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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00254
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: August 1945
Copyright Date: 1946
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00254
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Full Text






Qwoe


fear,


Scon-9Jegree


Curricula


culture


for

Veterans


-. -' B.Jfl.,& fl r .1 I r -ru art.2 2 -i 4'.


' --* -/ .- Ah.


m1I

































On the Cover-
Three fine heifers form the nucleus of a Guernsey herd at the Florida Experiment Station.
President John J. Tigert, right center, and Agricultural College Dean H. Harold Hume,
left center, inspecting the animals, which are held by students.














STATE


BOARD


OF EDUCATION


MILLARD


GRAY............... ...--------. --------------------- -Secretary


State


J. EDWIN


J. TOM
COLIN


LARSON .................-- ......... .... ..--------------------- ---- -.----------- ---------------.......... State


WATSON


ENGLISH, Secretary ...........--.......................--.. Stat e


Superintendent


Treasurer


.... ...Attorney General


Public


Instruction


BOARD


CONTROL


THOMAS


BRYANT,


LL.B.


(Florida) ..


.............-.......--.........................-...-..-...-... Attorney-at-Law


Lakeland, Florida


THOMAS


GURNEY..................................---------.--


..............-.. ....-- ......-- ..... ..........Attorney-at-Law


Orlando, Florida
JORDAN ....-..-................. ....- .--.....---- .-...-------- ------ ...-Banker
Quincy, Florida


M. LUTHER MERSHON, LL.B.


(Florida).............


.........Attorney-at-Law


Miami, Florida


HENSON


MARKHAM, LL.B.


(Florida) ................... ----................ ....--. --Attorney- at -La w


Jacksonville, Florida


JOHN T. DIAMOND .... .--...- ......... ........... .......--..... Secretary


of the Board of


Control


Tallahassee, Florida


. BLANDING .......... ... .............. ..... .............. .. Auditor


for the


Board of


Control


Gainesville, Florida


UNIVERSITY


COUNCIL


JOHN


JAMES


TIGERT,


M.A.


(Oxon.), LL.D.,


Ed.D.,


D.C.L.,


D.Litt.,


L.H.D.


President of the


TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Sc.D...................Acting


Vice-President


of the


University
University;


Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A .................... ....... ..... ...---- .. ..-.........-- ....... ....-----.... ..... Dean of Students


HARLEY


WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S...................


Dean of the


University


PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D


FREDERICK


.......Director of the School of Pharmacy


T. HANNAFORD, B.A., A.I.A.............Acting Director of the School of Architecture
and Allied Arts


H. HAROLD HUME. D.Sc.........Provost for Aericulture and Dean of the College of Agriculture


CALDWELL ..............................-----...--------.................................. Governor


I













COLLEGE


AGRICULTURE


FACULTY


H. HAROLD HUME, M.S.A., D.Sc.


(Clemson)


Provost for


Agriculture and Dean,


College of


Agriculture


WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M


, Assistant Dean and Head Professor of Horticulture, Emeritus


AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY


ALVIN PERCY BLACK, Ph.D.


(Iowa


, Professor of Chemistry


GEORGE


WASHINGTON


MUHLEMAN, Ph.D.


(Univ. of Geneva, Switzerland)


Acting Assistant


Professor


Agricultural


Chemistry.


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


CLARENCE


VERNON


NOBLE, Ph.D.


HENRY GLENN HAMILTON, Ph.D.


JOHN R.


(Cornell
(Cornell)


Head


Professor


Agricultural


Economics


, Professor of Marketing


GREENMAN, B.S.A., Professor of Agricultural


Economics


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION


EDWARD


WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D.


(Peabody


, Professor of Agricultural Education


AGRICULTURAL


ENGINEERING


FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Head Professor of Agricultural Engineering


AGRONOMY


PETTUS HOLMES SENN


Ph.D.


Wisconsin


, Head Professor of Agronomy


ANIMAL


INDUS


TRY


ARTHUR LISTEN


SHEALY, D.V.M.


(McKillip


Head Professor of Animal Husbandry


RAYMOND BROWN


BECKER,


Ph.D.


Minnesota),


essor


Dairy


Husbandry and Animal


-













BOTANY


WILLIAM B.


TISDALE,


Ph.D.


(Wisconsin


Head


Professor of Botany


WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL,


Ph.D.


(Minnesota)


Professor


Bateriology


MADISON DERRELL CODY


, M.A., Professor of Botany


GEO. F.


WEBER,


Ph.D.


(Wisconsin


Professor


Plant


Pathology


ENTOMOLOGY


JOHN


THOMAS CREIGHTON,


Ph.D.


Ohio State)


Head


Professor


Entomology


ARCHIE NEWTON


TISSOT


HOMER HIXSON, Ph.D.


Ph.D.
Iowa).


