cessation of hostilities or the termination of the war these needs will in
no way diminish but will be greatly enlarged. These economies represent im-
mense sacrifices and unfilled obligations to the youth of the State which must be
met.
In concluding this report, I wish again to express appreciation for the co-
operation and support which has been extended by the people of the State and
by all State officials. The Governor, and the Board of Education, as well as the
Board of Control have been peculiarly sensitive to our welfare and the difficult
situation in which we have been placed. The attitude and spirit of the student
body has been beyond anything that might have been expected. For all of these
we are grateful. I am confident that all of us will work through the trying days
that are ahead toward ultimate victory in this cruel war and for the preservation
of our liberties and institutions, of which, I am sure, the people of Florida do not
regard the State University among the least.
Respectfully submitted,
JNO. J. TIGERT,
President, University of Florida





BUILDINGS AND IMPROVEMENTS
COSTS AND SOURCES OF FUNDS 1940-42

I From Fed.
From ] Gover- From I Earnings Total
State nment Gifts I or Other


L aw L library .................... .. ..... .......................... ... ..... ........................................................
Rem odeling Section "D" Buckm an H all .............................................................................
Rem odeling Section "E" Buckm an H all ...........................................................................
Florida Union Building Addition .............................................................................................................---
Underground Heating Lines (Expansion to Law Building and Language Hall ........
Fluorescent Lights for Library ........................................................................................... ....
Miscellaneous Improvements under $1500 such as partitions, roof repairs, etc ........
Misc. Improvements such as installing Linoleum, Tile Floors, Alterations, etc. ........
Engineering Building A nnex ...................- .............. ..................-................- ...................
Horticulture Greenhouse, College of Agriculture .....-- .....--- ..............................
W ood P products L laboratory ...................................... --.... ..... ...-.....-- ............... .......... ...........
Remodeling Experiment Station Building ...........-- ................... ..............................
Agricultural Engineering Vocational Shop ............................. .............................
Shop Building and Residence, Lake Wauberg ....--..-...-....-........ .................................
Temporary Buildings for Civilian Protection School, Chemical Warfare Division ....
Permanent Improvements to Grounds, Walks, Roads, Plantings and Sprinkler
S system ............................... ............................... .......... ...........................
Main Experiment Station
Isolation Barn and Silos .......-......-...... ..- .......... ......................................
Soils Storage and Labora ory ..........------- .......... .......................................................
02 A gronom y Laboratory ..............................................................................
Storage W warehouse ............................. ............ ...... .......................................
Addition to Dairy Products Laboratory ....................................................................
Celery Laboratory, Sanford
Pum p H houses ............. ..-- ....---- ... ----....... .... .... -....... .........................................
Laboratory and Greenhouse .........................................................
Garage and Storehouse ................ ... -.......- ......- ........-.. .... ................. ....................
Citrus Station. Lake Alfred
D eep W ell and Irrigation System ................................................-.......... ....................
Everglades Station, Belle Glade
Water Mains and Fire Hydrants .... ---..-.-.- ...-..-.... .-..-...............--..................
Range Cattle Station, Hardee County
Superintendent's H house ........................ -- .. ... ..................................................
F orem an's H house ................................. ..... ............ ............... .............................................
Sheds, Garage, Feed Rooms, Corrals, Pens, etc ................................................................
Sub-Tropical Station, Homestead
G greenhouse ............................. ......................................................................................................
Sheds for Plants, Machinery, Tanks, etc ............. .......................................................
Vegetable Crops Laboratory, Bradenton
Greenhouse and Laboratory ..................................... .............................. .................... ..
Watermelon Laboratory, Leesburg
Barn and Im plem ent Shed .. .................... ...........................................


T O TA L 1940-42 ..............................................................................

*Building Funds-Other Amounts from Operating Funds.
,Special State Appropriations.


36,127.94


5,577.20
7,000.00
6,600.00
7,753.45
7,377.88
178.58
7,950.54
7,043.29 I
44,881.06*
1,000.00
500.00


5,000.00

2,300.00
750.001|
2,000.00t
2,000.00"|
..................

75.00
..................00


4,000.00

5,000.00

4,00.00+!
3,500.00t1
3,950.001,

3,000.00
1,300.00 I

6,400.00t1
1,000.00
1,000.00 1


$ 3


1,251.00 ............






1,891.52 ] 1,630

3,250


1,973.835


3,000.00
1,000.00


I .


$176,764.94 I $ 35.116.37 $ 8.880.38 $ 79.532.03


1.38

.090


$ 6,529.96
18,987.13
15,418.58
31,096.36
I ......................
S......................
S......................




.......................



42,500.00








----------------------


73,908.90
19,987.13
15,418.58
36,673.56
7,000.00
6,600.00
7,753.45
7,377.88
3,700.48
7,950.54
10,293.29
44,881.06
1,000.00
5,000.00
1,973.85

5,000.00

2,300.00
750.00
2,000.00
2,500.00
2,000.00

75.00
3,000.00
1,000.00

4,000.00

5,000.00

4,000.00
3,500.00
3,950.00


3,000.00
1,300.00

6,400.00

1,000.00


$300.293.72


, ------ .. -- - - -


--------------
-------------





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF STUDENTS
To the President of the University:
SIR:.. During the past biennium the Office of the Dean of Students has had
minor changes in personnel and organization. Assistant Dean of Students, J.
Ed. Price, assumed a major responsibility for employment and placement, with
Miss Eloise Trott as secretary. The attempt is being made to more completely
centralize the employment on the campus and to integrate it with classroom work.
Experience has shown, during the past five years, in dealing with students on
NYA work projects that in many instances the work project can become a teach-
ing device, supplementing classroom teaching. Consequently, since approximately
forty percent of the student body is employed in some kind of part-time jobs, we
believe a more careful supervision and integration of employment is necessary.
The demands on the part of the Armed Forces for college men have been very
great. Every phase of student life has been disrupted and in some instances
demoralized; however, students have rallied to the demands in a remarkable way.
They have carried on as students in the face of the inevitable fact that sooner
or later they would be called into service. The demands of the Armed Forces
have come gradually and for that reason students have taken the fact that they
would be in service eventually as a matter of course. These demands for college
trained and technically skilled men have served in many cases to create a greater
interest in school work and a more serious attitude on the part of students.
The Office of the Dean of Students during the past two and a half years has
served as a clearing house on information for the various branches of the service,
including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the United States Civil Service,
and other allied government agencies in their search for qualified recruits. This
has meant, therefore, that many conferences have been held with representatives
of these agencies in going over the qualifications of applicants. These qualifica-
tions not only include the scholastic record of the student, but the conduct record,
he extra-curricular record, and other information that would enable the agencies
get a complete record of the applicant. It develops, therefore, that in practic-
v every instance where a college student applies for connection with an agency,
college is used as first reference. This has entailed many interviews and the
ing of thousands of letters as well as answering many questionnaires on
nts who have been registered at the University.
addition to the above, the staff of the Office of the Dean of Students has
mnected with practically every branch of defense effort in the community.
retaries have been working with such organizations as the Pilot Club,
nurses aid, the U.S.O., etc. The dean and assistant dean of students are
of the University War Policies Committee, working with sub-committees
ysical Fitness Program; the Committee on Procurement, Employment,
S i inent; the Committee on Extra-Curricular Activities; and the Air Raid
-.axis. In spite of the accelerated war program on the campus, the Office of
the Dean of Students has continued to carry on its usual duties, as follows:
Work with individual students; work with the faculty in dealing with student-
faculty relationships; student government, and other student extra-curricular
organizations; committee on Student Residence; inspection of rooming houses
and publication of approved rooming facilities; social fraternities; student social
affairs; honorary fraternities, societies, and clubs; scholarships and loans;





university employment and self-help; administration of NYA student aid pro-
gram; placement; Freshman Week; conduct and discipline; university regula-
tions; committee responsible for the investigation of all new fraternity build-
ings, additions to present buildings, and leases of fraternity organizations; ex-
pansion and enlargement of the placement service for graduates and former stu-
dents who are seeking employment; publication of the UNIVERSITY NEWS:
and chairmanship of the Board of Trustees responsible for the supervision of the
estate donated to the Cooperative Living Organization by Dr. Joseph R. Fulk as a
memorial to his late wife, Nellie Swanson Fulk.
Respectfully submitted,
R. C. BEATY, Dean of Students



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE UNIVERSITY
To the President of the University:
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report on the activities of the
Office of the Dean of the University for the biennium ending June 30, 1942. With
the creation of this position in September, 1939, the duties of the Dean were con-
strued as assisting the Administration in the improvement of instruction, the
correlation of various activities, articulation of the Library with the educational
program, adjustment of teaching loads and evaluation of results and similar
matters. To follow out these objectives has been my endeavor in the past two and
one-half years.
The problem of improving instruction was met in some degree by the appoint-
ing of a representative committee which laid the groundwork for an objective
rating of instruction. In addition, Professional Service Reports, which cover
their teaching loads and their extra-curricular activities are circulated among
the faculty twice yearly. In 1941, the Southern Association of Colleges and
Secondary Schools instituted a Work Conference on Higher Education. One of
the projects considered in this Conference was the matter of improving instruc-
tion among its members. The University committee is engaged in canvassing
the results of the Conference and suggesting means in our own institution for
implementation A further effort in improvement of instruction took place in
1941, when a detailed survey was made of every building on the campus. Ques-
tionnaires were sent to all persons using the buildings, either as classrooms or
in any other way. A digest was made of their remarks, both constructive or
critical. Several of the worst and most glaring conditions were remedied at
once. As a whole, the situation has not been relieved to any great extent, owing
to the fact that we were unable to get any appropriation for additional buildings
and that the war has brought building operations on the campus to a standstill.
Through the University Committee on Libraries, of which the Dean of the
University is Chairman, a great deal has been accomplished in the articulation of
the Liberty with the educational program. Much of what has been done will be
reported by the University Librarian. One very successful innovation was the
appointment of three sub-committees of the Library Committee, which cover the
fields of the social sciences, the physical sciences and the humanities. These
committees have surveyed the needs of the University in all fields, have assisted
in the allotment of book funds to the various departments and in fields neglected





in the past because of the lack of a specific administrative unit in the University.
The committees have assisted the administration in many other ways. As a re-
sult of their efforts, there is a more genuine understanding and interest in the
Library on the part of the entire staff.
During the biennium, the Dean has been chairman of a number of committees
which have successfully solved or are attacking certain problems. A study was
completed of the coordination of the Department of Psychology in the College
of Arts and Sciences and the Department of Educational Psychology in the Col-
lege of Education. Under the direction of a committee of which the Dean of the
University is chairman, a program of Training for Radio was instituted, where-
by the candidate may obtain his degree from the Colleges of Arts and Sciences,
or Business Administration, or Engineering with emphasis on the courses in each
college which deal with the three general categories of radio broadcasting: pro-
gramming, commercial activities or technical operation. Preliminary work has
been done on the coordination of the Social Sciences, although progress in this
direction has been limited due to war conditions. Much time and effort has gone
into consideration of the various matters concerning tenure and academic freedom.
Mention should be made of an important function of this office which is the
keeping of complete personnel records for the entire faculty and staff, which
have been particularly useful in the various administrative duties which this
office is called upon to perform. These were of vital importance in connection
with the work involved in participation in the Teachers' Retirement System.
A most important activity of the biennium concerns the work of the War
Policy Committee, to which is entrusted the coordination of the University's war
effort. Much time and constructive thought have been given to the various phases
of this difficult problem. The details of the Committee's work will be presented
in the report of the President and those of the Deans of the various colleges.
Respectfully submitted,
H. W. CHANDLER, Dean



REPORT OF THE BUSINESS MANAGER
To the President of the University:
Smi: I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the Business Office and
its subsidiary activities for the biennial period ending June 30, 1942.
The report includes a complete financial statement and balance sheet for all
Colleges and Departments of the University, the Agricultural Experiment Stations
and Agricultural Extension Service, as well as such auxiliary activities as Cafe-
teria-Soda Fountain, Bookstore, Infirmary, Dormitories, Student Activity, and
other Custodian Funds. Detailed reports are printed annually as exchange pub-
lications and copies are available for general distribution.
Budget recommendations for the Business Office and Maintenance Depart-
ments for the Biennium ending June 30, 1945, are submitted to you with only
a few increases in salaries, upkeep and plant maintenance. The amounts are
not large and will be paid from receipts of auxiliary activities, but will not take
care of the increased cost of living, nor additional duties and responsibilities re-
quired of the employees. However, I realize that sacrifices are necessary and
that funds will not be available to meet these conditions.

19





BUSINESS OFFICE

While the enrollment in the regular term is decreasing due to war conditions,
we are cooperating with the Government in making short courses of various kinds
available to the Government for men in the Armed Service. Therefore, the Busi-
ness Office has had no decrease in transactions required in the collection of stu-
dent fees, rentals, purchasing of supplies and equipment, and preparing of vouch-
ers and reports, notwithstanding a decrease in student enrollment, and we con-
tinue to operate on less than 1% of the total amount of funds handled. This is
being accomplished by adjustments in the allocation of work of the staff and by
the addition of better accounting methods which will speed up the actual handling
of office routine and the preparation of numerous reports furnished from this
office.
We continue to be handicapped by lack of covenient office facilities and space
which we hope may be taken care of in the future with an increased building
program.
MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT
Buildings

Notwithstanding Federal building restrictions which have come about in the
past biennial period, many improvements have been made to the physical plant
by alterations to the present buildings in order to provide additional space and
make more liveable and up-to-date the class-rooms for our students and the De-
fense Training Program now in effect. This has placed a heavy burden on the
Department in securing necessary supplies and labor to do the work. For your
information, I list the larger projects which, under the supervision of Mr. W. L.
Schoch, Superintendent of Building and Construction, have been completed during
this biennial period:

A new fire-proof Law Library, a W.P.A. Project .......................................$...75,000.00
(not including equipment purchased by University)
Florida Union Annex in course of construction, paid from Student Funds ................................ 19,000.00
Rehabilitation of Section D of Buckm an H all .......................... .......... ................. ..................... 21,000.00
New Greenhouse for Horticulture Departm ent .................................................................................... 1,000.00
Cement Block building for Engineering Experimental Station staff and office of the
E S. M D T C ............................................................................................................................... 3,500.00
(From Lime Rock C.A.A. and E.S.M.D.T.C. Funds)
Recreational building with home for Mr. Perry, Custodian of this project at Lake Wauberg 5,000.00

The following buildings are in the course of construction but have not been
completed:

W ood Products Laboratory, School of Forestry ................................................................................ 10,000.00
(From State Funds and donors)
Rehabilitation of Experiment Station building, including two temporary buildings con-
structed for storage, laboratory and office space. Spent to date ..................................... 45,000.00

Other outstanding improvements are as listed:

First and seventh floors of Seagle Building for use of A.A.A. and the General Extension
D division, respectively ............................................................................................................................ 4,000.00
Repairs to Agricultural Engineering Shop constructed for class work in T. and I. Voca-
tional Training in W elding courses ........................ ..................... .. ............................. 700.00
Science H all alterations, painting, etc. ......................... ...................... ................. .. ................ 1,200.00
Painting various temporary barns, laboratories of the Agricultural College ............................ 400.00





Stuccoing and painting the first floor of Seagle building ........................................................ 500.00
Sundry buildings for Civil Defense Courses ................................... ... ................ 2,000.00
(paid by the Government)
Enlarging Bake Shop, new improvements in Cafeteria, and cabinets and tables for Soda
Fountain ....................................................................................... ..... ...................... ....................... 800.00
Improvements to the Gymnasium building and additional bathroom facilities in Basketball
Court ..................................................................... .................................................... ....... ...................... 2,000.00
Repairing and improving Language Hall with tile-tex floors, additional lavatory facilities,
and installation of fluorescent lights in all administrative offices ............................................ 2,000.00
New roof on Military stables, farm stables, etc. ........................... .......... ..... ...... ......... 2,000.00
General repairs to various Departments ................................................................ ........................ 5,000.00

The wood-working shop, which was built by N. Y. A. help several years ago,
has been a great help to this Department in turning out furnishing for building
projects at a minimum cost, such as desks, shelves, doors, windows, etc., for
various class-rooms in Buckman building.

ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE DEPARTMENT
AND TELEPHONE EXCHANGE
During the past two years special emphasis has been placed on the improve-
ment of lighting conditions in the various buildings. In many offices, drafting
rooms, and at study tables adequate lighting without any increase in current con-
sumption has been accomplished by installing fluorescent lighting fixtures. Old
fixtures removed from these rooms have been reinstalled in other buildings where
needed.
Due to regular insulation tests on our campus distribution cables we have
located and corrected two defective cable splices before break-down occurred, thus
preventing interruption of electrical services due to cable failures. We have had
no major electrical service interruption due to failure of our distribution system.
In order to prevent any possible physical hazard in use of electrical equipment
and appliances, special attention has been given to installing equipment with
proper ground connections. Special grounded outlets have been installed in most
buildings where required.
From our motor oiling records we find there has been a large increase in
electric motor driven equipment. By regular inspection and oiling of these motors
we have increased the life of this equipment and greatly prevented many motor
failures.
The maintenance of our elevators with exception of Seagle Building has been
handled by this department up to February 1st of this year, at which time all
elevators were included in Otis Elevator Company's Monthly Service Contract.
Early this year we installed a motor driven siren above the Benton Engineer-
ing Building for "Air Raid" and "Black Out" signaling. At present this siren is
operated from our main distribution vault by our electricians, but later when
equipment is installed, the telephone switchboard operator will control this signal.
Provision is also made for operation from Diesel alternator in case of City power
failure.
Listed below are a few of the larger electrical jobs on which we have furnished
supervision and labor during this biennium:
Laboratory Wiring and Fixtures Installed: Agriculture College, Agriculture Farm Shop, Agricul-
ture Greenhouse, Chemistry Attic, Hydraulic Laboratory, Old "F" Club, Leland House, Poultry
Laboratory, Poultry Houses, Slaughter House, New Parasite Laboratory, basement, A.A.A.
Offices, and Preparatory Room of Seagle Building.





Complete Wiring and Installation of Fluorescent Fixtures: Drafting Room of Engineering Build-
ing, Law Library, Library, Language Hall, Peabody Hall (Art Class and Department of Archi-
tecture), Science Hall, Agronomy Laboratory, Museum Cases in Seagle Building.
Rewiring and Installation of Fixtures: Benton Engineering Attic, Benton Engineering Physics
Department Shop, Buckman "D" and "E," Law Building, Peabody Hall, Science Hall, Electric
Scoreboard of Stadium with new circuit, Experiment Station Building, Fumigation Greenhouse.
Underground Service and Wiring: U. S. Biology Laboratory, Soils Sample House, Alarm System
for Artillery Building.
Inter-Office Communication Sets: Language Hall.
Wiring for Motors: Benton Engineering 101, Wood Products Laboratory, (also installed conduit for
primary cable to Wood Products Laboratory in Wood Products Laboratory area), Dairy Products
Laboratory.
24 Sterilamp unit and connected oil burner: Horticulture Refrigeration Laboratory and Greenhouse.

Electrical Consumption

On the attached graph is shown the yearly kilowatt hour consumption and cor-
responding yearly cost, from 1925 through June, 1942. In the first 18 months
of this biennium there was a gradual increase in KWH consumption with a cor-
responding higher yearly cost and lower rate per KWH. By the cooperation of
various departments with Dr. Tigert's request for economy and the reduction in
street lighting, the KWH consumption has dropped in the last 6 months.
Due to the increased cost of fuel oil in the months of May and June this year,
our rate per KWH has increased, as is shown by the figures below:

KWH Amt. Paid Rate per KWH
July- December, 1940 .......................... 832980 9593.16 1.151 January- June, 1941 ............................ 965820 10804.36 1.119f
July-December, 1941 .......................... 919760 10452.54 1.136c
January-June, 1942 ....-.........-........... 874900 10456.55 1.195e

From above we find an average rate per KWH of 1.149. for this biennium.

Telephone Exchange
The Telephone Exchange which operates under the general supervisions of
Mr. E. B. Godwin, Superintendent of Electrical Maintenance, has been handling
from 1500 to 3000 calls per day (except Saturdays and Sundays), and during some
busy days as high as 500 calls per hour have been recorded.
The average monthly cost per phone has increased from $2.43 in 1939 to $2.45
this biennium, but this is still $0.45 less than the 1930 monthly cost per phone.
We can expect an increase next biennium, as N. Y. A. funds are no longer avail-
able for student operators.
Since July 1941, a regular full time assistant operator has been employed
and the service improved somewhat; however, the capacity of our switchboard
has been taxed to the limit, and there are times when a call cannot be answered
because all line cords are in use. Some relief has been obtained by the installa-
tion of inter-office communication sets in various buildings.
Our campus telephone cables are inadequate in certain areas, but this will
be improved some in the next biennium by installation of some additional cables
now on hand.
CENTRAL HEATING PLANT

The Central Heating Plant has operated most efficiently the past year as in-
dicated by the report of Professor N. C. Ebaugh, as follows:





COMPARISON OF FUEL COSTS AT CENTRAL HEATING PLANT
1938-1941


Cold Weather
Intensity,
Degree Days

c Radiation
Served, sq. ft.
ruel Burned,
Hot Water
and Service
Total

Fuel Cost
Saving due to
oil and plant
improvement

Saving for 3
year period


1 2 3 4


Coal
1938-39


818


73,000

860 tons

1630.45
tons

$10,136.06


Coal
Estimate based
on load and
weather
increases
1939-40


1537
88% inc.


93,000
28% inc.
1290 tons
50% inc.

3140 tons

$19,300.00


Coal
Estimate based
on load and
weather
increases
1940-41


1353
67% inc.


94,000
29% inc.
1290 tons
50% inc.

2950 tons

$18,870.00


Oil
Including esti-
mate for summer
of 1940
1939-40


1537
88% inc.


93,000
28% inc.
3,284 bbls.
50% inc.
9,702.86
bbls.
1,338 bbls.
$12,997.93

$6,302.07


5

Including esti-
mate for June,
1941
1940-41


1353
67% inc.

94,000
29% inc.
4,000 bbls.
50% inc.
8,129.46
bbls.
Cost $1.37 bbls.
$11,123.54


$7,753.54


$14,055.61


6

Including
estimate
for June, 1942
1941-42


1078


95,000


42,000
8,122 bbls.

154 bbls.
$12,514.49


$4,835.57


$18,090.57*


*Almost sufficient to pay for the cost of equipment necessary to convert from coal to oil.


1 -1 I


.


.


,





SEWERAGE DISPOSAL PLANT


We regret to report that the Sewerage Disposal Plant which was constructed
some fifteen years ago is overloaded to "approximately twice its capacity as the
campus population has about doubled since it was built" (quoted from Professor
N. C. Ebaugh, Campus Engineer and Head of the Mechanical Engineering De-
partment), and is badly in need of major repairs or replacements, and this should
be provided. The operation of this plant, due to its overloaded condition and the
wearing out of the parts, has been a serious problem. Minor improvements, such
as the installation of a Weir box and Dosing Tank and the construction of a Bar
Screen in order to keep rags, paper, and other solids out of the tank, have been
partially taken care of, as well as replacements of sprinkler heads which have
worn out and come loose. As soon as I can secure from Professor Miles, who is
making plans and estimates as a project in a Sanitary Course, I shall submit same
to you for approval. In the meantime, I am recommending that we set up in
this biennial budget an amount of $40,000.00 for a new Sewerage Disposal Plant
to be placed in a different location.

GROUNDS

Under the supervision of Mr. C. E. Nelson, Superintendent of Grounds, and in
spite of the handicap of labor shortage due to war conditions, the work of campus
upkeep, physical improvement, and beautification has shown substantial result.
One important piece of work was the installing of a 6-inch main water line
from the Engineering building through the Plaza of the Americas as a continua-
tion of the irrigation system and also to provide an auxiliary emergency water
line. Over 1800 feet of 6-inch cast iron pipe was used and over 1000 feet of 4-inch
cast iron pipe for the leads to the buildings, which included Language Hall,
Science Hall, Peabody Hall, Horticulture building, Post Office, and the Auditorium.
The cost of this work was $1,500.00.
The large 30 acre field west of the stables has been improved by removing
all barb wire fences, mowing, leveling, and ridding the area of weeds and rub-
bish. Dirt roads around and west of the stables were resurfaced with lime rock,
at a cost of $650.00.
Another improvement was the making of parking areas south of Language
Hall and near the new Law Library. Over 3,000 colored cement blocks, con-
structed largely from salvaged materials, were laid, costing $750.00. New cement
sidewalks also were made in this area, costing $250.00.
The Stadium road was improved and landscaped by planting dogwood, live
oak, and red bud trees. Over 150 biotas and other plants were used in this proj-
ect. For watering these trees and shrubs new water pipe lines were installed.
Cost approximately $500.00. New barb wire fencing around the Stadium wall
together with digging up old shrubbery and replanting with yuccas cost $750.00.
Large oak trees were planted west of Murphree Hall in the courtyard, and
over 200 oleanders were used to landscape this area. Large sycamore trees were
dug up from the Ninth Street end of the campus and replanted east of Murphree
Hall. The area south and northeast of this building was landscaped. New ce-
ment basket gutters were constructed on the south side of Murphree Hall, and
25 loads of lime rock were hauled from Arredonda for this purpose, costing
$900.00.





