• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Officers of administration
 Deadlines
 General information
 Fields of instruction
 Index
 Notes














Title: University record
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00236
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Gainesville -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no.1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol.1, no.2-v.4, no.2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida,; <vol.4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida,.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00236
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000917307
oclc - 01390268
notis - AEM7602
lccn - 2003229026
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Catalog and admission bulletin
Succeeded by: College of Medicine catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the University of Florida. Graduate catalog
Succeeded by: University record of the university of Florida. Undergraduate catalog

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page i
    Table of Contents
        Page ii
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
        Page ix
    Officers of administration
        Page x
        Page xi
    Deadlines
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    General information
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Graduate school
            Page 5
            Page 6
            Page 7
            Page 8
            Page 9
            Page 10
            Page 11
            Page 12
            Page 13
            Page 14
            Page 15
            Page 16
            Page 17
            Page 18
            Page 19
        Admission to the graduate school
            Page 20
            Page 21
            Page 22
            Page 23
            Page 24
            Page 25
            Page 26
            Page 27
        General regulations
            Page 28
            Page 29
            Page 30
            Page 31
        Requirements for Master's degrees
            Page 32
            Page 33
        Requirements for the Ph.D.
            Page 34
            Page 35
            Page 36
        Specialized graduate degrees
            Page 37
            Page 38
            Page 39
            Page 40
            Page 41
            Page 42
            Page 43
            Page 44
            Page 45
            Page 46
            Page 47
            Page 48
        Financial information and requirements
            Page 49
            Page 50
            Page 51
            Page 52
        Financial aid
            Page 53
        Research and teaching services
            Page 54
        Computer facilities
            Page 55
            Page 56
            Page 57
            Page 58
        Student services
            Page 59
            Page 60
            Page 61
            Page 62
            Page 63
            Page 64
    Fields of instruction
        Page 65
        Course prefixes, titles and academic units
            Page 66
            Page 67
            Page 68
            Page 69
        Accounting
            Page 70
        African studies
            Page 71
        Agricultural and biological engineering
            Page 72
            Page 73
            Page 74
            Page 75
        Agriculture: general
            Page 76
        Agronomy
            Page 76
            Page 77
        Anatomy and cell biology
            Page 78
        Animal sciences
            Page 78
            Page 79
        Anthropology
            Page 80
            Page 81
            Page 82
        Applied physiology and kinesiology
            Page 83
            Page 84
        Architecture
            Page 85
            Page 86
        Art and art history
            Page 87
            Page 88
            Page 89
        Astronomy
            Page 90
        Biochemistry and molecular biology
            Page 91
        Biomedical engineering
            Page 92
            Page 93
        Botany
            Page 94
        Building construction
            Page 95
            Page 96
        Business administration: general
            Page 97
        Chemical engineering
            Page 98
        Chemistry
            Page 99
            Page 100
            Page 101
        Civil and coastal engineering
            Page 102
            Page 103
            Page 104
        Classics
            Page 105
            Page 106
        Clinical and health psychology
            Page 107
        Clinical investigation
            Page 108
        Communication sciences and disorders
            Page 109
            Page 110
        Communicative disorders
            Page 111
        Comparative law
            Page 112
        Computer and information sciences and engineering
            Page 112
            Page 113
        Counselor education
            Page 114
            Page 115
        Criminology and law
            Page 116
        Decision and information sciences
            Page 117
            Page 118
        Dental sciences
            Page 119
            Page 120
        Economics
            Page 121
            Page 122
        Educational administration and policy
            Page 123
            Page 124
        Educational psychology
            Page 125
            Page 126
        Electrical and computer engineering
            Page 127
            Page 128
            Page 129
        Engineering: general
            Page 130
        English
            Page 130
        Entomology and nematology
            Page 131
            Page 132
        Environmental engineering sciences
            Page 133
            Page 134
            Page 135
        Epidemiology and health policy research
            Page 136
        Family, youth, and community sciences
            Page 137
        Finance, insurance, and real estate
            Page 138
            Page 139
            Page 140
            Page 141
        Fisheries and aquatic sciences
            Page 142
        Food and resource economics
            Page 143
        Food science and human nutrition
            Page 144
            Page 145
        Forest resources and conservation
            Page 146
            Page 147
        Geography
            Page 148
        Geological sciences
            Page 149
            Page 150
        Germanic and slavic studies
            Page 151
        Gerontological studies
            Page 152
        Health education and behavior
            Page 152
            Page 153
        Health services research, management, and policy
            Page 154
            Page 155
        History
            Page 156
            Page 157
        Horticultural science
            Page 158
            Page 159
            Page 160
        Industrial and systems engineering
            Page 161
        Interdisciplinary ecology
            Page 162
        Interior design
            Page 163
            Page 164
        International business
            Page 165
        International taxation
            Page 165
        Landscape architecture
            Page 165
            Page 166
        Latin American studies
            Page 167
        Linguistics
            Page 168
            Page 169
        Management
            Page 170
            Page 171
            Page 172
        Marketing
            Page 173
            Page 174
        Mass communication
            Page 175
            Page 176
            Page 177
            Page 178
        Materials science and engineering
            Page 179
            Page 180
        Mathematics
            Page 181
            Page 182
            Page 183
        Medical engineering
            Page 184
            Page 185
            Page 186
        Medical sciences
            Page 187
            Page 188
            Page 189
            Page 190
            Page 191
            Page 192
            Page 193
            Page 194
        Medicinal chemistry
            Page 195
        Microbiology and cell science
            Page 196
        Molecular genetics and microbiology
            Page 197
        Music
            Page 198
            Page 199
        Nuclear and radiological engineering
            Page 200
            Page 201
            Page 202
            Page 203
            Page 204
        Occupational therapy
            Page 205
            Page 206
        Oral biology
            Page 207
        Pathology, immunology, and laboratory medicine
            Page 208
        Pharmaceutical sciences: general
            Page 208
        Pharmaceutics
            Page 209
        Pharmacodynamics
            Page 209
        Pharmacology and therapeutics
            Page 210
        Pharmacy health care administration
            Page 210
        Philosophy
            Page 211
        Physics
            Page 212
            Page 213
        Physiology and functional genomics
            Page 214
        Plant molecular and cellular biology
            Page 215
        Plant pathology
            Page 215
        Political science
            Page 216
            Page 217
            Page 218
            Page 219
        Psychology
            Page 220
            Page 221
        Public health
            Page 222
            Page 223
            Page 224
        Real estate
            Page 225
        Rehabilitation counseling
            Page 225
        Rehabilitation science
            Page 226
        Religion
            Page 227
            Page 228
        Romance languages and literatures
            Page 229
            Page 230
            Page 231
        Sociology
            Page 232
        Soil and water science
            Page 233
            Page 234
        Special education
            Page 235
        Statistics
            Page 236
            Page 237
            Page 238
        Taxation
            Page 239
        Teaching and learning
            Page 240
            Page 241
            Page 242
            Page 243
        Theatre and dance
            Page 244
        Tourism, recreation, and sport management
            Page 245
            Page 246
        Urban and regional planning
            Page 247
            Page 248
        Veterinary medical sciences
            Page 249
            Page 250
        Wildlife ecology and conservation
            Page 251
        Women's studies
            Page 252
        Zoology
            Page 253
            Page 254
    Index
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
    Notes
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
Full Text





University of Florida


Graduate Catalog


UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


University of Florida, Office of the University Registrar, Academic Publications,
Gainesville, FL 32611-4000.





Table of Contents


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INTERDISCIPLIN AR' GR-DL' ATE CERTIFICATES


CONCENTR-ATI)NS. ..
-Alri(a in StLudies .......
A-nimal ,Mol Lular .ind (
Bioloir ,11 Sc ien'nce .
Chemic al Ph\ ci( .
E c >l> i. a l En'inieerini .
Ge(>, ,ra1phi( Inflormi ionii
Ge(,ro ic ) 1 i l ai Studies .
Hi tori( Prisere i iona ..
H\ dr(>l( i(c Scieni( e' ..
Latin I-meri an Studies.
Nledic al Phi\ ic-, ......
t)uantiliie Finnia ..


AND


)I ),


)Q uiantum Theior\ Proje(I iQ TPT .........................


O FFICERS (_)F ADM INISTR-\TI()N ........................
B(-)-RD ()F EDLI(-C TI(-)N (_)F FL()RIDA. ..............
FL()RID- B(-)-RD OF GO\ ERNO)RS ...............
LINI\ ERSIT ()F FL()RID- B(-)-RD O)F TRUSTEES .....
LIN I\ ERSIT ()F FL()R ID .............................
President aind \ i e Precidenil I l ithe Lni er\it ...........
Dea n i an ld o her -dm ini a r .......................
(G rI adlu a1 e S l . . . . . . . . .
G r(niadlua e C LI-un il .................................
D E- D LIN ES iSH O RT LIST, .............................
D E AD LIN ES iL()N G LISTi ..............................
G EN ER -L IN F(O )R IM TI(-)N .............................
IN STITLITI()N L PL RP(O SE ..........................
MN ISSI(C) .N .......................................
CO)M M ITM ENT TO) DI\ ERSIT .......................
GO\ ERNMENT O)F THE LINI\ ERSIT ..................
GR -ADU ATE DE ANS AND E -RS O(F SER\ ICE ...........
GR -DL ATE SC H(O)(O)L ...............................
MN ISSI C) .N .......................................
\ ISIO N ........................................
O)RG AN IZ ATIO()N. .................................
H IS T (O )R . . . . . . . . . .
D EFIN ITIO N S ...................................
GR-\DULATE DEGREES -ND PR(-)GR-AMS\1.................
N(-)NTR ADITI(O)N L PRO GR -AMS. ........................
CONCURRENT GR-\DULATE PR(-)GR-\IS ...............
IO INT DEG REE PR(-)G R-AM S .........................
COMBINED B\ACHELO()R' MASTERS DEGREE PR( )GRAMS.
STATE LINI\ERSITM STEMN PR(-)GR-AMSI ..............


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Sustainable Architecture ............................... 16
Toxicology ......................................... 17
Translation Studies ................................... 17
Transnational and Global Studies ........................ 17
Tropical Agriculture .................................. 17
Tropical Conservation and Development .................. 18
Tropical Studies ..................................... 18
V ision Sciences...................................... 19
W etland Sciences .................................... 19
W omen's and Gender Studies .......................... 19
ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL ..................... 20
HO W TO APPLY ....................................... 20
ADMISSIONS EXAMINATIONS ............................ 20
M EDICAL IMMUNIZATION............................... 20
COMPUTER REQUIREMENT.............................. 20
CONDITIONAL ADMISSION ............................. 21
RESID EN C Y ........................................... 21
Florida Administrative Code ............................ 21
How to Apply for Residency............................ 23
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS ............................. 23
STUDENTS W ITH DISABILITIES ........................... 23
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION AND SOCIAL SECURITY
ADMINISTRATION BENEFITS INFORMATION ............. 24
POSTBACCALAUREATE STUDENTS ........................ 24
NONDEGREE REGISTRATION............................. 24
REA D M ISSIO N ........................................ 24
FACULTY MEMBERS AS GRADUATE STUDENTS .............. 25
GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS ............ 25
TUITIO N PAYM ENTS.................................... 25
RESIDENCY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ON APPOINTMENT ... 25
UNIVERSITY-W IDE FELLOWSHIPS ......................... 25
A lum ni Fellow ship ................................... 25
G rinter Fellow ship ................................... 26
Title VI-Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship ....... 26
GRADUATE MINORITY PROGRAMS ....................... 26
COLLEGE/SCHOOL FINANCIAL AID WEBSITES ............... 27
EXTERNAL FELLOWSHIPS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS ........ 28
GENERAL REGULATIO NS................................... 28
CATALO G YEAR........................................ 28
CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS .......................... 28
CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS. ................ 28
ACADEM IC HO NESTY................................... 29
STUDENT CONDUCT CODE ............................. 29
REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS .......................... 29
REQUIRED FULL-TIME REGISTRATION ................... 29




















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MASTER
MASTER
MASTER
MASTER


-RTS IN LrRB-N -ND REGION
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION ..
BUSINESS ADMIINISTRATIO )N .
ED LIC ATIO N ...............


MASTER (F ENGINEERING


MASTER
MASTER
MASTER
MASTER
MASTER


-TTEND-N(CE PO LICIES ..................
(H -NGE OF GR-ADLUATE DEGREE PR(-)GR-AM ...
COU()LRSES ND CREDITS ....................
G R -DES .................................
LrNS\TISF ACT()R SCH(O)L RSHIP .............
F()REIGN L ANG LAGE E\AMlIN ATI()N ..........
E\ AM IN \ TI( )N S ...........................
PREP-AR TI()N FOR FINAL TERM ..............
\ ERIFICA-TI()N OF DEGREE CANDID-TE STATUS .
-\\\ -RDING O F DEGREES ...................
-TTEND-N(E -T COMMENCEMENT ...........
REQLIlREMENTS FOR MASTERS DEGREES .........
GENER-L REGULAL TI()NS ....................
MASTER OF -RTS -ND MA-STER OF SCIENCE ....
REQLrIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D..................
CO)URSE REQLIlREM ENTS. ....................
LE \ E ( )F -BSEN C E ........................
SLUPER\ ISO)R' COMM ITTEE ..................
L -NGL'-AGE REQLUIREMENT ..................
C-AMPLrS RESIDENCE REQLIlREMENT ...........
QUAL LIF'M NG E\AMINATI)N .................
REGISTR-ATI()N IN RESE-ARCH COURSES. ........
ADM IISSIC)N TO CANDID\D .................
D ISSERTATIO N ............................
GUIDELINES FOR RESTRICTION O)N RELE -SE
O F D ISSERTATIO)NS' ......................
FIN AL E\ AM IN ATI()N .......................
SPECI-LIZED GR-ADLUATE DEGREES ............
MASTER OF ACCO)LNTING ...............
M ASTER OF -D\ ERTISING ................
M ASTER OF AGRIBLUSINESS ...............
MASTER OF AGRICU LLTULRE ................
M ASTER OF -RCHITECTURE ...............
MASTER OF -RTS IN TEACHING -ND MASTER
SCIENCE IN TE ACHING .................


. . . . . . . 4 1


F-AMIL'\ '1O)LrTH -ND CO)MMILNITM
FIN E A R TS .. .. .. .. .
FISHERIES -ND AQUATIC SCIENCES
FOREST RESOURCES -ND C()NSER\
HE ALTH ADMIINISTR-ATION .......


SCIENCE


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MASTER OF HEALTH SCIENCE ......................... 43
MASTER OF INTERIOR DESIGN ........................ 43
MASTER OF INTERNATIONAL CONSTRUCTION
M ANAG EM ENT.................................... 43
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ................ 44
M ASTER O F LATIN................................... 44
MASTER OF LAWS IN COMPARATIVE LAW ............... 44
MASTER OF LAWS IN INTERNATIONAL TAXATION ......... 45
MASTER OF LAWS IN TAXATION ....................... 45 a
M ASTER O F M USIC .................................. 45 *I
MASTER OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY. ................. 45
MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH .......................... 45
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURAL STUDIES ........ 46
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING ..................... 46
COOPERATIVE M.S.Nsg. DEGREE FROM
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY (FSU) AND THE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (UF) ....................... 46
MASTER OF STATISTICS............................... 46
MASTER OF WOMEN'S STUDIES ....................... 46
EN G IN EER ......................................... 47
DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY............................ 47
ED .S. A N D ED .D ..................................... 48
SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION ........................... 48
DOCTOR OF EDUCATION ............................ 48
DOCTOR OF PLANT MEDICINE ........................ 49
FINANCIAL INFORMATION AND REQUIREMENTS. .............. 49
EX PEN SES ............................................ 49
A application Fee ..................................... 49
Enrollment and Student Fees............................ 49
Fee Liability ........................................ 50
Assessm ent of Fees ................................... 50
Health, Athletic, Activity and Service, and
M material and Supply Fees ......................... 50
Special Fees and Charges ........................... 50
Paym ent of Fees ..................................... 51
D ead lines ....................................... 5 1
Cancellation and Reinstatement ...................... 51
Deferral of Registration and Tuition Fees ................ 51
W aiver of Fees.................................... 52
Refund of Fees ................................... 52
GENERAL FISCAL INFORMATION ......................... 52
PAST DUE STUDENT ACCOUNTS ......................... 52
TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES ................ 53
FINA N C IA L A ID .......................................... 53
OFFICE FOR STUDENT FINANCIAL AFFAIRS ................. 53













Z


FIN ANC( I -L AID NE\LS T PES . . . . ..... 5
L ( ) N S . . . . . . . .. . .. .. . 5 _N
PART-TIMIE EM PL() M ENT ............................... 54
ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICE( FOR FIN-ANC(I-L -ID RECIPIENTS 54
RESE ARCH -ND TE ACHING SER\ ICES ........................ 54
LIBR-\RIES ................... ........... 54
C()O M PL TER F-AC ILITIES .................................. 55
C( )IompL ti nI i and NeH\lorkiniI Serk ic e IC(NSi ............. 55
(_-enter lor InIru- tioni al and Recear 1-i C(ompuLtii 1i Il\ itiec
iCIR(-A\ () li e (ol -\ ademi( Tec -hndIIo '\ -\T,. ............ 56
-RT G ALLER IES ................................ .......... 5
PERFO R 1IIN G ARTS .................................... 56
FLORID- MLISELIM OF N-ATLURAL HISTORY' ............... ..5
AGRICULLTLURAL E\PERIMENT ST-TION ..................... 5-
ENGINEERING AND INDUSTRI-AL E\PERIMENT ST-TION ... ... ..5
FLORID- ENGINEERING EDLICATI()N DELl\ ERM S' STEM FEEDS, 5 8
OFFICE OF RESE -RCH AND GR ADU ATE PRO(GR _IS ......... 5..8
LINI\ ERSIT PRESS O)F FLO RID ........................ 5I
INTERDISCIPLIN -R' RESE ARCH CENTERS ................. 5.
)A\I\ RIDGE ASSOC( I ATED LINI\ ERSITIES. .................. . 5
STU D ENT SER\ ICES ............. ....... ........... ......... 5
CAREER RESO URCE CENTER ......................... 5.
CO)LNSELING CENTER ..................................
ENGLISH SKILLS FOR INTERN -TI()N L STUDENTS ........... .. 0
GR ADU ATE STUDENT E-MAIL LISTSER\ AND \\EBSITE .... ... .
GRADUL -ATE NE\\SLETTER.............................. I
GR ADU ATE SCH )(OO)L EDITO(RI -L OFFICE ................... ..
GR-ADUATE SCH )(OO)L RECO)RDS .......................... .
GR ADUL ATE STUDENT COU)LNCIL. ........................ .
GR ADU ATE STUDENT H ANDB(OO)()I\ ....................... I
HOULSING ............................................ I
I~)L \ i iN.r H ) i .. ........ ............. .... .......
Resident e Hall, fior Sin'le S ltudenkl ........ ............ .6
Coo[eralike Lik i n i Ar-rinn em enl l ....................... .
Sinll fle G raCIlu.1I e mnil F.1m il\ Housin . . . . .. _
Sinl-Cme G us Lile and Fami.\ H..I. ......... .. ........ .
)ii-C( a1 III)L c Life . . . . . . . . . 2
)OMBLIDSM N ........................................ .i
RE -DING AND \\ RITING CENTER ..................... ..i
SPEECH AND HE ARING CLINIC ........................ 1..
STUDENT HE ~LTH CARE CENTER ..................... .. i
LIF INTERN -TI()N AL CENTER ........................... ..4
\\ OR SH()PS F()R TE ACHING ASSISTANTS. ................ ..4
FIELD S O)F IN STRLUCTIO N .................................. 5
ACC(O UN)LNTING ...................... ...... .. ......... -t.
AFRIC AN STLID IES .................... ....... ........ -I


LC.


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AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING ........... 72
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION. ....... 74
AGRICULTURE-GENERAL................................ 76
AG RO NO M Y.......................................... 76
ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY .......................... 78
ANIM AL SCIENCES ..................................... 78
ANTHRO PO LOGY ..................................... 80
APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY AND KINESIOLOGY ................. 83
A RCH ITECTU RE ....................................... 85
ART AND ART HISTORY ................................. 87
ASTRO NO M Y ......................................... 90
BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY ............... 91
BIOM EDICAL ENGINEERING ............................. 92
BO TA N Y ............................................. 94
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION ............................. 95
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-GENERAL .................... 97
CHEM ICAL ENGINEERING ............................... 98
C H EM ISTRY ........................................... 99
CIVIL AND COASTAL ENGINEERING ...................... 102
C LA SSIC S............................................ 105
CLINICAL AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY ................... 107
CLINICAL INVESTIGATION ........................... .. 108
COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS ............ 109
COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS .......................... 111
COM PARATIVE LAW ................................... 112
COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES
AND ENG INEERING ................................. 112
COUNSELOR EDUCATION.............................. 114
CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW .............................. 116
DECISION AND INFORMATION SCIENCES ................. 117
D ENTAL SCIENCES .................................... 119
ECO N O M ICS......................................... 121
EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND POLICY ............ 123
EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY .......................... 125
ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING. .............. 127
ENGINEERING-GENERAL............................... 130
EN G LISH ............................................ 130
ENTOMOLOGY AND NEMATOLOGY ..................... 131
ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCES. ............... 133
EPIDEMIOLOGY AND HEALTH POLICY RESEARCH .......... 136
FAMILY, YOUTH, AND COMMUNITY SCIENCES ............. 137
FINANCE, INSURANCE, AND REAL ESTATE ................. 138
FISHERIES AND AQUATIC SCIENCES ...................... 142
FOOD AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS. .................... 143
FOOD SCIENCE AND HUMAN NUTRITION ................ 144


I












Z



LJ


Z


INTERDIS( CIPLIN -R\ ECO( ()L)G
INTERIOR DESIGN ..........
INTERNATI()NAL BLUSINESS...
INTERN -TI()NAL T-\\ TI()N ..
L-\NDSC( APE -ARCHITECTLURE. .
LATIN AMIERICAN STUDIES .
LING L ISTICS ..............
M ANA-GEMIENT.............
1M ARKETING ...............
I -MASS C (-) IMM IL N ICATI-)N .
M-\TERIALS (SCIENCE AND ENG
IMATHEM AITICS ............
MIE(CH NICAL ENGINEERING. .
MIEDI(C\L SCIENCES .........
MIEDICIN L CHEMISTR. ......


-ND


. . .
... .. ....
. .. .. .....
. .. .....




INEERING1. .
. .. .. .....
. .. ......


MICRO)BIC)LO()G A-ND ( ELL SCIENCE ........
M(_-)LEC LLA R GENETICS AND MICRO)BIC)LO()G,
M1LSIC. ................................
NLC( LE AR AND RADI()L()GICAL ENGINEERING
N U R SIN G .. .. .. .. .. .. .
()(CC L-PATI()N -L THER -P'\ ................
C)R -L B IC)L( )G 1 .........................
PA-TH()L()CG IMMIUNC)L(O)G A-ND L-AB()R-AT(-
PH R/\MICELITICAL SCIENCES-GENERAL. ......
PH ARM\I ACELTICS .......................
PH ARM A( ()D' NAMl ICS ...................
PH -RIMC( )L(_)G AND THERAPELITICS ......
PH RM\ AC' HE LTH C( RE -ADMINISTR-\TIC)N.
PH ILO)SO)PH 1 ...........................
P H \ SI S .. .. .. .. .. .....
PH SI(C)LC)G A-ND FL'N( TI()N-AL GEN(C)IIC( S.
PL-\NT M(_-)LE( LL-R AND CELLLIL AR BIC)L(O)GC
PLANT P-THC)L(- )G, ......................
P()LITIC AL SC IEN C E ......................
PS' C H )L( )G 1 .. .. .. .. .. .


FOREST RESO)LURCES -ND C( )NSER\ ATI()N .
G EC)G R -PH \ .........................
GE()L(C)GIC AL SC IEN( ES .................
GERMINIC AND SL \ IC STUDIES .........
GERC)NTO)L(C)GIC AL STL DIES. .............
HE -LTH EDLC'( TI()N AND BEH \ I()R ..
HEALTH SER\ ICES RESEA-RCH MANAGEMIEN
H IS T( )R . . . . . . . .
H()RTICLILTLUR L SCIENCE ..............
INDL'STRI-AL AND S'iSTEMS ENGINEERING .


u.



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I 4;6
1418
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15 1
I 52
I 52
154


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1155
I 55
l55
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210



2IS


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212


IEDI(









PU BLIC H EALTH ...................................... 222
REA L ESTATE ......................................... 225
REHABILITATION COUNSELING ......................... 225
REHABILITATION SCIENCE.............................. 226
RELIG IO N ........................................... 227
ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES ............... 229
SO CIO LO G Y ......................................... 232
SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE ............................. 233
SPECIAL EDUCATIO N .................................. 235
STATISTIC S .......................................... 236
TA XATIO N ........................................... 239
TEACHING AND LEARNING............................. 240
THEATRE AND DANCE ................................. 244
TOURISM, RECREATION, AND SPORT MANAGEMENT. ....... 245
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING ...................... 247
VETERINARY MEDICAL SCIENCES ........................ 249
WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION ................ 251
W O M EN'S STUDIES ................................... 252
ZO O LO G Y .......................................... 253
IN D EX ................................................ 2 55


i.







OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION



BOARD OF EDUCATION OF FLORIDA


F. PHILIP HANDY
Chair, Winter Park

DONNA CALLAWAY
Tallahassee

T. WILLARD FAIR
Miami


KATHLEEN SHANAHAN
Tampa

ROBERTO MARTINEZ
Coral Gables

PHOEBE RAULERSON
Okeechobee


LINDA TAYLOR
Fort Myers

JOHN WINN
Commissioner


FLORIDA BOARD OF GOVERNORS


CAROLYN K. ROBERTS
Chair, Ocala

JOHN H. DASBURG
Vice Chair, Miami

JORGE ARRIZURIETA
Miami

AKSHAY M. DESAI
St. Petersburg

ANN W. DUNCAN
Tarpon Springs

CHARLES EDWARDS
Ft. Meyers


FRANK S. HARRISON
Tampa

J. STANELY MARSHALL
Tallahassee

FRANK MARTIN
Tallahassee

SHEILA M. MCDEVITT
Tampa

MARGARET LYNN PAPPAS
Jacksonville


MARTHA PELAEZ
Miami

HECTOR "TICO" PEREZ
Orlando

JOHN W. TEMPLE
Boca Raton

JOHN WINN
Tallahassee

ZACHARIAH P. ZACHARIAH
Ft. Lauderdale


AVA L. PARKER
Jacksonville


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOARD OF TRUSTEES


MANNY A. FERNANDEZ
Chair, Fort Myers

CARLOS ALFONSO
Tampa

C. DAVID BROWN II
Orlando

COURTNEY CUNNINGHAM
Coral Gables


JOHN BOYLES
Student Body President

W. A. MCGRIFF III
Jacksonville

JOELEN MERKEL
Boca Raton

DIANA F. MORGAN
Windermere


CYNTHIA O'CONNELL
Tallahassee

EARL POWELL
Miami

DANAYA WRIGHT
Chair, Faculty Senate

ALFRED C. WARRINGTON, IV
Houston, Texas


ROLAND DANIELS
Gainesville








UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

PRESIDENTS AND VICE
PRESIDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY
J. BERNARD MACHEN, Ph.D., D.D.S., President of the University
JANIE FOUKE, Ph.D., Provost and Senior Vice President for
Academic Affairs
JANE ADAMS, B.S., Vice President for University Relations
DOUGLAS J. BARRETT, M.D., Senior Vice President for Health
Affairs
KYLE CAVANAUGH, M.B.A., Vice President for Human Resource
Services
JIMMY GEARY CHEEK, Ph.D., Senior Vice President for Agriculture
and Natural Resources
WINFRED M. PHILLIPS, D.Sc., Vice President for Research
EDWARD J. POPPELL, M.Ed., Vice President for Finance and
Administration
PAUL A. ROBELL, M.A., Vice President for Development and
Alumni Affairs
PATRICIA TELLES-IRVIN, Ph.D., Vice President for Student Affairs
BARBARA C. WINGO, Ph.D., Interim Vice President, General
Counsel


DEANS AND OTHER
ADMINISTRATORS
LARRY R. ARRINGTON, Ph.D., Dean for Extension, Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences
R. KIRBY BARRICK, Ph.D., Dean, College of Agricultural and Life
Sciences
DALE CANELAS, M.A., Director, University Libraries
CARMEN DIANA DEERE, Ph.D., Director of Center for Latin
American Studies
TERESA A. DOLAN, D.D.S., M.P.H., Dean, College of Dentistry
STEVE DORMAN, Ph.D., Dean, College of Health and Human
Performance
CATHERINE EMIHOVICH, Ph.D., Dean, College of Education
ROBERT G. FRANK, Ph.D., Dean, College of Public Health and
Health Professions
KENNETH J. GERHARDT, Ph.D., Interim Dean, Graduate School
ROBERT JERRY II, J.D., Dean, Levin College of Law
DENNIS C. JETT, Ph.D., Dean, International Center
DOUGLAS S. JONES, Ph.D., Director, Florida Museum of Natural
History
PRAMOD P. KHARGONEKAR, Ph.D., Dean, College of Engineering
JAMES W. KNIGHT, Ed.D., Dean, Continuing Education
JOHN KRAFT, Ph.D., Dean, Warrington College of Business
Administration
LUCINDA LAVELLI, M.F.A., and M.N.O. (Master's degree in
Nonprofit Management) Dean, College of Fine Arts
KATHLEEN LONG, Ph.D., Dean, College of Nursing
MARK McLELLAN, Ph.D., Dean for Research, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences


REBECCA M. NAGY, Ph.D., Director, Ham Museum of Art
MILAGROS PENA, Ph.D., Director, Center for Women's Studies and
Gender Research
STEPHEN J. PRITZ, JR., B.S., University Registrar
WILLIAM RIFFEE, Ph.D., Dean, College of Pharmacy
CHRISTOPHER SILVER, Ph.D., Dean, College of Design,
Construction, and Planning
NEIL SULLIVAN, Ph.D., Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
JAMES P. THOMPSON, D.VM., Ph.D., Interim Dean, College of
Veterinary Medicine
C. CRAIG TISHER, M.D., Dean, College of Medicine
LEONARDO A. VILLALON, Ph.D., Director, Center for African
Studies
JOHN W. WRIGHT, II, Ph.D., Interim Dean, College of Journalism
and Communications
EUGENE L. ZDZIARSKI II, Ph.D., Dean of Students


GRADUATE SCHOOL
KENNETH J. GERHARDT, Ph.D. (Ohio State University), Interim
Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of Communication
Sciences and Disorders
LAURENCE B. ALEXANDER, J.D. (Tulane University), Interim
Associate Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of Journalism


GRADUATE COUNCIL
KENNETH J. GERHARDT (Chair), Ph.D. (Ohio State University),
Interim Dean of the Graduate School
H. JANE BROCKMAN, Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin), Professor of
Zoology
KENNETH L. CAMPBELL, Ph.D. (Iowa State University), Professor of
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
NICHOLAS B. COMERFORD, Ph.D. (State University of New York),
Professor of Soil and Water Science
EILEEN B. FENNELL, Ph.D. (University of Florida), Professor of
Clinical and Health Psychology
BRIDGET FRANKS, Ph.D. (University of Nebraska-Lincoln),
Associate Professor of Educational Psychology
ABRAHAM G. HARTZEMA, Ph.D. (University of Minnesota),
Eminent Scholar, Pharmacy Health Care Administration
LINDA L. HON, Ph.D. (University of Maryland), Professor of
Journalism and Communications
PANAGOTE M. PARDALOS, Ph.D. (University of Minnesota),
Distinguished Professor, Industrial and Systems Engineering
CYNTHIA PURANIK, Doctoral Student in Communication Science
and Disorders, Graduate Student Council Representative
DIETMAR W. SIEMANN, Ph.D. (University of Toronto), Professor of
Radiation Oncology and Pharmacology and Therapeutics
COLIN SUMNERS, Ph.D. (University of Southampton), Professor
and Program Director of Physiology and Functional Genomics
V. BETTY SMOCOVITIS, Ph.D. (Cornell University), Professor of
Zoology and History








DEADLINES (SHORT LIST)


Fall 2006

University deadlines
Registration ........................... ..... August 21-22
Classes start ............................ August 23
Degree application ....................... September 15
Midpoint of term ......................... October 19
Classes end ............................ Decem ber 6
Commencement .................... . December 15-16+
Graduate School deadlines
Dissertation first submission .................. October 16
Thesis first submission ...................... November 6
Final submission . . . . ...... December 4


Spring 2007

University deadlines
Registration ...................................... January 5
Classes start ...................................... January 8
Degree application ........................ February 2
Midpoint of term ................................... March 7
C lasses end ....................................... A pril 25
Commencement .......................... May 4-6+


Summer 2007

University deadlines
Summer A+C registration ....................... May 11
Summer A+C classes start ..................... May 14
Degree application .......................... . M ay 16
Summer A classes end ........................ June 22
Summer B registration ....................... ..... June 29
Sum m er B classes start ......................... . July 2
Late degree application ........................ ..... July 2
Midpoint of Summer term ....................... . July 2
Summer B+C classes end ..................... August 10
Commencement ......................... August 11 +
Graduate School deadlines for Summer 2007
Dissertation first subm mission ..................... . July 2
Thesis first submission ........................ July 18
Final subm mission ............... ................... August 1
+Tentative date. Notification of dates and times of ceremonies for col-
leges and schools will be sent to degree candidates as soon as plans
are finalized. Please do not anticipate exact dates and times until noti-
fication is received.
Note: Prospective students should contact the appropriate academic
department for admission application deadlines.


Graduate School deadlines
Dissertation first subm mission ................... . M arch 5
Thesis first subm mission ......................... . April 2
Final subm mission ............................ ..... A pril 23



DEADLINES (LONG LIST)


Fall 2006


2006


August 4, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline if requesting transfer of credit (for Fall degree candidates)
August 21-22, Monday-Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Registration
August 23, Wednesday
Classes start.
Drop/add starts.
Late registration starts (late fee assessed).
August 29, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Drop/add ends.
Late Registration ends (late fee assessed).
Deadline to withdraw with no fee liability.
September 1, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payment deadline.
Residency reclassification deadline for receiving the request and all
documents.
September 4, Monday, Labor Day
No classes.
September 15, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol assigned).
Degree application deadline (222 Criser) for degree award this term.
October 6-7, Friday-Saturday, Homecoming*
No classes. *Tentative date.
October 16 Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Dissertation first submission to Graduate School Editorial Office
(160 Grinter) for review ii r. .. I ih. .. r I.. l I .. if-files/
checklist-dissertation.pdf
October 19, Thursday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying examination.
Late degree application deadline (222 Criser) for degree award this
term (college Dean's signature needed).


November 6, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Thesis first submission (defended, signed, formatted, on paper) to
Editorial (160 Grinter) for review. mii. r .. i .. I r .i .. 1i ../
pdf-files/checklist-thesis.pdf
Abstracts deadline for Fine Arts' performance and project option
(Editorial, 160 Grinter)
November 10, Friday, Veterans Day
No classes.
November 23-24, Thursday-Friday, Thanksgiving
No classes.
December 4, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Final exam form deadline (Editorial, 160 Grinter) for dissertation or
thesis degree award.
Final exam form deadline (Records, 106 Grinter) for nonthesis
degree award.
Final submission of thesis or dissertation. Deadline for "Final
Clearance" status in the Editorial Document Management (EDM)
system, to qualify for degree award this term.
December 6, Wednesday
Classes end.
December 7-8, Thursday-Friday
Examination reading days (no classes).
December 9-15, Saturday-Friday
Final examinations.
December 15, Friday
Last day to drop a course and receive W on transcript
December 15-16, Friday-Saturday
Commencement
December 18, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Fall 2006 must be in the Registrar's office
December 19, Tuesday
Degree certification


I









Spring 2007

2006
December 6, Wednesday
Deadline if requesting transfer of credit (for Spring degree candi-
dates)
2007
January 5, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Registration
January 8, Monday
Classes start.
Drop/add starts.
Late registration starts (late fee assessed).
January 12, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Drop/add ends.
Late Registration ends (late fee assessed).
Deadline to withdraw with no fee liability.
January 15, Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day
No classes.
January 19, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payment deadline.
Residency reclassification deadline for receiving the request and all
documents.
February 2, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Degree application deadline (222 Criser) for degree award this term.
Deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol assigned).
March 5, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Dissertation first submission to Graduate School Editorial Office
(160 Grinter) for review. For checklist: 1ii. _r .. i ,. ...i r ,. .,i
edu/pdf-files/checklist-dissertation.pdf
March 7, Wednesday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying examinations.
Late degree application deadline (222 Criser) for degree award this
term (college Dean's signature needed).
March 10-17, Saturday-Saturday, Spring Break
No classes.
April 2, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Abstracts deadline for Fine Arts' performance and project option
(Editorial, 160 Grinter).
Thesis first submission (defended, signed, formatted, on paper) to
Editorial (160 Grinter) for review 1ii. _r .i i. .i r i. i f-
files/checklist-thesis.pdf
April 23, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Final exam form deadline (Editorial, 160 Grinter) for dissertation or
thesis degree award.
Final exam form deadline (Records, 106 Grinter) for nonthesis
degree award.
Final submission of thesis or dissertation. Deadline for "Final
Clearance" status in the Editorial Document Management (EDM)
system, to qualify for degree award this term.
April 25, Wednesday
Classes end.
April 26-27, Thursday-Friday
Examination reading days (no classes).
April 28-May 4, Saturday-Friday
Final examinations.
May 4, Friday
Last day to drop a course and receive W on transcript.
May 4-6, Friday-Sunday
Commencement+
May 7, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Spring 2007 must be in the Registrar's office.
May 8, Tuesday
Degree certification.


