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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00239
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1946
Copyright Date: 1946
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00239
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Foreword
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
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The Record


Comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of


Control, the bulletins
a


information,


announcements


special


courses


instruction,


reports of


University Officers.


These


them.


bulletins


applicant


formation is desired.


should
Address


gratuitously


specifically


stat


to all
e whicl


persons


bulletin


apply


or what


THE


REGISTRAR,


University


of Florida,


Gainesville, Florida













TABLE OF CONTENTS


PAGE


Campus


Officers of


Administration


Summer


Session


Calendar


Admission


Information for


Veterans


........--......e-.......e.- ...-..-..-.. --. -. .- ........ - r ........-.-- - 8--. 8


Expenses


Loan


Funds


Rooming Accommodations


General


Information


Reading Program -........... .......... .a.--.-.........-.........-...-...................... ......-...... 16


Latin-American


Workshop


Teacher


Placement


Bureau


Laboratory
Libraries ....
Certification


School


Teachers


General Regulations ......................... ....... .. ......- .-................................ 22


University


Colleges


Institute
Schools .


College of Agriculture .......... ... ....................................................... 26
School of Architecture and Allied Arts .... ce..c..e..................................... ........ ................ 26


College of Arts and Sciences


College of Business Administration ....................................e............... 27


College


Education


College of Engineering .. .........e......a................. c .. ........ 30


School


of Forestry


College of Law


Schoc
The


ol


Pharmacy


University Colleg'


.e.. -........eee...i......e..ae. .*.e.... un..m. -....... ..C....Sm....... s... ...eec............, 5c ....


Graduate


School


Guide to Courses


DeDartments


Instruction


(Courses and


Schedules)






rt.


BUILDING


J1


BUILDING


BUILDING


Administration
Law Building


Language H
Library
Peabody Ha
Engineering
Benton Hall


Building


all


Building
and Shops


Auditorium
Horticultural Building
Campus Post Office
Agricultural Building
Chemistry Building
Science Hall
Fletcher Hall


Buckman Hall
Florida Union
Experiment Station
Storage Building
Barracks
Cafeteria
Sledd Hall


Thomas
Murphr
Basket
Infirmal
Gymnas
"F' Clr
Swimmi


I


Bi


IRN II II m








STATE BOARD


OF EDUCATION


MILLARD CALDWELL ................ ................. ....................... ............................................. Governor
R. A. GRAY ... .. ...................................... ...................................... .................. ............. Secretary of State
J, EDWIN LARSON .................................. ................ ............................... ...................State Treasurer
J. TOM WATSON ........................... ..... ................................ ...... ......................... .Attorney General
COLIN ENGLISH, Secretary ..................................... State Superintendent of Public Instruction


BOARD


CONTROL


THOMAS


W. BRYANT, B.S., LL.B.


(Florida) ... ....................... .......... ........ ............... Attorney-at-Law
Lakeland, Florida


THOMAS


GURNEY.... ....... ..................................................................................................A ttorney-at-Law
Orlando, Florida


JORDAN......... ............................ ............... ....................... ............................................Banker
Quincy, Florida


M. LUTHER MERSHON, LL.B

HENSON MARKHAM, LL.B.


(Florida) ............................................. ..-..................... Attorney-at-Law
Miami, Florida


(Florida) .......... ................... .... ....................... ....... .. Attorney-at-Law
Jacksonville, Florida


JOHN T. DIAMO ND..._..,... ... ...... ...............Secretary
Tallahassee, Florida


Board of


Control


W. BLANDING. ......... .................................. Auditor for the Board of Control
Gainesville, Florida


UNIVERSITY


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS


C-


JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D.; Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D.
President of the University
TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D., Sc.D.....................Acting Vice-President of the University;
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
WILLIAM T. ARNETT, M.A. in Arch.......Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts
ROBERT COLDER BEATY, M.A.............. .................................................................... Deanof Students
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S .............................................................. .....Dean of the University
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D. .................... ................. ... ........ Director of the School of Pharmacy
KLEIN H. GRAHAM, LL.D........................a......................... .............................. Business Manager
H. HAROLD HUME, D.Sc.........Provost for Agriculture and Dean of the College of Agriculture
RICHARD SADLER JOHNSON, B.S.P..................................................... ........................... Registrar
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A.................................................Dean of the University College
HAROLD MOWRY, M.S.A ..................................... Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station


L.


CI i m


_ _








CALENDAR FOR 1946 SUMMER SESSION


May 6, Monday


Last day for filing preliminary application for
mer Session.


1946 Sum-


June 3 and 4, Monday and
Tuesday ........................................
June 6, 7, and 8, Thursday,
Friday, and Saturday ..............
June 10 and 11, Monday and
Tuesday ...................... ...................


June 12,


Wednesday, 7 a.m.


FIRST TERM
Registration for College of Law.


Placement


Tests.


Registration for
Classes begin.
on this date.


First Summer


Term.


Late registration fee of $5 for registering


June 13,


Thursday,


4 p.m ..........


Last day for registration for the First Summer
for adding courses.


Term, and


June 15, Saturday


June 22, Saturday, noon ................


June 29,


Saturday


Classes will meet as of Tuesday.


Last day for making application for a degree that is to be


awarded at the end of the First Summer
Classes as of July 5 to be made up.


Term.


1, Monday


ast day for graduate students graduating at the end of
the term to submit theses to the Dean.


July 4 and 5, Thursday and
Friday ..........................................


July 6,


Holidays.


Saturday, noon .................. Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at the
end of the term to complete correspondence courses.


11, Thursday, 4 p.m. ............


Wednesday,


4 p.m. ........


16, Thursday


Last day for filing application for extension of certificate.
Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade
of E.
Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at the
end of the term are due in the office of the Registrar.
Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees.


19, Friday, noon .................... First Summer Term ends. All grades
Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.


are due


in the


19, Friday, 8 p.m. ................


Conferring of degrees.


ily 22 and
Tuesday .


Monday and


SECOND TERM


Registration for Second Summer


Term.


July 24,


Wednesday,


a.m ........


Classes begin.
on this date.


Late registration fee of $5 for registering


July 25,


Thursday,


4 p.m. .......... Last


day for registration
id for adding courses.


for the


Second


Summer


Term,


July 27,


Saturday


August 3, Saturday, noon


Classes will meet as of Tuesday.
Last day for applications to take Comprehensive Examina-


tions in the Second Summer


August


Term.


Saturday, noon ........ Last day for making application for a degree that is to
be awarded at the end of the Second Summer Term.


August 10, Saturday, noon .......... Last day for graduate students graduating at the end
the term to submit theses to the Dean.


August 17, Saturday, noon ..........


Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at the







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


ADMISSION

GENERAL STATEMENT


The Board of University Examiners is the agency responsible for administering all
admissions to the University and its various components.
Students who are planning to enter the University of Florida for the first time will be
considered for admission as follows:
1. If the student is entering the University from high school and has not attended
college, he will be considered for admission to the University College.
2. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university
and is presenting less than 64 semester hours of acceptable college credit for advanced
standing, he will be considered for admission to the University College.
3. If the student is transferring to the University from another college or university and
is presenting 64 semester hours or more of acceptable college credit as advanced
standing toward a baccalaureate degree, he will be considered for admission to the
Upper Division school or college of his choice provided his record indicates the
completion of college work in the Social Sciences, the Physical Sciences, English,
the Humanities, and the Biological Sciences.
4. If the student wishes to pursue graduate studies and has been graduated from a
standard college or university, he will be considered for admission to the Graduate
School.
If a student desires to attend the Summer Session not for pursuing work toward a
degree but for meeting some specific need, such as the satisfaction of teacher certification
requirements, he will be considered for admission as an unclassified student.


ADMISSION


SUMMER


SESSION


1946


For the first time in its history the University finds it necessary to restrict
its enrollment. All persons considering attending he 1946 Summer Session are
urged to read the following carefully.
Date of Application
No applicant will considered for admission to the 1946 Summer Session unless
the preliminary application (the postcard found in this bulletin) has been received
at the Office of the Registrar on or before Monday, May 6, 1946. Other applica-
tion forms (if required), which will be sent upon the receipt of the preliminary
application, must be in the Office of the Registrar on or before May 13. It will
be absolutely impossible to consider applications received after these dates. All
persons planning to attend the Summer Session, whether or not they have pre-
viously attended the University, must file the preliminary application form to be









ADMISSION


Wives of veterans of World War II whose husbands will also attend the
1946 Summer Session.
Students in professional schools. Women over twenty-one who have com-
pleted at least two years of acceptable college work (one year for those
planning to study Pharmacy) and wish to enroll in programs leading to
degrees in Agriculture, Architecture, Engineering, Forestry, Law, or
Pharmacy.


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY


COLLEGE


A. For students who have never attended college:
1. Graduation from high school. Records show that the student who does not graduate
from high school in the top half of his class rarely succeeds in college work. The
University urges the prospective student to consider this fact carefully before making
application. Non-Florida students will not be considered for admission if they do
not meet this criterion.
2. Satisfactory achievement in high School. The University does not specify any high
school units as required, but the general pattern of the units presented and the
student's achievement will receive careful consideration. The records reveal that
those students who scatter most in their choice of subjects are those who accom-
plish least in any of them. Therefore applicants who present a record which shows
no unity or a lack of essential subjects cannot be considered.
3. Satisfactory scores on placement tests. All applicants must take the placement
tests before being admitted to the University College. These are achievement tests
in the fields of English, mathematics, social studies, and natural sciences. Attain-
ments in these fields are possible without specific high school courses and are not
guaranteed by the acquiring of certain high school units. If the scores on the
placement tests indicate inadequate foundation for college work, the applicant may
be denied admission.


B. For
1.


2.


transfer
Honorable
attended.
tion last
Satisfacto
on all w
admission


students:*
e Dismissal. The student must
Students who for any reason
attended cannot be considered
iry record. All transfer students
ork attempted at all institution
I.


be eligible to return to the institution last
will not be allowed to return to the institu-
for admission.
s must have made an average of C or higher
is previously attended to be considered for


REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO


THE UPPER DIVISION


A. From the University College:








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


2. A C average or better. The average grade for all work attempted at other institu-
tions must be C or better (the average required for graduation from the University
of Florida). One who does not meet this requirement need not apply.


3. Specific


course


requirements


professional


The courses listed as required for admission


curricula or
the student f
requirements
without redu
cases it may
requirements


acceptable substitutes must
or admission to the Upper D
may be permitted to enroll
cing the credits required in


be required that the student
are met.


school


to the Upper Divisio
offered as advanced
ion. An applicant la'
the Upper Division
? Upper Division for


applicants choice.
n under the various
standing to qualify
king some of these
and complete them
a degree. In some


enroll in the Lower Division


until these


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS


Special


students


admitted


to the


various


schools


colleges


Upper


Division only by approval


sidered
(1) re
(2) a
reason


on an individual ba
cords of previous
statement as to the
or reasons for select


of the Board of University Ex
sis. Application for admission
educational experience (high
type of studies to be pursue<
acting a special program other


miners.
as a spec
school
d; (3)
than the


Each case will be con-
:ial student must include:
or college transcripts);
a brief statement of the
regular one; (4) satis-


factory evidence of ability to pursue these studies-for example, a student wishing to
enroll as a special student for some technical courses who feels qualified to do so by reason
of employment or other experience should submit a brief description of this experience.

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW


Applicants for admission to the College of Law
of academic college work meeting the requirement
Schools. Evidence of this work must be presented
before the date on which the applicant wishes to


must have credits for at least two years
its of the Association of American Law
to the Registrar of the University on or
register.


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


To be admitted to the Graduate School an
college or university and have a foundation in
quality to be satisfactory to the department in
A complete transcript of all undergraduate
the Office of the Registrar before the date of


applicant must be a graduate o
the major subject sufficient in
I which the student proposes to
and graduate work must be tr
registration.


tf a standard
quantity and
major.
transmitted to


ADMISSION


OF UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS


To be admitted as an unclassified student the a]
.. ** -


pplicant


must


submit


a statement








ADMISSION


these requirements. Before any veteran applies he should read the requirements carefully
to make sure that he is qualified.
Former students at the University who have been in the service will be admitted pro-
vided they file application in accordance with the information set forth on page 6.
One of the most acute problems faced by the veteran, especially the married one, is
finding suitable housing. While the University has some housing units for married veterans
with families, it has not been possible to place all applicants. The veteran is strongly urged
not to bring his family to Gainesville until he has made arrangements for suitable housing.


The cost for all fees and tuition,
government to those veterans who qi
considerable time is required to clea
begin the procedure long before he pi


books and
lalify under
r these apple
ans to enter


training supplies, is paid
the G. I. Bill or Public
ications, the veteran is st
the University. Approval


by thb
Law 1(
rongly
by the


e federal
6. Since
urged to
Veterans


Administration of such application for benefits under either of these bills is approval for
benefits only and does not remove the responsibility of the veteran to comply with the
University's admission requirements.
The veteran whose application for veterans benefits has been approved will receive
documents certifying his eligibility. These should be presented to the Registrar at the
time of registration, and should not be mailed in advance.
Veterans who have not received notices of approval of their applications should bring
a copy of their discharge or certificate of service. This document must show separation
from the service under honorable conditions and must indicate the length of service. A
veteran possessing this evidence of eligibility for government benefits will be granted credit
for his fees and books even though his application has not yet been formally approved by
the Veterans Administration.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


EXPENSES

GENERAL FEES


Registration Fee,
(Florida Stud
Registration Fee,
(Non-Florida
Registration Fee,
Registration Fee,


University
ents) per
University
Students)
College of
College oi


Institute and All Schools and Colleges except
term .. -.........-......... ---....................................-..........-.........
rInstitute and All Schools and Colleges except
per term ........................... ....................... ........ .... .. .........
Law, (Florida Students) per term ...... -..............
f Law, (Non-Florida Students) per term ..............


Law,


...aw,......... 23.
Law,


... ... ---.-..
..............


Registration Fee, Special Three Weeks' Courses .........................................................
Late Registration Fee ............................................... .. ................ ....................................
Breakage Fee for Biology and Chemistry (unused portion refunded) ............................
Diploma Fee ..... ....... ....F.........e.. ..... ...................................


43.00
35.00
55.00
12.00
5.00
5.00
5.00


P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL FEES


Kindergar rten ........... ..............................-
Elementary School Fee ................................................................................................................


EXAMINATION FEES


A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged
application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary only
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned.


each
case


REFUND OF FEES


Fees paid in
not after June 7,
If before 4 P
wish to withdraw
No refunds will


advance
for first
. M. on
from the
be made


for room reservation will
term reservations, or July
Friday of the first week
: University, the fees paid,
after this date.


be refunded up to and including, but
14 for second term reservations.
of each term students for any reason
less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded.


LIVING EXPENSES
Board and lodging will be somewhat higher this summer than they have been in previous


Summer
houses,
to 50 ;
available
campus
accomm
The


r Sessions. Food can bI
and at various eating pi
lunch and dinner will c
e in private homes, in
for $12.50 to $30 per
:odations.
following table will aff


e obtained
aces near
:ost 50 te
rooming h
person i


ord


at the University cafeterias, at certain rooming
the campus. An average breakfast will cost 254
o 75t. Lodging outside the residence halls is
houses, and in fraternity houses adjacent to the
>er month, depending upon the quality of the


an estimate


expenses for the


Summer


Session


six-weeks' term. The cost of board and lodging is,


course,


variable,


depending upon








EXPENSES


LOAN FUNDS

The Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of Summer Session
teachers through the establishment of certain loan funds-the Florida State Scholarship
Fund, the College Girls' Club Scholarship Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan
Fund, the R. A. Gray Loan Fund, the Doyle E. Carlton Loan Fund, the W. N. Sheata
Memorial Loan Fund, and the Harold Colee Loan Fund. Through the Office of the Dean
of Students, information can be secured concerning other loans available to summer school


students.

(1)
(2)
(8)
(4)


Loans are governed by the following regulations:


Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school.
Applicant must be in need of aid.
Applicant must apply for loan at least two weeks before opening


g of a Summer Term.


Application must be made directly to the De
Applicant must be recommended by two sch
teaching at the time of application.
Loans are to be used for attendance at the
Loans are made for a period not to exceed n
Loans bear interest at the rate of 6%, which


Upon application to the Dean of the Summer Session,
a scholarship loan will be furnished.

KAPPA DELTA PI LOAN F


an of the Summer Session.
Lool officials of the county


in which she


University of Florida Summer Session.
ine months.
is added to the principal fund.


blank forms for application for


UND


Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi has established a loan fund available for small
loans to graduate and undergraduate students who are preparing for the teaching profession.
Among other eligibility requirements, a student desiring a loan must be a member of
Kappa Delta Pi and must have a scholarship average of not less than B. Information


concerning this loan fund and forms for making
from the Secretary of the College of Education,
Florida, Gainesville, Florida.


application
Room 120,


for a loan may be secured
Yonge School, University of


LEWIS SUMMER SCHOOL SCHOLARSHIPS

The 1945 Legislature provided annual Summer School Scholarships, now known as
Lewis Scholarships, for approximately one fourth of Florida's teachers. These scholarships
are awarded to teachers upon recommendations of the county superintendents. Application
should be made for them prior to entrance to the Summer Session. Each of these scholar-
ships carries a stipend of $75 for those who earn six semester hours credit during a
summer term at one of the institutions of higher learning.


STUDENTS'


DEPOSITORY


- l C- - -. -- -- .. .- ..


I








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


All service is cafeteria style, affording individual selections. The policy is to furnish
well prepared food at actual cost. Coupon books containing tickets with a monetary value
for use at the Cafeteria are sold by the University Cashier.


P. K.


YONGE SCHOOL CAFETERIA


The P. K.
Summer Sessii
of food will b
All service
well-prepared


Yonge School
on. It is unde
e furnished at
is cafeteria s
food at actual


Cafeteria will be open
;r the direction of an ex
reasonable prices.
tyle, affording individual
cost.


to University students for the entire
perienced dietitian and a high quality


selections.


policy


is to furnish


UNIVERSITY


RESIDENCE


HALLS


FACILITIES

The University of Florida Residence Halls consist of five dormitories: Buckman, Thomas,
Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree Halls. Each is divided into sections which accommodate
an average of thirty-two residents each. A bathroom with shower, lavatories, and toilets


C
}








EXPENSES


Room furnishings consist


single


beds,


innerspring mattresses,


desks,


chairs,


waste-


baskets, and roller shades. Additional equipment, suE
tables, and similar items, is gradually being placed in
are included in the incidental costs listed below. So
Fletcher Hall, as well as several two-room suites for
with commodious double-deck bunks instead of single
A limited number of the following types of room
room for two persons; Triple (T.)-one room for three


bedroom and study room for two persons;
room and study room for three persons.


:h as


upholstered


I the rooms; cha
me of the small
three in other I
beds.
s are available:
persons; Two R


and Two-Room Suite for


chairs, extra


rges for such items
er double rooms in
Halls, are furnished


Double
oom Suit


Three


(D.)-one
(2RS.)--


(2RS-3.)-bed-


RATES AND CHARGES

The schedule given below indicates the rate per person for each semester of the Regular
Session.


Halls:
Type:

Double


BUCKMAN
Rms.I Rate


$32.00


THOMAS
Rms.I Rate

38 $32.00
12 $30.00**


SLEDD
Rms.| Rate

- -


FLETCHER
Rms.I Rate

14 $40.00
6 $37.50'


I


II MURPHREE
fj Rms.I Rate


15 $37.50*


Triple 2 $24.50 3 $30.00 -
2 $24.50 -. -


2-Room .-- 56 $40.00 63 $41.00 133 $41.00
Suite -- -- 21 $34.00* 22 $40.00* 30 $40.00*
for 2

2-Room 22 $24.50 10 $24.50 8 $36.00 4 $37.00 8 $37.00
Suite -- -- -- 2 $36.00*
for 3


* Fourth floor rooms.
** Without lavatory in room.


Summer Session rates (per term) are approximately one-third of the amounts shown
above: e.g., a two-room suite for two renting at $41.00 per person per semester in the
Regular Session rents for $13.50 per person each term of the Summer Session.
Room rent and other charges for the term or semester are due and payable in advance
at the beginning of the period. In cases where necessity is shown, arrangements may be
made for installment payments of room rent, subject to the approval of the Committee on
Residence. Such arrangements bear a carrying charge. Failure to pay rent when due or







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Pillows, lamps, typing tables, blankets, linens, and other types of


available for rent in limited quantities.


of such items.


extra equipment are


Residents are responsible for exchange or return


Except for emergencies, it is recommended that residents furnish their own


linens, pillows, and blankets.


MAKING RESERVATIONS


Anyone


desiring


to make room


reservations


should


address


Office of


Director


Residence for


application


forms


information


as to halls


available for


period


he plans to attend.


room


reservation


$10.00


per person


for the


Regular


Session


$5.00


person for the Summer Session, must be posted before an assignment can be made.


This


fee is not a


payment on


rent but is a deposit which is refundable, less any


outstanding


charges,


after the
premises


student


have


completed


been


checked as to


period


condition.


residence
Checks or


vacated his


money


orders


room,


for this


fee should be made payable to the


University of Florida.


Assignments are made in order


according to the date on which the reservation fee is posted.
Each applicant will be given advance notification, if possible, of his exact room assign-
ment, the earliest date he may occupy his room, the latest date for cancellation of reserva-
tion without forfeiture of the reservation fee, and other essential information.
Room assignments for men residents are made by a schedule under which certain rooms


are assigned


to freshmen


only,


others


to upperclassmen


only.


purpose


schedule is to distribute the two levels of students evenly throughout all sections.


During the Summer


Session, certain sections


or halls


reserved for women


students are allocated for the assignment of rooms to women students under 21 years of age.


Residents are


responsible


for their rooms for the entire


Regular


Session


(two, semes-


or Summer Session


(two terms


unless otherwise arranged.


Residents may not change


rooms or move to quarters off-campus


unless such


changes are


approved, in


advance,


Director


Residence


or the


Committee


on Residence.


Residents


resigning


from


school because of induction into the armed services or because of illness will be granted
pro-rata refunds when proper evidence of induction or illness is presented to the Director
of Residence.


GENERAL POLICIES


Statement of
to each room.


Policy


Residence


Halls is


posted


Each resident is responsible for knowing


on the inside of


and observing the


the entrance door


principles


conduct set forth in such


"Statement"


and "Supplements"


thereto.


The "Quiet Hour"


Period


(7:00


P.M. to 8:00 A.M. daily except Saturday)


is the most


important


single


point


in Residence


Halls


policy


. Its scrupulous


observance


all resi-


dents contributes more than any other activity to the creation of ideal conditions for study
and rest.








EXPENSES


nailing, screwing, or otherwise attaching pictures, hangers, racks, and similar gadgets to
walls or woodwork is strictly prohibited. Thumb tacks or slip-over picture molding hangers
may be used.
University Regulations prohibit the use of firearms or explosives in rooms or the Resi-
dence Halls area, cooking or keeping food in rooms, and the possession or use of alcoholic
beverages in rooms or Residence Halls area.


All equipment is numbered and recorded as
ing, or otherwise altering the location or condi
from the Office of the Director is prohibited.
by both equipment and room number.


SPECIAL INFORMATION


to location and condition. Trading, shift-
tion of any equipment without permission
Items requiring repair should be reported


AND SERVICES


Residents must furnish, unless it is otherwise arranged, their own linens, pillows, towels,
blankets, bedspreads, laundry bags, study lamps, and other special items they may desire
for their personal convenience.
Heavy luggage may be sent ahead, prepaid, addressed in the name of the resident,
c/o Sledd Hall Archway. The University assumes no responsibility beyond the exercise
of reasonable care for any shipments so received. Residents making such shipments must
sign for them before they will be released from the Archway.
Residents check in at the Office of the Director of Residence to receive their room keys
and pay their rent. IMPORTANT NOTE: Residents who will arrive later than the
opening day of registration, or who will arrive in the evening hours after 5:00 P.M. should
give advance notification of the date and hour of their arrival.