In the P. K. Yonge School area a new cement curb was made along the east
side driveway, the lime rock road was repaired, and new grass plantings made.
The running track was improved, a new water system for the playgrounds laid,
and new water drains laid, at a cost of $900.00.
Hundreds of new ties replaced decayed ties on the spur track. Rails were
leveled. Holes were filled in and weeds and rubbish were cut or removed. The
track was repaired. Cost $750.00.
A new tile walk east of the Chemistry building, work of felling trees and
leveling ground around the new Wood Products Laboratory, widening and re-
surfacing road to the Horticultural grounds and Dairy Laboratory, various plant-
ings of azaleas around the dormitories and patios, new cement walks south of
Science Hall, repairing old walks east and laying new gravel walks south of the
Chemistry building, hauling ten loads of lime rock from Arredonda to Lake Wau-
berg for new driveway, sum up to a total approximate cost of $825.00.
This report does not detail general ground upkeep, daily care of stables and
campus, hauling of materials for defense work, hauling of carloads of coal for
the Heating Plant and of sand and gravel for the Maintenance Department, as
well as the planting and staking of as many as 750 seedlings on the campus
grounds.
MILITARY PROPERTY
There are no noticeable changes in the operation of the Military Property
Supply Room, Quartermaster and Ordnance Divisions since the last report. How-
ever, this Department under the immediate care of Mr. A. J. Burnham, Assistant
Military Property Custodian, has demonstrated increased efficiency in the Cus-
todian set-up.
We are having our first experience with a summer R.O.T.C. Military Training
Unit, necessitated by the war effort, and the work of supply seems to be progres-
sing very effectively.
Army commutation of uniforms for Advanced Military students has been dis-
continued for the duration of the war, and uniforms in kind will be issued from
Government stock from our supply room. This has increased the responsibility
and demand upon the energy of the Custodian and his assistants in taking care
of the U. S. Army ordnance.
The War Department has called in 8 of our 75-mm. guns, and all of our 30-30
Army rifles. We now are using the Armory for a Military class-room.

CAFETERIA-SODA FOUNTAIN
Under the supervision of Miss Mary S. Fawcett, our Dietician, this Depart-
ment continues to render excellent service in making the Cafeteria the eating
center of the campus. The rising cost of foodstuffs and related overhead has
made it increasingly difficult to operate without loss-which we were able to
avoid by decreasing service quantities. However, it will be necessary to increase
cost of food service to avoid loss in the future.
An ever increasing number of patrons has offered an additional problem in
view of the limited quarters available. We have had to confine the patronage
principally to the students and to abridge service to faculty and townspeople.
The Cafeteria has a seating capacity of 320, and during 1940-41 we considered
that we had reached the maximum service we could offer. The majority of stu-
dents are served in one hour, meaning that ten people are seated every minute





and that each seat is occupied by slightly more than three people every meal
hour. The average patronage during 1940-41 was 640 customers. During 1941-42
the average has reached 1,000, and this is exclusive of our staff of about 100.
Extra employees have had to be added to meet the expanding service.
Last February the University Soda Fountain was placed under the manage-
ment of the Cafeteria in order to insure better sanitary conditions, proper food
preparation, and a central purchasing and cooking unit, in an effort to get maxi-
mum returns from the equipment in use. This change relieved the Soda Fountain
of maintaining a food preparation unit, and, while restaurant service is offered,
the same food is served as in the Cafeteria.
New equipment and improvements in sanitation and service are: In the Cafe-
teria a complete new steam table unit, a meat and vegetable machine, exhaust
fans and ventilators, and the bake shop enlarged. In the Soda Fountain tile floors
repaired, new dishwashing machine installed, and the space formerly occupied
by the Bookstore has been equipped with procelain tables and chromium chairs,
as an additional small dining room.
All of this makes for better and more efficient service. However, with the
above mentioned maximum attendance it is practically impossible to maintain
efficiency unless our seating capacity can be enlarged.

BOOKSTORE

The separation of the Bookstore from the Soda Fountain and Lunch Room
with change of location to the new Florida Union Annex was a great step. The
new quarters are larger and much more commodious. Whereas, formerly the
space occupied was about 480 square feet, there is now available the approximate
amount of 2400 square feet of floor space, permitting greater display as well as
offices for the operating staff, which is under the supervision of Miss Hellice
Rathbun, Chief Clerk.
The new Bookstore is finished with salt glazed brick walls, durable tile floors,
insulating tile ceiling, and is equipped with modern fluorescent lighting-making
an exceedingly attractive sales-room.
In addition to furnishing text-books and schoolroom supplies, the store also
furnishes the supplies used by the University departments and in addition sends
out to the correspondence students throughout the State, books and supplies neces-
sary to their courses. The Bookstore also handles an attractive line of collegiate
goods, such as pennants, stationery, and seal and ring jewelry
It is the object of the Bookstore to operate on as close a margin of profit as
possible and to take care of new equipment and book obsolescence and also give
the maximum of service and assistance to the students.

DUPLICATING DEPARTMENT

The Duplicating Department has been a great economic asset to the Univer-
sity. This Department is the outcome of an effort initiated some years ago to
centralize the duplicating work of the colleges and departments, and the result
has been a real saving to the institution. During the past year the bookkeeping
system was reorganized-so that its true financial picture is shown monthly.
Managerial duties have been taken over by Mr. G. T. Bond in the place of Mr.
L. C. Hicks, who is away on leave of absence during the war.






In September, 1941, the Department enlarged its service by assuming the
handling of student photographs for the Seminole, the University student annual.
In addition, the Duplicating Department has extended its facilities in aiding the
war effort by doing work for the Civilian Protection School, Engineering, Science
Management, and the course in War training. It also is serving the State and
Federal Agricultural Experiment Station.
Improvements to the physical plant during the last biennium have included
arrangements of the plant space, with additions to the operating machine. The
older equipment generally is not in good condition because of wear and tear.
Especially to be noted is the multilith machine, which badly needs replacement.
The Duplicating Department is entirely self-supporting, receiving its operat-
ing funds as compensation for supplies, printing, photographic and bindery serv-
ices performed for other departments of theUniversity at a saving 15% to 25%


lower than the cost through outside concerns. This work is
full-time employees and six part-time student employees.

REPORT OF NON-EDUCATIONAL FUNDS
JULY 1, 1940 THROUGH JUNE 30, 1942


Distribution of Cash:
AUXILIARY FUNDS
Cafeteria and Soda Fountain .....................
Dormitories-
Thomas, Buckman, Sledd ................. .....
Fletcher ..........................................................
M urphree ......................... ..................
B on ds .. ........................... ....................... .
Room Reservations ..................................
In firm ary ............................. .....................
R radio Station ............... .......... ......... ..
B ookstore ............................. .....-..-..... .........
P. K. Yonge Cafeteria .....................................
T O T A L S ...................... ..... ................
AGENCY FUNDS
Student A activity .......................... ................
University Incidentals ....................................
Station Incidentals .......................-.. ... ...........
ROTC Student Clothing Funds ..................
Louis D. Beaum ont ... ..... ..........................
Laboratory Breakage ...................... ..........
Pharmacy Professional ... ......... .....
Cash Deposit-Student Bank .......................
Scholarships and Loans ................... .........
Day Lily Research ............. .... ..... ..........
D rug R research ...................... ....... ..............
E D T C-Federal Funds ..............................
ESMDTC-Federal Funds ................... ........
Fla. Agri. Exp. Station-Federal Funds ..
Swimming Pool and Locker .........................
Sloan Project in Applied Economics ..
Civil Aeronautics Authority ........................
Wood Products Laboratory ...........................
Fla. Union Annex-Special Building Fund
Engineering Experiment Station ................
A accounts Payable ............................ ...............
Albert A. Murphree Memorial Fund ............
YMCA Furniture Fund .....................
Tung Oil Fellowship .......................................
General Education Bd. P. K. Yonge Lab.
T OTA LS ...................................


I Balances
July 1, 1940


8,040.13

7,659.50

13,100.00
10,723.50
18,194.40
1,206,27
1,295.52 |
893.05 I


carried on by seven


Debits I Credits


304,921.61

83,394.74
51,473.00
79,483.08

30,740.75
54,369.36
59,838.20
212,655.31
14,534.87


296,895.93

100,372.00
51,473.00
79,483.08

29,713.75
62,351.64
58,973.64
212,098.50
15.473.38


.1 61.112.37 1 891,410.92 1 906,834.92


12,314.95 1


*1


1,548.84

773.61

14,218.48
11,380.24

127.90

8,955.64
3.00
833.80
3.05

7,287.27

18,582.67
2,893.47
741.30
223.43


158,961.85
5 76,929.44
156,187.82
24,401.79
2,000.00
10,605.00
10,836.06
456,320.19
84,619.17
311.00

121,512.92
97,686.57
245,782.96
5,838.00
31,697.80
19,190.75 |
550.00
37,808.24
10,247.50
907,943.07
88.05
2.40
1.17
260.87


161,848.88
576,929.44
156,187.82
25,064.18
115.00
8,491.52
10,780.58
443,665.80
85,441.18

10.34
121,512.92
85,501.09
244,856.86
5,808.00
25,970.15
17,805.60
387.25
31,096.36
7,589.15
895,966.74

360.83
224.60
250.87


Balances


Balances
June 30, 1942

16,065.81

9,317.76*

13,100.00
11,750.50
10,212.12
2,070.83
1,852.33
45.46t
45.688.37


9,427.92

886.45
1,885.00
2,887.09
55.48
26,872.87
10,558.23
311.00
117.56

12,185.48
9,881.74
33.00
6,561.45
1,388.20
162.75
13,999.15
2,658.35
30,559.00
2,981.52
382.87


II 79887.65 112.950.772.62 182.905.565.16 IS 1 38705.11


SPECIAL TRUST FUNDS I
Parson Museum Fund .................... .. 1,276.77 I 20.00 1 673.59I 623.18
To' ls ............... ....... ........... .. ...................... $ 1,276.77 1$ 20.00 1$ 673.59 1$ 623.18

TOTAL ALL FUNDS ... ............. $ 142,276.79 i$3,851,203.54 $3,813,373.67 1$ 180,106.66


* Debit.
t Debit.


Respectfully submitted,

K. H. GRAHAM, Business Manager


.


.





FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AND AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
REPORT OF INCOME AND DISBURSEMENTS
1940-1942


STATE APPROPRIATIONS
Main Experiment Station
Salaries .............................................................................--- ................--
Necessary and Regular Expense ....... .........................................
Vegetable Crops Laboratory
Salaries ..................................................................
Necessary and Regular Expense ...... .............. .....................
Strawberry Investigations Laboratory
Salaries .......................... ..................................................... ..................
Necessary and Regular Expense ................................ .....................
Gladioli Investigations Laboratory
Salaries ................... ...................... .................................... ..................
Necessary and Regular Expense .--.....-- .........................
Citrus Disease Investigations
Salaries ....... .................... .. ....... ....------------------------.----- --...---.
S Necessary and Regular Expense.......................... ...................
Potato Disease Investigations
S salaries ........... ........... ........... ............................ ........................... .........
Necessary and Regular Expense ........ .......... ................
Potato Investigations Laboratory
Salaries ...................... ........... ....... ............................... ..
Necessary and Regular Expense -.-..-..-......... .------..........
Pecan Insect Investigations
Salaries ........................................................ ..................
Salaries .................................. ........................... .................... ................
Celery Investigations Laboratory
Salaries .......... ............................... ................. .....................................
Necessary and Regular Expense ..... ............................................
Fumigation Research
Salaries ........ ................... ................ .....---- ............... .....................
Necessary and Regular Expense .................................................
Grape Pest Investigations
Sa laries ............................................ ............... ......................................
Necessary and Regular Expense ................................................
Watermelon and Grape Investigations
Sa laries ....................................................... ......................................
Necessary and Regular Expense ........ .....................................
Citrus Experiment Station
S a laries ............................. ..... ...... ... ... ...... ........ ...................
Necessary and Regular Expense ..-...- .............. ................


Disburse- II Disburse- I Balance
Income ments Reverted | Income I ments ) Forward
1940-1941 1 1940-1941 6-30-41 1 1941-1942 1 1941-1942 1 7-1-42


94,037.26
105,734.02

2,400.00
14,335.90

5,305.60
1,835.40

.....................


3,060.00
443.19

10,252.91
2,409.00

.....................

1,300.00
5,499.64

12,853.55 I
5,966.55

2,400.00
919.06

2,520.00
980.00



66,619.24
20,012.35


89,123.56
85,063.68

2,400.00
14,170.24

5,172.50
1,253.74



510.00
124.45

7,617.70
2,399.69

......................


1,083.33
982.32

6,900.00
4,276.06

2,400.00
661.92

2,520.00
980.00


4,913
20,670

165

133
581



2,550
318

2,635
9



216
4,517

5,953
1,69(0

257


39,697.72 26,921
19,984.58 27


1.70 126,803.00
1.34 120,996.00

....... 11,860.00
.66 13,140.00

1.10 4,800.00
.66 1,500.00

....... I 3,600.00
....... 1,400.00

0.00 ......................
8.74 ......................

.21 ......................
.31 ......................

...... I 7,800.00
....... 4,200.00

.67 | ......................
'.32 ......................

1.55 10,200.00
1.49 4,800.00


'. 14 ...



....... 9,240.00
....... 4,260.00

.52 43,048.00
.77 28,402.00


119,239.18
116,139.49

8,384.40
12,561.96

3,385.00
1,405.95

1,000.00
1,318.35






7,757.37
4,197.48



9,707.13
4,800.00






9,237.92
4,260.00

38,479.43
24.830.28


7,563.82
4,856.51

3,475.60
578.04

1,415.00
94.05

2,600.00
81.65






42.63
2.52



492.87







2.08

4,568.57
3.571.72






I Disburse-
Income ments
1940-1941 1940-1941


Everglades Experiment Station
Salaries ........ ................................. .......... . ...... ......... .....
N necessary and Regular Expense ........................ ................ ...........
Everglades Continuing Fund-Chapter 8442 .......... ...... ..........
Everglades Experiment Station Building and Laboratory ............
North Florida Experiment Station
Salaries ...................................................................
Necessary and Regular Expense .... ...... ............
Sub-Tropical Experiment Station
Salaries .......... ---.................................. ..........
Necessary and Regular Expense ................ ................
Watermelon Investigations
Salaries ........ ............. .... .. ... ........ .. ..............
Necessary and Regular Expense .. .................... ........... .......
Dairy Investigations
Salaries .......................................................
Necessary and Regular Expense ........................... ..................
to Poultry and Turkey Investigations
CO Salaries ................................................... .. ... ........... ..................
Necessary and Regular Expense .................... ..... ...................
Weather Reports
Salaries ..... .. .......................................
Necessary and Regular Expense ................................................
Weather Forecasting Service
Salaries ............................................... .............. .................
Necessary and Regular Expense ............................. ................... .
Cotton and Peanut Investigations
Salaries ................................ ............ ..... ...... .. ...... ...................
Necessary and Regular Expense .......................................................
Rem odeling Beef Cattle Barn ..................................................................
Special Pasture Research and Demonstration-Salaries ....................
Permanent Equipment for Soil Conservation Districts .................
Research and Demonstration Work on Bright or Flue-Cured
Tobacco ...................................................................................................
Branch Experiment Station in Hardee County (Range Cattle)
Ornamental Horticulture
Salaries ............................. ............... ....................... .........
Necessary and Regular Expense ... ....... .... ..... .................
Range Cattle Station
Salaries ............................. ............ .. .. . ............ .....................
Necessary and Regular Expense .... ..............


I I
21,059.50
33,045.871
5,000.00
. . .....


I


19,598.62
29,401.28
5,000.00

11,066.37
14,957.41

12,783.66
8,742.55

4,200.00
2,874.70

8,255.62
8,438.00

6,627.25
4,387.42

960.00
17,073.25



1,881.03
1,420.85

6,354.70

5,970.34
14,994.18


1 1 Disburse-
Reverted i Income I ments
6-30-41 | 1941-1942 1941-1942


1,460.88 33,928.00 33,870.52
3,644.59 20,072.00 20,070.00
.................... 5,000.00 5,000.00
..................... 25,000.00 ......................

203.99 17,868.00 17,825.77
2,012.68 15,232.00 15,232.00

650.34 18,132.00 18,063.82
220.55 2,868.00 2,868.00

4,800.00 ....... ........
1,125.40

502 .19 ......... ...... .... .... ................


11,270.36
16,970.09

13,434.00
8,963.10

9,000.00
4,000.10

8,757.81
8,438.00

7,214.29
6.790.50

960.00
17,825.32



8,126,40
1,566.11
12,000.00
40,000.00
20,000.00

15,165.16
24,977.40

. .


752.07



6,245.37
145.26
12,000.00
33,645.30
20,000.00

9,194.82
9,983.22


1,200.00
18,800.00


6,000.00
4,000.00

5,400.00
7,100.00


1,200.00
12,867.95


Balance
Forward
7-1-42


57.48
2.00

25,000.00

42.23


68.18


5,932.05


. ........... .. 6,000.00
.... ........... | 4,000.00

4,691.67 | 708.33
7,096.21 1 3.79


587.04
2,403.08






I Disburse- I I | Disburse- |
I Income I ments 1 Reverted Income I ments I
1940-1941 1 1940-1941 | 6-30-41 1941-1942 1 1941-1942 |


State Soil Conservation .. ................... .............. ..............
Em ergency Appropriation .............................. ......- ..........
Special Vegetable Crops Laboratory ................. .........
Special Ve-etable Crops Laboratory
Plant Pathology and Entomology ....................
North Florida M obile Units ........... ... .......................
Bright Leaf Tobacco Investigations-Blue Mold .............
Laboratory at H astings ...........-- ... .... ..................
Total Experiment Station State Appropriation .............

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
Off-set for Federal Funds
S a la ries ............................. .............. ....... .. ....... ......----
Necessary and Regular Expense ....................
Special Funds
4-H Club Cam ps .... ... .......................
Salaries and Expenses of Extension
Co Agents- Chapter 19216 ....................................
0 Total Agricultural Extension Service Appropriation
Total State Appropriations ....................

FEDERAL FUNDS


Experiment Station
H atch ..................... ......--- --- ...
A dam s .... ........ .. .. ...... ..- .... ..
P u rn ell ......... ..... ..... ..... ... .. . ...... ....
Bankhead-Jones Fund ................ .. ...............
Total Experiment Station Federal Funds ...........
Agricultural Extension
Smith-Lever
Capper-K etcham ...... .... .... ... ......... ................... --
Further D evelopm ent .............................. ...... ..............
Bankhead-Jones ....--..--- .......- ......... ...... .......
Total Agricultural Extension Funds .....................
Total Federal Funds ...................
Incidental Incom e ........... ........ ..... ....
Experiment Station
Grand Total Funds ... ........


S... ..... .. ... .
.............. .... 6,196.98
.... ...... .... 2,740.00 |
............... $ 662,384.66 |$


4.170.71 I 2,026.27 | .
2,019.14 I 720.86
478,498.57 [$ 183,886.09 1$


6,,681.68 56,083.76
.... .. 1,494.76 39,556 29
... 4,003.37 1,846.24

............ 160.800.00 ......................
......... $ 281,979.81 1$ 97,486.29 1$
........... $ 944,364.47 1$ 575,984.86 1$


9,597.92
11,938.47
2,157.13

160,800.00 |


10,000.00 I 6,234.89
6,500.00 3,889.15
10,000.00 I 6,455.04
10,000.00 I 6,338.44
10,000.00 6,902.37

623,149.00.... $ ..... 35,309.79 $
623,149.00 $535,309.79 $


Balance
Forward
7-1-42

3,765.11
2,610.85
3,544.96

3,661.56
3,097.63


87.83U.21


60,980.00 59,990.80 989.20
47,820.00 ] 36,894.12 10,925.88
. . . . . . . . . . . ... . . .


184,493.52 1|$ 108,800.00 1$ 96,884.92 1$ 11,915.08
368,379.61 1$ 731,949 00 1$ 632,194.71 $ 99,754.29

1


15,000.00 15,000.00 .... 15,000.00 15,000.00
15,000.00 15,000.00 15,000.00 15,000.00 .
60,000.00 1 60,000.00 60,000.00 69,000.00 i
. 30,801.64 | 30,801.64 .... . 34,782.16 34,782.16 . ........
120,801.64 1$ 120,801.64 ... !$ 124,782.16 1$ 124,782.16 .

63,968.10 I 63,968.10 ...... 70,994.31 | 70,505.09 | 489.22
j 26,555 74 26,555.74 ... 27,417.72 26,872.10 545.62
8,462.00 I 8,462.00 .. ..... .. ..... ...... .. .. .. .................
120,447.93 I 120,447.93 | ........... 131,035.64 128,717.59 2,318.05
$ 219,433.77 1$ 219,433.77 | ..................... $ 229,447.67 1$ 226,094.78 1$ 3,352.87
$ 340,235.41 3$ 340,235.41 | ............. $ 354,229.83 |$ 350,876.94 1$ 3,352.89
I | I I
100,896.17 1 40,510.19 I .. ......... 148,334.05 I 53,623.02 I 94,711.03
81.385,496.05 $ 956,730.45 1$ 368,379.61 "$1,234,512.88 1$1,036,694.67 [$ 197.818.21


,





UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
REPORT OF INCOME AND DISBURSEMENTS
1940-1942

I I Disburse- I Disburse- | Balance
I Income ments | Reverted Income ments I Forward
| 1940-1941 1940-1941 | 6-30-41 1941-1942 1941-1942 | 7-1-42


STATE APPROPRIATIONS
University of Florida
S a la ries .................. ...............................................
Necessary and Regular Expense .....................
Extra Boiler for Dorm itories ..................................
Chair of Americanism and Southern History ..............
Department of Forestry-Chapter 17028 ..... ........
School of Forestry-Chapter 18403 ..................
Radio Station, W RUF- Salaries .............................
Radio Station, WRUF-Necessary and Regular .....
Radio Station, WRUF--Equipment .....................
J. F. Seagle Building, Section 2-Chapter 18404 ...
Agriculture College Fund-Chapter 5384 and 19137
Total State Appropriations .. .............
M FrrDERAL 1oUlNDb
" Morrill-Nelson Fund
Bankhead-jones Fund ........ . ................... ..........
Total Federal Funds ........ ... ..... ................................


Jt.nDOWMENT i'1COME
American Legion Interest ............
Seminarv Tntteret


........................ $ 786,792.34 1$ 738,972.46 1$ 47,819.88 [$ 783,090.00 1$ 749,122.66 1$ 33,967.34
........................ 267,757.76 248,806.11 18,951.65 209,160.00 208,181.99 978.01
........................ 12,500.00 ...................... 12,500.00 ............... .... ................... ....................
........................ 2,544.66 2,314.45 230.21 I 2,500.00 | 2,484.64 15.36
........................ 7,500.00 7,214.66 .... ......... 7,784.93 | 6,642.83 1,142.10
........................ 28,106.70 23,866.97 ......... ...... 29,239.52 29,485.16 245.64*
.. ............................... .... ................... ............. 5,000.00 800.00 4,200.00
.. ...................... ..................... .................... ....... .. 5,000.00 555.43 4,444.57
. ...................... ..................................... .. ..... ...... .......... 15,000.00 537.82 14,462.18
.... .... 17,763.22 ........ .. ............ ..... 17,763.22 4,560.52 13,202.70
... .................... 7,750.00 7,750.00 1 ......... .. 7,750.00 7,750.00 ......................
... .................... 1.13 ,714.68 11,028,924.656 $ 79,501.74 |1,082,287.67 I$1,010,121.05 1$ 72,166.62


.... 25,000.00 | 25,000.00
......... ........... 18,977.57 18,977.57
.......... ............... 43,977.b7 |$ 43,977.57


................................. 2,200.00
9 759 38


2,200.00 |
-11 10


I 25,000.00 | 25,000.00
. 20,827.55 20,827.55
. $ 45,827.55 1$ 45,827.55 |

. 2,200.00 2,200.00 |
6 1A9 87 14A9 B7


Total E ndow m ent Incom e ............. ....... ......................................... 4,952.38 $ 2,711.10 | ...................... $ 8,342.87 $ 8,342.87 | ......................
llNCIDE'NTAL INCOME I I I I
U university ......... ... ....... ... ........................ ............ .. ...... .... 275,507.45 197,385.98 ...................... 312,670.13 250,861.93 | 61,808.20
General Extension Division ................... .. ....................................... 46,129.32 39,129.04 | ... .............. 46,993.24 | 35,591.61 11,401.63
Total Incidental Income ................................... .. ...... .... 321.636.77 236,515.02 ...................... $ 359,663.37 $ 286,453.54 1$ 73,209.83
OTHER INCOME I I
Alachua County Appropriations for P. K. Yonge School ......... 10,200.00 10,200.00 ............... 10,700.00 | 10,700.00 ..
BUILDING 1~U.NDS I
Permanent Building Funds- Chapter 14573 .......................... ...... 5,765.50 I 4,114.75 ........ ...... 3,158.05 ..................... 3,158.05
Rehabilitation Agricultural Experiment Station Building .............. ................ .............. 80,000.00 I 44,881.06 35,118.94
Total Building Funds ............ ............... ................................. ........ ... 5 ,765.50 1$ 4,114.75 | ......... ....... $ 83,158.05 | 44,881.06 [$ 38,276.99

Grand Total University .. .................................. .......................... $1,517,246.90 |$1,326,443.09 |$ 79,501.74 1|$1,589,979.51 $1,406,326.07 $ 183,653.44

Debit.





REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR

To the President of the University:
SIR: As registrar of the University of Florida I have the honor to submit
the following report for the regular sessions of 1940-41 and 1941-42 and the sum-
mer sessions of 1941 and 1942. In compiling this report I have included only the
most pertinent information for the periods mentioned and a summary of enroll-
ment and graduation figures for the entire period of the University's operation in
Gainesville.

ENROLLMENT


TABLE 1.


ENROLLMENT DURING THE BIENNIUM


A. Enrollment by Schools and Colleges for the
1941-42.

College of Agriculture ............................---
School of Architecture and Allied Arts ...
College of Arts and Sciences ................
College of Business Administration ........
College of Education ............ .- .......-.-
College of Engineering ............-...- ... ..
School of Forestry ...........-...-.. ..... -.-.-.-.
General College ................ .... .- ........
Graduate School ............... .- ....-- .....-
College of Law .......... ...... --.---. .... -...
School of Pharm acy -.......... ...-.... ....-.. .. .


Less Duplicates ...... --........- ... .- ...--. ..-

NET TOTAL ENROLLMENT ................