Summer 2007

April 25, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline if requesting transfer of credit (for Summer degree candi-
dates)
May 11, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer A & C registration
May 14, Monday
Summer A & C classes start.
Summer A & C drop/add starts.
Summer A & C late registration starts (late fee assessed).
May 15, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer A & C late registration ends (late fee assessed).
Summer A & C drop/add ends.
Summer A & C deadline to withdraw with no fee liability.
May 16, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Degree application deadline (222 Criser) for Summer degree award.
May 23, Wednesday
Summer A deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol

May 25, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Summer A & C fee payment deadline.
Summer A & C residency reclassification deadline for receiving the
request and all documents.
May 28, Monday, Memorial Day observed
No classes.
June 1, Friday
Summer C deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol

June 22, Friday
Summer A classes end.
Summer A final examinations during regular class periods.
Last day to drop a course for Summer A and receive W on transcript.
June 25, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Summer A must be in the Registrar's office.
June 25-29, Monday-Friday, Summer Break
No classes
June 29, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer B registration.
July 2, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer B classes start.
Summer B drop/add starts.
Summer B late registration starts (late fee assessed).
Midpoint of Summer term
Late degree application deadline (222 Criser) for Summer degree
award (college Dean's signature needed).
Dissertation first submission to Graduate School Editorial Office
(160 G rinter) for review ,ii, _r Ii i ., .I r_ ri i, I if-files/
checklist-dissertation.pdf
July 3, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer B drop/add ends.
Summer B late registration ends (late fee assessed).
Summer B deadline to withdraw with no fee liability.
July 4, Wednesday, Independence Day
No classes.
July 11, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer B deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol

July 13, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Summer B fee payment deadline.
Summer B residency reclassification deadline for receiving the
request and all documents.
July 18, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Abstracts deadline for Fine Arts' performance and project option
(Editorial, 160 Grinter).
Thesis first submission (defended, signed, formatted, on paper) to
Editorial (160 G rinter) for review ii1 _r .i i .. .i r- ,.nri., i ..i if-
files/checklist-thesis.pdf









August 1, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Final exam form deadline (Editorial, 160 Grinter) for dissertation or
thesis degree award.
Final exam form deadline (Records, 106 Grinter) for nonthesis
degree award.
Final submission of thesis or dissertation. Deadline for "Final
Clearance" status in the Editorial Document Management (EDM)
system, to qualify for Summer degree award.
August 10, Friday
Classes end.
Final examinations during regular class periods.
Last day to drop a course for Summer B and C terms and receive W
on transcript.
August 11, Saturday
Commencement+
August 13, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Summer B and C terms must be in the Registrar's
office.
August 14, Tuesday
Degree certification.

NOTE: Prospective students should contact the appropriate aca-
demic department for admission application deadlines.

Students who must take a foreign language reading knowledge
examination (GSFLT) should contact the Office of Academic
Technology for test dates.

+ Projected dates. Notification of dates and times of ceremonies for
colleges and schools will be sent to degree candidates as soon as
plans are finalized. Please do not anticipate exact dates and times
until notification is received.




















General Information


I I


I I





GENERAL INFORMATION


Rules, policies, fees, and courses described in
this catalog are subject to change without notice.





INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE
3


UNIVERSITY OF

FLORIDA







Institutional Purpose Teaching is a fundamental purpose of this university at
both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Research and
The University of Florida is a public land-grant, scholarship are integral to the education process and to
sea-grant, and space-grant research university, one of the the expansion of our understanding of the natural world,
most comprehensive in the United States. The university the intellect and the senses. Service reflects the university's
encompasses virtually all academic and professional obligation to share the benefits of its research and
disciplines. It is the largest and oldest of Florida's eleven knowledge for the public good.
universities and a member of the Association of American These three interlocking elements span all of the
Universities. Its faculty and staff are dedicated to the university's academic disciplines and represent the
common pursuit of the university's threefold mission: university's commitment to lead and serve the state
teaching, research, and service, of Florida, the nation and the world by pursuing and
disseminating new knowledge while building upon the
experiences of the past. The University of Florida aspires
Mission to advance by strengthening the human condition and
improving the quality of life.
The University of Florida is a public land-grant,
sea-grant and space-grant research university, one of the
most comprehensive in the United States. The university Commitment to Diversity
encompasses virtually all academic and professional
disciplines. It is the largest and oldest of Florida's eleven The University of Florida is committed to creating a
universities and a member of the Association of American community that reflects the rich racial, cultural, and ethnic
Universities. Its faculty and staff are dedicated to the diversity of the state and nation. The greatest challenge
common pursuit of the university's threefold mission: in higher education is to enroll students and hire faculty
teaching, research and service. and staff who are members of diverse racial, cultural,
The University of Florida belongs to a tradition of or ethnic minority groups. This pluralism enriches the
great universities. Together with our undergraduate and University community, offers opportunity for robust
graduate students, UF faculty participate in an educational academic dialogue, and contributes to better teaching and
process that links the history of Western Europe with the research. The University and its components benefit from
traditions and cultures of all societies, explores the physical the richness of a multicultural student body, faculty, and
and biological universes, and nurtures generations of young staff who can learn from one another. Such diversity will
people from diverse backgrounds to address the needs of empower and inspire respect and understanding among us.
our societies. The university welcomes the full exploration The University does not tolerate the actions of anyone who
of its intellectual boundaries and supports its faculty and violates the rights of another person.
students in the creation of new knowledge and the pursuit Through policy and practice, the University strives to
of new ideas. embody a diverse community. Our collective efforts will
lead to a university that is truly diverse and reflects the state
and nation.






GENERAL INFORMATION


Government of the University

A 13-member Board of Trustees governs the University
of Florida. The governor appoints 6 of the trustees, and
5 are appointed by the 17-member Florida Board of
Governors, which governs the State University System as a
whole. The University's student body president and faculty
senate chair also serve on the Board of Trustees as ex officio
members. Trustees are appointed for staggered 5-year
terms.
The UF Board of Trustees is a public body corporate
with all the powers and duties set forth by law and by
the Board of Governors. The UF President serves as the
executive officer and corporate secretary of the Board of
Trustees and is responsible to the Board for all operations
of the University. University affairs are administered by the
President through the University administration, with the
help and advice of the Faculty Senate, various committees
appointed by the President, and other groups or individuals
as requested by the President.


Graduate Deans and
Years of Service

February 2004 to Present
Kenneth J. Gerhardt, Interim Dean

1999-2004
Winfred M. Phillips, Dean

1998-1999
M. Jack Ohanian, Interim Dean

1993-1998
Karen A. Holbrook, Dean

July-September 1993
Gene W. Hemp, Acting Dean

1985-1993
Madelyn M. Lockhart, Dean

1983-1985
Donald R. Price, Acting Dean

September 1982-January 1983
Gene W. Hemp, Acting Dean

1980-1982
Francis G. Stehli, Dean

1979-1980
F. Michael Wahl, Acting Dean

1973-1979
Harry H. Sisler, Dean

1971-1973
Alex G. Smith, Acting Dean

1969-1971
Harold P. Hanson, Dean

1952-1969
L. E. Grinter, Dean

1951-1952
C. F. Byers, Acting Dean

1938-1951
T. M. Simpson, Dean

1930-1938
James N. Anderson, Dean





GRADUATE SCHOOL
5


Graduate School


Mission

Graduate education is an integral component of a major
research university that impacts education at all levels.
The mission of graduate education at UF is to produce
individuals with advanced knowledge in their fields, who
appreciate learning and are constant learners, and who are
prepared to address creatively issues of significance to the
local and global community for improving the quality of
life. Essential to this mission is an environment that fosters
*Effectively transmitting knowledge for future generations.
*Inquiry and critical analysis.
*Assimilation and creation of new knowledge.
*Skills contributing to success and leadership in academic and
creative arenas and in the world of practice.
*Applying that knowledge in service to Florida, the nation,
and the international community.


Vision

The vision is a university internationally recognized for
its graduates, Graduate Faculty, and scholarly achievements.
This university produces intellectually energized individuals
who excel at future careers in diverse settings, and who
provide bold leadership in new directions. Important signs
of this recognition include
*Graduates recognized for strength of preparation in their
chosen discipline, for abilities to solve problems in new
environments, and for high standards of excellence in
scholarly activity and professional practice.
*Significant scholarly, creative achievements and service
that contribute to improvement of human society and the
natural environment.
*A highly qualified, diverse student population.
*Strong disciplinary and interdisciplinary programs that pre-
pare graduates to assume their roles in a changing world.
*Evidence of service in their disciplines by students and fac-
ulty at state, national, and international levels.


Organization

The Graduate School consists of the Dean, Associate
Dean, Graduate Council, and the Graduate Faculty.
General policies and standards of the Graduate School
are established by the Graduate Faculty. Any policy
change must be approved by the graduate dean(s) and the
Graduate Council. The Graduate School is responsible for
enforcing minimum general standards of graduate work in
the University and for coordinating the graduate programs
of the various colleges and divisions of the University.
Responsibility for detailed operation of graduate programs


is vested in individual colleges, schools, divisions, and
academic units. In most colleges an associate dean or other
administrator is directly responsible for graduate study in
that college.
The Graduate Council helps the Dean in being the
agent of the Graduate Faculty for executing policy related
to graduate study and associated research. The Council
(chaired by the graduate dean) considers petitions and
policy changes. A graduate program's academic unit
appoints members of the Graduate Faculty, with approval
of the graduate dean.
All faculty members who serve on supervisory
committees or who direct master's theses and doctoral
dissertations must first be appointed to the Graduate
Faculty. The academic unit determines the level of duties
for each Graduate Faculty member.


History

Graduate study at UF existed while the University was
still on its Lake City campus. However, the first graduate
degrees, two Master of Arts with a major in English, were
awarded on the Gainesville campus in 1906. The first
Master of Science was awarded in 1908, with a major in
entomology. The first programs leading to the Ph.D. were
approved in 1930, and the first degrees were awarded in
1934, one with a major in chemistry and the other with a
major in pharmacy. The first Ed.D. was awarded in 1948.
Graduate study has grown phenomenally at UF In 1930,
33 degrees were awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 degrees
were awarded in 16 fields. In 2004-05, the total number
of graduate degrees awarded was 1103 in more than 100
fields. The proportion of Ph.D. degrees, after the initial
rapid growth, remained relatively static during the early
1980s but increased significantly between 1987-88 and
1993-94, growing from 304 to 424. In 2004-05, the
University of Florida awarded 553 Ph.D. degrees.


Definitions

Degree: the title conferred by the University on
completing the academic program, for example, Doctor
of Philosophy. Some degrees include the name of the field
of study (Master of Architecture, Master of Education).
Others (Master of Arts, Master of Science) do not.
Program: the student's primary field of study. This is the
student's major. Programs offered at UF are approved by
the Graduate Council, Faculty Senate, Board of Trustees,
and Florida Board of Governors (specialist and doctoral
degrees). The degree and program name appear on the
student's transcript. Available programs are identified
under the degree name in the list of graduate degrees and
programs.






GENERAL INFORMATION


Concentration: a subprogram in a major.
Concentrations offered at UF are approved by the
Graduate Council. The concentration, degree, and
program, may appear on the student transcript.
Minor: a block of course work completed in any
academic unit outside the major, if approved for master's
or doctoral programs listed in this catalog. If a minor
is chosen, the supervisory committee must include a
representative from the minor field. Requires at least 6 to
15 credits from the minor, depending on the program. The
minor appears on the student's transcript along with the
program name and the degree awarded.
Specialization: Specialization is an informal designation
used by academic units to indicate areas of research or
scholarly strength, and has no formal significance. Track
and emphasis are similar unofficial terms. No tracks,
emphases, or specializations appear in official lists in this
catalog or on the student transcript.
Graduate certificate: An academic unit may offer a
graduate certificate along with a graduate degree. The
certificate indicates that the student took a required
number of courses in a special area. It requires Graduate
Council approval but is not listed on the student
transcript.
Multi-college program: a degree program offered
through more than one college.
Combined degree program: a combined bachelor's
and master's degree program allows an undergraduate
student to take graduate courses before completing the
bachelor's degree and to count 12 graduate credits toward
both degrees. Students admitted into a combined program
normally have at least a 3.2 grade point average and a score
of at least 1100 on the verbal and quantitative parts of
the GRE. Academic units may establish higher admission
standards. Individual academic units determine whether
a combined degree program is appropriate. Combined
degree programs established before January 1, 2003, may
have other requirements.
Cooperative degree program: leads to a graduate
degree with more than one institution authorized to
provide course work.
Catalog year: the rules in effect during the first year
a degree-seeking student enrolls in a program: the set of
requirements a student must fulfill. If the student takes
time off, then the catalog year is the academic year of
readmission.
Joint degree program: a course of study that leads
simultaneously to a graduate degree and a professional
degree (i.e., DMD, DVM, JD, MD, PharmD). Normally
12 credits of professional courses are counted toward
the graduate degree and 12 credits of graduate courses
are counted toward the professional degree. Individual
academic units determine whether a joint degree program
is appropriate. Joint programs established before January 1,
2003, may have other requirements.
Concurrent degree program: Simultaneous study on
an individualized basis that leads to two master's degrees in
two different graduate programs or two master's degrees in
the same major. Such a program is initiated by the student


and requires prior approval of each academic unit and the
Graduate School. If the student is approved to pursue two
master's degrees, no more than 9 credits of course work
from one degree program may be applied toward the second
master's degree.
Co-major: a course of study allowing two majors for
one Ph.D. degree. Each co-major must be approved by the
Graduate Council.


Graduate Degrees and Programs

See Fields of Instruction for specializations in the approved
programs.

T=thesis or dissertation N=nonthesis or no dissertation
Degree names and correct abbreviations are listed in
bold.
Possible majors (if different than the degree name) are
listed in normal type.
Possible concentrations are listed under the major in italics.

Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) N
Master of Advertising (M.Adv.) T
Master of Agribusiness (M.AB.) N
Food and Resource Economics
Master of Agriculture (M.Ag.) N
Agricultural Education and Communication
Animal Sciences
Botany
Food and Resource Economics
Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) T
Sustainable Architecture
Master of Arts (MA.)
AnthropologyT N
Art Education T
Art HistoryT
Business Administration
Finance
InsuranceT
International BusinessT
Management
Marketing TN
Classical StudiesT
Communication Sciences and Disorders TN
Criminology and Law TN
Digital Arts and Sciences T
Economics T/N
English TN
French TN
Geography T
Applications of Geographic Technologies
German TN
History TN
International Business T
Latin T









Latin American Studies T
Linguistics nTN
Mathematics TN
Museology [Museum Studies] T
Philosophy TN
Political Science TN
Political Science-International Relations T/N
Psychology TN
ReligionT
Sociology T/N
Spanish T/N
Women's Studies T
Master of Arts in Education T Majors are those listed for
the Master of Education degree.
Master of Arts in Mass Communication (M.AmC.) TN
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) N
Anthropology
French
Geography
Latin
Latin American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Philosophy
Political Science
Political Science-International Relations
Psychology
Spanish
Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning
(M.A.U.R.P.) T
Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.) N
Sustainable Construction
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) N
Arts Administration
Business S- .-. i and Public Policy
Competitive S- .-. .
Decision and Information Sciences
Electronic Commerce
Entrepreneurship
Finance
Global Management
C .'- -.. f/. Security Analysis
Human Resource Management
International Studies
Latin American Business
Management
Marketing
Real Estate and Urban Analysis
Sports Administration
Master of Civil Engineering (M.C.E.) TN
Master of Education (M.Ed.) N
Curriculum and Instruction
Early Childhood Education
Educational Leadership
Educational Psychology


GRADUATE DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
7
Elementary Education
English Education
Foundations of Education
Marriage and Family Counseling
Mathematics Education
Mental Health Counseling
Reading Education
Research and Evaluation Methodology
School Counseling and Guidance
School Psychology
Science Education
Social Studies Education
Special Education
Student Personnel in Higher Education
Master of Engineering (M.E.) TN
Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Master of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences
(M.F.Y.C.S.) N
Community Studies
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) T
Art
Creative Writing
Theatre
Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (M.F.A.S.) N
Master of Forest Resources and Conservation (M.ER.C.) N
Geomatics
Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.) N
Master of Health Science (M.H.S.) TN
Occupational Therapy
Rehabilitation Counseling
Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.) T
Master of International Construction Management
(M.I.C.M.) N
Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) T
Master of Latin (M.L.) N
Master of Laws in Comparative Law (LL.M.Comp.Law) N
Tropical Conservation and Development
Master of Laws in International Taxation (LL.M.I.T.) N
Master of Laws in Taxation (LL.M.Tax.) N
Master of Music (M.M.) T
Music
Choral Conducting
Composition
Instrumental Conducting






GENERAL INFORMATION


Music History and Literature
Music Theory
Performance
Sacred Music
Music Education
Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.) N
Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) N
Biostatistics
Environmental Health
Epidemiology
Public Health Management and Policy
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Master of Science (M.S.)
Aerospace Engineering T/N
Agricultural and Biological Engineering T/N
Agricultural Education and Communication T/N
Farming Systems
Agronomy T/N
Animal Sciences T
Applied Physiology and Kinesiology T/N
Athletic Ta' i,u, ug Spow t Medicine
Biomechanics
Clinical Exercise P.'- '.. -,
Exercise F.'- '.. ..-
Human Performance
Motor Ler ii:'g Control
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Astronomy T/N
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology T
Biomedical Engineering T/N
Botany T
Business Administration T/N
Entrepreneurship
Insurance
Marketing
Real Estate and Urban Analysis
Retailing
Chemical Engineering TN
Chemistry T/N
Civil Engineering T/N
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering T/N
Computer Engineering T/N
Computer Science T/N
Decision and Information Sciences TN
Dental Sciences T
Endodontics
Orthodontics
Periodontics
Prosthodontics
Digital Arts and Sciences T
Electrical and Computer Engineering T/N
Entomology and Nematology T/N
Environmental Engineering Sciences T/N
Epidemiology T
Biostatistics


Health Policy
Family, Youth, and Community Sciences T
Community Studies
Finance N
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences T
Food and Resource Economics TN
Food Science and Human Nutrition TN
Nutritional Sciences
Forest Resources and Conservation T
Geomatics
Geography T
Geology T
Health Education and Behavior T/N
Horticultural Science TN
Environmental Horticulture
Horticultural Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering T/N
Interdisciplinary Ecology TN
ManagementT/N
Materials Science and Engineering T/N
Mathematics T/N
Mechanical Engineering T/N
Medical Sciences T
Clinical Investigation
Microbiology and Cell Science T/N
Nuclear Engineering Sciences T/N
Physics TN
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology T
Plant Pathology TN
Psychology T/N
Real Estate
Recreation, Parks, and Tourism TN
Soil and Water Science T/N
Sport ManagementTN
Veterinary Medical Sciences TN
Forensic Toxicology
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation TN
Zoology T/N
Master of Science in Architectural Studies (M.S.A.S.) T
Sustainable Architecture
Master of Science in Building Construction (M.S.B.C.) T
Sustainable Construction
Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.Nsg.) TN
Master of Science in Pharmacy (M.S.P.) TN
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Forensic Drug Chemistry
Forensic Serology and DNA
Medicinal Chemistry
Pharmacodynamics
Pharmacy
Pharmacy Health Care Administration
Master of Science in Statistics (M.S.Stat.) T
Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.) N
Astronomy
Botany
Chemistry









Geography
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Psychology
Zoology
Master of Statistics (M.Stat.) N
Master ofWomen's Studies (M.W.S.) N
Engineer (Engr.)"N A special degree requiring 1 year of
graduate work beyond the master's degree. For a list of
the approved majors, see those listed for the Master of
Engineering degree, except Biomedical Engineering.
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) N A special degree requir-
ing 1 year of graduate work beyond the master's degree.
For a list of the approved programs, see those listed for the
Doctor of Education degree.
Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) N
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) T
Curriculum and Instruction
Educational Leadership
Educational Psychology
Foundations of Education
Higher Education Administration
Marriage and Family Counseling
Mental Health Counseling
Research and Evaluation ', r..1. d....1..
School Counseling and Guidance
School Psychology
Special Education
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) T
Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Agricultural Education and Communication
Agronomy
Animal Sciences
Anthropology
Art History
Astronomy
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Biomedical Engineering
Botany
Business Administration
Accounting
Decision and Information Sciences
Finance
Insurance
Management
Marketing
Real Estate and Urban Analysis
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Classical Studies
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Communication Sciences and Disorders


GRADUATE DEGREES AND PROGRAMS
9
Computer Engineering
Counseling Psychology
Criminology and Law
Curriculum and Instruction
Design, Construction, and Planning
Economics
Educational Leadership
Educational Psychology
Electrical and Computer Engineering
English
Entomology and Nematology
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Food and Resource Economics
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Food Science
Nutritional Sciences
Forest Resources and Conservation
Geomatics
Foundations of Education
Geography
Geology
German
Health and Human Performance
Athletic Ti, z, n, g Sport Medicine
Biomechanics
Exercise '.,.
Health Behavior
Motor La',i 'ig -' Control
Natural Resource Recreation
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Sport Management
Therapeutic Recreation
Tourism
Health Services Research
Higher Education Administration
History
Horticultural Science
Environmental Horticulture
Horticulture Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Interdisciplinary Ecology
Linguistics
Marriage and Family Counseling
Mass Communication
Materials Science and Engineering
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Medical Sciences
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Genetics
Immunology and Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience
P ,'T ..,'..'.-, and .' ..






GENERAL INFORMATION
10
Mental Health Counseling
Microbiology and Cell Science
Music
Composition
Music History and Literature
Music Education
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Nursing Sciences
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Medicinal Chemistry
Pharmacodynamics
Pharmacy
Pharmacy Health Care Administration
Philosophy
Physics
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Psychology
Clinical Psychology
Psychology
Rehabilitation Science
Religious Studies
Research and Evaluation I.- ... rl...:
Romance Languages
French
Spanish
School Counseling and Guidance
School Psychology
Sociology
Soil and Water Science
Special Education
Statistics
Veterinary Medical Sciences
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
Zoology
Doctor of Plant Medicine (D.Pm) N


Nontraditional Programs


Concurrent Graduate Programs
Any student interested in pursuing two master's degrees
in two different programs or two master's degrees in the
same program concurrently should discuss the proposed
study with Graduate Student Records (392-4643, 106
Grinter) before applying. Written approval is needed
from each academic unit and the Graduate School Dean.
The student must be officially admitted to both programs
through regular procedures. No more than 9 credits
from the first program may be applied toward the second.
Contact the academic unit(s) for details.


Joint Degree Programs
A joint degree program leads to a graduate degree and
a professional degree. Normally 12 credits of professional
courses count toward the graduate degree and 12 credits
of graduate courses count toward the professional degree.
Individual academic units determine whether a joint
degree program is appropriate. Joint programs established
before January 1, 2003, may have other requirements.
To participate in a joint program, a student must be
admitted to both programs. Enrollment in one program
may precede enrollment in the other according to timelines
set by the program. During the term the student is
graduating, registration is required (at least 3 credits fall
or spring, or 2 credits summer). This course work must be
credit that applies toward the graduate degree requirements.
See graduate coordinator for details.


Combined Bachelor's/Master's Degree
Programs
UF offers a number of bachelor's/master's programs for
superior students in which 12 credits of graduate-level
courses are counted for both degrees. See Transfer of Credit
for requirements. For admission requirements and available
programs, contact the academic unit.


State University System Programs
Traveling Scholar program: By mutual agreement
of the appropriate academic authorities in both the
home and host institutions, traveling scholars' admission
requirements are waived and their earned credits are
guaranteed acceptance. Traveling scholars are normally
limited to 1 term on the host campus, and it cannot be
their final term. The program offers special resources on
another campus that are not available on the student's
home campus. To participate, graduate students need prior
approval from their graduate coordinator, their supervisory
committee chair, and the Dean of the Graduate School.
Interested students should contact Graduate Student
Records, 106 Grinter Hall.
Cooperative degree programs: In certain degree
programs, faculty from other universities in the State
University System hold Graduate Faculty status at UE In
those approved areas, the intellectual resources of these
Graduate Faculty members are available to students at UF.


Interdisciplinary Graduate
Certificates and Concentrations

A number of graduate programs offer interdisciplinary
enhancements in the form of concentrations, field research,
or graduate certificates. Those approved by the Graduate
Council are summarized on the next pages.









African Studies
The Center for African Studies, a National Resource
Center on Africa (funded partly by Title VI of the Higher
Education Act), directs and coordinates interdisciplinary
instruction, research, and outreach related to Africa. In
cooperation with participating academic units throughout
the University, the Center offers a Certificate in African
Studies for master's and doctoral students. The curriculum
provides a broad foundation for students preparing for
teaching or other professional careers requiring knowledge
of Africa.
Graduate fellowships and assistantships: Students
pursuing degrees in participating academic units can
compete for graduate assistantships and Title VI Foreign
Language and Area Studies fellowships.
Extracurricular activities: The Center for African
Studies sponsors the annual Carter Lectures on Africa on a
given theme, a weekly colloquium series (BARAZA) with
invited speakers, an African film series, and periodic brown
bag discussions. Other conferences and lectures, and
performances and art exhibits in conjunction with other
campus units, are held throughout the academic year.
The Center also directs an extensive outreach program
addressed to public schools, community colleges, and
universities nationwide.
Library resources: The Center for African Studies gives
direct support for African library acquisitions to meet the
instructional and research needs of its faculty and students.
The Africana Collection exceeds 120,000 volumes and
500 periodicals. The Map Library has 360,000 maps and
165,000 serial photographs and satellite images and is
among the top five academic African map libraries in the
U.S.
Graduate certificate program: The Center for African
Studies, cooperating with participating academic units,
offers a Certificate in African Studies in conjunction with
the master's and doctoral degrees.
For more information about the various programs and
activities of the Center, contact the Director, Center for
African Studies, 427 Grinter Hall, website http://www.
africa.ufl.edu.


Agroforestry

The agroforestry interdisciplinary concentration is
administered through the School of Forest Resources
and Conservation. It offers facilities for interdisciplinary
graduate education (M.S., Ph.D.) by combining course
work and research around a thematic field focusing on
agroforestry, especially in the context of tropical land use.
Students seeking admission to the concentration need
a degree in a relevant field such as agronomy, forestry,
horticulture, soil science, or social sciences. They should
apply to the School of Forest Resources and Conservation
or another academic unit that closely represents their
background and interest. Course work may be chosen
from several related disciplines. Thesis research can be


NONTRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
11
undertaken in Florida or overseas. Degrees are awarded
through the academic units the candidates are enrolled in.
In conjunction with the graduate degree, a student can
earn a concentration or minor in agroforestry by fulfilling
certain requirements. Students who have a primary interest
in agroforestry and undertake graduate research on an
agroforestry topic can seek the concentration. Those who
have an active interest and some training in agroforestry,
but do not conduct graduate research on an agroforestry
topic, can earn a minor. Candidates meeting the
requirements can have Concentration in Agroforestry or
Minor in Agroforestry appear on their transcripts.
Each option requires completing FNR 5335
(Agroforestry) and an appropriate number of approved
supporting courses. These courses should be distributed
over at least two academic units outside the major to
prepare the student to function in multidisciplinary teams
and to associate with professionals from other disciplines.
Students whose background is in biology are encouraged
to take social science courses, and vice versa.
For a student with a concentration or minor in
agroforestry, at least one member of the supervisory
committee should represent agroforestry. The Agroforestry
Program Advisory Committee requires this member to
counsel the student on selecting courses and the research
topic.
For more information, contact the Agroforestry Program
Leader, 330 Newins-Ziegler Hall, phone (352)846-0880,
fax (352)846-1322, e-mail pknair@ufl.edu.


Animal Molecular and Cell Biology
The interdisciplinary concentration in animal molecular
and cell biology (AMCB) gives graduate students in
the animal and veterinary sciences an understanding of
principles of molecular and cell biology as applied to
animal health and production. It emphasizes participation
in molecular and cell biology research and provides an
intellectual environment for cross-fertilization among
disciplines. Graduate Faculty from the Departments of
Animal Sciences, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
Chemistry, and the College of Veterinary Medicine
participate in the program. The AMCB gives graduate
students access to the diverse research facilities needed to
study cellular and molecular biology, reproductive biology,
virology, immunology, and endocrinology. Facilities exist
for recombinant DNA research, experimental surgery, in
vitro culture of cells, tissue and organ explants, embryo
manipulation, vaccine production, and recombinant
protein engineering.
Ph.D. degrees are awarded by participating academic
units, with an interdisciplinary concentration in animal
molecular and cell biology. Applicants need a strong
background in animal or veterinary sciences. Graduate
degree programs are designed by each student's supervisory
committee, headed by the member who represents AMCB.
All students must complete a core curriculum, may obtain
cross-disciplinary training through rotations in laboratories






GENERAL INFORMATION
12
of participating faculty, and may participate in the AMCB
seminar series.
Requirements for admission to AMCB are the same
as for the faculty adviser's academic unit and college.
Graduate assistantships and fellowships are available from
sources in individual academic units and the AMCB.
For more information, contact Dr. Peter J. Hansen,
Department of Animal Sciences, hansen@animal.ufl.edu.


Biological Sciences

The Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research
conducts research on all aspects of the biology of sea
turtles. Researchers at the Center for Sea Turtle Research,
collaborating with students and faculty of various academic
units, take a multidisciplinary approach to address the
complex problems of sea turtle biology and conservation.
Scientists from the Center have investigated questions of
sea turtle biology around the world, from the molecular
level to the ecosystem level, from studies of population
structure based on mitochondrial DNA to the effects
of ocean circulation patterns on the movements and
distribution of sea turtles. Long-term field studies of the
Center are conducted mainly at two research stations in the
Bahamas and the Azores. For more information, contact
the Director, Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research,
223 Bartram Hall, phone (352)392-5194, website
http://accstr.ufl.edu.
The Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience
is a UF research center for biomedical research and
biotechnology. Founded in 1974, the Whitney Lab is
dedicated to using marine model animals for studying
fundamental problems in biology and applying that
knowledge to issues of human health, natural resources,
and the environment.
The academic staff of the Whitney Laboratory consists
of eight tenure-track and three nontenure-track faculty
members, together with 70 associates, students, and visiting
scientists. Dr. Peter A. V. Anderson is the director.
Fields of research conducted at the Whitney
Laboratory include chemosensory and visual physiology
and biochemistry, ion channel structure and function,
neurogenomics, synaptogenesis and synaptic physiology,
protein-lipid interactions, physiology and evolution
of neurotransmitter pathways, membrane pumps and
transporters, and regulation of ciliary mechanisms. This
research uses the techniques of modern cell and molecular
biology, for which the Laboratory is particularly well
equipped and recognized.
Research at Whitney Laboratory attracts graduate
students and scientists from all over the United States
and abroad. Students enroll in the graduate programs of
academic units on campus and complete their course work
before moving to the Whitney Laboratory, where they
conduct their dissertation research under the supervision of
resident faculty. An NSF undergraduate research training
program at the Whitney Laboratory is also available for 10-
week periods.


The Laboratory is situated on a narrow barrier island
with both the Atlantic Ocean and the Intracoastal
Waterway within a few hundred feet of the facility. It
is located in Marineland, about 18 miles south of St.
Augustine and 80 miles from Gainesville.
For more information, contact the Director, Whitney
Laboratory for Marine Bioscience, 9505 Ocean Shore
Blvd, St. Augustine FL 32080-8610,
phone (904)461-4000; fax (904)461-4008;
website http://www.whitney.ufl.edu.
The UF Marine Laboratory at Seahorse Key is a field
station providing (a) support for research by students,
faculty, and visiting scientists; (b) an outstanding teaching
program in marine related subjects; and (c) support
from public education related to marine, estuarine, and
coastal resources of Florida. Seahorse Key is 57 miles west
of Gainesville on the Gulf Coast, 3 miles offshore and
opposite Cedar Key. Facilities include a research vessel,
several smaller outboard-powered boats for shallow water
and inshore work, a 20 x 40 foot research and teaching
building, and a 10-room residence, with 2 kitchens, a
dining lounge, and dormitory accommodations for
24 persons.


Chemical Physics
The Center for Chemical Physics, with participating
faculty from the Departments of Chemistry, Physics,
and Chemical Engineering, is concerned with graduate
education and research in the theoretical, experimental,
and computational aspects of problems in the borderline
between chemistry and physics. Graduate students join
one of the above academic units and follow a special
curriculum. The student receives a Ph.D. degree and a
Certificate in Chemical Physics. For information, contact
the Director, Dr. Valeria Kleiman, 311A Chemistry
Laboratory Building, P.O. Box 117200, Gainesville FL
32611, e-mail kleiman@chem.ufl.edu.


Ecological Engineering
The Graduate Certificate in Ecological Engineering
is for graduate engineering students wishing to develop
expertise in ecological solutions to engineering problems.
Students interested in the certificate must apply for
admission through the Department of Environmental
Engineering Sciences. The certificate program is open
to individuals in any graduate program who hold an
undergraduate engineering degree, or who complete the
additional undergraduate engineering articulation courses
needed to bring the student's background to the minimum
level required for engineers by the Accreditation Board for
Engineering and Technology.
The certificate program consists of 15 course credits,
and a research project with content materially related to
some aspect of ecological engineering. If appropriate, the
15 credits of graduate course work may count toward
the minimum requirements for the graduate degree. The








student's terminal project, master's thesis, or individual
studies project may satisfy the ecological engineering
project requirement. For more information, contact the
Graduate Coordinator, Department of Environmental
Engineering Sciences, P.O. Box 116450, University of
Florida, Gainesville FL 32611, phone (352)392-8450.


Geographic Information Sciences
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) revolutionized
the way land features are located, measured, inventoried,
managed, planned, and studied. GIS provides theories and
methods for measuring location and topography, physical
and biological attributes, and distribution of cultural
components through data storage, analysis, modeling,
mapping, and data display.
GIS applications are diverse. They include determining
the suitability of land for different uses, planning future
land uses for different objectives, setting cadastral
boundaries for the purpose of property recognition and
taxation and regulation, analyzing land and land-cover
properties for both resource inventories and scientific
studies, and siting commercial enterprises.
Users and producers of GIS include engineers,
geographers, urban and regional planners, biologists and
ecologists, land resource managers, anthropologists and
archaeologists, sociologists, public health professionals
and medical researchers, county land-management and
property tax assessors, law enforcement officers, land-
development companies, utility companies, retail stores,
and others. Undergraduate and graduate students who
learn to use GIS technology are in high demand and so
start at higher salaries than their non-GIS peers. As a result
the GIS community at the University of Florida developed
the Interdisciplinary Concentration for Geographic
Information Sciences (ICGIS).
The ICGIS integrates existing GIS resources on
campus, for graduate students, in response to changing
regulatory environments in institutions and governments
at all levels. This concentration established a standard set
of courses and activities that allow graduate students to
become experts in creating, studying, and using geographic
information. Such graduates are in strong positions to
meet future regulatory requirements for certification
as professionals. Structurally, the ICGIS established a
five-category curriculum that adds several courses to
the standard M.S., M.A., M.E., or Ph.D. requirements.
Completing the GIS concentration is officially recognized
by statements on transcripts and a certificate.
For more information, contact Dr. Scot E. Smith,
University of Florida, P.O. Box 116580, Gainesville FL
32611, phone (352)392-4652, e-mail ses@ce.ufl.edu.


Gerontological Studies
The Center for Gerontological Studies offers the minor
in Gerontology, the Graduate Certificate in gerontology,
and a college certificate in Geriatric Care Management.


NONTRADITIONAL PROGRAMS

These programs are completed in conjunction with the
student's graduate degree, for master's, specialist, and
doctoral students. Graduate students may complete
one or all of these programs. All programs require GEY
6646, an interdisciplinary core course that gives a broad
introduction to critical issues and growing academic
knowledge about aging, covering biomedical and health,
psychosocial, and applied issues. Advanced courses at
the graduate and professional level allow all students to
expand their interdisciplinary knowledge and research
background in aging. Students interested in studying aging
are in graduate programs all over campus but their degrees
are predominantly in the fields of nursing, psychology,
occupational therapy, rehabilitation, sociology, exercise and
sport sciences, communication sciences and disorders or
audiology, and recreational studies.
For the minor in gerontology, students complete
6 credits (master's level) or 12 credits (doctoral level)
of approved aging courses outside of the major. This
program is most appropriate for students wanting course
work in aging that will complement their future career
interests. The Graduate Certificate in Gerontology requires
completing a large research project (typically, the student's
thesis or dissertation), plus 12 credits of approved aging
courses. This certificate is most appropriate for students
planning to do substantive research in the field of aging as
part of their graduate work.
For details on the Geriatric Care Management
Certificate: http://geriatriccaremanagement.dce. For
details on other programs: http://www.geron.ufl.edu.
For questions: e-mail info@geron.ufl.edu, Center for
Gerontological Studies, P.O. Box 117335, 2326 Turlington
Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611-7335,
phone (352)392-2116.


Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation addresses sites, landscapes,
structures, districts, and intangible heritage as a way to
safeguard, celebrate, and adapt valuable resources that
range from decades to centuries old. The field became
professionalized in the last half of the twentieth century,
thanks to the National Historic Preservation Act in 1966.
The twenty-first century offers significant expansion
of the field to address smart growth, sustainability, and
economic development initiatives. Opportunities include
preservation and redevelopment work in architecture,
building construction, interior design, landscape
architecture, and urban and regional planning. Many
related jobs exist, including preservation consultant,
preservation contractor, preservation researcher, Main
Street program director, site manager, lawyer, archeologist,
cultural resource manager, historian, real estate
professional, and policy administrator.
The Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate
in Historic Preservation (ICCHP) integrates resources
throughout UF to address the diverse topics relevant to the
field. Thus, the ICCHP establishes a set of courses that
allow graduate students to gain expertise in researching






GENERAL INFORMATION


and applying historic preservation in the United States
and abroad. Depending on the student's career goals and
background, this can include recognizing, documenting,
and protecting historic structures and sites; rehabilitation
and restoration technologies; and/or exploring
emerging and related specializations such as community
development and sustainable development.
The interdisciplinary curriculum structure draws on
course work providing 12 credits for master's students
and 15 credits for Ph.D. students specializing in historic
preservation. Completing the concentration is officially
recognized by statements on the transcripts and by a
certificate.
For more information, contact Roy Eugene Graham,
FAIA, Bienecke-Reeves Distinguished Professor, Director
of Historic Preservation Programs, University of
Florida, P.O. Box 115701, Gainesville FL 32611, phone
(352)392-0205, ext. 233, e-mail regraham@ufl.edu.


Hydrologic Sciences

Interdisciplinary graduate studies in hydrologic sciences
are for science and engineering students seeking advanced
training in diverse aspects of water quantity and quality,
and water-use issues. This concentration emphasizes
(1) understanding the physical, chemical, and biological
processes occurring over broad spatial and temporal scales;
and (2) skills in hydrologic policy and management based
on a strong background in natural and social sciences and
engineering.
Graduate Faculty from nine departments in
three colleges contribute to this interdisciplinary
concentration. Depending on academic background
and research interests, students may earn a degree in
any one of the following departments: Agricultural and
Biological Engineering, Civil and Coastal Engineering,
Environmental Engineering Sciences, Food and Resource
Economics, Forest Resources and Conservation,
Geography, Geological Sciences, Horticultural Sciences,
and Soil and Water Science.
M.S. (thesis and nonthesis option) and Ph.D. studies are
available. Interdisciplinary graduate requirements recognize
diversity in the academic backgrounds and professional
goals of the students. A core curriculum (12 credits for
M.S.; 18 credits for Ph.D.) provides broad training in
five topics: hydrologic systems, hydrologic chemistry,
hydrologic biology, hydrologic techniques and analysis,
and hydrologic policy and management. Additional
elective courses (11 to 14 credits for M.S.; 30 credits for
Ph.D.) allow specialization in one or more of these topics.
Research projects involving faculty from several academic
units can provide the basis for thesis and dissertation
research topics.
Assistantships supported by extramural grants are
available. Tuition waivers may be available to students
who qualify. Students with B.S. or M.S. degrees in any
of the following disciplines are encouraged to consider
this specialization in their graduate program: engineering
(agricultural, chemical, civil, environmental); natural


sciences (physics, biology, chemistry); social sciences
(agricultural and resource economics); forestry; and earth
sciences (geography, geology, soil and water science).
For more information, contact Dr. Michael Annable,
P.O. Box 116450, Gainesville FL 32611, phone
(352)392-3294; or visit the Hydrologic Sciences Academic
Cluster website (http://www.hydrology.ufl.edu).


Latin American Studies
The Center for Latin American Studies offers
interdisciplinary teaching and research focused on Latin
America and the Caribbean.
Master of Arts degree in Latin American Studies:
This M.A. degree requires a thesis and 30 credits,
including a 15 credit specialization in either a discipline or
a topic.
Discipline specializations emphasize training and
research in area and language studies in a specific
academic unit, such as Anthropology, Economics, Food
and Resource Economics, Geography, History, Political
Science, Romance Languages and Literatures (Spanish),
or Sociology, to develop a greater understanding of Latin
America's cultures and societies. This option gives students
a well-rounded background in Latin American studies
before pursuing a Ph.D. in a particular discipline.
Topic specializations cluster course work and research
around a thematic field focusing on contemporary Latin
American problems, such as Andean studies, Brazilian
studies, Caribbean studies, international communications,
Latin American business environment, Latino studies,
religion and society, and tropical conservation and
development. This option builds on prior professional
or administrative experiences and prepares students for
technical and professional work related to Latin America
and the Caribbean.
Additional requirements for both options are
(1) 15 credits of Latin American area and language courses
in two other academic units outside the specialization,
including the required seminar LAS 6938; (2) reading,
writing, and speaking knowledge of one Latin American
language (Spanish, Portuguese, or Haitian Creole); and
(3) an interdisciplinary thesis on a Latin American topic.
Although the M.A. degree in Latin American studies
is terminal, many past recipients have entered the Ph.D.
programs in related disciplines preparing for university
teaching and research careers. Other graduates are
employed in the Foreign Service, educational and research
institutions, international organizations, government or
nonprofit agencies, and private companies in the United
States and Latin America.
Requirements for admission to the program are
(1) a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or
university; (2) grade point average of at least 3.2 for all
upper-division undergraduate work; (3) a combined verbal-
quantitative score of at least 1000 on the Graduate Record
Examination; (4) a TOEFL score of 550 for nonnative
speakers of English; (5) basic knowledge of either Spanish
or Portuguese; some Latin American course work.








Juris Doctor/Master of Arts program: This joint
degree culminates in the Juris Doctor degree awarded by
the College of Law and the Master of Arts degree in Latin
American studies awarded by the College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences. Earning both degrees together is about 1
year faster than earning each degree consecutively. The
joint program lets students develop their area and topical
expertise in Latin America, while studying law.
Candidates for the joint program must qualify and
be admitted to both academic units. See Requirements
for Master's Degrees for admission criteria for the
M.A. program. Contact the College of Law for J.D.
requirements.
General features of the joint program: (1) select a
discipline or topic as described above, (2) complete a thesis
on a topic relating to law and Latin America, (3) complete
the College of Law's advanced writing requirement (the
thesis satisfies this requirement if certified by a member of
the law faculty), and (4) a reciprocal arrangement between
the College of Law and the Center for Latin American
Studies allows participating students, with approval,
to count 12 credits toward both programs. For more
information, contact Dr. Terry McCoy, Center for Latin
American Studies (tlmccoy@latam.ufl.edu).
Graduate Certificates in Latin American Studies:
Master's students may earn a Certificate in Latin
American Studies along with a degree from the College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences; Business Administration;
Design, Construction, and Planning; Education; Fine
Arts; Journalism and Communications; or Liberal Arts and
Sciences.
Thesis students need at least 12 credits of Latin
American course work distributed as follows: (1) Latin
American specialization in the major (to extent possible);
(2) at least 3 credits of Latin American course work in one
academic unit outside the major; (3) 3 credits of
LAS 6938; (4) intermediate proficiency in a Latin
American language (language courses at the 3000 level or
higher count toward the certificate); and (5) a thesis on a
Latin American topic.
Nonthesis master's degree candidates must have at least
15 credits of Latin American course work distributed as
follows: (1) Latin American specialization in the major (to
extent possible); (2) at least 6 credits of Latin American
courses in two other academic units; (3) 3 credits of
LAS 6938; and (4) intermediate proficiency in a Latin
American language (language courses at the 3000 level or
higher count toward the certificate).
Advanced Graduate Certificate in Latin American
Studies: The Center offers the Certificate in Latin
American Studies to Ph.D. candidates in the Colleges of
Agricultural and Life Sciences; Business Administration;
Design, Construction, and Planning; Education; Fine
Arts; Journalism and Communications; and Liberal Arts
and Sciences. Candidates for the Advanced Graduate
Certificate must have at least 18 credits of Latin American
course work distributed as follows: (1) Latin American
specialization in the major (to extent possible),
(2) 9 credits of Latin American courses in two other


NONTRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
15
academic units; (3) 3 credits of LAS 6938; (4)
intermediate or better proficiency in one Latin American
language (language courses at the 3000 level or higher
count toward the certificate); (5) research experience in
Latin America; and (6) a dissertation on a Latin American
topic.
Certificate for J.D. students: Law students may earn
the Certificate in Latin American Studies in conjunction
with the J.D. degree. The curriculum consists of
participation in the College of Law's summer program in
Mexico or a similar program; 6 credits of Latin American
courses outside the College of Law (including LAS 6938);
a major research paper on a Latin American topic; and
intermediate proficiency in a Latin American language.
Graduate fellowships and assistantships: In addition
to University fellowships and assistantships, the Center
for Latin American Studies administers financial assistance
from outside sources, including Title VI fellowships and
private endowments.
Research: Several research and training programs
provide opportunities and financial support for graduate
students, especially in the Amazon, the Andes, and the
Caribbean.
Library resources: UF libraries hold more than
300,000 volumes of printed works and manuscripts,
maps, and microforms dealing with Latin America.
Approximately 80% of the Latin American collection is
in Spanish, Portuguese, and French. Strongest holdings
are in the social sciences, history, and literature, and
in Caribbean, circum-Caribbean, and Brazilian areas.
Andean and Southern Cone region acquisitions are
growing.
Other activities: The Center for Latin American
Studies sponsors conferences, colloquia, and cultural
events; supports publication of scholarly works; provides
educational outreach service; and cooperates with other
campus units in overseas research and training activities.
The Center also administers summer programs in Brazil
and Mexico.
For more information on the Center's programs and
activities, contact the Associate Director of the Center
for Latin American Studies for Academic Programs and
Student Affairs, Dr. M. Cristina Espinosa, 319 Grinter
Hall, e-mail espinosa@latam.ufl.edu, phone (352)392-
0375, ext 807.


Medical Physics

Medical Physics applies advanced physical energy
concepts and methods to the diagnosis and treatment
of human disease. Students enroll in the Department
of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and take
courses taught by the medical physics faculty from
Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Radiology, and
Radiation Oncology. Students interested in the radiation
protection aspects of applications of radioactivity or
radiation in the healing arts may enroll in the medical






GENERAL INFORMATION


health physics option. Formal courses include academic
unit core requirements, a radiation biology course, and
a block of clinical medical physics courses taught by
Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Radiology, and
Radiation Oncology faculty. The program also includes
clinical internships in the Departments of Radiology and
Radiation Oncology. Research opportunities and financial
support exist in the form of faculty research and projects
related to patient care.


Quantitative Finance
The interdisciplinary concentration in quantitative
finance trains students for academic and research
positions in quantitative finance, and risk management.
It gives graduates an edge in the job market by providing
substantial expertise in key related disciplines: finance,
operations research, statistics, mathematics, and software
development. It is focused in teaching and research on
design, development, and implementing new financial
and risk management products, processes, strategies,
and systems to meet demands of various institutions,
corporations, governments, and households. Emphasis is
on an interdisciplinary approach requiring knowledge in
finance, economics, mathematics, probability/statistics,
operations research, engineering, and computer science.
Four academic units participate in this interdisciplinary
concentration: Industrial and Systems Engineering
(College of Engineering), Mathematics (College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences), Statistics (College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences), and Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate (College
of Business Administration). To be eligible, a student
must be admitted to a Ph.D. program in one of these
participating academic units. Students seeking admission
to the concentration need strong quantitative skills and
a degree in one of the relevant fields such as finance,
engineering, statistics, or mathematics. Students with a
background in several disciplines are welcome. Application
should be submitted to one of the participating academic
units.
Each student takes basic courses and meets the home
academic unit's Ph.D. requirements. The student also takes
approved courses in the other participating academic units
to meet the requirements of the concentration.
Dissertation research is conducted in quantitative
finance, risk management, and relevant areas involving
quantitative finance approaches. The student receives a
Ph.D. degree and a Certificate in Quantitative Finance.
Activities of the Ph.D. concentration in quantitative
finance are supported by the Risk Management and
Financial Engineering Laboratory (RMFE Lab),
http://www.ise.ufl.edu/rmfe. The RMFE Lab facilitates
research and applications in the area of risk management
and financial mathematics/engineering, including
organizing research meetings, seminars, and conferences.
It provides a basis for the collaborative efforts of
multidisciplinary teams of UF researchers, governmental
institutions, and industrial partners. For details, visit
http://www.ise.ufl.edu/rmfe/qf.


Quantum Theory Project (QTP)
QTP (officially the Institute for Theory and
Computation in Molecular and Materials Sciences)
is an interdisciplinary group of 12 faculty plus
graduate students, postdoctoral associates, and staff
in the Departments of Physics and Chemistry. The
computationally oriented theoretical research investigates
electronic structure, conformation, properties, and
dynamics of molecules and materials. The work covers
large areas of modern chemistry, condensed matter and
materials physics, and molecular biology. Essentially all the
effort is supported by substantial extramural funding, both
individual and collaborative. QTP operates the
J. C. Slater Computation Laboratory to support large-scale
computing for precise numerical solutions and simulations,
plus graphics and visualization. The Institute also organizes
a major international meeting, the annual Sanibel
Symposium.
Graduate students in chemistry and in physics are
eligible for this specialization and follow a special
curriculum. For more information, contact the Director,
Quantum Theory Project, P.O. Box 118435 (New Physics
Building); or visit the QTP website http://www.qtp.ufl.
edu.


Sustainable Architecture
The Interdisciplinary Concentration in sustainable
architecture is for M.Arch. and M.S.A.S. students seeking
advanced courses on a wide range of topics related to
sustainable architecture. The concentration in sustainable
architecture allows detailed rigorous study in specific
areas of expertise. Students' academic backgrounds and
professional goals are diverse, so course selection is flexible
while exposing students to the multidisciplinary subject
matter of sustainable architecture. This allows students
to develop individualized yet focused plans of study.
Students select from a variety of approved courses offered
in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning
(School of Architecture, School of Building Construction,
Department of Interior Design, Department of Landscape
Architecture, and Department of Urban and Regional
Planning); and other colleges in the University.
Students enrolled in the interdisciplinary concentration
program must complete at least 12 credits of approved
electives. At least 6 credits must be completed in the
School of Architecture. At least one 3-credit course from
an approved non-architectural school is also required.
Students also must do a research project or thesis on a
subject pre-approved by the concentration's Governing
Board. Students receive official recognition of their
concentration by notations on their transcripts and by
receiving a certificate from the School of Architecture in
Sustainable Architecture.
For more information, contact the Graduate Program
Assistant, School of Architecture, University of Florida,
Box 115702, Gainesville FL 32611-5702, phone
(352)392-0205 ext. 202, e-mail bhuds@ufl.edu









Toxicology
The Center for Environmental and Human
Toxicology serves as the focal point for activities
concerning the effects of chemicals on human and animal
health. The Center's affiliated faculty includes 20 to
30 scientists and clinicians interested in elucidating the
mechanisms of chemical-induced toxicity, and is drawn
from the Colleges of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, and
Pharmacy, and the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences. The broadly based, interdisciplinary expertise
provided by this faculty is also used to address complex
issues related to protecting public health and the
environment.
Students who wish to receive graduate training in
interdisciplinary toxicology leading to a Ph.D. enroll
through one of the participating graduate programs,
such as the IDP in the College of Medicine, an
appropriate concentration in the College of Pharmacy,
veterinary medical sciences, or food science and human
nutrition. The number of graduate programs involved in
interdisciplinary toxicology, and the variety of perspectives
provided by their disciplines, allows a great deal of
flexibility in providing a plan of graduate study to meet
an individual student's interests and goals in toxicology.
Student course work and dissertation research are guided
by the Center's researchers and affiliated faculty who are
also Graduate Faculty members in the student's major
academic unit. Dissertation research may be conducted
either in the student's academic unit, or at the Toxicology
Laboratory facilities, at the Center. For more information,
please write to the Director, Center for Environmental
and Human Toxicology, P.O. Box 110885, University
of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; or visit their website
(http://www.floridatox.org).


Translation Studies
This 15-credit certificate program prepares students for
translation careers in government, business, law, health
care, and other fields. The certificate can be combined
with any M.A. or Ph.D. program or taken by itself.
Course work includes translation theory and practice,
t.-. iri.1.. .., computer-assisted translation, translation for
the professions, literary translation, special seminars, and a
practicum.
A study-abroad elective conducted in partnership with
the UF Paris Research Center to examine translation in
the European Union is available for variable credit. To
enter the program, students must have intermediate to
native-speaker proficiency in the source language, and
advanced to native-speaker proficiency in the target
language. The program is open to translators who work in
any language pair, pending availability of faculty mentors
in less commonly taught languages (LCTLs). The program
is housed in the Center for Latin American Studies and
has faculty support from the Departments of Romance
Languages and Literatures, Germanic and Slavic Studies,
and African and Asian Languages and Literatures. Students


NONTRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
17
must complete 15 credits for the certificate, including
a practicum and instruction on using state-of-the-art
technologies that help the practice of translation. For more
information on the Translation Studies Certificate, contact
Dr. Elizabeth Lowe, Director, 368 Grinter Hall,
(352)392-0375 ext. 809, elowe@ufl.edu; or visit their
website (http://www.translationstudies.ufl.edu).


Transnational and Global Studies
The Transnational and Global Studies Center (TGSC)
is one of several federally funded centers on campus. The
TGSC is a National Resource Center created in 2003
through funding from the U.S. Department of Education.
It is part of a Florida-wide consortium of universities,
the Florida Network for Global Studies. The TGSC is
housed in the International Center but has affiliated
faculty from the entire campus. The TGSC promotes
interdisciplinary research, supports faculty and students
by developing curricula and academic programs, sponsors
cultural activities and guest speakers on transnational
and global issues, and conducts outreach. The TGSC
offers the Transnational and Global Studies Graduate
Certificate. This certificate will enable graduate students to
identify one of four tracks that will help strengthen their
interdisciplinary studies. The graduate tracks articulate
with the undergraduate international studies major. The
certificate curriculum is reviewed by the Transnational
and Global Studies (TNGS) Certificate Committee
for approval, but does not supersede the supervisory
committee's role. The graduate certificate recognizes
successful completion of course work (13 credits for
master's, 15 credits for Ph.D.) related to transnational and
global issues. Courses meeting certificate requirements
come from more than 50 graduate courses already offered
with specific transnational and global content, organized
into four areas of specialization: science and technology,
business and economics, global governance and security,
and development and area studies.
Students earning the certificate need the required
credits and must participate in the Transnational and
Global Studies Seminar. The seminar addresses the most
pressing transnational and global issues and is led by fac-
ulty with expertise in these fields. This course is taken for
either 1 credit or 3 credits: a research paper is needed to
earn 3 credits.
For more information on the Translation Studies
Certificate, contact Ms. Leslie A. Owen, UF International
Center, 416 Peabody Hall, Gainesville FL 32611,
phone(352)392-7074, e-mail lowen@ufic.ufl.edu; or visit
the website (http://www.ufic.ufl.edu/tgsc.htm).


Tropical Agriculture
The Center for Tropical Agriculture, in the Institute
of Food and Agricultural Sciences, seeks to stimulate
interest in research and curriculum related to the tropical
environment and its development. Website: cta.ufl.edu.






GENERAL INFORMATION
18
Research: International agricultural development
assistance contracts frequently have research components.
The Center helps coordinate this research.
Minor in tropical agriculture: An interdisciplinary
minor in tropical agriculture is available for both master's
and doctoral students majoring in agriculture, forestry, and
other fields where knowledge of the tropics is relevant. The
minor may include courses treating specific aspects of the
tropics such as natural resource management (e.g., soils,
water, biodiversity), climate, agricultural production, and
the languages and cultures of those who live in tropical
countries.
Certificate in Tropical Agriculture (CTA): the
certificate emphasizes breadth in topics relevant to
tropical agriculture for graduate students (available
through the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences).
The CTA prepares students for work requiring knowledge
of biological and social aspects of tropical agriculture.
Students entering the program receive guidance from
members of the CTA Steering Committee regarding course
work appropriate for careers in international agricultural
development.
The CTA requires at least 12 credits. The "typical"
certificate program has 12 to 24 credits. These credits may,
with approval from supervisory committees, also count
toward the M.S. or Ph.D. While foreign language abilities
and work experience in a foreign country are strongly
encouraged, they are not requisites for the CTA.
For information or application brochure, contact
Dr. Waldemar Klassen, Director, Center for Tropical
Agriculture, University of Florida, c/o Tropical Research
and Education Center, 18905 SW 280th Street,
Homestead FL 33031, e-mail klassen@mail.ifas.ufl.edu.
Other activities: The Center seeks broad dissemination
of knowledge about tropical agriculture by sponsoring
conferences, short courses, and seminars featuring leading
authorities on the tropics; publishing books, monographs,
and proceedings; and by acquiring materials for the library
and the data bank.


Tropical Conservation and
Development
The Tropical Conservation and Development Program
(TCD), in the Center for Latin American Studies, offers
an interdisciplinary graduate certificate and graduate
concentration focused on integrative approaches to
conservation and development in Latin America and other
tropical regions. Both the certificate and concentration are
open to students enrolled in master's and Ph.D. programs
in TCD's affiliate academic units at the University of
Florida who are interested in acquiring interdisciplinary
knowledge and technical skills to pursue a career in
conservation and development research and practice.
Course work for the certificate and the concentration
includes social science theory, principles of tropical
ecology, patterns and trends of tropical resource use and
conservation, and research methods. TCD core courses also


allow students to gain essential practical skills. Emphasis
is on communication and presentation techniques, grant
writing, proposal writing, and fundraising; facilitation and
conflict management; participatory methods for research
and project implementation; and project design, analysis,
and evaluation. Summer research, practitioner experiences,
and field-based training programs provide learning
opportunities outside the classroom.
On completing the certificate or concentration, students
should have an in-depth understanding of the relationships
among biological conservation, resource management,
and the livelihood needs of rural communities; and the
appropriate professional skills for a career in research, field
practice, or both.
TCD's affiliate academic units are Agricultural
Education and Communication, Agronomy, Anthropology,
Comparative Law, Botany, Food and Resource Economics,
Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, Geological
Sciences, Latin American Studies, Natural Resources and
Environment, Political Science, Religion, Sociology, Soil
and Water Science, Urban and Regional Planning, Wildlife
Ecology and Conservation, Women's Studies, and Zoology.
Master's students can earn a certificate in TCD by
completing 12 credits of approved course work: two
interdisciplinary core courses and one course each in
tropical ecology and social science. Ph.D. students can earn
a certificate by completing 15 credits of approved course
work (three interdisciplinary core courses and one course
each in tropical ecology and social science). Students from
natural science academic units must take the social science
credits outside their major. Otherwise, courses from the
student's major can count toward program requirements.
Substitutions need prior approval from the TCD Associate
Director.
To earn a concentration in TCD, students must
complete the course requirements for the certificate
(as explained above) and they must focus on tropical
conservation and development in their thesis, dissertation,
or final project. One member of the student's supervisory
committee must be a TCD affiliate faculty member.
This person is responsible for judging whether the
student's thesis focuses on tropical conservation and/or
development. For the faculty member to make this
judgment, the student must articulate in writing how
the research fits in the broader context of biodiversity
conservation and/or rural development in the tropics.
This person cannot count as the external member of the
committee.
For more information on the TCD certificate and
concentration program, and for a list of approved courses,
visit the TCD website (www.latam.ufl.edu/tcd), or contact
Hannah Covert, Associate Director, 358 Grinter Hall,
(352)392-6548, ext. 825, e-mail hcovert@latam.ufl.edu.


Tropical Studies

The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) is
a consortium of 50 major educational and research








institutions in the United States and abroad, created to
promote understanding of tropical environments and their
intelligent use by people. The University of Florida is a
charter member. Graduate field courses in tropical biology
and ecology, agricultural ecology, population biology, and
forestry are offered in Costa Rica and Brazil during spring
and summer terms. Students are selected on a competitive
basis from all OTS member institutions.
A University of Florida graduate student may register
for 8 credits in an appropriate course cross-listed with
OTS (e.g., PCB 6357C or AGG 6933). The University
of Florida does not require tuition for OTS courses.
Registration is on the host campus. However, students
on Graduate Assistantships must also be registered at UF.
Research grants are available through OTS. For more
information, contact University of Florida representatives
to the OTS board of directors, Dr. Robert Holt
(111 Bartram Hall) and Dr. Hugh Popenoe (2169
McCarty Hall).


Vision Sciences
An interdisciplinary specialization in vision sciences
is available through the College of Medicine. The
Department of Ophthalmology serves as the administrative
and logistical center. However, most of the faculty
are from the IDP advanced concentrations. Current
interests include retinal gene therapy, gene expression in
the mammalian retina and lens, especially during fetal
development, biochemistry of vision in vertebrates and
invertebrates, biochemistry and neurobiology of wound
healing and neural tissue degeneration, and molecular and
cell biology of animal model retinal regeneration. For more
information, contact the Program Director, Dr. William
W Hauswirth, P.O. Box 100266, College of Medicine,
Gainesville FL 32610, phone (352)392-0679.


Wetland Sciences
The interdisciplinary concentration in wetland sciences
(ICWS) is a unified interdisciplinary program in wetland
science and policy for master's and doctoral students.
Graduate faculty from the following academic units
contribute to the wetlands sciences concentration:
Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Botany, Civil
Engineering, Environmental Engineering Sciences,
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Forest Resources and
Conservation, Geography, Geological Sciences, Landscape
Architecture, Law, Soil and Water Sciences, Urban and
Regional Planning, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation,
and Zoology. Students in any of these programs may elect
to participate in the ICWS. A major strength of the ICWS
is the breadth of wetlands-related courses and research
opportunities in many academic programs across campus.
The ICWS exposes students to perspectives outside their
disciplines and provides a rigorous, substantive education
in wetlands sciences in addition to their disciplinary focus.
Students may complete the ICWS for either the M.S.
or Ph.D. degree. A core curriculum (15 credits for M.S.


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL
19
and 18 credits for Ph.D.) provides the opportunity for
interdisciplinary training in four broad subject areas:
(1) wetlands science (1 course each in wetlands ecology,
wetland hydrology, and wetlands biogeochemistry),
(2) wetlands systems, (3) wetlands organisms, and
(4) wetlands policy/law. Additional course work in a
student's disciplinary focus may strengthen the student's
knowledge base or allow for specialization in one or more
of the areas.
For more information, contact Dr. Thomas L. Crisman,
Director, Howard T. Odum Center for Wetlands,
Phelps Lab, P.O. Box 116350, Gainesville FL 32611,
phone (352)392-2424; or visit the website (www.cfw.ufl.
edu).


Women's and Gender Studies

Two certificates, two master's degrees, and a doctoral
concentration are offered in women's and gender studies.
Participating graduate faculty are from several academic
units, campus-wide, including Agricultural and Life
Sciences, Anthropology, Counselor Education, English,
German and Slavic Studies, History, Journalism and
Communications, Latin American Studies, Linguistics,
Medicine, Nursing, Philosophy, Psychology, Religion,
Romance Languages and Literatures, Sociology, and
Teaching and Learning.
The two graduate certificates in women's studies for
master's and doctoral students are offered in conjunction
with degree programs in other academic units. The
Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies and the Graduate
Certificate in Gender and Development require specific
sets of course work to thoroughly ground students in the
discipline. The Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies
is a general introduction to the field, and the Graduate
Certificate in Gender and Development allows students to
focus on issues related to gender, economic development,
and globalization.
The doctoral interdisciplinary concentrations in women's
and gender studies give graduate students a thorough
grounding in the new scholarship produced by the
intersection of women's studies and other academic fields.
The concentration facilitates analysis and assessment of
theories about the role of gender in cultural systems and its
intersections with other categories of differences, such as
race, ethnicity, religion, class, sexuality, physical and mental
ability, age, and economic and civil status. Emphasis is
on participating in women's and gender studies research
and on providing an intellectual environment for cross-
fertilization among disciplines. Women's and gender
studies critically explores the role and status of women and
men, past and present.
Participating academic units award Ph.D. degrees
with an interdisciplinary concentration in women's and
gender studies. Study plans are designed by each student's
supervisory committee, whose chair is affiliated with
women's and gender studies.
Admission requirements are those of the student's
home academic unit and college. After admission to the






GENERAL INFORMATION
20
degree-granting academic unit, the application is sent to
the Graduate Coordinator of Women's and Gender Studies
who chairs an admissions committee.
For more information on the master's degrees, see
Specialized Master's Degrees and Fields of Instruction; or
contact the Director, Center for Women's Studies and
Gender Research, 3324 Turlington Hall.


Admission to the
Graduate School


How to Apply
To apply for admission: contact the academic unit of
interest for information about admissions procedures. To
find websites for academic units, visit http://gradschool.rgp.
ufl.edu/students/college-department-links.html. Applications
that meet minimum standards are referred by Graduate
Admissions in the Office of the University Registrar to
the graduate selection committees of the various academic
units for approval or disapproval. To be admitted to
graduate study in a given academic unit, the prospective
student must meet the requirements of the unit and the
Graduate School. Admission to some programs is limited
by the resources available.
Minimum requirements: minimum grade average of
B for all upper-division undergraduate work and at least
1000 total verbal-quantitative score on the General Test of
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) (or satisfactory
scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test for
students applying to the Warrington College of Business
Administration) for students with an earned bachelor's
degree only or its international equivalent based on a
4-year curriculum. Some academic units and more
advanced levels of graduate study require higher GRE
scores. Some academic units require a reading knowledge
of at least one foreign language. Exceptions to the above
requirements are made only when these and other criteria,
including letters of recommendation, are reviewed by the
academic unit, recommended by the college, and approved
by the Dean of the Graduate School.
Direct admission to the Graduate School requires
a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or
university. Two copies of the official transcripts from
all previously attended colleges or universities should
accompany all applications: one for the academic unit and
one for the Registrar. These transcripts must be received
directly from the registrar of the institution where the work
was done. Official supplementary transcripts are required
as soon as they are available for any work completed after
applying for admission.
Admission requirements of an academic unit are often
more rigorous than the minimum requirements set by the
Graduate School. Because of resource limitations, most
academic units do not accept all qualified applicants.
UF is committed to creating a community that reflects
the rich racial, cultural, and ethnic diversity of the State


of Florida and the United States of America. The greatest
challenge in higher education is to enroll students and
hire faculty and staff who are members of diverse racial,
cultural, or ethnic minority groups. This pluralism enriches
the University community, offers opportunity for robust
academic dialogue, and contributes to better teaching
and research. The University and its components benefit
from the richness of a multicultural student body, faculty,
and staff who can learn from one another. Such diversity
empowers and inspires respect and understanding among
us. The University does not tolerate the actions of anyone
that violates the rights of another. By policy and practice,
the University embodies a diverse community. Our
collective efforts lead to a University that is truly diverse
and reflect the U.S. population.
The University encourages qualified applicants of
both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic
groups. The University does not discriminate on the basis
of marital status, sexual orientation, disability, or age in
admission or access to its programs and activities. The Title
IX Coordinator's office is in 145 Tigert Hall
(352)392-6004.


Admissions Examinations
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): In addition
to the General Test of the GRE, some academic units
encourage the applicant to submit scores on one or
more advanced subject tests. Scores on all tests taken are
considered for admission. Applicants with a previous
graduate or professional degree or equivalent from a
regionally accredited U.S. institution may be exempt from
the GRE and undergraduate GPA requirements. Contact
the academic unit for specific requirements.
Graduate study in Business Administration:
Warrington College of Business Administration applicants
may substitute satisfactory Graduate Management
Admission Test (GMAT) scores for GRE scores. Master
of Business Administration (M.B.A.) applicants must
submit satisfactory GMAT scores (at least 465). For
more information, contact Educational Testing Service,
Princeton NJ 08540.
Graduate Study in Law: Master of Laws in Taxation
applicants must hold the Juris Doctor or equivalent degree.


Medical Immunization
When the admission application is approved, the student
is sent a Proof of Immunization form to complete and
return. Students cannot register until the Health Care
Center receives and approves the form. For details:
http://shcc.ufl.edu/medical/immune.htm.


Computer Requirement
All students need ongoing access to a computer
to complete their degree programs successfully. The
University expects each student to acquire computer








hardware and software appropriate to the degree program.
Basic competency in using a computer is required
for graduation; class assignments may require using a
computer, academic advising and registration can be done
by computer, and University correspondence is often sent
by e-mail.
The University offers limited access to computers
through its computer labs, but most students are expected
to purchase or lease a computer that is capable of dial-up
or network connection to the Internet, graphic access to
the World Wide Web, and productivity functions such as
word processing and spreadsheet calculations. For details:
http://www.circa.ufl.edu/computers. Most colleges have
additional software requirements or recommendations. See
their web pages for that information.


Conditional Admission
Students admitted as exceptions under the 10% waiver
rule must present both an upper-division grade point
average and Graduate Record Examination General Test
score with their applications and meet all other criteria
including excellent letters of recommendation from
colleagues, satisfactory performance in a specified number
of graduate courses taken as postbaccalaureate students,
and/or practical experience in the discipline for a specified
period of time.
For students granted conditional admission to the
Graduate School, final admission decisions are deferred for
1 term until requisite examination scores or final records
are available.
Students granted conditional admission need to have
these conditions communicated to them by the academic
unit admitting them. When these conditions are met, the
academic unit must notify the student in writing, sending
a copy to Graduate Student Records (106 Grinter,
392-4643). Eligible course work taken while a student is in
conditional status may apply toward the graduate degree.
Students failing to meet any condition of admission are
barred from further registration.


Residency


Florida Administrative code

Classification of Students: Florida or Non-Florida
(6A-10.044, Florida Administrative Code) Residency for
Tuition Purposes.
The State Board of Community Colleges and the
Board of Education shall maintain consistent policies
and practices for classifying students as residents for
tuition purposes to facilitate the transfer of students
among institutions. Policies and practices may vary
to accommodate differences in governance, but
determinations of classification shall be consistent to assure
students of being classified the same regardless of the
institution determining the classification.


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


(1) Classification of a student as a Florida resident for
tuition purposes by a public Florida community
college or university shall be recognized by other public
postsecondary institutions the student later seeks
admission to, unless the classification was erroneous
or the student did not then qualify as a resident for
tuition purposes.
(2) Once a student is classified by a public institution,
institutions the student may transfer to are not
required to reevaluate the classification unless
inconsistent information suggests that an erroneous
classification was made or the student's situation has
changed.
(3) Changes the State Board of Community Colleges and
the Board of Education intend to make in the policies
and practices for classifying students as residents for
tuition purposes shall be filed with the Articulation
Coordinating Committee.
(4) Non-U.S. citizens such as permanent residents,
parolees, asylees, refugees, or other permanent
status persons (e.g., conditional permanent residents
and temporary residents), who have applied to
and have been approved by the U.S. Citizenship
and Immigration Service with no date certain for
departure shall be considered eligible to establish
Florida residency for tuition purposes. In addition,
nonimmigrants holding one of the following visas shall
be considered eligible to establish Florida residency for
tuition purposes. Persons in visa categories not listed
herein shall be considered ineligible to establish Florida
residency for tuition purposes.
(a) Visa category A: Government official.
(b) Visa category E: Treaty trader or investor.
(c) Visa category G: Representative of international
organization.
(d) Visa category H-1: Temporary worker performing
nursing services or a specialty occupation.
(e) Visa category H-4: Only if spouse or child of alien
classified H-1.
(f) Visa category I: Foreign information media
representative.
(g) Visa category K: Fianc6, fiance, or a child of
United States citizenss.
(h) Visa category L: Intracompany transferee
(including spouse or child).
(i) Visa category N: Parent or child of alien accorded
special immigrant status.
(j) Visa category 0-1: Workers of "extraordinary"
ability in the sciences, arts, education, business, or
athletics.
(k) Visa category 0-3: Only if spouse or child of alien
classified 0-1.
(1) Visa category R: Religious workers.
(m)Visa category NATO-1-7: Representatives and
employees of NATO and their families.