(Ohio State)


Assistant


Associate


Professor of


Professor of Entomology


Entomology


HORTICULTURE


HERBERT SNOW


WOLFE,


Ph.D.


Chicago)


Head


Professor


of Horticulture


CHARLES


ELLIOTT


ABBOTT,


M.S.. Professor of Horticulture


JOHN VERTREES


WATKINS, M.S.A.,


Assistant


Professor of Horticulture


SOILS


FREDRICK BUREAN SMITH, Ph.D.


GEORGE DANIEL


(Iowa State College)


THORNTON, M.S.A., Assistant


Head Professor of Soils


Professor of Soils


JOSEPH RUSSELL HENDERSON, M.S.A., Assistant Professor of


Soils













INFORMATION


FOR


VETERANS


As demobilization


accelerates,


more


more


ex-service


men


enter


college,


some


to begin


college


work,


some


resume


interrupted


programs


and others


to seek


special


types of training for specific jobs. In so far as its facilities permit, the University of Florida
is preparing to serve all these groups. Publications are available describing offerings other


than the non-degree Agricultural curricula which are outlined


in this


bulletin.


veteran


an involved


problem


concerning


admission,


credits


from


other institu-


tions, college program desired, or anything else, should come to the campus for necessary


conferences with


University


officials before registration


Since men


are released from


the service every day, many will have time to adequately plan and avoid the rush of opening
day. During the semester, officials have time to check rather thoroughly with each individual.


There
Assistant


has been appointee
Dean J. Ed Price,


1


a member


University


Veterans'


Counselor,


whom the veteran is invited to contact if he has any problem


to discuss or questions to ask.


Dean Price is located in Room 3, Language Hall.


Our experience to date has indicated that most veterans planning to enter the University


of Florida, regardless of the type of program they


desire, have several common


questions.


This section is devoted to answers to questions most frequently

How does the veteran gain admission to the University?


asked by veterans.


See
there.


the section on ADMISSION. Request the proper application
Application should be made before coming to Gainesville.


as described


Can a veteran who has not graduated from high school enter the non-degree program?


Such


Does the


veterans will


admitted.


University provide housing facilities for veterans


with families?


Efforts are


being made


arrange


University


operated


or supervised


living


quarters
can be


made


veterans
available


families.


in the


University


present


time


dormitories


some


these


accommodations


would


not include


housekeeping facilities.


obtained by the


It is hoped


University.


that in


Office of


the near future


Dean


some family


Students


units can


will maintain


a list of apartments and small houses available adjacent to


the campus.


veteran


planning to bring his family is urged to correspond with


the Dean of Students well


in advance of enrollment for assistance in this connection.


Who is eligible for benefits under the GI Bill of Rights


(Public Law 346


Any veteran with a discharge other than dishonorable who


has 90


days or more


active military service


(exclusive of


time spent in


the ASTP,


the Navy


V-12,


as a cadet at one of the service academies)


and who was less than 25 years of


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make a certified


copy


and forward it


the application.


If this


method is


used, the original document should be sent by registered mail.)

What benefits are available under the GI Bill?
A qualified veteran receives tuition, fees, books and training materials up to $500


an academic year


of Florida are


less than


calendar


$500 for the


months


(these


academic year)


expenses


at the


a subsistence


University
allotment


in the amount of $50 per month if single, $75 per month with dependents.

Can any portion of the $500 per year allowed by the Government be used to pay for board
and room?
No. $500 is the maximum paid to the institution by the Government for tuition,


books,


etc., not an allotment


to the veteran for those expenses.


Personal


penses


veteran


including


board


room


are his


own


responsibility.


subsistence allotment should

How long can a veteran attend the


provide for these expenses in most cases.

University under the GI Bill?


The qualified veteran is entitled to one year of education or training.


completion of that year entitles him to an additional


Satisfactory


period not to exceed the time


spent in active service after September


16, 1940.


The total


period may in no event


exceed


years


Veterans


Administration


regards


term


"year"


as used


above as a calendar year of twelve months).


Who is eligible for


benefits


under the


Vocational


Rehabilitation


(Public


16)?


An honorably discharged veteran with a service connected,


pensionable disability


produced


a vocational


handicap


is eligible.


provisions


somewhat complex and eligibility can be determined only


by the


Veterans Adminis-


tration.


A veteran who feels that he might qualify is advised to consult officials of


Veterans Administration.


What fields of study are open to veterans under


Public Law


Veterans


Administration


approved


program


trains


one for


vocation


selected by the veteran and the officials of the


Veterans Administration.


The train-


ing must be directly preparatory for


a specified


employment


objective.


What benefits are available under


Public Law


The Government pays costs of training


(fees, tuition, books, etc.)


institution and allowances to the veteran for living and


personal


directly to the


expenses that vary


the type of


disability,


dependants,













GENERAL


INFORMATION


EXPENSES


REGISTRATION FEES


Undergraduate


Students


All Non-Florida Students


Additional


1st Sem.
..$ 50.00


100.00


2nd Sem.