Regular Sessions, 1940-41 and


1940-41
....-.- ... ..-...-.. 17 7
................... 45
.. ........-..-...- 295
..... ............. 240
... ......-..-..-.. 93
................... 149
-.- ..- ... .... .- 2 8
. ...- ........-... 2152
.............. 175
.- ..-- ...-.-..... 171
...-.-. ...- ..- .... 3 9

3564
.-....-..- ...- ... 126

. .......-..-..... 3438


1941-42
149
35
255
231
80
169
27
2122
127
o10
35

3330
91

3239


B. Enrollment by Schools and Colleges for the Summer Sessions, 1941 and 1942.


SUMMER SESSIONS AT



College of Agriculture ...................... ............
School of Architecture and Allied Arts .........
College of Arts and Sciences .....................
College of Business Administration ............
College of Education ................. .----- -----
College of Engineering ...............................
School of Forestry ...... .......... .......... .....
General College ........ .................. --. .. ..
Graduate School . .................. ..................
College of Law ..... -- .... ......... .
School of Pharm acy ...--............... ........ ..


L ess D uplicates ........................................... ..... ............
Number of Individuals Enrolled at Gainesville.


GAINESVILLE
1941
1st 2nd
Term Term
33 18
6 6
154 103
83 83
660 354
23 13
3 3
467 372
...... 312 162
54 ---
. .... 7 1


1802 1115 2917
808
2109


1942
1st 2nd
Term Term Tota:
56 46 102
20 13 33
180 126 306
104 85 189
324 170 494
94 86 180
1 1 2
821 734 1555
142 98 240
38 34 72
16 13 29

1796 1406 3202
1247
1955








2. TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL AT DAYTONA BEACH


Undergraduates ...............
Graduates .............--.--


Less Duplicates


1941
1st 2nd 3rd
Term Term Term
........ ..... 140 154 107
.............. 28 27 11

168 181 118


Number of Individuals Enrolled at
Daytona Beach...--............. ...... ........
RECAPITULATION
Individuals Registered at Gainesville .................
Individuals Registered at Daytona Beach .......


Less Duplicates ...... ...

NET TOTAL INDIVIDUALS REGISTERED .


TABLE II. ENROLLMENT IN THE UNI


Regular
Session
1905-06
1906-07
1907-08
1908-09
1909-10
1910-11
1911-12
1912-13
1913-14
1914-15
1915-16
1916-17
1917-18
1918-19
1919-20
1920-21
1921-22
1922-23
1923-24
1924-25
1925-26
1926-27
1927-28
1928-29
1929-30
1930-31
1931-32
1932-33
1933-34
1934-35
1935-36
1936-37
1937-38
1938-39
1939-40
1940-41
1941-42


Number
Enrolled
135
102
103
103
186
241
302
321
361
395
447
460
421
554
664
823
1,002
1,183
1,347
1,488
1,860
1,968
2,073
2,270
2,257
2,388
2,558
2,628
2,371
2,848
2,983
3,069
3,278
3,438
3,456
3,438
3,239


VERSITY OF FLORIDA
Summer *Number
Term Enrolled
I -- -... ..


1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942


140
269
402
539
434
434
612
743
783
895
1,028
944
987
908
1,269
1,686
1,613
1,480
1,530
1,746
1,086
1,310
1,602
1,706
2,136
2,631
2,591
2,805
2,622
2,463


294
1941 1942
.............. 2109 1955
............ 338 294

2447 2249
2 3

2445 2246
FROM 1905 TO 1942


Total
135
102
1,03
103
186
241
302
461
630
797
986
894
855
1,166
1,407
1,606
1,897
2,211
2,291
2,475
2,768
3,237
3,759
3,883
3,737
3,918
4,304
3,714
3,681
4,450
4,689
5,205
5,909
6,029
6,261
6,060
5,702


These figures include the enrollment in the demonstration school, except for the Summer
Sessions of 1933, 1934. 1935, 1936, 1937. 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, and 1942.


1st
Term
126
16

142


1942
2nd 3rd
Term Term
115 89
12 6

127 95





TABLE III. DIPLOMAS, CERTIFICATES AND DEGREES CONFERRED SINCE 1905
tDiplomas & Bacca- Profes- Honorary
Certificates laureate sional Masters' Doctors' Degrees
*1905-1938 1,730 5,054 53 467 23 21
1938-39 446 408 .... 22 2 2
SS 1939 122 166 .... 47
1939-40 457 437 .... 22 1
SS 1940 83 170 ... 41 3
1940-41 452 488 2 33 4 2
SS1941 71 187 41 1
1941-42 381 386 1 22 4 2
SS1942 116 140 .... 17 2
For distribution by years see The Biennial Report for the biennium ending June 30, 1938.
? In the column headed "Diplomas and Certificates" is grouped the number of all awards made
upon the completion of curricula of less than four years duration.
Respectfully submitted,
July 1, 1942 R. S. JOHNSON, Registrar



REPORT OF THE
ACTING ASSISTANT UNIVERSITY EXAMINER

To the President of the University:
SIR: As Acting Assistant Examiner, and in the absence of the Examiner, I
wish to submit the following report covering the activities of the Board of Uni-
versity Examiners for the biennium beginning July 1, 1940, and ending June 30,
1942.
The Board of University Examiners regularly handles admissions to the
University and the General College testing program. The work of the Board
will be discussed under placement tests, progress tests, comprehensive examina-
tions, and other related activities.

PLACEMENT TESTS

In cooperation with the General College, the Board of Examiners has con-
ducted a placement test program for all high school seniors of Florida, both boys
and girls. It has been possible to return meaningful results of these tests to
school officials throughout the State before the closing date of their respective
schools, and thus render a decided service through them to their students. On
the basis of these measures, good students can be encouraged to attend the Uni-
versity and poor students led to try other things in which they have a greater
chance of success.
In 1941, 9,873 high school seniors and in 1942, 10,066 high school seniors took
placement tests. The results of this program are combined in one volume for
each year and sent to the colleges and universities of the state.
The tests used in the placement program were the Henmon-Nelson Test of
Mental Ability; the Cooperative English Test, Effectiveness of Expression; and
three parts of the Cooperative General Achievement Test covering Social Studies,
Natural Sciences, and Mathematics. In case a language was studied, a supple-
mentary test in French, Spanish, or Latin was offered.
Admissions are handled directly through the Registrar's Office.

34





PROGRESS TESTS

In order to provide students, their parents, and instructors with a gauge of
success in their various courses, progress tests are offered by the Board of Ex-
aminers from time to time during each General College course. It has been found
that the scores made on a series of progress tests in a given course are the best
single predictive measure yet devised of what a student will do on the compre-
hensive examination.
These tests are made up of items submitted by the staff teaching the course
and are given to all sections simultaneously. In this way an unstandardized
measure is given meaning, as it provides a comparison with more students than
are taught by a single instructor.
In order that these tests may be most effective as a teaching device, every
effort is made to return them while the student is still interested in the results
and can attempt to catch up on his low points. For this reason almost all of
these tests are back in the hands of students and instructors at the class meeting
following the test period. In the meantime the tests have been scored and the
results recorded, the items analyzed as to validity and difficulty for future use
of the staff, and all this reported to the staff.
In 1940-41, one hundred progress tests were given to 35,987 examinees, and in
1941-42, one hundred and twenty progress tests were given to 38,737 examinees.
This work involved the production of 89,111 test booklets, and the scoring of 7,-
742,867 test items or about 100,000 individual answer sheets. In addition, most
of these tests (i. e., all the regular session and some of the summer tests) were
analyzed and the results returned to the staffs and used in making later tests
and for statistical analysis of testing procedures. A definite improvement in
testing procedure and methods of building tests has been possible as a result of
this analyzing, and it is likely that the tests now being used are in many respects
superior to what could have been done without these findings.
The value of the progress test is dual: It is designed primarily to provide a
measure of success in course work of an individual, and it is implicitly a power-
ful teaching device.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS
All General College courses culminate in a comprehensive examination which
is administered by the Board of Examiners to all students alike and serves as a
basis for determining all final grades.
Comprehensive examinations are offered in May and August in year courses
and in January, May, July, and August in half-year courses. Twenty-nine ex-
aminations were given by the Board of Examiners in 1940-41 to 6,835 persons,
and 33 comprehensive examinations were given in 1941-42 to 6,369 persons. For
the first time the Board undertook to prepare all booklets for the comprehensive
period.
Since the Board of Examiners came into existence in 1935 it has issued ap-
proximately 48,204 final grades in comprehensive courses, produced 136,607 com-
prehensive examination booklets, and administered comprehensive examinations
to around 100,000 examinees.
Like the progress tests, all comprehensive examinations are studied item by
item and the items classified and filed for future use in making tests.





Comprehensive examination scores show a high correlation with other meas-
ures of a student's success, and it is thought that they give the best single
measure yet devised of a student's mastery of the material covered. As a result
of the use of comprehensive examination scores in grading, it is possible to re-
move the personal estimate element from the grading problem and relieve the
staffs of the responsibility of assigning grades. In assigning letter grades on
comprehensive examination scores, the staff is invited to come in and give its
suggestions. No person's rank order in the group is ever altered, and grades
are assigned according to the results of the comprehensive examination.
This total program of examining relieves the teaching staff of a large amount
of clerical work and makes it possible to offer General College courses to larger
classes than might otherwise be done so effectively with present facilities.

OTHER ACTIVITIES

Many studies and investigations become desirable, and some are attempted
with occasional changes of method or technique when such changes seem war-
ranted by the findings. Among those problems studied during the past biennium
are optimum length and difficulty for progress tests, ability of different raters
using the same procedures and papers to rate these papers the same, differences
in small group distributions when all scores are based on comparison within a
larger group, and methods of eliminating errors in clerical work of scoring and
recording. Some of these studies have led to saving of time and effort, and
several of them have been published in nationally known magazines.
In addition to the regular load of University testing, the Examiner's office
acted as Florida agent for the National Teacher Examinations and also conducted
an evaluative program for graduate students in Education, in cooperation with
the College of Education. The office facilities of the Board were loaned to the
Sloan Foundation for work on the rural housing study reported in the April, 1942
issue of Educational and Psychological Measurement.
Future Plan. It is hoped that the work of the Board of Examiners may be so
continued as to render the maximum service to faculty and students, and more
immediately to assist the University in its war program to the fullest extent.
The Board plans to continue the testing programs as in previous years.
As a result of the highly technical nature of its work, the office of the Board
of Examiners must employ and train a small crew of student workers to carry on
the routine. This offers training to the small number employed of an unparalleled
nature in the field of test building and administration, and nearly all the students
so employed become operators of office machines and equipment as used by the
Board in scoring and recording. These people are given training and in return
render the University a service of no small value at low cost.
Respectfully submitted,
ROBERT GEIGER, Acting
Assistant Examiner





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
To the President of the University:
SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report for the biennium ending
June 30, 1942.
During the biennium 138 candidates earned the master's degree and 12 the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Since graduate study was established in 1910,
the University has graduated 695 masters and 38 doctors. Thus about one-fifth
of all masters' degrees and nearly one-third of all doctorates were conferred in
this biennium.
The School has a two-fold purpose: to train selected students in the more
advanced areas of knowledge and to promote the advancement of knowledge. In
these critical days it is essential to continue to train some qualified students be-
yond the undergraduate level. The presence of a group of advanced students
with able minds has a stimulating effect upon the entire University program.
So significant is this truth that a university can usually be judged by the quality
of its graduate work.
Prior to the outbreak of war our enrollment had a steady and fairly rapid
increase. The war has brought about a decline in the number of graduate stu-
dents, since the men are affected by the Selective Service Act, and since fewer
women are attending summer school, perhaps due to the call of occupations other
than teaching. Furthermore, the pressing demands for technically trained men
has called away students into industry and defense work.
Care is exercised to make requirements for the various degrees conform to the
best standards. In certain departments some universities have abandoned the
requirement of a master's thesis. On the contrary, we believe the thesis to be an
important part of the work. Writing a thesis offers a chance for the student to
show how well he can collect and organize material and whether he possesses the
qualities of persistence, originality, and insight.
One of our acute problems results from the fact that departments with staffs
best prepared for superior instruction and research are at the same time carrying
a heavy teaching load on the undergraduate level. It should be recognized that
an advanced course, dealing with material close to the frontier of knowledge in
the field, makes much heavier demands upon a professor's time and energy than
a course on material that is familiar and well known. The student-clock-hour
method of measuring teaching loads does not take this into account.
Registration in graduate work at the School of Trade and Industrial Educa-
tion at Daytona Beach totalled 105 for the three summer terms of 1940 and 66
for the three summer terms of 1941.
During the week of June 22-27, 1942, a short course for doctors of medicine
was held in Jacksonville under the joint auspices of the Florida Medical Associa-
tion, the Florida State Board of Health, and the Graduate School of the Univer-
sity. Approximately 200 were registered.
Respectfully submitted,
T. M. SIMPSON,
Dean Graduate School





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
To the President of the University:
SIR: I respectfully submit the following report on activities of the College
of Arts and Sciences for the biennium ending June 30, 1942.

CURRICULAR REVISIONS
During the last two years particular attention has been given to the improve-
ment of the courses of instruction and to the development of a better educational
program. Departments have studied their individual problems, various commit-
tees have made investigations and reports, and the faculty has adopted curricular
revisions and enlargements which have enhanced the work of the College.
The most noteworthy additions are the following: First, the Division of Geo-
graphy and Geology, which has been organized to provide instruction and re-
search in geography and geology, to serve students desiring these subjects as part
of their general education, to furnish some of the training for students preparing
for certain business careers, and for the United States Foreign Service, and to
prepare students for teaching positions and research work in these sciences;
Second, the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry,
which affords an especially strong foundation in chemistry for students who desire
to make chemistry their profession. Students receiving that degree are eligible
for full membership in the American Chemical Society after they have had two
years of postgraduate study or experience in the field of chemistry or chemical
engineering.
Besides these two outstanding additions, modern and improved courses have
been developed by the various departments, some of them especially designed to
meet the needs of war-time conditions.

FACULTY PERSONNEL AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS
In addition to the carrying out of their assigned teaching and administrative e
duties, members of the faculty of the College have to their credit various intel-
lectual accomplishments during the present biennium. Indeed, so numerous and
diverse have been the contributions of the faculty that too much space would be
required to recount in detail the activities of individual members; therefore a
summary will be presented. They have been active in research, the publication
of books, learned articles and reviews, editorship of learned journals, delivering of
numerous addresses before civic and other bodies, heading of short courses, acting
as consultants and advisers, attendance at the meetings of scientific societies and
professional groups, the presentation of papers, the holding of offices in national,
regional and state organizations, serving on important state- and nation-wide
committees, and in many other educational pursuits. Their constructive partici-
pation has resulted in an enrichment not of the organizations and themselves
alone but of the College as well, and likewise the students in their classes.
Especially has there been a marked improvement in the amount and quality
of the research work produced. For instance, the staff of the Department of
Biology and Geology alone has published thirty-six separate papers in various
recognized biological journals since the last biennial report.





During the biennium a gratifying number of the members of the faculty have
been promoted in rank in evidence of their meritorious service. Some have been
granted leaves of absence for graduate study, a part of whom have obtained
higher degrees. A number have entered the armed forces of the country. In
most cases we have been able to care for the work of the absent ones by a division
of their work among others, that is, without employing substitutes.
Members of the faculty are rendering various and valuable services as civilians
toward winning the war. Since the inauguration of the Selective Service one
member of our faculty has been serving on Selective Service Board No. 2 of
Alachua County, and another as Government Appeal Agent with the same Board.
Many members of our teaching staff are rendering highly specialized and technical
services while others are rendering valuable patriotic services in many other ways.
Indeed, to recount in detail all the contributions to the war effort made by the
different members of the faculty would require many pages.
Professor Wm. J. K. Harkness of the University of Toronto was an exchange
from that University and Professor J. S. Rogers, Head Profesor of our Depart-
ment of Biology and Geology, occupied Professor Harkness's position in Toronto
in 1940-41. The Dean of the College received the honorary degree of Doctor of
Science from Stetson University in 1941 and was awarded the Herty Medal for
work in chemistry in 1942.
During the biennium, Professor L. M. Bristol and Professor H. 0. Enwall have
been placed on special status. Professor J. M. Farr and Associate Professor W. S.
Cawthon have requested retirement effective July 1, 1942. Dr. C. L. Crow, Pro-
fessor Emeritus of Modern Languages, passed away in the spring of 1942. For
many years before his retirement he served the College with distinction. He was
loved and admired by us all.

CONDITIONS AND NEEDS
Some of the rooms occupied by the Department of Biology and Geology have
been greatly improved during last year. The basement and two lecture rooms
on the first floor have been floored with plastic tile; a roomy office and two con-
venient service rooms have been gained for the Department by remodeling the
front stair well. A former office has been remodeled and furnished to provide a
graduate reading and seminar room. The model room has been rearranged and
the storage of charts, models, dissections and lantern slides has been improved.
A very satisfactory system for the handling and checking of department property
has been developed, which provides definite economy in time and material. Al-
though improvements have been made, many needs of the Department are ap-
parent. The flooring in most of the rooms above the basement is unsightly. Some
of the proper functions of the Department are barred by lack of space. A part
of the equipment has deteriorated, and funds are needed for overhauling and re-
pairing.
The physical condition of the building and equipment of the Department of
Chemistry is reasonably good. However, certain needs are clearly evident and
some of them are acute. Among these may be mentioned increased space for de-
partmental library and full-time librarian; equipment for lecture demonstrations
and research; and additional laboratory space for research students and agricul-
tural chemistry. During the last two years, the Naval Stores Research, under
the Department of Chemistry, has undertaken several important investigations,
the results of which have been reported monthly.





The greatest need of the Department of History and Political Science as has
often been stressed, is a better arrangement of classrooms and offices conveniently
located, where the Department could be housed in one building. Another pressing
need of the Department, like many others, is adequate library facilities, especially
for graduate work.
We make no recommendation for additional facilities for journalism because
of the urgency of the war situation at this time. However, just so soon as the
war is terminated, we urge that a model city room be acquired. Under present
circumstances we propose to improve and professionalize our instruction in
journalism and advance further the splendid cooperation between Florida publish-
ers and the Department.
The Division of Language and Literature has the usual problems of adequate
offices, supplies and equipment. Because of the great extension of short-wave
broadcasting in foreign languages, and because of the war, there is more need
than ever for a closer connection between foreign language instruction and the
radio and press.
A considerable advance has been made in the quality and quantity of apparatus
and equipment by the Department of Physics owing to the increased allotment for
the present biennium. However, the adequacy of the housing of the Department,
which has often been presented in the past, is the most pressing physical need of
the College.
The Bureau of Vocational Guidance has established a shelf of vocational infoi -
mation in the reading room of the University Library, which has been of great
value in the counseling work of the Bureau. Improved service has also been ex-
tended to students by arranging for special conferences between students seeking
vocational advice and faculty members who are authorities in the fields concerned.
The Department of Psychology has been handicapped in carrying on the neces-
sary laboratory work owing to the paucity of aparatus and the extremely small
amount of space at its disposal.
The Department of Sociology, like most of the departments of the College,
has made gratifying progress despite the lack of space and facilities. At the
present time one small office is available for the regular use of the Department.
This means that the Head Professor, the Assistant Professor, and two graduate
assistants engaged in detailed research must work in an over-crowded space.
Much of the material developed in the Department would be of value for distribu-
tion to State leaders and interested persons, if means were available.
The Department of Speech is gradually building up apparatus to aid in the
diagnosis and treatment of speech defects. Recordings of outstanding speakers
have been secured for aid in classroom teaching, and microphone and public ad-
dress apparatus are now available as a help in the teaching of radio speaking.
The Department would be greatly aided in its teaching by the acquisition of a
"mirrophone." A workshop, in which to construct and paint scenery used in
plays, would add greatly to the Department's progress.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

This report on the School of Pharmacy represents the report by the Director,
with only slight modifications.
The work of the biennium has been characterized by improved instruction,
continued research and greater professional service to Florida pharamacists and





physicians. Recently the war effort and the accelerated program of instruction
have been emphasized.
The curriculum was improved by the introduction of a course in applied physi-
ology replacing histology and microscopy. Space was acquired for research in
pharmacognosy and for experimental animals.
Many gifts were received in the form of money, books, apparatus and student
prizes.
The Bureau of Professional Relations was established July 1, 1940 to assist
pharmacists, physicians and dentists in solving mutual problems. It was made
possible by donations amounting to $10,300 during the biennium by the Board of
Pharmacy. Its program is approved by both the Florida medical and pharma-
ceutical associations. To date it has distributed over 40,000 pieces of literature.
The active work is carried on by a new staff member who devotes much time to
field work. The Bureau already has a national reputation as a model.
More native plants were added to the Medicinal Plant Garden. Drainage and
sprinkler systems should be installed. Excellent research on mints was carried
out during the biennium. A WPA project compiling a bibliography of Florida
medicinal plants is practically complete and is of much assistance in answering
the many inquiries received about medicinal plants.
Graduate work is at a high level. All faculty members have attended state and
national meetings of professional organizations. Their ability was recognized by
appointments on committees and election to offices in such organizations. Fifteen-
teen research and twenty-five professional papers were published by them during
the period. The Head Professor of Pharmacy was awarded the Ebert prize for
research.
The staff has assisted in defense work by serving on advisory and instructional
committees. The State Defense Council has designated the School as an emer-
gency drug manufacturing unit. An accelerated program of instruction is being
given.
BASIC BUDGETARY CONSIDERATIONS

The Equity Committee appointed by the Dean has considered the needs of
the different departments and many special problems involving promotions and
salaries for the ensuing biennium. Its basic considerations for equity in salaries,
in which the Dean concurs, are in part as follows:
"In the deliberations of the Committee the faculty member's length
of tenure of service, his financial status, and the size of his family have
been factors to which practically no weight has been attached; whereas
intellectual promise, excellence of teaching, actual academic achievement,
publications and research, professional recognition, and significant service
to the State of Florida have been controlling considerations. Accord-
ingly, the Committee has avoided making any recommendation of in-
crease which is not based on actual academic merit. Necessarily, some
salaries should remain unchanged, unless there is a general adjustment of
salaries based solely upon the increase in cost of living."
The proposed budget for the College, including the School of Pharmacy, which
is submitted herewith has been derived conservatively from these considerations
as an aid. No new positions have been recommended. Requests for funds for
supplies and equipment have been adjusted to conditions that prevail.
Respectfully submitted,
TOWNES R. LEIGH, Dean





REPORT OF THE PROVOST FOR AGRICULTURE
To the President of the University:
SIR: I submit the following reports upon the three divisions of the College
of Agriculture, namely, teaching division, Agricultural Experiment Station, and
the Agricultural Extension Service for the biennium ending June 30, 1942.
Respectfully submitted,
WILMON NEWELL,
Provost for Agriculture



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
To the President of the University:
SIR: For the biennium ending June 30, 1942, the following report for the
teaching Division of the College of Agriculture, the School of Forestry and the
Conservation Reserve is submitted.
Curricula of the College have received attention. Revisions have been made
to bring them up-to-date and to meet the needs of the changing agriculture of
the State. Relation of courses in agriculture to those of the General College
has been given careful thought and satisfactory coordination is being worked out.
Attention has been given to increasing the efficiency of instruction by repair-
ing equipment and buildings and adding such new equipment as has been possible.
Facilities of the Department of Botany have been modernized by additions and
repairs. A building formerly used for other purposes has been renovated and
equipped for Farm Shop in the Department of Agricultural Engineering. A new
greenhouse, classroom, work shop and heating plant have been added for Horti-
culture. The laboratory for Genetics in the Department of Agronomy has been
properly equipped. These improvements and additions have made it possible to
greatly improve instruction in the College. By special arrangements with the
Agricultural Experiment Station its library has been kept open for the use of
students at night. The College Farm has been merged with the College Station
Farm and its operation as a separate unit discontinued.
J. Wayne Reitz, on leave of absence for advanced study, has returned having
secured the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Wisconsin.
Because of the heavy teaching load in the Department of Soils, George D. Thorn-
ton, previously connected with the University of Georgia, has joined the faculty
as Assistant Professor of Soils. E. L. Fouts was appointed Professor of Dairy
Manufactures. 0. W. Anderson and Raymond M. Crown, having resigned to
accept positions elsewhere, have been replaced by 0. K. Moore and Douglas J.
Smith, respectively. When W. G. Kirk left to take charge of the Range Cattle
Station for the Experiment Station his place was filled by R. S. Glasscock. The
teaching staff for Agricultural Chemistry, carried out in cooperation with the
College of Arts and Sciences, has been strengthened by the addition of E. E.
Frahm as Assistant Professor of Agricultural Chemistry. On October 17th, 1941
A. W. Leland, who had rendered efficient service as the College Farm Superin-
tendent for twenty-five years, died.





For many years the necessity of adding another breed of cattle to the Dairy
herd had been recognized. In January, 1942 a beginning was made toward this
end by the purchase (in cooperation with the Experiment Station) of three
Guernsey heifers from one of the best herds in the country. This widens the
scope of instruction in dairy cattle.

School of Forestry
The principal curricular changes have been the addition of two courses in game
management and zoology has been added as an elective because of its relation
to game management. The two-year ranger course has been discontinued but
changing conditions in forestry in the State may necessitate its reinstatement
sometime in the future.
Summer Camp for 1942 was held on a property that has been completely pro-
tected against fire for 15 years belonging to the Georgia Forest Products Com-
pany near Brunswick, Georgia. Data for detailed maps and estimates of stand-
ing timber growth were collected.
Demand for foresters and those trained in certain phases of forestry has in-
creased. For the summer of 1942, 52 men from the School have been working on
Federal lands in the west on fire protection and White Pine Blister Rust eradica-
tion.
Assistant Professor P. W. Frazer was called to active duty in the Quarter-
masters Corps. Wilbur DeVall, former teaching fellow, has received his master's
degree and has been appointed instructor.
The Forest Products Laboratory is under construction. A modern dry kiln,
gift of the Moore Dry Kiln Company, is ready for operation. Much material used
in the construction of the building has been contributed by firms and individuals
interested in forest products. A new bus, for student transportation, has been
added to the equipment.
During the first year of the biennium enrollment in the School increased but
during the second year the number decreased. It has averaged about 150 for
all forestry courses. During the biennium 16 received their degrees in Forestry.