GENERAL INFORMATION
22
(5) Non-U.S. citizens in the following categories shall also
be considered eligible to establish Florida residency for
tuition purposes.
(a) Citizens of Micronesia.
(b) Citizens of the Marshall Islands.
(c) Beneficiaries of the Family Unity Program.
(d) Individuals granted temporary protected status.
(e) Individuals granted withholding of deportation
status.
(f) Individuals granted suspension of deportation
status or cancellation of removal.
(g) Individuals granted a stay of deportation status.
(h) Individuals granted deferred action status.
(i) Individuals granted deferred enforced departure
status.
(j) Applicants for adjustment status.
(k) Asylum applicants with INS receipt or
Immigration Court stamp.
Specific 229.053(1) 240.325 FS., Law Implemented
240.1201 FS. History: New 10-6-92, Amended
10-17-2000.
Student Residency, Section 6C-7.005 Florida
Administrative Code.
(1) For the purpose of assessing tuition, residency and
nonresidency status shall be determined as provided
in Section 240.1201, Florida Statutes, and the
Florida State University System Residency Policy
and Procedure Manual (revised effective October 17,
2000), incorporated by reference herein.
(2) An individual shall not be classified as a resident for
tuition purposes and, thus, shall not be eligible to
receive the resident tuition rate, until the individual
provides satisfactory evidence of legal residence
and domicile to appropriate university officials. In
determining residency, the university shall require
evidence such as a voter registration, driver's license,
automobile registration, or any other relevant materials
as evidence that the applicant has maintained 12
months residence immediately before qualifying as
a bona fide domicile, rather than for the purpose of
maintaining a mere temporary residence or abode
incident to enrollment in an institution of higher
learning. To determine if the student is a dependent
child, the university shall require evidence such as
copies of the aforementioned documents. In addition,
the university may require a notarized copy of the
parent's IRS return. "Resident student" for tuition
purposes classification shall also be construed to
include students to whom an Immigration Parolee card
or a Form 1-94 (Parole Edition) was issued at least 1
year before the first day of classes the resident student
status is sought for, or whose resident alien status
was approved by the United States Immigration and
Naturalization Service, or who hold an Immigration
and Naturalization Form 1-151, 1-551 or a notice of an
approved adjustment of status application, or Cuban
Nationals or Vietnamese Refugees or other refugees or
asylees so designated by the United States Immigration
and Naturalization Service who are considered as
Resident Aliens, or other legal aliens, provided such


students meet the residency requirements stated above
and comply with subsection (4) below. The burden
of establishing facts that justify classifying a student
as a resident and domiciliary entitled to "resident for
tuition purposes" registration rates is on the applicant
for such classification.
(3) In applying this policy:
(a) "Student" shall mean a person admitted to
the institution, or a person allowed to register at the
institution on a space available basis.
(b) "Domicile" denotes a person's true, fixed, and
permanent home, the person intends to return to
whenever absent.
(4) In all applications for admission or registration at the
institution on a space available basis a "resident for
tuition purposes" applicant, or, if a dependent child,
the parent of the applicant, shall make and file with
such application a written statement, under oath, that
the applicant is a bona fide resident and domiciliary of
the State of Florida. All claims to "resident for tuition
purposes" classification must be supported by evidence
as stated in Rule 6C-7.005(1), (2) if requested by the
registering authority.
(5) A "nonresident" or, if a dependent child, the
individual's parent, after maintaining a legal residence
and being a bonafide domiciliary of Florida for
12 months, immediately before enrolling and
qualifying as a resident, rather than for the purpose
of maintaining a mere temporary residence or abode
incident to enrollment in an institution of higher
education, may apply for and be granted classification
as a "resident for tuition purposes"; provided that
students who are nonresident aliens or who are in
the United States on a non-immigration visa are
not entitled to reclassification. An application for
reclassification as a "resident for tuition purposes"
shall comply with provisions of subsection (4) above.
An applicant classified as a "nonresident for tuition
purposes" at initial enrollment shall furnish evidence
as stated in Rule 6C-7.005(1) to the satisfaction of the
registering authority that the applicant has maintained
residency in the state for the 12 months immediately
before qualification required to establish residence for
tuition purposes. Without such evidence, the applicant
shall not be reclassified as a "resident for tuition
purposes." The application for reclassification should
be accompanied by a certified copy of a declaration
of intent to establish legal domicile in the state,
which intent must have been filed with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court, as provided by Section 222.17,
Florida Statutes. If the request for reclassification and
the necessary documentation are not received by the
registrar before the last day of registration for the term
the student intends to be reclassified, the student will
not be reclassified for that term.
(6) Appeal from a determination denying "resident for
tuition purposes" status to applicant therefore may be
initiated after appropriate administrative remedies
are exhausted by the filing of a petition for review
pursuant to Section 120.68 F.S.








(7) For any student granted status as a "resident for tuition
purposes," if that status is based on a sworn statement
that is determined to be false, the student is subject to
such disciplinary sanctions as may be imposed by the
president of the university.
Specific 240.209(1), (3)(r) FS. Law Implemented
120.53(1)(a), 240.209(1), (3)(e), 240.233, 240.235,
240.1201 FS. History: Formerly 6C-2.51, 11-18-70,
Amended 8-20-71, 6-5-73, 3-4-74, Amended and
Renumbered 12-17-74, Amended 1-13-76, 12-13-77,
8-11-81, 6-21-83, 12-13-83, 6-10-84, 10-7-85, 12-31-85,
Formerly 6C-7.05, Amended 11-9-92, 4-16-96.


How to Apply for Residency
All U.S. citizens, permanent residents and others
included in Section 4 of the Board of Education Rule 6a-
10.044 above are eligible to apply for Florida residency.
Residency for tuition purposes is controlled exclusively
by laws enacted by the Florida Legislature. For the purpose
of assessing tuition, residency and nonresidency status shall
be determined as provided in Classification of Students,
Florida or Non-Florida (Section 6A-10.044, Florida
Administrative Code), Section 240.1201, Florida Statutes,
and the Florida State University System Residency Policy
and Procedure Manual [revised effective October 17,
2000]. For the entire law, see http://www.leg.state.fl.us/
statutes. Staff members in the Office of the University
Registrar review applications for Florida resident status,
together with supportive documentation, and render a
decision based on the documentation and the requirements
of Florida law.
This law, the rules, and the implementation manual
presume that students initially classified as nonresident will
not be reclassified as residents merely by being enrolled for
1 year. The applicant is responsible for providing all of the
documents needed to merit a reclassification for tuition
purposes.
A student wishing to establish residency should pick up
the Request for Change in Residency Status form from
the Office of the University Registrar, 222 Criser Hall, to
review the information and items that may be requested
when the student files for Florida residency for tuition
purposes.


International Students
All international students seeking admission to the
Graduate School must submit satisfactory scores on the
GRE General Test and a score of at least 550 on the paper-
based, 213 on the computer-based, or 80 on the internet-
based TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) with
the following exceptions:
1. International students whose native language is
English or who have spent at least 1 academic year
at a college or university before enrolling at the
University of Florida in a country where English is the
official language, excluding intensive English language


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

programs, need not submit TOEFL scores but must
submit satisfactory scores on the General Test of the
Graduate Record Examination before their applications
for admission can be considered.
2. All international students applying for admission
for the Master of Business Administration program
must submit satisfactory scores from the Graduate
Management Admission Test before their applications
for admission will be considered.
International students with unsatisfactory scores on the
TOEFL or verbal part of the GRE must write a short essay
for examination. If skills used in the essay are not acceptable
for pursuing graduate work, the examination will be used as
a diagnostic tool for placement in appropriate courses that
will not count toward a graduate degree.
Graduate students whose native language is not English
must submit satisfactory scores on the Test of Spoken
English (TSE) or the SPEAK Test to be eligible for teaching
assignments. Students who score 55 or above are allowed
to teach in the classroom, laboratory, or other appropriate
instructional activity. Those who score 45 to 50 are allowed
to teach on the condition that they enroll concurrently in
EAP 5836, to help their interpersonal and public speaking
communication skills. Students who fail to score 45 points
may not be appointed to teach. To raise their scores on
the TSE, they are advised to take EAP 5835, a course to
improve general oral language skills. They must then submit
a TSE or SPEAK score of 45 or higher to be appointed to
teach, and they come under the guidelines described above.
Applicants should write to the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, NJ 08540, for registration forms and
other information on TOEFL, TSE, GMAT, and GRE.
Students may register for the locally administered SPEAK
test with the Academic Spoken English Office, 3340
Turlington Hall.


Students with Disabilities
The University of Florida does not discriminate on the
basis of disability in recruiting and admitting students, in
recruiting and employing faculty and staff, or in operating
any of its programs and activities, as specified by federal
laws and regulations. The designated coordinator for
compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act
of 1973, as amended, is John Denny, Assistant Dean of
Students, 202 Peabody Hall (352)392-1261.
The designated coordinator for the Americans with
Disabilities Act (ADA) is Kenneth J. Osfield, ADA
Office/Environmental Health and Safety (352)392-7056,
(352)846-1046 (TDD).
The Dean of Students' Office Disability Resources
Program helps students with disabilities. Services vary
depending on individual needs and include (but are not
limited to) academic accommodations, learning strategies,
help securing auxiliary learning aids, and help with
general University activities. Students with disabilities
are encouraged to contact this office (202 Peabody Hall).
For more information, visit the Dean of Students' Office
website, http://www.dso.ufl.edu.






GENERAL INFORMATION
24
Veterans Administration and Social
Security Administration Benefits
Information
The University of Florida is approved for educating and
training veterans, spouses, or dependents of veterans
(100% disabled or deceased service connected) by the
Florida Department of Veterans Affairs.
Ten federal public laws currently provide education/job-
training programs for Department of Veterans Affairs
(DVA) eligible students. The four programs serving
most students are Chapter 30 for U.S. Military Veterans,
Chapter 31 for Disabled U.S. Military Veterans, Chapter
35 for Spouse and Children of Deceased or 100% Disabled
Veterans (service connected), and Chapter 1606 for
personnel in the National Guard or U.S. Military Reserves.
Students can contact the Office of the University Registrar
or the DVA counseling center for specific program
information such as terms of payment, months of eligibility
and an additional allowance under the DVA work-study
program.
UF students who may be eligible for a particular DVA
educational program must obtain and submit a completed
Application for Educational Benefits to the Office of
the University Registrar. This office will then certify the
student for full-time (undergraduate 12 credits, graduate
9 credits) or part-time educational benefits in accordance
with DVA rules and regulations.
The Atlanta Regional Processing Office of the U.S.
Department of Veterans Affairs determines eligibility
based on official service records, evidence submitted by
the student, and applicable laws for veterans. Students
who have already established their DVA program
eligibility at another college or university must submit a
completed Change of Program or Place of Training form
to the University Registrar, and a University of Florida
Certification of Enrollment Request. All forms are
available at the UF Registrar Information Counter in
222 Criser Hall. This office also can provide confirmation
of student status for DVA health care or other benefits.
For questions about Social Security benefits contact the
local Social Security Office. The Office of the University
Registrar will submit enrollment certificates issued by the
Social Security Administration for students eligible to
receive educational benefits under the Social Security Act, if
the graduate student registers for 9 credits or more during
fall or spring term or 8 credits during Summer C. A full-
time graduate load for DVA or Social Security benefits is
9 credits per term.


Postbaccalaureate Students
Postbaccalaureate students have a bachelor's degree and
have not been admitted to the Graduate School. Admission
for postbaccalaureate enrollment requires a 2.0 grade point
average and a score of 550 on the Test of English as a
Foreign Language (TOEFL) if the applicant is from a
non-English speaking country. Postbaccalaureate
enrollment is offered for (1) students not seeking a graduate


degree (including students who change their professional
goals or students wishing to expand their academic
backgrounds); and (2) students who do intend to enter
a graduate program at some future date, but need a
substantial number of prerequisite undergraduate courses.
Postbaccalaureate students may enroll in graduate
courses, but that work normally does not transfer to apply
toward the graduate degree if the student is then admitted
to the Graduate School. By petition in clearly justified
cases and in conformance with regulations on courses and
credit, it is possible to transfer up to 15 credits of graduate
course work earned with a grade of A, B+, or B.
For the College of Education, only students who
have completed a baccalaureate program in the College
may be admitted to postbaccalaureate status for the
purpose of completing a teacher certification program.
Other applicants may be admitted to postbaccalaureate
status only for a limited time to fulfill prerequisites for
admission to a master's program. Applicants seeking
teacher certification, with degrees in other fields, should
apply for admission to a master's program in the College
of Education. For more information, visit the Registrar's
website, http://www.admissions.ufl.edu/grad/postbacc.
html.


Nondegree Registration
Nondegree enrollment is restricted to participants in
special programs, off-campus programs, University-affiliated
exchange programs, and those participants with nondegree
educational objectives at UE Students denied admission to
UF for any term are not eligible for nondegree registration.
Students need prior approval from the academic unit(s)
to take courses in a nondegree status. That course work
normally does not transfer to apply toward the graduate
degree if the student is then admitted to the Graduate
School. By petition in clearly justified cases and in
conformance with regulations on courses and credit, it is
possible to transfer up to 15 credits of graduate course work
earned with the grade of A, B+, or B. A student should
not remain in this classification for more than 1 term
before being admitted as a postbaccalaureate or graduate
student.


Readmission
This information applies only to students admitted to
a graduate program who have attended the University.
Former graduate students who do not enroll at the
University for 2 consecutive terms, including any summer
term, must reapply for admission whether to the same
or a different program. Readmission, however, is not
guaranteed and is subject to the availability of space at the
appropriate level, college or major. Therefore, students
may need prior written approval (from their academic
unit) to take a leave of absence for 2 or more consecutive
terms. Students who skip a single term will be scheduled
automatically for a registration appointment for 1 (the








next) term. To apply for readmission, contact the Office
of Admissions, P.O. Box 114000, University of Florida,
Gainesville, FL 32611-4000, www.reg.ufl.edu/regadmi.htm


Faculty Members as Graduate Students
UF faculty in tenured or tenure-accruing lines, as
designated by the Florida Administrative Code, normally
may not pursue graduate degrees from this institution.
Exceptions are made for the Florida Cooperative Extension
Service (IFAS) county personnel, the faculty of the P. K.
Yonge Laboratory School, and University Libraries faculty.
Under certain restrictions established by the Graduate
Council, persons holding nontenure- or nonpermanent-sta
tus-accruing titles may pursue graduate degrees at UF. Any
other exceptions to this policy must be approved by the
Graduate Council. Such exceptions, if given, are rare and
will only be approved when it is determined to be in the
best interest of the University.


Graduate Assistantships and
Fellowships
Graduate Assistantships are available through individual
academic units. Stipend rates paid are determined by the
employing academic unit. Interested students should
ask their academic-unit offices about the availability of
assistantships and the procedure for applying. Prospective
students should write directly to their major academic
units. Early inquiry is essential to be assured of meeting
application deadlines. Appointments are made on the
recommendation of the academic unit chair, subject to
admission to the Graduate School and to the approval
of the Dean of the Graduate School. Requires clear
evidence of superior ability and promise. Reappointment
to assistantships requires evidence of continued good
scholarship.
For these awards, unless otherwise specified, apply to the
appropriate academic unit chair, University of Florida, on
or before February 15 of each year.
Fellows and graduate assistants must pay appropriate
in-state and out-of-state tuition. Fellows receiving term
stipends of $3150.00 or greater and trainees are expected
to devote full time to their studies. Graduate assistants
with part-time teaching or research duties register for
reduced study loads, according to the schedule required
for their appointment. Students on appointment are
financially liable for excess credits, beyond the required
registration or dropped courses.


Tuition Payments
In-state matriculation fee payments: available to
graduate assistants and fellows who meet the eligibility
requirements. Any change in the student's academic or
employment status after processing a tuition payment will
result in the original payment being updated, reduced, or
voided as appropriate.


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

Non-Florida tuition payments: available to
out-of-state students who hold graduate assistantships or
fellowships and who meet the eligibility requirements.
Any change in the student's academic or employment
status after processing a tuition payment will result in the
original payment being updated, reduced, or voided as
appropriate.


Residency for Graduate Students on
Appointment
Graduate research and teaching assistants and University
Alumni or Named Presidential Fellows who are United
States citizens or permanent residents are eligible for in-
state residency for tuition purposes after completing
3 consecutive terms over 12 consecutive months.
By University of Florida policy, all such students must
take the appropriate actions to become in-state residents
for tuition purposes at the start of their first term of
enrollment and no later than the end of drop/add. This
includes (1) registering as a voter in Florida; (2) obtaining
a Florida driver's license or Florida ID; (3) obtaining a
Florida vehicle registration and insurance if appropriate;
and (4) completing a declaration of domicile. Information
to accomplish these tasks is available from the academic
unit's graduate coordinator or http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.
edu/students/faqs-introduction.html.
At the start of their second year of enrollment, students
must file the appropriate documentation with the Office of
the University Registrar before the end of drop/add.


University-Wide Fellowship
http://www.aa.ufl.edu/fellows/


Alumni Fellowship
http://www.aa.ufl.edu/fellows/alumni.html
Alumni Graduate Fellows represent the highest graduate
student award available at the University. Funded at
nationally competitive levels, these highly prestigious
awards support students in all academic units of the
University awarding a Ph.D. or M.F.A.
The Alumni Graduate Fellowships focus on identifying
and supporting students who seek the Ph.D. degree or
selected terminal master's degrees (the M.F.A. for example).
To ensure that Alumni Fellows receive every opportunity
to succeed, the Alumni Graduate Fellowships provide a full
4 years of support through a nationally competitive stipend
and full tuition waiver for qualifying students.
Most Alumni Graduate Fellows will receive at least
2 years of fully funded fellowship, and they will receive
another 2 years of research or teaching assistantship. The
University expects Alumni Fellows to demonstrate high
standards of academic achievement and participation in
University life.






GENERAL INFORMATION
26
For Alumni Fellowships, students apply to their major
academic unit. Successful applicants have outstanding
undergraduate preparation, a strong commitment to their
field of study, and demonstrated potential in research and
creative activities.


Grinter Fellowship
Named in honor of Dr. Linton E. Grinter, Dean of
the Graduate School from 1952 to 1969, this fellowship
helps recruit truly exceptional graduate students. Currently
enrolled graduate students are not eligible, except when
entering a Ph.D. (or other terminal degree) program.
Stipends are normally $2000 to $4000. Continuing the
Grinter Fellowship beyond the first year depends on
satisfactory student progress. Students in the Colleges
of Agricultural and Life Sciences, Engineering, and Law
are not eligible. For information, visit http://www.aa.ufl.
edu/fellows/grinter.html. For details, contact your major
academic unit.


Title VI: Foreign Language and Area
Studies Fellowship
Title VI fellowships are available to graduate students
whose academic programs are either Latin America or
Africa oriented.
Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents
and must be registered for a full-time course load including
a language relevant to the area of their choice, specifically,
Portuguese or Haitian Creole for recipients through
the Center for Latin American Studies; Akan, Amharic,
Arabic, Swahili, Xhosa, Yoruba, or other African languages
for which appropriate instruction can be arranged,
for recipients through the Center for African Studies.
Remuneration is a $14,000 stipend for the academic year
and $2,400 for the summer plus payment of all tuition
and fees.
For more information, contact the Director, Center for
Latin American Studies (319 Grinter Hall); or Director,
Center for African Studies (427 Grinter Hall), University
of Florida.


Graduate Minority Programs

http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/diversity/introduction.
html, 115 Grinter, P.O. Box 115500, Gainesville FL
32611, phone (352)392-6444, (800)753-9798, e-mail
ogmp@ufl.edu.
The Office of Graduate Minority Programs (OGMP)
at the University of Florida (UF) spearheads the Graduate
School's contribution to campus diversity by working
to recruit, retain, and award degrees to minority and
underrepresented students in master's and doctoral
programs. Its mission is to
1. Increase graduate student application, enrollment,
and degree awards of first-generation college students,


academically underrepresented students (women in
engineering, men in nursing, etc.), and ethnic or racial
minority groups (African Americans, Hispanics, Native
Alaskans [Aleuts and Eskimos], Native Americans, and
Native Pacific Islanders).
2. For prospective and enrolled graduate students in
underrepresented demographic groups, offer resources
and opportunities to successfully pursue and complete
graduate education.
The following development and funding opportunities
are available through OGMP:
Florida Board of Education (BOE) summer
program: BOE is held during Summer B and is an
early admissions orientation and preparation program
for ethnic/cultural minorities, first-generation college
students, and academically underrepresented students who
have not previously attended the University of Florida.
This retention program prepares eligible, newly admitted
students for the demands of graduate education (research,
writing, time management, etc.). Participants receive a
$1500 stipend and payment of 4 credits for Summer B.
All participants must be registered as full-time students
for the next academic year. U.S. citizens admitted to a
UF graduate program, who meet criteria for eligibility, are
invited to apply online at http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/
.-... r r I.... -summer.html
Florida A&M University (FAMU) Feeder program:
UF is 1 of 47 universities in the FAMU Feeder program,
aimed at increasing the number of FAMU students in
graduate programs. FAMU nominates students with at
least a 3.0 GPA to participating feeder institutions for
admission into their graduate programs. OGMP is UF's
main contact for the feeder program. UF offers five
fellowships every year to qualified FAMU Feeder students
who have been admitted to a graduate program. Each
fellow receives an $8,000 annual stipend, and pays up to
12 credits tuition for fall and spring terms. The application
deadline is February 15th.
McKnight Doctoral Fellowship: The Florida
Education Fund (FEF) awards McKnight Fellowships to
African-American students newly admitted into selected
doctoral programs at state universities. The Fellowship
provides a $12,000, 12-month stipend, and pays tuition
and fees for up to 5 years, given satisfactory progress
toward completing the degree. African Americans who
are U.S. citizens are eligible to receive the McKnight
Fellowship and should contact FEF for applications and
more information: 201 East Kennedy Blvd., Suite 1525,
Tampa FL 33602, phone (813)272-2772. The application
deadline is January 15th.
University of Florida/Santa Fe Community College
Faculty Development Project: This partnership initiative
allows UF doctoral students to teach as adjunct professors.
Participants must teach 3 courses per year at SFCC and
help SFCC recruit and retain minority students. The
program provides a $9,000 stipend for 10 months and
pays up to 12 credits of tuition and fees for fall and
spring terms, for up to 4 years. Faculty Development
Project applicants must be U.S. citizens from a minority/
























underrepresented group and hold a master's degree in one
of the approved disciplines.
National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for
Minorities in Engineering and Sciences, Inc. (GEM)
Fellowship: This fellowship program supports African
American, Native American, and Hispanic American
students to pursue the Master of Science degree in
engineering and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in
engineering and science disciplines. The GEM Consortium
pays both master's and doctoral fellowship recipients
tuition, fees, and a stipend. The Practical Summer
Internship component brings the fellowship total value
to between $20,000 and $60,000 for master's students
and $60,000 and $100,000 for doctoral students. Each
M.S. applicant must be a junior, senior, or graduate of
an engineering program with at least a 2.8 GPA. Each
Ph.D. applicant must be a junior, senior, or graduate of
an engineering program with at least a 3.0 GPA. For more
information about GEM Fellowship Programs, visit
http://www.gemfellowship.org, or call (574)631-7771.
Supplemental Retention Award: This award's purpose
is to help doctoral students complete their degrees, by
involving them in a structured program. Students within
3 semesters of completing their Ph.D. degree, who no
longer have funding available through an assistantship or
fellowship, are eligible to apply for the program and receive
limited tuition assistance for the remaining semesters. The
tuition assistance is not cash, is not employment, and is
not a tuition or fee waiver. This award is limited to U.S.
citizens or permanent-resident aliens.
Campus Visitation Program (CVP): This program
invites prospective students who are underrepresented in
graduate studies to visit the University of Florida campus.
During the visitation, participants learn more about UF's
graduate programs, and meet with administrators, faculty
members, and current graduate students. CVP is held
for 3 days during fall and spring terms. OGMP provides
housing and some meals, and participants are reimbursed
for part of their travel expenses. All participants must apply
for admission to a UF graduate program before or during
the visitation and are reimbursed the graduate application
fee. Moreover, students need at least a 3.0 upper-division
undergraduate grade point average and must meet
minimum UF requirements (GRE, GMAT, etc.) to be
accepted for the visitation program.


ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL


Professional development workshops: Each term,
the Office of Graduate Minority Programs plans multiple
professional development workshops on topics related
to graduate and professional success (getting your work
published, financial management, choosing a mentor, etc.)
These workshops are free and open to all UF students.


College/School Financial Aid Websites

In addition to the university-wide fellowship and
assistantship opportunities, numerous awards specific to a
particular field of study are available through the various
academic units. See the following websites for financial aid
available in each discipline.
Fisher School of Accounting
http://www.cba.ufl.edu/fsoa/
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
http://www.cals.ufl.edu/
M. E. Rinker School of Building Construction
http://www.bcn.ufl.edu/
College of Design, Construction, and Planning
http://www.arch.ufl.edu/
Warrington College of Business Administration
http://www.cba.ufl.edu/
College of Dentistry
http://www.dental.ufl.edu/
College of Education
http://www.coe.ufl.edu/
College of Engineering
http://www.eng.ufl.edu/
College of Fine Arts
http://www.arts.ufl.edu/
School of Forest Resources and Conservation
http://www.sfrc.ufl.edu
College of Health and Human Performance
http://www.hhp.ufl.edu/
College of Journalism and Communications
http://www.jou.ufl.edu/
Levin College of Law
http://www.law.ufl.edu/
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
http://web.clas.ufl.edu/
College of Medicine
http://www.med.ufl.edu/
School of Natural Resources and Environment
http://snre.ufl.edu/
College of Nursing
http://con.ufl.edu/
College of Pharmacy
http://www.cop.ufl.edu/
College of Public Health and Health Professions
http://www.phhp.ufl.edu/
College of Veterinary Medicine
http://www.vetmed.ufl.edu/






GENERAL INFORMATION
28
External Fellowships for Graduate
Students
Information on external fellowships, small grants, and
other funding opportunities is available on the Research
and Graduate Programs (RGP) website: http://rgp.ufl.
edu/research/funding.html. The Community of Science
Funding Opportunities database and the Grants Database
are keyword searchable and highly recommended as
information resources by RGP Program Information staff.


General Regulations

The student is responsible for becoming informed
and observing all program regulations and procedures.
The student must be familiar with Graduate Catalog
general regulations and requirements, specific degree
program requirements, and offerings and requirements
of the major academic unit. Rules are not waived for
ignorance. Any exceptions to the policies stated in the
Graduate Catalog must be approved by the Dean of the
Graduate School.
After admission to the Graduate School, but before the
first registration, the student should consult the college
and/or the graduate coordinator in the major academic
unit about courses and degree requirements, deficiencies
if any, and special regulations of the academic unit. The
dean (or representative) of the college where the degree
program is located must oversee all registrations. Once a
supervisory committee is appointed, registration approval is
the responsibility of the committee chair.


Catalog Year
Catalog year determines the set of academic requirements
that must be fulfilled for graduation. Students graduate
under the catalog in effect when they first enroll as degree-
seeking students at UF provided they maintain continuous
enrollment. Students who are unregistered for 2 or more
consecutive terms must reapply for admission and will be
assigned the catalog in effect when enrollment is resumed.
Students with the approval of their college dean's office
may opt to graduate under the requirements of a later
catalog, but they must fulfill all graduation requirements
from that alternative year. The University will make every
reasonable effort to honor the curriculum requirements
appropriate to each student's catalog year. However,
courses and programs are sometimes discontinued and
requirements may change as a result of curricular review or
actions by accrediting associations and other agencies.


Classification of Students
6 Postbaccalaureate students: degree-holding students
admitted to postbaccalaureate credits.
7 Graduate students seeking a first master's degree.


8 Graduate students who have earned a master's degree,
or who have earned 36 or more credits while seeking
a graduate degree, but who have not been admitted to
doctoral candidacy.
9 Graduate students admitted to doctoral candidacy.


Confidentiality of Student Records
The University assures the confidentiality of student
educational records in accordance with the State University
System rules, state statutes, and the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, known as the
Buckley Amendment.
Student directory information that can be released to the
public is limited to name, class, college and major; dates of
attendance; degrees) earned; honors and awards received;
local, permanent, and e-mail addresses; phone number;
most recent previous educational institution attended;
participation in officially recognized activities and sports;
and the weight and height of members of athletic teams.
Currently enrolled students must contact the appropriate
agency/agencies to restrict release of directory information.
The Office of the University Registrar, the Department
of Housing and Resident Education, and the Division of
Human Resources routinely release directory information
to the public. Such students must request this restriction
from the Office of the University Registrar, and students
who live on campus must also request this restriction from
the Department of Housing and Resident Education (next
to Beaty Towers). Students who are University employees
must also request this restriction from the Division of
Human Resources.
Student educational records may be released without a
student's consent to school officials who have a legitimate
educational interest to access the records. "School officials"
shall include
*An employee, agent, or officer of the University or State
University System of Florida in an administrative, supervi-
sory, academic or research, or support staff position
*Persons serving on University committees, boards, and/or
councils
*Persons employed by or under contract to the University to
perform a special task, such as an attorney or an auditor.
"Legitimate educational interest" shall mean any
authorized interest or activity undertaken in the name of
the University for which access to an educational record is
necessary or appropriate to the operation of the University
or to the proper performance of the educational mission of
the University.
The University may also disclose information from a
student's educational records without a student's consent to
either individuals or entities permitted such access under
applicable federal and state law.
Students have the right to review their own educational
records for information and to determine accuracy. A
photo I.D. or other equivalent documentation or personal
recognition by the custodian of record is required before
access is granted. Parents of dependent students, as defined








by the Internal Revenue Service, have these same rights on
presenting proof of the student's dependent status.
If a student believes the educational record contains
information that is inaccurate, misleading, or in violation
of his or her rights, the student may ask the institution
to amend the record. The UF Student Guide outlines the
procedures for challenging the content of a student record
and the policies governing access to and maintenance of
student records.


Academic Honesty
In the fall of 1995 the UF student body enacted a new
honor code and voluntarily committed itself to the highest
standards of honesty and integrity. When students enroll
at the University, they commit themselves to the standard
drafted and enacted by the students.
Preamble: In adopting this honor code, UF students
recognize that academic honesty and integrity are
fundamental values of the university community. Students
who enroll at the University commit to holding themselves
and their peers to the high standard of honor required
by the honor code. Any individual who becomes aware
of a violation of the honor code is bound by honor to
take corrective action. The quality of a University of
Florida education depends on community acceptance and
enforcement of the honor code.
The Honor Code: We, the members of the University
of Florida community, pledge to hold ourselves and our
peers to the highest standards of honesty and integrity.
On all work submitted for credit by students at the
University, the following pledge is either required or
implied:
"On my honor, I have neither given nor received
unauthorized aid in doing this assignment."
Information on procedures (http://www.registrar.ufl.
edu/catalog/policies/students.html) is set forth in Florida
Administrative Code.


Student Conduct Code
Students enjoy the rights and privileges of membership
in a university community and are subject to the
responsibilities that accompany that membership. To have
a system of effective campus governance, all members of
the campus community should notify appropriate officials
of any violations of regulations and help enforce the
regulations. For UF's conduct regulations, see the website
http://www.dso.ufl.edu/judicial, and Florida Administrative
Code. For questions, contsct the Dean of Students Office,
202 Peabody Hall (352)392-1261.


Registration Requirements

The University of Florida operates on a semester system
consisting of two 16-week terms and two 6-week summer
terms. One semester credit equals 1.5 quarter credits.
"Term" is used hereafter, instead of "semester."


GENERAL REGULATIONS
29
Required Full-Time Registration
Fall and Summer
Spring A B C


Full-time graduate students
not on appointments
Assistants on .01 to .24 FTE and/or
fellows receiving $3150 or more
per term, and trainees
Assistants on .25 to .74 FTE
Assistants on .75 to .99 FTE
Full-time assistants:
1.00 Fall & Spring
1.00 Summer A
1.00 Summer B
1.00 Summer C


9-12 4 4 8


2 or 2
2 or 2
1 & 1 or 2


Graduate students on appointment: Required
registration for fellows and trainees with stipends of
$3,150 or greater per term is 12 credits. Fellows whose
stipends are less than $3,150 must register for at least
3 credits during fall and spring terms, and 2 credits for
summer. Any additional credits are at the expense of the
student. The full-time registration requirement is reduced
for students who are graduate assistants. For students on
appointment for the full summer, registration must total
that specified for C term. Registration may be in any
combination of A, B, or C terms. However, courses must
be distributed so that the student is registered during
each term on appointment. Students on appointment
are financially liable for excess credits, beyond the
required registration or dropped courses. Students who
do not register properly are not permitted to remain on
appointment.
Full-time registration: 9 to12 credits. However, most
fellows and assistants on .01 to .24 FTE must be registered
for 12 credits in fall or spring and 8 credits in summer.
Students not on an appointment may want to enroll full
time to finish their degrees in the minimum time frame
or may be required to enroll full time by external funding
agencies or their academic units.
Full-time equivalent: required or prescribed
registration; fewer than 9 to 12 credits but considered
appropriate in specific circumstances. This includes
students on a .25 to 1.00 FTE assistantship and other
limited circumstances. See the Graduate Council Policy
Manual (http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/archived-files/
policy-manual-archived-copy.html).
Lockstep programs such as M.B.A. are defined as
cohorts who move together in the same enrollment
sequence with courses taught in a particular order, on a
particular schedule. Students have no flexibility in their
program or sequence, and may not drop in and out of
courses independently. On academic unit request, the
Graduate School will certify specified students as full-time
equivalent under the circumstances stated in the Graduate
Council Policy Manual.
Part-time registration: Students not on an
appointment and without a specific registration
requirement by the government, external funding agency,






GENERAL INFORMATION
30
or academic unit may register as a part-time student.
Minimum registration is 3 credits in fall or spring and 2
credits in summer.
Employee registration: UF staff employed on a
permanent, full-time basis may be permitted to waive fees
up to a maximum of 6 credits per term on a space-available
basis. Enrollment is limited to courses that do not increase
direct costs to the University. Courses that increase direct
costs can include TBA (to be arranged), computer courses,
individualized courses, distance learning, internships, and
dissertation and master's thesis courses. Laboratory courses
are permitted on a space available basis.
Undergraduate registration in graduate courses:
Upper-division undergraduate students may enroll in 5000-
level courses with consent of the instructor. Normally, a
student must have a grade point average of at least 3.00.
To enroll in 6000-level courses, a student must have senior
standing, consent of the instructor, and an upper-division
grade point average of at least 3.00.
After a student is accepted to graduate school, up to 15
credits of graduate-level courses earned with a grade of A,
B+, or B taken under this provision may be applied toward
a graduate degree at UF, if credit for the course has not
been used for an undergraduate degree, and if the transfer
is approved by the academic unit and made as soon as the
student is admitted to a graduate program.
Final term registration: During the term the final
examination is given and during the term the degree
awarded, a student must be registered for at least 3 credits
in fall or spring and 2 credits in summer (thesis students
in 6971 and doctoral students in 7980). Students on a
fellowship, traineeship, or assistantship must be registered
appropriately for their appointment.
Cleared prior: Students exempt from final term
registration must meet all of the following conditions by
the last working day before classes start:
1. Register correctly during the term before graduation (3
credits if fall or spring, 2 credits if summer) during the
previous term.
2. Complete all degree requirements. Includes giving
the final examination report to the Editorial Office
(160 Grinter); and final submission of the thesis,
dissertation, or project.
3. Submit the final examination form (to Graduate
Student Records, 106 Grinter)
4. Clear all incomplete or other unresolved grades.
5. Apply for a degree (222 Criser) for the upcoming term.
Drop/add: Courses may be dropped or added during
drop/add without penalty. This period lasts 5 UF calendar
days, or 3 days for summer, starting with the first day of
the term. Classes that meet for the first time after drop/add
may be dropped without academic penalty or fee liability
by the end of the next business day after the first meeting.
This does not apply to laboratory sections. After this
period, a course may be dropped and a W appears on the
transcript. Any course added or dropped after the deadline
results in a registration fee liability, even for students with
fee waivers.
Retaking courses: Graduate students may repeat courses
in which they earn failing grades. Grade points from first
and later attempts are included in computing the grade


point average, but the student receives credit for the
satisfactory attempt only.


Attendance Policies

Students are responsible for meeting all academic
objectives as defined by the instructor. Absences count
from the first class meeting. In general, acceptable reasons
for absences from class include illness, serious family
emergencies, special curricular requirements, military
obligation, severe weather conditions, religious holidays,
and participation in official University activities. Absences
from class for court-imposed legal obligations (e.g., jury
duty or subpoena) must be excused. Other reasons also
may be approved.
Students may not attend classes unless they are registered
officially or approved to audit with evidence of having paid
audit fees. After the end of drop/add, the Office of the
University Registrar provides official class rolls/addenda to
instructors.
Students who do not attend at least one of the first 2
class meetings of a course or laboratory in which they are
registered and who have not contacted the academic unit
to indicate their intent may be dropped from the course.
Students must not assume that they will be dropped
if they fail to attend the first few days of class. The
academic unit will notify students dropped from courses or
laboratories by posting a notice in the academic unit office.
Students may request reinstatement on a space-available
basis if documented evidence is presented.
The University recognizes the right of the individual
professor to make attendance mandatory. After due
warning, professors may prohibit further attendance and
then assign a failing grade for excessive absences.


Change of Graduate Degree Program
To change majors (same or different college), submit
a completed Change of Degree Program for Graduate
Students form to the Graduate School. The form must be
signed by an authorized representative of the new academic
unit and college and then submitted to the Graduate
School for processing (https://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/
GIMS2/forms/forms.asp).


Courses and Credits

Undergraduate courses (1000-2999) may not be used
as any part of the graduate degree requirements. All 1000-
and 2000-level courses may be taken on a satisfactory/
unsatisfactory basis (S/U).
Six credits of undergraduate courses (3000-4999)
outside the major may count when taken as part of an
approved graduate program.
Courses numbered 5000 and above are limited to
graduate students, with the exception described under
Undergraduate Registration in Graduate Courses. Courses
numbered 7000 and above are mainly for advanced
graduate students.








No more than 5 credits each of 6910 (Supervised
Research) and 6940 (Supervised Teaching) may be taken
by a graduate student at UF Students who have taken 5
credits of 6910 cannot take 7910; the rule also applies to
6940 and 7940.
For a complete list of approved graduate courses, see
Fields of Instruction. Academic units decide which of these
graduate courses to offer in a given term. Contact the
academic unit for information on available courses.
Generally graduate courses may not be repeated for
credit. However, there is no limit on courses numbered
6971, 6972, 6979, 7979, and 7980. Other courses
repeated for credit indicate "max" credit after the credit.
Professional work: Graduate students may receive
credit toward their degrees for courses in professional
programs (e.g., J.D., D.V.M., or M.D.) when their advisers
and graduate coordinators certify that the course work
is appropriate for their programs and when the students
receive permission from the academic units and colleges
offering the courses. A list of such courses for each student
must be filed with the Graduate Student Records (106
Grinter) and is limited to a maximum of 9 credits toward
the master's degree and 30 credits toward the doctorate.