After checking
aid in delivery of
such items in the
loss of room key.


in residents should: (1) pin their name cards to their room doors to
messages; (2) unpack trunks and heavy luggage preparatory to storing
basements; and (3) obtain key case or key chain to aid in preventing


Limited messenger service is provided for delivering telephone messages, long distance
calls, campus mail, and special delivery letters. Telephone facilities for local calls are
available in the 'Office during office hours.


Repairs and electrical reply
office. Residents should not
who find any defects in their
them at once to make certain
be left in fixtures till replace


acements needed should be re
attempt to make repairs or
rooms or room furnishings i
i they are properly recorded.
Id by maintenance workers.


sported promptly to the Director's
replacements themselves; those
when they move in should report
Burned out light bulbs should


Laundry, newspaper, and dry-cleaning solicitors are allowed to
Halls only after obtaining a permit from the Director of Residence.


service


Residence








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


GENERAL


INFORMATION


SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE 1946 SUMMER SESSION

THE TEACHING OF READING PROGRAM


In response to


a demand


from teachers, supervisors, and administrators in the State,


the College of Education has designed a series of courses in the field
in avoiding and in solving reading difficulties. Dr. Stella Center,
Laboratory and Clinic of New York University, and a member of her
two to three weeks the first term as special lecturers and consultants
gram. The courses and the laboratories connected with the program
basic physical, emotional, biological, psychological, and intellectual
teaching reading. (See En. 480 and En. 575 and 576, First Term.)


of reading to assist
Director of Reading
staff will spend from
in the reading pro-
m will examine the
factors involved in


THE LATIN-AMERICAN WORKSHOP


The Latin-American


Workshop


will be offered for the second consecutive time.


This


summer it will be conducted
through the help of the United
The Workshop will include
drill and other intensive metho
guage-and-Area Study. There


from Latin
exhibits.


America.


Other


with the aid
States Office
a full program
ds similar to
will also be


features


of visiting Latin-American lecti
of Education.
m of foreign language courses, f
those used by the Army in its
opportunity for contact with na


Latin-American


films,


music,


irers


secured


featuringg oral
Foreign Lan-
tive speakers
and cultural


ENTERTAINMENTS


AND PLAYS


Adequate facilities for en
torium, which has a seating
University Auditorium, the au
School will be available. S
and musical entertainments I
ments of Speech and Music.


itertainments
capacity of
iditoriums in
tress is placid
beingg produce


and plays are provided in the University
approximately 1800. In addition to the
Florida Union and in the P. K. Yonge Labo
ed upon performances by the students in
;d from time to time by the staffs of the d


Audi.
main
ratory
plays
lepart-


RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE


The moral and religious atmosphere
religious denominations have attractive
every service. Transportation to and
attend. Frequent devotional services a
with the Student Assembly.


of the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading
places of worship, and students are welcomed at
from church is provided for students who will
re held in the University Auditorium in connection


THE FLORIDA UNION BUILDING








GENERAL INFORMATION


discipline, and must stand among the upper tenth of all candidates for degrees.
for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor point average of


(B) on all scholastic work.


Candidates
at least 3.00


If a student comes within the quota for his college, an average


of 3.00 assures his eligibility, but if he does not come within the quota, it is necessary that


he have an average of 3.30 or higher.


Graduate students are also eligible for membership.


KAPPA DELTA PI

Upsilon Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was established at the University of Florida in 1923.


Kappa Delta Pi has as its purpose the encouragement of high intellectual


and scholastic


standards


and the recognition of


outstanding contributions


in education.


general,


scholarship requirement for members in Upsilon Chapter is a scholastic average of 3.00 (B).


High scholarship alone, however,


which


person


must


will not guarantee election to membership.


possess


are desirable


personal-social


qualities,


Other qual-
leadership


abilities,


worthy educational ideals,


continued


interest in


education.


PHI BETA KAPPA


Phi Beta Kappa


was established


on the


campus


University


of Florida in


1938.


It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in


1776.


In conformity with the national


objectives of the society, the University of Florida chapter restricts election to the College


of Arts and Sciences.


Not more than 15% of the senior class graduating in each semester,


including both graduating classes of Summer Session, is eligible for election.

SPORTS AND ATHLETICS


Division


of Physical


Education,


Health


and Athletics


through


Department


Intramural Athletics and Recreation will sponsor a complete program of


sports and recre-


national


activities


during


summer


sessions.


program


provide


diversified


recreational activities for the faculty


purely


voluntary


basis.


Facilities


graduate


instruction


undergraduate


available


students


at specified


on a
hours.


All faculty and students of the


University


Summer School will be urged to


participate in


some phase of this program.
Where there is sufficient interest among organizations such as sports clubs, fraternities,


dormitories,


honor


societies,


and individual


groups,


units


competition


will be


formed


and individuals with exceptional ability in these areas will be encouraged to act as volun-
teer leaders.
Information concerning any phase of this program will be furnished through announce-
ments in the Orange and Blue Bulletin and by other notices.

SWIMMING POOL


-1 1


- _


rFlt I a..l*!.,1 .a *L . ... 1 ..11 Ll .. ,. .m.


Q sIv


rwfrr nlnn C Etilmrt j T^ c- mi n







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


articles, and other pertinent information.


Announcements made in the General Assembly;


notices on


bulletin


boards in Florida


Union,


Peabody


Laguage


Hall;


news items in the Florida Alligator serve to


keep the Summer


Session students informed


concerning student


activities.


TEACHER PLACEMENT BUREAU


The purpose of the


Teacher Placement Bureau of the College of Education is to assist


in placing


utilize


their


University


special


Florida


training


students
abilities


alumni


to the


in teaching
advantage.


positions


which


service


University students is charged.


Those who wish to avail themselves of this service should


submit complete credentials to the Director and arrange an interview with him if possible.


Superintendents,


principals, and other officials seeking competent teachers and students


desiring


assistance


from


Teacher


Placement


Bureau


in finding


desirable


positions


should address all requests to the Director of the


Teachers'


Placement Bureau,


College of


Education,


University of Florida,


Gainesville.


THE P. K.


YONGE LABORATORY


SCHOOL


The P. K.


Yonge


Laboratory


School


was established


serve


the public


schools


other educational agencies through four major functions:

1. By demonstrating an excellent quality of teaching in elementary and high school.


2. By


assisting


schools of


state


through


counseling


teachers


distribution of educational materials.


3. By


serving


as an experimental


educational


laboratory


investigation


kinds of


school


problems, for the


production


materials,


experiments


in improved methods of teaching and supervised student


teaching.


4. By providing opportunities for observation of classroom management and' partici-
pation in teaching.


The Laboratory School


be open


both terms of


Summer


Session.


Application


for enrollment should be made to the Director of the Laboratory School as soon as possible,


since the number who may


accommodated is


limited.


Classes


from


kindergarten


through the eighth grade will be held as needed.


Pupils will register on Monday, June


10, in Room 230,


Yonge


Building,


from 8:30 to


10:00 A. M.


FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY


FIn r-a


Tnhantory in Innated


an the third anor


. .... ... ... ..


VY nna


Currien1nm








GENERAL


INFORM TION


DOE MUSEUM


The Doe Museum connected with the P


Yonge Laboratory School


is located on the


third floor of the P


Yonge


Building.


Museum


be open


from


A.M.


4:00 P. M. daily, except Saturday, and from 9:00


A. M.


to 12:00 noon


on Saturday, from


June 11 through July 21.


This Museum houses a unique collection of Florida ornithological


specimens prepared by the Curator, Charles E. Doe.


THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

The University Library system consists of twelve libraries, eight of which have separate


administrations:


Florida


Union,


Main


Library,


Chemistry-Pharmacy,


which


and the


under
School


its jurisdiction
of Architecture


libraries


Yonge


Library of Florida History; the Law Library


Extension Division Library;


Fulk Administrators'


Experiment


Station


Library


Research


Yonge


Curriculum


Library.


the School of Forestry Library


Laboratory
Laboratory


holdings


School


Library


Library


these


libraries


; the General
he Joseph R.
: Agricultural
are shown in


the card


catalog of the


Main Library with


exception


newly


organized


Yonge Library of Florida History,


which is now being cataloged.


THE MAIN LIBRARY


Main


Library


collection


consists


over


180,000


volumes.


There


are two large


reading rooms


one, on the ground floor, is assigned for reading in the


University College


and for Reserve books; on the second floor is the Reference Room, housing also the current


periodicals, newspapers, the Central
stacks are forty-eight carrels for the


Card Catalog and the Circulation Desk.


use of


In the book


graduate students.


P. K. YONGE LABORATORY


SCHOOL


LIBRARY


The P


Yonge Laboratory School Library will be open for use of teachers attending


the Summer Session.


This library


contains over


7,000 books for


oys and girls


from


kindergarten through the twelfth grade.
only and may not be checked out.


These


books are


available for use in the library


library


open


during


the following


hours:


to 12:00


noon;


Saturday: 9:00 A. M. to 12:00 noon.


of the teachers.


The librarian will


Afternoon hours will be scheduled to meet the needs
post hours when she will be available for conference


on individual library problems.


Teachers and


principals


are invited


to ask for whatever


help they may need.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


CERTIFICATION


OF TEACHERS


Persons


desiring


information


concerning


certification


teachers


are advised


write to the


State


on Certification


Undergraduate


Department
Teachers.
Certificates


of Education,


This


booklet


in the


Tallahassee,


gives


various


Florida,


requirements


fields


as well


requesting


regular


as instructions


Bulletin


Graduate


concerning


applications for certificates.


various


types


Provisional


Limited


Provisional


Certificates


not be issued to cover teaching in schools beginning terms after July


1946.


After that


date,


Temporary


Certificates


with


a validity


one year


issued


to such


applicants only upon recommendation of County School Superintendents.


Persons


interested


shifting


from


provisional


or temporary


certification


to regular


certification


should


write


the State


Department


of Education


for recommendations


as to


what
does


summer
not hold


courses


a degree


I count
from a


toward


n accredj


fulfilling rec
ited college,


uimrements.


should


case


have


individual


transcript (s)


evaluated by an accredited institution, as defined in
the State Department for such suggestions.


As a matter of information to students


Certificate Bulletin A, before writing


(and with emphasis on the point that certificates


are granted


the State


Department


Education,


not by


University)


some of


requirements listed in the Certificate Bulletin A, September, 1944, of the State Department
of Education are repeated below with the numbers of the courses offered by the University
which are designed to meet these requirements.


REQUIREMENTS


*UNIVERSITY COURSES MEETING THE
REQUIREMENTS


Certificates:


Constitution'

General Preparation
Health Education
Physical Education


Two of th
331, 3,
C-l and (
HPl. 387
HPI. 363,


he
32
-3
(o
3l


following
; CPl. 13
and C-2
ir En. 381
54, 373


: Hy. 301, 302, 303, 304
; Pcl. 313, 314; Pcl. 241
or C-6
or En. 103)


Certificates:


Child Development
Educational Psychology
History and Principles o
to Education
Elementary School Cur
Methods of Teaching
Elementary School
Principles and Methods


Readi,
Children'!
Methods
Eleme


ng


En. 385 (or En. 203 or En. 319)
En. 386 (or En. 207)


r Introduction


En. 241


riculum
in the


(or CEn. 13 or En. 101 or


471 (or En. 308)


of Teaching


s Literature
of Teaching Science in
rntary School


Methods in Arithmetic


(or En. 221)


Gl. 301 or G1. 302


(or En. 209 or 222)


En. 471 (or En. 124)


Elementary








GENERAL


For Secondary Certificates:
English
Mathematics
Physical Education
Science:
Physical Sciences
Biological Sciences
Conservation


INFORMATION


C-3 and courses in CEh. and Eh.
C-42, C-421 and courses in CMs. and Ms.
Courses in HP1.


C-2, Courses in Ps. and Cy.
C-6, Courses in Bly. and Bty.
C-l or C-2 or C-6 or Gpy. 385
or Es. 381 or Es. 382


or Gpy.


Social


Studies:


History
Political Science
Economics
Sociology
Geography
Conservation
General


Courses ii
Courses i.
Courses i1
Courses ii
Courses ii
See Scien
C-l will
require


n CHy.
n CPl.
n CEs.
n CSy.
n Gpy.
ce


be counted as 8
ed but will not


requirements.


381, 385


of the total hours
reduce the specific


Some of the certification requirements listed in


literature of the State


Department


not be


represented


same


titles


in this


catalogue.


facilitate


finding


proper course descriptions for such fields consult the guide on page 43.


REGULATIONS


GOVERNING


EXTENSION


CERTIFICATES


The following more important items govern the


granting of extension certificates:


The certificate must


be valid at


the close


the Summer


Term


attended


and at the time formal application for extension is made.
The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no
below a "C".


grade is


No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply for


the same.


In case the student fails to apply on the Registration


Card at


time of registration, request may be made to the Registrar, Room 110, Lan-


guage Hall, to have his application for extension properly recorded.


A list


of those who have applied will be posted on the bulletin boards in Language
Hall and Peabody Hall not later than July 5 for the First Term and August


14 for the Second Term.


In case of error in this list, students should report


to the


Registrar.


student will


recommended


extension


whose


name does not appear on this list by
23 for the Second Term. Students


July 12 for the First Term or August
should indicate exactly the name that


appears on the certificate which they wish to have extended.








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


GENERAL


REGULATIONS


STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY


Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper co
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dea
college regarding choice of courses several days before registration; in addition:
juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which th
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal applica
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.


nurses and


n

ey
tic
to


of their
to this,
expect
m for a
receive


Courses
in which th
at the office
of the Surm


can be dropped or changed only with the approval of t\
e student is registered and by presentation of the cards
of the Registrar. Unclassified students must secure the
mer Session for this purpose.


he dean of the college
authorizing the change
approval of the Dean


The student is advised to procure a copy of Student Regulations, Part I, and acquaint
himself with all general regulations. Particular attention is directed to the following items:

CREDITS
The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one semester
hour.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS


1. The


minimum


residence requirement


for the


baccalaureate


degree


two semester


terms, or one semester and three summer terms, or
offering advanced standing must meet this requirement
Students who break their residence at the University
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement


five summer terms. New students
;nt after entrance to the University.
by attending another institution for
after re-entering the University.


2. For the Master's Degree two semesters or six summer terms are necessary to satisfy
the residence requirements, except for the Master of Education Degree, where the require-
ments are two regular terms and one summer term, or six summer terms.


3. Students are required to complete the last thirty
Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during r
which the student is to be graduated. Exception to this
written petition approved by the faculty of the college
amount of extension work permitted exceed more than
required for a baccalaureate degree.


credit hours (28 in the College of
regular residence in the college from
regulation may be made only upon
concerned, but in no case may the
twelve of the last thirty-six hours


AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED








GENERAL


REG ULA TIONS


MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAF,

The maximum load for which an undergraduate student may register is 6 hours or two
courses totaling 7 hours.
Maximum load is six semester hours per term in the Graduate School and seven hours
in the College of Law.
Minimum load is four semester hours. At the time of registration loads of less than
four hours may be approved by the Dean concerned. After registration, loads of less than
four hours can be approved by the Sub-Committee of the University Senate.


GRADUATION WITH


HONORS


For
Catalog.


regulations


various


colleges


covering


graduation


Honors,


UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS


1.
credits


This group will include (a) students from other
to be transferred eventually to their respective


colleges and
institutions,


universities earning
(b) students with


degrees taking refresher courses, and


other students not candidates for


degrees.


2. In the
dent later
the Unive]
it all the


event any
wishes to
rsity, he m
credentials


r student who has attended a Si
become a candidate for a degree
ay do so (1) by regularizing his
required) and (2) by meeting 1


summer Session as an unclassified
in one of the colleges or schools
admission to the University (pre-
the requirements (in effect at the


time of his application for candidacy)
to enter.


for admission


to the school


or college


desires


3. If


such a student is


admitted


to candidacy for


a degree,


credits


earned


while


unclassified student will be accepted in so far
(in effect at the time he is admitted to candied
student. A student must have been registered
from which he expects to receive the Bachelor'
in the Graduate School for at least five summer
requirement of at least five summer terms in t


as they apply
dacy) of the
as a regular
s Degree for
terms for the


toward
college
student
at least
Master


the degree requirements
or school chosen by the
in the college or school
three summer terms and
's degree. The residence


he University will not be waived in any case.


4. Students regularly enrolled during
students during the Summer Session.


the academic


cannot


become


unclassified


5. Each student registered as an unclassified student will be given a definite statement
of the policies governing the application for admission to candidacy in the various colleges
and schools. This statement will make clear that credits earned while a student is regis-
tered as an unclassified student can be applied toward a degree in the college of his choice
only if under regular procedure this credit will apply toward that degree.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


course with a failing grade. Where
otherwise, it will be mailed to the
Instructors shall immediately report a]
ment Head.
Should any absences or failure to
student will be dropped from the co
dropped from more than one course
Student Progress who may rule that
marked "Dropped for Non-Attendance'
may be.


possible this warning will be delivered personally;
student's last University address by the Registrar.
[U such warnings to the Course Chairman or Depart-


do
urse
his
he
" or


class work b
and be giver
case will be
be dropped fr
"Dropped for


e incurred after this warning, the
a a failing grade. Should he be
considered by the Committee on
om the University and his record
Unsatisfactory Work" as the case


FAILURE IN STUDIES

A person registered in one of the colleges or professional schools of the Upper Division


who fa;
failure
semester
Senate.
fails fif


ils


fifty per cen


in studies and
;r, except upon
A student who
ty per cent or


for readmission.


a


or more of his work in any term


will
appro
o has
more
.dmin:


course only cause a student to


Students
Committee
committee v
has been in


registered in
on Student Pr
vill be guided
attendance o0


considered the equival
fifty per cent or more
readmission until the
the Sub-Committee of
subsequent period of
permanently and not


not be


I of a formal petition by the
:en dropped once and in any
his work shall be dropped
ring the above regulation,
be dropped.
University College will hi


liver
rnce
rible


sity Senate.


A s


or semester will be dropped for
university until the lapse of one
Sub-Committee of the University
r subsequent period of attendance
permanently and not be eligible
in no case shall failure in one


wve


ogress at the end of each period of


ent o1
of his
lapse
the Un
attenda
be elig


their


records


attendance.


reviewed


general


weeks summer terms
period of attendance i
i will not be eligible
of a formal petition
dropped once and in


fails fifty per cent or more of his work shall be dropped
for readmission. In administering the above regulation,


in no case shall failure in one course only cause a student to be dropped.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS


The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must successfully pass
six or more to complete the program of the University College) are administered by the
Board of University Examiners and are given in January, May, and August of each year.
Student must be familiar with the work of the various courses and be able to think in the
several fields in a comprehensive way in order to pass these examinations. A total of six
hours, divided into two equal periods, will be required for each examination covering a full
year course. Standings on the comprehensive examinations are issued by the Board of
Examiners and are not subject to change by any other agency.


readmitted


the following policy.
semester or the equi
a semester) and in
s work will be droppi
of one semester, exc


The student in the Lower Division who


valent (two six
any subsequent
ed first time am
ept on approval
studentt who has









GENERAL


registered in
applicant will
has not been
accepted only
The Board of
examinations
Should a
the examinati
additional pri
application to


REGULATIONS


the colleges of the Upper Division. Before the application is accepted the
be required to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof that this privilege
used to avoid the payment of usual University fees. Applications will be
for those examinations which are administered by the Board of Examiners.
Examiners is the only agency authorized to give University College students
by application.


student fail a comprehensive
ion by repeating the course
separation must be submitted
repeat the examination.


course examination, he may qualify to repeat
or by further independent study. Evidence of
to the Board of Examiners with the formal


UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE


The University Institute has been organized for veterans and adult students who wish
to complete their high school work and meet the entrance requirements to the University
under an accelerated program. Classes at the secondary school level are organized in
English, mathematics, social studies, science, industrial arts, and business education.
Veterans enrolled in the University Institute receive benefits under the Veterans' Ad-
ministration and enjoy regular University privileges.
For further information apnlv to the Director of the University Institute, Room 120,


A t


Yonge Building.


-








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


COLLEGES


AND


SCHOOLS


COLLEGE OF


AGRICULTURE


The College of Agriculture offers a number of curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor
of Science in Agriculture. For complete information on the requirements for the various
curricula the student should consult the Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division
under the heading, College of Agriculture. The Summer Session offerings of the College
are selected from as many fields as possible with the view of:


1. making available some of the basic courses required in several
those beginning their Upper Division work in ihe College,


curricula for


providing some advanced courses which will enable students now enrolled in the
College to speed their individual programs and graduate earlier,


3. offering
teachers


several courses in agricultural fields which
and others with non-professional interest in


will be of
agriculture,


value


offering


non-degree


courses


in agriculture


veterans


interested


in vocational


training, as part of a two-year curriculum.


SCHOOL OF


ARCHITECTURE AND


ALLIED


ARTS


The Summer Session of 1946 will offer undergraduate work in Architectu
Construction, Painting, and Commercial Art.
Subjects will be taught by the project method. The student progresses
according to his ambition, previous preparation, natural ability, and applicati
are given on acceptable work completed.
Credits obtained may be applied toward the degrees in Architecture, Bi


re,


Building


individually
on. Credits


lilding


Con-


struction, Painting, and Commercial Art. For detailed requirements for t
degrees offered by the School, the student should consult the University Catalog


several


COLLEGE


ARTS


AND


SCIENCES


Inasmuch as


most


of the


subjects


taught


in the public


schools


are continued


on the


college
service
College
either t
institute


level by
to teach
of Arts
:o make
ions and


sciences requi
Returning
the College or
*


departments in the
ers of the State.
and Sciences in th
up deficiencies or
of other colleges


rements or electives.
veterans are invited to
his representative. As
S j. S * *


College of Arts an
Others who profit
e Summer Session
to hasten gradua
of the University


id Sciences, this college is of particular
particularly by the operation of the
are students of the College who wish
tion, and students of other collegiate
who wish to complete basic arts and


cuss their academic problems with the Dean of
as circumstances permit, the College will adapt
*1 ,1


t


1








COLLEGES


AND


SCHOOLS


Dean of
versity Co
the Dean
degrees.


the College of Arts and Sciences. Only students who have completed the
llege or its equivalent (as determined by the Board of Examiners and approved
of the College) are eligible to enter the curricula and become candidates


THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF


ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE


Every student who
carefully the description
in the Catalog.
The degree of Bache


wishes to be a
of requirements


candidate for one of these degrees should read
under the heading College of Arts and Sciences


lor of Arts will be conferred


upon


those who fulfill the specified


requirements and whose majors center in one or
Bible, economics, English, French, German, history
sociology, Spanish and speech. Similarly, the
conferred upon those who fulfill the specified re
one or more of the fields of biology, botany,
students who major in geography, in mathemati
of Bachelor of Arts while others receive the degree
determined by the direction of the student's inte
work.


THE PRE-LAW


more of the
, journalism,
degree of B
quirements
chemistry, g


fields
philoso
bachelor
and wh
eology,


ics or in psychology


of ancient languages,
'phy, political science,
of Science will be
ose majors center in
and physics. Some
y receive the degree


i of Bachelor of Science, the degree being
Rests and accomplishments in his major


a


COURSE


In cooperation with the College
bined academic-law curricula. For
possible to earn the academic and 1
in the University College, one in the
of Law.


of Law, the College
students who make
aw degrees in six ye
College of Arts and


of Arts
adequate
ars, of w
Sciences,


and Sciences offers com-
scholastic progress it is
which two years are spent
and three in the College


PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES

Students who upon graduation from the University College are eligible for admission to
the College of Arts and Sciences and who have not completed requirements for admission
to medical and dental schools should continue and complete their pre-professional training
in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student should select courses in accordance with
requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes to enter, and should corre-
spond with the dean of that school for information and advice.