Conservation Reserve
Development of the Conservation Reserve (Welaka) has been carried forward
along lines previously planned. More than 10,000 slash pine seedlings have
been planted during the biennium and harvesting of mature and turpentined trees,
in accordance with modern forestry practices, has been initiated. The Reserve
has provided facilities for students in reforestration and tree growth under dif-
ferent ecological conditions.
Extensive use of the Reserve has been made by the Department of Biology
and during the year several studies, made possible by its facilities, have been
completed. The more important of these are: Relations between water tempera-
ture and oxygen requirements of certain Florida fishes, by J. C. Hart, exchange
student from University of Toronto; Plant Associations of the Welaka area and
their relationships to the various soil types, by A. L. Laessle; Ecological relation-
ships of the orthoptera of the Reserve, by J. J. Friauf; Comparative survival of
wild and penreared quail on the Reserve by 0. E. Frye; Mammals of the Reserve,
by J. C. Moore; and Life history and food relationships of the long-tailed shrew,
an insect eating mammal, also by Moore. Basic studies, of this character, are of





great value and wide application, laying as they do the foundations for an under-
standing of Florida's wild life.
Respectfully submitted,
H. HAROLD HUME, Dean



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE
EXPERIMENT STATION
To the President of the University:
SIR: I respectfully submit the following report of the University of Florida
Agricultural Experiment Stations for the biennium ending June 30, 1942.
A World at war-when foods, feeds and fibers are so vitally necessary-places
a new and added emphasis on the work of the agricultural experiment stations.
Upon these stations devolves the responsibility of devising and discovering
methods and means of protecting, improving and increasing the State's varied
agricultural output to meet present urgent demands. A review of activities of
the biennium discloses that this obligation is definitely being met through re-
sults and findings of immediate application and assistance in the Nation's war
effort. During the past year a realignment of investigational work has been com-
pleted stressing particularly that research which has the most direct usefulness
and bear on wartime needs.
New varieties of vegetables with higher yields and better quality have been
developed and released; higher yielding and better varieties of corn, oats, sugar
cane, forages and other crops have been distributed; a most satisfactory soil
building lupine, recently released, is now extensively used and will aid greatly
in some areas during this time of nitrogen shortages; pastures and new feeds
have been developed; cultural practices have been advanced; plant pest control
methods have been simplified and improved; new or substitute plant ma-
terials are being tested; micro element deficiencies of fruit, vegetable and field
crops are being identified and remedied; these, and many other activities are of
direct benefit to the Nation particularly at this time.
Investigations under the 178 projects now in progress have been very satis-
factory and fruitful. Brief statements of some of these accomplishments are made
in this report. The 26 Station bulletins and the annual reports for 1941 and 1942
published during the biennium give more detailed discussions of the research in
progress and of the results obtained. In these will be found also citations of 280
articles published in scientific journals, trade and farm papers by Station work-
ers; these deal with varied phases of Florida agriculture.
To date, leaves of absence have been granted to one staff member who was
called into the Bureau of Economic Warfare and to 12 others who have been called
into military service; in addition, 28 of the Stations' laboratory assistants and
laborers have likewise entered military service.

IMPROVEMENTS AND LAND ADDITIONS

The Board of County Commissioners and interested citizens of Hardee County,
in June, 1940, deeded a 1000-acre tract of land to the State Board of Education
for the establishment of a Range Cattle Station. In April, 1941, that Board





donated an adjoining tract of 1180 acres, making the total for that Station 2180
acres. Through the cooperation of the Works Progress Administration one mile
of road was built on the property and land was cleared for building sites. Major
improvements on this property consist of two residences for staff workers, garage,
and other buildings. To date 835 acres have been put under fence.
At the Sub-Tropical Station a new greenhouse and service building were con-
structed; additional acreage of rockland was cleared; sufficient orchard heating
equipment was provided for about 20 acres, and additional irrigation equipment
was secured.
Two so-called Mobile Units, with an agronomist in charge of each, were estab-
lished to conduct cooperative field crop experiments with growers in several north-
ern Florida counties. Headquarters for these units are at the North Florida
Station.
At the Celery Laboratory 6.5 acres of land, a greenhouse and service building
were deeded by the Board of County Commissioners of Seminole County to the
State Board of Education for Station use.
At the Main Station an implement shed, a building for housing cattle for in-
ternal parasite investigations, two concrete silos, and a small addition to the
Dairy Products Laboratory which will serve as a meats laboratory were built. An
additional 50 acres of land was cleared and 8 miles of fence erected. The old
Experiment Station Building is in process of complete renovation. This necessi-
tated the locating of different departments in various temporary quarters, and
required the construction of two 26 x 100 feet frame buildings for temporary stor-
age and housing of laboratories.
The Citrus Disease Laboratory, Cocoa, was discontinued on August, 31, 1940.

EDITORIAL

New bulletins published were 26, 13 each year, totalling 1,266 pages and 234,-
500 copies. They covered a wide variety of research topics in different fields of
agriculture. In addition, 25 new press bulletins were published, totalling 132,000
copies, and 14 of these 2- to 4-page leaflets were reprinted in the number of
51,000 copies.
Staff members other than Editors delivered 296 talks over the Florida Farm
Hour, noon-day WRUF radio program, and 116 of these talks were revised and
forwarded as Farm Flashes to from seven to twelve other Florida radio stations.
Experiment Station information was widely printed by both daily and weekly
newspapers, being distributed through a weekly clipsheet, over press association
wires, and by direct mail. Two dailies carried questions and answers columns
weekly.
Of articles written by the Editors, four Florida farm journals printed seven
for a total of 234 column inches, one Southern farm periodical printed seven
amounting to 122 inches, and four national journals also printed seven articles
which totaled 235 column inches. Copies of radio talks made by staff members
were forwarded in generous numbers to Florida farm papers, who used from four
to ten of them each month. The Station staff also contributed heavily to scientific
journals.
LIBRARY
Material for 733 volumes was sent to the bindery and 561 volumes were re-
ceived by gift, purchase and exchange. Thus a total of 1,2*kvolumes were acces-





signed for the biennium, bringing the number of bound volumes in the library to
16,642. The library received the record number of 29,160 pamphlets, periodicals
and continuations. Workers at branch stations were lent 729 volumes, the libra-
rian borrowed 147 volumes from other libraries, and the resident staff borrowed
3,607 volumes. Catalog cards which were prepared and typed numbered 23,363.
During the last year of the biennium 8,941 pieces of reserve material were
used by students, and 4,532 students used the library.
The classification of all agricultural literature in the library has been com-
pleted, and all books have been given call numbers in addition to the original
accession numbers. This will facilitate the use of the library.

HORTICULTURAL PROTECTION SERVICE

Intensive work in the frost forecasting service, conducted in cooperation with
the United States Weather Bureau, covered the entire peninsula. In the admin-
istration of the forecasting and temperature survey work this area was sub-
divided into ten districts in charge of eight assistant meteorologists. Each of
these men, though attached to the Lakeland office, made his winter residence with-
in the local area under his supervision. These ten districts were equipped with
369 temperature survey stations, all in operation during the biennium. Of these
stations, 239 were completely equipped with themographs so that the duration of
critical temperatures could be measured. Results of the temperature survey were
published in ten mimeographed volumes. At many of the stations there are now
complete records for seven consecutive seasons. Specialized frost forecasts were
issued during the winter season for a network of 83 forecast stations each placed
in a carefully planned location so that the temperature forecast could easily be
adapted to individual farms. During the 1940-1941 season a total of 15,106 sep-
arate temperature forecasts were made of which 95.7 per cent were accurate and
99 per cent within 3 of being correct. In the 1941-1942 season a total of 12,382
forecasts were made of which 97.6 per cent were accurate and 99.5 per cent within
3 of being accurate. Forecasts were distributed twice daily through a network
of 20 commercial radio stations, by telephone and telegraph services and by the
daily press. Considerable research in frost protection was conducted at the
meteorological laboratory near Lakeland and at other sites. During the summer
seasons research in forecasting was carried on at Lakeland and the field men
were assigned to assist in the special hurricane weather service. A Shipper's Bul-
letin was published daily in season for the benefit of growers who market in
eastern and middle western markets.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
The completed study of production credit in Florida citrus and vegetable areas
was reported in Station Bulletin No. 367. It was found that 25.3 and 71.8 per
cent of the citrus and vegetable growers, respectively, who were interviewed,
borrowed for production purposes. An extended and recently completed study of
a general farming area of the State demonstrates that marked variations in farm-
ing returns between different areas, as affected by race, tenure, size of business,
labor efficiency and crop yields, are due principally to different types of soil on
which the farms are located.
Extension Circular No. 61, "Food for Home and Victory" was prepared for im-
mediate use in the National Food Production Program from farm and home data





obtained in cooperation with State Home Demonstration workers. Mimeographed
summaries of cooperative cost accounts with citrus growers were prepared for
the eighth and ninth seasons and returned to cooperating growers for their in-
formation and guidance. Florida Truck Crop Competition Bulletin No. 224 was
brought up to date by the issuance of mimeographed supplements covering the
1939-40 seasons.
In the study of Florida citrus marketing cooperatives particular attention was
given to production services rendered to members; basic reasons for cooperative
failures are being sought. The ninth consecutive season of the study of the citrus
cost of production and grove organization has been completed. Early completion
of the Florida farm products price index series is anticipated, and the project on
breeding efficiency and depreciation of Florida dairy herds as related to soil types,
and conducted in cooperation with the Department of Animal Industry, continues.
The 187 farm management records from Columbia County are being analyzed for
specific factors which contribute most to the success or failure of individual farms.

AGRONOMY

Major attention was given to variety tests and fertilizer requirements of field
crops, crop rotation, pasture establishment, management and evaluation, breeding
and selection of improved crops, and introduction and trial of new grasses,
legumes, grains, forage and pasture plants.
Investigations, in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Agriculture, have
focused attention on three new grasses and one legume which have possibilities
as forage crops. Fertilizer tests were made with cotton, corn, peanuts, oats, sugar
cane, tobacco, hay and pasture crops and a wide variation in the nutrient require-
ments was found. In general, corn, cotton and grains respond best to nitrogen,
peanuts little to any fertilizer, tobacco to a complete fertilizer high in potassium,
and legumes such as clover and lespedezas to calcium, phosphorus and potassium.
In experiments with trace elements some field crops on mineral soils responded to
zinc, boron, copper, and magnesium.
Crop rotation experiments continue to indicate the value of proper sequence
of field crops to avoid disease and insect damage, to maintain soil fertility and to
produce profitable yields. Expansion in pasture investigations covers more soil
and climatic conditions, more specific fertilizer and trace element uses, wider use
of new pasture plants and combination plantings in an effort to obtain data
relative to both summer and winter grazing conditions.
Breeding and selection of corn, oats, peanuts, sugar cane, tobacco, nepier
grass, clovers, blue lupine, pasture grasses and sea island cotton have increased
yields and quality of these crops.

ANIMAL INDUSTRY
Investigations of mastitis in dairy cattle have shown that a specific mixture
of resublimed crystals of iodine and heavy medicinal mineral oil is effective in
destroying causative bacteria in chronic infections of the udder. External para-
sites of poultry including lice, mites and fleas were controlled by feeding 5 per
cent sulfur in the regular mash, together with the dusting of sulfur on the soil
at the rate of two pounds per 100 square feet. Internal parasites of sheep were
controlled by feeding phenothiazine in a grain mixture. It was found that larvae
of stomach worms in cattle were able to survive a non-grazing period of 373 days





which demonstrates that the climatic conditions of Florida are decidedly favorable
for the perpetuation of these parasites.
Napier grass proved to be a satisfactory pasture grass for dairy cattle. An
experimental plot of eight acres furnished 1529 cow-days grazing and supplied
56.5 per cent of the total digestible nutrients required for maintenance and milk
production. A yield of 25.6 pounds of milk and 1.2 pounds of butterfat daily per
cow was obtained. To reduce cost, one per cent of marble dust was used as a
calcium supplement replacing one-half of the bonemeal that was added to the
mixed concentrates fed to dairy cattle. It was found that marble dust could be
used satisfactorily as a source of part of the calcium in mixed concentrates.
Investigations of calcareous mineral supplements for poultry feeding sho;.
that Florida oyster, clam, and coquina shells, were good sources of calcium .,,
proven by tests for egg production, breaking strength and thickness of egg she1,;
In controlled feeding trials with swine it was found that peanuts were d4-
ficient in calcium, and that the condition referred to as "down in the back" w,
a calcium shortage. By proper mineral supplementation, it was possible to obta
satisfactory gains in feeder pigs on a ration of peanuts alone, and no weak bon
were produced.
Investigations in wintering beef cattle indicated that one of the cheapest an'.
most practical roughages was shocked sugar cane. A digestibility trial reveal'
that freshly-cut shocked sugar cane had a higher feeding value than sugar ca
silage.
ENTOMOLOGY

A major portion of the time was spent on investigations on the control of
root-knot. As before, a heavy mulch, regardless of what plant material was used.
was effective in decreasing the infestation to the extent that very succeptible
plants such as okra have been grown satisfactorily. Effort are being made to
determine how mulching controls, and study is inade, in cooperation with the
Department of Soils, of the comparative flora and fauna in mulched and un-
mulched areas.
The finding of root-knot resistant strains of vegetable crops by selection has
received attention; a resistant conch pea has been found as has also a somewhat
resistant strain of Kentucky Wonder beans. The effect of a two-year fallow in a
three-year rotation on tobacco root-knot is under observation.
A study of the biology, food plants, ecology and control of the lubberly locust
has been concluded, a similar one for aphids is in progress, and one for cutworms
has been started. Investigations of insects of pecans, mole crickets, and plant
bugs continue.
A bulletin on insects attacking truck and garden crops has been revised and
printed, and special effort has been made to aid home gardeners in the Food for
Victory Program by correspondence and radio talks.

HOME ECONOMICS

Nutritional investigations during the past 7 years yielded data on the nutri-
tional and physical status of 8,000 rural children. Of this group 90 per cent had
gross defects, some of which were related to nutrition. The endemic nature of
nutritional anemia was noted and associated with soil and plant deficiencies. The
number of children with gingivitis and dental caries was not as great in the citrus
sections as elsewhere. Roentgenograms of the wrists of children of the same age





and sex showed wide variations in development and maturity of bones. Appar-
ently these variations were related to diet. A well balanced school lunch has been
found very effective in improving nutrition of children.
Several methods for the determination of vitamins A and C are being eval-
uated. An interesting biological one was an association of a lack of vitamin A
with changes in the leucocyte picture, particularly with an increase in large
lymphocytes. In a survey for fruits and vegetables that were rich in vitamins A
and C, locally grown pink guavas and Ceylon gooseberries were found to be ex-
cellent sources of both vitamins. A study of the fruit from certain crosses of
tomato grown at the Vegetable Crops Laboratory indicated that this too has a
relatively high vitamin A content.
Investigations on royal jelly have centered upon a study of a hydroxydecanoic
acid which possesses unique physiological properties. The acid is being identified
by oxidative procedures and formation of derivatives.

HORTICULTURE

Horticultural investigations included various problems dealing with production
of vegetables, deciduous fruits, nuts, ornamentals, and with the preservation
of fruits and vegetables.
Consideration has been given to the economical use of fertilizers in the pro-
duction of vegetables. New crops have received attention and a crisp-heading
lettuce has been found that is satisfactory when grown on suitable soils properly
fertilized. Leguminous cover-crops were found valuable in vegetable production.
The importance of legumes has been further emphasized in the maintenance of
soil fertility in the production of tung and pecans. The results with legumes
become significantly important as the nitrogen situation becomes more critical.
Vital plants which may have possibilities in the production of materials such
as rubber, fiber, condiments, and others, and certain substitutes totaling 56
species are being tested for their adaptability in Florida.
Investigations in the preservation of fruits and vegetables have given note-
worthy results. Pliofilm wrappers were found to keep these products in a con-
dition almost equal to harvest freshness for a long period of time at proper tem-
peratures. Citrus fruit wrapped in pliofilm and packed and shipped in standard
containers held up better than in other types of wrappers.
The 1940 tung oil crop in Florida was the largest on record, amounting to
approximately 1,600,000 pounds of refined oil. Yields in 1942 will be greater and
will help in supplying this critical material for war purposes. An iron deficiency
of tung has been determined and treatments with iron sulfate for its control were
developed.
Attention has been given to certain types of ornamentals which can be planted
about the numerous army bases and camps in Florida. The experimental Camelia
planting now totals over 1000 plants of 515 varieties. Varieties of Narcissus
bulbs responded differently when fumigated with methyl bromide and hydrocyanic
acid gas. The portable gas analyzer developed in fumigation experiments was
found to be adaptable for ethylene gas.

PLANT PATHOLOGY

Considerable information has been obtained on several plant disease problems
and disseminated by means of bulletins, radio talks, consultation and demon-
strations.





By means of cooperative demonstrations farmers in Suwannee County were
shown how to manage tobacco plant beds to increase the yield of healthy plants.
The fungus which causes a leaf spot and tip-over of eggplant has been found
to be carried in commercial seed, and to live at least one year in the soil and old
plant material. A small percentage of infected seedlings in the plant bed or
setting healthy plants in infested soil may result in severe infection in the field.
Its perfect stage has been found and given the binomial Diaporthe vexans.
The application of a 1:25,000 solution of ethyl mercury phosphate to the soil
around Caladium and Iris plants has provided considerable protection against
infection by the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii, but the treatment is not safe to use
with all plants.
Several chemicals have been found which will improve the percentage germi-
nation of seed of several varieties of plants when they are planted in soil infested
with fungi that cause seed decay and damping-off. The organic content and
hydrogen-ion concentration of the soil and temperature were found to influence
the effectiveness of certain of the chemicals as seed protectants. The new or-
ganic compounds, tetramethyl thiuram disulfide and tetrachloro-para-benzo-
quinone have proved to be as good or better than the inorganic compounds in pre-
venting seed decay and are less injurious to the seed.
More than 8,000 collections have been added to the herbarium. Many plants
and plant diseases have been identified for residents of the state.

SOILS

The passage of a state-wide soil survey law transferred the entire responsibility
for this work to the Agricultural Experiment Stations and set up a definite fund
for its development. The program is in full cooperation with the U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture. Field work of the survey has been completed in Alachua and
Collier Counties and recently initiated in Manatee County. Good progress has
been made in several other parts of the State where soil conservation programs
require field information of this type.
Marked progress has been made in the evaluation of soil reaction (pH),
especially in relation to certain physical and chemical characteristics that are
associated with various soil types. This greatly increases the precision of liming
recommendations, which is of great importance in guarding against the disastrous
effects of overliming. Data have been obtained on the relation of soil reaction,
organic matter content and other soil type characteristics to fertilizer losses
through fixation and leaching.
The study of type and distribution of soil microorganisms has been continued
but most emphasis in the field of soil microbiology has been given to investigation
of factors affecting nitrogen fixation by various strains of legume bacteria
Rhizobium. Fertilizer treatments, including lime on certain soils and drainage
on others, stand out sharply. Striking differences also were shown by organisms
isolated from different sources. This study is especially significant in view of
the wartime shortage of nitrogenous fertilizers.
In the field of trace element studies, a fully quantitative spectrographic
method was developed for molybdenum, the zinc method was considerably mod-
ified and certain critical changes which were effected in the method for the highly
important element, cobalt, have increased its sensitivity several times.





BRANCH STATIONS
CITRUS STATION
(Lake Alfred)
Mineral deficiency studies in citrus originally stressed the effect of these de-
ficiencies on production. The outstanding development of the last biennium has
been the determination of the extent to which these deficiencies affect the quality
of fruit and the resistance of the tree and fruit to the hazards of cold. This work
was briefly mentioned in the last report. It was not realized then that the in-
fluences mentioned were as important as they have since proved to be. Origin-
ally, work along this line dealt primarily with the amount of production and
secondarily with the tree condition. During the last few years there has been
more emphasis on fruit quality, and it was found that the correction of mineral
deficiencies in citrus not only tremendously increased the gross production but
frequently resulted in increases of 25 to 50 per cent in the sugar content together
with increases in citric acid, vitamin C and other important constituents. This
has resulted not only in better fruit on an analytical basis but also in better and
richer flavor to a degree obvious to the consumer.
The last biennial report mentioned that some increase in cold resistance was
present where deficiencies were corrected. Data collected subsequently demon-
strated conclusively that the correction of mineral deficiencies actually increased
the resistance of the fruit to damage due to freezing and also reduced leaf drop
and wood damage. While crops on deficient trees were a complete loss, well-
fertilized trees showed a fruit loss of 0 to 20 per cent under identical conditions.
Correction of mineral deficiencies has resulted in heavier scale infestation.
This necessitated the development of a much more efficient control program. Scale
insects have been found to thrive better on normal than on deficient leaves and are
favored by the increased shade following heavier foliation resulting from de-
ficiency correction.
The use of magnesium, copper, manganese and zinc in citrus nutrition, along
lines developed at the Citrus Station, has had almost universal acceptance by the
citrus industry. The result has been a considerable improvement in total produc-
tion and in the quality of the fruit shipped. Likewise the industry suffered much
less from the two freezes of 1940 than was expected. This can be traced largely
to the application of the above mentioned elements to citrus groves in general.

EVERGLADES STATION
(Belle Glade)
Some of the crop diversification and soil conservation goals, set up earlier,
and mentioned in the last report are being approached. The growing in the
Everglades of excellent quality green or Pascal celery, Iceberg lettuce, Red
Creole and Grano onions and U. S. 34 sweet corn is directly a result of the efforts
of Station workers. Planting material of a new pasture grass has been given to
ranchers in widely scattered points in South Florida to establish 44 1-acre planting
stock areas. Other types are under investigation.
Better yields of corn and grain sorghum indicate that the Everglades growers
can soon grow their required feed concentrates. Sweet potatoes yielded over 500
bushels per acre when allowed to grow beyond the harvest stage for table stock,
and may thus show promise for use as stock feed.
The Station herd of pure bred Devon cattle is used in successful breeding and





nutrition experiments. Over 40 bull calves were furnished to Florida ranchers.
In the steer feeding experiments emphasis was placed on Everglades pastures
and home grown forages and concentrates.
Improvements have been obtained in plant pest control by the use of new
fungicides and insecticides and through new and improved methods of application
such as "vapo-dusting." Substitutes for copper in spray and dust materials have
been successful in some instances. Wireworm control was effected by certain
cultural practices and favorable results were had by the introduction of cane
borer parasites.
Plant breeding experiments have continued with valuable results, with most
attention given to sugarcane, where 55,000 seedlings, each a new variety, were
set in the field during the biennium. Two seedlings of the 1936-37 series prove
equal to and possibly better than any variety now in commercial production.
New varieties of beans have been produced which are resistant to rust and
mildew and breeding experiments are in progress with various grasses, corn,
celery, okra and tomatoes.
Soil test methods and a field lysimeter placed in operation are of definite aid
to various experimental work. Active cooperation was continued with the Soil
Conservation Service on the important problem of the conservation of Everglades
organic soils and much basic information on conservation practices has been
obtained.
NORTH FLORIDA STATION
(Quincy)
The development and distribution of two high yielding smut and leaf rust
resistant varieties of oats, Quincy No. 1 and Quincy No. 2 is a significant contribu-
tion to Florida agriculture. Likewise, Florida White and Florident Yellow corn,
originated and distributed by the Florida Stations, improve grain crop production
on many Florida farms. These corn varieties are high yielding, prolific, open
pollinated varieties with flinty kernels and a long, heavy, tight husk which offers
weevil resistance. Heretofore, such a type of corn did not exist on the com-
mercial market. This Station is also producing and distributing the single cross
seed involved in making double cross Florida W-1 hybrid corn. This hybrid
is gaining favor on Florida farms.
Red rot and mosaic resistant sugar cane varieties, developed at the Everglades
Station and distributed by this Station, have almost completely replaced other
varieties in Northwest Florida. Blue lupine (Lupinus angustifolius L.), intro-
duced by this Station several years ago, is still being distributed, but by now its
use has spread through Florida, into Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana,
and Texas.
The development of grass-legume pastures that carry from three-fourths to
to one and a half cows per acre seven months per year has stimulated much
interest in pasture improvement work.
Rotational grazing combined with periodic treatment with phenothiazine gave
a high degree of control of internal parasites of sheep, major problem of Florida
sheep growers. An effective and practical year-round pasture and feed program
for farm herds of beef cattle has been developed. Feeding trials show the im-
portance of feeding protein and mineral supplements to hogs fattening on corn
and peanuts.
Application of copper oxide sprays or paradichlorobenzene has proven effec-
tive in controlling downy mildew of cigar wrapper tobacco seedlings. Breeding





for resistance to root-knot, black shank and mosaic offers encouraging results.
The commercial acreage of wrapper tobacco of Florida and Georgia continues to
be planted to black shank resistant varieties which were originated at this Station.

SUB-TROPICAL STATION
(Homestead)
Malnutrition symptoms of avocado, mango, loquat and many other economic
plants growing on rockland soil were corrected by zinc sprayed on the foliage.
Zinc sulfate added to copper fungicides increased yields and reduced spray burn
on potatoes and tomatoes growing on marl.
Cleopatra and rough lemon proved better than other rootstocks. New varie-
ties of avocado were found which show promise for commercial use and a com-
mercially practical method of asexually propagating sapodilla was developed.
Pineapples were grown successfully on rockland soils heavily mulched with pine
sawdust and shavings. Variety trials of 15 kinds of vegetables were conducted
on marl soil.
Supplementing complete fertilizers with intermediate applications of in-
organic nitrogen proved practical for growing Tahiti (Persian) limes on rock-
land soil. Tests indicated that the percentage of potassium in papaya fertilizers
need not exceed 5 per cent, and poultry manure proved highly satisfactory as a
source of nitrogen for papayas. Potato fertilizer tests showed that 4 per cent
nitrogen is in excess of requirements for good yields provided a cover crop is
maintained between seasons. Field tests indicated that chance weeds form as
satisfactory a cover crop as sesbania or velvet beans.
Evidence was obtained of the existence of a virus affecting limes. Patho-
genicity was proved for a Phytophthora isolated from roots of avocado trees
showing decline and Cercospora spot proved controllable with lower concentra-
tions of copper fungicides than were previously recommended. Scab of poinsettias
caused by a new species of Sphaceloma was described. It was demonstrated that
larvae of cucumber beetles (Diabrotica sp.) cause "healed holes" in potato tubers.