Grades
The only passing grades for graduate students are A,
B+, B, C+, C, and S. C+ and C grades count toward a
graduate degree if an equal number of credits in courses
numbered 5000 or higher have been earned with grades
of B+ and A, respectively. Grade points are not given for
S and U grades; S and U grades are not used to calculate
grade point averages. All letter-graded courses taken as a
graduate student, except 1000- and 2000-level courses, are
used to calculate the cumulative grade-point average.
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory: Grades of S and U are
the only grades awarded in courses numbered 6910
(Supervised Research), 6940 (Supervised Teaching), 6971
(Research for Master's Thesis), 6972 (Engineer's Research),
7979 (Advanced Research), and 7980 (Research for
Doctoral Dissertation). Additional courses for which S and
U grades apply are noted in the academic unit offerings.
All language courses regardless of level may be taken S/U
if the student's major is not a language and the courses
are not used to satisfy a minor, with approval from the
student's supervisory committee chair and the instructor
of the course. S/U approval should be made by the date
stipulated in the Schedule of Courses. All 1000 and 2000
level courses may be taken S/U. No other courses (graduate,
undergraduate, or professional) may be taken for an S/U
grade.
Deferred grade H: The grade of H is not a substitute
for a grade of S, U, or I. Courses for which H grades are
appropriate must be so noted in their catalog descriptions,
and must be approved by the Graduate Curriculum
Committee and the Graduate School. This grade may be
used only in special situations where the expected unit of
work may be developed over a period of time greater than
a single term.


GENERAL REGULATIONS
31
Incomplete grades: Grades of I (incomplete) received
during the preceding term should be removed as soon as
possible. Grades of I carry no quality points and become
punitive after 1 term. All grades of H and I must be
removed before a graduate degree can be awarded.


Unsatisfactory Scholarship
Any graduate student may be denied further registration
if progress toward completing the program becomes
unsatisfactory to the academic unit, college, or Dean
of the Graduate School. Unsatisfactory scholarship is
defined as failure to maintain a B average (3.00) in all
work attempted. Students need an overall GPA of 3.00,
and graduate students also need a 3.00 GPA in their major
(and in the minor, if a minor is declared) at graduation.
Students with less than a 3.00 GPA may not hold an
assistantship or fellowship.


Foreign Language Examination
A foreign language examination is not required for
all degree programs. For specific information on foreign
language requirements, contact the graduate coordinator of
your academic unit.
If an academic unit requires satisfactory performance on
the Graduate School Foreign Language Tests (GSFLT) in
French, Spanish, or German, the student should contact
the Office of Academic Technology, 1012 Turlington Hall,
for an application and payment of fees. The examination
times and dates are listed in the University Calendar.
Educational Testing Service (ETS) no longer administers
this examination and does not accept application fees or
issue tickets of admission for these tests.


Examinations
The student must register for sufficient graduate credits
during the term any examination is taken. The student's
supervisory committee is responsible for administering
the written and oral qualifying examinations and the final
oral examination for the defense of the thesis, project, or
dissertation. All members of the supervisory committee
must sign the appropriate forms, including the ETD
signature page, for the student to meet the requirements of
the examination.
The written comprehensive examination for the
nonthesis master's degree may be taken at a remote site.
All other qualifying and final examinations for graduate
students must be held on the University of Florida
campus. Exceptions to this policy are made only for certain
graduate students whose examinations are administered
at the Agricultural Research and Educational Centers or
on the campuses of the universities in the State University
System.
With the approval of all members of the supervisory
committee, one committee member (not the chair and not
the external member) may be off-site at a qualifying oral






GENERAL INFORMATION
32
examination or at the final oral defense of the thesis or
dissertation, using modern communication technology to
participate rather than being physically present.


Preparation for Final Term
The student is responsible for meeting all
requirements and observing every deadline. Deadlines
are given in the front of this catalog and in the Graduate
Student Handbook.
When the thesis or dissertation is ready to be put in final
form, the student should consult the Guide for Preparing
Theses and Dissertations (http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/
editorial/introduction.html) and work with the ETD lab
(http://www.circa.ufl.edu/-etd). Students must also file
a degree application with the Office of the University
Registrar (222 Criser Hall) at the start of the final term
and must meet minimum registration requirements.


Verification of Degree Candidate Status
This service is not provided during the last 3 weeks
before graduation. However, students who before that
time have completed all requirements for the degree,
including the final examination report and final acceptance
of the thesis or dissertation, may request verification to
that effect. Verification of Degree Candidate Status (http://
gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/education/currentstudents.html)
request forms should be filled out by the candidate, signed
by the supervisory committee chair, department chair,
college dean, and Graduate School Editorial Office (160
Grinter); then given to Graduate Student Records (106
Grinter) for verification and processing.
Although a student may have fulfilled academic
requirements, the degree is not awarded until the Graduate
School certifies the degree to the University Registrar. That
is done at the end of Fall, Spring, and Summer C terms
for all students who applied to graduate. Some employers
and licensure boards require the degree statement on the
transcript, which is available about 3 days after certification
in December, May, and August.


Awarding of Degrees
The Graduate School authorizes a candidate to be
awarded the degree appropriate to the course of study
under the following conditions (see degree descriptions for
details):
1. The candidate must have completed all course
requirements, including an internship or practicum if
required, in the major and minor fields; observing time
limits and limitations on transfer credit, on nonresident
work, and on level of course work.
2. The candidate's grade average must be at least B (3.00,
truncated) in the major and in all work attempted
in the graduate program, including a minor where
appropriate. All grades of I, H, and X must be resolved.
Grades of I, X, D, E, and U require a written petition
to the Dean of the Graduate School.


3. The candidate must have satisfactorily completed all
required examinations (qualifying, comprehensive,
and final) and be recommended for the degree by
the supervisory committee, major academic unit, and
college.
4. The dissertation or, if required, thesis or equivalent
project must have been approved by the supervisory
committee and accepted by the Graduate School.
5. Recommendations for awarding a degree include
meeting all academic and professional qualifications as
judged by the faculty of the appropriate academic unit.
6. All requirements for the degree must be met while the
candidate is a registered graduate student.
Degrees are certified 3 times per year: December, May,
and August.


Attendance at Commencement
Graduates who are to receive advanced degrees are urged
to attend Commencement to accept in person the honor
indicated by the appropriate hood. Through the University
Bookstore, the student may arrange to rent or buy the
proper academic attire to be worn at Commencement.


Requirements for Master's
Degrees

The master's degree is conferred only on completing a
coherent and focused program of advanced study. Each
academic unit sets its own minimum degree requirements
beyond the minimum required by the Graduate School.


General Regulations
Graduate School regulations are as follows. Colleges
and academic units may have additional regulations
beyond those stated below. Unless otherwise indicated
in the next sections on master's degrees, these general
regulations apply to all master's degree programs at the
University.
Course requirements: Graduate credit is awarded
for courses numbered 5000 and above. The program of
course work for a master's degree must be approved by
the student's adviser, supervisory committee, or faculty
representative of the academic unit. No more than 9
credits from a previous master's degree program may
apply toward a second master's degree. These credits are
applied only with the written approval of the Dean of the
Graduate School.
Major: Work in the major must be in courses
numbered 5000 or above. For work outside the major, 6
credits of courses numbered 3000 or above may be taken if
part of an approved plan of study.
Minor: Minor work must be in an academic unit other
than the major. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits of
work are required in the minor field. Two 6-credit minors
may be taken with the major academic unit's permission. A
3.00 GPA is required for minor credit.








Degree requirements: Unless otherwise specified, for
any master's degree, the student must earn at least 30
credits as a graduate student at UE No more than 9 of
the 30 credits (earned with a grade of A, B+, or B) may
be transferred from institutions approved for this purpose
by the Dean of the Graduate School. At least half of the
required credits (not counting 6971) must be in the major.
Transfer of credit: Only graduate-level (5000-7999)
work with a grade of B or better, is eligible for transfer
of credit. A maximum of 15 transfer credits are allowed.
These can include no more than 9 credits from institu-
tion/s approved by UF, with the balance obtained from
postbaccalaureate work at the University of Florida.
Credits transferred from other universities are applied
toward the degree requirements, but grades earned are
not computed in the student's grade point average.
Acceptance of transfer of credit requires approval of the
student's supervisory committee and the Dean of the
Graduate School.
Petitions for transfer of credit for a master's degree must
be made during the student's first term of enrollment in
the Graduate School.
The supervisory committee is responsible for using
established criteria to ensure the academic integrity of
course work before accepting graduate transfer credits.
Supervisory committee: The student's supervisory
committee should be appointed as soon as possible after
the student is admitted to Graduate School, and no later
than the second term of graduate study.
Supervisory committees for graduate degree programs
are initiated by the student, nominated by the respective
academic unit chair, approved by the college dean, and
appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The
Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of
all supervisory committees. Only Graduate Faculty may
serve on a supervisory committee. If a student takes fewer
than 12 credits in the first term, the deadline is the end of
the term during which the student has accumulated 12 or
more credits or the end of the second term. If a minor is
designated for any degree, a representative from that minor
is needed on the supervisory committee. If two minors are
designated, two representatives are needed.
The supervisory committee for a master's degree with
a thesis must consist of at least two members selected
from the Graduate Faculty. The supervisory committee
for a master's degree without a thesis may consist of one
member of the Graduate Faculty who advises the student
and oversees the program. If a minor is designated, the
committee for both thesis and nonthesis programs must
include one Graduate Faculty member from the minor
academic unit.
Language requirements: (1) Each academic unit
determines whether a reading knowledge of a foreign
language is required. The requirement varies from
one academic unit to another, and the student should
check with the appropriate academic unit for specific
information. (2) All candidates must be able to use the
English language correctly and effectively, as judged by the
supervisory committee.


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE.
33
Examination: Each candidate must pass a final
comprehensive examination. This examination must
cover at least the candidate's field of concentration. It
must occur no earlier than the term before the degree is
awarded. The comprehensive examination for the nonthesis
master's degree may be taken at a remote site. All other
examinations must be held on campus.
Time limitation: All work, including transferred credit,
counted toward the master's degree must be completed
within 7 years before the degree is awarded.
Leave of absence: Any student who will not register at
UF for a period of more than 1 term needs prior written
approval from the supervisory committee chair for a leave
of absence for a designated period of time. The student
must reapply for admission on return. See Readmission and
Catalog Year.


Master of Arts and Master of Science

The requirements for the Master of Arts and the
Master of Science degrees also apply to the following
degrees, except as they are individually described
hereafter: Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts
in Mass Communication, Master of Science in Building
Construction, Master of Science in Pharmacy, and Master
of Science in Statistics.
Course requirements: A master's degree with thesis
requires at least 30 credits including up to 6 credits of
Research for Master's Thesis (6971). All thesis students
must register for an appropriate number of credits in 6971.
A nonthesis Master of Arts or Master of Science degree
requires at least 30 credits. No more than 6 of those credits
can be from S/U courses. Nonthesis students cannot use
Research for Master's Thesis (6971).
For all master's programs, at least half the required
credits (not counting 6971) must be in the major. One
or two minors of at least 6 credits each may be taken, but
a minor is not required by the Graduate School. Minor
work must be in an academic unit other than the major.
Nonthesis M.S. students in engineering, if working
at off-campus centers, must take half the course work
from full-time UF faculty members and must pass a
comprehensive written examination by a committee
recommended by the Dean of the College of Engineering
and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. This
written comprehensive examination may be taken at an
off-campus site. The College of Engineering may use the
Fundamentals of Engineering examination in lieu of the
GRE for admitting students into the nonthesis master's
degree programs.
Thesis first submission: Thesis students must
prepare and present a thesis acceptable to the supervisory
committees and the Graduate School. For checklist:
http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-thesis.pdf.
First submission is always on plain paper.
Electronic final submission: Electronic final
submission is required for students who started their
graduate program in Fall 2001 or later. For more






GENERAL INFORMATION
34
information, visit http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/pdf-files/
checklist-dissertation.pdf and http://etd.circa.ufl.edu
Change from thesis to nonthesis option: Permission of
the supervisory committee is needed to change from thesis
to nonthesis option. This permission must be forwarded
to the Graduate School by midpoint of the final term. The
candidate must meet all the requirements of the nonthesis
option as specified above. A maximum of 3 credits earned
with a grade of S in 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis)
can be counted toward the degree requirements only if
converted to credit as A, B+, or B in Individual Work.
The supervisory committee must indicate that the work
was productive in and by itself and that the work warrants
credit as a special problem or special topic course.
Supervisory committee: should be appointed as soon
as possible after the student has been admitted to Graduate
School and no later than the end of the second term.
Supervisory committee duties are to advise the student,
to check on the student's qualifications and progress, to
supervise preparation of the thesis, and to conduct the final
examination.
Final examination: When most of the student's course
work is completed, and the thesis is in final form, the
supervisory committee must examine the student orally
or in writing on (1) the thesis, (2) the major subjects, (3)
the minor or minors, and (4) matters of a general nature
pertaining to the field of study.
The candidate and the entire supervisory committee
must be present at the defense. The defense date must be
fewer than 6 months before degree award. All forms should
be signed at the defense: The candidate and the supervisory
committee chair sign the ETD Rights and Permission
form; and the entire supervisory committee should sign the
ETD Signature Page and the Final Examination Report.
If thesis changes are requested, the supervisory committee
chair may hold the Final Examination report until satisfied
with the thesis.
Final comprehensive examination: Nonthesis students
must pass a comprehensive written or oral examination on
the major and on the minor if a minor is designated. This
comprehensive examination must be taken no more than 6
months before the degree is awarded.


Requirements for the Ph.D.

The Doctor of Philosophy is a research degree and is
granted on evidence of general proficiency, distinctive
attainment in a special field, and particularly on ability for
independent investigation as demonstrated in a dissertation
presenting original research with a high degree of literary
skill. Consequently, doctoral programs are more flexible
and varied than those leading to other graduate degrees.
The Graduate Council does not specify what courses are
required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. General
requirements: the program should be unified in relation to
a clear objective, the program should have the considered
approval of the student's entire supervisory committee,


and the program should include an appropriate number of
credits of doctoral research.


Course Requirements

Course requirements for doctoral degrees vary from
field to field and from student to student. In all fields,
the Ph.D. degree requires at least 90 credits beyond the
bachelor's degree. All master's degrees counted in the
minimum must be earned in the last 7 years.
Transfer of credit: No more than 30 credits of a master's
degree from another institution will be transferred to a
doctoral program. If a student holds a master's degree in a
discipline different from the doctoral program, the master's
work will not be counted in the program unless the academic
unit petitions the Dean of the Graduate School. All courses
beyond the master's degree taken at another university to be
applied to the Ph.D. degree must be taken at an institution
offering the doctoral degree and must be approved for
graduate credit by the Graduate School of the University
of Florida. All courses to be transferred must be graduate
level, letter graded with a grade of B or better and must be
demonstrated to relate directly to the degree being sought.
All such transfer requests must be made by petition of the
supervisory committee no later than the third term of Ph.D.
study. The total number of credits (including 30 for a prior
master's degree) that may be transferred cannot exceed 45,
and in all cases the student must complete the qualifying
examination at the University of Florida. In addition, any
prior graduate credits earned at UF (e.g., a master's degree
in the same or a different discipline) may be transferred into
the doctoral program at the discretion of the supervisory
committee and by petition to the Graduate School. The
petition must show how the prior course work is relevant to
the current degree.
Major: A Ph.D. student does the major work in an
academic unit specifically approved for offering doctoral
courses and supervising dissertations. See Graduate
Programs. At least a B (3.00) is needed for courses included
in the major.
Minor: With the supervisory committee's approval, the
student may choose one or more minor fields. Minor work
may be completed in any academic unit outside the major,
if approved for master's or doctoral programs listed in
this catalog. The collective grade for courses included in a
minor must be B (3.00) or higher.
If one minor is chosen, the supervisory committee
member representing the minor suggests 12 to 24 credits
of courses numbered 5000 or higher as preparation for
a qualifying examination. Part of this credit may have
been earned in the master's program. If two minors are
chosen, each must include at least 8 credits. Competence
in the minor is demonstrated by written examination
by the minor academic unit, or by the oral qualifying
examination.
Minor course work at the doctoral level may include
courses in more than one academic unit, if the objective of
the minor is clearly stated and the combination of courses








is approved by the Graduate School (this approval is not
required for a minor in one academic unit).


Leave of Absence

A doctoral student who ceases to be registered at UF
for more than 1 term needs prior written approval from
the supervisory committee chair for a leave of absence
for a stated period of time. The student must reapply for
admission on returning. See Readmission and Catalog Year.


Supervisory Committee
Supervisory committees are nominated by the academic
unit chair, approved by the dean of the college concerned,
and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. The
committee should be appointed as soon as possible after
the student starts doctoral work and no later than the
end of the second term of equivalent full-time study. The
Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all
supervisory committees.
Duties and responsibilities of the supervisory
committee:
1. Inform the student of all regulations governing the
degree sought. This does not absolve the student
from responsibility for being informed about these
regulations. See Student Responsibility.
2. Meet immediately after appointment to review the
student's qualifications and discuss and approve a
program of study.
3. Meet to discuss and approve the proposed dissertation
project and the plans for carrying it out.
4. Give the student a yearly evaluation letter in addition to
S/U grades earned for research courses 7979 and 7980.
The chair writes this letter after consulting with the
supervisory committee.
5. Conduct the qualifying examination (or participate
in it, if administered by the academic unit). In
either event, the student and the entire supervisory
committee must be present for the oral part of the
examination. This examination must be given on
campus. For exceptions, see Examinations in General
Regulations.
6. Meet when at least half the work on the dissertation is
complete, to review procedure, progress, and expected
results; and to make suggestions for completion.
7. Meet on campus when the dissertation is completed
and conduct the final oral examination to assure
that the dissertation is a piece of original research
and a contribution to knowledge. At least four
faculty members, including the entire supervisory
committee, must be present with the candidate
for this examination. Only the actual supervisory
committee may sign the ETD Signature Page, and
they must approve the dissertation unanimously. See
Examinations in General Regulations.
Membership: The supervisory committee for a doctoral
candidate comprises at least four members selected from


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D.
35
the Graduate Faculty. At least two members, including the
chair, should be from the academic unit recommending
the degree. At least one member serves as external
member and should be from a different educational
discipline, with no ties to the home academic unit. One
regular member may be from the home academic unit or
another unit.
If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee includes
at least one Graduate Faculty member representing the
student's minor. If the student elects more than one minor,
each minor area must be represented on the supervisory
committee.
Special appointments: People without Graduate Faculty
status may be made official members of a student's
supervisory committee through the special appointment
process. The student's supervisory committee chair requests
the special appointment, briefly explaining what the special
appointment contributes to the supervisory committee.
A special appointment is made for a specific supervisory
committee. If a student changes to a new degree or major
and the committee chair wishes to include the special
member on the new supervisory committee, another
request must be submitted to the Graduate School for
the new committee. Appropriate candidates for special
appointments include individuals from outside of the
University of Florida with specific expertise who contribute
to a graduate student's program of study; tenure-track
faculty not yet qualified for Graduate Faculty status; and
nontenure-track faculty or staff at the University of Florida
who do not qualify for Graduate Faculty status.
Special appointments have several limitations because
they are not members of the Graduate Faculty. A special
appointment may not serve as a supervisory committee
chair, cochair, or external member. A special
appointment may not be the minor representative for a
student with a minor.
External member: The external member's responsibilities
are to represent the interests of the Graduate School
and the University of Florida; be knowledgeable about
Graduate Council policies; and serve as an advocate for
the student at doctoral committee activities. In case the
academic unit's committee activity conflicts with broader
University policies or practices, the external member is
responsible for bringing such conflicts to the attention of
the appropriate governing body. Therefore, the external
member is prohibited from holding any official interest
in the doctoral candidate's major academic unit. Faculty
holding joint, affiliate, courtesy, or adjunct appointments
in the degree-granting academic unit cannot be external
members on a student's committee.
Minor member: The faculty member who represents a
minor on a student's committee may be appointed as the
external member if they do not have a courtesy graduate
appointment in the student's major academic unit.
Cochair: To substitute for the chair of the committee
at any examinations, the cochair must be in the same
academic unit as the candidate.
Retired faculty: Graduate Faculty members who retire
may continue their service on supervisory committees for






GENERAL INFORMATION
36
1 year. With approval of the academic unit, retired faculty
may continue serving on existing or new committees
beyond this period.
Substituting members at qualifying and final examination:
If a supervisory committee member cannot be present at
the student's final defense, a Graduate Faculty member
in the same academic area may substitute for the absent
committee member. The substitute should sign the Final
Examination form on the left side, in the space provided
for committee members, noting the name of the absent
member.
The chair of the student's major academic unit also
must indicate the reason for the absence and indicate that
the absent member agreed to this substitution at the final
examination.
The substitute should not sign the ETD signature page.
The original committee member must sign.
With approval of all members of the supervisory
committee, one committee member (not the chair or
external member) may be off-site at a qualifying oral
examination or at the final oral defense of the thesis or
dissertation, using modern communication technology to
be present rather than being physically present.
No substitutes are allowed for the chair or external
member of the committee. Changes to the supervisory
committee may be entered online before the qualifying
examination.
The Graduate Council wants each supervisory
committee to function as a University committee (not
a departmental committee), applying University-wide
standards to the various doctoral degrees. For complete
information on the appointment process, consult the
Graduate Council Policy Manual, http://gradschool.rgp.
ufl.edu/archived-files/policy-manual-archived-copy.html
(Chapter VIII).


Language Requirement
Any foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. is
established by the major academic unit with approval of
the college. The student should check with the graduate
coordinator of the appropriate academic unit for specific
information. The foreign language departments offer
classes for graduate students starting to study a language.
See the current Schedule of Courses for available languages.
All candidates must be able to use the English language
correctly and effectively, as judged by the supervisory
committee.


Campus Residence Requirement

Beyond the first 30 credits counted toward the doctoral
degree, students must complete 30 credits enrolled at
the University of Florida campus or at an approved
branch station of the University of Florida Agricultural
Experiment Stations or the Graduate Engineering and
Research Center. A department or college may establish
and monitor its own more stringent requirement as
desired.


Qualifying Examination
All Ph.D. candidates must take the qualifying
examination. It may be taken during the third term of
graduate study beyond the bachelor's degree.
The student must be registered in the term the
qualifying examination is given.
The examination, prepared and evaluated by the full
supervisory committee or the major and minor academic
units, is both written and oral and covers the major
and minor subjects. Except for allowed substitutions,
all members of the supervisory committee must be
present with the student at the oral part. At this time the
supervisory committee is responsible for deciding whether
the student is qualified to continue work toward a Ph.D.
degree.
If a student fails the qualifying examination, the
Graduate School must be notified. A re-examination
may be requested, but it must be recommended by the
supervisory committee and approved by the Graduate
School. At least 1 term of additional preparation is needed
before re-examination.
Time Lapse: Between the oral part of the qualifying
examination and the date of the degree there must be
at least 2 terms. The term the qualifying examination is
passed is counted, if the examination occurs before the
midpoint of the term.


Registration in Research Courses

Advanced Research (7979) is open to doctoral students
not yet admitted to candidacy (classified as 7 and 8).
Students enrolled in 7979 during the term they qualify for
candidacy will stay in this registration unless the academic
unit elects to change their enrollment to Research for
Doctoral Dissertation (7980), which is reserved for
doctoral students admitted to candidacy (classified as 9).


Admission to Candidacy
A graduate student does not become a candidate for the
Ph.D. degree until granted formal admission to candidacy.
Such admission requires the approval of the student's
supervisory committee, the academic unit chair, the college
dean, and the Dean of the Graduate School. The approval
must be based on (1) the academic record of the student,
(2) the supervisory committee's opinion on overall fitness
for candidacy, (3) an approved dissertation topic, and (4)
a qualifying examination as described above. The student
should apply for admission to candidacy as soon as
the qualifying examination is passed and a dissertation
topic is approved by the student's supervisory
committee.


Dissertation
Dissertation first submission: First submission of
the dissertation is on plain paper. The Graduate School








Editorial Office must receive this by the Dissertation first
submission deadline, or at least 5 working days before
the defense (whichever is sooner). For checklist: http://
gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-dissertation.
pdf. The Editorial Office e-mails the student when the
dissertation has been reviewed. The student is responsible
for retrieving the edited dissertation and review comments.
Typically, students make these changes after the defense,
when they make their committee's changes. Students then
work diligently to make final submission and to procure
acceptance of the dissertation before the final acceptance
deadline.
Electronic final submission: Students who entered
in Fall 2001 or later must submit their final dissertations
electronically. For more information, visit http://gradschool.
rgp.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-dissertation.pdf and http://
etd.circa.ufl.edu.
Each doctoral candidate must prepare and present a
dissertation that shows independent investigation and
that is acceptable in form and content to the supervisory
committee and to the Graduate School. Dissertations
must be written in English, except for students pursuing
degrees in Romance or Germanic languages and literatures.
Students in these disciplines, with the approval of their
supervisory committees, may write in the topic language.
Since all dissertations are published by microfilm (and
most are published electronically), the work must be of
publishable quality and must be in a form suitable for
publication.
Publication of dissertation: All dissertation students
must pay a $55 microfilm fee to University Financial
Services, S113 Criser Hall. All dissertation students also
must sign a microfilm agreement form.
Copyright: The student is automatically the copyright
holder, by virtue of having written the dissertation. A
copyright page should be included immediately after the
title page to indicate this. Registering copyright is not
required, and only benefits students who might need to
sue someone for money for infringing on their copyright.
Most dissertations do not involve money. If you choose
to register copyright, provide $45 (certified check, cashier's
check, or money order payable to PQIL) with the signed
microfilm agreement form, including a permanent address
where you can always be reached. Because these checks
go to PQIL months after graduation and take months to
process, make sure that the certified check, cashier's check,
or money order is good for at least a year.


Guidelines for Restriction on Release
of Dissertations
Research performed at the University can effectively
contribute to the education of our students and to the
body of knowledge that is our heritage only if the results of
the research are published freely and openly. Conflicts can
develop when it is in the interests of sponsors of university
research to restrict such publication. When such conflicts
arise, the University must decide what compromises
it is willing to accept, taking into account the relevant


REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PH.D.

circumstances. The AAU guidelines contained herein were
adopted by the University of Florida Graduate Council on
January 19, 1989.
1. Sponsors' recommendations should be considered
advisory and not mandatory.
2. Maximum delay in publication should not exceed 3
months.
3. No additional delays in publication beyond the pre-
review. Timely submission of any patent or copyright
applications requires effective communication among
investigators and sponsors throughout the project.
4. Participation in nonclassified sponsored research
programs cannot be restricted on the basis of
citizenship.
5. Agreements involving publication delays must not
delay students from final defense of their dissertations.


Final Examination
After submitting the dissertation and completing all
other work prescribed for the degree (but no earlier than
the term before the degree is awarded, the candidate is
given a final examination, oral or written or both, by the
supervisory committee, on campus. All members must
be present with the candidate at the oral part of this
examination. The candidate and the entire supervisory
committee must be present at the defense. The defense
should be no more than 6 months before degree award. All
forms should be signed at the defense: the candidate and
the supervisory committee chair sign the ETD Rights and
Permission form; and the entire supervisory committee
should sign the ETD Signature Page and the Final
Examination Report. If dissertation changes are requested,
the supervisory committee chair may hold the Final
Examination report until satisfied with the dissertation.
Satisfactory performance on this examination and
adherence to all Graduate School regulations outlined
above complete the requirements for the degree.
Time limitation: All work for the doctorate must be
completed within 5 calendar years after the qualifying
examination, or this examination must be repeated.


Specialized Graduate
Degrees

The Graduate School monitors the degree criteria
stipulated below. For detailed requirements, see Fields of
Instruction.


Master of Accounting
The Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) is the graduate
degree for students seeking professional careers in public
accounting, business organizations, and government. The
M.Acc. program offers specializations in auditing/financial
accounting, accounting systems, and taxation.






GENERAL INFORMATION
38
The recommended curriculum to prepare for a
professional career in accounting is the 3/2 five-year
program with a joint awarding of the Bachelor of Science
in Accounting and the Master of Accounting degrees on
satisfactory completion of the 150-credit program. The
entry point into the 3/2 is the start of the senior year.
Students who have already completed an undergraduate
degree in accounting may enter the 1-year M.Acc.
program, which requires 34 credits of course work. At
least 18 credits must be in graduate-level accounting,
excluding preparatory courses. All students must take
a final comprehensive examination. For details about
requirements, see General Regulations for master's degrees.
M.Acc./J.D. program: This joint program culminates
in both the Juris Doctor degree awarded by the College
of Law and the Master of Accounting degree awarded by
the Graduate School. The program is for students with an
undergraduate degree in accounting, who are interested
in advanced studies in both accounting and law. About
20 credits fewer are needed for the joint program than if
the two degrees were earned separately. The two degrees
are awarded after completing curriculum requirements for
both degrees. Students must take the GMAT (or the GRE),
and also the LSAT before admission, and must meet the
admission requirements for the College of Law (J.D.) and
the Fisher School of Accounting (M. Acc.).


Master of Advertising
The Master of Advertising (M.Adv.) program develops
leaders in the profession by giving students theoretical,
research, and decision-making skills essential for strategic
advertising and integrated communications planning; and
the opportunity to develop expertise in an area such as
account management, research, creative strategy, media
planning, international and cross-cultural advertising, new
technology, special market advertising, and advertising sales
management.
Students without a basic course or substantial
professional experience in marketing or advertising must
complete articulation courses before entering the program.
All students must complete a basic statistics course
before entering. The M.Adv. requires at least 33 credits
and a thesis. Some areas allow a terminal project in lieu of
thesis (with permission from the academic unit's Graduate
Faculty).
Students select a supervisory committee to guide
selection of courses, selection of thesis topic (or project
in lieu of thesis), and completion of the thesis or project.
At least one committee member must be from the
Department of Advertising's Graduate Faculty.
Students complete and orally defend their theses or
projects. The student's supervisory committee is responsible
for evaluating the thesis or project and the final defense.


Master of Agribusiness
The Master of Agribusiness (M.AB.) degree program
offers advanced study for students seeking careers in sales,


marketing, and management with organizations that
operate mainly in the food industry and agribusiness
sector. Through rigorous practical course work, students
can capitalize on the program's broad-based resources,
as students look forward to careers as food marketers,
commodity merchandisers, and agribusiness managers.
Students may focus on areas such as strategic sales,
international marketing, human resource management, and
the futures market. This program is not recommended for
students seeking careers in research and university teaching.
The program requires at least 30 credits (core and
elective courses in finance, marketing, management,
decision-making, and quantitative methods relevant to
agribusiness). These courses prepare students to analyze
current situations, anticipate opportunities, and develop
effective action plans. Before starting the program, students
must have taken and successfully passed prerequisite
courses in marketing, management, statistics, and finance.
Contact the academic unit for information on additional

prerequisite courses and program requirements.


Master of Agriculture
The degree of Master of Agriculture is for students with
primary interests other than research.
General requirements are the same as for the Master of
Science degree without thesis; except that for the Master of
Agriculture, a major comprises 12 credits of graduate courses
in an academic unit. At least one member of the Graduate
Faculty must be included on the student's supervisory
committee. A comprehensive written or oral examination is
required in the term the degree is awarded.


Master of Architecture
The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) is an accredited
graduate degree meeting the professional requirements
of the National Architectural Accrediting Board, for
students who wish to qualify for registration and practice
as architects. Candidates are admitted from architectural,
related, and unrelated undergraduate backgrounds;
professional experience is encouraged but not required.
The M.Arch. requires at least 52 credits, including
no more than 6 credits in ARC 6971 or 6979. Course
sequences in design history and theory, structures,
technology, and practice must be completed. Students
are encouraged to propose individual programs of study
(outside of required courses), and interdisciplinary work is
encouraged.


Master of Arts in Teaching and Master
of Science in Teaching
These degrees combine graduate study in a discipline
with selected education courses and a teaching internship,
providing flexible curricula that prepare students for a
variety of options including teaching and further graduate
work.








Requirements for the degrees are as follows:
1. A reading knowledge of one foreign language if
required by the student's major.
2. Satisfactory completion of at least 36 credits while
registered as a graduate student, with work distributed
as follows:
a. At least 18 credits in the major and 6 credits in
the minor.
b. Six credits in an academic unit internship in
teaching (6943 Internship in College Teaching). Three
years of successful teaching experience in a state-
certified school may be substituted for the internship
requirement, and credits thus made available may be
used for further work in the major, the minor, or in
education.
c. At least one course selected from three or
more of the following: social and/or psychological
foundations of education; education technology;
counselor education; special education, and
community college curriculum. Other areas may
be added or substituted at the discretion of the
supervisory committee. These courses may be used to
comprise a minor.
3. Off-campus work: At least 8 to 16 credits (at the
academic unit's discretion), including at least 6 credits
in one term, must be earned on the Gainesville
campus. Beyond that, credits earned in off-campus UF
courses approved by the Graduate School are accepted,
if they are appropriate to the student's degree program
as determined by the supervisory committee.
4. At degree completion, the student needs at least 36
credits in the major, for certification purposes.
5. The student must pass a final comprehensive
examination (written, oral, or both). This examination
covers the field of concentration and the minor.


Master of Arts in Urban and Regional
Planning
The degree of Master of Arts in Urban and Regional
Planning is a graduate degree for professional urban
and regional planners and meets the educational
requirements for the American Institute of Certified
Planners. The program is accredited by the Planning
Accreditation Board.
The general requirements are the same as those for other
Master of Arts degrees with thesis except that the minimum
registration required is 52 credits including no more than
6 credits in URP 6971 or 6979. All areas allow a project
(requiring 6 credits) in lieu of thesis (with permission from
the academic unit's Graduate Faculty).
M.A.U.R.P./J.D. joint program: A 4-year program
leading to the Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in Urban
and Regional Planning degrees is offered under the
joint auspices of the College of Law and the College of
Design, Construction, and Planning, Department of
Urban and Regional Planning. For students interested in
the legal problems of urban and regional planning, this
program blends law studies with relevant course work in
the planning curriculum. Students receive both degrees


SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES

at the end of a 4-year course of study whereas separate
programs would require 5 years. Students must take the
GRE and the LSAT before admission, must be admitted
to both programs, and must complete the first year of law
school course work before commingling law and planning
courses. A thesis is required on completing the course
work.
Interested students should apply to both the Holland
Law Center and the Graduate School, noting on the
application the joint nature of their admission requests.
For more information on the program, contact the
Holland Law Center and the Department of Urban and
Regional Planning.


Master of Building Construction
The Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.) degree
for students pursuing advanced work in construction
management, construction techniques, and research
problems in the construction field.
General requirements are the same as for the Master of
Science degree except that the M.B. C. requires at least
33 graduate credits (at least 18 in the School of Building
Construction). Nine credits must be earned at the 6000
level in building construction courses. The remaining 15
credits may be earned in other academic units. A thesis is
not required, but an independent research study (BCN
6934) of at least 3 credits is required.
When the student's course work is completed (or
practically so) and the independent research report is
complete, the supervisory committee must examine the
student orally on (1) the independent research report,
(2) the major subjects, (3) the minor or minors, and (4)
matters of a general nature pertaining to the field of study.
Joint Program: The M.B.C./J.D. program is offered in
conjunction with the Levin College of Law.


Master of Business Administration
The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree
gives students (1) conceptual knowledge for understanding
the functions and behaviors common to business
organizations; and (2) analytical, problem-solving, and
decision-making skills essential for effective management.
Emphasizes developing the student's capacities and skills
for business decision making.
The traditional M.B.A. curriculum is structured so
that students may extend their knowledge in a specialized
field. The program offers certificate programs in auditing
and informational technology, financial services, supply
chain management, decision and information sciences,
entrepreneurship and technology management, and global
management, and concentrations in finance, security
analysis, real estate, competitive strategy, marketing,
entrepreneurship, decision and information sciences,
management, global management, human resource
management, Latin American business, management,
international studies, and sports administration.






GENERAL INFORMATION
40
Admission: Applicants for admission must submit
recent official scores from the Graduate Management
Admission Test (GMAT) and official transcripts for all
previous academic work. All program options require at
least 2 years of full-time professional work experience
performed after receiving an acceptable bachelor's degree,
along with written essays and personal recommendations
from employers. Some applicants are asked to interview.
Applicants whose native, first language is not English must
submit scores for the Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL). Admission is competitive; thus, meeting
minimum requirements is unlikely, in itself, to result in
admission.
A heterogeneous student body is seen as an important
asset of the program. Accordingly, the backgrounds of
students include a wide range of disciplines and cultures.
Although the curriculum assumes no previous academic
work in business administration, enrolling students find
introductory course work in statistics, calculus, and
financial accounting beneficial.
For more specific information on other aspects of the
program, contact the Office of Admissions, Florida M.B.A.
Program, 134 Bryan Hall, P.O. Box 117152, Gainesville
FL 32611-7152, or visit the website, http://www.
floridamba.ufl.edu.
Course work required: At least 48 acceptable credits of
course work for the executive option, 2-year option, and
1-year Option A. The other 1-year options require
32 credits. Credits cannot be transferred from another
institution or program.