COLLEGE OF BUSINESS


The College of Business
the regular terms. The co'
who wish to return during
take courses to prepare for
Lf. *a,.1fnl;, aannil aantane%


ADMINISTRATION


Administration operates during the Summer Session as during
urses offered appeal to students attending the regular terms
the Summer Session and to teachers and others who wish to
teaching commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare


w







BULLETIN


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
The College of Business Administration combines with the University College and the
College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately
to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first two years in the University
College and the third year in the College of Business Administration. When they have
fully satisfied the academic requirements of the College of Business Administration, they
are eligible to register in the College of Law and may during their last three years com-
plete the course in the College of Law.

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION


REQUIREMENTS FOR


ADMISSION


For admission to the College of Education all students will be required to present a
certificate of graduation from the University College, or its equivalent, and have the approval
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education.


GRADUATION


WITH


HONORS


For graduation With Honors, a student must earn an
in the work of the Upper Division. For graduation With
the following requirements: (1) attain an honor point
of the Upper Division; (2) obtain the recommendation o
supervised a special project or program of work for the i
tions governing graduation With High Honors may be ol


honor point average of a
High Honors, a student
average of at least 3.5 in
f the Faculty Committee
student. A copy of detail
stained from the office of


t least 3.2
must meet
the work
which has
ed regula-
the Dean.


DEGREES


Two degrees are offered in
and Bachelor of Science in Ed
plete 66 semester hours, with
University College.


AND CURRICULA


the College of Education-Bachelor of Arts in Education
ucation. For either degree the student is required to con-
an average of "C" or higher, after graduation from the


CURRICULA IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION


For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit.


Graduation from
Professionalized
Children's
Children's
Children's


the
Subj
Soci
Scie
Lite


University College.
ect Matter:
al Studies.........................................-----
l te ........... ..... .... ....- ----- .... ..-- ... .... -- ---....--- ....--- ...-....------... ----.............................------.
naturee .......... -.... .. ......... .... .. .............. ..... ................. ......................


Health and Physical Education ..
Health Education ........................


.------------.---.--------..... .....*--. .* ..-------------------...


Credits
3
2
3
2
3


ARTS


*
*








COLLEGES


AND


SCHOOLS


* English


15 credits


Total of at least 66 credits in the Upper Division.

II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years'
college credit.


General Background:


Credits


or C-6 ...................................................................................................................8 or 6
................................................................................................................................ 8
OY -


Professionalized Subject Matter:
Children's Social Studies .........
Children's Science .....................
Children's Literature .................
Health and Physical Education
Health Education ..........................
Public School Art .......... ...........
Public School Music .................


Handwriting


Credits


................................................... ...............................- .............-- - - ..0


Education:


En. 241


(CEn.13) -Introduction to


Education


385-Child Development
386-Educational Psychology
421-422-Student Teaching
406-Elementary School Administration
471-Problems of Instruction (Elementary


*English


*Social


School)


15 credits
15 credits


Studies


Enough electives to make a total of ...


....132 credits


*By permission
other areas.


of the Dean


of the College of


Education,


these


hours


may


be completed in


CURRICULA IN SECONDARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF


ARTS IN


EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other


institutions with less than the equivalent of two years


Graduation from the


' college credit.


University College.


Health Education ...................................................-................... ...-...........--.......-.........-........
Health and Physical Education ..................................... ......... ...........................


3 credits
2 credits


-I .







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years'
college credit.


General Background:


Credits
S8


C-2 or C-6


C-41
Speech
Health


...................................................................................................................8


.............................................................................................................................
- *************kjmrffr-firfffm. *-m........ *- *r *'*'*****AII fif.j *w............,.. ...**..., ***.n..ffj.j .*-***** '.*****i *Rt


I


Education


Health and Physical Education ...........................


Education:


En. 241


(CEn.13)--Introduction to


Education


En. 385--Child Development
En. 386--Educational Psychology
En. 401-School Administration


En. 421-422-Student


Teaching


En. 471-Problems of Instruction


(Secondary School)


Complete certification requirements in two fields.


(See page 20.)


Electives, if needed, to make a total of ..............................................................-.......... 124 credits

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


The College of Engineering


is offering several


courses during


Summer


Session


various departments so that students may


graduate in


a minimum


time.


Many


other


courses included in the engineering curricula, such as mathematics and


available.


During the summer months the engineering student may


physics, are also
take subjects to


meet elective requirements.


Students entering the


University


for the


find it


to their


advantage


enroll


in mathematics,


either


Freshman


English,


American


Institutions


or General


Chemistry.


Students having completed one year at the University may take courses in cal-


culus and physics. Foi
mechanics is suggested.


r those students who have completed calculus and


Elective subjects in mathematics,


physics, applied


physics and the humanities are


recommended to all students.
For advanced students, special laboratory work in connection with the Florida Engineer-


ing and Industrial Experiment Station may


be secured.


Students


contemplate


registration


in the


College


Engineering


those


are already registered in this college should confer about their schedules with the depart-
ment heads and the dean as soon as possible.








COLLEGES


AND


SCHOOLS


COLLEGE


OF LAW


First Term June
Second Term July 22


The purpose of the College of Law is to
knowledge of law and thus to equip students
this field. Since 1927 the College has opera
offered during the regular terms are rotated.
terms are offered in the Summer Session. The v
Session of 1946 is sufficient to enable students
appeal to a wide range of students.


SCHOOL


3 -July 19
- September


impart a thorough scientific and practical
to take advantage of the opportunities in
ted during the Summer Session. Courses
Some courses not given during the regular
variety of courses offered during the Summer
of different types to carry a full load and


OF PHARMACY


Courses will be offered by the School of Pharmacy during both terms. These courses
have been chosen to assist veterans in completing required foundational work in pharmacy
and to help those who need refresher studies.


THE


UNIVERSITY


COLLEGE


INTRODUCTORY


STATEMENT


In a reorganization at the


University of Florida in


1935, all freshmen and sophomores


were placed in one college. The University College
Division, which includes the pre-professional work
colleges and a core program of basic education for
Council on Education defined this program: "Gen
of nonspecialized and nonvocational education that
so to speak, of educated persons. . the type of
people must have if they are to be good citizens,
freshman and sophomore years at the University, a


administers all the work
for the Upper Division
all students. In 1944 t
eral education refers to
should be the common
education which the ma
parents, and workers."
student's time is about e'


of the Lower
schools and
he American
those phases
denominator,
jority of our
During his
venly divided


between these objectives of general education
preparation.
While fully accepting its responsibility t
remain four years or longer and earn degrees,
also accepts its civic responsibility to help
the University. These students-more than
because they do not continue and earn degri
state university than an odd assortment o:
at the University of Florida a group of con
give some unity and meaning to a begin


1 and those of pre-professional or professional


:oward the professional training
the University of Florida as a s
those who spend only one or
two-thirds of all enrolled-are
ees, and they probably deserve
f only "introductory courses."
aprehensive courses have been
ler's program. These compreh


a -


; of men who
tate institution
two years at
not "failures"
more from the
Consequently
worked out to


ensive


courses


that make uD the core uroeram are:


Jh







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


GUIDANCE

If a freshman has definitely decided to study toward a certain profession, these compre-


hensive courses make up an essential part of his program.


(See programs that follow for


the respective colleges.)


However, if he is still


"undecided,


he is not urged to


"guess"


on registration day
the comprehensive


objective.


interests and needs.


about
which


includes


his life's


approved


work.
direct


program
thinking


electives


The first program listed


en the


high school graduate who is a bit undecided about


made


toward
further


pages


his professional


up largely


a desirable


enable
follow


from


professional
to explore


is for the


objective and


usual
wishes


to use at least a part of his first year of college study as a preparation for this decision.


Thus, since the purpose of general education is to replace fragmentation,


absorbs much of the responsibility for guidance.


College program is
tive steps toward a


designed to guide the student.


profession by taking special subjects


the program


Every subject or course of the University
During the time that he is making tenta-


to test aptitudes,


interests,


ability, he is also studying the several great areas of human understanding and achievement.
The program is adjusted to the individual, but there must be a more substantial basis for


adjustment than


just his chance whim of the moment.


The material of the comprehensive


courses is selected and tested with guidance as a


primary function.


While,


necessity,


this training must point forward to distant goals, this work in the


University College must


present materials which are


directly


related


to life


experiences


which


mediately


become a part of the student's


thinking and guide him in making correct next


steps.
tests,


Thus


basic


whole


vocational


program-placement


materials,


selected


tests,


progress


material


reports,


comprehensive


vocational


courses,


aptitude
student


conferences, adjustments for individual


differences,


election


privileges,


comprehensive


examinations-all


are parts of


a plan


designed


to guide students.


Specifically,


however,


a student is assigned to a comprehensive course chairman.


This chairman or a member of


his staff


acts as the student's


official


advisor.


Many


of the


Upper


Division


colleges and


professional schools have special committees to


help those students in the Lower


Division


who are working in major part in the special subject fields.
Guidance, then, is not attempted at one office by one individual with a small staff, but


at more than a dozen places.


The whole drive of the


University College program is one


directing the thinking of the student.


While the necessary


correlation and


unification


is attempted


at the


University


College


Office,


throughout


University


College


students consult Upper Division deans and department heads to discuss future work.


period
During


the last month of each school year these informal conferences are concluded by a scheduled


formal


conference at which each student fills out a


pre-registration


for the coming


year.
Every spring the University is privileged to give placement tests to all seniors in every


high school of the state.


Since many high schools are also trying to acquaint the student


.1 .11 I t 4 *- i i 1t _








COLLEGES


AND


SCHOOLS


VETERANS

The Council and Senate of the University of Florida have decided not to attempt group


prescription for
civilian life. 1


veterans


University


but to consider


each


believes


man


standard


as an individual


educational


readjusting into


program


offered


the average high school graduate may not be desirable, in full, for every veteran.


Intel-


lectual maturity,


experience,


ability


enable


a veteran


to elect


more


specific


ends and to move forward more rapidly.
(1) The placement tests will be the four tests of educational development as worked out


by the Armed Forces Institute


(college level).


As a part of his registration procedure the veteran will report to the
selor of the University.


Veterans' Coun-


However,


after


tests


advice


veteran


to elect


any program


feels will meet his needs better than those hereafter


listed for beginners


just out of


high school.
Veterans in the Lower Division who have not earned the Associate of Arts Certificate,


but who have 64 semester hours of college credit may enter any college of the


Upper


Division by permission of its dean.


THE ASSOCIATE OF


ARTS


CERTIFICATE


The Associate of Arts Certificate is awarded in recognition of the successful completion


of two years of planned work.


In specific detail, one must pass


at least sixty-four semester


hours


including


pre-professional


work


comprehensive


courses


make


core program.


PROGRAMS OF STUDY

NORMAL PROGRAM


Freshman


Year


Hours


Sophomore Year


Hours


1.--American Institutions
2.--The Physical Sciences


...............................
..- ......--.---------... -


1.-The Humanities


2.-Biological


Science .. .............- .......


3.-Freshman


English


- -1 .


4.-Logic and Mathematics


* *9. *. .... -


5.--Departmental Electives .......... .................... 2-6
Military Science; Physical Fitness -
30-34


3.-Departmental Electives ...............16-20


Military


Science;


Physical Fitness


30-34


A student who has had three or four years of preparatory school study in any
subject-areas of the comprehensive courses and whose placement test grades indic
knowledge and understanding at that level may substitute an approved elective.


one of


ate


superior


At least


Division;


sixty


academic


hours


plus Mili


additional approved electives taken


of hours required for an Upper Division degree.


tary Science are required to complete the Lower
during the first two years may reduce the number


AGRICULTURE


program


freshmen


sophomores


working


a degree


in the


College


Animulturo*


sm arls *t*ta S *U* -


2







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Electives in Agriculture are:


Ag. 301, Ag. 306*


Al. 211*


, As. 201*


, As. 306, Ay. 321*,


Ay. 324*
limited


, Dy. 311*


to one


freshman year.


, Ey. 202*


course


, Ey. 301, Fy. 313*


per department.


Starred


, He. 201, He. 312, Py. 301*, Sis. 301, Sis. 302,


courses


elected


Students should consult the curriculum of the department in


during
which


expect to major for suggestions as to courses to be elected.

Students intending to major in Agricultural Chemistry are required to take Cy. 101-102
instead of Acy. 125-126.
Students intending to major in Agricultural Education see page 95.


Forestry.-Students working for


a degree


in Forestry follow


program


above


the following exceptions.


in the Freshman


Year substitute C-41 and C-42; in the


Sophomore


Year take either Cy. 101-102 or Acy. 125-126 for


take Fy.


220 and C421


and Bty. 303, 0. 223, Fy. 226 and Fy. 228 for


ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS

The program for freshmen and sophomores working for a degree in the School of Archi-
tecture and Allied Arts.


Freshman Year
1.--American Institutions


*2.-The Physical
3.-Freshman Ei


Sciences
english


*4.-Logic and Mathematics
6.-Fundamentals of Architecture


Military


Science;


Sophomore Year
1.-The Humanities
2.-Biological Science


3.-Basic


Mathematics


4.-Fundamentals of
5.-Electives


Physical Fitness


Military


Science:


*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at these


levels may substitute Chemistry or


Logic and Fundamental Methematics.
electives which may be chosen from a8


Physics for the Physical Sciences and Basic


Mathematics for


This choice permits during the sophomore year additional
advanced work in Architecture.


At least


Division


academic


hours


Military


; additional approved electives taken


of hours required for an


Science


during the filr


are required to complete the Lower
st two years may reduce the number


Upper Division degree.


Students


working


degree


Bachelor


Science


in Landscape


Architecture


substitute Acy.


125-126, Agricultural


Chemistry, for


105-106, Basic Mathematics.


Students working for the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of


mercial Art substitute Pg. 11A, Fundamentals of pictorial Art, for


Arts in Cornm-


Ae. 11A, Fundamentals


of Architecture, and take electives in place of Ms. 105-106, Basic Mathematics.
4*


ARTS AND SCIENCES


A student who plans to earn a four year degree in the college of Arts and Sciences has


the following


basic


program:


Basic


Freshman Year


1.-American Institutions
an-, *T-M- _--------- .1 C .----------


Program
Sophomore Year
1.-The Humanities
n m31-" A I -- -- 1I


Architecture
Physical Fitness








COLLEGES


AND


SCHOOLS


Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.-There are no specific electives to be taken


during the freshman and sophomore years;


however, it is impossible to earn


a major in


four semesters in some departments of the College of Arts and Sciences.


It is, therefore,


distinctly to the advantage of the student to include as elective during the first two years
as much as he can of the contemplated major field or of the required foreign language.


Bachelor


Journalism.-It


is strongly


recommended


Public


Opinion;


Jm. 214, Introduction to Journalism;


Jm. 215, History


Journalism;


and Jm.


216, Principles of Journalism, be taken as electives during the first two years.
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry.-The University College program for students planning


to earn this degree should include Cy. 101-102 and


106, Basic Mathematics


111-112,


Ms. 353-354, Differential and Integral


General


Chemistry;


Calculus;


and Cy. 201-202


and 211-212.


Analytical


Chemistry.


student


is unable


to complete


these


courses


before entering the Upper Division, it will be necessary to take them in the Upper Division.
Combined Academic and Law Curricula.-The College of Arts and Sciences offers three


different curricula in combination with Law.


One of them leads to the degree of Bachelor


of Arts, another to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, and the third to the degree


of Bachelor of Science.


In order to complete one of these combined curricula in the shortest


possible time, it is necessary that


a student


select as electives


in his


University


College


program courses which will form an integral part of his major in the College of Arts and
Sciences.


Basic Two-Year
Freshman Year


l;--American Institutions
2.-General Chemistry
3.-Freshman English


4.-Biological


Science


5.-General Animal Biology (Laboratory)
Military Science; Physical Fitness


Program for


Pre-Medical


or Pre-Dental Students


Sophomore Year


1.-The Humanities
2.-Organic Chemistry
3.-General Physics
4.-French or German


Military


Science; Physical Fitness


The above will cover the minimum two-year pre-medical


or pre-dental


work prescribed


American


Medical


Association


or by


American


Dental


Association


member schools.


Since


some medical


schools require more, a student should


write for a


catalog directly to the medical or dental school he is considering and


of its pre-medical


procure a statement


or pre-dental requirements.


School of


Pharmacy.-A student working for a degree


in Pharmacy should follow the


Basic


Program for


Arts and Sciences


including among his electives


101-102,


General


Chemistry


Phy. 223-224, Galenical Pharmacy


and Pgy. 221


Practical Pharmacognosy.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


The. nmoram inFr cftrleanft whn Ar wnrlrino fnr RBachelor's


Derree directly or in com-








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


Sophomore Year


Ist Semester


Hours


2nd Semester


Hours


1.--Accounting .........-... .-......... ...
2.-Economics .................. .............
3.-The Humanities -..-....... -- ... ...-....
4.--Biological Science .................
5.-- Stat istics ............ ............ -
Military Science; Physical Fitness


1.--Accounting .....-....... .. ........._......... 3
2.--Economics ......................... ........ 3
3. -The Humanities .............-..-............. 4
4.--Biological Science ................-- ........ 8
5.--Elective ..-................ ........... ...A... 2-4
Military Science; Physical Fitness --
15-17


*A student who has had three or more years of mathematics and science in preparatory school
and whose standings on the placement tests indicate superior knowledge and understanding at
these levels may substitute Chemistry or Physics for the Physical Sciences and Basic Mathematics
for Logic and Fundamental Mathematics.
At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number
of hours required for an Upper Division degree.


A student taking Accounting or
additional electives which may be
Administration.


Economics the first year may carry
chosen from advanced courses in


during the second year
Economics or Business


A student working for the degree in Public Administration must take Pcl. 241, Political
Foundations of Modem Life, in his sophomore year.


COURSES IN ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS IN THE


UNIVERSITY


COLLEGE 1


following


courses


Economics


Business


Administrati


on


students in the University College: Es. 203, Elementary Statistics; Es.
Foundations of Modern Life; Es. 208, Economic History of United States


may De
205-206,


taken


Economic


Es. 209, Economic


History


Individuals;


England;
Bs. 221,


Practice;


211-212,


Elementary


Business


Elementary


Accounting;


Business Finance;


Organization


Federal


Merchandising


Practice;


Taxes


Organization
Consumption


of Wealth;


Other


and Es. 282,


related


courses


Utilization
available


of Natural Resources.


to students


Introductory Typewriting; BEn. 91, Introductory
BEn. 98, Office Organization and Practice.


University


Shorthand;


BEn.


College are BEn.
94, Stenography;


EDUCATION


program


freshmen


sophomores


working


a degree


in the


College


Education is as follows:


Freshman Year


1.-American Institutions
*2.-The Physical Sciences
3.-Freshman English
*4.-Logic and Mathematics
5.-Electives (2-6 semester hours)
Military Science; Physical Fitness


Sophomore Year


1.-The Humanities
2.-Biological Science
3.-Basic courses for specialization (16-20
semester hours)
Military Science; Physical Fitness









COLLEGES


AND


SCHOOLS


With the exception of those specializing in the fields listed below, students in Education


should include during the first two years En. 241, HP1.


387. HP1.


or 132 or 231


232, Sy. 241, and Psy. 201.


If En. 241 and HPI. 387


are taken during the first year, the


student


carry in


the second


additional


electives


from


subject


matter


fields


from Education.
A student majoring in Health and Physical Education should take during the first two


years


HPI.


131-132,


HP1.


Division requirements.


231-232,


If HPI.


sufficient


electives


131-132 are taken in


the first


Education


year,


to meet


there is room


Lower
in the


program the second year for additional electives in the subject matter fields or in Education.
A student majoring in Industrial Arts Education should take during the first two years


In. 111-112, HPI.


or 132 or 231


or 232, In. 211-212, En. 241, HP1. 387


En. 305 and


En. 385.


If In. 111-112 are taken the first year,


the student may,


during the


sophomore


year, take additional electives in Education.
A student majoring in Business Education should take during the first two years BEn.


81 and 91, Es. 205-206, Bs. 211-212, En. 241, and En. 386.


If BEn. 81 and 91 are taken


during


year,


student


in the


second


additional


electives


Education.


Program for Students Majoring in Agricultural Education


Freshman Year


Hours


Sophomore Year


Hours


1.-American
2.-Biological


Institutions
Science -.


1.-Agricultural


3.-Biology and Botany Laboratories __-
4 .--Freshman English .......- .... ....... ......


Chemistry


2.-Logic and Mathematics


.... ......
. .f ... ...


3.-The Humanities .-............. ....-
4.--A y. 321 and Bty. 304 --.......... ...


5'.--Al. 211 and


Ag 306 .... .. ... .. -


Military Science; Physical Fitness


5.- En. 303 and En.


Military


Science


30 6 -.. .. ....... ...
; Physical Fitness


At least sixty academic hours plus Military Science are required to complete the Lower
Division; additional approved electives taken during the first two years may reduce the number
of hours required for an Upper Division degree.


ENGINEERING


program


freshmen


sophomores


working


a degree


in the


College


Engineering is as follows:


Freshman Year


1.-American Institutions
2.---C-2 or Cy. 101-102
3.-Freshman English
*4.-C-41 and C-42 or Ms. 105-106


**5.-MI. 181, Elective


Sophomore Year


1.-The Humanities
2.-Biological Science (elective except for
students in Public Health Engineering)


3.-Ms.
4.-Ps.


(from list below)


Military Science; Physical Fitness


353-354
205-206,


5.-Electives
below)
Military


207-208


(departmental electives as listed


Science:


Physical Fitness


Departmental prerequisites are as follows:


Cg. 345
(Public


Civil


Health


Engineering


Option),


(General),


Chemical Engineering, MI. 182,


223-226;


Electrical


Civil


Cy. 201-202,
Engineering


Engineering,


LT S .


AffI^k L* n^.


-' S.. nfl a rtn S


. SEr i r f rrr"i r orzCSTWni | nnflnmafrln"fro IW* I/ / / t S b* I iw |' *iUlirfl iJllii~r: i nla Si1M-








BULLETIN


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Students whose records in the University College do not indicate that they are qualified


to take


professional


courses


Engineering


not be


admitted


to the


College


Engineering.


Applicants for admission to the College of Law must


have received


a degree in


or science in a college or university of approved standing, or must be eligible for a degree
in a combined course in the University of Florida, upon the completion of one year of work


in the College of Law.


State College for


University also offers this combined course with the Florida


Women.


present,


applicants


admitted


have


completed


college work meeting the standards of the Association of American Law


years oj
Schools.


academic


In addition to other requirements, all applicants for admission to the College of Law,


whose pre-law training has not been received


at this institution,


*must


satisfactorily pass


scholastic


and legal


aptitude


tests


given


Board


University


Examiners,


unless


from the nature of their previous record they are excused by the law faculty.


SUGGESTED


UNIVERSITY


COLLEGE PROGRAM


COURSES


FOR STUDENTS


ENTERING


SUMMER SESSION


Freshmen


be able


to complete


nearly


program


for the


first year


attending


entire


twelve


weeks


Summer


Session.


Suggestions


as to Summer


Programs are listed below.


These should be used in conjunction with the regular University


Catalog and after consulting the Dean of the University College or a member of the Advisors
Group.


1. For the majority


students-any


combination


of the following 3 and 4 hour courses


totalling not more than seven hours per term.


First T


erm--


Second


erm-


C-ll American


Institutions


The Physical Sciences

Freshman English


C-42 Fundamental


Mathematics


C-61 Biological Science


C-12 American
(cont'd


Institutions
)


C-22 The Physical Sciences
(cont'd)
C-32 Freshman English
(cont'd)
C-41 Practical Logic

C-62 Biological Science
(cont'd)


(See description of courses, page 40, for number of hours'


credit.)


For certain special groups the following courses of study are suggested.