RANGE CATTLE STATION
(Hardee County)
Physical improvements of this Station began January 12, 1941, and the build-
ing program proper was started on April 20. In addition to the items mentioned
earlier a barn, machine shed, scale shed, corrals and two bridges have been con-
structed.
The Station herd how consists of 59 native and grade cattle, 5 Brahman
heifers, one Brahman and one Shorthorn bull. All cattle will be used in experi-
mental projects.
Pursuant to the soil survey which was made in June, 1941 the following
projects have been started: 1) fertilizer, variety and incorporation tests with
clover; 2) the effects of fertilizers on yield and chemical composition of grasses
alone and in combination with legumes; 3) breeding beef cattle for adaptation to
Florida environment; 4) wintering the beef herd on Florida ranges; 5) water
control and plant species adaptation for pasture purposes on low-lying lands;
6) management practices such as creep feeding of calves, controlled breeding,
rotational grazing, maintenance of pastures, mineral supplements and other
problems relating to the range industry.





FIELD LABORATORIES
VEGETABLE CROPS
(Bradenton)
The personnel of the laboratory has been expanded by the addition of an
entomologist, and a horticulturist for investigations of gladiolus culture. New
facilities include a greenhouse and a temporary laboratory building, which have
been built as a single unit.
Positive results of recent research include the release of three new tomato
varieties, bred for resistance to fusarium wilt and for adaptability to Florida
conditions. Zinc deficiency symptoms on field-grown tomatoes have been iden-
tified by experimental work, and adequate control measures found. A study of
various phases of crisp-head lettuce production has resulted in the publication of
Bulletin 365, which covers the results of the research program with the crop to
date.
Research is continuing on varieties, fertilizers, and field control methods for
insects and diseases with relation to both vegetable crops and gladioli. Cork
oaks are under trial and various herbs and plants which might serve as rubber
sources are being tested.

WATERMELON AND GRAPE INVESTIGATIONS
(Leesburg)
Work at the Watermelon and Grape Investigations Laboratory during the past
biennium has been concentrated on the testing of several varieties of wilt re-
sistant watermelons that could be released to commercial seed growers. Several
fairly large plantings scattered over the state have been made by commercial
growers and seedsmen cooperating to test these varieties under more variable con-
ditions than are present in central Florida. Present indications are that three
very resistant varieties tentatively named Blacklee, Whitelee, and Hawklee, and
having more desirable commercial characteristics than the Leesburg variety,
will be released to seedsmen next season. Work has been started to develop a
watermelon variety which will be resistant not only to wilt but also to anthrac-
nose.
The search for stainless sprays for use to control late rots of grapes has
continued. To date nothing has been found better than copper sulphate with
some form of sticker and spreader added to give it stability. A survey of the
wild species of grapes in the State has been made and living material from
promising vines has been moved to the experimental vineyard at Leesburg for
use in breeding to obtain varieties better adapted to Florida conditions. Various
intercropping methods have been tested in vineyards.
Additional plantings and selection have been made with Sea Island Cotton
to insure a source of pure strain of the seed. With the addition of an agronomist
to the staff more agronomic problems have been undertaken, not only with the
above mentioned crops but also with peanuts, sweet potatoes, castor beans, vari-
ous legumes and herbs.
POTATO INVESTIGATIONS
(Hastings)
Tests showed that yields of potatoes in the Hastings section could be in-
creased at least 25 per cent by replacing the standard varieties, Spaulding Rose
and Katahdin, with Sebago, a new variety. Profitable increases in yield of





Katahdin potatoes were demonstrated by increasing the standard rate of seedling
from 3 to 15 bushels per acre.
Experiments proved that ring rot of potatoes could be controlled completely
and loss from late blight reduced by using proper methods of selecting and han-
dling seed potatoes.
A sulfur-limestone soil treatment which controlled potato scab in infected
land the first year proved impractical, since the disease was severe again in the
second year after treatment.
Some cabbage stocks proved superior to others in yield, thus indicating that
seed should be purchased by stock number. Of the major plant food elements,
nitrogen proved to be the most essential for cabbage production on Bladen fine
sandy loam soil.
STRAWBERRY INVESTIGATIONS
(Plant City)

Trials with calcium cyanamide have indicated this material to be effective in
the control of the strawberry bud nematode which causes the so-called crimp dis-
ease. Vegetable seed treatments with standard and new treatments, particularly
organic, have been very promising.

CELERY INVESTIGATIONS
(Sanford)

The scope of the Laboratory's work was broadnened late in the biennium by
the addition of an entomologist to the staff
Tests with celery continued to show that fertilizers with 100 per cent inorganic
nitrogen produced the largest yields at the lowest cost. Further trials indicated
again that 5 per cent nitrogen fertilizers at the rate of 1000 pounds per acre
gave optimum yields. Starter solutions were not found effective. No conclusive
data were obtained from the use of liquid fertilizers. Experiments with iceberg
lettuce indicated that plantings in November and December are most likely to
produce marketable crops. Variety tests with celery are in progress and have
begun with cabbage.
In field tests no material was found more effective in controlling celery blight
than bordeaux mixture with a high copper and low lime content. Certain basic
coppers were found satisfactory on celery both for disease control and decreased
foliage injury except where conditions were most favorable for blighting. Semesan
appeared satisfactory in preliminary trials for the control of root-knot and damp-
ing off of celery in the seed bed, and in two years' trials, chloropicrin was found
very effective also, and formaldehyde quite beneficial.

PECAN INVESTIGATIONS
(Monticello)

Work of this laboratory, in cooperation with U. S. D. A. Bureau of Entomology,
has been confined principally to the control of the pecan nut casebearer and the
leaf casebearer. Experiments with winter washes and insecticide sprays have
been continued to further substantiate the data already obtained.
The most promising creosote mixtures used in experiments prior to 1942 for
control of pecan casebearers in their hibernacula are no longer obtainable. Tests
are being continued with other creosote mixtures. Data show that only fair con-





trol of first brood nut casebearers can be expected from single spray applications
of any insecticide.
Respectfully submitted,
WILMON NEWELL,
Provost for Agriculture and Director
of the Experiment Stations



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE
To the President of the University:
SIR: I respectfully submit the report of the Agricultural Extension Service of
the College of Agriculture for the biennium ending June 30, 1942.
The Extension Service is designated by the U. S. Department of Agriculture
to be the responsible subject matter agency that taps scientific and economic in-
formation affecting agriculture and uses this information in guiding farm people.
This organization has carried forward on every sector of the farm front the general
educational work in agriculture and home economics as related to production,
adjustment, conservation, marketing, rehabilitation and transportation. It has
served as the main collaborating state body in connection with programs of the
Agricultural Adjustment Agency and the establishment of soil conservation dis-
tricts. It has cooperated in programs relating to vocational agriculture, rural
electrification, the Federal Surplus Commodity Corporation, Federal feed and
seed loans, the Crop Reporting Board, State Department of Agriculture, State
Live Stock Sanitary Board, State Marketing Board, State Board of Health, and
commodity and production organizations.
The Director of Extension has served as Administrator of the State Soil
Conservation District Law and as Chairman of the Agricultural Advisory Com-
mittee of the State Defense Council. The Vice-Director is a member of the State
AAA Committee and the Florida U. S. D.A. War Board. The State Home Dem-
onstration Agent is Chairman of the Food and Housing Committee of the State
Defense Council. The county agents serve as secretaries of the county U. S. D. A.
war boards and many of them serve as committee representatives in the County
Defense Councils. Various members of the administration, specialist and county
staffs serve on state and national committees.
Projects include Administration, Publication and Printing, County Agent
Programs, Home Demonstration Programs including (a) Food Conservation (b)
Nutrition (c) Home Improvement (d) Clothing, 4-H Club work for boys and
girls, Citriculture, Poultry Husbandry, Agricultural Economics, Farm Forestry,
Land-Use Planning, Soil Conservation, and Farm and Home Demonstration work
for Negroes.
Personnel.-12 supervisors, 23 specialists, 105 county Extension workers
(white men and women) 18 county Extension workers (Negro men and women),
total 158 serving agriculture and rural homes in 61 counties. The counties are
served by the following employees. Two counties are served by one county agent,
one home agent and an assistant for each; twenty-four counties are served by one
county agent only; one county is served by one home demonstration agent only;
and thirty-six counties are served by one county agent and one home agent.





County appropriations in support of this work vary between counties and total
approximately $148,000 per year.
Negro agents are employed in counties having the greatest Negro agricultural
population. Number of counties served, 14; number of men employed, 9; number
of women employed, 9. Negro agents' work is harmonized with that of county
and home agents.
Since the work of county and home agents requires much travel to farms and
homes in the counties, the average monthly mileage as reported by county agents
was 16,455 miles, and for the home agents was 14,016 miles.

PUBLICATIONS AND PUBILICITY

The editorial staff consists of one editor and two assistants. They edit and
supervise the distribution of bulletins, circulars and other printed material, sup-
ply newspaper and the farm journal releases to state papers, and distribute radio
material.
The Agricultural News Service clipsheet is supplied weekly to Florida papers,
mats and news pictures are furnished from time to time, edtiorial articles are
written by the editor and members of the staff.
WRUF furnishes a radio period from 12 to 1 P.M. each weekday known as
the Florida Farm Hour. Each program includes three or more speaking parts
in addition to market reports. In 1941 the Farm Hour presented 14 remote con-
trol broadcasts relating to agriculture from various points in the state. Farm
Flashes were sent daily to seven other Florida radio stations.
The bulletins and publications are sent out on request and are also supplied
to the offices of the county Extension personnel and to Federal offices cooperating
with the Extension Service and institutions requesting them. The largest dis-
tribution is made through the county Extension agent's offices.
Number
Published Editions
Bulletins ...................................... ............ 8 125,000
Circulars and record books .................... 22 316,000
Miscellaneous publications ..................... 29 77,150

FINANCIAL STATEMENT
Sources of Revenue.-The Extension Service is supported by three sources of
revenue.
Amount Percent
U. S. Department of Agriculture ........ $467,398.67 48.4
State Appropriations ............................. 212,228.36 22.0
County Board Appropriations .......... 285,009.98 29.6

$964,637.01 100.00
The legislature of 1939 passed an act appropriating $80,400.00 per year to
apply on the salaries and expenses of county Extension agents. The purpose of
this bill was to more nearly equalize county salaries. To date this annual appro-
priation has not been available.
A special allotment from the Bureau of Agricultural Economics was set up for
the land-use planning program. On July 1, 1941, this appropriation was reduced
from $11,000 to $3,500. The program was discontinued as of June 30, 1942, due
to reduced appropriations by Congress to BAE.





COOPERATING FEDERAL AGENCIES


The Agricultural Adjustment Agency includes more problems in common with
the Extension Service than any other of the federal agricultural agencies. It
made conservation payments to 49,447 farmers in 1941. AAA also operated the
cotton and tobacco parity programs, sugar marketing program, and cotton mat-
tress program. The State AAA Administrative Officer is chairman of the Florida
USDA War Board, and the chairman of each county AAA committee serves as
chairman and the County Agent serves as Secretary of the county war board.
State War Board membership is made up representatives of all Federal agencies.
The AAA Administrator and Assistant Administrator serve in a joint capacity
with the Extension Service.
County agents serve as secretaries or ex-officio members of the county AAA
committees and their offices are AAA headquarters.
The home demonstration office has assumed the responsibility for making cot-
ton mattress furnished to low income farm families. The cotton and the ticking
were supplied through the Agricultural Adjustment Agency. Persons receiving
the mattresses were required to make up the mattress. Storage space for the
cotton and work rooms were provided from local sources.
Home Demonstration agents serve on state and county nutrition, clothing,
rural welfare, conservation and health committees.

COOPERATION WITH COLLEGE AND STATION

The College of Agriculture offered a three weeks' short course during June
and July of 1940 and 1941 for county and home demonstration agents. These
courses offered credits optional for advanced degrees. The Extension agents at-
tending were allowed official time for the period attending but paid their personal
expenses.
The Extension Service and the Florida Experiment Station work cooperatively
in the conduct of meetings, contests, and other informational programs. Similar
cooperation exists between this service and the Florida State College for Women
and the Florida A. & M. College for Negroes.
Staff members contribute subject matter used in Extension programs.

STATE EXTENSION GOALS COMMITTEE

To help secure production of needed farm crops requested by the U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture, the Extension Service, in cooperation with the Agricultural
Adjustment Agency and the State War Board, established Extension Goals Com-
mittees. These committees were headed by district agents, specialists and county
personnel that would encourage cooperation and adjustment on the farms to meet
the goals set up for Florida.
Each extension specialist assumed responsibility for the commodity with which
he works and made plans so that all counties could be contacted and county com-
mittees established. County and home agents represented the goals committees
in the counties and they in turn worked with the Agricultural Adjustment Agency
and War Board of the county to present the needs to the farmers within the
county. Reports to date indicate that all production goals will be met in 1942,
with the exception of peanuts where the goal was set at 275 percent increase, and
although not reaching this large goal there will be a very substantial increase.





4-H CLUB WORK

This work is conducted with both boys and girls. The 4-H clubs are under
the direction of county and home agents. This includes leadership training
courses for boys and girls, organized study of rural and farm problems, the pro-
duction of crops and livestock, home skills, direction in recreation, and training
in democratic principles. This program includes contests in the production of
baby beef, poultry, hogs, dairy cattle, and vegetables, and in clothing, baking,
food preparation and related lines. These are concluded at state shows and con-
tests and awards are made to successful contestants that provide attendance at
4-H summer camps, trips to the National 4-H Congress, trips to the National 4-H
Camp in Washington, D. C., trips to the National Dairy Show, in addition to
scholarships awarded by the State Bankers' Association and private institutions
and individuals.
4-H Regional Camps.-Three regional camps are established in Okaloosa, Madi-
son and Lake counties. Each camp is equipped to accommodate 125 4-H club
members.
Due to the many additional duties placed on county agents and to limtiations
in travel, the 4-H programs were necessarily curtailed. Local 4-H club voluntary
leaders have given valuable help in the organization, enrollment, holding meetings
and completion of projects and records.
Emphasis is placed on the production and use of agricultural garden, poultry,
dairy and animal products by the boys and girls.
In 1942, on account of travel restrictions, it became necessary to abandon the
4-H annual short courses at state institutions and in place of these state events,
4-H club camps were held in the counties under the direction of the Extension
Service.
POULTRY

The Poultry Extension program is tied in closely with the research and teach-
ing work of the college. The Florida Poultry Council has rendered valuable as-
sistance to Extension poultry work, in programs dealing with egg production,
feeding schedules, handling practices livability and production costs.
The Central Florida Fair Association, Orlando, has made available ample space
and accommodations to hold the annual 4-H club poultry and egg show and judg-
ing contests.
Florida National Egg Laying Test has been in operation for 15 years. In 1941
the highest records were made by a Florida pen entered by Crescent Farms, Brad-
enton, Florida. This pen of 13 pullets produced 3,550 eggs during the year's test,
the highest record ever reported in this state. Its records have supplied valuable
information as to livability and feeding practices.
Poultry Production Goals for 1942.-The U. S. Department of Agriculture set
up production goals for 1942 to meet war needs and home consumption. The De-
partment called for a 12 percent increase in egg production, 14 percent increase
in poultry for slaughter, and 10 percent increase in turkeys. Indications are that,
with the exception of turkeys, these goals will be exceeded.
The poultry Extension program includes the following: Production of healthy
pullets; practical poultry units on farms; culling to eliminate unprofitable birds;
green feeds in rations; 4-H club work; cooperation with poultry associations;
cooperation with the State Live Stock Sanitary Board to issue certificates to the
59





hatcheries and breeders so that healthy chicks will be distributed from these
hatcheries; a disease control program in cooperation with the Florida Experiment
Station; the use of artificial lights; and broiler production.

LIVESTOCK AND AIRYING

The Extension dairy program involves work with county agents, home
demonstration agents, and 4-H club members while the beef program is car-
ried along principally by the county agents. There are approximately 44,000
dairy cows on the farms and 86,000 dairy cows supplying whole milk to people
off farms. In both cases production and consumption have materially in-
creased. Commercial dairying involves many distribution problems. Dairymen
have been assisted in making adjustments necessitated by the location of military
camps at various places in Florida.
In the production of meats from beef and pork, better prices and food
needs have brought about many changes.
In cooperation with the Live Stock Sanitary Board and the Bureau of
Animal Industry the program to control Bangs' disease, tuberculosis and
parasites has been a very definite educational job contributing to the upbuild-
ing of the animal industry. The state markets have provided sales programs,
and with better prices, inferior stock is being marketed. The Extension spe-
cialists and county agents have helped cattlemen and dairymen to locate, se-
lect and purchase better animals.
The war demands, together with cholera control, grazing and fattening prac-
tices, have caused a greatly increased number of marketable hogs.
In all livestock work the 4-H club program has had an important part. The
boys and girls have been encouraged by awards and scholarships offered by in-
dividuals, banks, railroads, county officials and county boards.

AGRONOMY

The agronomy program has emphasized the demand for increased peanut pro-
duction for oil purposes. The AAA program assumed the responsibility to secure
a supply of extra seed needed and the needed harvesting and picking machinery.
The improved pasture program has been effective in a large area of Florida.
The soil conservation program of the AAA and results from production practices
on farms and from records of the North Florida Experiment Station provided
the basis for recommendations governing pasture improvement.
1. 325,000 acres have been established in permanent pastures: 2. Flue-cured
tobacco production, although governed by AAA regulations, is now furnishing a
very substantial part of the farmer's income; 3. It is now apparent that some
citrus counties that did not formerly produce Sea Island cotton may be the main
producing counties. Boll weevil control is highly important in Sea Island cotton
production.
CITRUS FRUIT CULTURE

The Extension citrus project went forward in all citrus growing counties.
Producing better fruit at lower cost and marketing it efficiently continue to re-
ceive stress.
Soil samples were taken from 4,240 citrus groves aggregating 46,510 acres.
Liming recommendations were followed on 4,146 groves, involving 48,177 tons.





Dolomitic limestone was used almost entirely, 17,900 tons of which were obtained
as AAA grant-in-aid, at a saving to the grower of $1.00 to $3.00 per ton. Mag-
nesium has been supplied very largely through the use of dolomite, applied for
changing the soil reaction to a more favorable level.
Manganese, zinc, and copper have been applied both in the fertilizer and to
the foliage. Reports from 67 demonstrations show a 55 percent increase in yield,
with an increase of only three percent of fertilizer used, and a reduction of 39
percent in production costs.
Cover Crops.-In 21 groves where the cover crop had been mainly crotalaria,
the yield of fruit has been increased 64 percent and production cost per box was
reduced by 23 percent.
Reports show that 9,371 growers were assisted with their cover crop practices
on 140,500 acres.
Irrigation Advancement.-Production records covering five years, show a 20
percent average increase in yield from irrigated groves over non-irrigated. The
average cost of irrigation was $5.68 per acre, approximately 3.2 cents per box.
The cost of production was seven cents per box less on the irrigated groves, and
the returns were 15 percent higher.
Assistance was given to 1,383 growers in melanose control, 300 growers in oil
spraying to control scale, and 1,100 growers in the control of rust mite.
The Extension Service distributed about 14,000 copies of spray schedules is-
sued by the Florida Citrus Commission.
Frenching in the chronic and acute forms has largely disappeared from the
groves under intensive foliage applications of zinc. Bronze leaf, a foliage symp-
tom of magnesium deficiency, has been brought under control by the almost uni-
versal use of dolomite, frequently supplemented by magnesium sulfate and more
lately by seawater magnesium.
The influence of magnesium on the yield of citrus fruits and consequent pro-
duction cost is seen in the records of 31 groves where dolomite has been used for
the last three years in building up from a very low soil reaction level and supply-
ing a pronounced deficiency of magnesium. The yield has been increased 67 per-
cent and the cost per box of producing the fruit has been reduced 40 percent by
the treatment.
Meetings.-Four hundred educational citrus meetings were held in 24 counties.
The growers' institute held at Camp McQuarrie, Lake County, ran through
four days each year with an average daily attendance of 150.

FORESTRY
The forestry program has included the following:
1. Fire Protection.-In areas where pine timber is the main forestry product,
burning continues to be an extremely destructive practice. In cooperation with
the U. S. Forest Service a determined effort is being made to overcome this prac-
tice.
2. Thinning.-Some areas are overstocked with pine trees. The problem here
is to select the most valuable trees for lumber and harvest and market other less
valuable trees for pulpwood, firewood, crossties, posts, etc.
3. Gum Farming.-The present demand is for a large production of turpen-
tine and rosin required by war industries. This provides another source of farm
income and if properly handled yields substantial returns.





4. Marketing.-Ways and means of marketing and delivering small supplies
of farm timber products that will justify the cost and give fair returns and enable
farmers to produce a substantial amount of the needed increases of turpentine
and rosin have been suggested.
5. Destructive Pulpwood Cutting.-Large areas have been devastated of all
trees and much valuable timber sold for pulpwood that should have been left for
the production of lumber for building purposes, fence posts and construction
work.
6. Norris-Doxey farm forest projects provide for planting and protecting
natural reforestation. Through cooperation with the U. S. Forest Service, the
State Forest Service and the Agricultural Adjustment Agency, there have been
about eight million trees planted each year in 35 counties.
The Extension Forester has launched a campaign for the planting of red
cedar on suitable soils.

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

This program provides for studies in the following:
1. Citrus Grove Management.-In this a study is made of management prac-
tices dealing with fertilization, cultivation, value of cover crops and soil correc-
tives. Apparently the cost of production in many areas is higher than conditions
justify.
2. Irish Potatoes and Celery.-This study has been carried on six years and
cost records were secured from farmers, marketing associations and packing-
houses.
Similar studies were made with celery in the Everglades to determine produc-
tion costs and returns from celery grown on the peat and muck lands.
3. Outlook Information.-The economics section prepares the farm outlook
report for Florida. This project has been underway for several years in coopera-
tion with the Federal Bureau of Agricultural Economics and is now of greater
value because of war production needs.
4. Management of Range Cattle.-The program is being carried in coopera-
tion with 15 range cattlemen who have agreed to keep records of their operations.
Cattlemen are assisted in making the necessary inventories, setting up schedules
and keeping costs and sales records.
5. Farm management surveys were made on 35 farms in Jefferson County in
cooperation with the Soil Conservation Service. This provided for a record of
production for home use and for sale and determination of farm needs.
6. Garden Studies.-Definite investigations were made to secure information
on farm gardens to supply food for farm families on low income farms, as a part
of the land-use planning program. This was correlated with a study of nutrition
needs to determine the effect a plentiful supply of vegetables as related to the
health and welfare of tenants and small farmers.

NEGRO WORK

Fourteen counties have Negro Extension agents, nine women and nine men,
supervised by two district agents. The main objective is the production of food
and feedstuffs so that farms may be self-sustaining with production to supply
62





farm and home needs. All work of negro agents is coordinated with that of the
white agents. Negro agents assist and work with county agents in problems
affecting negro farm families. Specialists and supervisors from the state office
supply subject matter, bulletins and programs as a basis for negro Extension
work. 4-H short courses are held at appropriate times and places, usually at the
Florida A. & M. College for Negroes at Tallahassee.
Headquarters for negro work is provided by the Florida A. & M. College in
Tallahassee, and the president of that institution gives cordial and substantial
assistance. There are approximately 9,700 negro farmers in Florida; 4,500 of
these are owners, 1,000 are part owners, and 4,200 are tenant farmers.

HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK
PROGRAMS WITH RURAL FAMILIES

Home demonstration work has been developed toward the goals of health,
thrift, adequate food and nutrition, and training in good citizenship. The 18,470
rural women and girls enrolled in the 820 organized home demonstration clubs
in 1941 were already trained leaders, carrying on a practical defense program
in their homes and communities through canning and preserving their food, home
food production, cookery and meal planning and preparation, and saving textiles
and equipment in the home. The long-time educational program has been ad-
justed during the biennium to meet many immediate war-time needs. Reports
show that 48,676 white farm and rural families and 2,378 negro farm families
received direct help, an increase of 4,000 over the number served the preceding
biennium. Home agents visited 28,806 farm homes, had 55,302 telephone calls,
and prepared 4,746 press articles and 460 radio talks.
Home demonstration workers kept in close touch with state and national pro-
grams affecting agriculture and Florida rural people, and received much valued
cooperation from other agencies. The agents have tried to use all available re-
sources to secure results which contribute to permanent improvement and give
immediate aid to the war efforts of the county.
The Florida State College for Women provides office quarters and cooperates
in the maintenance of the state-wide program.

FOOD PRODUCTION AND CONSERVATION-NUTRITION
In line with national agricultural production goals and the Food for Freedom
program, the home agents strengthened their work with home gardens, poultry
and home dairying to provide a more adequate supply of food for home use and to
release for shipment elsewhere some of the food products usually bought for use
in rural homes. Storage of surplus crop through home canning was encouraged.
More than 16,000 home gardens were grown by women and girls and 1,573
fruit trees planted. Also, 3,124,444 quarts of vegetables and fruits, meats, fish
and poultry were canned for home use. Florida citrus and other fruits were made
into 663,828 quarts of preserves, jams and marmalades; 948,017 pounds of meat
were stored or cured. Three times as much food has been canned and stored in
home pantries in the first six months of 1942 as during the same season of last
year. Canning centers have been established in communities, directed largely by
volunteer home demonstration women, and in some counties by canning assistants
employed by county boards.
Instruction in better preparation of Florida foods and better planned meals





was given to the 17,813 girls and women enrolled in the Foods, Nutrition and
Health program. Also, 9,882 women and girls reported having physical examina-
tions by physicians as part of their health improvement. More than 83,000 school
children were served by school lunch-room which home demonstration women
either sponsored or supervised in their wish to improve the health of their chil-
dren in school. Instruction on the use of enriched flour and on surplus food com-
modities was presented in all counties through cooperation with the Surplus
Marketing Administration. The use of Florida honey and sirup was stressed as
a part of the sugar-saving program. Information has been supplied county ra-
tioning boards on amounts of sugar needed to meet local canning needs.
The specialists in nutrition and in food preservation are members of the Ex-
tension Agricultural Goals Committee, serving as chairman of sub-committees on
nutrition and home gardens. The state agent is chairman of a state defense
council committee on home gardens and food conservation with volunteer county
chairman in each county pledged to push gardening and canning as part of a
needed defense program. Home agents serve as members of county defense coun-
cil committees on nutrition and victory gardens, and as instructors in Red Cross
nutrition classes.