Options
Traditional M.B.A. 2-year option: The traditional
M.B.A. program requires 4 terms of continuous full-time
study. Entering in the fall only, many students spend the
summer on internships. Requires at least 2 years of full-
time, post-undergraduate work experience.
Traditional M.B.A. 1-year, Option A: Students with an
acceptable bachelor's degree, which need not be in business,
may complete this option in 12 months. The program
starts in the summer and requires 48 acceptable credits.
Requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.
Traditional M.B.A. 1-year, Option B: For students
with recent, acceptable undergraduate degrees in business
(completed within 7 years before starting the program), this
option starts in July. Students take mostly electives during
summer B, fall, and spring terms and graduate in May.
Requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.
Executive M.B.A. option: A 20-month program for
working professionals. Students attend classes 1 extended
weekend per month (Friday-Sunday). The program is
divided into 5 terms and starts in August. Requires 8
years of post-undergraduate work experience, and students
are expected to have people or project management
responsibilities in their current positions.
M.B.A. for Professionals 2-year option: This 27-
month program starts in August and January and is for
professionals who work full time while pursuing their


degrees part time. Students attend classes 1 weekend per
month (Saturday-Sunday) and must attend a 1-week
in-residence elective class. Requires 2 years of post-
undergraduate work experience.
M.B.A. for Professionals 1-year option: For students
with acceptable undergraduate degrees in business
(completed within 7 years before starting the program),
this 15-month option starts in August. Students attend
classes 1 weekend per month (Saturday-Sunday) and
must attend a 1-week in-residence elective class. The
first meeting includes a 1-week, on-campus foundations
review of basic course work. Requires 2 years of post-
undergraduate work experience.
Internet M.B.A. 2-year option: This 27-month
program starts in January and allows students with
computer and Internet access to "attend" classes and
interact with faculty and classmates via such technology
as e-mail, DVD, streaming video, synchronous group
discussion software, asynchronous class presentation
software, and multimedia courseware. Students visit
campus 1 weekend (Saturday-Sunday) every 4 months.
Requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.
Internet M.B.A. 1-year option: For students with
acceptable undergraduate degrees in business (completed
within 7 years before starting this program), this 15-month
option starts in January and gives students and faculty
the same interactive technology as the Internet M.B.A.
2-year option. Students visit campus 1 weekend (Saturday-
Sunday) every 4 months. The first meeting includes a 1-
week, on-campus foundations review of basic course work.
Requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.
M.B.A. for professionals in South Florida
option: This 24 month program starts in October. For
professionals who wish to continue working full time while
pursuing their degrees part time. Students attend classes
once every 3 weeks (Saturday-Sunday) in Fort Lauderdale.
Requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.
M.B.A./M.S. in medical sciences (biotechnology)
program: Concurrent studies leading to the Master of
Business Administration and Master of Science degrees,
offered in cooperation with the College of Medicine,
are in response to the needs of businesses engaged in
biotechnological sciences. Both degrees can be obtained in
3 years. The program requires 1 year of science courses, 1
year of business courses, and a year devoted to research and
electives in business and science. Research is done in one
of the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research
core laboratories. Students must meet the admission and
curriculum requirements of both degrees. Requirements of
the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant
is admitted to the program. A student must at all times
remain in good standing in both degree programs to
remain in the M.B.A. program. Requires 2 years of post-
undergraduate work experience.
M.B.A./Ph.D. in medical sciences program:
Concurrent studies leading to the Master of Business
Administration and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are
offered in cooperation with the College of Medicine. This
120-credit program trains research scientists to assume








responsibilities as managers of biotechnical industries.
Estimated time to complete both degrees is 5 to 7 years.
Students must meet the admission and curriculum
requirements of both programs. Requirements of the
M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant
is admitted to the program. Requires 2 years of post-
undergraduate work experience.
M.B.A./J.D. program: A program of joint studies
leading to the Master of Business Administration and Juris
Doctor degrees is offered under the joint auspices of the
Warrington College of Business Administration and the
Levin College of Law. Current M.B.A. or J.D. students
must declare their intent to apply for the second degree
during their first year. Applications are then due according
to admission schedules for that year. Both degrees are
awarded after a 4-year course of study. Students must take
both the LSAT and the GMAT before admission and
meet the admission and curriculum requirements of both
degrees. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those
in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program.
Requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.
M.B.A./Pharm.D. program in management and
pharmacy administration: A program of concurrent
studies culminating in both the Master of Business
Administration and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees allows
students interested in both management and pharmacy
administration to obtain the appropriate education in both
areas. Candidates must meet the entrance requirements
and follow the entrance procedures of both the Warrington
College of Business Administration and the College of
Pharmacy, and admission to the two programs must be
simultaneous. The degrees may be granted after 5 years
of study. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those
in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program.
Requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.
M.B.A./M.I.M. program in international
management: A dual degree program between the
University of Florida (UF) and the American Graduate
School of International Management (Thunderbird)
makes it possible to earn both degrees after 3 years of
study. Students start the program at UF and apply to
Thunderbird in their first year. Requirements of the
M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant
is admitted to the program. Requires 2 years of
post-undergraduate work experience.
Exchange programs: The M.B.A. program offers
second-year students exchange opportunities at numerous
international universities. Currently, exchange programs
exist with schools in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile,
China, Canada, Denmark, England, Finland, France,
Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Liechtenstein, the
Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan,
Thailand, and Turkey. For a complete list of exchange
partners, see http://www.cba.ufl.edu/mang/docs/maib_
exchange_partners.pdf.


SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES


Master of Education
The Master of Education degree program meets the
need for professional personnel to serve a variety of
functions required in established and emerging educational
activities of modern society. A thesis is not required.
All master's programs require at least 36 credits, with at
least half of these credits earned in courses in the College
of Education. No more than 6 credits earned from 3000-
and 4000-level courses taken outside the academic unit
may be counted toward the minimum requirements for
the degree. (See also General Requirements for Master's
Degrees.)
At least 16 credits must be earned while the student is
enrolled as a graduate student in courses offered on the
Gainesville campus of the University of Florida, including
registration for at least 6 credits in a single term.


Master of Engineering

Students may choose a thesis or nonthesis option for
the Master of Engineering (M.E.) degree. To be eligible
for admission to the M.E. program, students must have
earned a bachelor's degree from an ABET-accredited
college or they must complete articulation work for
equivalence. Admission requirements of the Graduate
School must be met. The College of Engineering may use
the Fundamentals of Engineering examination in lieu of
the GRE for admitting students into the nonthesis master's
degree programs. Students who do not meet the ABET
requirement may be admitted to the Master of Science
program (see section on Master ofArts and Master of
Science).
The nonthesis M.E. degree is a 30-credit course-work-
only degree (practice-oriented project or capstone course
may be included in the 30 credits). At least 15 credits must
be in the student's major at the 5000 level or higher. For
work outside the major, courses numbered 3000 or above
(not to exceed 6 credits) may be taken if they are part of
an approved plan of study. If a minor is chosen, at least 6
credits are required: Two 6-credit minors may be taken. At
the discretion of individual engineering academic units, an
oral or written examination may be required.
The thesis option requires 30 credits of course work,
including up to 6 credits of 6971 (Research for Master's
Thesis). At least 12 credits (not counting 6971) must be
in the student's major. Courses in the major must be at
the 5000 level or higher. For work outside the major, up
to 6 credits of courses numbered 3000 or above may be
taken if part of an approved plan of study. If a minor is
chosen, at least 6 credits are required: Two 6-credit minors
may be taken at the discretion of the academic unit. A
comprehensive oral and/or written final examination is
required.
An off-campus (distance learning) student who is a
candidate for the nonthesis M.E. degree must take half the
course work from full-time UF faculty members and must
pass a comprehensive written examination administered by
a committee from the academic unit. If the student has a






GENERAL INFORMATION
42
minor, the committee must include a member representing
that minor.
Master of Civil Engineering (M.C.E.): a variant of
the Master of Engineering degree. The M.C.E. focuses
on design and professional practice in civil engineering.
Requirements include prescribed graduate-level instruction
in design and professional practice; 6 months (or its
equivalent) of full-time experience related to civil
engineering practice that occurred after the student
achieved junior status; and completing the Fundamentals
of Engineering examination. If a thesis or report is
required, it must be design related. For details contact the
Department Chair, Civil and Coastal Engineering.


Master of Family, Youth, and
Community Sciences
The Master of Family, Youth, and Community
Sciences degree prepares students for mid-level leadership
positions in public and private organizations, agencies,
and businesses that address the needs of families, youths,
and communities. The program of study provides the
student with a broad base of knowledge in the discipline.
It includes required courses in the theoretical foundations
of the discipline, public policy analysis, program planning
and evaluation, nonprofit management and ethics for
practitioners. Requires at least 32 credit hours (half of
which are electives the student selects with the supervisory
committee). Completing the degree requires comprehensive
written and oral examinations.


Master of Fine Arts
The Master of Fine Arts degree is offered with majors in
art, creative writing, and theatre. Same requirements as for
the Master of Arts with thesis, except the M.F.A. requires
at least 60 credits (48 for creative writing), including 6 to 9
credits in 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis). Students in art
and theatre substitute 6973 (Individual Project) creative work
in lieu of the written thesis.
Admission: Applicants requesting admission to any of
the programs should have an earned baccalaureate degree
in the same or a closely related field from an accredited
institution.
Students must fulfill the admission requirements of their
disciplines and the Graduate School's admission criteria.
In cases where the undergraduate degree is not in the area
chosen for graduate study, the student must demonstrate
a level of achievement fully equivalent to the bachelor's
degree in the chosen graduate field. A candidate deficient
in certain areas must remove the deficiencies by successfully
completing appropriate courses.
Art or theatre candidates also must submit a portfolio of
the creative work, or must audition, before being accepted
into the program. Creative writing candidates must submit
2 short stories, 2 chapters of a novel, or 6 to 10 poems.
Three years of work in residence (two for creative
writing) are usually needed to complete degree


requirements. If deficiencies must be removed, the
residency could be longer.
See Fields of Instruction for Art, English, and Theatre.
Art: The M.F.A. degree with a major in art is for
those who wish to prepare themselves as teachers of art
in colleges and universities and for those who wish to
attain a professional level of proficiency in studio work.
Specialization is offered in the studio areas of ceramics,
creative photography, drawing, painting, printmaking,
sculpture, graphic design, and digital media. For studio
work, the M.F.A. is generally the terminal degree.
In addition to the general requirements above, students
must take at least 60 credits. Requirements include 42
credits in studio courses (24 in specialization, 12 in
electives, and 6 in ART 6971 or 6973C); 6 credits in art
history; 3 credits in teaching art in higher education; 3
credits in aesthetics, criticism, or theory; and 6 credits of
electives.
The College reserves the right to retain student work for
purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction.
Creative writing: The M.F.A. in creative writing
develops writers of poetry and fiction by a series of
workshops and literature seminars. Candidates are
expected to produce a thesis (a manuscript of publishable
poetry or fiction) at the end of the 2-year program.
The degree requires nine courses (four workshops, three
literature courses, and two electives), three reading
tutorials, and a thesis: 48 credits in all. Students take
at least one workshop each term. All of the literature
courses cannot be in the same century. The electives may
be literature seminars or workshops; one elective may be
an approved graduate course outside the Department of
English.
Theatre: The M.F.A. degree with a major in theatre
is for those interested in production-oriented theatrical
careers and teaching. Two specializations are offered: acting
and design. The craft skills encompassed in the program
are later applied in public and studio productions.
The program requires 60 credits, including 18 credits of
core classes, 17 credits of specialty training, an internship,
and a project in lieu of thesis.


Master of Fisheries and Aquatic
Sciences
The nonthesis M.F.A.S. program trains students in
the technical aspects of fisheries and aquatic sciences
emphasizing written and oral communication of scientific
information. Requirements are the same as for the Master
of Science degree with the nonthesis option, except that
the M.F.A.S. also requires a technical paper. The program
requires at least 32 graduate credits of graded course work
(at least 16 in the major). The final draft of the technical
paper must be submitted to all supervisory committee
members for approval at least 3 weeks before the scheduled
date of the oral and written final examination.








Master of Forest Resources and
Conservation
The Master of Forest Resources and Conservation
(M.F.R.C.) degree is for additional professional preparation
rather than primary research. Same requirements as for
master's degrees, except that the M.F.R.C. requires GRE
scores of at least 500 verbal and 500 quantitative.
Work required: at least 32 credits of letter-graded
course work, with at least 12 credits of graduate course
work in the major. A thesis is not required, but the student
must complete a technical project in an appropriate field.
This project may take various forms, such as a literature
review, extension publication, video, training manual, or
curriculum. The M.F.R.C. requires a final examination
covering the candidate's entire field of study. The student
must present the work to the supervisory committee in an
on-campus public forum before the final examination.


Master of Health Administration
The Master of Health Administration, offered by the
College of Public Health and Health Professions, trains
qualified individuals to become managers and leaders of
health care organizations. The degree provides a core of
business and analytical skills, concepts and knowledge
specific to health administration, opportunities for
application and synthesis, and exposure to the field of
practice. The M.H.A. program admits students only in the
fall term and requires full-time study for 2 years, plus a
summer internship between the first and second years. The
program requires a total of 62 credits.


Master of Health Science
The Master of Health Science degree, offered by
the College of Public Health and Health Professions,
provides exposure to health research and meets the need
for leadership personnel in established and emerging
health care programs. The College offers programs in
occupational therapy and rehabilitation counseling.
There are three paths to enter occupational therapy
and attain the Master of Health Science degree. The
4-term thesis option emphasizes research and is the
appropriate route for (but not limited to) students seeking
admission to the College of Public Health and Health
Profession's Ph.D. program in rehabilitation science.
The 3-term nonthesis option emphasizes research and
advanced theories related to the practice of occupational
therapy. Both options prepare leaders in the profession
and require 36 credits. The third option, the distance
learning program, is for working professionals to increase
knowledge in emerging practice areas and leadership.
The rehabilitation counseling program meets the need
for professional personnel to serve in various areas of
rehabilitation counseling. The Department requires at least
52 academic credits for most students, including at least
49 credits in the major. Some exceptionally well-qualified


SPECILAIZED GRADUATE DEGREES

students may need fewer credits with approval of the
program chair. Work in the major includes both practicum
experiences and a full-time internship. Elective courses
may complement the major and relate to the student's
career plans. All candidates must pass a comprehensive
examination. See General Regulations for requirements for
all master's degrees.


Master of Interior Design
The Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.) allows
students to direct their attention to a variety of topics,
including historic preservation and restoration of interior
architecture; design for special populations (for example,
the disabled, elderly, and children); investigation and
application of design technology, materials, and lighting;
design education; issues of indoor air quality and
sustainability; environment and behavior research, theory,
and applications in interior design.
Work required: at least 36 credits (no more than 6
thesis credits). Required preparatory courses are in addition
to the minimum credits for graduate work.


Master of International Construction
Management
The Master of International Construction Management
(M.I.C.M.) is a nonthesis, distance education, advanced
degree program with a research report/project requirement
offered by the Rinker School of Building Construction.
The M.I.C.M. allows students with computer and Internet
access to attend classes at any time, any place and to
interact with faculty and classmates via such technology as
e-mail, CD-ROM, streaming video, synchronous group
discussion software, asynchronous class presentation
software, and multimedia courseware. The program
incorporates leading-edge interactive technology and
proctored course final examinations.
Admissions: Applicants for admission must have (1) an
undergraduate degree, (2) at least 5 years of meaningful,
supervisory-level construction management experience, (3)
cumulative verbal and quantitative GRE scores of 1000
or higher, (4) a grade point average of 3.00 on a 4.0 scale,
(5) if an international student, a TOEFL score of 565 or
higher, and (6) sponsorship by the employer.
Work required: The M.I.C.M. has three main
specializations: (1) corporate/strategic management, (2)
project management, and (3) construction management.
The M.I.C.M. prepares students to assume upper-
level construction management responsibilities in a
multinational construction company. Other specializations:
sustainable construction, information systems, facilities
management, construction safety, affordable housing,
productivity, and human resource management. In
addition to 6 research-oriented graduate credits, the
student selects one or two specializations and then takes
the rest of the required 33 credits from the remaining
courses and special electives. Students must pass a






GENERAL INFORMATION
44
comprehensive oral and/or written examination on
completing course work and the master's research report/
project.


Master of Landscape Architecture
The degree of Master of Landscape Architecture is
the advanced professional degree for graduates with
baccalaureate credentials in landscape architecture and
is a first professional degree for the graduate from a
nonlandscape architectural background. Candidates
are admitted from related and unrelated fields and
backgrounds. An advanced professional life experience
track is available for eligible candidates.
Work required: Candidates must complete at least
52 credits, including no more than 6 credits of thesis or
project. For students without baccalaureate credentials in
landscape architecture, required preparatory courses are
in addition to the minimum credits for graduate work.
For advanced professional life experience candidates, the
minimum requirement is 30 credits, including thesis. At
least 50% of all course work must be graduate courses
in landscape architecture. Some areas allow a project
(requiring 6 credits) in lieu of thesis, with permission of
the academic unit's Graduate Faculty.


Master of Latin

The Classics Department offers the nonthesis Master
of Latin degree, a 30-credit program mainly for currently
employed and/or certified teaching professionals who wish
to widen their knowledge of Latin, broaden their education
in the field of Classics, and enhance their professional
qualifications. This degree can be attained by students in
residence for fall/spring terms or by a program of summer
course work at UF and by directed independent study and/
or distance learning courses during the regular academic
year.
Students registering during summer terms can complete
the degree in 4 years by earning 6 graduate credits each
summer (total = 24), plus just two 3-credit independent
study or distance learning courses during the intervening
academic years. Those who already have some graduate
credit in Latin, or who can take more credits during the
year, can complete the degree more quickly.
Unlike the M.A. degree in Latin, the Master of Latin
degree has no thesis requirement, does not prepare
students for Ph.D. level studies, and is aimed specifically at
currently employed and certified Latin teachers.
Admission: Contact the Department's Graduate
Coordinator or Distance Learning Coordinator before
applying. Requirements for the admissions process are (1)
apply to UF's Graduate School, (2) acceptable GRE scores,
(3) three letters of recommendation, and (4) transcripts
recording undergraduate courses (and graduate courses, if
any; students must demonstrate the ability to take Latin
courses at the graduate level).
Degree requirements: at least 30 credits as a UF
graduate student. Of these, no more than 8 credits (grade


of A, B+, or B) may be transferred from institutions
approved for this purpose by the Dean of the Graduate
School. At least half of the 30 credits required should
be from Latin language and literature courses (LAT or
LNW courses at the 5000 level or above). UF graduate-
level courses taken before admission to Graduate School
(e.g., in the Latin Summer Institutes) may be applied to
the 30 credits if approved by the Graduate School. The
Department will work closely with individual students to
determine how many previous graduate credits at UF or
other institutions may be applied to this program.
The student may elect minor work in other academic
units (e.g., history, philosophy, art history, religion),
although there is no requirement to do so. If a minor is
chosen, at least 6 credits are required in the minor field.
Two 6-credit minors may be taken with departmental
permission. A GPA of 3.0 is required for minor credit
and for all work counted toward the degree. All work in a
minor must be approved by the supervisory committee.
Examination: The supervisory committee administers
a final oral and written comprehensive examination
at completion of the course work. This examination
includes (1) an oral component on Roman literary
tradition, and (2) a written component, covering (a) Latin
sight translation and grammar, (b) Roman history and
civilization, and if applicable (c) the minor, or minors. As
preparation for this examination, the student should read
the required reading list of secondary works in English.
Language requirement: The Department for this
degree plan does not require, but strongly recommends,
at least a reading knowledge of one (or more) of the
following: German, French, Italian, or Spanish. Such
study will facilitate reading important secondary works not
translated into English, enhance travel, and perhaps lead
to teaching opportunities in the chosen language at the
secondary school level.


Master of Laws in Comparative Law

The Master of Laws in Comparative Law (LL.M.Comp.
Law) degree is for graduates of foreign law schools who
want to enhance their understanding of the American legal
system and the English common law system.
The program starts with Introduction to American Law,
a 4-credit summer course that gives students a foundation
in the American legal process. It also helps students
acclimate to the College of Law and the University
community before starting the academic year. During
fall and spring terms, and with the director's approval,
students choose their remaining 22 credits from more
than 100 Juris Doctor and LL.M. in Taxation courses and
seminars. Students who follow a special curriculum may
simultaneously receive the Certificate of Specialization
in International Tax Studies. For admission information
consult the College of Law Catalog or write to the
Comparative Law Office, P.O. Box 117643, University of
Florida, Gainesville FL 32611-7643.








Master of Laws in International
Taxation
The Master of Laws in International Taxation (LL.
M.I.T.) degree program offers advanced instruction for law
graduates who plan to specialize in international taxation,
in the practice of law. Degree candidates must complete
26 credits. Of these 26 credits, 22 must be graduate-level
tax courses, and 13 must be graduate-level international
tax courses, including a research and writing course.


Master of Laws in Taxation
The Master of Laws in Taxation (LL.M.Tax.) degree
program offers advanced instruction for law graduates
who plan to specialize in federal taxation and particularly
federal income taxation, in the practice of law. Degree
candidates must complete 26 credits. Of these 26 credits,
22 must be graduate-level tax courses, including a research
and writing course.


Master of Music
The Master of Music (M.M.) degree is offered in
music or music education. The music program offers the
following concentrations: choral conducting, composition,
instrumental conducting, music history and literature,
ethnomusicology, music theory, performance, and sacred
music. The M.M. degree prepares students for careers as
teachers in studios, schools, and universities; performers;
music historians; music critics; church musicians;
composers; conductors; and accompanists.
Admission: Applicants should have a baccalaureate
degree in music or a closely related area from an
accredited institution and must meet the admission
requirements of the Graduate School and the College
of Fine Arts. Students whose undergraduate degree
is in another discipline must demonstrate a level of
achievement fully acceptable for master's level work in
this discipline. Applicants normally complete at least 16
credits in music theory, 6 credits in music history, and 12
credits in performance. A candidate deficient in certain
undergraduate areas must remove the deficiencies by
successfully completing appropriate courses. If remedial
work is needed, the residency (usually 4 terms of full-
time study) may be longer. An audition is required for all
students.
Work required: At least 32 credits of course work (not
counting prerequisite or deficiency courses) including a
core of 9 credits. The core in all emphases includes MUS
6716 (MUE 6785 in the music education program), MUT
6629, and one MUH or MUL graduate course. Requires
a thesis or creative project in lieu of thesis.
The College of Fine Arts reserves the right to retain
student work for purposes of record, exhibition, or
instruction. For more information, see Fields of Instruction.


SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES


Master of Occupational Therapy
This nonthesis degree program is for students who
do not have a degree in occupational therapy, and who
want to enter the field of occupational therapy. The
program gives students a holistic perspective, including an
understanding of the philosophical and theoretical bases
for practice in the current health care environment. The
M.O.T. program provides a strong background in theory,
assessment, and therapeutic intervention.
This 5-term program of graduate study consists of
3 terms of classroom course work and 2 terms (24 weeks)
of internship. Students enter the program after completing
a bachelor's degree. The M.O.T. degree is awarded after
completing 58 credits. Students must receive a B on all
course work and satisfactory evaluations on all clinical
fieldwork.


Master of Public Health
The Master of Public Health degree program prepares
students to become effective public health scientists,
practitioners, and educators. Graduates can contribute
to the health of the local, national, and international
communities by advancing public health knowledge and
implementing collaborative approaches to service and
policy development impacting disease prevention and
health promotion. Students have the opportunity to
develop skills in one or more public health concentration
areas. These concentrations include (1) biostatistics,
applying quantitative and analytical methods in public
health research and evaluation; (2) environmental health,
assessing risk levels and protecting environmental health;
(3) epidemiology, applying the principles and methods
of epidemiological investigation to prevent or lessen the
spread of disease; (4) public health management and
policy, providing leadership in public health administration
and developing and applying policy to health promotion
and disease prevention initiatives; and (5) social and
behavioral sciences, applying social and behavioral
science to the design and implementation of cutting-edge
community health education and intervention programs.
Specific emphases in aging and disability and community/
social health, including rural health, are possible. A
combined degree program and a certificate program also
are available. For more information, visit http://www.
mph.ufl.edu.
Admission: Students with any undergraduate major
are eligible for consideration for the program as long as
they meet the Graduate School admission requirements
and their interests match the program's philosophy and
curriculum offered.
Work required: Two program tracks are offered: one
for students without terminal health care degrees and one
for working health care professionals. In the first track,
which applies to most students, all students take at least
48 graduate credits, including 15 credits of core public
health course work, 3 credits of an integrative seminar, and
3 credits of a special project, which can include a research






GENERAL INFORMATION
46
project or an internship, determined by the concentration
selected and the specific career goals of the student. The
remaining 27 credits include required and elective course
work in the concentration chosen by the student. The
specific course requirements vary by concentration.
Students who have a relevant professional or doctoral
degree may be eligible for the 36-credit working
professional program, pending M.P.H. admissions
committee approval. This program requires completing
15 credits of core public health course work, 15 credits
of concentration course work, and 6 credits of a special
project and/or other course work accepted by the
supervisory committee. On successfully completing all
requirements, students in both tracks are awarded the
Master of Public Health degree.


Master of Science in Architectural
Studies
Admission: The Master of Science in Architectural
Studies is a nonprofessional, research degree for students
with undergraduate degrees in any field of study who wish
to undertake advanced studies and research in architectural
specialties. Specialization is offered in environmental
technology, architectural preservation, urban design,
history, and theory.
Work required: At least 32 credits of course work,
including up to 6 credits of ARC 6971 (Research for
Master's Thesis). Most course work should be in the School
of Architecture, but multidisciplinary electives in planning,
history, law, engineering, art history, and real estate are
encouraged. Students also may enroll in one of the School's
off-campus programs, in Nantucket, in the Caribbean, or
in Italy. A thesis is required.
Requirements for level and distribution of credits,
supervisory committee, and final examination are the same
as for the Master ofArts and Master of Science with thesis.


Master of Science in Nursing
The College of Nursing offers the Master of Science in
Nursing (M.S.Nsg.) degree (thesis and nonthesis option)
with advanced practice preparation for nurse midwifery
and the roles of the nurse practitioner in adult, family,
neonatal, pediatric, psychiatric/mental health, and
midwifery nursing. In addition to the advanced practice
clinical tracks, the College also offers a track for the clinical
nurse leader (CNL). The CNL is a generalist clinician who
brings a high level of clinical competence and knowledge
to the point of care and serves as a resource for the health
care team.
Work required: at least 46 credits for advanced practice
clinical tracks, and at least 36 credits for the generalist
CNL track. Thesis M.S.Nsg. candidates must prepare and
present theses acceptable to their supervisory committees
and the Graduate School. An oral presentation of the
thesis and a comprehensive examination in the major are
also required. Nonthesis M.S.Nsg. candidates must pass a
comprehensive written examination in the major.


Cooperative M.S.Nsg. degree from
Florida State University (FSU) and the
University of Florida (UF):
For students in the nurse-midwifery clinical track, the
cooperative degree program is an approved mechanism
allowing students to transfer more than the usual number
of semester credit hours (9 vs. 24) from FSU to UF.
On completing the curriculum, students are awarded
an M.S.Nsg. from UF Students meet admissions
requirements for both universities and take most of
the core graduate and primary care courses at FSU; on
completing these courses, credits are transferred to UF and
students enroll in the UF midwifery clinical track courses.
The guidebook for midwifery students explains admissions,
advisement, and progression for traditional and cooperative
degree students (http://www.nursing.ufl.edu/academics/
curriculum_plans/midwifery%20guidelines.pdf). For
information on clinical placement, see the College of
Nursing's website (www.nursing.ufl.edu).
Applicants for all M.S.Nsg. clinical tracks are
encouraged to apply by April 1st, but materials are
accepted through May 31st.
For admission criteria and information on the
application process, see the Master of Science in Nursing
page (http://www.nursing.ufl.edu/academics/academics_
sub.asp?ID=39). For general M.S.Nsg. program inquiries,
contact the Coordinator of Graduate Student Affairs. For
specific information on clinical midwifery, contact
Dr. Alice Poe, Clinical Coordinator, Nurse Midwifery
Track, (904)244-5174.


Master of Statistics
The Master of Statistics degree requires at least 36
credits, including at least 30 graduate credits in the major.
Courses are selected in consultation with the supervisory
committee chair, and approved by the supervisory
committee. Students must pass two examinations: (1) a
comprehensive written examination, given by a committee
designated for the purpose, on material covered in statistics
courses for first-year graduate students and (2) a final oral
examination consisting of a presentation by the student on
a statistical topic not covered in depth in the regular course
work. Students should consult with their supervisory
committee chair to choose a topic, and present a written
report on the topic to the supervisory committee at least 1
week before the examination date. A typical report is 8 to
10 pages. During and after the presentation, the student's
committee may ask questions related to the topic of the
presentation and related to other material covered in the
student's program of study.


Master of Women's Studies
The Master of Women's Studies (M.W.S.) is a nonthesis
degree. Requires at least 33 credits, including the core
curriculum of 4 courses (12 credits) and 7 elective








courses (21 credits), and a written comprehensive final
examination. At least half of the 33 credits must be
graduate courses in the major.


Engineer
For those engineers who need additional technical
depth and diversification in their education beyond the
master's degree, the College of Engineering offers the
degree of Engineer. This degree requires at least 30 credits
of graduate work beyond the master's degree. It is not to
be considered as a partial requirement toward the Ph.D.
degree. The student's objective after the master's degree
should be the Ph.D. or the Engineer degree.
Admission to the program: Students must have
completed a master's degree in engineering and apply for
admission to the Graduate School of the University of
Florida. The master's degree is regarded as the foundation
for the degree of Engineer. The master's degree must
be based on the candidate having a bachelor's degree in
engineering from an ABET-accredited curriculum or
having taken sufficient articulation course work to meet
the minimum requirements specified by ABET.
Course and residence requirements: Total registration
in an approved program must include at least 30 graduate
credits beyond the master's degree. This minimum
requirement must be earned through the University of
Florida. The last 30 credits must be completed within 5
calendar years.
Supervisory committee: Each student admitted to
the program needs a supervisory committee with at least
3 members of the Graduate Faculty (2 from the major
academic unit, and at least 1 from a supporting academic
unit). In addition, every effort should be made to have a
representative from industry as an external adviser for the
student's program.


SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES

This committee should be appointed as soon as possible
after the student is admitted to Graduate School and no
later than the end of the second term of study.
This committee informs the student of all regulations
pertaining to the degree program. The committee is
nominated by the academic unit chair, approved by
the Dean of the College of Engineering, and appointed
by the Dean of the Graduate School. The Dean of the
Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory
committees. If a thesis or report is required, the committee
will approve the proposed thesis or report and the plans
for carrying it out. The thesis must be submitted to the
Graduate School. The committee will also conduct the
final examination on campus when the plan of study is
completed.
Plan of study: Each plan of study is developed on
an individual basis for each student. Thus, there are no
specific requirements for the major or minor; each student
is considered individually. If the plan of study includes a
thesis, the student may register for 6 to 12 credits of 6972
(Research for Engineer's Thesis).
Thesis: The thesis should represent performance at a
level above that ordinarily associated with the master's
degree. It should clearly be an original contribution; this
may take the form of scientific research, a design project,
or an industrial project approved by the supervisory
committee. Work on the thesis may be conducted in an
industrial or governmental laboratory under conditions
stipulated by the supervisory committee.
Final examination: After the student completes all
work on the plan of study, the supervisory committee
conducts a final comprehensive oral and/or written
examination (for thesis students, this also involves
defending the thesis). This examination must be taken on
campus with all participants present.


Doctor of Audiology
The Colleges of Public Health and Health Professions
and offer a program leading to the degree of Doctor
of Audiology. The Au.D. degree is awarded after a 4-
year program of graduate study. Foreign languages are
not required. The program leading to the Au.D. degree
is administered by the Departments of Communicative
Disorders and Communication Sciences and Disorders,
their respective colleges, and the Graduate School.
Admission: To be considered for the Au.D. program,
students must meet the following minimum requirements:
(1) a 3.00 junior-senior undergraduate grade point
average and a combined verbal and quantitative score
of 1000 on the GRE General Test, (2) evidence of good
potential for academic success in at least three letters of
recommendation, and (3) evidence of acceptable skills in
written expression through a personal statement describing
the motivation and skills applicable to graduate study and
the profession of audiology.
Course requirements: 125 credits for students entering
the program with a bachelor's degree awarded by an
accredited institution. This includes at least 70 credits of






GENERAL INFORMATION
48
didactic instruction, 45 credits of applied practicum, and 3
credits of audiology research.
A 70-credit program leading to the Au.D. is offered for
applicants holding an earned master's degree in audiology
from an accredited institution.
A 45-credit program leading to the Au.D. is offered for
applicants holding an earned master's from an accredited
institution, certification and/or licensure in audiology, and
at least 3 years of full-time experience in audiology.
Supervisory committees: Supervisory committees
are nominated by the chairs of the Departments
of Communication Sciences and Disorders and
Communicative Disorders, approved by the deans of their
respective colleges, and appointed by the Dean of the
Graduate School.
The committee should be appointed as soon as possible
after the student starts the program and, in general, no
later than the end of the second term of equivalent full-
time study. The supervisory committee shall consist of
no fewer than two members of the audiology Graduate
Faculty.
Duties of the supervisory committee include curriculum
planning for the student, annual evaluation of the student's
progress in the program including administration of the
oral and written comprehensive examination in the third
year of study, and determining successful completion of the
audiology research project.
Comprehensive examination: required for all Au.D.
candidates. May be taken during the eighth term of study
beyond the bachelor's degree. Both written and oral, this
examination is prepared and evaluated by the supervisory
committee, which is responsible for determining whether
the student is qualified to continue work toward the degree
by completing the clinical residency.


Ed.S. and Ed.D.
The College of Education offers programs leading to the
degrees Specialist in Education and Doctor of Education.
The Specialist in Education degree is awarded for a 2-
year program of graduate study. The Doctor of Education
degree requires a dissertation. Foreign languages are not
required. See Requirements for the Ph.D.
In cooperation with the Office of Graduate Studies
in the College of Education, programs leading to these
degrees are administered by the individual departments
and school in the College of Education. A department's
chair or the school's director is responsible for carrying out
the policies of the Graduate School and the Curriculum
Committee of the College of Education. Contact the
individual departments and school for information about
the various programs and their requirements. For help
or general information, contact the Office of Graduate
Studies in Education, 125 Norman Hall.


Specialist in Education
An Ed.S. program develops competencies needed for a
professional specialization. Specializations are offered in
the School of Teaching and Learning and the Departments
of Counselor Education, Educational Administration and
Policy, Educational Psychology, and Special Education.
Ed.S. applicants must apply and be admitted to UF's
Graduate School. All work for the degree, including
transferred credit, must be completed within 7 years
before the degree is awarded.
The Ed.S. degree is awarded on completing a planned
program with at least 72 credits beyond the bachelor's
degree or at least 36 credits beyond the master's degree.
All credits accepted for the program must contribute to
the unity and the stated objective of the total program.
Students are tested (no more than 6 months before
graduation) by written and oral examination. A thesis is
not required; however, each program includes a research
component relevant to the intended profession. With the
academic unit's approval, course work taken as part of the
specialist program may count toward a doctoral degree.
Students who enter the program with an appropriate
master's degree from another accredited institution must
complete at least 36 credits of post-master's study to meet
the following requirements:
1. At least 30 credits in graduate-level courses.
2. At least 12 credits in graduate-level professional
education courses.
Students who enter the program with a bachelor's degree
only must (during the 72-credit program) meet these
requirements in addition to the requirements of the
Master of Education degree or its equivalent.
Only graduate-level (5000-7999) work, earned with
a grade of B or better, is eligible for transfer of credit.
A maximum of 15 transfer credits are allowed. These
can include no more than 9 credits from institutions
approved by UF, with the balance obtained from postbac-
calaureate work at UF. Credits transferred from other
universities are applied toward meeting the degree require-
ments, but the grades earned are not computed in the
student's grade point average. Acceptance of transfer of
credit requires approval of the student's supervisory com-
mittee and the Dean of the Graduate School.
Petitions for transfer of credit for the Ed.S. degree must
be made during the student's first term of enrollment in
the Graduate School.
The supervisory committee is responsible for basing
acceptance of graduate transfer credits on established
criteria for ensuring the academic integrity of course work.


Doctor of Education
The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree offers
advanced professional training and academic preparation
for the highest levels of educational practice. Programs
are available in the School of Teaching and Learning and
the Departments of Counselor Education; Educational








Administration and Policy; Educational Psychology; and
Special Education.
Requires at least 90 credits beyond the bachelor's degree
(master's degrees included must be in the last 7 years).
Course requirements vary with the academic unit and
with the student's plan for research. With the approval
of the supervisory committee, the student may choose
one or more minor fields of study. The Ed.D. requires a
qualifying examination and a dissertation.
See Requirements for the Ph.D. for information on
transfer of credit, minors, leave of absence, supervisory
committee, language requirement, campus residence
requirement, qualifying and final examinations, admission
to candidacy, dissertation, and certification. These
statements apply to both the Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees.