A. Students considering Pre-Medical or


Pre-Dental Programs:


First


erm-


erm-


C-11 American


nI situations


C-12 American


Institutions


__ _____ ______~~_~_








AND


B. Students considering Engineering who


SCHOOLS


completed


39

three or four years of high


school mathematics:


First Term-


Second Term-


105 Masic Mathematics


Ms. 106 Basic Mathematics


(cont'd)


And one of the following each term:


C-11 American Institutions

C-31 Freshman English


C-12 American Institutions
(cont'd)
C-32 Freshman English
(cont'd)


These


are not inflexible


programs;


varied


upon


consultation


dean


or an advisor


there


is a particular


need


or if


a student


produces


satisfactory


evidence of his ability to carry more advanced courses.

TEACHERS WHO EXPECT TO TEACH IN GRADES


The following courses are required to complete the regular program of the University
College and to meet the requirements of the State Department of Education for an Under-


graduate


Certificate


in Elementary


Education,


as stated


State


Department's


Bulletin A, Certification of Teachers.


Completion of the basic comprehensive courses and at least twenty-two semester hours
from the other courses will entitle the student to the Certificate of Associate of Arts and


admission to the College of Education,


where the remainder of the courses may


be com-


pleted for the Undergraduate Certificate and also apply on the Bachelor's degree.


Basic Comprehensive Courses


Minimum Credit


American Institutions ......................................................
The Physical Sciences .-.-... .........................................
Freshman English ............................ ................
Practical Logic ............................................................
Fundamental Mathematics
The Humanities ....................................................................
Biological Science .............................................................


Additional Courses Required
for Undergraduate Certificate


........ .............


.a. n........*....s.s


Minimum Credit


En. 241

En. 305
En. 385

En. 386
En. 471
*En. 421

*En. 422


Introduction to Education


Development and
Child Developmei
or


Educati
Problem
Student

Student


or
Organization
it .....


- 5a. *SS.WS. et.. a.sa.


Education


onal Psychology J
is of Instruction......-......... ........ .....-...........................
Teaching .
or ...............................................n...n...-..
Teaching J


COLLEGES







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


HP1. 373


Methods a
Geography
History or


Materials in


Physical


Education ........................


Political Science ..................................................


Special Program for Undergraduate Certificate for


Elementary School


Teachers


The following courses are required to complete a program offered at the University and


especially


approved


by the


State


Department


Education


leading


an undergraduate


certificate for elementary teachers.


Completion of this program does not qualify a student


for the Certificate of Associate of Arts from the


University


of Florida.


The Certificate is


awarded


only to


those who satisfactorily


complete the comprehensive examinations


in all


the basic courses of the University College.


General


Preparation Requirements


Minimum Credit


C-1
C-2

C-6
C-3
C-5
HP1.
HP1.


American Institutions ............... ......... ............ ................. ..........
The Physical Sciences


- -. c.C....... .......


or ........................................
Biological Science J
Freshman English ..............................---.......
The Humanities ..................................................
Health Education .................. ...............................
Methods and Materials in Physical Educatio


n................
n... .........c...


Professional Requirements
En. 241 Introduction to Education 1
or
En. 305 Development and Organization of Education


*En.
En.
G1.
Eh.
Scl.


Problems


Instruction


Student Teaching
Child Development


Children
Children
Children


Public
Public
** History


Minimum Credit


.... -----------... -.-.c -..... -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


n's Science ............................. ..........................................
n 's Literature .-.......................................... ...
n's Social Studies .......... ... ......-............................... .
School Music .....................................................................
School Art ............ ... ................... ...................................
or Political Science .....................................................


Note:


Total for all courses must not be less than 64 semester


THE


GRADUATE


hours.


SCHOOL


The Graduate School offers work leading to


the degrees of


Master of Arts, Master


Arts in Architecture, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Science, Master of Science in


Agriculture,


Master


Science


in Engineering,


Master


Science


in Pharmacy,


Master


of Science in Forestry, Master of Education and Master


of Agriculture.


a few


fields


the Graduate School offers work for the Ph.D.


For details consult the Catalog.


Passing grades for students registering in the Graduate School are A and B.
grades are failing.


All other








COLLEGES


of which
determine
work for
case of r
approval
In all
whole of
brace not


shall be in a single
ed by the student's
the Master's Degree
elated subject matter
of the Supervisory C


AND


SCHOOLS


field of study and the remainder in related
Supervisory Committee. The principal pi
shall be designated strictly for graduates.
, courses numbered 300 and above may be


41

subject matter as
art of the course
However, in the
offered upon the


committee.


departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the
the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em-
only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-


* S 1 9


'1 1


ing m that department may reasonably be expected to answer.
A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely alli
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the firs
thesis itself should be completed and submitted in time to allow an ii
full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the su
The requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is left t
of the student's Supervisory Committee. If it is required the examination s
by the end of the third summer term, or when the work is half completed.
The work for the Master's Degree must be completed within seven year
of first registering for graduate work. For Summer Session students th
summers.


led to the n
it summer.
interval of t
mmer term.
to the discr
should be pi


iajor
The
three


etion
missed


:s from the time
xis means seven


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF EDUCATION


1. Requirements


credited institution
he has previously
A student from
student while his
supervisory commi


Admission. -A


student


3 may be admitted to the Mast
earned any prescribed amount
a non-credited institution may
standing is being determined.
ttee and the approval of the De


while a student is unclassified


2. Admission
that the student
committee will r
satisfied them of


(not to exceed one


to Candidacy.-Admission to the work of
will be admitted to candidacy for the d
recommend the student for admission to
his qualifications. This will not be done


Bachelor's


Degree


:er of Education program
of credit in Education.


from


whether


an ac-
or not


be permitted to register as an unclassified
Upon the recommendation of the general
an of the Graduate School, credits earned
term) may count toward his degree.


this program is not a guarantee
egree. The general supervisory
candidacy as soon as he has
in any case before the student


has submitted his own, proposed program for completing the degree.
3. Residence Requirements.-A minimum of six summer terms,
one summer term, or the equivalent, is required as residence.


4. Course


quirement.
more than
5. The


Requirements.-A


minimum


thirty-six


semester


No. 6 below.)


or two


hours


Not more than six of these may be earned in any one summer
fifteen in any one semester.
Requirement of Competence in Certain Areas.-Instead of ha


semesters


a tne course re-
er term, and not

ving a fixed re-










BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


b. For all candidates preparing to teach in the elementary school:
tary education.
c. For all candidates preparing to teach in the secondary school:
education, including subject matter in two teaching fields.
d. For candidates preparing to be principals, supervisors, or adn
in school administration.
Competence is to be judged (1) by oral or written, or by both ora
1 at the end of each term, and (2) by a comprehensive oral an


Problems in elemen-


Problems in secondary

iinistrators: Problems


il and written, evalua-
I written examination


tier


just before graduation.
The program is so arranged that each individual student may at any time request that
his competence be determined in one of the areas represented in the program. When


requested, the
the committee i
6. Planning
writing to the
This must be d


Dean of 1
in charge
the Indi
Dean of
one by th


the G:
of the
vidual
the G
e end


graduate
area, i
Student
graduate
of the


School will direct the student to 1
vho will arrange for an examination.
ts Program.-Each student is require
School his own proposed program
first six weeks of residence. This d


the chairman


of


-ed to submit in
for the degree.
evelops with the


aid of the instructional staff members and should grow out of the needs, interests, and
desires of the student.
7. Transfer of Credits.-Credits earned prior to admission to the University will be
governed by the same regulations that apply to all other graduate degrees. If recommended
in advance by the general supervisory committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate
School, a student may be permitted to study with some competent teacher in another
institution for one six-weeks summer term.
8. One Year Teaching Experience.-Each candidate must have had at least one year
of teaching experience prior to the last summer term.
9. Transfer Students.-Students in Education who have started graduate work and who
wish to study for the Master of Education degree may do so by arranging with the general
supervisory committee to comply with the requirements of this program.
10. Thesis.-A thesis will not be required, but the student will be required to submit
a considerable amount of written material in the form of reports, term papers, records of
work accomplished, etc., all of this written material to be directed toward the integration,
adaptation and utilization of the student's program.
11. Foreign Language.-A reading knowledge of a foreign language will not be required,
but the effective use of the English language is expected of all candidates.
12. The General Supervisory Committee.-Students in this program will be directed
by a general supervisory committee of five members, with Dean J. W. Norman as chairman.


Other members of the staff will be
In 1946 those students entering
will be expected to register for


called in to aid in
for the first time in
Education 540 and
*- -- -11 __e L .... _1-


individual cases.
the first term of the Summer Session
during the first term to submit in
--_.- L .1[. -..... -a- .'-- I L... JL ^ ..-







GUIDE' TO COURSES


LISTED


GUIDE


TO


COURSES


LISTED


THIS


CATALOGUE


The course


offerings


followed


registration


are listed


departmental


student


should


separately


courses


always


each


term,


in alphabetical


use the


comprehensive


order


departmental


department


abbreviation


courses
name.
course


number, not abbreviations of the course title.
Some of the certification requirements listed in


literature of the State Department


may not


be represented


same


titles


in this catalogue.


facilitate


finding


proper course descriptions for such fields, the following guide is provided:


Elementary Teachers


General Preparation-the


basic comprehensive courses


University


College


(C-.1,


C-2, C-3, C-41, C-42, C-5, and C-6)


Elementary Science--listed under General Science (Gl. 30

General Psychology--Psy. 201 listed under Psychology

Child and Educational Psychology-listed under Education


(En. 385, En. 386)


Children's


Literature-listed under English


(Eh. 391)


Social Studies in Elementary Grades-listed under Social Studies (Scl. 301 and Scl. 302)


Handwriting-listed under Business Education


(BEn. 97


Health Education-listed under Health and Physical


Education


(HPI.


Secondary Teachers


Commercial Subjects--listed under


Business Education and


under Economics and Busi-


ness Administration

English-C-3 and courses listed under English and Speech


Mathematics-C-42, and courses listed under


Science-C-2,


Mathematics


C-6, and courses listed under Chemistry, Biology, and Physics


Social


Studies-C-l


courses


listed


under


Geography,


History,


Political


Science,


i ---;- Cn---1 .- ---1 -?' a---







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


DEPARTMENTS


OF


INSTRUCTION


AND SCHEDULE OF COURSE


First


Term


All classes ordinarily meet for eighty minutes.
meet Monday through Friday.


Classes scheduled to meet daily


Some


courses are indicated as being offered by the project method.


Students


taking these


courses will do independent


work under the supervision of


the in-


structor, with no regular class meetings unless time


meeting


listed in the


schedule.
Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to regis-


ter for graduate courses unless


they secure written approval


from the Dean of


Graduate


school and the instructor concerned.


COMPREHENSIVE COURSES


Comprehensive examinations for


University College students in


C-l, C


, C-3,


, and C-6 will be given and will cover the work of both terms.


consult official announcements of the Board of University


C-11.--American Institutions.


Students should


Examiners for details.


4 credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture Section 1
Lecture Section 2


: 4:00
: 4:00


Ch.-Aud.
Ch.-Aud.


STAFF.
STAFF.


Discussion Sections


Section
Section


Section 13.


Section
Section
Section


Section 21.


Section
Section


Section 24.


Section


Section 26.


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
1:00 daily.
2:30 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
1:00 daily.
2:30 daily.


Pe-101.
Pe-101.
Pe-101.
Pe-101.
Pe-101.
Pe-101.
Ag-108.
Ag-108.
Ag-108.
Ag-108.
Ag-108.
Ag-108.


HAMMOND.
EUTSLER.
QUACKENBUSH.
BROADER.
EUTSLER.
BROWDER.


C-12.-American Institutions.


4 credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture
Tpri.nrp


Section
RSppt.an


4:00 Th.


Atf n l T


Ch.-Aud.
lh .A d1


STAFF.
Qp A w


I.








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Section 21.


Section
Section


Section 24.


Section


Section 26.


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.


0 daily.


1:00 daily.
2:30 daily.


Pe-205.
Pe-205.
Pe-205.
Pe-205.
Pe-205.
Pe-205.


C-11-12:


Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems


of the modern social


world.


The unequal


rates


of change in


economic life, in government,


education, in science, and in
effective coordination of the


religion


are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more


factors of our evolving social


organization of today.


Careful scrutiny


is made of the changing functions of


social


organizations


as joint interdependent activities so that


a consciousness


of the


significant


relationships between the individual and social institutions may


be developed, from which


consciousness


a greater


degree


of social adjustment may be achieved.


C-21.-The Physical Sciences.


3 credits.


(Register for


one section


only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.


0 daily.


10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.


Bn-201.
Bn-201.
Bn-201.
Bn-201.


SNOW.
SNOW.


C-22.-The Physical Sciences.


credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00


daily.


8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:00 daily.


Bn-205.
Bn-205.
Bn-205.
Bn-205.


GADDUM.
EDWARDS.


0-21-22:


An attempt to


survey


the phenomena of the physical universe with particular refer-


ence


to man


's immediate environment; to show how these phenomena


are investigated


to explain


the more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of


them; and to


review


the present


status


man


's dependence upon


the ability to utilize physical


materials,


forces,


and relations.


The concepts


are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry,


astronomy,


geology,


and geography, and they


are so integrated


as to demonstrate their essential


unity.


The practical and cultural


significance


of the physical


sciences


is emphasized.


C-31.-Freshman English.


Reading,


Speaking, and


Writing.


4 credits.


(Register for one Discussion Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Discussion Sections:


7:00 daily.


8:30


daily.


10:00 daily.


11:30


daily.


1:00 daily.
2:30 daily.


La-201.
La-201.
La-201.
La-201.
La-201.
La-201.


WALKER.


ZINK.
WISE.
CLARK.
LOWRY







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Writing Laboratory


Sections:


7:00
7:00
1:00
5:30
1:00
5:30


La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.


LOWRY.
WALKER,
WALKER,
CLARK, Z
ZINK.
CLARK.
CLARK.
ZINK, BR
WALKER.


LOWRY,


3


LOWRY.
BRUNET.
;INK.


UNET.

BRUNET.


C-32.--Freshman English. Reading, Speaking, and Writing. 4 credits.
(Register for one Discussion Section and one Laboratory Section.)


Discussion Sections:


1:00
2:30


daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.
daily.


La-203.
La-203.
La-203.
La-203.
La-203.
La-203.
La-212.
La-203.
La-314.
La-314.
La-314.
La-314.
La-314.
La-314.


MOUNTS.
SPIVEY.
STROUP.
MOUNTS.
CONGLETON.


Writing


Laboratory


Sections:


La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
T.aS_ONQ


LOWRY.
WALKER,
WALKER,
CLARK, Z
ZINK.
r'T A DT.


LOWRY.
BRUNET.
;INK.









DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


5:30


1:00 T.


La-209.
La-209.


C-31-32:


Reading, Speaking, and Writing.


Designed to furnish the training in reading, speak-


ing and writing


necessary


for the student's work in college and for his life thereafter.


This training


will be provided through practice and counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking,


in fundamentals of form and style, in extension


voice in speaking.


Students will be encouraged


of vocabulary
to read widely


and in


control


of the


as a means of broadening


interests and increasing their appreciation of literature.


C-41.-Practical Logic.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section 1.


Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.


Sc-212.
Sc-212.
Sc-212.


HAINES.
HAINES.
LITTLE.


Both in private life and vocational life man is faced with the necessity of thinking.


In this


course an attempt is made to stimulate the student (1) to develop his ability to think with greater


accuracy


and thoroughness,


to be able to


use objective


standards


necessary


in critically


evaluating


his own


thinking


process


and product


as well as the conclusions


reached


by others,


and (3) to record both process and product of thinking in effective language.


applies to actual living and working conditions.


case


The material used


method is used to insure practice, many


illustrations


are given, and numerous


exercises


are assigned.


C-42.-Fundamental


Mathematics.


credits.


(Register for one section


only.)


Section 1.
Section 2.


Section


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.


Pe-2.
Pe-2.
Pe-2.


GAGER.
LANG.
KOKOMOOR.


A practical course covering the development of the number system, algebra


as a generalization


of arithmetic,


equations,


exponents,


logarithms


and slide


series,


investment


mathematics,


geometrical


applications,


and the elements


of trigonometry.


Analysis


leading


to fundamental


understandings and correct manipulation are stressed.


The course is designed for students who do


not plan


necessarily


to specialize


in mathematics.


open


to students


who have


completed


Basic Mathematics, or Trigonometry.


C-51.-The Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture


Section and one


Discussion


Section.)


Lecture Section 1


: 2:30 M.


Aud.


STAFF.


Discussion Sections:


Section 11.
Section 12.
Section 13.


Section


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.


Sc-206.
Sc-206.
Sc-206.
Sc-206.


DAVIDSON.
GROWTH.
GROWTH.


C-52.-The Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion


Section.)


Lecture Section 1:


2:30 T.


Aud.


STAFF.


-. aa b *I








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


is devoted to a consideration of the basic ideas which have been most significant in man's cultural


development (classicism, romanticism, realism and idealism)


music and the graphic and plastic


C-61.-Biological Science.


as expressed in drama, poetry, fiction,


arts.

credits.


(Register for one section


Section 1.


Section
Section
Section


Section 5.


Section


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
1:00 daily.


0 daily.


only.)
Sc-101.
Sc-205.
Sc-101.
Sc-101.
Sc-101.
Sc-101.


BYERS.
YOUNG.
BYERS.
YOUNG.


BERNER.
BERNER.


C-62.-Biological Science.


credits.


(Register for


one section


only.)


Section
Section
Section
Section


Section 5.


Section


C-61-62:
a living


The biological


individual,


7:00 daily.


daily.


10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
1:00 daily.


30 daily.
problems
a member


Sc-1ll.
Sc-209.
Sc-1ll.
Sc-1ll.


Sc-111.


and principles


a race,


HUBBELL.
GOING.
HUBBELL.
GOING.
DICKINSON.
DICKINSON.


associated


a product of


the organism's


evolutionary processes,


a member


a socially


and economically


inter-related


complex


of living


organism,


supply


the main


sequence


and material of the


course.


AGRICULTURAL


As. 308.-Marketing.


ECONOMICS


credits.


10:00


Laboratory


. Ag-208.


: 2:30 to 4:30


HAMILTON.


Ag-208.


Principles of marketing


auction
modities.


companies;


market


agricultural


finance:


One or two field trips at an


commodities


market


news;


; commodity
marketing


estimated cost of $4 each


exchanges and future trading


of important


agricultural


com-


to be paid by the student at


the time trips


are made.


AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING


Ag. 302.-Farm Motors.


Identical


with In. 404.


3 credits.


7:00


Laboratory


. Ag-210.


: 1:00


to 3


ROGERS.
r. Ag-210.


The general principles of operation of the various sources of farm power.


The care, operation


----A F t. k.r -__ I -. J.-... iI .. 1 9* ** at


as:








DEPARTMENTS


STRUCTION FIRST


TERM


AGRONOMY

Ay. 34.-Southern Forage and Conservation Crops.


7:00 M.


. Ag-302.


SENN.


Laboratory:


1:00 to


3:00


Ag-302.


A study of those plants common to the South that provide grazing and harvested


livestock.


Soil conservation


crops and cropping practices suited


to Florida


forage


are considered.


Ay. 321.-General Field


Crops.


credits.


10:00


Laboratory:


Th. F.
1:00 to


Ag-302.


:00 T.


SENN.
Th. Ag-302.


A study of the grain, fiber,


sugar,


peanut,


tobacco, forage and miscellaneous field crops,


with


special emphasis on


varieties


and practices recommended for southern United


States.


The history,


botanical
processes,


characteristics,


harvesting,


soil and climatic


uses,


economic


adaptations,


production


fertilizer


and cropping


and culture practices,


systems


are topics


growing


discussed.


400.-Agricultural Extension Methods.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.
Laboratory:


(June


17-July 3).


1:00 to 4:00 daily.


SENN


STAFF.


Ag-302.


Methods


of instruction employed in agricultural extension


work.


Result and method


demon-


stations
progress


are featured


throughout


in extension work


course.


Ways


of measuring


effectiveness


of methods


are considered.


ANIMAL


PRODUCTION


Al. 309.-Fundamentals in


Animal


Husbandry.


3 credits.


7:00


. Ag-2


PACE.


Types


Laboratory:
and breeds of


2:30 to 4:30 T


Ag-208.


farm animals; principles of breeding, selection


management.


Al. 413.-Swine Production.


3 credits.


8:30


daily.


Ag-20


PACE.


Laboratory:


:30 to


4:30


. Ag-208.


Selection, feeding


and management of hogs


forage


crops and


grazing


disease


and parasite


control


: slaughtering of hogs on the farm.


ARCHITECTURE


Courses


in Architecture are


carried


on by means


problem


or project


method, and accomplishment is the sole criterion for advancement.


Credits


depend


upon


number


projects


completed.


Laboratories


be conducted


seven hours


daily


will remain


open


additional


hours


for those who desire to use them.


Ae. 11A.-Fundamentals of


A creative


introductory


course


Architecture.
for beginners.


Variable credit.


Ae. 21A.--Architectural De


LasL CAa


Variable credit.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Ae. 31B.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color.


2:30 to 5:30 T


A continuation of


Variable credit.


Pe-201.


Ae. 31A for students in Architecture.


41 A.-History


Architecture.


Variable credit.


1:00


Th. and


4 additional


hours


to be arranged.


Pe-302.


An analytical study


of the development of


the art of building.


Walls.


openings,


plan arrangement.


41B.-History


Architecture.


Variable


credit.


1:00 T


Th. and


4 additional


hours


be arranged.


Pe-201.


A chronological


study


of the development


of the art of building


from


ancient


to modern


time.


Environmental


influences,


architectural


development,


and significant


buildings.


Ae. 51A.-Materials and Methods of Construction.


Variable credit.


2:30 to 5:00


3 additional


hours to


be arranged.


Pe-302.


A continuation of


11A for students in Architecture.


A study of building materials and


of methods of building construction.


Ae. 51B.-Mechanical Equipment of Buildings.


Variable credit.


2:30 to 5:00


For students


in Architecture.


A study


6 additional
of plumbing,


hours
heating,


to be


arranged.


and electrical


Pe-201.


installations


buildings.


Ae. 52A.-Materials and Methods of Construction.


Variable credit.


2:30 to 5:00


3 additional


hours


to be arranged.


Pe-302.


A continuation of Ae. 11A for students in Building Construction.


Ae. 52B.-Mechanical Equipment of Buildings.


2:30 to 5:00 M.


A parallel course to Ae. 51A.


Variable credit.


. Pe-302.


For students in Building Construction.


A parallel course to Ae. 51B.


Ae. 52D.-Working Drawings and Building Costs.


Variable credit.


8:30 to


11:30


. Pe-302.


A continuation of Ae. 11A for students in Building Construction.
ing drawings and the estimation of building costs.


Ae. 61A.-Structural Design of Buildings.


The preparations of work-


Variable credit.


1:00 to 3:00


'., 8:00 to


11:00


3 additional


hours


arranged.


Pe-302.


For students


in Architecture.


Structural


design


as a correlated


of the planning


design of buildings.


61B.-Structural Design


Buildings.


Variable credits.


1:00 to


3:00


F., 8:00


11:00 Th.


3 additional hours


arranged.


Pe-201.


A continuation of Ae. 61A for students in Architecture.


Ae. 62A.-Structural Design of Buildings.


Variable credit.








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


BACTERIOLOGY


Bey. 31.-Bacteriology.
7:00 M. T. Th.


Sc-104.


CARROLL.


Laboratory:


1:00


to 3:00 T.


Sc-104.


This course is intended to


give information on the occurrence and distribution of the different


kinds of bacteria, requirements for their growth in nature and controlled conditions, their relation


to health and disease of man, animals,


plants, soil fertility, household and farm sanitation,


their use in certain industries.


Bey.


301.-General


Bacteriology.


credits.


Prerequisites:


or equivalent;


Cy. 101-102, or Acy. 125-126.


10:00 T.


Th. F


. Sc-104.


CARROLL.


Laboratory:


1:00 to 4:00


W. F


. Sc


-104.