HOME IMPROVEMENT, THRIFT, AND HME INDUSTRIES

Thrift by preventing waste and improved management of resources was em-
phasized in the Home improvement Program in all counties. More than 2,000
rural homes were reported electrified. Clinics for the repair and better use of
pressure cookers, sewing machines or other household equipment were held in
more than 30 counties.
Recognizing the need of making the home itself attractive and sanitary, 207
new homes were built, 1,158 painted or repaired, 459 water systems installed,
and 1,019 homes screened.
Total cash sales reported by rural women of home industries products they
had developed from farm resources amounted to $424,399.72 for the biennium.
Through thrift, better management and self-denial, rural families invested
generally in the government's war-time stamps and bonds, although no state-wide
report is available on the total amount purchased by home demonstration mem-
bers. County councils and clubs assisted with sale of these securities in coopera-
tion with the U. S. D. A. War Board.

COORDINATED COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

With the increasing difficulties of transportation, county-wide meetings have
been fewer and local people have taken on greater responsibility for community
programs. Local leaders held 15,402 instruction meetings on timely subject with
an attendance of 58,000 persons. Thirty-three home demonstration club houses
or rooms are reported secured in 1941 and 25 libraries. At least six counties
bought motion picture projectors for county-wide use. All this shows a whole-
some interest in maintaining a fine community life in spite of the war.
A thousand volunteer women leaders assisted in explaining the government's
program set up to control the cost of living.
Home demonstration clubs and councils cooperated actively with other organ-
izations in programs for civic improvement, including the state-wide health com-
mittee; the celebration of the President's Birthday to aid the fight against infan-





tile paralysis. Other educational agencies, especially the administrators and
teachers of the public schools, have given valued cooperation.

TEXTILE AND CLOTHING-HOME FURNISHINGS

Home sewing and greater use of cotton for clothing and house furnishings was
encouraged in all parts of the state, through instruction to club groups and
leaders, and by exhibits and demonstrations. Thrift was taught in buying textiles
and repairing and reclaiming used garments. The value of suitable and attrac-
tive clothing to health and morale was emphasized.
Nearly 30,000 mattresses and cotton comforts were made by farm families
under the direction of home agents, carrying out a program cooperatively with the
Agricultural Adjustment Administration to use surplus cotton.
The 21 counties where the Cotton Stamp program was set up were supplied
with especially prepared circulars and posters to encourage wise spending of the
isued stamps for cotton goods needed in the homes.

4-H WORK WITH GIRLS

Ten thousand girls were enrolled, which was only a slight increase over the
previous two years. Local people available in other years to serve as local leaders
for the community groups were either employed or used their time as volunteers
in specific defense work, and did not give their usual aid to the 4-H program.
The president of the State Junior Council for 4-H girls was named to the
State Youth Committee of the State Defense Council.
One hundred and five former 4-H club girls were enrolled in 1941-42 as students
in the Florida State College for Women, with 23 of these girls receiving degrees
in 1941 and 1942. Many earned all or part of their college expenses. The women
of the State Council maintained a scholarship loan fund, contributed by county
councils, the amount of loans made in the past ten years amounting to two thou-
sand dollars.
The Annual State Short Course for Florida 4-H girls was not held in 1942,
due to the war situation, the only time this event has not been held in the 30
years since home demonstration work was established in Florida.

WORK WITH NEGRO FAMILIES
All the developments of the home demonstration program, as given in this
report, are conducted with negro families, adapting the plans to meet their spe-
cific needs. Nine negro home agents are employed in counties having large num-
bers of negro farm families, with a negro district agent in immediate charge of
the program. A home grown food supply, stored and eaten properly for the
health of the family, and home improvement and sanitation and personal health
have been taught in all counties.
Respectfully submitted,
WILMON NELLWELL,
Provost for Agriculture and Director
of Agricultural Extension Service





REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

To the President of the University:
SIR: The College of Business Administration, during the biennium ending
June 30, 1942, has made satisfactory progress. The advent of war has of course
altered activities in many ways and has necessitated a change in emhpasis, but
registration of students has remained largely unchanged. While the number of
students enrolled in the University as a whole, decreased sharply from 1940-41
to 1941-42, the number in the College of Business Administration decreased only
from 240 in the first year to 231 in the second year, or less than four per cent.
The number of graduates, however, remained exactly the same-112-in each
of the two years.
Both the number of students and the number of graduates in Business Ad-
ministration are likely to increase rather than decrease during the next biennium.
Under Occupational Bulletin (No. 10), issued by the Selective Service System on
June 18, 1942, students preparing to become accountants, economists, personnel
managers, statisticians, or industrial managers were placed on the list of "critical
occupations." This means that there are acute shortages in these occupations and
that students preparing therefore, along with engineers, chemists and certain
other selected groups, will be deferred under the draft until they have received
their degrees. Since virtually all students in the College of Business Administra-
tion are preparing to enter one of these occupations, they will be given the oppor-
tunity, provided they make satisfactory progress, to remain in the University until
they graduate. This arrangement will undoubtedly increase rather than decrease
student enrollments.
To adjust its program to the war needs of students, the College of Business
Administration has made some changes in its regulations. To begin with, stu-
dents who are preparing to enter particular divisions of the armed forces are per-
mitted, subject to the approval of the Dean, to increase the number of elective
credits outside courses in economics and business. This regulation has enabled
students to make individual adjustments and to fit themselves more effectively
for the military services which they expect to enter. Provisions have also been
made without lowering standards in any way, to take care of the needs of students
who are near graduation but who may be called for active before they are able
to take regularly scheduled final examinations or before they are able otherwise to
comply with the mechanics of graduation.
Five permanent changes in staff have been made during the biennium. A. S.
Campbell resigned to become economist for the Tennessee Valley Atuhority and
C. H. Donovan, A. B., Ph.D., was appointed as Associate Professor of Economics
in his place. Robert Collins resigned to enter the practice of accounting and
George Dandelake, M. A., C.P.A., was appointed to take his place. Miss Catherine
Smith, Secretary, resigned and Miss Tex Brown, B.S., was appointed in her
place. William H. Joubert, B.S., M.A., with five years teaching experience at the
Florida State College for Women and with virtually all requirements completed
for his Doctor's degree, was appointed Assistant Professor of Economics. John
W. Dietz, B.S., M.A., with several years of business experience, was appointed
Assistant Professor of Finance, half-time.





Several faculty members have entered the Army or Navy or the government
service. Wesley Fly and Earl Powers, who held reserve commissions in the
Army, was called to active duty in January, 1942. C. H. Donovan was given a
reserve commission in the Navy and was called to active duty in June, 1942. While
T. C. Bigham will return to his teaching duties this fall, he was given a leave
of absence from November 1941 to September, 1942 to become Secretary and
Director of Research of the National Transportation Board in Washington. R. S.
Atwood was given a leave of absence in March, 1942 to accept a war-time appoint-
ment as economic advisor to the American Embassy in Quito, Ecuador.
This college has followed the policy of not replacing faculty members called
into the armed forces or into the government service, except in cases where re-
placements were absolutely necessary. In line with this policy, Fly and Powers
were only partially replaced. Their courses were taken care of by shifting Assist-
ant Professor Joubert half-time from other courses to accounting, by adding Roy
Purvis to the staff on a half-time basis and by advancing Lloyd Johnson from a
graduate assistant to a full-time instructor. In this way considerable savings were
effected in the budget. Johnson, however, resigned in June, 1942. Unless anti-
cipated enrollments in accounting increase this fall, no further replacement will
be made. Other staff members took over the courses of Donovan and Atwood.
Certain faculty members have acted in a consulting or other capacity during
the biennium. James E. Chace was granted a leave of absence for one year to
serve with the Florida Industrial Commission. While he was away George Baugh-
man took his place. Walter J. Matherly was appointed by the State Board of
Health, for a two year period, as Chairman of the Merit System Council of the
State Board of Health and the Crippled Children's Commission. He was also
appointed by the Governor for a three-year term on the Florida Centennial Com-
mission. R. B. Eutsler is acting as economic advisor to the Florida Railroad Com-
mission in connection with its study of the Southern freight rate structure. Dur-
ing the present summer, D. M. Beights is serving with the United States Civil
Service Commission in Washington and John W. Dietz with the Office of Price Ad-
ministration in Atlanta.
The Bureau of Economic and Business Research which operates under the
College of Business Administration has continued to function effectively during
the biennium. In December, 1941, this Bureau began the monthly publication of
Economic Leaflets-a four-page sheet designed to serve the people of Florida by
gathering, classifying and interpreting facts concerning commerce, finance, manu-
facturing, insurance, government, taxation and other related fields. It carries
articles each month prepared by University faculty members which are of direct
interest not only to business men but also to individual citizens and those who are
concerned with problems of state and local government. The following articles
have appeared in the publication from December, 1941, to August, 1942, inclu-
sive: "Florida's Position in National Defense," Roland B. Eutsler; "A Decade of
Federal Expenditures in Florida," C. H. Donovan; "Inflation," John G. Eldridge;
"Population Changes in Florida, 1930-1940," John M. Maclachlan; "The Incipient
Metropolitan Economy of Florida," Oscar E. Heskin; "War Finance," Walter J.
Matherly; "War Production," Roland B. Eutsler; "The Banking Facilities of
Florida," Harwood B. Dolbeare; "Florida Banks and the Federal Deposit Insur-
ance Corporation," Frank W. Tuttle; and "The Control of Consumer Credit,"
Walter J. Matherly.
In addition to the research efforts of faculty members which have appeared in





Economic Leaflets, several faculty members have written and published important
articles during the past two years: Montgomery D. Anderson, "Sobre A'Molda
Neutra'," Separata, Do No. c Ano v, Da Revista Brasilliera De Estatistica and)
"Investment and Valuation of Capital," in Econometrica, April, 1942; Sigismund
deR. Diettrich, "Hemisphere Defense and American Solidarity," Proceedings of
Florida Academy of Sciences, 1940; Frank W. Tuttle, "Should Banks be Per-
mitted to Fail?" Proceedings of Florida Academy of Sciences, 1940; Truman C.
Bigham, "The Transportation Act of 1940," Southern Economic Journal, July,
1941; and Walter J. Matherly, "The Development of Consumer Economics,"
Southern Economic Journal, July, 1942.
James E. Chace and William H. Joubert have continued with their work toward
Doctors' degrees. Joubert will probably secure his degree from the University
of North Carolina at the end of the current summer session. Wesley Fly in 1941
and Earl Powers and George Dandelake in 1942, successfully passed the examina-
tions given by the Florida Board of Accounting Examiners and received their
C.P.A.'s. Walter J. Matherly, in June, 1940, received the honorary degree of
Doctor of Laws from William Jewell College.
The needs of the College of Business Administration are of three kinds: First,
adjustment of salaries of faculty members to rising price levels and costs of
living; second, holding open the positions and adjusting their salaries upward
of those who have been given leaves of absence to enter the armed forces or
government service; and third, maintenance of teaching personnel to take care
of possible increases in the number of students which may come as a result of
draft deferments. The College of Business Administration has a significant role
to play in the war. Every effort will be made to insure that it plays that role
effectively.
Respectfully submitted,
WALTER J. MATHERLY, Dean of the
College of Business Administration



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
To the President of the University:
SIR: I have the honor to submit to you the following report of the College of
Engineering and the Engineering Experiment Station for the period ending
June 30, 1942.
The College of Engineering was one of the first divisions of the University to
become actively affected by what was first, the nation's defense effort, and later,
the real war effort. Among the important activities of the College during the
past biennium are the following:
(1) The United States Army has contracted for special training for selected
groups of enlisted personnel and civilians.
(2) Since 1940 the College has cooperated with the Civil Aeronautics Admin-
istration in its pilot training program giving instruction to 306 pilots many of
whom are now engaged in combat duty with the armed forces.
(3) The College was selected in 1940 by the United States Security Agency
as the only authorized institution in the state for administering its special college-
level program of Engineering, Science, Management War Training whose purpose





it is to train civilians for war industries and the armed services. During the past
biennium 3,795 Floridians have enrolled in 115 of these courses which are now
available in all parts of the state.
(4) The need for technically trained men has been reflected in the largest
engineering classes in the history of the institution. Industries throughout the
nation, many Government bureaus, and the armed forces are contacting us and
absorbing these graduates in ever increasing numbers. The increased enrollment
of many of our classes could not have been met without increasing the faculty
except by the greatly increased efforts of our staff and the more efficient use of
our facilities, including laboratories and classrooms.
(5) The College has been called upon for many services to industry and the
armed forces, particularly with reference to Government contracts. Our technical
staff and equipment are in frequent use on such work.
(6) To further meet the demands for engineers the College has accelerated
its program by making available for the first time a large number of courses in
engineering in the summer school session. Approximately 50 per cent of our
students availed themselves of this possibility of accelerating their progress.
The above items have called for an unprecedented demand upon not only our
physical equipment, but also upon our staff. The loyalty of our men in this emer-
gency has been outstanding. Many of them have refused offers of greatly in-
creased compensation because of their loyalty to our institution, and because of
the fact that they felt that they could serve the war effort to better advantage by
remaining here.
LABORATORIES

During the past biennium, the Chemical Engineering laboratory has been able
to secure many outstanding pieces of equipment so that this department is now
in a much better position insofar as its instructional work and research are con-
cerned.
The Electronics Laboratory has been fortunate in securing, through the efforts
of Dr. Palmer H. Craig, a comprehensive tube-making and glass-blowing labora-
tory. This equipment is some of the most outstanding of its type in the South
and will be of real value not only in instructing our students, but also for research
purposes.
The Mechanical Engineering Laboratory has almost completed the construction
of a wind tunnel to be used not only in the field of aeronautics, but also in con-
nection with studies pertaining to stresses produced by high winds in building
structures. Commendation should be given to Professor R. A. Thompson for the
unique and intricate design of the automatic equipment involved and to Mr. C. H.
Swartz for its construction.
The improvement in our laboratories has been brought about through the hard
work and ingenuity of our staff, in spite of the fact that funds were not available
for purchase of such improvements.

CURRICULA

Curricula of various departments have been changed insofar as technical con-
tent is concerned because of many new developments which have occurred.
Our Electrical Engineering course now gives added emphasis to the field of
electronics. Students in Mechanical Engineering may specialize in the aeronaut-
ical field. Students in Civil Engineering may now secure special courses in the
field of public health which should enable them to fill a great need in solving
health problems of our state.





Throughout the curricula emphasis has been placed upon technical applications
pertaining to the war effort.
The General College program has been of inestimable value in connection with
our increased program due to the war effort. It has enabled us to quickly separate
those students not qualified for engineering and steer them into other channels.
Through the testing program it is possible to analyze the student's needs at the
beginning of his college career and so give him additional instruction when needed
in fundamental courses of study. On the other hand, it has enabled the superior
student to accelerate his program and so more quickly make him available in the
war effort. By postponing entrance into the College of Engineering until the
junior year and demanding more than a mere passing grade in fundamental sub-
jects before a student is admitted to the College, a better quality of work is done
in the professional school with a considerably decreased number of dropouts due
to failure.
FLORIDA INDUSTRIES' COOPERATIVE PLAN

During the past biennium approximately 40 men per year have received tech-
nical and industrial instruction while earning over $20,000 per year. Not only does
this give a student an opportunity to earn part of his college expenses, but also
enables him to secure an insight into industrial practice concurrently with his
educational program.
PERSONNEL

1. Associate Professor William L. Sawyer has been granted a leave of abesnce
to serve with the armed forces. Mr. Gerald M. Keith was selected to fill
this vacancy.
2. Associate Professor S. P. Sashoff has been granted a leave of absence to
serve with the armed forces. This vacancy was filled by Dr. Palmer H.
Craig.
3. Assistant Professor Geo. 0. Phelps resigned from the Department of In-
dustrial Engineering. Professor E. D. deLuca, who has since resigned,
was appointed to his place.
4. Associate Professor C. H. Janes has resigned and Mr. J. T. Leggett has
been appointed in his place.
5. Professor E. C. Barrett has been doing research in limerock in connection
with the Engineering Experiment Station and teaching in the Chemical
Engineering Department from January, 1941, to August, 1942.
6. Professor C. A. Moreno was added to the Electrical Engineering Depart-
ment in the first semester 1941-42 and he brings valuable assistance to the
work of that department in electronics.
7. Mr. James L. Shivler resigned from the department of Civil Engineering
in March, 1942.

ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION

For several years the Biennial Report called attention to the need for funds
for the Engineering Experiment Station. Many problems pertaining to the wel-
fare of our state affecting our industrial development, and the health and pro-
tection of our people should be studied by engineers properly qualified for this
work in laboratories equipped for these problems.





The last legislature made available an annual appropriation of $50,000 so that
this important work could go on. It was found, however, that the State's gnances
were unable to meet this appropriation, and so no funds were made available for
this work. An investment in engineering experimentation would return dividends
to every citizen in our state. It could be of real assistance in our war effort and
it would be of even greater assistance in the reconstruction period which will
come.
The Station is, however, using its facilities in helping many of the industries
solve many of their minor problems. Lack of funds, however, prevents the
Station from endeavoring to solve many important problems which will confront
us in the future. The Electrical Engineering Department has been unable to con-
tinue the excellent work which it started in the field of hurricane location through
means of associated static due to lack of personnel and funds. Studies are now
being made pertaining to the value of ground resistance of various Florida soils.
Acknowledgement should be made to the Florida Limerock Association for a
grant of $10,000 which has enabled us to make studies in connection with limerock,
one of Florida's important natural resources.
The Chemical Engineering Department is carrying on research pertaining to
the following:

1. Recovery of acetic acid from pine wood distillation products.
3. Decovery of toluene and other critical chemicals from gas
tar.
3. Production of plastics from citrus waste.
4. Liquid film coefficients in heat transfer.
5. The condensation of mixed vapors.
The Mechanical Engineering Department has begun studies pertaining to the
stresses in roof structures at high winds.
The Civil Engineering Department has been studying certain sewage problems
of Florida.

SPECIAL TRAINING PROGRAMS

Short Course for Electric Metermen: For many years the College of Engineer-
ing has recognized the importance of training for special groups. The short
course for electric metermen in 1922 was one of the first technical training courses
given at the University. Industry has demanded the repetition of this course
from year to year and under the direction of Professor E. F. Smith the two
courses given during the past biennium were probably the most outstanding that
have yet been given. The attendance was considerably increased, the material
covered was of an usually high level, and the persons attending came from many
different states.
Civilian Pilot Training Program of the Civil Aeronautic Administration: In
to stimulate an interest in aviation the Civil Aeronautics Administration insti-
tuted a Civilian Pilot Training Program at the University of Florida furnishing
to selected students instruction both in flight and theory of aeronautics. With
the advent of the war this program was limited to students selected by the Army
and Navy. At the present time groups of approximately 40 men receive instruc-
tion every eight wekes. During the past biennium 237 men received instruction
in the primary work and 69 students received instruction in the secondary phase.
Engineering, Science, Management, War Training: The United States Office





of Education instituted a special training program of college level in engineering
in 1940. In 1941, science and management were added. The University of Florida
was authorized to contact the industries of Florida in an endeavor to determine
their future need in these fields and to make available special courses throughout
the state. These courses are not intended to replace college work nor are they
intended for persons merely wishing additional education; they are made available
to those persons who through intensive training in certain special courses of
college level may better contribute to the war effort either by accepting employ-
ment in war industries or with the armed forces. A new feature of this program
will probably be the added emphasis to be placed on the training of women for
war industries in the near future.
The following courses have been made available:


Elementary Engineering Drawing
Elementary Surveying
Ultra High Frequency Techniques
Fundamentals of Radio, Course I
Radio Communications (Pre-Radar)
Mold Loft Procedure and Layoff
Elements of Aircraft Engineering
Basic Engineering
Chemistry of Non-Metallic Elements
Foreman Training
Fundamentals of Engineering
Fundamentals of Radio Engineering
Kinematics of Machines
Sanitary Science
Radio Communications
Airport Design and Construction
Chemical Engineering Plant Design
Foundations of Engineering
Machine Design
Structures
Mapping for Engineering Decon-
naissance


Advanced Engineering Drawing
Safety Engineering
Engineering Aide (Radio)
Applied Mathematics
Plant Management
Elem. Electrical Engineering
Elements of Radio Engineering
Differential Calculus
Machine Elements
Chemistry of Metallic Elements
Integral Calculus
Simple Structures
Military Drafting
Radio Communications, Special
Aircraft Engineering
Engineering Drawing
Marine Design
Radio Design
Airport Design
Principles of Chemical Engineering


Instruction has been given in the following cities:


Daytona Beach
Gainesville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville Beach
Miami
Mulberry
Orlando
Pensacola


St. Augustine
St. Petersburg
Tallahassee
Tampa
West Palm Beach
Panama City
Camp Blanding


Through this program the College of Engineering has been able to be of assist-
ance to the State Defense Council in special courses given for the Council in
Gainesville and Tallahassee.
Special Courses for Army and Navy: At the request of the armed forces in-
struction has been given to several groups of civilian employees assigned to us
by the Army and Navy. These courses have extended over a period of from three
to six months. In general, they have been in specialized technical fields. Upon
the completion of these courses these men have ben assigned to various army
units. Groups of enlisted men have also been sent us for instruction in radio
from various army posts.





A special group of commissioned officers of the Army and Navy have also
been assigned to us for instruction in Ultra High Frequency Techniques.

RECOMMENDATIONS

The demands for engineers in industry and in the armed forces has resulted
not only in producing heavy demands upon our staff, but has placed the members
of the staff in a peculiar position. The younger members of the faculty now
find themselves working at lower salaries than are paid to students just graduat-
ing from their classes. Other members of our faculty are receiving compensa-
tion much less than that which industry is now offering them. These facts to-
gether with the increased cost of living make it almost imperative that increases
in salary be granted the members of our teaching staff.
Some of our laboratories have been handicapped by lack of funds for many
years, although through industry and Federal sources valuable equipment has
been obtained. As soon as it is practicable funds should be made available to im-
prove these laboratories. It is not likely that this can be done until after the
successful culmination of the war.
For several years now there has been no active head of our Electrical En-
gineering Department. This has caused considerable difficulty in the administra-
tion of the College. It is recommended that this condition be changed as soon as
possible.
Respectfully submitted,
JOSEPH WEIL, Dean



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF LAW
To the President of the University:
SIR: There is a tendency accentuated by war to view education quantitatively
rather than qualitatively. Law schools suffer in war time. Yet the education of
young lawyers of character and ability is necessary in the national interest.
Many of the young men employed by the federal, state, and city governments
are recruited from law graduates. Law firms which perform an important role
in the organization and operation of essential war industries are dependent upon
a steady flow of law graduates. Likewise is general business, necessary to finance
the war.
FACULTY
The faculty has been represented on the Merit Committee of the State Welfare
Board and the Merit Council of the Florida Industrial Commission. It has had
one or more members on the following committees of the State Bar Association:
Public Relations; Adoption of Federal Rules in Florida; Legal Education and Ad-
mission to the Bar; Judicial Administration and Reform. It has taken part in the
programs of the state law institutes of 1940 and 1941. It has lectured before
various circuit institutes and the Abstracter's Association. One of its members
drafted the Probation and Parole Act enacted by the 1941 legislature. Another
member contributed to the Ninth and Tenth Yearbooks of School law and super-
vised the preparation by students of Florida Case Comments for the Florida Law





Journal. In addition its members have taken part in the work of important
University committees.
If, as former Chief Justice Hughes said, "work condemns a man to perpetual
youth," the College has a young faculty. It was made younger by the addition
in September, 1940, of William A. McRae, Jr., B. Litt. (Oxon.), J. D. (Florida),
an honor graduate and Rhodes scholar. Since January, 1942, Profesor McRae
has been on leave of absence and in the armed forces, being Captain, Army In-
telligence. Professor McRae took the position left vacant by Judge Robert S.
Cockrell, who retired in 1940 after serving the College with distinction since 1919.

ADJUSTMENTS

A professor to take the place of Professor McRae has not been requested.
With a few re-asignments and omissions of courses, the remaining five men are
carrying on the work. Some teaching has been assigned the Assistant Librarian,
Herbert J. Allan, B.S., LL.B., B.L.S. Omitted courses will be given during the
summer, or rotated with other courses, so students will not be denied the oppor-
tunity of taking them.
While the bulk of law courses is as useful in war time as in peace time, the
faculty has striven to offer subjects spot-lighted by the war. Thus courses in
Military Law, Air Law, Admiralty, and Administrative Law are given; and dur-
ing the intersession term, 1942, one of our faculty will teach Military Administra-
tion. Hitherto the faculty has offered one summer law term, but in 1942 two
terms were given, enabling students to get more law before entering the service.
This practice probably will continue during the emergency.
During 1941-42, students from time to time were called into the service, con-
fronting us with the problems of credit salvage. Each case was handled by stu-
dent petition, but the following general policy emerged from our actions. Stu-
dents above first year class called into service: (a) attending one-half semester,
given examinations, for one-half credit, one; (b) attending two-third semester,
given examinations for two-thirds credit, two; (c) substantially completing the
semester's work, given examinations for full credit, four; (d) candidates for de-
grees in sixth semester, given examinations for full credit, nine.

ATTENDANCE, DEGREES AND HONORS
In 1940-41, the College enrolled 166 students; in 1941-42 (exclusive of sum-
mer), 100. In 1940-41 forty-three law degrees were given, three with honors
and four with high honors; in 1941-42 (exclusive of summer school) twenty-seven
law degrees were given, three with honors and four with high honors. In 1940-41
the first year student making the highest average was Irving Cypen; in 1941-42,
Mrs. Ralph H. Martin, nee Margaret Hopkins. In 1940-41 the senior making the
highest average during his entire course, the work being done entirely in this
College, was Donn N. Gregory; in 1941-42, Thomas V. Lefevre.