Doctor of Plant Medicine
The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences offers an
interdisciplinary program leading to the degree of Doctor
of Plant Medicine (D.Pm). The D.Pm degree is awarded
after a 3- to 4-year program of graduate study. Foreign
languages are not required. The program leading to the
D.Pm degree is administered by the College of Agricultural
and Life Sciences and the Graduate School.
Admission: Students must meet the following
minimum requirements:
1. B.S. or B.A. degree, preferably in biological,
agricultural, or health science.
2. A 3.00 grade point average in upper-division courses.
3. Combined verbal and quantitative score of 1000 on
the GRE General Test. Applicants from countries
where English is not the native language must also
achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 550 on the paper
test or 213 on the computer version.
4. Evidence of good potential for academic success in at
least three letters of recommendation.
5. Evidence of acceptable skills in written expression
through personal statements briefly describing their
backgrounds, reasons, and career goals for studying
plant medicine.
Course requirements: Students entering the program
with a bachelor's degree must earn 120 credits. This
includes at least 90 credits of course work and 30 credits of
internship. Students entering the program with a master's
degree in a related area may be allowed to transfer up to 30
credits in graduate courses corresponding to those required
by the Plant Medicine program.
Supervisory committee: Selected by the student,
nominated by the Director of the Plant Medicine Program,
approved by the Dean of the College of Agricultural and
Life Sciences, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate
School.
The committee should be appointed as soon as possible
after starting the program and before midpoint of the
student's third term. Each supervisory committee must
consist of three UF Graduate Faculty members: one each
from entomology/nematology, plant pathology, and plant/
soil science. Duties of the supervisory committee include


SPECIALIZED GRADUATE DEGREES

planning elective courses and internships, helping to
complete the program of study form (Form 2), evaluating
elective internships, periodically evaluating the student's
progress in the program (must meet at least once per
year; preferably twice), and administering the final oral
comprehensive examination.
Comprehensive examination: Both written and oral
comprehensive examinations are required of all D.Pm
students and may be taken at the end of the term in which
the student completes all course work and internships.
The written examination has three sections: entomology/
nematology, plant pathology, and plant/soil science.
Faculty from the appropriate disciplines are appointed
by the Program Director to develop and grade the final
written examination, working in concert with faculty
who teach courses required for the D.Pm degree. After
a student passes all three sections of the final written
examination (80% or higher is considered a passing
grade), the supervisory committee administers an oral
examination that tests the student's ability to diagnose
and manage plant health problems. A student who fails to
pass a comprehensive examination may retake it within 3
months.


Financial Information and
Requirements

Expenses


Application Fee
Each application for admission to the University must
be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of
$30. Application fee waivers are provided for Florida
A&M University (FAMU) Feeder Program participants,
Institute for the Recruitment of Teachers (IRT) Program
participants, and Ronald E. McNair scholars. The
application fee is also waived for students who apply to
the University through the Florida Fund for Education
McKnight Doctoral Fellowship Program. For details
contact the Office of Graduate Minority Programs
(352)392-6444, 115 Grinter Hall, P.O. Box 115500, or e-
mail ogmp@ufl.edu.


Enrollment and Student Fees
Pursuant to Section 6C1-3.037(1) University of Florida
Rules, registration shall be defined as consisting of two
components: a) formal selection of one or more credit
courses approved and scheduled by the University; and
b) fee payment or other appropriate arrangements for fee
payment (deferment or third-party billing) for the courses
the student is enrolled in, at the end of drop/add.
Registration must be completed on or before the date
specified in the University Calendar. Students are not
authorized to attend class unless they are on the class







50


GENERAL INFORMATION


I


Cost breakdown
Tuition/fees*
Books and supplies
On campus housing
and meals**
Off campus housing
and meals***
Computer minimum****
Local transportation
General expenses
and clothing
Personal and Health
insurance

On campus TOTAL
New / Cont.
Off campus TOTAL
New / Cont.


New / Cont.
$6,234 / 5,750
930

7,000

7,500
910
400

570

1,340


$17,384 / $16,900

$17,884 / $17,400


ar
Non-FL
New / Cont.
21,359 /21,359
930

7,000

7,500
910
400

570

1,340


$32,509 / $32,509

$33,009 / $33,009


roll or have been approved to audit. Unauthorized class
attendance will result in fee liability.
A student must be registered during the terms of the
qualifying examination and the final examination, and
during the term the degree is awarded.


Fee Liability

Pursuant to Section 6C1-3.037(2) University of Florida
(UF) Rules, a student is liable for fees for all courses the
student is registered for, at the end of the drop/add or
courses the student attends after that deadline. Deadline for
fee payment is 3:30 pm at the end of the second week of
classes.


Assessment of Fees

Pursuant to Section 6C1-3.0375(1) UF Rules, resident
and nonresident tuition is assessed based on course
classification: courses numbered through 4999 are assessed
at the undergraduate level, and courses numbered 5000
and above are assessed at the graduate level.
Students must assess and pay their own fees. Lack
of written notification of the tuition fee debt does not
negate the student's responsibility to pay by the published
deadline. University personnel will not be held
accountable for assessment or accuracy of calculations.
Tuition fee rates are available from University Financial
Services.
Shown below is the tuition and fee schedule for the
2005-2006 academic year. The tuition and fees for the
2006-2007 academic year have not been established at
the time of printing of this catalog, but some adjustments
are likely. Generally tuition and fees are established some
time in July for the next academic year. In some instances,
tuition waivers accompanying assistantships or fellowships
include only the matriculation fee and where applicable the
nonresident fee. All other fees must be paid by the student.


Graduate Cost Estimates Per Ye
FL residents


Health, Athletic, Activity and Service,
and Material and Supply Fees

Health fee (6C1-3.0372(1) UF rules): All students
must pay a health fee that is assessed on a per credit
hour basis and is included in the basic rate per credit.
The health fee maintains the University's Student Health
Service and is not part of any health insurance a student
may purchase.
Athletic fee (6C1-3.0372(1) UF rules): All students
must pay an athletic fee per credit each term and is
included in the basic rate per credit. Half-time graduate
research and teaching assistants enrolled for 6 or more
credits during the fall or spring terms and all other
students enrolled for 12 or more credits can purchase
athletic tickets at the student rate.
Activity and service fee (6C1-3.0372(1) UF rules):
All students must pay an activity and service fee that is
assessed per credit and is included in the hourly tuition
rate.
Transportation access fee (6C1-3.009(2) UF rules):
All students must pay a transportation access fee that is
assessed per credit and is included in the hourly tuition
rate.
Material and supply fee (6C1-3.0374(1) UF rules):
Material and supply fees are assessed for certain courses to
offset the cost of materials or supply items consumed in
the course of instruction. Information may be obtained
from the academic units or University Financial Services.
Late registration/payment fees
Late registration fee (6C1-3.0376(2) UF rules): Any
student who fails to initiate registration during the regular
registration period will be subject to the late registration
fee of $100.
Late payment fee (6C1-3.037(4) UF rules): Any
student who fails to pay all fees or to make appropriate
arrangements for fee payment (deferment or third party
billing) by the fee payment deadline will be subject to a
late payment fee of $100.
Waiver of late fees: A student who believes that a
late charge should not be assessed because of University
error or extraordinary circumstances that prevented all
conceivable ways of complying by the deadline may
petition for a waiver.
Late Registration fee: University Registrar
Late Payment fee: University Financial Services
The University reserves the right to require documentation
to substantiate.


Special Fees and Charges

Audit fee (6C1-3.0376(17) UF rules): Fees for
audited courses are assessed at the applicable resident or
nonresident cost as set forth in rule 6C1-3.0375, F.A.C.
Diploma replacement fee (6C1-3.0376(13) UF
rules): Each diploma ordered after a student's initial degree
application will result in a diploma replacement charge.
Transcript fee (6C1-3.0376(12) UF rules): On
written request, a complete transcript for undergraduate,








graduate, and professional students can be purchased
for a fee not to exceed $10. The University releases only
complete academic records.
Registration for Zero Credits (6C1-3.0376(16) UF
rules): The student is assessed the applicable resident or
nonresident cost as set forth in Rule 6C1.0375, F.A.C., for
1 credit hour.
Off-campus educational activities (6C1-3.0376
(18)UF rules): The President of the University of Florida
or a representative for the President will establish fees for
off-campus course offerings when the location results in
specific identifiable increased costs to the University. These
fees are in addition to the regular tuition and fees charged
to students enrolling in these courses on campus. As used
herein, "off campus" refers to locations other than regular
main campus, branch campuses, and centers.
Graduate Record Examination (GRE): The General
Test of the GRE is required for admission to the Graduate
School and is offered by computer. The ETS website
(http://www.gre.org) shows the nearest testing location
and gives information on subject tests (not offered by
computer).
Graduate School Foreign Language Test: All
students wishing to be certified as proficient in reading
French, German or Spanish must take the Educational
Testing Service (ETS) Graduate School Foreign Language
Tests. Each examination is $5. Register and pay for this
examination in the Office of Academic Technology, 1012
Turlington Hall.
Library processing fee: Thesis or dissertation students
in their final term pay $12.80 for the administrative
costs of processing the thesis or dissertation; architecture
students pay $20 for the project option. This charge is
payable at University Financial Services (113 Criser). A
copy of the receipt must be presented to the Graduate
School Editorial Office at dissertation first submission
or thesis first submission, or to the Architecture graduate
office (for project).
Microfilm fee: Dissertation students must pay a $55
microfilm fee. This fee is payable at University Financial
Services. A copy of the receipt must be presented to the
Graduate School Editorial Office.
All charges may be subject to change without notice.


Payment of Fees
Fees are payable on the dates listed in Deadlines.
Payments are processed by University Financial Services.
Checks, cashier's checks, and money orders written
in excess of the assessed fees will be processed and the
difference refunded at a later date, according to University
policy. Checks from foreign countries must be payable
through a United States bank in U.S. dollars. The
University can refuse three-party checks, altered checks,
and checks that will not photocopy.
Electronic funds transfer (EFT) payments can be made
directly from a student's checking account by enrolling for
"EFT Sign Up" at http://www.isis.ufl.edu.


FINANCIAL INFORMATION
51
Payments can be made via debit cards at the University
Cashier's office. A personal identification number (PIN)
is needed to access the student's bank account. Cash
withdrawals against debit cards will not be processed.
Credit card payments by MasterCard, American Express,
or Visa may be made over the Internet at http://www.isis.
ufl.edu.
Returned checks and returned EFT payments must be
paid in cash, money order, or cashier's check. A minimum
$25 service fee will be charged; $30 will be charged if the
check is $50.01 to $299.99, and $40 will be charged for
returned checks of $300 or more.
The University also may impose additional
requirements, including advance payment or security
deposit. All financial obligations to the University will be
applied on the basis of age of the debt. The oldest debt
will be paid first.


Deadlines
Deadlines are enforced. The University does not have
the authority to waive late fees unless the University is
mainly responsible for the delinquency or extraordinary
circumstances warrant such waiver.


Cancellation and Reinstatement
The University shall cancel the registration of students
who have not paid any part of their fee liability by the
deadline and have not attended class after drop/add ends.
Reinstatement shall require the approval of the
University and payment of all delinquent liabilities,
including the late registration and late payment fees. On
payment of fees, it is the student's responsibility to ensure
that his/her registration is updated.
If the entire balance of a student's fee liability is not paid
by the deadline, the University suspends further academic
progress by placing a financial hold on the student's record
to prevent the release of grades, schedules, transcripts,
registration, diplomas, loans, use of UF facilities and/or
services, and admission to UF functions and athletic
events, until the debt is satisfied.


Deferral of Registration and Tuition
Fees
A fee deferment allows students to pay fees after the
deadline without cancellation of registration or late
payment fee. The University may award fee deferments in
the following circumstances:
*Students whose state or federal financial assistance is
delayed by circumstances beyond the student's control.
*Students receiving veterans or other benefits under
Chapter 32, Chapter 34, or Chapter 35 of Title 38
U.S.C., and whose benefits are delayed.
*Students for whom formal arrangements have been made
with the University for payment by an acceptable third-
party donor.






GENERAL INFORMATION
52
Deferment covers tuition fee payments only and must be
established by the fee payment deadline. Fee deferments are
granted based on information from the Office of Student
Financial Affairs (financial aid deferments) or the Office
of the University Registrar (veterans). Refer questions on
eligibility to the appropriate office.


Waiver of Fees

The University may waive fees as follows:
*Participants in sponsored institutes and programs where
direct costs are paid by the sponsoring agent.
*Intern supervisors for institutions in the State University
System may be given one nontransferable certificate (fee
waiver) each term the person serves as intern supervisor.
The certificate is valid for 3 years from the date of issu-
ance. During a single term, no more than 6 credits of
instruction (including credit through continuing educa-
tion) are allowed. The certificate waives the matriculation
fee; the student must pay the balance of the fees by the
deadline.
*Persons 60 years of age or older are entitled to a waiver of
fees for audited courses (up to 6 credits), as provided by
Section 240.235(3), Florida Statutes.
Certain members of the active Florida National Guard
are entitled to a waiver of fees pursuant to Section
250.10(7), Florida Statutes.
A student enrolled through the Florida Linkage Institutes
Program is entitled to a waiver of fees pursuant to Section
288.8175(6), Florida Statutes.
The non-Florida student financial aid fee may not be
waived for students receiving an out-of-state fee waiver.


Refund of Fees
Tuition fees will be fully refunded in these circumstances:
*Approved withdrawal from the University before the end
of drop/add, with written documentation from the stu-
dent.
*Credits dropped during drop/add.
*Courses canceled by the University.
*Involuntary call to active military duty.
*Death of the student or member of the immediate family
(parent, spouse, child, sibling).
*Illness of the student of such severity or duration, as con-
firmed in writing by a physician, that completing the term
is precluded
*Exceptional circumstances, on approval of the University
President or his designee(s).
A refund of 25% of the total fees paid (less late fees) is
available if notice of withdrawal from the University with
written documentation is received from the student and
approved before the end of the fourth week of classes for
full terms or a proportionately shorter time for summer
terms.


Refunds must be requested at University Financial
Services. Proper documentation must be presented when
a refund is requested. A waiting period may be required.
Refunds will be applied against any University debts. The
University reserves the right to set minimum amounts for
refunds produced for overpayments on student accounts.
Tuition refunds for cancellation, withdrawal, or
termination of attendance for students receiving financial
aid are first refunded to the appropriate financial aid
programs. If a student receives federal financial aid (Pell
Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
[SEOG], Perkins Loan, Federal Direct Stafford Loans, or
PLUS loans), federal rules require that any unearned part
of the student's federal aid must be returned to the U.S.
Department of Education. The amount earned is based on
the number of days the student attended classes, compared
to the number of days in the entire term (first day of class
to end of final exam week). Any remaining refund is then
returned according to University policy.


General Fiscal Information
Students should bring sufficient funds, other than
personal checks, to meet their immediate needs. Personal
checks are accepted at University Financial Services for
the exact amount of fees and/or other amounts owed the
University. Payments on all financial obligations to the
University are applied to the oldest debts first. University
Financial Services does not cash checks or make cash
refunds. Checks written in excess of assessed fees or
other amounts paid the University will be accepted and
processed, but the excess will be refunded to the student at
a later date, according to University policy.
The student must file a correct current address with
the Office of the University Registrar by going to the
ISIS website at http://www.isis.ufl.edu. Under Registrar
Services, click on Address Change. This updates the UF
Directory.
Photo ID: A valid Gator 1 card must be presented to
transact business at University Financial Services; to pick
up tickets for athletic events; and to use Gator dining
accounts, CIRCA computer labs, University Libraries,
and all recreational facilities. The Gator 1 card can be
obtained at the ID Card Services office. An official picture
ID (passport or driver's license) and $10 are required. A
student's spouse should go to the ID Card Services office
with a photo ID (e.g., driver's license, military ID, or
passport), the student's Gator 1 card, a copy of the marriage
certificate, and $10. For more information: phone
(352)392-UFID.
Local address: The student's must file a correct local
address with the Office of the University Registrar in 222
Criser Hall.


Past Due Student Accounts
All students' accounts are payable at University Financial
Services at the time such charges are incurred. Graduating








students with outstanding financial obligations will have
a hold placed on their records withholding release of a
diploma, transcript, and other university services until the
debt is satisfied.
University regulations prohibit registration, graduation,
granting of credit, release of transcript, diploma, grades
and schedules, loans, use of UF facilities and/or services,
and admission to UF functions and athletic events for any
student whose account with the University is delinquent
until the debt is satisfied. Delinquent accounts, including
debts for which the students' records have a financial hold,
may require payment by cash, cashier's check, or money
order.
Delinquent debts may be reported to a credit bureau
and can result in placement with a collection agency
without further notice, at which time additional collection
costs will be assessed for the collection agency fees.


Transportation and Parking Services
Any student with an ongoing need to park a motor
vehicle on campus on weekdays between 7:30 am and 4:30
pm must purchase a parking decal. Parking decals may
be purchased at the Transportation and Parking Services
Customer Service Office, at the corner of Gale Lemerand
Drive and Mowry Road (Building 112, phone 392-2241).
A parking decal allows the holder to park in specific areas,
depending on the decal. Decal eligibility is determined
by the student's local address and the number of credits
the student earned. Everyone on campus must obey UF's
traffic and parking rules and regulations at all times. For
a complete list of these rules and regulations and parking
information: Transportation and Parking Services, website
http://www.parking.ufl.edu. To receive e-mail updates
of important parking and transportation information,
subscribe to the Transportation and Parking Listserv,
http://www.parking.ufl.edu.


Financial Aid


Office for Student Financial Affairs
Financial aid is available to qualified graduate students
through the Office for Student Financial Affairs (SFA) in
S-107 Criser Hall, mainly through work or loan programs
(see Loans and Part-Time Employment). Students who
wish to apply for aid administered by SFA must follow
the instructions in the Gator Aid Application Guide,
completing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) by the application deadline.
Graduate students who apply for assistance through SFA
must be registered for at least 5 credits to receive aid from
Federal Direct Stafford/Ford Loans (FDSL), Federal Direct
Unsubsidized Stafford/Ford Loans (FDUSL), and Federal
Work-Study. To receive FDSL, FDUSL, or Federal Work-
Study during the summer, graduate students must register


FINANCIAL INFORMATION
53
for at least 4 credits for the entire summer term (students
who enroll for fewer than 4 credits during Summer A/C
cannot be paid until Summer B).
For complete financial aid information, including
instructions on how to apply: SFA website http://www.sfa.
ufl.edu/. After applying, use UF's ISIS system: http://www.
isis.ufl.edu/. To access ISIS, students must use their UF
PIN and their UFID and GatorLink password.


Financial Aid Nexus Tapes
The Office for Student Financial Affairs prepared a
series of brief tapes for the NEXUS phone tape series to
provide current information on financial aid programs.
To use this service, call (352)392-1683 and request the
tape you want to hear: 402-A Applying for Financial Aid;
402-B Student Loans; 402-C Federal Direct Loans; 402-
D Student Budgets; 402-E Financial Aid for Graduate
Students; 402-F Student Employment; 402-G Grants;
402-H Scholarships; 402-I Loans and Debt Management;
402-J Financial Aid Phone Numbers; 402-K How
Financial Aid Is Disbursed; 402-L Registration Period
Update; and 402-M Financial Aid for Students with
Disabilities. These tapes are available on the web at
http://www.sfa.ufl.edu/infoserv/nexus.html.


Loans
Graduate students may qualify for the following
student loans: Federal Direct Stafford Loans, Federal
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, University of Florida
Institutional Loans, and Federal Perkins Loans. These
programs offer long-term, low-interest loans that must be
repaid when the borrower graduates, withdraws, or drops
to less than half-time enrollment.
In general, students may borrow up to the cost of
attendance minus any other financial aid per academic year
at interest rates from 2.77% to 9% annually. Some loans
are based on financial need; others are not. The actual
amount of each loan is based on financial need and/or
program limits.
To apply, obtain a Gator Aid Application Guide and
complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA): http://www.fafsa.ed.gov or Office for Student
Financial Affairs in S-107 Criser Hall. Do not wait
until you are admitted to apply for aid. Apply as soon as
January for fall loans. Although students may apply for
Federal Direct Stafford Loans throughout the year, they
must observe the deadlines set each term for applying for
loans for the next term and should always apply as early as
possible. For deadlines, visit Gator Aid Application Guide,
or SFA's website http://www.sfa.ufl.edu.
Short-term loans: UF has an emergency short-term
loan program to help students meet temporary financial
needs related to educational expenses. Graduate students
may borrow up to $1,000 or the amount of in-state tuition
if they have an acceptable repayment source. Interest is
1% per month and these loans must be repaid by the first






GENERAL INFORMATION
54
day of the last month in the term the money is borrowed.
Processing takes about 48 hours. For applications, visit SFA
in S-107 Criser Hall.


Part-time Employment
UF offers part-time student jobs through three
employment programs: Federal Work-Study jobs, including
the Federal Community Service component; Other
Personnel Services (OPS); and off-campus jobs. Federal
Work-Study jobs are based on financial need. To apply
for Federal Work-Study jobs, students must complete a
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) available
from the Office for Student Financial Affairs (SFA) in S-
107 Criser Hall, or use FAFSA on the Web at http://www.
fafsa.ed.gov. OPS jobs are not based on financial need. UF
maintains online job boards for student work programs.
For information on jobs and how to apply, go to
http://www.sfa.ufl.edu/job.html.


Academic Progress Policy for Financial
Aid Recipients
Students receiving financial aid must be in good standing
at UF and maintain financial aid satisfactory academic
progress requirements. UF's financial aid academic progress
requirements are available on the Office for Student
Financial Affairs (SFA) website at http://www.ufsa.ufl.
edu/sfa/, in SFA's Gator Aid Handbook, in the brochure that
accompanies all financial aid award letters issued by SFA,
and as a handout at the SFA service counters in S-107 Criser
Hall.


Research and Teaching
Services


Libraries
The Libraries of the University of Florida (UF Libraries)
form the largest information resource system in the state
of Florida. While the collections are extensive, they are not
comprehensive and graduate students supplement them
with a variety of services and cooperative programs drawing
on the resources of many other libraries.
The UF Libraries comprise 9 libraries: 7 are in the
system known as the George A. Smathers Libraries of the
University of Florida, and 2 (Health Sciences and Law)
are attached to their respective administrative units. All of
the libraries serve all the University's faculty and students,
but each has a special mission to be the primary support
of specific colleges and degree programs. Because of the
interdisciplinary nature of research, scholars may find
collections built in one library to serve a specific discipline
or constituency to be of great importance to their own
research in another discipline. Usually, more than one


library is needed to discover all the resources that pertain
to a particular research interest. The University of Florida
Gator 1 card gives students and faculty access to library
services. This card is used to circulate books, to borrow
reserves, and to establish identity for other library services
such as Interlibrary Loan and remote access to databases.
The library home page (http://www.uflib.ufl.edu) offers
a wealth of information about the Libraries and links to
a vast array of resources. The Libraries are integrating
electronic collections and services, and are digitizing
materials from our Florida and other unique collections.
Indexes, abstracts, and other reference resources (including
hundreds of specialized databases) are increasingly
available. From the home page it is possible to connect to
the full text of articles in more than 20,000 journals and
thousands of books, documents, maps, and manuscripts.
The library home page has a link to the library catalog
that contains records for all UF collections in all formats
(except for some special archival, map, and document
collections that must be accessed through catalogs and
finding aids at the collection location). It connects to lists
of materials currently on course reserve and provides links
to a growing number of these materials that are available in
electronic form.
The Subject Guides and Specialists page provides
guides to subject literature and links to key resources and
pertinent websites as well as the name of the library subject
specialist. The library home page provides links to the
pages of individual campus libraries, lists library training
opportunities, and provides a great deal of information
on services and policies. It enables students to link to
the libraries' Ask a Libraraian IM chat reference service,
and to electronic forms for making suggestions, renewing
materials, initiating interlibrary loan requests, and recalling
materials charged to other borrowers.
Workstations in UF libraries provide access to this whole
array of electronic resources and services. They may also
be accessed readily from other campus workstations, with
a University of Florida IP address (campus location or off-
campus GatorLink account), or by using the VPN or a
proxy and your library card number (please see
http: //www. uflib.ufl.edu/access.html for details on remote
access).
Because of the disciplinary variation in research
methods, the policies enforced and the services offered may
differ from library to library. Most of the libraries have
an advisory board consisting of faculty and students who
advise on the policies and services relating to their library.
Information on local policies is available at the circulation
and reference desks in each library and on the specific
library's home page. As is common in research libraries,
library materials are housed in a variety of locations
depending on discipline.
Library West houses most of the humanities and
social science collections, and professional collections in
support of business, health and human performance, and
journalism are normally housed in this building. Library
West includes 84 individual graduate study carrels that
are assigned for the academic year. An online application








form is available from the library home page. In addition,
the sixth floor of Library West is a study area reserved for
graduate students. Access is provided after students register
at the Circulation Desk.
Smathers Library (also known as Library East) holds
the Latin American Collection and the Special Collections:
rare books and manuscripts, P. K. Yonge Library of Florida
History, and University Archives.
Marston Science Library holds most of the agriculture,
science, and technology collections. The Map Library and
Documents Department is a regional depository for U.S.
federal government publications.
Architecture/Fine Arts Library (201 Fine Arts
Building A) holds visual arts, architecture, and building
construction materials.
Education Library (1500 Norman Hall) holds most of
the education collections.
Music Library (231 Music Building) holds most music
materials and a collection of recordings.
The Allen H. Neuharth Journalism Library (1060
Weimer Hall) holds a small collection of materials relating
to journalism and mass communication.
Health Science Center Library holds resources for
the medical sciences, related life sciences, and veterinary
medicine.
Legal Information Center holds resources for law and
related social sciences.
Together the Libraries hold over 4,000,000 cataloged
volumes, 7,200,000 microforms, 1,300,000 documents,
766,000 maps and geographic images, and nearly 18,000
computer files. The Libraries have built a number
of nationally significant research collections mainly
supporting graduate research programs. Among them are
the Baldwin Library of Children's Literature, which
is among the world's greatest collections of literature
for children (Special Collections, Smathers Library);
the Map and Imagery Library, which is an extensive
repository of maps, atlases, aerial photographs, and remote
sensing imagery with particular collection strengths for
the southeastern United States, Florida, Latin America,
and Africa south of the Sahara (Marston Science Library,
Level One); the Isser and Ray Price Library of Judaica,
which is the largest collection of its kind in the Southeast
(Education Library); and the P.K. Yonge Library of
Florida History, which is the state's preeminent Floridiana
collection and holds the largest North American collection
of Spanish colonial documents about the southeastern
United States and rich archives of prominent Florida
politicians (Special Collections, Smathers Library).
The Libraries also have particularly strong holdings in
architectural preservation and 18th-century American
architecture (Architecture and Fine Arts), late 19th- and
early-20th-century German state documents (Library West:
request retrieval), Latin American art and architecture
(Architecture and Fine Arts and Smathers Library),
national bibliographies (Humanities & Social Science
Reference, Smathers Library), U.S. Census information,
especially in electronic format, and other U.S. documents
(Documents Department, Marston Science Library), the


RESEARCH AND TEACHING SERVICES
55
rural sociology of Florida and tropical and subtropical
agriculture collections (Marston Science Library), and
English and American literature (Library West collection:
request retrieval).
Reference service is provided to library users in each
library and is also available via phone, e-mail, and
interactive chat. All of the libraries provide special services
to help students and faculty with disabilities in their use
of the libraries; information is available at all circulation
desks. At the start of each term, the Libraries offer
orientation programs to explain available services and
how to use them. Schedules are posted in each library at
the start of each term and in the training session part of
the library webpage. Individual help is available at the
reference desk in each library. In addition, instructional
librarians will work with faculty and teaching assistants
to develop and present course-specific library instruction
sessions. Instruction coordinators are available in
Humanities and Social Science Reference in Library West,
in Marston Science Library, and in the branches.
Subject specialists, who work closely with faculty and
graduate students to select materials for the collections,
also advise graduate students and other researchers who
need specialized bibliographic knowledge to define local
and global information resources available to support
specific research. Consult the subject specialists when
starting work on a large research project or developing a
working knowledge of another discipline. A list of subject
specialists is available at reference desks and via the library
home page. Users may schedule a meeting with the
appropriate specialist.
The Libraries' memberships in the Research Libraries
Group and the Center for Research Libraries give
faculty and students access to many major scholarly
collections. The Libraries also are linked to major national
and international databases. Many materials not held on
campus can be quickly located and borrowed through one
of the cooperative programs to which the Libraries belong.
Consult with a reference librarian to take advantage of
these services. Publications describing specialized services
are available at reference and circulation desks throughout
the Libraries.
For information on library hours: http://www.uflib.ufl.
edu or call the desired library.


Computer Facilities



Computing and Networking Services
(CNS)
Computing and Networking Services, formerly the
Northeast Regional Data Center (NERDC), is a unit of
the UF Office of Information Technology. CNS's facilities
are used for instructional, administrative, and research
computing, and are in the Bryant Space Sciences Research
Building (SSRB). For more information, visit the CNS
home page http://cns.ufl.edu.






GENERAL INFORMATION
56
Center for Instructional and Research
Computing Activities (CIRCA), Office
of Academic Technology (AT)
Services available to graduate students include electronic
thesis and dissertation computing support; phone and
walk-in consulting; GatorLink mail; web and dialup
services; UNIX@ and Computing and Networking Services
(CNS) computing accounts; software distribution; and the
use of computer classrooms, multimedia equipment, and
laboratories; and programming languages and packages
for mathematical and statistical analysis. The AT/CIRCA
computer classrooms are available for personal and
academic use. They are equipped with IBM-compatible
and Macintosh-compatible computers, laser printers,
plotters, and scanners. CIRCA computer facilities offer
students applications for word processing, spreadsheets,
data analysis, graphics, and the Internet.
Instructors whose courses require UNIX@ or IBM
mainframe computing may apply for class computing
accounts. Applications for these instructional accounts are
available in E520 Computer Sciences and Engineering
(CSE). Instructors may reserve CIRCA computer
classrooms or multimedia lecture classrooms for class
sessions. Instructors may also use site-licensed WebCT
(Web Course Tools) software to provide a framework for
developing course resources.
For more information about AT/CIRCA and other AT
units, contact the UF Computing Help Desk, E520 CSE,
helpdesk@ufl.edu, (352)392-HELP, or see the AT website
at http://www.circa.ufl.edu.


Art Galleries
Samuel P. Harn Museum of Art provides the most
advanced facilities for exhibiting, studying, and preserving
works of art. The Harn offers approximately 15 changing
exhibitions per year. The Museum's collection includes the
arts of the Americas, Africa, and Asia and contemporary
international works of art. Exciting performances, family
programs, lectures, and films are also featured. Museum
hours are 11am to 5pm Tuesday through Friday, 10am to
5pm Saturday, and 1 to 5pm Sunday. The Harn Museum
is accredited by the American Association of Museums. For
more information, visit http://www.harn.ufl.edu.
The University Gallery, established in 1965, is an
essential component of the teaching, research, and service
missions of the School of Art and Art History. The
Gallery's primary purpose is to present high-quality visual-
arts exhibitions that reach a diverse cross section of the
University's many academic disciplines and core research
areas and to provide rich first-hand interaction with
cutting-edge artwork for art students and faculty to foster
learning in art.
Focus Gallery (in the lobby of the School of Art and Art
History offices in the Fine Arts Complex) was established
in 1963. Public exhibition space is used by students and
faculty sponsors in the School of Art and Art History to


experiment with artwork and experience the production of
art exhibitions.
Grinter Galleries (in the lobby of Grinter Hall) was
established in 1972. This venue is reserved for exhibitions
of international art and artifacts that teach about world
culture. Many of the University's international centers
are located in Grinter Hall, and their programs provide
content for the galleries' exhibitions.


Performing Arts
University of Florida Performing Arts brings a diverse
range of events to its venues each season, including
theatre, chamber, classical, dance, family, jazz, opera,
pops, film, and world music/dance. The 1,700-seat
Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
features computerized lighting and sound systems. Its
Black Box Theatre is used for experimental or small
musical productions, recitals, and receptions. The historic
University Auditorium seats 867 and provides a classic
setting for chamber and solo concerts, lectures, and more.
The Baughman Center, a breathtaking pavilion on the
shores of Lake Alice, is an inspirational setting for both
contemplation and celebration. For information about
UFPA: administrative offices, phone (352)392-1900. For
event information or tickets: Phillips Center Box Office,
phone (352)392-ARTS ext. 2787, website http://www.
performingarts.ufl.edu.


Florida Museum of Natural History

The Florida Museum of Natural History was
created by the Legislature in 1917 as a department of
the University of Florida. Through its affiliation with the
University, it carries dual responsibility as the official State
Museum of Florida and as the University museum.
The public education and exhibits division of the
Museum is in Powell Hall, on Hull Road at the western
edge of campus, situated between the Ham Museum of
Art and the Center for the Performing Arts. Opened in
1998, Powell Hall is devoted exclusively to permanent and
traveling exhibits, educational and public programs, and
special events. Powell Hall is open from 10 am to
5 pm Monday through Saturday, and 1 to 5 pm on
Sunday and holidays. The Museum is closed on
Thanksgiving and Christmas. Addmission for the Butterfly
Rainforest exhibit, which opened in 2004, is $7.50 for
adults and $4.50 for children ages 3-12. There is no
admission charge for the remainder of the Museum.
The research and collections division of the Museum is
in Dickinson Hall, at the corner of Museum Road and
Newell Drive. This building is not open to the public.
The Museum operates as a center of research in anthro-
pology and natural science. Under the director are three
administrative units: the Office of the Director is respon-
sible for administrative oversight and also for fund-raising
and development; the Department of Natural History








houses the state's natural history collections and is staffed
by scientists and support personnel concerned with the
study of modern and fossil plants and animals, and historic
and prehistoric people and their cultures; Exhibits and
Public Programs in Powell Hall is staffed by specialists in
interpreting natural history through exhibits and educa-
tional programs. Scientific and educational faculty (cura-
tors) hold appointments in appropriate UF academic units.
Through these appointments, they participate in both
undergraduate and graduate teaching programs.
The Museum's newest addition is the McGuire Center
for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity. This world-class
facility features a 46,000-square-foot Lepidoptera center
devoted to housing one of the world's largest and most
comprehensive Lepidoptera collections, and state-of-the-art
research facilities for their study. It also contains dynamic
public exhibitions and a live Butterfly Rainforest with a
walking trail, educational exhibits, and hundreds of living
butterflies.
The Randell Research Center at the Pineland
archeological site near Fort Myers, Florida, is dedicated to
learning and teaching the archeology, history, and ecology
of Southwest Florida.
The Herbarium at UF is also a division of the
Museum. It contains over 255,000 specimens of vascular
plants and 170,000 specimens of nonvascular plants.
The research collections are in the care of curators who
encourage scientific study of the Museum's holdings.
Materials are constantly being added to the collections
both through gifts from friends and as a result of research
activities of the Museum staff. The archaeological and
ethnographic collections are noteworthy, particularly
in the aboriginal and Spanish colonial material remains
from the southeastern United States and the Caribbean.
There are extensive study collections of birds, mammals,
mollusks, reptiles, amphibians, fish, invertebrate and
vertebrate fossils, and plant fossils, and a bioacoustic
archive consisting of original recordings of animal sounds.
Opportunities are provided for students, staff, and visiting
scientists to use the collections. Research and field work are
presently sponsored in the archaeological, paleontological,
and zoological fields.
Students interested in these specialties should apply to
the appropriate academic units. Graduate assistantships are
available in the Museum in areas emphasized in its research
programs.
The Katharine Ordway Preserve-Swisher Memorial
Sanctuary (http://www.ordway.ufl.edu) is a year-round
biological field station established for the long-term
study and conservation of unique ecosystems through
management, research, and education. It is managed for
the University of Florida by the UF/IFAS Department
of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation. The 9600-acre
property is located in Putnam County, Florida (roughly
26 miles from Gainesville) and is not open to the general
public. The property is a mosaic of wetlands and uplands
that include sandhills, xeric hammock, upland mixed
forest, swamps, marshes, plastic upland lakes, sandhill


RESEARCH AND TEACHING SERVICES


upland lakes, and marsh lakes. A variety of fauna inhabit
the preserve including a number of state and federally
listed species. Archeological sites on the preserve show
human presence and require more investigation. The most
recent uses of the lands comprising the preserve were cattle
ranching and game hunting. Wildfires and prescribed
burning have had a strong influence on the property. The
Preserve is a member of the Organization of Biological
Field Stations (OBFS).


Agricultural Experiment Station
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station conducts a
statewide program in food, agriculture, natural resources,
and the environment. Research deals with agricultural
production, processing, marketing, human nutrition,
veterinary medicine, renewable natural resources, and
environmental issues. This research program includes
activities by departments on the Gainesville campus and
on the campuses of Research and Education Centers
throughout the state. Close cooperation with numerous
Florida agricultural and natural resource related agencies
and organizations is maintained to provide research
support for Florida's broad variety of crops, commodities,
and natural resources.
The land-grant philosophy of research, extension, and
teaching is strongly supported and administered by the
Vice President for Agriculture and Natural Resources.
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, under his
leadership, comprises the Florida Agricultural Experiment
Station, the Florida Cooperative Extension Service, the
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and elements
of the College of Veterinary Medicine, each functioning
under a dean. Most IFAS faculty have joint appointments
involving teaching, research, and/or extension.
Funds for graduate assistants are made available to
encourage graduate training and professional scientific
improvement.
Research at the main station is conducted in 17
departments: Agricultural and Biological Engineering,
Agricultural Education and Communication, Agronomy,
Animal Sciences, Entomology and Nematology,
Environmental Horticulture, Food and Resource
Economics, Food Science and Human Nutrition, Fisheries
and Aquatic Sciences, Forest Resources and Conservation,
Family, Youth and Community Sciences, Horticultural
Sciences, Microbiology and Cell Science, Plant P arl.1..:,,
Soil and Water Science, Statistics, Veterinary Medicine,
and Wildlife Ecology and Conservation. Additional
support units vital to research programs include
Educational Media and Services, Facilities Planning and
Operations, Planning and Business Affairs, Sponsored
Programs, Personnel, and Governmental Relations.
Research and Education Centers include Belle Glade,
Bradenton, Fort Lauderdale, Homestead, Lake Alfred,
Quincy, Monticello, Brooksville, Fort Pierce, Immokalee,
Dover, Ona, Apopka, Marianna, Live Oak, Vero Beach,
and Jay. A Center for Cooperative Agricultural Programs






GENERAL INFORMATION
58
(CCAP) in Tallahassee is jointly supported with Florida
A&M University.
The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station is
cooperating with the Brooksville Subtropical Research
Station, Brooksville, a USDA field laboratory, in its beef
cattle and pasture production and management programs
and with the National Weather Service, Ruskin, in the
agricultural weather service for Florida.
Additional research is conducted through the IFAS
International Programs Office, the Center for Natural
Resources Programs, the Center for Environmental
Toxicology, and the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants.