Morphology, physiology, and cultivation of bacteria and


related micro-organisms.


BIOLOGY


101.-An Introduction to Vertebrate Zoology.


credits.


Co- or prerequisite


8:30 daily.
Laboratory:


Sc-101.


HOBBS.


1:00 to 5:00 M. and 7:00 to


10:00 p.m.


. Sc-10.


A laboratory course based chiefly on the morphology, physiology and embryology of the frog.


Designed to parallel


C-6 and


with the latter to provide a satisfactory prerequisite for


Bly. 209.


This course in combination


in the Biological


with C-6 and Bly. 209 provides the minimum premedical requirement


Sciences.


Bly. 133.-Common Animals and Plants of Florida.


credits.


1:00 to 5:00 T. Th. and one other period to arrange.


Sc-205.


LAESSLE.


Designed


to provide a recognition


of and an


acquaintance with some of


the more common


animals and plants


of Florida.


Especially planned


to prepare


teachers


to answer the question,


"What animal-or what plant-is that?"


Individual work in the field and the making of personal


reference


collections of plants and animals


are encouraged.


Bly. 210.-Vertebrate


Embryology.


4 credits.


Prerequisite:


Bly 209.


30 daily.


Sc-1ll.


SHERMAN.


Laboratory:


1:00 to 4:00 T.


Th. and 7:00 to 10:00 p.m.


Sc-107.


BOTANY


Bty. 23.-Botany.
10:00 T. Th.


Sc-2.


CODY.


Laboratory:


2:30 to 4:30 M.


W. F.


Sc-2.


This course will acquaint the student with the principal parts of seed plants, their functions,


and the influence of physical factors of their environment upon them.


This study will


be inte-


- - f







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


BUSINE


ADMINISTRATION


Economics and Business Administration)


BUSINE


EDUCATION


NOTE:


These courses with the exception of BEn.


461-462 do not count as credit


in Education.


BEn.


81.-Introductory Typewriting.


credits.


Section
Section
Section
Introduction to


1. 8:30 daily.
2. 10:00 daily.
3. 1:00 daily.
touch typewriting;


Yn-306.
Yn-306.
Yh-306.


MAXWELL.
MAXWELL.
MAXWELL.


practice upon personal and


business problems.


BEn. 91.-Introductory
8:30 daily. Y1


Shorthand.


n-305.


3 credits.


MOORMAN.


Introduction


to Gregg


shorthand by the functional method.


BEn. 97.-Handwriting.


1 credit.


7:00


Yn-305.


MOORMAN.


BEn. 461.-Principles of


Business


Education.


3 credits.


11:30 daily.


Yn-209.


MOORMAN.


A study of the purposes of business education; problems relating to the development of


appropriate


program;


problems


in administration


and supervision


of business


education.


CHEMISTRY


101.-General Chemistry.


4 credits.


The first half of the course Cy


101-102.


Lecture Section:


10:00


daily.


Ch-Aud.


JACKSON.


Laboratory


Sections:


Section 11.


Section


1:00 to 5:00 M
1:00 to 5:00 T


Ch-130.
Ch-130.


101-102:


Fundamental


laws


and theories


of chemistry,


and properties


of the common


non-metallic elements and their compounds.


102.-General


Chemistry.


4 credits.


second


half


course


101-102.


10:00 daily.


Ch-112.


TUCKER.


Laboratory Sections:


Section
Section


201.-Analytical


7:00


to 10:00 p.m.,


7:00 to


Chemistry


10:00


p.m.,


1:00


1:00 to


(Mainly Qualitative).


to 5:00


5:00 Th.


4 credits.


Ch-130.
Ch-130.

The first


half


of the course Cy. 201-202.


-)1I~~- .qL -a


T a nrr


I 11


FI~ n~A








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


GRADUATE COURSES


Cy. 518.-Advanced Organic Chemistry.


To arrange.


3 credits.


POLLARD.


Cy. 572.-Research in Organic Chemistry.


To arrange.


2 to 6 credits.


POLLARD.


574.-Research in Naval Stores.


To arrange.


2 to 6 credits.


HAWKINS.


CIVIL ENGINEERING


CI. 223.-Surveying.


credits.


Prerequisites:


CMs.


Ml. 182.


1:00


Laboratory:


. H1-302.


WINSOR.


1:00 to 5:00 T


FIELD.


The use of chain, level, and transit; balancing of survey, calculating of


areas,


contour work,


simple


curves;


elementary practical problems generally included


in a short


course for students


who do not take advanced surveying work.


Cl. 327.-Hydraulics.


4 credits.


Corequisite


Ig. 367.


11:30 daily.
Laboratory:


H1l-302.


WILLIAMS.


2:30 to 5:30


'. H-101.


The principles underlying the
and measurement of fluids.


behavior of


fluids at rest and in motion.


The transportation


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING


Cg. 361.-Materials of Engineering.


3 credits.


Prerequisites: Cy. 10


, Ps. 206.


10:00 daily.


Bn-208.


Production, properties and


BEISLER.


uses of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, cement,


brick,


plastics, timber, etc.


ECONOMICS


AND


BUSINE


ADMINISTRATION


Course


designated


are Economics


courses,


those


designated


letters Bs. are Business Administration courses.


Es. 203.-Elementary Statistics.


3 credits.


(Formerly CEs.


Section 1.


Section


10:00 daily.
7:00 daily.


Pe-1.
Pe-1.


ANDERSON.
BONNER.


The statistical method


as a tool for examining and interpreting data


acquaintance with such


fundamental techniques


as find application in business, economies, biology, agriculture, psychology,


sociology,


etc.;


basic


preparation for more


extensive


work in the field of statistics.


Prerequisite


for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.


Es. 205.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life.


3 credits.


The first half of the







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


rent,


processes
interest,


are explained, especially those relating to an


wages,


profit,


money,


banking.


commerce,


understanding


foreign


exchange,


of value,


foreign


price,
trade


business cycles.


The first term,


which is devoted largely to the study of economic organizations


and institutions and


to the principles


governing value and price, may


be taken


separately for


which


semester hours of credit are given.


Es. 206.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life.


3 credits.


The second half of


the course Es.


205-206.


Section 1.


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


8:30 daily.
7:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
1:00 daily.


Pe-102.
Sc-215.
Sc-215.


Sc-2
Sc-2
Sc-2


ELDRIDGE.
JOUBERT.


DOLBEARE.


211.-Elementary


Accounting.


credits.


first


half


course


-212.


(Formerly CBs. 141.)


Section 1.


Section


Section 3.


Section


Bs. 211-212:


8:30 daily.
11:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
1:00 daily.


Designed to provide the


Sc-202.
Sc-202.
Sc-202.
Sc-202.


EVANS.
MOSHIER.


basic training in


business practice and in accounting.


A study of business papers and records


and reports.


recording transactions; preparation of financial statements


Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.


Bs. 21


2.-Elementary


Accounting.


credits.


The second half of the course Bs-


211-212.


(Formerly CBs.


152.)


Section 1.


Section
Section
Section


Section 5.


Section
Section


7:00 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
1:00 daily.
2:30 daily.


Sc-202.


Sc-2
Sc-2


Sc-21


EVANS.
POWERS.
POWERS.
MOSHIER.


Sc-213.
Sc-213.
Sc-213.


Es. 246.-The Consumption of Wealth.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.


Pe-1.


JOUBERT.


economic


analysis


of the problems


involved


in determining


the extent


and trends


consumer demand and in the adjustments of productive processes to that demand.


Bs. 311.-Accounting Principles.
half of the couse Bs. 311-312.


3 credits.


Prerequisite


Bs. 211-212.


The first


10:00 daily.


Sc-205.


BEIGHTS.


A study of the mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting


fiscal


period


and adjustments;


working


papers;


form


and preparation


books of record


of financial


; accounts;
statements;


followed


an intensive


and critical


study


of the problems


of valuation


as they


affect


,. .* 9 U -I C -








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Es. 351.-Elements of Transportation.


credits.


Prerequisite:


205-206.


11:30 daily.


Pe-208.


BIGHAM.


Significance,


history, facilities,


geography,


economic


characteristics,


elementary


rate making,


and development of regulation of all


important forms of


intercity transportation.


Bs. 401.-Business Law.


3 credits.


The first half


of the course


401-402.


8:30 daily.


La-311.


CHACE.


Contracts


agency;


rights


and obligations


of the agent,


principal,


and third


party


termination of


the relationship of


agency.


Conveyances


and mortgages


of real


property;


sales


and mortgages of personal property;


the law of negotiable instruments.


Es. 404.-Government Control of Business.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


Es. 205-206.


11:30 daily


Sc-212.


MCFERRIN.


A study of the evolution of economic control; an examination


control in


mental


control;


monopolies; Federal


the American


economy;


the development of


Trade


Commission


legality


the relationship


control


of and chief


between


of competitive


of the effectiveness of


methods


government
practices;


of effectuating
and non-public


a critical


laissez
govern-
utility


appraisal


recent developments in the field of government control.


Es. 407.-Economic Principles and


Problems.


credits.


first


half


course Es. 407-408.
10:00 daily.


Prerequisite: Es.


Pe-102.


205-206.


ELDRIDGE.


An advanced course in economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic mal-


adjustments arising from


the operation


of economic forces.


411.-Advanced


Accounting


Problems.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


7:00 daily.


Sc-209.


BEIGHTS.


A study of specialized accounting problems; statement of affairs; consignments; installments


ventures;


insurance; and other related subjects.


454.-Principles of


Public


Utility


Economics.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


205-206.


10:00 daily.


Pe-208.


BIGHAM.


The nature,


place and development of


public


service


corporations;


types


of public


control


valuation and rate making; regulation of service, accounts, reports, and securities


combinations


public relations; public ownership.


Es. 469.-Business Forecasting.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: Es. 203.


11:30 daily.


Pe-1.


ANDERSON.


A survey of the problems of the reduction of


business risk


by forecasting general


business


conditions; statistical methods used by


leading commercial agencies


in forecasting.


GRADUATE COURSE


Es. 585.-Problems in International Economic Relations.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


Es. 407-408, or equivalent.


n d rl ily


T. -2flA


nlIETT.Rl


.. L,-








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


En. 306.-Vocational Education.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.


Yn-138.


GARRIS.


Development,


function,


scope


of vocational,


agricultural,


home


economics,


trade


industrial, and commercial education


as provided


for by the National


Vocational Education Act


of Congress.


En. 317.-Measurement and


Evaluation.


credits.


11:30 daily.


A study


of the basic


Yn-218.
principles


CUMBEE.
and methods


of measurement


and evaluation


of school


practices.


En. 385.-Child Development.


10:00 daily


Yn-218.


3 credits.
CUMBEE.


Designed to acquaint the student with


the growth and development of children


into mature


personalities.


The findings


of recent


research


will be studied


through


outside


reading,


class


discussion


and observation.


Methods


of evaluation of child growth


will be included.


401.-School Administration.


3 credits.


1:00 to 4:00 daily.


(First three weeks.)


Yn-140.


LEON HENDERSON.


Problems


peculiar


to superintendent,


to schools


boards,


teachers,


in Florida
pupils, pi


the supervising


atrons,


principal,


and community;


qualifications,


adapting the school


relation
to the


child's


needs;


business


practices.


En. 421.-Student Teaching.


3 credits.


The first half of the course En.


421-422.


4:00 daily and


n-222.


one hour daily to arrange between 8:30 and 11:30 daily


LEWIS and PETERS.


421-422:


The student


is given practice in


the art of teaching


by actually taking over


responsibility for the teaching-learning situation, and putting into operation


under direction


supervision


the theories,


methods, materials,


and teaching techniques acquired


during


his junior


year


through observation and participation.


En. 422.-Student Teaching.


3 credits.


The second half of the course En. 421-422.


4:00


daily


Yn-22


one


hour


BOUTELLE


Arrange
GRACE A


between


8:30


11:00


daily.


STEVENS.


(En. 421


or En. 422 may be completed in three weeks provided the student devotes full time to


the course.)


En. 471.-Problems of Instruction.


4 credits.


8:30 to 11:30 M. T.


Yn-150.


GREEN.


An opportunity will be given for studying curriculum practices and for developing tentative


plans for classroom experience.


Evaluation in various fields will be studied.


Problems in teaching


reading and the language arts will be stressed.


472.-Methods and


Organization in Industrial


Arts.


credits.


Project method.


Yn-Shop.


STRICKLAND.


Organization of industrial arts materials for the various grades and schools; planning courses


of studv. selection euninmennt and sunnlies: study of aims and objectives


of


industrial arts.


JLf








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


GRADUATE COURSES


Orientation Meeting.


No credit.


7:00


P.M.


June 14,


and 19.


Yn-315.


MEAD and


STAFF.


Required


of all


new graduate


students


in Education.


Information


will be supplied


about


types of graduate study, planning individual programs, available facilities,
interest to graduate students.


and other matters


501.-Elementary


2:30 daily.


School


Yn-209.


Curriculum.
GRACE A.


3 credits.
STEVENS.


Intensive study of the development and present content of the elementary school


including the kindergarten


curriculum,


selection and evaluation of material.


En. 519.-High


School


Curriculum.


3 credits.


1:00 daily.


Yn-134.


LEWIS.


This


is a course dealing with high school curriculum problems.


En. 536.-Supervision of the Elementary School.


3 credits.


11:30 daily.


Yn-134.


TISON.


The objectives,


procedures,


means


of evaluation


of supervision


in elementary


schools;


the preparation of teachers.


En. 540.-Foundations of


Education.


Variable credit;


maximum


credit


8:30 to


11:30 daily.


Yn-311.


MEAD and BOUTELLE.


En. 557.-Work Conference on School Administrative


Problems.


6 credits.


8:30 to 11:30 daily.


Yn-140.


JOHNS.


Committees will study special problems in school organization and administration for Florida.


Reports will be prepared in


the nature of recommended handbooks or manuals.


En. 565.-Problems in Agricultural


Education.


credits.


10:00


and 2:30


daily.


(First


three


weeks.)


Yn-132.


GARRIS.


En. 565-566:


The course is designed for graduate students


who are qualified


to select


pursue


advanced


problems.


Problems


will be selected


to suit individual


needs


and the results


of the study will be reported in the form of term papers.


En. 575.-Corrective
8:30 daily.


Reading.
Yn-236.


3 credits.
CENTER a:


(Admission by
MCCRACKEN.


application.)


Intensive study of


the diagnosis,


correction,


and prevention


of reading


difficulties


in silent


and oral reading with the objective of developing teachers and administrators from selected


areas


as reading specialists.


Deals with


both elementary and high schools.


576.-Corrective


10:00 daily.


Reading
Yn-236.


Laboratory.


3 credits.


CENTER and MCEACHERN.


Practical application with selected groups of children of methods and materials for diagnosing,
correcting, and preventing reading difficulties.


TPT oprPDTP AT


WATOTATWWWTATE


*' U V* TE' S -t I*S I*i nnf 1U1 *








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


El. 346.-Electrical Communications.


4 credits.


8:30 daily.


Bn-208.


SASHOFF.


Laboratory:
Speech and hearing;


2:30 to 5:30


receivers and loud speakers; principles of various systems of wire and


radio


telegraphy


and telephony;


elementary tube


theory;


amplifiers,


radio


receivers,


and trans-


mitters.


El. 349.-Dynamo Laboratory.


1 credit.


The first half of the course El. 349-350.


Corequisite: El. 341.


Laboratory:


Experimental studies and


1:00 to 4:00 M.


tests


on direct


W. F.
current


Bn-106.


and alternating


WILSON.


current


apparatus.


ENGLISH


Eh. 217.-Literary 1
11:30 daily.


Masters of England.


La-212.


3 credits.


CONNER.


The most interesting and significant English writers from the beginning to the 19th century
are read and discussed primarily for an appreciation of their art and their outlook on life. For
teachers, particular attention will be devoted to writers and works stressed in junior and senior
high school English courses, and to methods of presentation.


Eh. 301.-Shakespeare.


3 credits.


10:00 daily.


La-210.


LYONS.


The primary


design


is to increase the


students'


enjoyment


and appreciation


of the plays.


Devoted chiefly to the romantic comedies and the history plays, including


A Midsummer


Night'e


Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado, As


You Like It. Twelfth Night,


Richard the Second,


and Henry the Fourth.


As an aid to the reading of Shakespeare, some of the most interesting


features of the Elizabethan stage and drama


are treated briefly.


Eh. 305.-Introduction to the Study of the English Language.


3 credits.


2:30 daily.


La-210.


MORRIS.


A course designed to meet the needs of three types of students:


it offers


for the general student


a means of improving his written and spoken English by showing him what "good Eng-


lish"


is; (b)


for the English


teacher in the secondary school


it provides an adequate minimum


knowledge of the English Language;


for the English Major and beginning graduate student


serves


as an introduction to further


linguistic


study.


Primary


emphasis


is placed,


not upon


grammatical rules, but rather upon the most interesting features of our language as written and
spoken.


Eh. 391.-Children's
7:00 daily.


course


designed


Literature.
La-212. V


to arouse and


3 credits.


rISE.
satisfy


a genuine


interest in


children's


books


apart from


school textbooks, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and
to make him more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form.


Eh. 399.-Introduction to the Study of Literature.


3 credits.


11:30 daily.


La-210.


LYONS.









DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Eh,. 413.-The Renaissance in England.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.


La-210.


STROUP.


The origin of


the movement


in Italy


and its


spread


in England


special


emphasis


on the


Renaissance


humanists,


such


as Colet,


Erasmus,


and Moore,


upon


the 16th century


poets,


such as Skelton.


Wyatt, Sidney, and Spenser.


Eh. 433.-English Literature of the 18th Century.


1:00 daily. La-210.


3 credits.


CONGLETON.


A study of English


prose


and poetry from Dryden


through Pope,


with chief emphasis


upon


Dryden, Defoe, Addison and Steele, Pope, and Swift.


GRADUATE COURSES


Eh. 501.--American Literature.


10:00 daily.


La-311.


3 credits.
SPIVEY.


A study of American literature to the Civil


War.


Eh. 513.-The


8:30 daily.
A consideration of


Renaissance in England.


La-210.


3 credits.


STROUP.


the Italian origins of


the movement and


a study


of the development of


English literature.


Extensive readings and reports.


Eh. 533.-English Literature of the


18th


Century.


credits.


1:00 daily.
A study of English


La-210.


prose


CONGLETON.


and poetry from Dryden


through


Pope.


ENTOMOLOGY


Ey. 301.-Introduction to Entomology.


4 credits.


8:30


Ag-306.


CREIGHTON


and HIXSON.


Laboratory:


1:00 to 5:00


Ag-306.


An introduction to entomology which


is based


upon


a study


of the structure,


classification,


life histories,


and control


of major


insect enemies


American


agricultural


crops.


Particular


stress


is placed


upon


Southern


and Florida


students in the College of Agriculture either


Ey. 304-Advanced Entomology.


economic


insects.


as a pre- or co-requisite


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


course


is designed


for other entomology


for all
courses.


or Ey. 301.


11:30 daily.
Laboratory:


Ag-306.
1:00 to


HIxsoN.


3:00


Ag-306.


A survey of the major phases of entomology including biological and natural control,


histology, insect taxonomy,


insect


ecology,


economic entomology,


insect behavior, and the


insect
experi-


mental method.


course


is designed primarily for students majoring in the field of entomology.


. 305.-Problems
Ey. 301.
To arrange.


Consists


specialization


in Entomology.


Ag-306.


an entomological


ni cluding


UhistfloflVV


2 to 4


CREIGHTON


problem


morphology


for study


credits.


Prerequisite


and HIXSON.


which


may


taxonomy embryology


be selected


biological


Sw. r - V ------------------ a -- - ,* m m ,*-- 7 - -


control.


field of
ecology,








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


GRADUATE COURSE


Ey. 503.-Problems in Entomology.


3 credits.


To arrange.


Ag-306.


CREIGHTON and HIXSON.


Consists of a problem for study which may be selected in any field of entomological specializa-


tion; including


histology,


morphology,


taxonomy,


embryology,


biological


control,


ecology,


ecology, plant quarantine, inspection, control life, history and habits, biology, and medical, veterinary
and commercial entomology.


FORESTRY


Fy. 220.-Introduction


to Forestry.


Ht-409.


2 credits.
ZIEGLER.


A basic


course designed


to acquaint the student with


the various


phases


and fundamental


underlying principles of the field of Forestry.


Fy. 228.-Forest Mensuration.


3 credits.


1:00 to 5:00 M.


. Ht-409.


ZEIGLER.


Principles


and practice of


measuring


forests


and forest


products


special


attention


Florida conditions.


FRENCH


Fh. 33.-First-Year


French.


credits.


The first half


the course


33-34.


Open to students who have had no previous work in French.


8:30 daily.


Bu-205.


BRUNET.


A beginning


course


basic


for further


study.


The objective


a moderate


proficiency


speaking and reading the language.


with emphasis on oral drill.


201.-Second-Year


201-202.


Franch.


Prerequisite:


3 credits.


year


college


first


French,


half


or two


course


years


high


school French.


10:00 daily.


Bu-101. ATKIN.


Fh. 201-202:


Readings from modern French writers.


rPices


in speaking.


GRADUATE COURSE


Fh. 530.-Individual Work.


To arrange.


Variable credit.


BRUNET.


A course offering graduate students an opportunity to study


certain


phases of French


liter-


ature, language and civilization for which there are no regular course offerings.


Such individual


work


may


be elected for additional


credit


in subsequent


sessions.


Students


will be helped


plan a definite program, and will meet the instructor for conferences.


Gl. 301.-Children's Science.


GENERAL

2 credits.


SCIENCE


8:30 daily.


Yn-142.


GOETTE.


The content of elementary science, together with its organization for use both in the integrated


program and in the departmentalized school.


of children.


Consideration given to the interests and experiences


Investigation of instructional aids that will assist teachers of the elementary school


I









DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Gn. 201.-Second-Year German.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


or equivalent.


The first half of the course Gn. 201-202.


7:00 daily.


Bu-201


JONES.


Reading in German prose of moderate difficulty.


Continued practice in


oral German.


GRADUATE COURSE


Gn. 530.-Individual Work.


To arrange.


3 credits.


JONES.


Readings and reports in fields chosen by the individual student.


Mainly designed for


graduate


students


desiring


gain


special


information


in certain


genres,


movements


or authors.


course may


be repeated without duplication of credit.


GEOGRAPHY


Gpy. 305.--Geography of Florida.


3 credits.


10:00 daily.


La-204.


DIETTRICH.


A study of the geographic conditions and human adjustments in the major regions


of Florida.


The distribution


of population,


routes


of communication,


industries,


resources,


and strategic


location


in their


geographical


and historical


aspects;


explanation


and interpretation


of major


phenomena such


as weather and climate,


geologic structure and


land forms, surface and


under-


ground drainage, shoreline characteristics, natural vegetation, soil types, and animal life.


Optional


field trips.


Gpy. 387.-World Geography.


3 credits.


11:30 daily.


La-204.


DIETTRICH.


Economic


and cultural


geography


in its relations


to the Social


Studies.


Basic


principles


underlying


the study and


teaching


of modern


geography


from


the world


point


view,


special emphasis on the place and purpose of geography


as a social


science


in junior and senior


high school curricula.


Special


stress


is given to the relations of geography to history and


civics.


course


may be used to satisfy the conservation certificate requirement.


HANDWRITING

(See Business Education)


HEALTH


AND


PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


HP1. 373.-Methods and Materials in Physical Education.


credits.


10:00 daily.


Yn-138.


STEVENS.


The program of physical education activities for the elementary school including small group


large group


directed


team


game


units:


together


with


appropriate


cedures


and methods for conducting such a program.


HPI. 381.-Advanced Football.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.


Basketball


Court.


COACHING


STAFF.


A .2r .A __t-_l1 AeI---- t ..? *t. J4..nAln1n44n nnnnt- n-niann+nrv f iinjrn.a.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


HPI. 481.-Advanced Basketball.