$ 50.00
100.00


DESCRIPTION OF REGISTRATION FEFS


Registration Fees listed in the above table include the


Contingent Fee.-A fee of


following:


$27.50 per semester is charged every student.


Special Fee.-A fee of $2.50 per semester is required of each student for the construc-
tion and rehabilitation of buildings.


Infirmary Fee.-All students are charged an Infirmary
secures for the student, in case of illness, the privilege of


Fee of $7.50 per semester which


a bed


in the Infirmary and the


services of the


University


Physician and the professionally trained nurses, except in cases


involving a major operation.
Student Activity Fee.-A fee of $24.00 is assessed to maintain and foster athletic sports,


student publications, and other student activities.


$12.00 of


this fee is paid the first semester,


and $12.00 is paid the second.


Student fees are passed by a vote of the student body and


approved by the Board of Control before they are adopted.


Swimming Pool Fee.-A fee of 50 cents per


semester is charged all students for use of


the lockers and supplies at the swimming pool.

SPECIAL FEES


Fees which apply in special cases only are


isted below


Breakage


Fee.-Any


student


registering


a course


requiring


locker


laboratory


apparatus in one or more of the following departments is required to buy a breakage book:
Chemistry, Pharmacy, Biology, and Soils. This book costs $5.00. A refund will be allowed
on any unused portion at the end of the year, when the student has checked in his apparatus
to the satisfaction of the departments concerned.
Room Reservation Fee.-Students wishing to reserve rooms in the Residence Halls must
pay a room reservation fee of $10 at the time such reservation is made.


Special


Infirmary


Charges.-A student requiring an


emergency


operation,


which is not


covered


the fee assessed, may


employ


services


accredited


physician


whom


he may select, and utilize the facilities of


the Infirmary for the operation.


To secure this


medical service the student must report to the physician in charge of the Infirmary.


When


fnfl.fl Snr r n fI rt natt C, 1S : 1 n frln rr t., tim I a n' ut 4..


l rv-Al ,n tl, lvif-movw lo fha -er-rl =t thr













students must pay any tuition which their classification specifies. Such
entitled to any of the privileges attached to any other University fee.


students


are not


PAYMENT OF FEES
Fees are payable as a part of the registration procedure except for the Non-Florida Fee
for the first semester of attendance which must be sent to the Office of the Registrar before
the applicant may be issued an Admission Certificate; the Room Reservation Fee which


must accompany the Application
Residence; and Special Fees whi
receive the service for which the
registration incomplete and will re:
If any remittance is made by
student concerned and a notation
must be made payable to the Uni
Manager except as noted above.
for all funds received which will i
to preserve these receipts and have
concerned.


Room


Reservation


ch are payable at the time
fee is assessed. Failure tu
suit in assessment of the $5
mail it must be accompani
concerning the fee or fees
versity of Florida and sent


Office of the Business


be
that
o pay
late
ed b
being
to th
Man


indicate the purpose of payment.


sent to the Director of
the student expects to
r fees when due makes
registration fee.
y the full name of the
g paid. All remittances
e Office of the Business
lager will issue receipts
Students are cautioned


them available for examination by any University official


REFUND OF FEES


Students resigning before the dates specified in the
to a refund of all fees except $5 of the contingent fee.
registering the student and is never refunded.


University Calendar are entitled
This $5 is the cost of service in


OTHER EXPENSES


Room Rent.-Rent for rooms
student per semester. Remittanc
directions issued by the Directo,
reside in one of the units of the
and method of payment are the
Meals.-Cost of meals in the


in the Residence Halls varies from $32.00 to $45.00
:es for Room Rent should be made in accordance with
r of Residence. (See page 14.) If the student does
Residence Hall System the arrangements concerning
responsibility of the individuals concerned.
University Cafeteria varies with the individual. Book


per
the
not
rates


:s of


coupons having cash value n
or meals may be paid for in
The P. K. Yonge Cafeteri
days each week, and offers to
The University Soda Foun
fountain service, all kinds of
Books and Supplies.-Cost
Pstimntprl that (frn, t'A NN tn


purchased


cash.
a, located in
University s
tain, located
sandwiches,
of these ite:
NNflA ,nr


from


Office


the Yonge Building
students high quality
in the basement of
candies, tobaccos, e
ns varies with the pr
3or nrTll1 Fntror c v


Business


Manager


serves noon day meals five
food at reasonable prices.
Florida Union, offers strictly
;tc.
program of the student. It is
nanca Fnnr mat ctlntQ'nfc













TUITION
No tuition, except in the College of Law. is charged Florida students.
Non-Florida students, including those pursuing graduate work, pay tuition of $100.00 per


semester in addition


to the fees charged Florida students.