STUDENTS AND ALUMNI

In the early part of 1941 a student bar association-the John Marshall-was
organized with over 95% of the students as charter members. Leo Foster, the
first President, was succeeded in 1942 by P. J. Yonge. This association has sent
delegates to the State Bar Association meetings, and has brought a number of





prominent speakers to the College. In the spring of 1942 the student bar fostered
the formation of a society of pre-law students.
Wm. J. Bivens was President of the Law Alumni for 1940-41; S. T. Dell, Jr., for
1941-42. In 1940-41 S. 0. Carson was law clerk for the Supreme Court; in 1941-42,
Donn N. Gregory. Alto Adams, Law '21, is a member of the State Supreme Court,
and H. L. Sebring, Law, '28, has won the 1942 primary election for a position
thereon.
DEDICATION EXERCISES

November 22, 1941, the sumptuously equipped and furnished five-story Law
Library Building was formally accepted. At these impressive exercises, presided
over by the President of the University, the law plant was dedicated to the mem-
ory of the late Nathan Philemon Bryan, 1872-1935, First Chairman, Board of Con-
trol, 1905-09, United States Senator from Florida, 1911-1917, United States Circuit
Judge for the Fifth Circuit, 1920-35. Honorable H. P. Adair, Chairman, Board of
Control, Honorable Armstead Brown, Chief Justice, Supreme Court of Florida,
Honorable Spessard L. Holland, Governor of Florida, and others, voiced eloquent
and heart-felt tributes to the great man whose zeal and interest were responsible
for the founding of the College in 1909. Mrs. N. P. Bryan and many relatives of
Judge Bryan attended the exercises. An oil portrait and a medallion of Judge
Bryan are to be given the College, the gift of Mrs. Bryan and other relatives.

LIBRARY

September, 1941, the law library was moved into its new home. Ivan Odle,
B.S., LL.B., Assistant Librarian, resigned during said summer to enter the prac-
tice, and Herbert J. Allan, training previously noted ,was elected to take his
place.
It is desired to increased the size and effectiveness of the library as rapidly as
possible. Appeals for gifts have been made in bulletins of Friends of the Uni-
versity of Florida Library. Grateful acknowledgment is made of gits from J. C.
Adkins, Mrs. Lida J. Drew, Herbert Gibson, Miss Allison Locke, Barbara Cummer
Sterling, Florida Supreme Court Library, Professor Edward H. Warren.
The library, however, should not neglect the latest legal material, and its ap-
propriations should be as generous as possible under present conditions. In view
of the rapid changes in certain fields, we have acquired two loose-leaf services,
to-wit: Commerce Clearing House, Federal Tax Guide, and Pike and Fischer,
Administrative Law Service. More and more future legal material probably will
be in this form, but the heavy cost of such services limits their use.
The library has added to its law reviews and important texts and has acquired
late codes of Alabama, South Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia, the New
Federal Digest, the Commonwealth Law Reports (Australia), the Quebec and
Prince Edward Island Reports, and the Pennsylvania Inferior Court Reports.

CONCLUSION

Law teachers may derive special satisfaction from two things: they preserve
the continuity of the law; they build morale. Chief Justice Harlan Stone, writing
to law teachers, said: "You have important work to do. Perhaps not the least
of it, in a time of change and unsettlement, is to insure adequate recognition of
the function and importance of continuity in the law." In The White Cliffs Alice





Miller refers to "the sullen might of the English standing upon a right." Un-
yielding devotion to rights and liberty is the quenchless spirit of English and
American law ,and students of it are quick and resolute to defend rights and
liberty. So it has been here.
Respectfully submitted,
HARRY R. TRUSLER, Dean



REPORT OF THE ACTING DEAN OF THE
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
To the President of the University:
SIR: I respectfully submit the following report for the College of Edu-
cation for the biennium ending June 30, 1942.
At the opening of the biennium the increasing duties of the Summer
School deanship called for the full-time work of Dean J. W. Norman; ac-
cordingly, G. Ballard Simmons, who had been Assistant Dean for thirteen
years, was made Acting Dean of the College of Education.
During the biennium there have been four additions to the line faculty.
Leon Gray and C. F. Cumbee, who had held Florida school principalships,
were made Research Associates; Kenneth Rast Williams, who had held the
position of dean of students, University of Georgia, became Professor of
School Administration; and Walter Rollin Williams from Florida Southern
College was made Professor of Education.
There have been four additions to the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
faculty: James E. Bevis, industrial arts; Robert 0. Stripling, core curricu-
lum; Mary Ann Rhodes, girls' health and physical education; and Elizabeth
H. Rusk, core curriculum. In the Yonge School there have been four leaves
granted for graduate study; one leave and two resignations to join the
armed forces.
Several honors have come to the College of Education. A. R. Mead
served as president of the National Society of College Teachers of Educa-
tion during the year 1941-42 and as chairman of the Southeastern Regional
Committee for the Improvement of Education in 1942-43. E. Benton Salt
served as president of the Southern District of the American Association
for Health, Physical Education and Recreation, for the year 1942-43. Act-
ing Dean Simmons served as president of the Florida Education Association
for the year 1941-42. Alfred Crago served as president of the University
of Florida Athenaeum Club during the year 1942-43. Mrs. Margaret Bou-
telle is a member of the State Course of Study Committee, an associate
editor of the English Journal, an associate editor of Journal of Educational
Method, and state chairman of the Public Relations Committee of the Na-
tional Council of English.
Many of the faculty have served as consultants on state department bulletins,
have helped in work shops, have assisted at pre-school conferences and have
spoken at state and district teachers' meetings.
The physical education department of the Yonge School has just published a
textbook for teachers, "Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School."*
Miss Grace Fox of Florida State College for Women was a co-author with E. Benton Salt,
Billie K. Stevens and Miss Elsie Douthett of the Yonge faculty.





OUTSTANDING FEATURES

A few of the outstanding features of the College of Education are mentioned
briefly.
PLANNING COMMITTEE

During the first year of the biennium a Planning Committee for the College
of Education, which meets weekly during the regular school year, was set up.
The purpose of the Committee is to study and recommend plans for the improve-
ment of the College of Education. The recommendations made in this report
have been approved by the Planning Committee.

STUDENT PERSONNEL SERVICE

The College of Education recognizes its responsibility for the direction of an
effective personnel program for its students. Such a program has three major
aspects, namely: (1) the selection of students for professional education as
teachers; (2) the advisement or counseling of students participating in the teach-
er-education program; (3) placement and follow-up services to the individuals
who successfully complete the teacher-education program. Each member of the
faculty of the College of Education serves as a counselor in the advisement phase
of the student personnel program. Each student enrolled in the College of Edu-
cation is asked to select a counselor on the basis of the student's interests and
area of training. The counselor advises the student in any problems or difficulties
which the latter finds. Much headway has been made in the first two major
aspects of the student personnel program. Before placement and follow-up services
can be implemented adequately, it will be necessary that the College of Education
assume direct responsibility for and direction of the Placement Bureau.

BUREAU OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH
The Bureau has directed during the biennium seventeen different projects and
cooperated in about one dozen more. The following have been completed: Effects
of the Draft upon the Teaching Staff of the State; Classification of Teachers As
a Basis for Salary Schedules; History and Program of the P. K. Yonge Elemen-
tary School; Registration Practices in Summer Sessions of Universities; An In-
tensive Two-Year Survey of the Seventh Grade Group for 1939-40.
Four studies are near completion. They are: School Library Services in
Florida Schools; Actual School-Community Activities in a Limited Area; Evalua-
tion of Civic Attitude Tests; A Selected Bibliography on Materials on Florida for
Use by Teachers (with the Writers' Project of the WPA).
Six projects are about ready to be put into manuscript from and published.
The uncertainties of the present situation and emergency demands may cause
radical changes in the work of the Bureau. It now seems that two types of proj-
ects are important: first, those concerned with emergencies in our present school
situation and not due to the war; second, those projects which grow out of the
present emergency.

THE FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY
The Florida Curriculum Laboratory serves teachers in service as well as stu-
dents and faculty members of the College of Education and the P. K. Yonge Lab-
oratory School. During the past year outstanding publications have included





Materials for the Classroom, an annotated bibliography of inexpensive materials
for Florida teachers, A Topical Index to the Literature in the State-Adoptedc
Textbooks for Grades 2-6 and Cooperating Schools as a Technique of Curriculum
Improvement. A "kit" service has been developed for the schools of Alachua
County, and it is hoped that arrangements can be made to extend this means of
enriching instructional materials in Florida schools. The Laboratory has coop-
erated with the State Department of Education in providing materials for a
Workshop held at Southern College in January, 1942, and for groups working on
bulletins.

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA PROJECT IN APPLIED ECONOMICS
Through the cooperation of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, Incorporated, the
University of Florida Project in Applied Economics has continued its investiga-
tion in the development of a school program, which emphasizing housing, will
assist boys and girls and their parents in improving housing conditions. New
developments include the introduction of a series of illustrated, printed readers
and mimeographed activity books in each of the grades of the three Assisting
Schools of the Project. Actual assistance in industrial arts and home arts activi-
ties has also been provided teachers. The establishment of a Revolving Publish-
ing Fund has made it possible to continue the publication and distribution of ad-
ditional housing materials for the school program.

INTER-AMERICAN DEMONSTRATION CENTER
The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School was selected by the Office of Education,
Washington, as an Inter-American Demonstration Center. J. Douglas Haygood,
the Director, works in cooperation with the Inter-American Affairs Committee of
the University. Through the facilities of the Curriculum Laboratory, materials
that can be sent to local schools have been assembled. Several small conferences
have been held with social science teachers, and a three-day Institute was held
during the Summer, 1924, two speakers and an outstanding exhibit of Bolivian
and Chilean handiwork being furnished by the Office of Education.

INSTITUTE ON PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS

The College of Education of the University of Florida in Collaboration with
the National Education Association, the Florida Education Association, and the
State Department of Education, sponsored Florida's First Annual Institute on
Professional Relations in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Auditorium, June
18-19, 1942. Kenneth R. Williams served as Director. The Institute, the purpose
of which is to develop a greater professionalization of teaching in Florida, was
organized around three panel discussions, "Evidences of Need of Increased Pro-
fessionalization of Teachers in Florida," "Five Years of Progress in the Profes-
sionalization of Teachers in Florida," and "We Look Ahead to the Increased Pro-
fessionalization of Teachers in Florida." Approximately 350 public school teach-
ers and administrators, most of whom were students enrolled in the summer ses
sion, attended.
P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL

In keeping with the national emergency, the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School
is adjusting the learning experiences of the boys and girls to new needs created





by the war. Greater emphasis has been placed on mathematics and science;
physical education is required of all pupils, and a period of over 200 minutes per
week set aside for Grades 7 through 12; arrangements were made that further
facilitate superior students to accelerate their programs (an usually large sum-
mer school in 1942 aided acceleration) ; and definite plans made for 1942-43 in-
cluded for Grades 7 through 12 a time for the study of topics pertinent to the
war effort, such as Fire Protection, Gas Defense, First Aid. Visiting Days have
emphasized assisting teachers in guiding pupils toward a better understanding
of our problems.
RECOMMENDATIONS
I wish to make the following recommendations, all of which have been ap-
proved by the Planning Committee of the College of Education.
1. That a Teachers' Advisory Council be set up, the members of which will
be representatives from the College of Education and subject-matter depart-
ments and the purpose of which is to bring about a better teacher-education pro-
gram.
2. That graduate work be offered leading to the degree of Doctor of Educa-
tion and Doctor of Philosophy to meet the needs of certain people, such as ad-
ministrators and supervisors.
3. That at least eight scholarships of a minimum of $500 be set up for the
purpose of bringing in certain selected personnel for a year's study. This would
be a splendid means of the College extending its services to the public schools.
4. That the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School be extended through the General
College so that it would be the type of school that should be set up in every
county in Florida.
5. That the College of Education enter cooperatively into a program of work
in school improvement with some near-by school over a period of years, the pur-
pose of which would be to show the schools of the state how the College could
assist a school in studying its needs and solving its problems.
6. That a College of Education Bulletin be published as a service bulletin for
the public school teachers of Florida.
Respectfully submitted,
G. BALLARD SIMMONS,
Acting Dean, College of Education



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE SUMMER SESSION

To the President of the University:
SIR: The Summer Session of 1942 has in my opinion reached a new high.
More care was taken in its planning than I have known before. This meant a
better balanced program, fewer small classes and fewer adjustments in the teach-
ing staff at the time of registration than we have generally had. The registration
while not the largest in our history (that of 1940 was larger) still was larger by
over 500 than we had expected. The first term ran from 7:30 A.M., Saturday,
June 13, to 8:30 P.M., Friday, July 24. The second term began the very next
morning at 7:30 and will continue until 10:00 P.M., Friday, September 4. Then





an intersession of three weeks will begin the very next morning at 7:30 and con-
tinue until September 25. Thus no time has been lost.
In other ways the session of 1942 is not like those of previous years. Up to
this year each succeeding session was very much like those that had gone before.
That is to say, the 1941 session was much the same as that of 1940, which in turn
was much the same as that of 1939, and so on. The main purpose from as far
back as summer sessions go through 1941 was the education of teachers as has
been pointed out before.
This year, 1942, the line of development seems to have changed direction. The
enrollment of teachers, and prospective teachers, has dropped off 50 per cent or
more, while that in the General College has more than doubled. The ratio of men
to women which in former years was at times two, three, or even four to one in
favor of the women is this year the other way around. More freshmen this year
began their college careers in June rather than September than ever before and
more of our winter students returned than in the past. For the first time in our
history the College of Engineering and the School of Architecture have remained
open, so that it can for the first time be said that now all colleges and schools are
open in the summer.
These facts seem to indicate that the Summer Session has become an important
part of the twelve months' program of a modern university. A generation ago,
except in a few institutions, summer sessions were not taken seriously but in the
country as a whole this is not the case today. For with the coming of Pearl Har-
bor, it was thought that opportunity should be offered young men to complete
their college courses in three years or less. Such expressions as "stream lined,"
"speed up program," "graduation in three years," etc., became familiar. All this
means making better use of the time from June to September than has been done
hitherto, which of course means the Summer Session.
It would seem, therefore, that the time has come no longer to plan winter
sessions and summer sessions as if they were largely independent of each other.
A closer articulation is certainly desirable. Just what this would mean perhaps
none of us knows at present, but the Summer Session Council have recognized
that this problem exists and are giving thought and study to its solution.

THE SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
AT DAYTONA BEACH

A few words should be said about the School of Trade and Industrial Education
at Daytona Beach. This school is a cooperative venture between the University
of Florida and the State Department of Education. It is in operation only in the
summer. The first session was held in 1938. That year two terms of three weeks
were maintained. Since the sessions have consisted of three weeks each. The
purpose of the school is to develop leaders in trade and industrial education as de-
fined by the Smith-Hughes and George-Deen Acts. This is the only school of its
kind in the state and seems to be rendering a valuable service.
Respectfully submitted,
J. W. NORMAN, Dean





REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS
To the President of the University:
SIR: I submit herewith the biennial report of the School of Architecture and
Allied Arts for the period ending June 30, 1942.
In General.-Despite the war situation and the great changes which have been
taking place in private enterprise there have been more requests for graduates
from this School than we could supply. Furthermore, although our courses have
not been devised specifically for war effort nevertheless many of our graduates are
now serving in technical departments of both the Army and the Navy, and of
course also as officers in the armed forces.
Building is vital and necessary in both war and peace-time and while the
neds, under these conditions vary widely, the fundamental training prepares a
student to meet such markedly differing conditions. Furthermore, the Project
Method of education which we fellow is adaptable to changes in content which
permits the introduction of problems related to war conditions to be substituted
for certain peace-time objectives.
To have the good opinion of the profession we serve within the state and the
nation, is of prime importance. That we have this favorable opinion is evidenced
by a published statement, in May 1942, of the president of the Florida Association
of Architects, as follows: "The University of Florida is leading the country in
providing a curriculum designed to make its graduates the 'Master Builders' of
Nationally, we were again awarded the medal of the American Institute of
tomorrow."
Architects which is the award to Schools of Architeture recognized by this na-
tional body as having a sound educational program.
Two graduate students, one from the Argentine and one from Chile took their
major work in Architecture this biennium. It is our hope that such recognition
abroad will continue as a part of better economic and political relations between
the Americas.
The University of Florida continues to be the only institution in Florida where
a curriculum in architecture is offered to its citizens.
Faculty Personnel.-Assistant Professor (Captain) William T. Arnett was
granted a leave of absence, February, 1941, to enter the United States Army.
Assistant Professor Arthur D. McVoy resigned, June 1, 1941 to become City Plan-
ner for Daytona Beach, at a much larger salary; he has since gone into the
government service as a Town Planner.
In September, 1941 Mr. Ralph G. Gulley, head of the Department of Archi-
tecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Instittue was appointed with the rank of Pro-
fessor. Mr. Gulley has a sound educational background, he is sympathetic with
the methods used here and is a strong addition to the teaching staff.
During the second semester of 1942, Assistant Professor Alfred B. Parker
resigned to receive a commission in the United States Navy. To finish out the
term we secured the temporary services of the distinguished Professor Emeritus
Lorch of Michigan University.
One of the problems that will confront us in the coming year will be to find
qualified and experienced teachers to replace others who will also enter the Army
or Navy in the near future.





Faculty Activities.-In addition to the regular assignments, the faculty mem-
bers continue to broaden their sphere of influence through public lectures in their
respective fields. By study and travel during summer periods and by work with
practitioners in the larger centers of activity they refresh themselves for more
valuable teaching during the regular sessions. The director of the School is a
member of the State Board of Architecture and has served during the past three
years as a national director of the American Institute of Architects and has just
been appointed a member of the national committee on Architectural Education,
which adds, within our profession, to the standing of the University.
Gifts.-The following gifts have been received during the biennium:
From the Fine Arts Society of the University-two important books on Art.
By bequest of Henry H. Dupont, Architect, St. Petersburg, deceased-41 books
on Architecture, many plates and photographs.
From Robert R. McGoodwin, F.A.I.A., Philadelphia-1 book on McGoodwin's
Architectural Works.
From Theodore H. Skinner, Architect, Clearwater-68 books and pamphlets,
46 drawings and 2 framed architectural photographs.
Needs.-The full influence of our effort cannot be realized with the present
lack of space to adequately carry out our activities. Graduate students have had
to work in crowded undergraduate laboratories. A building-materials laboratory
and a small shop are most desirable where students can work with the essential
materials of the building arts. A large room for teaching from actual example
is needed for the Fine Arts students and for the advantage of the general stu-
dents as well; this room is also needed for the study of completed projects and
lectures upon such projects.
Facilities.-Excluding upkeep we have acquired the following facilities: Two
office desks, twelve laboratory stools, four cases for drawings and storage, one
moisture meter, one projector and screen, slides for lectures, an air brush, a jig-
saw and a rotary tool for wood-working laboratory.
Recommendations. (a) That programs be modified to include war-time prob-
lems as far as possible while retaining the fundamentals of basic training looking
toward peace-time needs. (b) Provision of one large room such as the original
library room in Peabody Hall. (c) At least one small office, if possible on the
second floor of Peabody Hall. (d) During the period of difficult economic condi-
tions incidental to the war, increased cost of living and gradually rising taxes
will bring hardships to people with low, fixed income. I recommend that in any
possible adjustments first consideration be given to the men in the lower brackets,
and especially those with families.
Respectfully submitted,
RUDOLPH WEAVER, Director



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE GENERAL COLLEGE
To the President of the University:
I beg to submit the following biennial report of the General College for the
years 1940-41 and 1941-42.
The first two years a student spends at the University are the storm and
strife years. Before he enters the calm waters of the Upper Division, he must





decide such big questions as: "Shall I remain in college?" (A majority of the
students of American universities drop out.) "Toward what profession or busi-
ness shall I study?" (Here again the records show that a majority of freshmen
choices made on registration day are later changed.) Scores of other questions
concerning financial support, fraternity life, social life, study habits, etc., must
be faced. These years of the General College are vital years. Much additional
help and guidance is needed.
The present status of general education in the United States is shown by the
United States Office of Education in its recent bulletin, Higher Education. The
University of Florida is named along with the University of Wisconsin, the Uni-
versity of Minnesota, and the University of Chicago as being the four key in-
stitutions that have had great influence on the development of the General College.
In the same bulletin the University of Florida, the University of Southern Cali-
fornia, and the University of Chicago are the three institutions listed as typical
of one of the six general patterns now being followed in college and university
reorganization in the United States. It is pointed out further that more than
fifty-three colleges and universities now have programs of general education.
Fifty-two per cent of the state universities are divided into upper divisions
(juniors and seniors) and lower divisions.
A generation or more ago a man went to college for a liberal education-basic
education of a type that would better prepare him for life whatever it might be.
But later, in the plethora of subdivisions of applied subjects offered under the
free elective system, the average college student as someone to be guided, directed
and given basic understandings, attitudes, and training was about lost.
Today a new unity is being demanded. The program of general education
which gives a common basic core of fundamental disciplines fits into the emer-
gency situation caused by the war. As never before fundamentals are being
stressed. The students themselves demand it. For instance, mathematics is a
subject that many students avoided or attempted to avoid in the past; many people
argued that mathematics should not be included in general education; today the
mathematics classes are crowded.
Also, new material is being placed in each of the basic courses. In the social
science area our studies now include significant material on the rise of the Orient
in world affairs and the social implications of this total war. As popularly in-
dicated in current publications, an airplane world is not the same as that of the
steamship. Thus our physical world viewed in a new light becomes a different
physical world. Our studies in straight thinking take greater time today to
analyze the omnipresent propaganda that comes to us from every point of the
compass wearing many disguises. Our "General Mathematics" course changes
both material and title to "Fundamental Mathematics." In our humanities course
we raise anew the question of our heritage in the world conflict of races, philoso-
phies, and cultures. Thus throughout the various areas under consideration in
general education, there is adaptation and re-direction. This goes back to one of
our fundamental tenents from the very beginning; namely, we concern ourselves
with life problems as they arise today. True we use the past to throw light on
the present, but in a very significant way the present interprets the past.
As previously pointed out, the students realize as they face the uncertainties
of the future that one needs fundamental training for a rapidly changing world.
It is an education that will enable one to adapt and adjust. The many rules of





thumb taught in special colleges in the past for living in a stable society are no
longer adequate. General education has a new meaning today.
Respectfully submitted,
WINSTON W. LITTLE, Dean



REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE
GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION
To the President of the University:
SIR: I herewith submit my eleventh biennial report covering the period July
1, 1940 to June 30, 1942.
The General Extension Division is helping Florida meet the demands of war.
University courses and information are being translated by
extension methods into new work tools for the average adult.
New types of service and new methods of cooperation which
enable the University to assist state and national institutions
and agencies have been established.
The regular program of instruction by extension and services
through long established activities is being used by a greater
number of persons than previously.
Numerous war projects carried on in conjunction with the
regular program, for which there is an increased demand, are
taxing the ingenuity of the staff and requiring the greatest
economy in handling the resources of the General Extension
Division at this time.
A record of the work accomplished is presented in the following tables and
statements.





A. INSTRUCTIONS

Enrollments and distribution in correspondence study and extension classes
are shown in Table I; short courses and special subjects in Table II.


TABLE I. FORMAL INSTRUCTION
CORRESPONDENCE STUDY AND EXTENSION CLASS


IN STATE:


I No. En-


County I rollment TOWNS REPRESENTED IN ENROLLMENT
Alachua ............... 343 Alachua, Archer, Campville, Gainesville, Hawthorne, High Springs,
I Melrose, Micanopy, Newberry, Rochelle, Waldo, Windsor
Baker ................... 45 Glen St. Mary, Macclenny, Olustee, Sanderson
bay .. ...... .... 145 Bay Harbor, Lynn Haven, Millville, Panama City, Parker, St. An-
drew, Southport. Westbay, Youngstown
Bradford ......-....-| 66 Brooker, Graham, Hampton, Lawtey, Starke
Brevard ........... 32 Cocoa, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Titusville
Broward .............. 49 Dania, lYeerfield Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood, Pomona, Pom-
Ipano
Calhoun ...... 133 I Altha, Blountstown. Clarksville, Frink
Charlotte .....-..1 9 | Boca Grande, Murdock, Punta Gorda
Citrus ................... 27 Crystal River, Floral City. Hernando, Holder, Lecanto
Clay ............. I 58 Camp Blanding, Doctor's Inlet, Green Cove Springs, Keystone
1 Heights, Middleburg, Penney Farms, Russell
Collier ............... 15 1 Collier City, Everglades, Immokalee, Marco, Naples
Columbia ............ 46 I Fort White, Lake City, Lulu, Watertown
Dade ...................... 275 Coconut Grove, Coral Gables, Hialeah, Homestead, Kendall, Miami,
i Miami Beach, Miami Shores, Miami Springs, Opa Locka
D'eSoto ............ 26 Arcadia, Brownville, Fort Ogden, Nocatee
Dixie .................... 34 Banana River, Cross City, Fletcher, Horse Shoe, Old Town, Sham-
i Irock
Duval ............... 848 Atlantic Beach, Dinsmore, Grand Crossing, Jacksonville, Jackson-
I ville Beach, Mandarin, Maxville, Mayport, Neptune Beach, South
Jacksonville, Whitehouse
Escambia ....... 615 Barth, Bay Springs, Bluff Springs, Cantonment, Century, Cottage
|I Hill, Escambia, McDavid, Molino, Myrtle Grove, Pensacola, War-
[ rington
Flagler ......... 5 Bunnell
Franklin .. | 8 i Apalachicola, Carrabelle
Gadsden _-......... 30 1 Chattahoochee, Concord, Greensboro, Gretna, Havana, Hinson, Quincy
Gilchrist ........ 8 | Bell. Trenton
Glades .-..-- ......... 4 Moore Haven
Gulf ....... ......... 27 I Port St. Joe. Wewahitchka
Hamilton .........I 40 | Jasper, Jennings, White Springs
Hardee ... ........ 55 Bowling Green, Fort Green, Gardner, Limestone, Ona, Wauchula,
| IZolfo Springs
Hendry ................ 3 I LaBelle
Hernando .......... I 14 I Brooksville
Highlands ............ 16 1 Avon Park, DeSoto City, Sebring, Venus
Hillsborough 224 Brandon, Dover, Lutz, Mango, MacDill Field, Plant City, Port Tampa
I City, Ruskin, Seffner, Tampa, Valrico, Wimauma
Holmes ............. 275 I Bonifay, Dady, Esto, Noma, Ponce de Leon, Westville
Indian River ] 56 1 Fellsmere, Roseland, Sebastian, Vero Beach, Wabasso, Winter Beach
Jackson ............. 208 Alford, Bascom, Campbellton, Compass Lake, Cottondale, Graceville,
Grand Ridge, Greenwood, Kynesville, Malone, Marianna, Sneads
Jefferson ............ 40 Aucilla, Lamont, Lloyd, Monticello, Wacissa, Waukeenah
Lafayette ............| 44 I Day, Mayo
Lake ................. 76 Altoona, Clermont, Eustis, Fruitland Park, Groveland, Howey-in-the-
Hills, Lady Lake, Leesburg, Mount Dora, Mascotte, Montverde,
Sorrento. Tavares, Umatilla
Lee ........................ 51 I Bonita Springs, Fort Myers, Slater, Useppa Island
Leon ............... 208 [ Chaires, Concord, Miccosukee, Tallahassee
Levy ...................... 57 I Bronson, Cedar Key, Chiefland, Ellzey, Gulf Hammock, Montbrook,
I I| Morriston, Otter Creek. Raleigh, Williston, Yankeetown, Inglis
Liberty ................ 31 I Bristol, Hosford, Sumatra
Madison ................ 59 I Ebb, Greenville, Lee, Madison. Pinetta






TABLE I. FORMAL INSTRUCTION


Manatee ..............I 69


M arion ................