2 credits.


10:00 daily.


Basketball


Court.


COACHING


STAFF.


Fundamentals of basketball for men


stops, and guarding.


A consideration


; dealing with the techniques of shooting,


of offensive play,


defensive


team


passing,
signals,


dribbling,
scouting,


team strategy,


training, practice


sessions,


selection


and placing


of players,


and other essentials


of the modern court game.


GRADUATE COURSE


HPI. 531.-Guided Professional


Development in


Health


Physical


Education.


3 credits.


The first half of the course HPI. 531


11:30 daily.


Ilesigned to


Yn-138.


-532.


STEVENS.


teachers, supervisors, and administrators


a broad understanding of the field


of health and physical education.


At the beginning of the course the student and instructor will


outline
student.


a program of professional


development in


keeping with


the needs


and interests


of the


HISTORY


241.-History


Modern


World.


credits.


Prerequisite:


or Hy.


313-314.


7:00 daily.


Pe-112.


PATRICK.


A study of the modern world from the Congress of Vienna to the present time.


303.-American History


1830 to


1876.


credits.


Prerequisite:


or Hy.


13-314.


8:30 daily.


Pe-112.


LEAKE.


A study of the Ante-Bellum period,


the War Between the States and the Reconstruction


Hy. 361.-English History to


1688.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


or Hy. 313-314.


10:00 daily.


Pe-lO.


PAYNE.


survey


of English History from the Anglo-Saxon settlements to the Glorious Revolution.


363.-Latin American History to


1850.


credits.


Prerequisite:


or Hy.


313-314.


11:30 daily.


Pe-11


GLUNT.


survey


course


on the colonization and development of Latin America.


GRADUATE COURSE


509.---History Seminar.


3 credits.


To arrange.


Pe-112A.


LEAKE.


For graduate students majoring in History.


HORTICULTURE


era.








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


INDUSTRIAL ART


EDUCATION


Courses in Industrial Arts Education will be conducted by the project method.


In. 111.-Mechanical Drawing.


2 credits.


Project


method.


Yn-316.


STRICKLAND


MCGAUGHEY.


For industrial arts students.


construction,


Freehand sketching, lettering, orthographic projection,


working drawing and blue printing, care and use of


geometric


instruments.


In. 112.-Mechanical Drawing.


2 credits.


Project Method.


For industrial


arts students.


Yn-Shop.


Perspective


STRICKLAND


rendering,


tracings


MCGAUGHEY.
and blue prints


for a small


building; different types of letters, machine sketching,


and conventions.


Suggestions


and plans


as to the most effective way of teaching a course of this type.


In. 211.-General Shop.


2 credits.


Project Method.
For industrial arts students.


Yn-Shop.


STRICKLAND


MCGAUGHEY.


Practice in use of hand tools commonly found in school shops


types of


construction,


design,


woodfinishing:


block-printing.


Analysis


of logical


teaching


units


in projects and problems in the various phases of industrial arts.


In. 305.-Design and Construction.


3 credits.


Project


Method.


Yn-Shop.


STRICKLAND


-MCGAUGHEY.


Advanced problems in design and construction taken from some area of work in the general
shop in selected advanced areas in which the student desires major emphasis.


401.-Architectural Drawing.


credits.


Prerequisite:


111-112.


Project


Method.


Yn-Shop.


STRICKLAND


MCGAUGHEY.


Designed for industrial arts teachers.


Study made of building materials, sources and prices


landscaping


as to orientation


; plans, elevations,


sections,


details, conventions


types and styles of


domestic architecture, and


a review


of the history of architecture.


In. 411.-General Machine Shop and Metal Work.


credits.


Project Method.


Yn-Shop.


STRICKLAND


MCGAUGHEY.


Recommended for properly qualified students in the College of Education.


It consists of


class-


room study and laboratory practice in pattern work, foundry, and general machine shop operations.


INDUSTRIAL


ENGINEERING


Ig. 365.-Engineering Mechanics-Statics.


credits.


Prerequisites: Ps.


353, M1. 182.


8:30 daily.
Principles of statics


Eg-209.


BOURKE.


resolution and equilibrium of concurrent


forces;


numerical and graphical


solution of trusses and hinged frames; couples, centers of gravity


forces in


space


and moments


of inertia.


LATIN-AMERICAN WORKSHOP


A special


workshop


program


is offered


1946


Summer


by the


Division of Language and


Literature


College


Arts


S- --


Sciences


with


1








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


LAW

The courses offered in law each term will provide work for entering as well
as advanced students.


First


Term, June


- July


1946


303.-Contracts.


3 credits.


8:00 to 8:50 M.


F. and 9:00 to 9:50


Lw-105.


TESELLE.


Formation


: consideration;


object;


operation;


assignments.


Costigan,


Cases


on Contracts,


4th edition.


Lw. 310.-Judicial Administration.


credit.


9:00 to 9:50 T.


Lw-105.


TESELLE.


Venue:


jurisdiction;


local


and transitory


actions;


process;


summons,


personal


service;


pearance and


waiver


process,


immunity; service for personal judgments, also in rem; return.


McBaine,


Cases


on Trial Practice, 2nd edition.


Lw. 312.-Property.


2 credits.


11:00 to


11:50 M.


Th. F.


Lw-105.


DAY.


Introduction


therein,
licenses ;


including
convenani


to the law of


the land itself,
:s running with


conveyances;


air, water,
the land.


rights


fixtures,
Warren,


incident


to ownership


emblements,


Cases


waste;


of land
profits;


and estates
easements;


2nd edition


; Day,


Outline on Property.


416.-Insurance.


2 credits.


12:00 to


12:50


Th. F.


Lw-105.


CLARK.


Theory,


significance;


insurable interest; concealment, representations,


warranties; subrogation


waiver


and estoppel;


assignees,


beneficiaries; creditors.


Vance,


Cases


on Insurance,


3rd edition.


432.-Current


Constitutional


10:00 to 10:50 M.


Th. F.


Law.


Lw-204.


credits.


SLAGLE.


Bill of Rights
mental relations;


taxation


; governmental regulation; foreign statutes and


inter-governmental


relations.


judgments;


depart-


U. S. Reports and selected materials.


Lw. 503.-Public


Utilities.


2 credits.


8:00 to 8:50 M.


Th. F.


Lw-204.


SLAGLE.


Nature of public utilities; common carriers


telegraphs and telephones; light,


water and gas


companies;
common law
2nd edition.


inns; warehouses;


elevators ;


and under federal and


stockyards


state statutes.


public


Welch,


control;


Cases


right


on Public


and obligations


Regulation,


Lw. 504.-Municipal


Corporations.


2 credits.


10:00 to 10:50 M. T.


Th. F.


Lw-105.


CLARK.


-I


FltX1i a t m ar n* 4 -- &- -- U 1


on Property,


Utility


,,1


m


f


I _


__ ___1_Y


_ _


m


.. .- -- --- . .








DEPAR TMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Lw. 532.-Landlord & Tenant.


2 credits.


7:00 to 7:50


Th. F. Lw-105.


DAY.


Rights and obligations of landlord and


tenant;


form and legal


consequences resulting


from


express


covenants;


implied


covenants;


term


leases


; conditional


limitation


and conditions


in leases;


equitable


relief


from


forfeiture;


option


to purchase;


option


renew;


holdovers


redemption from forfeiture.


Jacobs


, Cases and Materials on Landlord and Tenant, 2nd edition.


Lw. 533.-Labor


Law.


2 credits.


9:00 to 9:50 M.


Th. F


. Lw-204.


WILSON.


Exercise


of right of combination by employers and employees; interference with contractual


relationships:


conduct


of strikes;


strike


objectives:


trade


agreements;


boycotts


"Union


Label"


; employer interference with the right to work and trade.


Casebook to


be selected.


MATHEMATICS


Before


registering


course,


student


should


ascertain


pre-


requisites by writing to or consulting the head


of the department.


C-42.-Fundamental


Mathematics.


Comprehensive


Courses.)


Ms. 105.-Basic Mathematics.


Section
Section
Section


Section 4.
Section 5.


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.


11:3


0 daily.


8:30 daily.


credits.
Pe-l.
Pe-l.
Pe-1l.
Pe-ll.
Eg-211.


QUADE.
PIRENIAN.
GERMOND.


LANG.


GAGER.


Ms. 105-106:


In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry


in succession, this course offers a sequence of topics including the above plus a liberal amount of


calculus.


Teachers of high school mathematics who wish to advance in technical command of the


subject matter should elect both Ms. 105 and Ms. 106.


This


is also


designed for those who plan


to major in mathematics or to elect courses above the freshman level.


106.-Basic Mathematics.


3 credits.


Section 1.


Section
Section


7:00 daily
8:30 daily
11:30 daily


Pe-102.


. Eg-202.
. Pe-102.


BLAKE.
QUADE.
KOKOMOOR.


A continuation of Ms. 105.


Ms. 311.-Advanced


College


Algebra.


3 credits.


first


half


course


311-312.


Prerequisite


105-106,


or equivalent.


10:00 daily.


La-212.


SIMPSON.


The further treatment of arm nof the materis


LI ann processes


of Ms. 105-106. and


the intro-








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


3b3.-Differential


Calculus.


credits.


Section


Section 2.


11:30 daily.
10:00 daily.


Eg-202.
Eg-202.


MCINNIS.
PIRENIAN.


A beginning


course.


Differentiation,


one of the most


important


and practical


fields


mathematics,


is treated in the niain, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse operation


of differentiation.


354.-Integral Calculus.


11:30 daily.


Pe-2.


3 credits.
BLAKE.


Integration.


the inverse


operation


of differentiation,


is used


in the calculation


areas,


volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems.

GRADUATE COURSE


530.-Individual Work.


Variable credit.


To arrange.


GERMOND


STAFF.


An opportunity to register for work in any phase of graduate mathematics.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING


MI. 181.-Engineering


2:30


Drawing.


Bn-203.


2 credits.


PHELPS.


Laboratory:


7:00 to


10:00 daily


and 2:30 T


. Th.


Eg-304.


Designed to teach the student how to make and how to read engineering drawings.


costing about thirty dollars


Equipment


is required but will be used extensively in later work.


182.-Descriptive Geometry.


credits.


Prerequisite


1:00


Bn-203.


LEGGETT.


Laboratory: 2:30 to 5:30 daily and 1:00


. Eg-304.


The principles of projection and the development of surfaces.


Ml. 281.-Elementary


Design.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


1:00


Laboratory


. Eg-300.


1:00 to 5:00


FRASH.


Eg-300.


The size and proportions of


standard machine parts,


screws,


thread,


bolts,


nuts,


pipe,


fittings, shafts,


bearing, tolerances and allowances riveted and welded joints,


springs, lubrication,


and design of simple machine parts.

M1. 385.-Thermodynamics. 3


credits.


Prerequi


sites:


53-354, Ps.


205-206


Cy. 101-102.
10:00 daily


. Eg-209.


LEGGETT.


Energy


equations and availability of energy


gases,


vapors, and mixtures


engineering applica-


tions in flow


of fluids,


vapor power cycles,


gas compression and refrigeration.


PAINTING








DEPARTMENT


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


Pg. 21A.-Pictorial Composition.


Variable credit.


8:30 to


11:30


3 additional


hours to


be arranged.


Pe-300.


A continuation of Pg. HlA for students in Painting.


The study of principles,


technique and


media.


Pg. 22A.-Commercial Design.


8:30 to


11:30


Variable credit.


and 6 additional hours to


A continuation of Pg. 11A for students in Commercial Art.


be arranged.


The study of principles,


Pe-300.
technique


and media.


Pg. 31A.-Freehand Drawing.


Variable credit.


10:00 to 12:00 daily and 6 additional hours to
A continuation of Pg. 11A for students in Painting.


be arranged.


Pe-3


32A.-Freehand


10:00 to


Drawing.


12:00 daily.


Variable
Pe-300.


credit.


A continuation of Pg. 11A for students in Commercial Art.


Pg. 51A.-Oil Painting.


Variable credit.


2:30 to 5:30 M.


. and 6 additional hours to be


arranged.


Pe-300.


A continuation of Pg. 11A for students in Painting.


Pg. 52A.-Oil Painting.


Painting of still life and' the head.


Variable credit.


2:30 to


3 additional hours


to be arranged.


Pe-300.


A continuation of Pg. 11A for students in Commercial Art.


Painting of still life,


landscape,


heads and figures.


PHARMACOGNOSY


Pgy.


221.-Practical


Pharmacognosy.


credits.


first


half


course


Pgy. 221-222.


Lecture and Laboratory


2:30


to 5:30 daily.


Ch-316.


JOHNSON.


Sources


of crude drugs and


systematic


classification of the


vegetable and animal drugs of the


United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary.

PHARMACOLOGY


Ply.


455.-New


Remedies.


credits.


The first half


of the course


455-456.


2:30 M.


Th. F


Laboratory


8:3(


. Ch-400.
3 to 11:30


FOOTE.


. Ch-316.


A study of the most important non-official
practice and over-the-counter sales.


remedies currently found in


modern


prescription


PHARMACY


Phy.


223.-Galenical


Pharmacy.


3 credits.


first


half


course


Phy.


223-224.


1:00 M.


Laboratory


Th. F. Ch-316.
: 8:30 to 11:30


FOOTE.


. Ch-306.


Galenical


preparations


such


as syrups,


spirits, solutions.


The preparation


of these


materials





__







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY SUMMER


SESSION


207.-Elementary


Physics


Laboratory.


credit.


Corequisite with


Section 1.


Section


Section 3.
Section 4.


7:00 to 10:00 p.m. M. and 1:00 to 5:00 F. Bn-306.
7:00 to 10:00 p.m. M. and 1:00 to 5:00 F. Bn-307.
7:00 to 10:00 p.m. Th. and 1:00 to 5:00 T. Bn-306.


7:00 to 10:00 p.m. Th. and 1:00 to 5:00 T


SWANSON.
PERRY.
PERRY.


. Bn-307.


Laboratory to accompany Ps. 101.


Ps. 311.-Electricity and Magnetism.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: one year of college


physics.
7:00 daily.


Bn-210.


WILLIAMSON.


Designed to meet the growing need of physics, chemistry and electrical engineering


for a working


students


knowledge of the basic principles of electricity and magnetism.


POLITICAL SCIENCE


309.-International Relations.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


or Pcl.


313-314,


or its equivalent.
10:00 daily.
The first half of the


Pe-112.


course


CARLETON.


treating


the main


developments


in the field of international


relations


Pcl. 313.-American


Government and Politics.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


7:00 daily.


Pe-10.


PAYNE.


A study of the structure and working of the Federal


Government.


405.-History


Political


Theory.


credits.


Prerequisite:


313-314, or its equivalent.


8:30 daily.


Bn-210.


DAUER.


A study and


analysis


of Ancient and Medieval political theories.


Pcl. 407.--Comparative Government.


credits.


Prerequisite: C-l or Pcl. 313-314,


or its equivalent.
11:30 daily.


A comparative


Bn-210. DAUER.


study of the theory and practice of modern governments.


PORTUGUESE


Courses


in Portuguese


Spanish


Latin-American


civilization


being offered


as part of the Latin-American


Workshop,


with


the cooperation


the United States


Bulletin.)


Office of Education.


(See under "General Information"


These courses are open to regular students


as well


in this


as to those enrolled


Workship.


Pe. 33.-First-Year Portuguese.


3 credits.


The first half of the course Pe. 33-34.


11:30 daily.


Bu-101.


ATKIN.


A beginning


course


basic


for further


study.


The objective


a moderate


proficiency


1 -


*i t1


- 1 *fl I


n i


mrlf rvJ in ni ncr t-h I 'io / IIir- l 1 1 rih1n n f l r tn .fl I1 it cnai


I


cnyncr


I .~


I/'in r nn


.l *-nR Ir- itf Tk I I1 1 1








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION FIRST


TERM


PSYCHOLOGY


Psy. 201.-General Psychology.


3 credits.


Section


Section 2.


7:00 daily.
11:30 daily.


Pe-114.
Pe-114.


WIMBERLY.
WIMBERLY.


An elementary treatment of the general topics in the field of Psychology.


Designed to provide


an understanding of human


study.


behavior, approached as a natural


phenomenon subject


to scientific


The unifying concept of the course is the adaptation of the individual to his physical and


social environment.


Psy. 304.-Experimental


Psychology.


credits.


1:00 daily.


Pe-114.


W. R.


THOMPSON.


Methods


of psychological


investigation;


individual


differences,


reactions,


work


and fatigue,


sensations, perceptions, illusions,


images, memory, attention, learning,


judgments.


Psy. 310.-Abnormal Psychology.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.


Pe-114.


HINCKLEY.


A study of the abnormal phases of mental life, and the


ways


by means of which the individual


develops


abnormal


habits


of thinking


and acting.


survey


of the


signs


of beginning


mal-


adjustment and procedures which should be followed to correct these tendencies.
tions are given for the prevention and treatment of mental disease.


Special


sugges-


Psy. 406.-Psychological Tests.


3 credits.


4:00 daily.


Pe-114.


THOMPSON.


Tests


ganization


of general


intelligence,


and administration;


special


methods


aptitudes,
and results


personality


; theory


traits,


and business


of test construction


ability;


and scoring


practical use of


tests.


Psy. 409.-Human Motivation.


10:00 daily.


Pe-114.


3 credits.
HINCKLEY.


A detailed


account of


the factors


underlying


human


motivation


approached


from


both the


physiological and the psychological viewpoints.


GRADUATE COURSES


Psy. 506.-Psychological Tests.


credits.


4:00 daily.


Pe-114.


THOMPSON.


Offered with Psy. 406 with extra readings and reports for graduate students.


Psy. 509.-Human Motivation.


10:00 daily.


Pe-114.


3 credits.
HINCKLEY.


SCHOOL ART


Pc. 251.-Art for the Primary Grades.


credits.


1:00 to 3:00


Yn-316.


MITCHELL.


Activities for the


kindergarten, first, second,


and third grades that interpret


the underlying


nhiniQnnhxy nnn +ho cl-ilao i o-+- +lm+ c0 0r Tn nO AlT O0 i iiif


* __ 1 -- __ JL ^ T _


- - - x


lao 0 Imnlyi ,?"T V n 1'1 1" I nj T'r 11 i Tivi-j/' n rn "l I I1 1 r







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


SOCIAL

Sdl. 301.-Children's Social Studies. 3


STUDIES


credits.


8:30 daily.


Yn-209.


TISON.


An opportunity will be given to study content material in the social studies field with implica-
tions for the activity program.


SOCIOLOGY


241.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life.


3 credits.


(Formerly CSy.


8:30 daily.


Pe-4.


MACLACHLAN.


The outlook for the individual


in the modern


world.


Direct measurement of


social credits


of invention and technological change in modern America.


The effect of the metropolitan epoch


on social institutions.


A review


of the American


regions


as cultural


environments


and chal-


lenges.


Sy. 344.-Marriage and the Family.


3 credits.


1:00 daily.


The nature


conditions.


Pe-4.


and development


Changes


in marital and


EHRMANN.
of domestic


institutions.


domestic relations


Problems


of adjustment


with particular emphasis on


to modern
preparation


for marriage.


The status of women and laws pertaining to marriage in Florida.


Divorce, family


disorganization, child training.


424.-Criminology.


3 credits.


10:00 daily.


Nature


causes


Pe-4.


of crime


EHRMANN.
; punishment,


treatment,


prevention.


Sociological


aspects


criminal law and procedure.


Sy. 490.-The South Today.


3 credits.


11:30 daily.


Pe-4.


MACLACHLAN.


The social


resources


and challenges of the modern South.


Measures of southern culture.


place of


the South in the nation.


Programs and plans for the region reviewed.


A broad


view


of the foundations of southern life.


GRADUATE COURSES


Sy. 524.-Criminology.


3 credits.


10:00 daily.


Pe-4.


EHRMANN.


Sy. 544.-Marriage and the Family.


credits.


10:00 daily.


Pe-4.


EHRMANN.


590.-The South Today


. 3 credits.


11:30


daily


. Pe-4.


MACLACHLAN.


SOILS


Sls. 301.-Soils.


3 credits.


Prerequisite


Acy. 125-126 or Cy


101-102.


R*R-n M T


A n_9ln2


IW n


IT D TPTFCar oarM


I








DEPARTMENTS


'STRUCTION


- FIRST


TERM


SPANISH


Courses


in Spanish,


Portuguese


Latin-American


Civilization


are being


offered as a part of the Latin-American


tion" in


this Bulletin.)


These courses


Workshop.
are open 1


(See unde "General Informa-


regular students


as well


to those enrolled in the


Workshop.


Sh. 33.-First-Year Spanish.


3 credits.


The first half of the course Sh.


33-34.


Open to students who have had no previous work in Spanish.


10:00 daily.


Bu-301.


YANCY.


A beginning course basic for further study.


The objective


a moderate proficiency in speak-


ing and reading the language with emphasis on oral drill.


Sh. 201.-Second-Year Spanish.


3 credits.


First half


of the course Sh. 201


Prerequisite: Sh.
8:30 daily.


34 or equivalent.


Bu-301.


HAUPTMANN.


Continued


practice


in conversation.


Readings


in Peninsular


and Latin-American


prose


moderate difficulty.


423. -The
structor.


Teaching


Spanish.


credits.


Prerequisite


permission


10:00 daily.


series


Yn-.


of demonstrations


YANCEY.
and practice


in the teaching


of Spanish


elementary


secondary schools.


Compilation of materials.


GRADUATE COURSE


Sh. 530.-Individual
To arrange.


Work. 3 credits.
Bu-304. HAUPTMANN.


Readings


and reports


in fields


chosen


the individual


students.


Mainly


designed


graduate students desiring to gain special information


on certain


genres,


movements or authors.


This course may


be repeated


without duplication


of credit.


SPEECH


Sch.


241.-Effective


Speaking.


credits.


Prerequisite:


or consent


of the


student's


dean.


Section
Section


7:00 daily.


8:30


daily.


Pe-209.
Pe-209.


CONSTANS.
CONSTANS.


Designed to aid the student through lecture, readings, demonstration,


and practice


in speaking


to learn to talk effectively to


a group.


The individual needs of the student


are given attention.


Sch. 307


Interpretation


Literature.


credits.


Prerequisite


or consent


of the student's


dean.








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Sch.


315.-Applied


Phonetics.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


or consent


student's dean.


1:00 daily.


Pe-209.


TEW.


A dynamic phonetic analysis of the sounds of speech


application


to the individual's speech,


to the study of dialects and foreign languages, and to remedial procedures.


Considerable practice


in vocal performance and phonetic transcription.


Sch. 404.-Dramatic Production.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


C-3, or the consent of


the student's dean.


4:00 daily.


Pe-205.


TEW.


Consideration


of voice,


line reading,


and the principles


of character


interpretation


problem of directing,


stage


equipment, costuming, lighting, and make-up.


Rehearsal of plays.


Sch. 417.-Correction of Speech Defects.


3 credits.


2:30 daily.


Pe-209.


MCCLELLAN.


A beginning


course


in the recognition and correction


of common speech


defects


; especially


designed


for teachers


and those planning


on entering


the teaching


profession.


Observing


working with


persons


in the Speech and Hearing Clinic.


Speech and Hearing Clinic.


11:30 to 12:15 M.


Pe-209 and 210.


MCCLELLAN.


Children and adults who have been receiving treatment in


the Clinic


will be in attendance.


Persons


from


anywhere


in Florida


may


come


during


summer


and receive


diagnosis


treatment.


GRADUATE COURSES


Sch. 504.-Problems


Dramatic


Production.


credits.


Prerequisite:


C-3,


consent of the student'


dean.


4:00 daily.


Pe-205.


TEW.


An advanced
producing plays.


course


in the problems


of the play


director.


Participation


in directing


Sch.


-Applied


Phonetics.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


or consent


student's


dean.


1:00 daily.


Pe- 209.