Classification of


Students.-For the


purpose of


assessing tuition, students are classified


as Florida and non-Florida students.


A Florida student,


if under twenty-one years of


is one:


whose


parents


have


been residents of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registra-


tion;


or (2)


whose parents were residents of Florida at the time of their death, and who


has not


acquired


residence in


another state;


or (3)


whose


parents were not


residents of


Florida at the time of their death but whose successor natural guardian has been a resident


of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next


preceding the student's registration.


A Florida student, if over twenty-one years of


age, is one:


whose parents are resi-


dents of Florida
in another state;


(or were at the time of their death)


or (2)


who,


while an adult, has


and who has not acquired residence


been a resident of Florida for at


least


twelve


not been


consecutive


acquired


months


while


next


preceding


attending


school


registration,
or college in


provided
Florida ;


residence


or (3)


is the


wife of a man who


has been


a resident of Florida for at


least twelve consecutive months


next preceding her registration;


or (4)


who is an alien who has taken out his first citizen-


ship papers and who has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months
next preceding his registration.
All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as non-Florida students.
The status of the classification of a student is determined at the time of his first regis-


tration


in the


University,


and may


not thereafter


changed


unless, in the


case


of a minor, his parents move


to and


become legal


residents of this State,


maintaining


such residence for twelve consecutive


months.


If the status of


a student changes from a


non-Florida


student


a Florida


student,


his classification


changed


at the


next


registration thereafter.


ADMISSION


veteran


contemplating


entering


the University


Florida


purpose


suing one


of the non-degree Agricultural


curricula


should request


application forms


from


Office


Registrar.


previous educational


High


achievement


School


graduation


must


is not required
the application


records


admission.


original


request for


forms


should


indicate


clearly


prospective


student


wishes


enroll in the non-degree program and should also give a brief summary of previous education.


___













who for some reason cannot spend more than


two years in a training


program.


For such


veterans, the College of Agriculture has arranged the courses described in this bulletin.


As has


been indicated previously,


the courses outlined


herein


cover


a two-year period.


is assumed


those


desiring


more


detailed


instruction


in scientific


agriculture


whose


education


taken


them


through


school


or beyond,


elect


regular


four-year course in


the particular field


in which they


are interested.


Florida


years,


offers


improved


many


strains


opportunities


corn


various


oats


been


fields


agriculture.


developed


through


Within


the work


recent
of the


Agricultural


Experiment


Station.


With


increased


production


crops,


future


stock production in this state will be placed on a more stable basis than in years past.


Much


attention


pastures


has been


during


given
few


to soil
years.


conservation


With


fertilization


the conservation


practices


: crops, groves
being followed


at the


present


time


information


available


on the


proper


use of


fertilizers,


the production


crops


pastures


is more


certain


at the


present


time


past years.


Florida


not furnish


sufficient


beef,


pork,


poultry,


eggs


dairy


products


from


local sources to meet


the demands


of home


markets.


Long


grazing seasons


on improved


pastures make


possible


an increased


production


of beef


and milk.


Millions


acres


in Florida


could


put in improved


pastures,


thereby


expanding


and milk


production.


to the limited


production


in Florida


during the


10-year


period


preceding


the war,


which provided


only enough


to supply the demand


for fluid


was given to the manufacture of dairy products other than ice cream.


milk, little attention
During this period


practically all of the dairy products used in ice cream


were shipped


into the state.


With


increased


milk


production,


however,


more


attention


given


in the


future


to the


manufacture of dairy products, such as butter, cheese, condensed


milk and milk


powder.


Florida is a


deficit


poultry


producing


state and


importation


of large


quantities of


eggs,


broilers


fryers


is necessary


to fill


local


demands.


to the


climate,


poultry production in this state is quite different from that practiced in other states where


greater


protection


must


given


birds


during


winter


months.


With


available


priced land in this state, it is possible to practice rotation of yards and range to a greater


extent than in states where land


prices are


higher.


control


of household


storage


has advanced rapidly in


years.


pests


through


Structural


modern


pest control


extermination


operators are


methods
located


in all major cities of


the United


States,


where


determine


nature


extent


damage caused by various household


pests and correct these problems in homes and com-


mercial buildings.


It is a relatively new field


that offers good


opportunities for interested


persons.
Florida ranks high as a fruit and vegetable producing state and there will be continuing














In pursuing the


program


outlined


herein,


emphasis


placed


upon


practical


phase of instruction in all


courses given.


Veterans will


have opportunity to discuss


their


problems with instructors at all


times in


the various


fields of


agriculture.


Those desiring


employment


assisted


the Dean


and the


members


in the


particular


in which the major work is taken.


Instruction


General


during


Agriculture, Animal Production,


Dairy


same


for all


Manufacturing,


veterans
Poultry


desiring


Husbandry,


to take


Horti-


culture, and Structura


Pest Control.