M artin ...............
Monroe ...........
Nassau ................
Okaloosa .....-.....

Ok hQobee of


186


148

19


Bradenton, Cherry Lake, Ellenton, Manatee, Myakka City, Oneco,
Palma Sola, Palmetto, Parrish
Anthony, Belleview, Burbank, Camp Roosevelt, Citra, Conner, Dun-
nellon, Fort McCoy, Kendrick, Lake Weir, Ocala, Oklawaha, Orange
Springs, Reddick, Sparr. Weirsdale


Jensen, Stuart
Key West, Marathon, Tavernier
Bryceville, Callahan, Fernandina, Hilliard, Yulee
Baker, Crestview, Fort Walton, Holt, Laurel Hill, Milligan, Nice-
ville, Valpariso
Bassinger. Bean City, Fort Drum. Okeechobee


Orange ................. 163 Apopka, Christmas, Dr. Phillips, Maitland, Ocoee, Oakland, Orlando,
Pine Castle, Windermere, Winter Garden, Winter Park, Zellwood
Osceola ............... 14 Holopaw, Kissimmee, Saint Cloud
Palm Beach ..... 136 Belle Glade, Canal Point. Delray Beach. Jupiter, Lake Worth, Pa-
hokee, Palm Beach, West Palm Beach
Pasco ............... 40 Date City, Lacoochee, New Port Richey, Saint Leo, San Antonio,
Zephyrhills
Pinellas ................ 152 Clearwater, Dunedin, Gul port, Largo, Passe-Grille, St. Petersburg,
Tarpon Springs
Polk ......................I 75 Auourndale, Babson Park, Bartow, Brewster, Davenport, Florence
Villa, Fort Meade, Frostproof, Haines City, Homeland, Lake Alfred,
Lake Hamilton, Lakeland, Lake Wales, Loughman, Mulberry, Polk
City, Winter Haven
Putnam ................ 81 Bostwick, Crescent City, East Palatka, Florahome, Georgetown,
Grandin, Hollister, Interlachen, Palatka, Johnson, San Mateo, Sat-
suma
St. Johns -............-- 115 Hastings, Saint Augustine, Yelvington
St. Lucie .......... 75 Fort Pierce, Walton
Santa Rosa ..--..... 182 Bagdad, Jay, Milton, Mulat, Munson, Fort Walton
Sarasota ....--.......... 39 Laurel, Osprey, Sarasota. Venice
Seminole .............. 63 Chuluota, Fern Park, Geneva, Lake Mary, Longwood, Oviedo, Sanford
Sumter ................ 56 Bushnell, Center Hill, Coleman, Linden, Oxford, Panasoffkee, Saint
S | Catherine, Webster, Wildwood
Suwannee ............I 157 I ranford, Dowling Park, Falmouth, Live Oak, McAlpin, O'Brien,
Pine Mount, Wellborn
Taylor ......---............ 51 Carbur, Foley, Perry, Shady Grove
Union .............. 81 Dukes, Lake Butler, Raiford
Volusia ............ 123 Coronauo Beach, Daytona Beach, Deland, Emporia, Holly Hill, New
Smyrna Beach, Oak Hill, Ormond, Osteen, Pierson, Port Orange,
| Seville


Wakulla ...............
Washington ........

Out of State:

Other States ........


29 Crawfordville, Saint Marks, Sopchoppy, Wakulla
133 Caryville, Chipley, Millers Ferry, Vernon, Wausau

PLACES REPRESENTED
Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware,
642 Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana,
Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada,
New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North
Dakota, Ohio, Pensylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Ver-
mont, Virginia, West Virginia. Wisconsin


Islands and Territory of Hawaii, Canal Zone, Pue
Dependencies ...... 9
Foreign Countries! 14 Bahama Islands, Canada, Cuba, Haiti
Dist. of Columbial 12 I


rto Rico, Virgin Islands


SUMMARY OF TABLE I
Correspondence Study ......................-..--...-........
E extension C lass .. .......................................... ........

T otal ............ ............................ ...... .... ....

DISTRIBUTION


415 Towns in 67 Counties ...............
34 other states .............................
4 islands and dependencies
4 foreign countries ...............
District of Columbia .........................


.......................... 4747
........................... 2695

-------...............------...........7442


........................... 6765
........................... 642
........................... 9
........................... 14
........................... 12

7442


...........................
. .............
..........................
..........................
.................





TABLE II. INFORMAL INSTRUCTION

SHORT COURSES AND SPECIAL SUBJECTS
SECTION A: SHORT COURSES

Course | Date ] Enrollment
194)
Property and Liability Insurance ............................... July 10-13 I 234
Life Insurance ................................................................... July 19-20 I 105
Truck and Bus Operators Safety Short Course........ July 23 24 110
1941
Probation and Parole ......................... ......................... Feb. 3-4 88
Municipal Finance Officers ...................................... ..... Feb. 24-26 I 66
Scout Leader Training Institute .................................... March 28-29 [ 91
Water and Sewage Treatment ................................ ..- April 2-5 61
Bankers .................................................................. ...................... M ay 26-28 78
Truck and Bus Operators Safety Short Course ........ June 5-6 76
Phrent-Teacher Leadership ...................................-----....... June 10-13 I 512
WPA Adult Education Teachers and Supervisors.. Aug. 4-18 85
Property and Liability Insurance ..............................I Sept. 9-11 | 255
Attorneys at Law ............ .................. ............ ................ Oct. 10-11 | 197
Interior Decorating (Daytona Beach) ........................ Nov. 24-28 | 135

Interior Decorating (West Palm Beach) .............. ... Jan. 19-21 171
Coordination of Community Activities for Social{
Defense in Time of W ar ....................................... Jan. 29-30 I 97
Probation and Parole .................................... .................... F I eb. 23-24 I 57
Scout Leader Training Institute .............................. ...... March 14 j 132
Water and Sewage Treatment ..................................... ... May 27-30 48
Parent-Teacher Leadership ................. ......................... June 8-10 I 385
TOTAL REGISTRATION FOR SHORT COURSES ........................| 2,983

SECTION B: SPECIAL SUBJECTS
COURSE Enrollment
Courses for Waterworks Operators and Superintendents ..................... 20
Course in Household Furnishings and Interior Decoration ..................... 155
Course in Plantings for Florida Homes .................................................... 52
Course in The Use of V isual A ids .................................................. ............... 647
TOTAL REGISTRATION FOR SPECIAL SUBJECTS ............ 874

SUMMARY OF TABLE II
Total Enrollment
Section A Short Courses .............................................................................. 2,983
61 counties represented
16 states represented
Section B. Special Subjects ................................. ................. 874
In state enrollments ........ 780
Out of state enrollments ........ 94
Total enrollment in short courses and special subjects ........................ 3,857

B. SERVICE FUNCTIONS
Through many services carried on by the Division instruction in the public
schools is supplemented and individuals and organizations received aid in their
educational endeavors. The services rendered are shown in the following table:

CIRCULATION REPORT OF SERVICE FUNCTIONS


Extension Library Service
R reference Books ......... .......... .. .. .............. ..- ...- ..-..--. .......---
For Civilian and Army Students
U nit L libraries .................................... ..................................... .......... ... .......
To School Libraries for Children
Package L libraries .......................................... .. .... ... ... .... --- .... ....
For Individual and Group Study
D ram atic Publications .................... .........--- ...--- .. ........... ... ........
For Classes and Groups
TOTAL LOANS FOR EXTENSION LIBRARY SERVICE ...........


No. Loans
.......... 5,092

......... 12,480

......... 1,134

......... 838

......... 19,544





Audio-Visual Aids for Class and Community Instruction No. Loans
P rin ts ........ .......... ....... ...................... ..... .......... 469
R ecordings 7.. ........... .. ......... ....... .... ..... ............ 517
Film slides ........... ........ 358
S lid es .......... ... ...... ............ ................... .......... .. ...... ..................................... 17,7 56
TOTAL LOANS OF AUDIO-VISUAL AIDS FOR CLASS AND COM-
MUNITY INSTRUCTION ............................... ........... .................. 20,067

SUMMARY OF CIRCULATION REPORT OF SERVICE FUNCTIONS
Total No. Loans
Extension Library Service ................................................... 19,544
Audio-Visual Aids for Class and Community Instruction 20,067
Total circulation of service functions .-.................... ................. 39,611

C. DEFENSE TRAINING
On February 3, 1942 the Governor of Florida appointed the Dean coordinator
of training for the State Defense Council. A plan for Teacher Training was sub-
mitted by the General Extension Division and approved by the State Defense
Council. District programs were conducted and Defense Council leaders were
instructed in General Subjects, Gas Defense and Fire Defense.
Defense councils have been assisted by furnishing the local instructors with
lecture notes, training questions, and other teaching guides to make effective the
use of the OCD manuals and information from other sources. Personal contact
is being maintained with defense councils to assist in completing the training of
all new enrollees in the citizens defense corps, and to train replacements as the3
occur.
The following table shows the progress of the teacher training program con-
ducted by the General Extension Division. It also shows the status of the state
training program for the Citizens Defense Corps in February at the time the
General Extension Division was asked to assist, and on June 1, when the last
state report was compiled. The General Extension Division has been given
appropriate credit for its work in the development of the state training program.
PROGRESS IN STATE DEFENSE COUNCIL TEACHER TRAINING COURSES
Course Enrollment
G general Subjects .......................... .. ........... ...................................... 913
F ire D defense .................................................................... ... 1,117
Gas D defense A and Gas D defense B ................................................................................. 1,375
TOTAL REGISTRATION BY COURSES ............... ........................ 3,405
TOTAL NUMBER INDIVIDUALS ENROLLED ............................... 1,751
STATE TRAINING PROGRAM
Citizens Defense Corps
No. Enrolled No. Trained No. In Training
F eb. 1 ..... ......................... 71,592 8,695
June 1 ............. ... ..... 79,974 27,898 38,213

DEVELOPMENTS

Adult interests are changing; however, there is an increased demand for ex-
tension instruction and services.
Department of Citizenship Training: At present this department is engaged
in the State Defense Council Teacher Training program, the production of teach-
ing aids, and the giving of assistance to local defense councils in their educational
programs.
Department of Classes and Short Courses: In addition to the regular work
this department is assisting in the State training program of the Citizens De-
fense Corps.





Department of Correspondence Study: As expected, there is a larger enroll-
ment in mathematics and technical courses. Engineering enrollments have in-
creased 140% in 1942. The University is a member of the Army Institute through
which correspondence courses are offered men in the Army.
Department of Women's Activities: 1410 were enrolled in short courses and
special subjects. This is an increase of 35% over the previous biennium.
Departments of Information and Extension Library, and Audio-Visual In-
struction: Florida citizens in constantly increasing numbers are looking to their
University for assistance through Extension loan materials. Individuals, organ-
izations, and agencies have made it possible to meet this demand by supplement-
ing the property of the Division with gifts and loans.

CONCLUSION
The General Extension Division has carried on the full regular program ad-
justed to meet the requirements of the emergency. There have been 11,299
registrations in instruction; and 39,611 loans have been made through the services.
In addition to the regular program the Division, coordinating the training
of the Citizens Defense Corps for the State Defense Council, has given Teacher
Training Courses to 1,751 persons and is assisting in many ways in the State
training program for the Citizens Defense Corps, through which 27,898 people
tlave been trained, and 38,213 are now in training.
The Division is cooperating with other state and national organizations and
agencies in the war effort.
Long experienced in the adaptation of extension courses and procedures to
meet changing needs, the staff can continue to carry on unless handicapped
through reduction in personnel and means.
Space does not permit a detailed descriptive review of all the work and ac-
complishments of the Division; however, detailed reports of the several con-
stitutional departments are in the files in the offices of the General Extension
Division.
Respectfully submitted,
B. C. RILEY, Dean



REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIAN
To the President of the University :
SIR: I have the honor to submit to you the following report on the Library of
the University of Florida for the biennium ending June 30, 1942.
In 1940-41 the Library operated with an average staff of eleven librarians and
forty student assistants. In 1941-42 there was a staff of fourteen librarians and
an average of forty student assistants. Additions to the staff have been as
follows: In Circulation, 2; in Periodicals, 1; in Order Department, 2; in Cata-
loging, 2. Resignations have been as follows: In Cataloging, 1; in Circulation, 2;
Readers Assistant, 1.
There have been a number of physical improvements in the Library, the most
important of these being the installation of flourescent lights on the tables in
the Reference Room. The lighting in the Catalog Rooms has been much improved
by ten flourescent ceiling lights. The work in cataloging has been divided be-





tween two rooms, and all typing and shellacing of books, etc., is done in the
smaller room. This has reduced the noise and crowding where actual cataloging
is done. The Order Department was moved to the fourth floor and new shelves
provided. The stock room was cleared out and is now used for two International
Business Machines, which serve two departments. Supplies were moved to the
office of the Librarian's secretary. The General College and Reserve room was
rearranged to provide four large alcoves for browsing, with adequate light and
ventilation. Six sets of shelves have been provided on the fourth floor to store new
books not cataloged.
In 1941 the sum of $5,000 was made available for books from the University
Reserve, in addition to the $10,000 provided by the budget. For the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1942, there was a substantial increase in the Library budget,
including a total of $20,000 for books and $4,000 for periodicals. In 1942, the
Library received a donation of $20,000 from the General Education Board, to be
used during the Biennium beginning July 1, 1942. These increases have improved
the book collection and periodical holdings materially. The increase in book buy-
ing meant more work for the Order and Catalog Departments.

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT

This department has operated with two staff members and an average of forty
students. The most striking advance in this department has ben the use of the
International Business Machines. The new plan has speeded up the work and has
resulted in greater accuracy. It has removed part of the circulation work to the
fourth floor, thus relieving somewhat the congestion behind the main charging
desk. The Head of the Circulation Department spent two weeks at the Customer's
School of the International Business Machines Corporation, Endicott, New
York. He wrote an article on the use of the machines by the University of
Florida Library, published in the April, 1942 issue of the Library Journal.
Fines have been reduced and all fines are reduced to fifty per cent if paid
when the books are returned. Receipts are given for all fines paid at the Library.
Fine accounts not paid are sent to the Business Manager's Office near the end of
each semester. Fine rates are low as compared with other colleges.
The time of faculty loans has been extended to one semester.
Rating sheets are used to determine pay and promotion of student assistants.
Two student assistant supervisors are now used to supervise stacks, schedule
hours and make out monthly payroll reports.
In order to provide more room in the stacks, some little-used materials, largely
duplicates and State documents, have been moved to the top floor of the Law
Library. The entire book collection has been shifted so that the new space now
available is evenly distributed.
During the fiscal year 1941-42, loans were as follows: two-week and term
loans, 30,727; reading room loans, 23,003; carrell loans, 1,558; General College
and reserves, 58,870. These figures do not represent the entire use of books, as
the General College reserve books are kept on open shelves, and the use of these
books in the building is not recorded.

CATALOG DEPARTMENT

The number of staff members has varied, due to the resignation of the Head
of the department, February, 1942. The Head of the department attended the





American Library Association convention in Boston, June 1941, and submitted a
written report on this meeting.
The card catalog was improved by marking the cards to show the location of
all books in the Chemistry-Pharmacy, Florida Union, and Architecture libraries.
This speeded up the handling of books by the Circulation Department. The
Chemistry-Pharmacy Library was put in order and made efficient by the Catalog
Department.
New books not cataloged were arranged by name of author, and a card file
set up for them, so that they can be located for examination. There are several
thousand such books, as books have been acquired faster than they can be cata-
loged.
The number of books accessioned, or officially acquired, was 22,648. The num-
ber of withdrawals was 486, so that the total net accessions came to 138,977. The
number of volumes cataloged was 17,892, and the number of titles was 9,752.
For the P. K. Yonge School, 921 books were accessioned, and for General Ex-
tension Division, 1,380.

PERIODICALS DEPARTMENT

The number of staff members was increased from one to two. The work of the
department was also increased. The University of Florida Library was made a
State document depository and 50 copies of nearly all State documents provided
(by law) for exchange with other States. At the end of the biennium, there were
1504 periodicals being received. The number added during 1940-42 was 101.
Four hundred and thirty-six periodicals are shelved in the reading room. Thirty-
five foreign periodicals formerly received are not now available, due to the war.
The periodicals are classified as follows: received by subscription, 695; by gift,
332; by exchange, 477. The list includes 84 Florida newspapers, and twenty
out-of-state newspapers.
The University is a member of the Duplicate Exchange Union. Eight lists
of ten pages each were sent to 168 libraries. In reply to requests received, 22,-
083 pieces of duplicate material were sent out. Prior to this, the University had
been in arrears on its duplicate exchange account with a number of colleges.

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT

During a period of nine months, the Reference Librarian was doing graduate
work at the University of Illinois. The assistant Reference Librarian handled the
work, with some help from the Reader's Assistant. The Reference collection has
grown, 1,081 volumes in two years. The Florida collection which is supervised
by this department, gained 787 volumes. Interlibrary loans made by us were
as follows: for faculty 310; for students, 287. Loans requested of us by other
libraries were 154, and the number of volumes sent, 190. The number of questions
answered by mail was 104. A total of 324 letters were written for free material.
New shelves have been added in the Reference Room, and a desk for the Assistant
Reference Librarian has also been added.

ORDER DEPARTMENT

The Order Department had one full time and one-half time staff members,
until April, 1942, when it had two full time staff members. The work of this
department has ben increased greatly, due to the doubling of the book appropria-





tion, in 1941-42. In addition to handling this increase, the Order Department
has set up a method of bookkeeping with the International Business Machines.
Only one other university is using such a system. Monthly statements are sent
to each department or college showing the amount spent, the amount covered by
orders outstanding, and the balance. The Library Committee adopted a report
made by a faculty committee, and book funds are now allocated to the departments
and colleges on the basis recommended.

CONCLUSION
It is recommended that a Documents Librarian be added to the Library staff.
The Librarian wishes to express his thanks for the efficient work of the Library
staff, and the student assistants. He also wishes to express his appreciation to
the administration, for the increased library budget. Dean Chandler and the
members of the Library Committee have been most helpful. Certain faculty
members, especially those service on committees advisory to the Library Commit-
tee have rendered useful services. The Librarian also wishes to thank the
Friends of the Library for their work in connection with the donation of books
to the Library.
Respectfully submitted,
WALTER B. HILL, Librarian



REPORT OF THE PROFESSOR OF
MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS
To the President of the University:
SIR: I respectfully submit the biennial report of the Department of Military
Science and Tactics for the period ending June 30, 1942.
The courses of instruction have been carried out in accordance with the
War Department program of training. The annual strength of the Cadet Corps
has averaged 1679 students. One hundred and forty students were awarded re-
serve commissions in 1941, and one hundred and forty-three in 1942. Three
honor graduates have received commissions in the Regular Army, one was com-
missioned in the Marine Corps and two are now pursuing a course for a com-
mission in the Marine Corps.
We have endeavored to give the maximum amount of instruction in the avail-
able time. It is gratifying that, each year, the units have been awarded the
highest rating for efficiency, as the result of the annual inspections.
Through the cooperation of the President and the University Physician, the
physical examinations of applicants for advance course contracts have been made
by the medical staff at the University Infirmary. This is definitely a warranted
and worthwhile service which has resulted in a substantial financial saving to
the students, who, otherwise would have to pay from three to five dollars for
each physical examination. It is also a great convenience to this department. It
is strongly recommended that this service be continued.
A summer semester of ROTC instruction for all classes was offered this sum-
mer (1942) as a contribution to the war effort and to enable students, who are
pursuing accelerated academic courses, to complete all military requirements for
a reserve commission prior to graduation. Three hundred and forty-nine students





are enrolled for military science for the summer session which comprises a period
of sixteen weeks.
Funds allotted this department have been used for salaries, maintenance, up-
keep, office supplies, and operating expenses.
Five of our more experienced officer instructors have been replaced recently.
Our rifles caliber .30 have been replaced with eight M-1 rifles. We have received
a battery of 105 mm howitzers to replace a 75 mm battery.
Students have displayed much interest and a full measure of cooperation in
military training.
I wish to express the appreciation of this department for the cooperation and
full support accorded us by the President, the staff, and the several colleges.
S. R. HOPKINS, Colonel, Field Artillery,
P.M.S.&T.



REPORT OF THE ACTING DIRECTOR OF THE
INSTITUTE OF INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS
To the President of the University:
SIR: I beg to submit the following report on the activities of the Institute of
Inter-American Affairs for the biennium ending June 30, 1942, together with
general recommendations for the biennium beginning July 1, 1942.
During the last two years the Institute has been active in the following fields:
encouraging the attendance of Latin American students at the University of
Florida; the orientation of foreign exchange students; the distribution of infor-
mation on Latin American republics to the schools of the State of Florida in co-
operation with the Inter-American Demonstration Center of the P. K. Yonge
Laboratory School; the sponsoring in 1940 of the high school Spanish declamation
contest; preparation of special Inter-American radio broadcasts presented over
the University Radio Station WRUF; arrangement of speaking and educational
tours for numerous Latin American students at the University; arrangement of
special lectures by visitors; publication of a periodical Revista Interamericana,
dealing with Latin American culture; the sponsoring of night classes in Spanish,
conducted by Manuel D. Ramfrez, Secretary of the Instittue of Inter-American
Affairs, and in Portuguese, conducted by Otto Lyra Schrader, Brazilian exchange
student; the expansion of a special Inter-American Reading Room, open to all
students and faculty members; and, the supervision of an Inter-American Section
in the University dormitory system occupied by Latin American scholars with
selected North American students.
Owing to the careful selection and training of Latin American holders of
scholarships, as well as their native ability, outstanding scholastic records were
made during 1940-42 by:
Mr. Domingo Donate Torres of Puerto Rico-Pharmacy
Mr. Roberto Gelpi of Puerto Rico-Pharmacy
Mr. Roberto Gelpi of Puerto Rico-Pharmacy
Mr. Joaquin 0. Moncrieff of Guatemala-Horticulture
Mr. Mario P6rez de Arce Lavin of Chile-Architecture
Mr. Daniel Montenegro of Chile-Political Science
Mr. Ernesto H. Casseres of Costa Rica-Horticulture





RECOMMENDATIONS
1. That the salary of the regular Secretary of the Institute, Mr. Manuel D.
Ramirez, amounting to $1,850.00 per annum, be authorized for the next two years,
unless in the meantime Mr. Ramirez shall have handed in his resignation.
11. That Item 671 covering Latin American Scholarships be maintained in
the neighborhood of $1,000 per annum. The sum of $112.00 a month per academic
year is an insignificant amount to expend on the creation of strong ties with
Latin America, whose sons not only form imperishable attachment during their
stay here, but also by oral propaganda direct future students to Gainesville upon
their return home. Thus, the award of scholarships in time can be substantially
reduced. At present, it should be thought of as a long-term investment. In the
field of education, dividends are not paid immediately. Some years ago the chil-
dren of the Secretary of Foreign Affairs of Brazil, Dr. Oswaldo Aranha, attended
a school conducted by American Methodist Missionaries. Subsequently, Dr. Aranha
represented his government in the United States. Today, thanks to cultural in-
fluences brought to bear, Dr. Aranha is counted among the best friends this
country has in Latin America. At the Rio Conference his friendship turned the
scales in favor of friendly neutrality towards the United States on the part of all
Latin American countries who had not declared war on the Axis.
III. That the Faculty Committee controlling the policies and program of the
Institute be reduced and constituted as follows: W. J. Matherly, Chairman; Rol-
lin S. Atwood (John F. Martin); 0. H. Hauptmann; James D. Haygood; H. Harold
Hume; W. W. Little; and Garland Powell.
IV. That ways and means be found to enable the Institute to cooperate more
closely with the Inter-American Demostration Center of the P. K. Yonge Labora-
tory School, even at a slightly greater expense to the University, while and until
a better knowledge of Latin America is promoted in the public schools and colleges
of Florida.
V. That the annual state high school Spanish declamation contest be resumed
at Gainesville as soon as the current restrictions on travel are lifted.
VI. That the offices of the Institute, now located on the fourth floor of the
Florida Union Building, where no elevator exists, be moved as soon as circum-
stances permit to other more accessible quarters.
VII. That the name of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs of the Uni-
versity of Florida be changed to "Inter-American Institute of the University of
Florida." Respectfully submitted,

JOHN F. MARTIN, Acting Director


REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE
FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM
To the President of the University:
SIR: In submitting my report for the biennium of July 1, 1940 to June 6,
1942, and recommendations for the next, I have to say that it is with no litt!
effort that I am dictating a few words from my sick bed to assist in making out
this report, which is being prepared almost entirely by my secretary, Miss Baker.
Our work for the biennium has been the finishing and opening of the South Half
of the Hall of Arnithology and general museum work.




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