TEW.


Offered with Sch. 315 with extra readings, reports, and research.


; the







DEPARTMENTS


DEPARTMENT

AND SCHI


INSTRUCTION SECOND


TS OF INSTRUCT


EDULE


COURSES


Second Term


All classes ordinarily meet for eighty minutes.


sses


scheduled to meet daily


meet


course


Monday


was


through


offered


Friday.


first


Course


term.


descriptions
appropriate


are not
section


gwven


first


same
term


schedule


for this information.


Students not registered in the


Graduate School will not be


permitted to register


for graduate courses unless


they


secure written approval


from the


Dean of the


Graduate School and the


instructor concerned.


COMPREHENSIVE


COURSES


Students


should


consult


official


announcements


Board


University


Exanminers for details concerning


C-11.-American Institutions.


comprehensive examinations.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture Section 1


: 4:00 W


.Ch-Aud.


STAFF


Discussion Sections:


Section
Section
Section
Section
Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
1:00 daily.
2:30 daily.


Ag-104.


JOUBERT.


Ag-104.
Ag-104.


BENTLEY.
EHRMANN.
HAMMOND.


C-12.-American Institutions.


4 credits.


(Register for one Lecture Section and one Discussion Section.)


Lecture Section 1:
Lecture Section 2:
Discussion Sections:


Section 11.
Section 12.


Section
Section


Section 15.
Section 16.
Section 21.
Section 22.


4:00 Th.
4:00 T.


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
1:00 daily.
2:30 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.


Ch-Aud.
Ch-Aud.


Pe-101.
Pe-101.
Pe-101.
Pe-101.


STAFF


BENTLEY.
HAMMOND.
JOUBERT.


Pe-101.
Pe-101.
Ag-108.
Ag-108.


TERM


[ON


_ I_







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


C-22.-The Physical Sciences.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section 1.


Section


. Section
Section


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.


Bn-201.
Bn-201.
Bn-201.
Bn-201.


GADDUM.
EDWARDS.


C-31.--Freshman English.


Reading, Speaking,


Writing.


4 credits.


(Register for one Discussion 'Section and one Laboratory
Discussion Sections:


Section.)


7:00 daily.


8:30
10:00


daily.
daily.


11:30 daily.


1:00 daily
2:30 daily


Writin


La-203.
La-203.
La-203.
La-203.
La-203.


LOWRY.


WISE.
WISE.
ZINK.


. La-203.


g Laboratory Sections:


10:00
11:30
2:30


:30 T.


10:00 T
11:30 T


O T.


4:00 T


La-209.
La-209.


. La-209.
. La-209.
. La-209.


La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.


ZINK.


CLARK.


MOUNTS, LOWRY.
MOUNTS.


STROUP,
MOUNTS,
STROUP.


CLARK,
CLARK.
STROP.


ZINK.
ZINK.


LOWRY.


LOWRY.


C-32.-Freshman English.


Reading,


Speaking, and


Writing.


4 credits.


(Register for one Discussion Section and one Laboratory Section.)
Discussion Sections:


daily.
daily.


10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.
1:00 daily.


2:30


daily.


2:30 daily.
4:00 daily.
7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.


10:00
i .on


daily.


La-201.
La-201.
La-201.
La-201.
La-201.
La-201.
La-212.
La-201.


CONGLETON.
SPIVEY.


MORRIS.


La-307.
La-307.


T ont?


7:00
8:30


IJA


*J /








DEPARTMENTS


'STRUCTION


- SECOND


TERM


4:00


8:30 T.
10:00 T.


11:30


2:30 T.
4:00 T.


La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.
La-209.


STROUP, ZINK.


MOUNTS
STROUP.
CLARK,
CLARK.
STROUP.


ZINK.


LOWRY.


LOWRY.


C-41.--Practical Logic.


3 credits.


(Register for one section


only.)


Section
Section
Section


8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.


Sc-2
Sc-2
Sc-2


WILSON.


LITTLE.


C-42.-Fundamental Mathematics.


credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section 1.


Section


Section 3.


7:00 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.


Pe-2.
Pe-2.
Pe-2.


LANG.


C-51.-The Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the Lecture


Section and


one


Discussion


Section.)


Lecture Section 1


: 2:30 T.


Aud.


STAFF.


Discussion Sections:


Section
Section


Section 13.


Section


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.


11:30


daily.


Sc-208.
Sc-208.
Sc-208.
Sc-208.


HAINES.
CONNER.
CONNER.
HAINES.


C-52.-The Humanities.


4 credits.


(Register for the


Lecture Section and


one Discussion


Section.)


Lecture Section 1:
Discussion Sections:


2:30


Aud.


STAFF.


Section
Section


Section 13.


Section


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.


Sc-206.
Sc-206.
Sc-206.
Sc-206.


DAVIDSON.
GROWTH.
GROWTH.
CLEMENTS.


C-61.-Biological Science.


3 credits.


(Register for one section only.)


Section
Section


Section 3.
Section 4.


7:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.
11:30 daily.


Sc-1ll.
Sc-1ll.
Sc-1ll.
Sc-111.


DICKINSON.
DICKINSON.
WALLACE.
WALLACE.








BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS


As. 306.-Farm Management.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.
Laboratory:


Ag-209.


30 to


GREENMAN.


4:30


Ag-210.


The factors of production; systems of farming,


their distribution and adaption; problems of


labor, machinery, layout of farms, and farm reorganization.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING


301.-Drainage and Irrigation.


3 credits.


7:00


Laboratory


Ag-210.


: 1:00 to 3:00


ROGERS.
r. Ag-210.


The drainage and irrigation of lands with treatment of the necessity for such in the produe-


tion of field, fruit and vegetable crops.


The cost,


design, operation and upkeep of drainage and


irrigation


systems.


Field work in laying out systems.


Ag. 302.--Farm Motors.


10:00


Laboratory:


Identical with In. 404.


. Ag-210.


2:30 to 4:30 T


credits.


ROGERS.
Ag-210.


The general principles of operation of the various sources of farm power.


The care, operation


and repair


gasoline


of electric


engines,


motors;


internal


truck and tractor).


combustion


and windmills.


engines


Laboratory


(including


work


automobile,


includes


actual


stationary
operation


and repair.


GRADUATE COURSE


Ag. 570.-Problems in Agricultural Engineering.


3 to 6 credits.


To arrange.


Ag-106.


ROGERS.


Special problems in agricultural engineering.


ANIMAL PRODUCTION


AL 211.-Principles of


7:00


Laboratory:


Animal Husbandry.


Ag-208.


2:30 to 4:30 T


3 credits.


PACE.


Ag-208.


The place of livestock in agriculture; principles of


livestock


improvement


characteristics of


feeds; and feeding principles.


For students majoring in departments other than Animal Husbandry.


Al. 309.-Fundamentals in Animal Husbandry.


3 credits.


10:00 M.


Laboratory:


. Ag-208.


2:30 to 4:30.


Types and breeds of farm animals


SHEALY.


Ag-208.


principles of breeding, selection and management.


AL 314.-Livestock Judging.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: Al.


309 or Al.


8:30 T


Ag-208.


PACE.


Laboratory:


2:30 to 4:30. M.


Special training in live stock iudEine


. Ag-208.


show rine methods


contests a


fanir


. AL


E


I


I


Z1L .








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION SECOND


TERM


11A.-Fundamentals of


Architecture.


Variable


credit.


Ae. 21A.-Architectural Design.


8:30 to 11:30


A continuation of Ae. 11A.

Ae. 21B.-Architectural De


8:30 to 11:30 M.


A continuation of


Variable credit.


Pe-302.


The design of simple buildings.

sirn. Variable credit.


Pe-201.


Ae. 21A for students in Architecture.


Ae. 31A.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color.


2:30 to 5:30 T.


A continuation of


Ae. 11A.


The delineation of form in Architecture.


Ae. 31B.-Freehand Drawing and Water Color.


2:30 to 5:30 T


A continuation of


Variable credit.


Pe-201.


Ae. 31A for students in Architecture.


41A.-History of Architecture.


Variable credit.


1:00 T


Th. and 4 additional hours to be arranged.


Pe-302.


An analytical study of the development of


the art of building.


Walls,


roofs, openings,


plan arrangement.


41 B.-History


Architecture.


Variable


credit.


1:00 T.


Th. and 4 additional hours to be arranged.


Pe-201.


A chronological study of the development of the art of building from ancient to modern times.
Environmental influences, architectural development, and significant buildings.


Ae. 51A.-Materials and Methods of


2:30 to 4:30 M.


Construction.


Variabe credit.


and 3 additional hours to be arranged.


Pe-302.


A continuation of


Ae. 11A for students in Architecture.


A study of


building


materials and


of methods of building construction.


Ae. 51B.-Mechanical Equipment of Buildings.


Variable credit.


0 to 4:30 M.


and 6 additional hours to be arranged.


Pe-201.


For students


in Architecture.


A study of


plumbing,


heating, and electrical


installations


buildings.


Ae. 52A.-Materials and Methods of Construction.


Variable credit.


2:30 to 4:30 M.


3 additional hours to be arranged.


Pe-302.


A continuation of


Ae. 11A for students in Building Construction.


A parallel


course


to Ae. 51A.


Ae. 52B.-Mechanical Equipment of Buildings.


Variable credit.


2:30 to 4


0 M.


. Pe-302.


For students in Building Construction.


Ae. 52D.-WorkinE


A parallel


Drawings and Buildinr


course

Costs.


to Ae. 51B.

Variable credit.


Pe-302.


Variable credit.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Ae. 61B.-Structural Design of Buildings.


Variable credit.


1:00 to 3:00


W. F., 8:30 to


11:30 Th.


additional


hours


arranged.
A continuation of Ae.


Pe. 201.
61A for students in Architecture.


Ae. 62A.-Structural Design of Buildings.


Variable credit.


1:00 to


3:00


arranged.


I. W. F., 8:30 to
Pe-302.


11:30


Th. and


additional


hours


For students in Building Construction.


Structural design of the component parts of buildings


in wood and steel.


62B.-Structural


Design


Buildings.


Variable


credit.


1:00 to 3:00


F., 8:30 to


11:30


or 15 additional


hours


to be arranged.


Pe-302.


A continuation of Ae. 62A for students in Building Construction.

BACTERIOLOGY


Bey. 31.-Bacteriology.


7:00 M.


Laboratory:


Sc-104.


CARROLL.


1:00 to 3:00 T.


Sc-104.


This course is intended to give information on the occurrence and distribution of the different
kinds of bacteria, requirements for their growth in nature and controlled conditions, their relation
to health and disease of man, animals, plants, soil fertility, household and farm sanitation, and their
use in certain industries.


Bey.


304.-Pathogenic


10:00


Bacteriology.


Sc-104.


4 credits.
CARROLL.


Prerequisite:


Bey.


Laboratory:


Recognition,


theories
13th Ed.


culture,


and principles


1:00 to


and special
of immunity


Sc-104.


laboratory
and infection


technique c
n. Jordan


if handling i
& Burrows,


pathogens
Text oJ


and viruses;
f Bacteriology,


Bey. 412.-Industrial Bacteriology.


4 credits.


Prerequisite:


Bey. 301.


8:30


W. F.


Sc-104.


CARROLL.


Laboratory:


1:00 to 3:00


Consideration of principles and problems


classifications of organisms concerned.


W. F.


in industrial


Sc-104.


bacteriology; isolation,


cultivation


Prescott & Dunn, Industrial Microbiology.


BIOLOGY


102.-An


Introduction


to Invertebrate


Zoology.


3 credits.


or pre-


requisite: C-6.


8:30 daily.
Laboratory:


Sc-101. BYERS.


1:00 to 5:00


M. and


7:00 to


10:00 p.m.


Sc-lO.


An introduction to the biology of the invertebrates with special reference to their morphology,


-a* -I ~


.~ ~ ~~~. ---3 -s- n U.S1S '


3:00


**.,








DEPARTMENT


INSTRUCTION SECOND


TERM


BOTANY


Bty.


304.-General Botany.


3 credits.


The second half of the course Bty


-304.


7:00 M.


Laboratory:


Sc-2.


CODY.


1:00 to 3:00 T


Sc-2.


311.-Plant Physiology


Botany;
Pt. 321.


Acy. 1


. 4 credits.


, or equivalent.


Prerequisites


one semester of


Desirable prerequisites:


General
Ps. 211.


10:00 M. T.
Laboratory:


. Se-2.


CODY.


1:00 to 3:00


Sc-2.


Absorption.


assimilation,


transpiration, metabolism,


respiration,


and growth of


plants.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


(See


Economics


Business


A dministrat ion)


BUSINESS


EDUCATION


NOTE:


These


courses


with


the exception


of BEn.


461-462


not count


Education.


BEn.


81.-Introductory


Typewriting.


credits.


11:30 daily.


Yn-306.


Introduction to touch typewriting


MAXWELL.
practice upon


personal and


business problems.


BEn. 94.-Stenography.


5 credits.


Prerequisites:


BEn.


and BEn. 91


or per-


mission of the instructor.


8:30 to


11:30 daily and two


hours weekly to arrange.


Yn-305.


MOOR-


MAN and MAXWELL.


Advanced course in shorthand and typewriting.


Designed for those who desire more instruction


than is given in the elementary courses in shorthand and typewriting for personal


use,


as well as


for those who desire certification in the commercial subjects.


BEn. 97.-Handwriting.


1 credit.


7:00 M.


Yn-305.


MOORMAN.


BEn. 462.-The Business Education Curriculum and Instruction.


credits.


Pre-


requisite:


a course


in each


following-typing,


shorthand


, accounting,


economics, business law.


1:00 daily.


Yn-305.


MOORMAN.


Principles, practices and problems in the evaluation and reconstruction of business curricula;
materials and methods of instruction; emphasis on secretarial subjects.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


202.-Analytical


Chemistry


(Quantitative).


credits.


second


half


the course Cy. 201-202.


8:30 M.


Laboratory:


. Ch-110.


HEATH.


1:00 to 5:00 M.


Ch-114.


Theoretical pirnciples and laboratory technique involved in
the common metals and acid radicals.


the quantitative determination


Cy. 262.--Organic Chemistry.


10:00 daily.
Laboratory:


Ch-212.
7:00 to


5 credits.
TUCKER.
10:00 p.m.


and 1:00 to 5:00


Th. F


. Ch-230.


more


important aliphatic and aromatic compounds, chiefly for students in applied biological


fields.


302.-Organic


Chemistry.


credits.


second


half


course


301-302.


10:00 daily.
Laboratory:


Ch-110.


POLLARD.


1:00 to 5:00 W


. Ch-230.


GRADUATE COURSES


Cy. 572.-Research in


Organic Chemistry.


2 to


credits.


To arrange.


POLLARD.


Cy. 574.-Research in Naval Stores.


To arrange.


2 to 6 credits.


HAWKINS.


CIVIL ENGINEERING


Cl. 226.-Higher Surveying.


1:00 daily.


H1-302.


3 credits.
WINSOR.


Prerequisite:


Traverse,


triangulation,


precise leveling,


topographic mapping


hydrographie,


aerial


surveying


practical astronomy, and map projections.


Cl. 323.-Materials Laboratory.


3 credits.


Corequisite: Ig. 367.


2:30 T


H1-302.


WILLIAMS and STAFF.


Laboratory:


2:30 to 5:30 M.


Laboratory work in


the testing


of stone,


brick, asphalt,


and other road


materials


cement,


sand,


concrete,


timber, steel and other materials used in construction.


ECONOMICS


AND


BUSINESS


ADMINISTRATION


Courses


preceded


are courses


Economics


courses


preceded


Bs. are courses in Business Administration.


I _








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION SECOND


206.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life.


3 credits.


TERM


The second half of


the course Es. 205-206.


Section 1.
Section 2.
Section 3.


8:30 daily.


10:00


daily.


7:00 daily.


Sc-215.
Sc-215.
Sc-215.


BIGHAM.
BONNER.


MCFERRIN.


Bs. 211.-Elementary


Accounting.


credits.


first


half


course


(Formerly CBs.


141.)


Section


Section 2.


8:30 daily.
1:00 daily.


Sc-202.
Sc-202.


MOSHIER.
MOSHIER.


Bs. 212.-Elementary


Accounting.


3 credits.


The second half of


the course


211-212.


(Formerly CBs.


142.)


Section 1.


Section
Section


8:30 daily.
11:30 daily.
2:30 daily.


Sc-213.
Sc-213.
Sc-213.


BEIGHTS.
EVANS.
POWERS.


Bs. 311.-Accounting Principles.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: Bs.


10:00


daily.


Sc-2


POWERS.


A study


of the mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting


books of


record


accounts


fiscal


period


and adjustments;


working


papers


form


and preparation


of financial


statements;


followed


an intensive


and critical


study


of the problems


of valuation


as they


affect


preparation


of the balance sheet and income statements.


Bs. 312.-Accounting


Principles.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


The second


half of the course Bs.


311-312.


10:00 daily.


Sc-209.


BEIGHTS.


Consideration


is given


to the legal


aspects


of accounting


and related


problems


resulting


from


the legal


organization


corporations; capital stock


form


surplus


used


followed


businesses:


liabilities;


proprietorship;


by a study of the financial aspects


partnerships;
of accounting


as disclosed


an analysis


and interpretation


of financial


statements:


financial


ratios


standards, their preparation, meaning, and use.


Es. 322.-Financial Organization of Society.
The second half of the course Es. 321-322.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: Es. 205-206.


8:30 daily.


Pe-lO.


DOLBEARE.


An introduction to the field of finance: a study of the institutions providing monetary, banking


and other financial


services;


interrelationships and interdependence of financial institutions


central


banking


government


control


of finance;


significance of


financial


organization


to the economic


system


as a whole.


Es. 327.-Public


Finance.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


205-206.


10:00 daily.


Pe-lO.


DONOVAN.


Principles governing expenditures of modern government


sources of revenue


public


credit


... ^ __ _1 - 1 A- r -tr... ._.r __ a_ - -. .. r..- &t T -1 -


K --


_ *


I_


1 I


~


_ ~







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Es. 382.-Utilization of Natural Resources.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.


La-204.


DIETTRICH.


A comprehensive


review


of the natural and human resources of the


United States followed


by an


intensive


study of the


and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these


resources.


A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation with


special


reference


to Florida.


Bs. 392.-Problems in Real Estate Brokerage.


3 credits.


11:30 daily.


La-311.


CHANCE.


Organization and


conduct of the real-estate


brokerage


business; social,


economic,


legal,


ethical responsibilities of the broker; listing and listing methods; advertising and sales; real-estate


brokers' law;


commissions


; relationship with title insurance companies and attorneys.


Bs. 402.-Business Law.


8:30 daily.


3 credits.


La-311.


The second half of the course Bs. 401-402.


CHANCE.


Es. 408.-Economic Principles and Problems.


3 credits.


The second half of the


course Es.


407-408.


10:00 daily.


Bs. 412.-Auditing.


8:30 daily.


Sc-205.


credits.


Sc-209.


BIGHAM.


Prerequisite:


EVANS.


A study of auditing theory and current auditing practice; principal kinds of audits and services


of the public accountant; professional and ethical aspects of auditing.


Lectures, discussions, and


problems.


422.-Investments.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


321-322.


11:30 daily.


Pe-lO.


The nature of investments


DOLBEARE.


investment policies and types of securities;


the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases; factors


influencing I


analysis of securities
general movements c


security


prices.


451.-Transportation:


Rate and


Rate-Making.


3 credits.


10:00 daily.


La-306.


EUTSLER.


Classification, tariffs, rate structures, rate-making procedures, and rate regulation of all types
of carriers.


Es. 478.-Problems in State and Local Finance.


credits.


Prerequisite: Es. 327.


8:30 daily.


La-306.


DONOVAN.


Allocation of functional responsibility; property taxation; sales


taxes:


highway finance, business


taxation;


supervision


of local finance.


Emphasis on Florida problems.


EDUCATION


305.-Development


Organization of


Education.


credits.


1:00 daily.


Yn-134.


SIMMONS.


An attempt to interpret the role of the public school in our rapidly changing society.


- - -








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION SECOND


TERM


En. 421.-Student Teaching.


3 credits.


The first half of the course En.


4:00 daily and one hour to arrange between 8:30 and 11:30 daily.


421-422.
Yn-134.


LEON HENDERSON.


En. 421-422:


The student is given


practice in


the art of teaching


by actually taking


over


responsibility for the teaching-learning situation and putting


into operation


under direction


supervision


the theories, methods,


materials,


and teaching techniques acquired


during


his junior


year


through observation and participation.


En. 422.-Student Teaching.


3 credits.


The second half of the course En. 421-422.


4:00 daily and one hour to arrange between 8:30 and 11:30 daily.


LEON


Yn-134.


HENDERSON.


421 or


422 may be completed in


three weeks provided the student devotes


full time to


the course.)


471.-Problems of Instruction.


8:30


to 11:30


daily.


Yn-236.


6 credits.


GREEN.


472.-Methods and


Organization in Industrial Arts.


3 credits.


Project


method.


Yn-Shop.


STRICKLAND.


Organization of industrial arts materials for the various grades and schools; planning courses


of study, selecting equipment and supplies; study


of aims


and objectives of


industrial


arts.


study of the utilization of


current acceptable


teaching techniques and devices.


482.-Planning


8:30 to 11:30 daily.


Improved Daily


Living.


(First three weeks.)


credits.
Yn-311.


GRACE A. STEVENS


and MITCHELL.
The technique of using Florida resources in the areas of arts and crafts, architecture, housing,
interior decorating, landscaping; appreciation and some understanding of fine arts, costume design-
ing. health practices, and social relationships.


GRADUATE COURSES


En. 502.-Elementary
10:00 daily.


School
Yn-140.


Curriculum.


credits.


BAXTER.


A study of a certain group of elementary children; how to develop and organize materials to


meet


the needs of the particular group concerned


En. 508.-Philosophy
8:30 daily.


of the Curriculum.


Yn-134.


how to evaluate.

3 credits.


NORMAN.


The nature of


experience,


the nature of


institutions,


the social


inheritance,


the individual,


society,


socialization, social control, dynamic and static


societies,


education its own end.


En. 520.-High School Curriculum.


3 credits.


1:00 daily.


Yn-218.


A study of the needs of


OLSON.


a particular group of adolescent children;


changes and adjustments


to meet the needs of this particular group of children; and evaluation of progress.


En. 528.-Supervision of


the Secondary


School


3 credits.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


human factor in the educative process.


The student is expected to become familiar with the tools,


agencies,


and common practices in the field of counseling and guidance.


Some attention will also


be directed to a study of the various methods of organizing and administering a comprehensive
student personnel program designed to reach all students in a systematic and effective way.


597.-Administration


of the


Elementary


School.


credits.


8:30 daily.


Yn-140.


JOHNS.


The administration


of the elementary


school


a study


of problems


of elementary


school


principals such


as supervision, professional growth,


selection of teachers, relation of administrative


officers


, discipline, child health, attendance, etc.


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING


El. 342.-Elements of Electrical Engineering.


credits.


The second half of the


course El. 341-342.


7:00


daily.


Bn-208.


. WILSON.


El. 350.-Dynamo Laboratory


credit.


The second half of the course El. 349-


Corequisite:
Laboratory:


El. 342.


1:00 to 4:00


. Bn-106.


J. W


WILSON.


ENGLISH


Eh. 133.-Effective


Writing.


credits.


Prerequisite:


, or permission


Course


Chairman.


8:30 daily.


La-210.


CONGLETON.


Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and clear


but pleasing and attractive to the reader.


Students are urged to do creative work.


Eh. 218.-Literary Masters of England.


3 credits.


second half of the course


217-218.


May be taken for credit without Eh. 217.


0 daily.


La-210.


ROBERTSON.


223.--Masterpieces of


World


Literature.


credits.


first


half


course Eh. 223-224.


May be taken for credit without Eh. 224.


0 daily.


La-212.


STROUP.