Veterans taking Forestry will have a special program


throughout the entire two years of instruction.


CURRICULA

First Year


(For all


programs except Forestry)


First Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Second Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


General


Arithmetic
Grammar


Breeds


Agricultural


and Classes


Science......


of Farm


General Agricultural Science........


General


Horticulture


Composition ................
Farm Poultry ............


A nim als ... ................. .............
B otany .................. .... ...................
General Entomology .................


Farm


Mechanics


Dairy Elements .....


a.


I .


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JB B














Second Year

GENERAL AGRICULTURE

Courses offered in the field of General Agriculture are planned to give veterans a broad


training in general farming activities.


Certain sections of the state are classified as general


farming areas in which numerous field and grazing crops may be produced.


Veterans taking


these


courses


should


receive


sufficient


training


to enable


them


to obtain


employment


farm managers in the general farming area


or to


prepare


themselves to operate their


own


farms more efficiently.


First Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Second Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Farm


Managing the Farm ........
Farm Soils ..--...................
Woodlot Forestry ............
Plant Disease Control ....
Southern Field Crops ....
Electives ............... ........


Marketing


Southern Forage and Conserva-
tion Crops ...............................
Farm Equipment .....................
Vegetable Growing ..................
E lectives ......................... ...


Second Year

ANIMAL PRODUCTION


Courses offered


and dairy


under Animal Production are planned to train veterans in the


cattle.


Feeding


management


of herds


are emphasized.


handling
Veterans


pursuing this program should be in a


position


to obtain employment


as herdsmen in


and dair


herds.


training


received


should


enable


veterans


to manage


their


own


ivestock operations more efficiently


in the event they plan to engage


in livestock farming.


First Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Second Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Judging and Selection of Farm
A nim als ..... ........ .......................
Feeding Farm Animals ..............
Managing the Farm ....................
Managing Dairy Cattle .............


Southern


Field


Crops


Southern Forage and
tion Crops .........


Farm Sa
Breeding


Farm


Invitation ..
of Farm


Milk


Livestock


Production
Production


Conserva-


Manage-


Ag.

22


Second Year


m ent ....... ............
Managing the Farm
Flock ..................
Farm Equipment .....


Poultry


DAIRY


MANUFACTURING


n p 1 1 JlI p I I 1 / 1 1


Animals ........


I tf*1














Dairy


Products


Laboratory


at the


University


Florida


offers


excellent


facilities


for the training of workers for those jobs.


The laboratory operates on a limited commercial


scale which together with class room work offers a well rounded program for such training.


First Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Managing Dairy Cattle


Bcy. 31


Dairy


Plant


Operation


Managing the Farm ....
Bacteriology ..................
Electives ........ .............


Workin


Bey. 34


Second Semester


Farm
Dairy
Farm


Milk
Plant


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Production
Operation


Marketing


Farm Equipment ............................
Practical Bacteriology of Dairy
P roducts.....................................
E lectives ...........................


with dairy cattle-one of the practical laboratories


in dairying.


Second Year


POULTRY


HUSBANDRY


The courses in


poultry


husbandry


are designed


to give veterans training


in incubation


and thereby qualify them for a


job in a commercial baby


chick hatchery


or -for the oper-


1














Second Year

STRUCTURAL PEST CONTROL

Since the field of Pest Control is a relatively new field, there is great need for persons


trained along these lines.


Veterans


pursuing this course


of study will


trained


in the


practical


and scientific


phases of


work.


Such


training should


qualify


them


ployment in well


established


firms


in pest


control


operations


or for


the establishment


their own firms in this field.


First Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Insect Structure ..................... ..... .
Pest Control ...............................
Domestic and Storage Pests..........
Environmental Sanitation ............
Building Construction Analysis..
Electives ......................................


Second Semester
Insect Identification


Insect


Bcy. 36


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Environment and


Behavior .............
Insects and Health


Building
Sanitary
Electives


Equipment
Practices .


Anal


ysIs....


Second Year

HORTICULTURE


Horticultural courses


offered are planned to assist students in fruit and vegetable growing


and in the production of


many special


crops for which Florida is noted.


With


increased


population


and new


means


transportation,


Florida


in the


war


period


position


to develop


new


phases


horticultural


industries.


Nursery


work


is particularly


well suited to


the man


with little capital


and short technical


training.


First Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Managing the Farm ......................
Farm Soils .................................... ...
Woodlot Forestry ............................
Plant Disease Control ....................
Southern Field Crops ............ .....


Citrus


Growing


Second Semester


Farm Mr
Southern


servation


marketing
Forage


Crops


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


and Con-


Farm Equipment ............................
Vegetable Growing ........................


Nursery
Electives


Practices


em-















FORESTRY


The program in Forestry is designed to equip men to operate their own forest properties


or to


serve


assistants


as log


to forest


scalers,
property


timber


cruisers,


managers.


lumber


A special


graders,
facility


forest


nursery


instruction


operators,


is the


Austin


Cary


Forest located a short


distance from the


University.