A lecture and reading


course


designed


to acquaint the student with some of the


great


books


of the world.


Eh. 302.-Shakespeare.


3 credits.


10:00 daily.


La-210.


ROBERTSON.


primary


design


is to


Increase


the student's


enjoynient


and appreciation


of the play.


Devoted chiefly to the great tragedies, including Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Anthony


and Cleopatra.


Eh. 301 and 302 may be taken in


reverse


order, or either one without the other.


Eh. 355.-Business


1:00 daily.


Writing.
La-210.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


CLARK.


A general course in


business


letter and report writing.


The more common types of business


1~j 1. --.-' -n < __ - --


I


1 J I "


n,,,~L,


.~ .1









DEPARTMENTS


INSTR AUCTION SECOND


TERM


402.-American


10:00 daily.


Literature.


La-210.


3 credits.


SPIVEY.


A general


survey


of American


literature


(all types


and all regions)


from


Whitman


to the


present,


with the major emphasis upon such writers


as Whitman, Howells,


James,


Twain, Lanier,


the local colorists,


Wharton, Cather, Glasgow, Lewis, Robinson, Frost, and O'Neill.


GRADUATE COURSE


Eh. 502.-American
10:00 daily.


Literature.
La-210.


credits.


A study of American literature and literary movements from
tensive readings and reports as directed.


ENTOMOLOGY


SPIVEY.


Whitman


to the present.


S201.-Man
students.


Insects.


credits.


Restricted


first


second


year


8:30


Laboratory:


Ag-306.


1:00 to 3:00 T.


HIxsoN.


Ag-306.


The influence of insects upon man's


agricultural and social world.


The course treats of the


contrast


between


the history


man


and insects


the influence of


insects


upon


domestic


agriculture,


commerce,


industry,


wars,


human


diseases,


and medical


practices,


machine


develop-


ment, engineering, legal practices, scientific investigations, and upon other insects.


to broaden the knowledge of all students concerning the influence of man's


in the continuance of the human


It is designed


greatest limiting factor


race.


450.-Entomology a
Prerequisite: Ey. 201


id Sanitation
or Ey. 301.


(Public


Health


Entomology).


credits.


10:00


Ag-306.


HIXSON.


Laboratory:


11:00


5:00


. Ag-306.


Studies of insects and related organisms affecting the health and comfort of man, and algae


and other growths found in water,


with engineering principles applicable to sanitation.


Designed


for students
agriculture.


interested


in sanitary


engineering,


entomology,


health


education,


sociology


Ey. 503.-Problems in Entomology.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: Ey. 201


or Ey. 301.


To arrange.


Ag-306.


HIXSON.


Consists of a problem for study which may be selected in any field of entomological, special-


ization :


including


histology,


morphology,


taxonomy,


embryology,


biological


control,


ecology,


toxi-


cology, plant quarantine, inspection, control, commercial, life history and habits, biology, and medical
and veterinary entomology.


FORESTRY


Fy. 220.-Introduction


8:30


to Forestry.


Ht-409.


2 credits.
ZIEGLER.


A basic


course


designed


to acquaint


the student


with


the various


phases


and fundamental


tlnent'.l,,4 crv nnwn ntnfil 4n1 nr nP 1'nmne







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


Fh. 202.-Second-Year French.


3 credits.


The second half of the course Fh. 201-


Prerequisite:
10:00 daily.


Fh. 201.


Bu-205.


' BRUNET.


GRADUATE COURSE


Fh. 530.-Individual Work.


To arrange.


Variable credit.


BRUNET.


GENERAL SCIENCE


Gl. 302.-Children's Science.


8:30 daily.


Yn-142.


2 credits.
GOETTE.


GEOGRAPHY


Gpy. 201.-Geography
10:00 daily.


of the
La-204.


Americas. 3
DIETTRICH.


credits.


A regional


survey


of the lands and peoples of


Anglo and Latin America


location, surface


features,
ment; an


climate, ancient civilizations,


analysis


interdependence.


European settlement, natural resources and economic develop-


s of the growth of present-day nations and their economic, political and social
Introductory to study of geography, history, languages and Inter-American affairs.


HANDWRITING


Business


Education)


HEALTH


AND


PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


HPI.


121.--Narcotics


Education.


2 credits.


(Offered August


12-30.)


11:30 daily.
A factual, scientific,


Yn-132.


and unemotional approach


to the present-day problem of


narcotics.


study of the nature of alcohol and its relation to the psychological, physical, social, economic, and


educational


aspects


of the problem will be considered briefly.


Suggestive


teaching projects,


units,


and methods for the various


age-grade


and subject levels will be explored and developed.


HP1.


373.-Methods and Materials


8:30 daily.


Yn-138.


Physical
STEVENS.


Education.


3 credits.


HPl. 387.-Health Education.


3 credits.


10:00 daily


Yn-138.


STEVENS.


GRADUATE COURSES


NOTE


: The courses listed below will be combined and conducted as a Physical


Education


workshop,


which


designed


primarily


junior-senior


high


-~~ -


school


I








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION SECOND


TERM


HPI. 534.-Problems of Physical Education.


3 credits.


10:00 daily.


Yn-150.


SALT.


HISTORY


Hy. 304.-American History,


8:30 daily.


Pe-112.


1776 to
GLUNT.


1945.


3 credits.


This course


covers


the development of the United States since the close of the Reconstruction era.


Hy. 314.-Europe During the Middle Ages.


3 credits.


7:00 daily.


A study


Pe-112.


of the development


HANNA.
of Western


European


civilization


from


the Crusades


to the


Reformation.


Hy. 362.-English History, 1688 to 1945.


10:00 daily.


Pe-112.


credits.


HANNA.


Survey


of English History since the Glorious Revolution.


Hy. 364.-Latin American History, 1850 to


1945.


3 credits.


11:30 daily.


Pe-112.


GLUNT.


The second half of a survey course in Latin America,


covering the main phases of its develop-


ment since 1850.


HORTICULTURE


He. 320.-Nursery B
10:00 daily.


management.
Ag-209.


3 credits.
WATKINS.


A course designed for students who plan to enter the nursery business.


Special attention


given


to the preparation


of layout


plans


for urban


retail


structures, equipment, figuring landscape and maintenance jobs,


yards,


rural


labor forms and


roadside
charts,


stands,
Florida


nursery laws.


Field trips to successful establishments are required.


429.-Ornamental Horticulture.


3 credits.


7:00 daily.


Plant materials


Ag-209.


suitable for use


WATKINS.
in ornamental


horticulture


with


special


application


to the


beautification of homes and schools in Florida.


INDUSTRIAL


ARTS


EDUCATION


In. 212.-General Shop.
Project method.


2 credits.
Yn-Shop.


Designed for industrial arts students.


STRICKLAND


Use of hand


tools and


MCGAUGHEY.
power machines,


with


special


emphasis on the speed lathe; use, parts and care of machines; shop equipment and construction.


In addition


to the development


of manipulative


skills.


special


emphasis


is given


to selecting


projects, and writing the various types of instruction sheets.


In. 301.-Sheet Metal.


3 credits.


Proniet mpthnrd.


Vn-Rhnn


gRTTITTT.ANn


. .. il


MC(.ATTrnRY..







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


In. 401.-Architectural Drawing.


3 credits.


Project method.


Yn-Shop.


STRICKLAND


MCGAUGHEY.


Designed for industrial arts teachers.


Study made of building materials, sources and prices;


landscaping


as to orientation; plans,


elevations,


sections,


details,


conventions:


types


and styles


of domestic architecture, and a review of the history of architecture.


In. 412.-General Machine Shop and Metal Work.


3 credits.


The second half of


the course In. 411-412.


To arrange.


Yn-Shop.


STRICKLAND


McGAUGHEY.


INDU


STRIAL ENGINEERING


Ig. 367.-Strength of Materials.


credits.


Prerequisite:


Ig. 365.


8:30 daily.


Eg. 209.


BOURKE.


Tension, compression, shear,


stress


and strain


combined


stresses:


riveted joints for pressure


vessels


and structural work


torsion:


bending moments


stresses


and deflection of simple, canti-


lever,


and continuous beams


concrete beams


; curved beams and hooks


eccentric loading


columns


and elastic strain energy.


LAW


Second Term, July 22


- September 6, 1946


Lw. 304.-Contracts.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


Lw. 303.


8:00


to 8:50


. Th.


9:00


9:50


Lw-105.


TESELLE.


Third party


beneficiaries; joint obligations


interpretation of contract; rules relating to evi-


dence and construction:


discharge of contract.


Costigan,


Cases


on Contracts, 4th edition.


Lw. 309.-Property.


2 credits.


12:00 to


12:50 M.


Th. F.


Lw-105.


WILSON.


Personal property;


possession


and rights based thereon


acquisition of title; liens and pledges;


conversion.


Warren,


Cases


on Property, 2nd edition.


405.-Equity


Pleading.


2 credits.


11:00 to 11:50 M.


Th. F


. Lw-105.


CLARK.


Pleadin
demurrers


g in equity
and pleas;


; parties
answer


to, proceedings in


and replication


a suit in


preparation


equity:
of bills,


in equity,


demurrers,


pleas


disclaimer;
, answers.


Keigwin,


Cases


in Equity Pleading, 2nd edition


Florida Chancery


407.-Legal Bibliography.


2 credits.


10:00 to


The classes


10:50


of law books


Th. F. Lw-105.


CLARK.


the location and use of decisions and statutes


the trial brief


brief on appeal.


Brandt, How to Find the Law, 3rd edition.


408.-Legal Ethics.


1 credit.


9:00 to 9:50 T


Lw-105.


LESELLE.


Organization of the bar; attorneys and professional conduct.


Lw. 502.-Damages.


Casebook to be selected.


2 credits.








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION SECOND


TERM


Lw. 509.-Sales.


2 credits.


7:00 to 7:50 M.


Th. F.


Lw-105.


CLARK.


Sale and contract to sell; statute of frauds


illegality


conditions and


warranties


delivery,


acceptance and receipt; vendor's lien; stoppage in transit; bills of lading; remedies of seller and


buyer.


Void. On Sales.


Lw. 530.-Administrative Law.


2 credits.


8:00 to 8:50 M. T.


Th. F.


Lw-204.


SLAGLE.


Creation of administrative tribunals;


legislative functions;


judicial


functions;


administrative


functions; doctrine of separation of powers; limits upon discretion; securing information; notice


and hearing;


enforcement of rules and orders; control of action; judicial relief.


Stason, Cases and


Materials on Administrative Tribunals.


MATHEMATICS


Ms. 105.-Basic Mathematics.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.


Pe-2.


QUADE.


Ms. 106.-Basic Mathematics.


3 credits.


Section 1.
Section 2.
Section 3.


10:00 daily.
8:30 daily.
7:00 daily.


Pe-102.
Pe-102.
Pe-102.


KOKOMOOR.
GAGER.
PHIPPS.


A continuation of Ms. 105.


Ms. 353.-Differential Calculus.


3 credits.


7:00 daily.


Pe-10.


GAGER.


A beginning


course.


Differentiation,


one of the most


important


and practical


fields


mathematics,


is treated in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse operation


of differentiation.


Ms. 354.-Integral Calculus.


3 credits.


11:30 daily.


Pe-102.


KOKOMOOR.


Integration,


the inverse


operation


of differentiation,


is used


in the calculation


areas,


volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems.


Ms. 431.-College Geometry.


3 credits.


10:00 daily.


Pe-1l.


LANG.


The use of elementary methods


in the advanced study


of the triangle


and circle.


Special


emphasis on solving


original


exercises.


Valuable to


prospective


school


geometry teachers.


Altshiller-Court, College


Geometry.


GRADUATE COURSE


Ms. 530.-Individual Work.
To arrange. QUA]


Variable credit.
DE and STAFF.


An opportunity to


register


for work in any phase of graduate mathematics.







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


MI. 282.-Mechanism and Kinematics.


3 credits.


Prerequisites: CMs. 24,


Ps. 205,


M1. 182.


1:00 M.


Laboratory:


. Eg-209.


FRASH.


1:00 to 5:00 T.


Eg-300.


Revolving and


oscillating bodies, link work, belts, pulleys,


gears,


cams


trains of mechan-


and the velocity and directional ratio of moving parts.


Ml. 386.-Power


10:00 daily


Engineering.


. Eg-209.


3 credits.
LEGGETT.


Prerequisite:


M1. 385


or Cg.


Steam and internal combustion engine power plants and their auxiliary equipment.

MUSIC


467-468.


Msc. 103.-Materials and


Methods


for Grades


One,


Two,


Three.


3 credits.


1:00 daily.


Yn-311.


CARSON.


The child


voice;


songs;


development of rhythm


sight-singing from rote to note; develop-


ment of skills


necessary


for teaching primary music.


Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six.


3 credits.


:30 daily.


Yn-311.


CARSON.


Development of sight-singing


study of problems pertaining to intermediate


grades;


part sing-


song


repertoire; appreciation work suitable for intermediate grades.


PAINTING

Courses in Painting are carried on by means of the problem or project method,


and accomplishment is


the sole criterion for


advancement.


Credits


depend


will be conducted


upon


seven hours


number


daily


projects
remain


completed.


open


Laboratories


additional


hours


for those


who desire to use them.


Pg. 11A.-Fundamentals of Pictorial Art.


Variable credit.


Pg. 21A.-Pictorial


Composition.


Variable credit.


8:30 to


11:30


and 3 additional hours to be arranged.


Pe-300.


A continuation of Pg. 11A for students in Painting.


The study of principles;


technique and


media.


Pg. 22A.-Commercial Design.


Variable credit.


8:30 to 11:30


6 additional hours to be arranged.


Pe-300.


A continuation of Pg. 11A for students in Commercial Art.


The study of principles, technique


and media.


31A.-Freehand


Drawing.


Variable


credit.


10:00 to


12:00


daily


6 additional hours


to be


arranged.


Pe-300.


A continuation of Pg. 11A for students in Painting.


Pg. 32A.-Freehand Drawing.


Variable credit.


10:00 to


12:00 daily.


Pe-300.


isms








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION SECOND


TERM


PHARMACOGNOSY


Pgy. 222.-Practical Pharmacognosy.


3 credits.


second half


of the course


Ch-316.


JOHNSON.


Pgy. 221-222.
2:30 to 5:30 daily.


Sources of crude drugs and systematic classification of the vegetable and animal drugs of the
United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary.

PHYSICS


Ps. 102.-Elementary Physics.


3 credits.


Prerequisites:


Ps. 101 and 207, or


205 and 207.


Section


Section 2.


8:30 daily.
10:00 daily.


Bn-203.
Bn-203.


KNOWLES.
PERRY.


A continuation of Ps. 101.


Ps. 208.-Elementary


Physics


Laboratory.


credit.


Corequisite:


Section 1.
Section 2.
Section 3.
Section 4.


7:00 to 10:00 p.m. M. and 1:00 to 5:00 F.
7:00 to 10:00 p.m. M. and 1:00 to 5:00 F.
7:00 to 10:00 p.m. Th. and 1:00 to 5:00 T


7:00 to 10:00 p.m. Th.


and 1:00 to 5:00 T


Bn-306.
Bn-307.
Bn-306.


KNOWLES.


PERRY.


. Bn-307


A continuation of Ps. 207.


PLANT


PATHOLOGY


Pt. 321.-Plant Pathology.


8:30 M.


3 credits.


'. Ht-407.


Prerequisite: Bty


WEBER.


Laboratory:


1:00 to 3:00 T


Th. F


. Ht-407.


Presents a conception of (a)


plant diseases caused by mechanical injury, environmental factors,


parasitic bacteria, fungi and other plants; (b)


(c) the economic importance and control of plant
in Plant Pathology except Pt. 825.

Pt. 570.-Research in Plant Pathology.


To arrange.


Ht-407.


WEBER.


life cycles and role of parasitic fungi and bacteria;


disease.


This course


to 6 credits.


is prerequisite to all courses


A study of methods of research in Plant Pathology, including life histories of parasitic organ-
isms in relation to the host plant and environmental factors influencing the development of disease.


POLITICAL SCIENCE


Pcl. 310.-International Relations.


3 credits.


10:00 daily.


La-314.


LAIRD.


The second


half of


a course


treating


the main


developments


in the field


of international


relations.


Pel. 314.-American Government and Politics.


3 credits.


nf iu ru* r A -


-- _A /' 1 1 ". l i ..


__







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER


SESSION


PORTUGUESE


Pe. 34.-First-Year


Portuguese.


3 credits.


The second


half


the course


33-34.


8:80 daily.


Bu-101.


ATKIN.


POULTRY


HUSBANDRY


34.-Poultry


Plant Operation.


Prerequisite:


Py. 24 or its equivalent.


8:30


MEHRHOF and


DRIGGERS.


Laboratory:


1:00 to 3:00


Instruction in the operation of a poultry plant.


Practical work will be given at the Poultry


Laboratory in the actual handling of all phases of poultry production.


PSYCHOLOGY


Psy. 201.-General Psychology.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.


Pe-114.


THOMPSON.


An elementary


treatment


of the general


topics


the field of Psycholoy.


Designed


provide an


understanding


of human


behavior,


approached


as a natural


phenomenon


subject


scientific study.


The unifying


concept of the course


is the adaptation


of the individual


to his


physical and social environment.


Psy. 305.-Social Psychology.


3 credits.


11:30 daily.


Pe-114.


WILLIAMS.


Influence of the


social


environment upon the mental, social, moral and emotional development


of the child,


the adolescent,


and the adult.


General


orientation,


typical


and atypical


forms of


behavior, social stimulations and responses, social attitudes, social adjustments, language develop-
ment, personality development, and social changes.


Psy.


306.-Applied Psychology.


10:00 daily.


Pe-114.


3 credits.
). WILLIAMS.


Application


of the


principles


and methods


of psychology


to the major


problems


in human


relations.


Application to business and industry, studies in the selection of personnel, employment,


job analysis,


effect of conditions of work,


and methods of


work


on productivity.


Psychological


factors


in advertising


and selling.


Problems


of human


motivation,


individual


differences,


personality.


Psy.


401.-Readings in


Experimental


Psychology.


credits.


7:00 daily.


Pe-114.


THOMPSON.


A consideration


of experimental


literature


in the fields


of retention,


conditioned


response,


learning,


transfer of training, feeling, emotion, reaction time, and association.


lWAflTITTA'Ph pflTTflgWq


.Po.








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION SECOND


TERM


SOCIAL STUDIES


Sel. 302.-Children's


Social


Studies.


3 credits.


2:30 daily.


Yn-140.


BAXTER.


A continuation of ScL 301.


Scl. 303.-Social Studies in the Secondary Schools.


(First three weeks.)


8:30 to


11:30 daily.


Yn-209.


LEWIS.


A course designed to fit the needs of teachers in the Florida schools.


of three parts:


(1) the need for integration


in the social sciences,


studies in the Florida junior and senior high schools,


particular problems of materials for different grade


levels.


The work will consist
the program of social


work with groups of teachers on


This


course is


for advanced


under-


graduates in the social studies and for graduate students.


SOCIOLOGY


Sy. 337.-Cultural Anthropology.


credits.


10:00 daily.


Pe-4.


QUACKENBUSH.


Physical anthropology:


physical characteristics of


prehistoric and modern


man


race distine-


distribution


races;


a critical analysis of


racial


theories-Aryanism,


Nordicism,


Nazism.


Archaeology.
sentative cultu:


Cultural anthropology: the development of culture; a comparative study of


res.


The American Indian.


repre-


The Timucua and Seminole Indians of Florida.


Sy. 426.-The City in American Life.


3 credits.


1:00 daily.


Pe-4.


QUACKENBUSH.


A study of the rising cities of America in their effects upon individuals and social institutions.
Cultural change in American life as related to the sweep of invention and the dominance of the


metropolitan region.


The cities of 1940


are examined as centers of social change and of challenge


education, government, and other group realities.


are reviewed via


case


The principles of city and regional planning


studies of cities, and criticized in relation to their demands upon citizenship.


Sy. 442.-Applied Sociology.


3 credits.


8:30 daily.


Pe-4.


MACLACHLAN.


Theories developed in previous courses applied to


a long-term program of improvement.


Social


investigation


as the basis


of social planning.


Outstanding achievements in


Europe and America.


Sy. 452.-American
11:30 daily.


Culture Today.


Pe-4.


credits.


MACLACHLAN.


Advanced study of the regional patterns of social reality in modern America.


Close analysis


of leading questions of public policy


as affected by population


trends,


technological


changes and


cultural adjustments.


Readings


in major concerns of


American


citizenship,


with emphasis


upon


the role of higher education, of the professions and of public opinion in a metropolitan epoch.


GRADUATE COURSES


-S ~ .w. ne S S Sl a.


*I







BULLETIN


THE


UNIVERSITY


SUMMER SESSION


SOILS


Sis. 32.-Farm Soils.


11:30 M.


Laboratory


Ag-209.


2:30 to 4:30 Th.


MCCALL.
Ag-202.


This course presents a simple discussion


of practical


soil management.


All phases of


management
management.


will be treated,


The factors


including


of economic


soil adaptability,


crop


production,


selecting


the soil and planning


as controlling


the water


supply


of the soil, crop rotations, manuring, liming, fertilizing pasture, truck, fruit and field crops will
be considered.


Sis. 302.-Soil Fertility.


8:30


Laboratory:


3 credits.


Ag-208.


1:00 to 3:00 T


Prerequisite:


MCCALL.


Ag-202.


General


principles


of soil fertility.


The physical,


chemical


and biological


factors


affecting


soil fertility and crop production.


Studies on samples of soil from the home farm; commercial


fertilizers, manures, green manures and organic matter maintenance, crop rotations and permanent
soil fertility.


SPANISH


Sh. 34.-First-Year Spanish.


10:00 daily.


Bu-301.


3 credits. T
TRUJILLO.


second half of the course Sh. 33-34.


202.-Second-Year


Spanish.


3 credits.


second


half


course


201-202.


0 daily.


Bu-301.


TRUJILLO.


SPEECH


Sch.


241.-Effective


Speaking.


credits.


Prerequisite:


, or consent


student's


dean.


7:00 daily.


Pe-205.


CONSTANS.


Designed to aid the student through lecture, reading, demonstration and practice in speaking


to learn to talk effectively to


a group.


The individual needs of the student are given attention.


Sch. 403.-One-Act Play.


3 credits.


Prerequisite: C


or consent of the student's


dean.


8:30 daily.


Pe-205.


CONSTANS.


The one-act


as a type of


drama; reading and criticism of the


best of


these plays


contemporary


authors


; the technique of playwriting.


Participation in the direction and producing


a bill of one-act plays.


Sch. 410.-Scientific Bases of


Speech.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


or consent


of the student's dean.


1:00 daily.


Pe-209.


TEW.


_ -- I r 1








DEPARTMENTS


INSTRUCTION SECOND


TERM


Sch.


420.-Speech


Activities


School.


credits.


Prerequisite:


consent of the student's dean.


2:30 daily.


Pe-209.


TEW.


A course designed primarily for teachers.


The place of speech


education


in the secondary


school


organization of materials and activities; methods of presentation; analysis of text books;


discussions of specific problems that arise in the teaching of public speaking, debate, auditorium
programs, oral reading, and dramatics.

Speech and Hearing Clinic.


11:30 to 12:15 M.


Pe-209 and 210.


Children and adults who have been receiving treatment in the Clinic


will be in attendance.


Persons


from


anywhere


in Florida


may


come


during


summer


and receive


diagnosis


treatment.


GRADUATE COURSES


Sch. 510.-Scientific


Bases of


Speech.


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


or consent


of the student'


dean.


1:00 daily.


Pe-209.


TEW.


Offered with Sch. 410 with extra readings, reports, and research.


Sch. 511.-Seminar in Hearing.


3 credits.


Prerequisite


or consent of the


student's


dean.


10:00 daily.


Pe-209.


Offered with Sch.


411 with extra readings and reports.


Clinical practice.







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