Here students


are given oppor-


tunity for practical work in Forestry.


The vocational


aspects


the training are emphasized


so that


upon


completion


of the


program the veteran will have


confidence in his ability to fit into a


practical forestry job.


First Year


First Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Second Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


General Agricultural Sci
Southern Forestry ............
Arithmetic ......................
Grammar .............. ............
Botany ...... ....................
Measurement of Forest
Products .....----. ....... .....


ences....


General


Agricultural


Sciences....


Southern Forestry ...... ........
Forest Fire Protection ....
Composition .........i..................
Tree Identification ...........
Timber Survey and Maps


Second Year


First Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Second


Semester


Clock Hrs.
Per Week


Lumber Seasoning and Wood
Preservation ...... ...................


Wood Identification
ber Grading .........
Timber Growing ...


Forest
ing
Forest


and Lum-


Products and Market-


Property


tion ....
Elective*


Timber Harvesting ...........
Naval Stores Operations
Forest Thinning ..................
Forest Equipment ...............
Forest Road and Buildin
Maintenance ..................
Saw Mill Operation .........
Forest Nursery Operation


Administra-


. -
g


. 6 to 12

25 to 31


*To be chosen from:


Logging,


Sawmills,


Forest


Wildlife.


Farm


Soils


Southern Field


Crops,


Breeds and Classes of Farm Animals, General Entomology, Farm Management, General Horticulture,


Plant Disease Control,


Internal


Combustion


Engines.


_


r


..... .--- ... ......4.I -














OUTLINE


AGRICULTURAL


COURSES


ECONOMICS


31.-Managing


the Farm.


hours


lecture


discussion,


hours


laboratory per week.


Farming


production,


as a business;


labor


efficiency,


factors


for successful


and combination


operation,


of enterprises ;


such
types


as size of business,


of farming;


farm


rates


layouts


farm


reorganization;


forms


of tenure


and leases ;


choosing


and buying


a farm.


One or two


field trips at an estimated cost of $5

As. 32.-Farm Marketing.


tory


each to be paid by the student at the time trips are made.

2 hours lecture and discussion, and 2 hours labora-


per week.


A study


of the marketing of agricultural commodities at the farm and shipping point level.


Particular emphasis


will be given


to the distribution


news, and use of marketing and production


credit.


, grade-standards,
One or two field


inspection,
trips at an


use of


market


estimated cost


of $4 each to be paid by the student at the time trips


are made.


Class in Agronomy


studying sugar


cane


varieties.














AGRONOMY


Ay. 33.-Southern Field


Crops.


hours


lecture


hours


laboratory


field demonstrations per week.


A study


of the field


crops


of the southern


United


States-the grain


crops,


cotton,


tobacco,


sugarcane,


sweet


potatoes,


peanuts,


and miscellaneous


crops,


with


emphasis


on varieties


practices for Florida.


rotation


Good seed and crop improvement methods, and crops for conservation


systems are discussed.


34.-Southern


Forage


Conservation


Crops.


hours


lecture


hours laboratory and field demonstration per week.
A study of these plants common to the South that provide grazing and harvested forage for


livestock, and soil conservation crops and cropping practices suited to


Florida are considered.


Students in Agronomy


pollenizing


grasses.


ANIMAL PRODUCTION















Al. 32.-Judging and Selection of Farm Animals.


1 hour


lecture and 4 hours


laboratory per week.


A study


of the


various points of


the animal;


how the points


appear


a perfect animal


actual


practice in


judging


beef cattle,


dairy


cattle,


horses


swine


to observe


the points


these animals


to compare animals having strong points with those having weak points; and how


to select animals with strong points for


breeding purposes.


A student participating in the Annual Livestock Show


Rodeo.


Al. 34.-Breeding of Farm Animals.


hours lecture per week.


meaning


of grade-breeding,


cross-breeding,


inbreeding,


line breeding,


out-crossing,


the breeding


of purebred


animals;


the reproductive organs


and development


of the


young,


breeding season and


the importance of


adhering to


a definite


breeding program


in the manage-


ment of farm animals.


36.-Livestock


Production


Management.


hours


lecture


2 hours


laboratory


week.


management


of breed


cattle


including


pasture


rotation,


water


supply,


use of mineral


supplements,


the breeding


season,


castration, separation of heifers, and care of herd


swine


management including


water supply, shade, shelter,


the breeding


season,


care


of the brood


-. p" p 1 - --- I - _------A L.... l 4


sow


1





I














Bcy. 34.-Practical


Bacteriology


Dairy


Products.


hour recitation and


hours


laboratory per week.


Consideration


will be given to


the sources


and kinds of


micro-organisms


in milk


and dairy


products ;


how to isolate and


utilize


desirable forms


in the manufacture of


dairy


products,


prevent the activities of the undesirable ones.


Bcy. 36.-Sanitary


Practices.


hours recitation and 2


hours


laboratory per


week.
Problems in public sanitary practices.


BOTANY


Bty. 23.-Botany.


1 hour recitation and 4 hours laboratory per week.


This course will acquaint the student with the principal parts of seed plants,


their functions,


and the influence


of physical


factors


of their


environment


upon


them.


This


study


will be


integrated


with courses in agronomy, forestry,


horticulture,


pharmacy, and general


agriculture.


DAIRYING


Dy. 24.-Dairy


Elements.


2 hours


lecture and


2 hours


laboratory per week.


The make-up of milk


the food value of milk; farm methods of handling milk from sanitation


standpoint;


dairy


cattle


breeds ;


selection


of desirable


cows


for milk


production;


the breeding


and raising of dairy cattle.


Dy. 33.-Managing Dairy Cattle.


2 hours lecture and 2 hours


laboratory per


week.


Feeding practices for dairy cattle; raising of calves and heifers;


water supply


to breed


dairy heifers; and care of herd bull.


Dy. 35-36.-Dairy


Plant


Operation.


hours


lecture


hours


laboratory


per week.
Practical work in the dairy products laboratory including the weighing, sampling, pasteuriza-
tion, cooling and bottling of milk; washing of milk utensils; care of machinery in a dairy plant


and the manufacture of


ice cream and other milk


products.


Dy. 38.-Farm Milk


Production.


hours


lecture and


hours


laboratory per


week.


Importance of pastures


in milk production


in Florida


; make-up of


rations for the dry


cow;


milking practices and the handling of milk when freshly drawn from the


cow.


ENTOMOLOGY















Ey. 33.-Domestic and Storage Pests.
This course considers the broad principles of


3 hours lecture per week.


structural


pest control.


It includes


a detailed


study of the life histories and habits of household and storage pests.


34.-Insect


Environment and


Behavior.


3 hours


lecture


per week.


A study


is made


of the various


places


where


insects


live and their


behavior


under


these


conditions.


Ey. 35.-Pest Control.


hours


lecture and 2


hours


laboratory


per week.


The course in insect control deals primarily with


the chemical phases of control.


It consists


of a review of older methods and a detailed study of the modern method and materials employed.


Consideration


given


fumigation,


contact


poisons,


stomach


poisons,


and repellants.


Special


emphasis is placed upon


the materials employed by the commercial pest control


operator and the


producer


of agricultural


crops.


Ey. 36.-Insects and Health.


2 hours lecture and


2 hours laboratory per week.


A study of insects and related pests


which affect the health


and comfort of


man.


Primary


consideration


is given such groups


mosquitoes and


their relation


to malaria,


yellow fever and


and dengue fever;


lice and their relation


to typhus fever; flies and


their influence upon


typhoid


fever; fleas and bubonic plague.


Ey. 38.-Citrus and Vegetable Insects.


3 hours lecture per week.


This


course


deals


with


major


insect


and related


pests


of citrus


and vegetable


crops


in the state of Florida.


A detailed
Consideration


study


is made


is also given


of the life histories,


the beneficial


agents


habits,


such


biology,


as fungi,


and control


parasites,


of such


and predators


pests.
which


aid in the control of these pests.


I'PUY Y I


YI I














FORESTRY


Fy. 21-22.-Southern


Forestry.


hours


lecture


per week for two semesters.


The development of.


and opportunities


in. forestry


in the South.


practice


of forestry


as applied


by state,


federal, and private owners of


forest land.


Fy. 24.-Tree Identification.


1 hour lecture and 4 hours field work per week.


The classification and


identification


by field


characteristics


of the commercial


timber species


of the United


States


, together with


their


distribution.


Fy. 25.-Measurement of Forest Products.


hours lecture and


hours field


work per week.


The various units of


measure, such as


board foot, cubic foot, and cord,


used to measure the


volume of forest products.


Techniques for measuring forest products in commercial practice.


26.-Timber


Survey


Maps.


hour


lecture


hours


field


work


per week.


Methods of


measuring


the Volume of


standing timber


in terms


of various


products


and of


constructing various types of forest stand maps.


28.-Forest Fire


Protection.


hours


lecture


week.


The organization


of forest


fire protection systems


and the techniques of


forest


fire control.


31.-Lumber


Seasoning


Wood


Preservation.


hours


lecture


hours field work per week.


Handling


and treatment


of lumber


air-seasoning,


and operation


a dry


kiln in the


Wood Products Laboratory.
methods and a consideration


Practice in treating lumber and timber by pressure and non-p


of various chemicals used.


Fy. 32.-Timber


Harvesting.


6 hours field work per week.


Use of various tools and machinery used in cutting of


saw lo


gs, pulpwood, poles and


cross


dA i
|4*,
AI

rj44


pressure














Fy. 33.-Wood Identification and Lumber Grading.


1 hour lecture and 4 hours


field


work


A study
tinguishing


per week.
of features


woods


used


by readily


in identifying


detected


commercial


characteristics.


woods


Consideral


and laboratory
tion of standard


practice
lumber


in dis-
grades


and their application in practice.


Fy. 34.-Naval Stores Operations.


6 hours


field


work per week.


Practice


operating


in the technique


naval


stores


faces.


of hanging
Operation c


new cups


a turpentine


and in the


use of hacks


and pullers


still.


35.-Timber Growing.


hour


lecture


hours


field


work


per week.


The theory of various cutting methods required to insure satisfactory regeneration and growth


of forests.


A consideration


also of


supplementary measures


as forest


planting,


prep-


aration, fertilization, and slash disposal.


Fy. 36.-Forest Thinning.


6 hours field work per week.


The application of thinning and improvement cutting to young forests of slash pine,
pine, and hammock hardwoods to increase growth and improve timber quality.


longleaf


Fy. 37.-Forest
The specifications


Products
and methods


Marketing.


of manufacture


hours


of the


major


lecture


forest


week.


products.


Methods


marketing forest products and the activities of cooperative and other marketing organizations.


Fy. 38.-Forest Equipment.


6 hours field


work per week.


Practice in


the care and use of


axes,


saws,


tractors,


fire line plows,


fire pumps


and other


tools used in


the operation of a forest.















42.-Saw


Operation.


hours


field


work


per week.


Practice in


the operation of


a small sawmill


for cutting


lumber


and heavy timbers,


and in


the proper handling of the finished product.


43.-Forest


Wildlife.


2 hours lecture and


hours field work per week.


Description and life habits of animals and birds of the forest, their food and habitat require-


ments, and plans for land management to handle them


as a


crop.


44.-Forest Nursery


Operation.


hours


field


work


per week.


Practice


various


phases


nursery


operation


such


as seed


preparation,


seeding,


watering,


weeding, fertilization,


lifting and packing of nursery stock.


Fy. 45.-Woodlot Forestry.


2 hours lecture and


hours laboratory per week.


Management of the farm woods as a farm resource and proper use and sale of


farm timber.


47.-Logging.


hours


lecture


per week.


The organization


of logging


camps


and logging


operations,


and the use of various


types


of logging
conditions.


equipment


as used under


varying


conditions of


timber stand,


topography, and


weather


- Irr IP~ I ------II














31.-Citrus


Growing.


hours


lecture


hours


practical


work


week.


A study of all


phases of


citrus growing, from planting


the seed


to marketing


of the fruit,


including


the effects


of soil type,


root-stock,


fertilizer


and spraying


programs


on the quantity


and quality of fruit.


A citrus


grove


with many varieties fruiting


is available for practical work.


He. 32.--Vegtable Growing.


hours lecture and


hours


practical


work per


week.


A study


field work


of principles and


in seeding,


practices


cultivating,


in home and


spraying


commercial


and harvesting


production


representative


of vegetables,


vegetables.


He. 34.-Nursery


Practices.


hours


lecture and


hours practical


work per


week.


A study of the methods of growing nursery stocks and of propagating fruit and


ornamental


trees and shrubs.


Practice


will be given


in both field and greenhouse methods.


POULTRY


HUSBANDRY


24.-Farm


Importance


Poultry.


of industry;


hours


breeds


; culling


lecture


housing;


hours


breeding;


laboratory


hatching


; brooding


week.
chicks;


rearing pullets; managing layers; feeding; marketing;


diseases and parasites.


Py. 31-32.-Managing the Farm Poultry


Flock.


hours


lecture and 4


hours


laboratory per


week.


Practical


pullets


study


equipment;


farming, and


of hatchery management


layout


the production


of farms;


eggs.


costs
(This


production


and returns ;


course


covers


of broilers


practical


and fryers


study


two semesters'


; production
commercial


work.)


Py. 33-34.-Poultry


Plant Operation.


2 hours lecture and


4 hours


laboratory


per week.


Instruction in the operation of a poultry plant.


Practical work will be given at the Poultry


Laboratory in the actual handling of all phases of poultry production.


Py. 36.-Poultry Sanitation and Disease Control.


hours lecture and


hours


laboratory per week.
Causes, symptoms, methods of prevention and treatment of diseases and parasites of poultry.


SOILS


Sls. 33.-Farm Soils.


2 hours recitation


hours


laboratory per


week.


This


course


presents


a simple discussion


of practical


soil management.


All phases


of soil


manaernen t w ill hP trl nfntc' inoliirincr .cnf aion^^ohH+,r ccslnlnn+hrv +hn tl onn nlnn,,ina rft (3 i Tan nr



























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Newel Hall houses part of the laboratories and
Experiment Station.


offices of the


Agricultural



















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