Engineering and Industrial Experiment
Station
The internationally recognized Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (EIES) is the research arm of the College
of Engineering. It was officially established in 1941 by
the Florida Legislature. Its primary purpose is to perform
research that benefits the state's industries, health, welfare,
and public services. The EIES also works to enhance
our nation's global competitive posture by developing
new materials, devices, and processes. The EIES provides
significant opportunities for undergraduate and graduate
engineering students to participate in hands-on, cutting-edge
research.
The EIES addresses a wide variety of state and
national research issues through the college's academic
departments and engineering research centers. It takes an
interdisciplinary approach to research by involving talents
from diverse areas of the College and the University.
Particle science and technology, nanoscience and
technology, materials, intelligent machines, transportation,
biomedical engineering, computer technologies and
systems, communications, information systems, energy
systems, robotics, construction and manufacturing
technologies, computer-aided design, process systems, a
broad spectrum of research related to the "public sector"
(agricultural, civil, coastal, and environmental) represent
some of the EIES broad-based research programs.


Florida Engineering Education Delivery
System (FEEDS)
The Florida Engineering Education Delivery System
(FEEDS) is a cooperative effort to deliver graduate
engineering courses, and degree and certificate programs
via an array of distance learning technologies to engineers
throughout Florida. Along with the University of Florida,
participating universities include the colleges of engineering
at Florida State University, Florida A&M University,
Florida Atlantic University, Florida International
University, the University of Central Florida, and the
University of South Florida. Florida Gulf Coast University,
the University of North Florida, and the University of
West Florida are educational partners in FEEDS and


help facilitate course delivery and program marketing.
Graduate students associated with any of these universities
have access to the graduate engineering courses offered
via FEEDS throughout the state during the school term.
Students wishing to participate in FEEDS and intending
to register for classes at the University of Florida should
do so by contacting the FEEDS Coordinator, E 117 CSE
(352)392-9670 or http://feeds@eng.ufl.edu/). For detailed
information, visit http://oeep.eng.ufl.edu. Students
pursuing a degree through the College of Engineering are
governed by its requirements, the academic unit to which
they have been admitted, and the Graduate School.


Office of Research and Graduate
Programs
The Office of Research and Graduate Programs
(RGP) includes the Division of Sponsored Research, the
Graduate School, the Office of Technology Licensing, and
the University of Florida Research Foundation. RGP is
administered by the Vice President for Research.
The primary missions of RGP are to administer and
stimulate the growth of research and graduate education
throughout the University; to help create significant
relationships among government, industry, other research
sponsors and the University; and to promote economic
development in Alachua County, the State of Florida, and
the nation through technology transfer opportunities.
The Division of Sponsored Research (DSR) has two
general goals: to promote and administer the sponsored
research program and to help faculty, staff, and students to
develop research activities.
Research, grant-in-aid, training, or educational service
agreement proposals are processed and approved by DSR.
Negotiations of sponsored awards are also the responsibility
of the Division. DSR helps researchers identify possible
sponsors for their projects, coordinates cross-disciplinary
research activities, and disseminates information and
University policies and procedures for the conduct of
research.
The University of Florida Research Foundation (UFRF)
is the steward for the technology transfer process and,
through the Office of Technology Licensing, handles all
intellectual property at the University.
The Office of Technology Licensing (OTL) handles
patenting, marketing, and licensing of intellectual property.
The OTL works closely with UF inventors in identifying
and protecting new inventions. All patents, copyrights, and
trademarks are processed and managed by OTL. The OTL
helps researchers develop confidentiality, mutual secrecy,
and material transfer agreements.
For more information, contact RGP, P.O. Box 115500,
website http://rgp.ufl.edu, phone (352)392-1582.








University Press of Florida
The University Press of Florida is the official scholarly
publishing agency of the State University System of
Florida.
The Press (just off campus, at 15 NW 15th Street)
reports to the President of the University, who supervises
the Press on behalf of the 10 state universities. The
statewide Council of Presidents is the governing board for
the Press.
An advisory board, consisting of representatives from
each of the 10 state universities, determines whether
manuscripts submitted to it reflect appropriate academic,
scholarly, and programmatic standards of the Press
The Press publishes scholarly works of intellectual
distinction and significance, books that contribute to
improving the quality of higher education in Florida, and
books of general and regional interest and usefulness to the
people of Florida, reflecting their rich historical, cultural,
and intellectual heritage and resources. The Press publishes
works in the following fields: the Caribbean and Latin
America; the Middle East; North American archaeology,
history, and culture; Native Americans; literary theory;
medieval studies; women's studies; ethnicity; natural
history; conservation biology; the fine arts; and Floridiana.
Submit manuscripts to the Editor-in-Chief, University
Press of Florida, 15 NW 15th Street, Gainesville, FL
32611.


Interdisciplinary Research Centers
The Office of Institutional Resources' website provides
access to the Florida ExpertNet searchable database of
Centers and Institutes. Go to http://www.ir.ufl.edu/
centers.htm and choose SUS Centers & Institutes. In
the box choose University of Florida and
then press for a complete list of UF
Interdisciplinary Research Centers.


Oak Ridge Associated Universities
Since 1948, UF students and faculty have benefited
from its membership in Oak Ridge Associated Universities
(ORAU). ORAU is a consortium of 91 colleges and
universities and a contractor of the U.S. Department of
Energy in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU works with its
member institutions to help their students and faculty gain
access to federal research facilities throughout the country;
to keep its members informed about opportunities for
fellowship, scholarship, and research appointments; and to
organize research alliances among its members.
Through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and
Education (ORISE), the DOE facility that ORAU
operates, undergraduates, graduates, postgraduates, and
faculty enjoy access to a multitude of opportunities for
study and research. Students can participate in programs
covering a wide variety of disciplines including business,
earth sciences, epidemiology, engineering, physics,


RESEARCH AND TEACHING SERVICES
59
geological sciences, pharmacology, ocean sciences,
biomedical sciences, nuclear chemistry, and mathematics.
Appointment and program lengths range from 1 month
to 4 years. Many of these programs aim to increase the
number of underrepresented minority students pursuing
degrees in science- and engineering-related disciplines.
For a comprehensive list of these programs and other
opportunities, their disciplines, and details on locations
and benefits: http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu.htm.
ORAU's Office of Partnership Development seeks
opportunities for partnerships and alliances among
ORAU's members, private industry, and major federal
facilities. Activities include faculty development programs,
such as the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement
Awards, the Visiting Industrial Scholars Program,
consortium research funding initiatives, faculty research,
and support programs and services to chief research
officers.
For more information about ORAU and its programs,
contact
*Dr. Winfred M. Phillips, Vice President for Research,
ORAU Councilor for the University of Florida;
*Monnie E. Champion, ORAU Corporate Secretary
(865)556-3306; or
*Visit the ORAU home page at http://www.orau.org.


Student Services



Career Resource Center
The Career Resource Center (CRC), on the west
side of the 1st floor of the J. Wayne Reitz Union, is the
central agency for career planning, employment help, and
cooperative education and internships for UF students.
The Center provides a full range of services for all graduate
students and alumni seeking employment opportunities.
The CRC also works closely with the Academic Advising
Center to help students identify suitable careers and
determine the associated academic preparation.
Graduate students wishing to explore career interests,
gain experience through cooperative education assignments
or internship, organize their job search campaign, or gain
skills in portfolio development, resume/CV preparation,
and interview techniques are invited to visit the Center
and use its services. The Center has an extensive career
library, with employer recruiting materials, directories
of employers, and other career skills information, and
its "immediate job openings" section averages over 600
possible openings a week. Graduate students seeking
individual help resolving career and academic problems
can make appointments with one of the Center's career
counselors and advisers.
The World Wide Web: The Career Resource Center
and the world of jobs and career information can be
accessed via CRC's World Wide Web page at http://www.
crc.ufl.edu/. The website also has pages specifically geared






GENERAL INFORMATION
60
toward grad students' career concerns at http://www.crc.
ufl.edu/gradservices. This website is as near as the closest
UF computer lab, through terminals in the CRC library,
or if web access is available, from a personal computer.
It contains a full spectrum of information, services, and
direct web links; includes details about the Career Resource
Center, its mission, location, and hours of operation;
describes CRC programs and services for students, career
fairs, and Career Showcase (including a current list of
employers attending); gives a schedule of CRC events
and programs, job listings, and interviewing/on-campus
recruiting (includes signing up for interviews); and provides
information for alumni. For those in the immediate job
market, direct links to a wide variety of job posting services
and registering with the Gator Career Link System enable
participation in on-campus interviews and resume referral
via the Gator Locator resume database.
A significant on-campus job interview program with
representatives from business, industry, government,
and education is conducted by the Center. These large
employers come to campus seeking graduating students
in most career fields. Graduate students are encouraged
to register early and to participate in the on-campus
interview program. During the academic year, the Center
also sponsors a number of Career Days and Showcases
that bring employers to campus to talk to students about
careers and jobs. These sessions are open to all majors and
are an ideal way for graduate students to make contact with
potential employers.
CRC also hosts Graduate and Professional School Day
in the fall, bringing to campus representatives from up to
100 colleges and universities around the country. Students
may gather information and ask questions about various
graduate and professional education programs offered by
these institutions.


Counseling Center
The Counseling Center offers services to currently
enrolled graduate students for personal, career, and
educational concerns. Professional psychologists and
counselors offer short-term individual, couples, and group
counseling. There is no charge for the Center's confidential
services. Topics of services for graduate students often
include help with concerns related to academic success,
time and stress management skills, anxiety and depression,
personal and family relationships, adjustment to the
culture, and other issues associated with transition.
Counseling Center faculty also provide a range of
consultation and outreach programs to the campus
community. Phone or in-person consultation is available
for students, parents, faculty, and staff regarding any
issues related to student development. Center faculty
serve as program resources for a wide variety of student
organizations and academic departments. The Center
has an extensive training program for selected graduate
students. Faculty teach undergraduate and graduate
courses in the Departments of Psychology and Counselor
Education.


All Center activities are conducted with sensitivity to the
diversity of the students on a large, multicultural campus.
For more information, phone (352)392-1575, or visit
http://www.counsel.ufl.edu.


English Skills for International Students
UF has three English language programs to help
international graduate students improve their proficiency
in English: the English Language Institute, Academic
Written English, and Academic Spoken English.
Applicants whose command of English is not as good as
expected may be required by their academic units to attend
the English Language Institute (ELI), an intensive English
program providing rapid gains in English proficiency.
An ELI student may need 1, 2, or even 3 terms of full-
time English study before entering Graduate School. For
information about ELI, visit 315 Norman Hall, or the
ELI website http://www.eli.ufl.edu.
The Academic Written English (AWE) program helps
foreign graduate students improve their writing ability.
Applicants whose verbal GRE scores are below 320 or who
are admitted provisionally with a TOEFL score lower than
550 are given a writing test. Students whose proficiency
is too low (for successful performance in written tasks at
the graduate level) must take EAP 5845. Another course,
EAP 5846 (Research Writing) helps students learn to
write in their fields of study. For information, contact
the coordinator's office, 4131 Turlington Hall, phone
(352)392-0639.
Academic Spoken English (ASE) helps international
graduate students with their oral communication skills in
English. Course offerings in ASE are particularly relevant
for those who expect to be Graduate Teaching Assistants at
UF but whose oral proficiency can benefit from additional
language work. Students who must raise TSE /SPEAK
scores to be eligible to teach are advised to take EAP
5835, a course to improve general oral language skills.
EAP 5836 is a required course for international graduate
students (whose first language is not English) whose oral
proficiency is good enough to qualify them to teach, but
is not sufficient to exempt them from language/teaching
supervision (SPEAK/TSE scores less than 55.) During
the course of EAP 5836, international graduate teaching
assistants are videotaped teaching, and their class work is
discussed constructively by the ASE staff. EAP 5837 is an
advanced oral skills course for those students interested in
continuing to improve their interpersonal and professional
communication in English.


Graduate Student E-mail Listserv and
Website
The Graduate School communicates directly with
enrolled graduate students' via e-mail using GatorLink
e-mail addresses. Messages contain time-sensitive
information about important deadlines. An archive
of messages is available at http://lists.ufl.edu/archives/








gradstudent-l.html. Students must establish this free
account and should regularly check their GatorLink e-
mail. The Graduate School cannot maintain personal
e-mail addresses. GatorLink has a website at http://www.
gatorlink.ufl.edu to create and modify an account.
Information about grants and fellowships, workshops, and
other items relevant to graduate education are posted in
the graduate student section of the student page at www.
my.ufl.edu. Students should subscribe to this section and
check it regularly.


Graduate Newsletter
Excel, the Graduate School newsletter, is published
annually in the spring to highlight graduate education at
UE For more information or to contribute a topic, contact
the Graduate School, phone 392-4646.


Graduate School Editorial Office
The Graduate School Editorial Office provides the
Guide for Preparing Theses and Dissertations to help
students prepare the manuscript and offers suggestions
and advice on such matters as preparing tables and figures,
requesting permission to borrow copyrighted material,
and using a consistent reference system. The following
procedures apply to the Graduate School's editorial services
to students.
1. The student and the supervisory committee are
responsible for acceptable English in a thesis or
dissertation, and for the originality and acceptable
quality of the content.
2. The Graduate School editorial staff act only in an
advisory capacity but will answer questions regarding
correct grammar, sentence structure, and acceptable
forms of presentation.
3. Before the first submission deadlines, editorial staff
will briefly examine the thesis or dissertation, answer
specific questions, and make recommendations about
the form of the thesis or dissertation.
4. At Dissertation first submission, editorial staff check
the format and pagination and read parts of the text
for general usage, references, and bibliographical form.
At Thesis first submission, editorial staff check format,
reference style, pagination, and signatures. At ETD
final submission, links to table of contents and lists of
figures and tables are also checked.
5. The Editorial Office maintains a list of formatters,
editors, and binders that students may hire.
For more information, contact Ms. Anne Taylor,
Coordinator, Graduate School Editorial Office,
160 Grinter Hall, Gainesville FL 32611-5500,
phone (352)392-1282, fax (352)846-1855,
e-mail taylora@ufl.edu, website
http://gradschool.rgp.ufl.edu/editorial/introduction.html.


STUDENT SERVICES


Graduate Student Records
Graduate Student Records staff work with academic
units to support students at all phases of their graduate
careers, from admission through degree certification and
graduation. The Office is responsible for keeping the
official graduate student record and ensuring compliance
with all Graduate Council and University policies.
The student and the supervisory committee chair
must notify Graduate Student Records
(106 Grinter, 392-4643) of any changes to the
supervisory committee. Changes to a student's
committee are allowed until midpoint of the term of
degree award if the defense has not occurred yet. No
changes are allowed after the defense. For procedural
details, contact the major academic unit.


Graduate Student Council
The Graduate Student Council was formed in 1989 to
foster interaction among graduate students on campus and
to provide an agency for coordinating graduate student
activities and programs. The GSC seeks the improvement
of graduate student education through active and
permanent communication with the Graduate School,
the University administration, and the Florida Board
of Trustees. It also represents the interests of graduate
students at the student government, administration, local,
state, and national levels. GSC is a dues-paying member
of the National Association of Graduate and Professional
Students.


Graduate Student Handbook
The Graduate School summarizes useful information in
the Graduate Student Handbook http://gradschool.rgp.
ufl.edu/students/introduction.html. The academic unit
distributes copies to new students.


Housing
For graduate and undergraduate students with
families: Apartment accommodations on the University
campus are available for students with families. Applicants
must have applied to the University and have a UF ID
number and are urged to apply as early as possible because
of the demand for housing.
For single graduate students: Graduate students are
housed in graduate and family housing villages or in the
Keys Residential Complex (available to graduate and
upper-division students). To be considered for assignment
to the Keys Residential Complex, you need to complete a
residence hall housing application (this is a separate and
different process from applying for graduate and family
housing).
To be eligible to continue living in University housing,
all resident students must make normal progress toward a
degree as determined by their academic departments.






GENERAL INFORMATION
62
Applying for Housing
Each student must make personal arrangements for
housing, either by applying to the Department of Housing
and Residence Education for assignment to University
housing facilities or by obtaining accommodations off
campus. For information or to apply: http://www.housing.
ufl.edu. For off-campus housing information: Dean of
Students website, http://www.dso.ufl.edu/offcampus.


Residence Halls for Single Students
Various types of accommodations exist at UF including
standard residence halls, apartments, and suites. The
double room for two students in a standard residence hall
is the most common type. Several of the larger rooms or
suites are designated as permanent triple rooms. Suites for
two students consist of 2 connected rooms: a bedroom and
a study room.
Carpeted and air-conditioned apartments for four are
available in the Keys Residential Complex, the Lakeside
Residential Complex, and Beaty Towers. Key and Lakeside
apartments include four single bedrooms, 2 baths, a
kitchen, and a living room. Beaty Towers apartments
include 2 single bedrooms, a private bath, and a study-
kitchenette. The Springs Residential Complex offers single-
room suites and double-room suites with central heating
and air conditioning and shared baths. Information about
all facilities including rental rates is available online at
http://www.housing.ufl.edu.


Cooperative Living Arrangements
Off-campus co-ops are the Collegiate Living
Organization, 117 NW 15th Street, and Georgia Seagle
Hall, 1002 West University Avenue. Inquiries should be
made to these addresses.


Single Graduate and Family Housing
The University operates five apartment villages for
eligible students. To be eligible to apply for graduate and
family housing, a student must be married and/or have
legal custody of a dependent children) before being
offered an assignment OR be a single graduate student.
The student also must meet UF admission requirements
and be a degree-seeking student, as defined by the student's
college; and make normal progress toward a degree, as
determined by the student's college.
Most village apartments are unfurnished; limited
furnished apartments are available in Corry Village only.
Residents in all villages must furnish their own linens,
dishes, rugs, curtains, or other similar items. Single
graduate students may apply for a 1-bedroom apartment
in any village. Married couples without children may
apply for a 1- or 2-bedroom apartment in any village.
Utilities are an additional expense and are billed with the
rent. Students assigned to Maguire Village are subject


to maximum income limitations as established by the
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Maximum income ranges from $33,650 for one person
to $55,800 for six persons. Documentation of income is
required before taking occupancy in Maguire Village.
Corry Memorial Village (216 units) of brick, concrete,
and wood construction contains almost an equal number
of 1- and 2-bedroom apartments, with a few 3-bedroom
units. Some apartments are furnished and have window
air-conditioning units. Community facilities include a
meeting room and a laundry. Wireless internet is available
throughout village.
Diamond Memorial Village consists of 208 apartments
similar in construction to those in Corry Village. All
Diamond apartments are unfurnished, and have central air
conditioning and heat and DHNet (Housing Ethernet).
Special features include a community building and air-
conditioned study-meeting room, laundry facilities, and a
study cubicle in each 2-bedroom apartment. Tanglewood
Village Apartments, about 1.3 miles south of the central
campus, consists of 208 unfurnished efficiencies, and 1-
and 2-bedroom townhouse units. All units have disposals,
and 2-bedroom units have dishwashers. All 1- and
2-bedroom units have 1-1/2 baths. Community facilities
include a large recreation hall, laundry facilities, and two
swimming pools.
University Village South (UVS) and Maguire Village
consist of 348 centrally heated and air-conditioned 1- and
2-bedroom unfurnished apartments. Community facilities
include a pool, laundry, and meeting room. The kitchens
are equipped with stoves and refrigerators. Diamond,
Maguire, UVS, and Tanglewood have wireless internet
available in and around the rooms and commons.
For Maguire Village only, the student must be part of a
family with a combined gross annual income (including
grants-in-aid, VA benefits, scholarships, fellowships, and
child-support payments) which does not exceed, during
the period of occupancy, the following maximum income
limitations: one person, $33,650; two persons, $38,500;
three persons, $43,300; four persons, $48,100; five
persons, $51,950; and six persons, $55,800.
For more information contact the Graduate and Family
Housing Office.


Off-Campus Life
The Off-Campus Life Department in the Dean of
Students Office offers many resources and services to
a wide variety of students including students currently
living in the community; students moving off campus;
students living on campus; and graduate, undergraduate,
and incoming students new to the Gainesville community.
Services include the Off-Campus Life website (http://www.
dso.ufl.edu/offcampus), Gator Guide to Off-Campus Life,
apartment locator, one-on-one support for student and
community issues and concerns, events for off-campus
students, and educational programming to help students
adjust to living in the community. The publications and








website include information and resources on budgeting,
finding the right place to live, apartment locator, leases,
city codes, landlord laws, and community and campus
resources. All services are free to students. For more
information, stop by the Off-Campus Life Department
in the Dean of Students Office, 202 Peabody Hall, phone
(352)392-1261.


Ombudsman
The Office of the University Ombudsman was
established by the state legislature and reports directly to
the President. The Office helps students resolve problems
and conflicts. It offers an informal avenue of redress for
students' problems and grievances that arise in the course
of interacting with the institution. By considering the
problems in an unbiased way, the Ombudsman works to
achieve a fair resolution and works to protect the rights of
all involved parties.
The Office of the Ombudsman deals with student
concerns of an academic nature. Students must first
contact the instructor, the academic unit chair, and the
college dean before seeking help from the Ombudsman,
although instances do exist where contact with the
University Ombudsman first is beneficial.
In many instances, nonacademic issues can be easily
and readily resolved for students merely by facilitating
direct communication and effective listening. For other
problems not related to academic issues, the Office of
the Ombudsman helps students contact the appropriate
campus office for dealing with their problems. For more
information, visit http://www.ombudsman.ufl.edu.


Reading and Writing Center
The Reading and Writing Center is part of the Office of
Academic Technology (formerly the Office of Instructional
Resources). Located in Southwest Broward Hall, the
Center offers one-on-one tutoring and writing help for
both undergraduate and graduate students. The Center
often helps people with application essays and personal
statements for graduate school applications. It also offers
help on papers written for graduate school classes, and
theses or dissertations. The Center guarantees 15 to 20
minute sessions (longer if staff are not busy) to look over
a student's writing. While multiple visits will give students
feedback on the strengths and weaknesses in their writing,
it is difficult to provide anything like a comprehensive
reading of any document as long as most theses and
dissertations. For information, visit http://at.ufl.edu/
rwcenter, phone (352)392-6420.


Speech and Hearing Clinic
The UF Speech and Hearing Clinic (4th floor of Dauer
Hall) offers therapeutic and diagnostic services to persons
with speech, language, and hearing disorders and to per-
sons with dyslexia and other learning disabilities. Lessons


STUDENT SERVICES

for general accent reduction and diction may be arranged.
These services are available to the University faculty and
students. Therapy is scheduled between 8 am and 5 pm,
Monday-Friday, with the Clinic being open in accordance
with the University Calendar. Students are encouraged
to visit the Clinic office at 435 Dauer Hall. For more
information, visit http://www.csd.ufl.edu. To schedule an
appointment, phone (352)392-2041.


Student Health Care Center
The Student Health Care Center (SHCC) is an
accredited outpatient clinic that provides primary medical
care, mental health counseling, health education, disease
prevention, wellness promotion and various specialty
services. Our goal is to make convenient appointments
with your own healthcare provider within 24 hours if
you simply phone first. The Center is staffed by a large
number of healthcare professionals. Physicians, physician
assistants, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, dietitians,
psychiatrists, psychologists and mental health counselors
are available at the SHCC to meet your needs. All
registered students are eligible for SHCC services. This
covers unlimited consultations with almost all SHCC staff.
Postdoctoral students, semester-off students and spouses
may receive care if they pay and optional health fee. A
Student Government-sponsored health insurance plan is
available.
The SHCC also offers a pharmacy, clinical laboratory,
and radiology services. Additional services include
immunizations, foreign travel consultation, women's
health care, specialized programs for students with eating
disorders and alcohol and substance abuse, an acute care
clinic, and a sports medicine clinic. In addition, students
can phone their individual medical team and talk with a
registered nurse to discuss medical concerns and questions.
The health-promotion staff offers counseling and extensive
campus-outreach programs.
There is no charge for an office visit with SHCC clinical
staff, health education, or mental health services. Fee-for-
service charges are assessed for laboratory tests, X-rays,
medical procedures, medications, physical therapy, massage
therapy, and consultation with health care specialists.
CPR and first-aid classes are also available for a fee. All
services are housed in the Infirmary (on Fletcher Drive,
on campus). Limited SHCC services are also available
at SHCC@shands and SHCC@Corry Village Satellite
Clinics.
For current services, hours, and special events, visit
http://www.shcc.ufl.edu
HIV infection: The University's policy is to assess the
needs of students, faculty or staff with HIV infection
on a case-by-case basis. With permission of the affected
individual, the director of the Student Health Care Center
will help coordinate resources and services.
The confidentiality of an individual's HIV status,
and the individual's welfare, is respected. Breach of
confidentiality of information obtained by a University






GENERAL INFORMATION
64
employee in an official University capacity may result in
disciplinary action.
Based on current medical information on risk of
infection, the University does not isolate persons with HIV
infection or AIDS from other individuals in the education
or work setting. Furthermore, the University supports the
continued participation, to the fullest extent reasonably
possible, of these individuals in the campus educational/
work environment. It is also the policy of the University to
provide education that seeks to prevent the spread of HIV
infection. Those individuals at risk for the HIV infection
are encouraged to get tested; those who are infected
are urged to seek treatment. With current advances in
HIV/AIDS treatment, early intervention is crucial to
maintaining well being and delaying complications of the
illness. In keeping with the Americans with Disabilities
Act, the University considers HIV/AIDS to be a disability.
Students or employees who are disabled with HIV
infection or AIDS can use existing support services.


UF International Center


The UF International Center (UFIC), in 123 Grinter
Hall, supports and promotes teaching, research, service,
and the enhancement of international education. UFIC
coordinates with government and university agencies to
provide the following services: evaluating international
student financial statements, issuing DS-2019s and I-20s,
and facilitating study abroad opportunities. UFIC is the
University of Florida liaison with foreign and domestic
embassies and consulates. For more information, contact
the appropriate person at UFIC: phone (352)392-5323,
fax (352)392-5575, e-mail ufic@ufic.ufl.edu, website
http://www.ufic.ufl.edu.
International Student Services (ISS) provides
orientation, immigration services, and cross-cultural
workshops to students from abroad coming to study at UF.
Services are provided to international students immediately
on their arrival at UF and continue until they return
to their home countries. ISS provides advisement to all
international students on problems pertaining to academic,
immigration, financial, cultural, and personal issues.
International Fulbright ISS student fellows must check in
with ISS.
International Faculty and Scholar Services (IFSS)
delivers administrative and support services to international
faculty, scholars, and their families. Services are provided to
faculty and scholars immediately on their arrival on campus
and continue until they return home. All international
faculty and scholars must check in with IFSS to verify visa
status and insurance coverage.
Study Abroad Services (SAS) administers summer,
fall, spring, and academic year programs that give students
the opportunity to live and study abroad while fulfilling
degree requirements. Students can choose among faculty-
led summer programs; fall, spring, and academic-year
exchange programs; and a wide range of independent
programs. Various and other financial aid can be applied
to help finance the international academic experience.


UF exchange programs enable students to pay UF tuition
while studying abroad. SAS program assistants advise
applicants on all aspects of UF approved programs,
provide pre-departure orientations, and process the foreign
transcript on return of the student. Program details are
available in the UFIC library or on the UFIC website.
Program Development (PD) helps UF faculty and
students devise projects in international applied research,
technical cooperation, student exchange, workshops,
outreach, and other international activities. Working
closely with other centers, academic units, and colleges,
PD promotes programs and projects that capitalize on the
strengths of UF's faculty and staff. UFIC administers the
World Citizenship Program, an international internship
program funded by the Coca-Cola Foundation, which
places students with humanitarian assistance and
environmental NGOs around the world. The Peace
Corps maintains a recruiting office in UFIC for students
interested in 2 years of voluntary services abroad. UFIC
maintains a country specialist database that contains
faculty expertise in particular countries and that anyone
can search by country (http://www.ufic.ufl.edu/csd/index.
asp).


Workshops for Teaching Assistants
The Graduate School and the Office of Academic
Technology (AT) Teaching Center offer an orientation and
a series of workshops for teaching assistants to improve
their instructional skills. The orientation and "getting
started" workshop are mandatory for all graduate students
starting teaching assignments. Some topics included
in the workshop series are presentation skills, course
and lecture planning, techniques for improving student
attention and motivation, group dynamics, testing and
grading, use of technology to enhance learning, and
how to elicit and interpret feedback. TAs who complete
a significant percentage of the workshops are awarded
certificates. Participants may request videotaping of their
classroom presentations and student feedback on strengths
and weaknesses. To register or for more information
go to Resources for Teaching Assistants at http://www.
teachingcenter.ufl.edu, call the AT Teaching Center, 392-
2010, or visit the office on the ground level, Southwest
Broward Hall. Teaching at the University of Florida: A
Handbook for Teaching Assistants: is available at http://www.
teachingcenter.ufl.edu/materials/ta_handbook_web.pdf.












i i


Fields of Instruction







I FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


Course Prefixes, Titles and Academic Units


PREFIX TITLE


ACADEMIC UNIT


PREFIX TITLE


ACADEMIC UNIT


ABE Agricultural and Biological
Engineering
ACG Accounting: General
ADV Advertising
AEB Agricultural Economics
and Business
AEE Agriculture and Extension
Education
AFH African History
AFS African Studies
AGR Agronomy
ALS Agricultural and
Life Sciences



AMH American History
AML American Literature
ANG Anthropology
ANS Animal Science
AOM Agricultural Operations
Management
APK Applied Physiology
and Kinesiology


Architecture
Art Education
Art History


AST Astronomy
BCH Biochemistry (Biophysics)



BCN Building Construction
BME Biomedical Engineering
BOT Botany

BUL Business Law
CAP Computer Application
Development
CAS Clinical Audiology and
Speech Language Pathology
CBH Comparative Psychology
and Animal Behavior
CCE Civil Construction
Engineering
CCJ Criminology and
Criminal Justice
CDA Computer Design/
Architecture
CEG Civil Geotechnical
Engineering
CEN Computer Software
Engineering
CES Civil Engineering Structures
CGN Civil Engineering


Agricultural and Biological
Engineering
Accounting
Mass Communication
Food and Resource Economics

Agricultural Education and
Communication
History
African Studies
Agronomy, Genetics
Agricultural Education and
Communication, Agriculture:
General, Entomology and
Nematology, Horticultural Science
History
English
Anthropology, Genetics
Animal Sciences
Agricultural and Biological
Engineering
Applied Physiology and Kinesiology;
Health Education and Behavior;
Tourism, Recreation,
and Sport Management
Architecture, Theatre and Dance
Art and Art History
Art and Art History
Art and Art History
Astronomy
Agriculture: General, Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology, Genetics,
Medical Sciences
Building Construction
Biomedical Engineering
Botany, Geological Sciences,
Horticultural Science
Management
Computer and Information Sciences
and Engineering, Genetics
Communicative Disorders

Psychology

Civil and Coastal Engineering

Criminology, Criminology and Law

Computer and Information Sciences
and Engineering
Civil and Coastal Engineering

Computer and Information Sciences
and Engineering
Civil and Coastal Engineering
Civil and Coastal Engineering


CHM Chemistry
CHS Chemistry: Specialized
CIS Computer Science and
Information Systems
CJL Law and Process
CLA Classics
CLP Clinical and Health
Psychology
CLT Classical Culture
in Translation
or Translation Skills
COP Computer Programming

COT Computing Theory

CPO Comparative Politics
CRW Creative Writing
CWR Civil Water Resources





DAA Dance, Emphasis on Activity
DCP Design, Construction and
Planning


Dentistry
Developmental Psychology

Dietetics
Experimental Analysis
of Behavior


Chemistry
Chemistry
Computer and Information Sciences
and Engineering, Genetics
Criminology
Classics
Clinical and Health Psychology,
Psychology
Classics



Computer and Information Sciences
and Engineering
Computer and Information Sciences
and Engineering, Genetics
Political Science
English
Agricultural and Biological
Engineering, Civil and Coastal
Engineering, Environmental
Engineering Sciences, Soil and
Water Science
Theatre and Dance
Architecture, Building Construction,
Interior Design, Landscape
Architecture, Urban and Regional
Planning
Dental Sciences
Clinical and Health Psychology,
Psychology
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Psychology


EAP English as a Second Language Linguistics
for Academic Purposes


EAS Aerospace Engineering
ECH Engineering: Chemical
ECO Economics
ECP Economic Problems
and Policy
ECS Economic Systems
and Development
EDA Educational Administration

EDE Elementary Education
EDF Education: Foundations
and Policy Studies
EDG Education: General

EDH Higher Education

EDS Education Supervision


Middle School Education
Early Childhood Education
Education:
Emotional Disorders


Mechanical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Economics
Economics

Economics

Educational Administration
and Policy
Teaching and Learning
Educational Psychology, Teaching
and Learning
Educational Administration and
Policy, Teaching and Learning
Educational Administration
and Policy
Educational Administration
and Policy
Teaching and Learning
Teaching and Learning
Special Education







COURSE PREFIXES I


Course Prefixes, Titles and Academic Units


PREFIX TITLE


ACADEMIC UNIT


PREFIX TITLE


ACADEMIC UNIT


EEL Engineering: Electrical
EES Environmental Engineering
Science
EEX Education: Exceptional Child-
Core Competencies
EGI Education: Gifted
EGM Mechanical Engineering
EGN Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering
EIN Industrial Engineering
ELE ESOL/Bilingual Education
EMA Materials Engineering
EME Education: Technology
and Media
EML Engineering: Mechanical
ENC English Composition
ENG English: General
ENL English Literature
ENU Engineering: Nuclear

ENV Engineering: Environmental
ENY Entomology
EOC Ocean Engineering

ESE Secondary Education
ESI I ndustrial/Systems Engineering
EUH European History
EVR Environmental Studies
EXP Experimental Psychology
FAS Fishery and Aquatic Sciences
FIL Film
FIN Finance
FLE Foreign Language Education
FNR Forestry and Natural
Resources
FOL Foreign Languages
FOR Forestry

FOS Food Science
FOT Foreign Languages
(in Translation)
FRE French Language
FRW French Literature (Writings)
FYC Family, Youth and
Community
GEA Geography: Regional Areas
GEB General Business



GEO Geography: Systematic
GER German
GET German Culture in Translation
or Translation Skills
GEW German Literature (Writings)


Electrical and Computer Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences

Special Education

Special Education
Mechanical Engineering
Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering, Engineering: General
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Teaching and Learning
Materials Science and Engineering
Teaching and Learning

Mechanical Engineering
English
English
English
Nuclear and Radiological
Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Entomology and Nematology
Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering
Teaching and Learning
Industrial and Systems Engineering
History
Interdisciplinary Ecology
Psychology
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
Mass Communication
Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate
Teaching and Learning
Forest Resources and Conservation

Romance Languages and Literatures
Forest Resources and Conservation,
Genetics
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Latin American Studies

Romance Languages and Literatures
Romance Languages and Literatures
Family, Youth, and Community
Sciences
Geography
Business Administration: General;
Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate;
International Business
Geography
Germanic and Slavic Studies
Germanic and Slavic Studies

Germanic and Slavic Studies


GEY Gerontology

GLY Geology
GMS Graduate Medical Sciences


GRE Classical Greek
(Language Study)
GRW Classical Greek Literature
(Writings)
HIS General History and
Historiography
HLP Health/Leisure/Physical
Education

HOS Horticultural Sciences
HSA Health Services
Administration
HSC Health Sciences



HUN Human Nutrition
ICM International Construction
Management
IDS Interdisciplinary Studies
IND Interior Design
INR International Relations
ISM Information Systems
Management
JOU Journalism
LAA Landscape Architecture
LAE Language Arts and
English Education


Latin American History
Latin American Studies
Latin (Language Study)
Law
Leisure

Linguistics
Literature
Latin Literature (Writings)
Mathematics: Analysis
Mathematics: Discrete
Mathematics Education
Management


Clinical and Health Psychology,
Gerontological Studies, Psychology
Geological Sciences
Anatomy and Cell Biology;
Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology; Clinical Investigation;
Epidemiology and Health
Policy Research; Genetics;
Medical Sciences; Molecular
Genetics and Microbiology;
Oral Biology; Pathology,
Immunology, and Laboratory
Medicine; Pharmacodynamics;
Pharmacology and Therapeutics;
Physiology and Functional
Genomics; Veterinary Medical
Sciences
Classics

Classics

History

Health Education and Behavior;
Tourism, Recreation, and Sport
Management
Genetics, Horticultural Science
Health Services Research,
Management, and Policy; Public
Communication Sciences and
Disorders, Health Education and
Behavior, Public Health
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Building Construction

Liberal Arts and Sciences: General
Interior Design
Political Science
Decision and Information Sciences

Mass Communication
Landscape Architecture
Communication Sciences and
Disorders, English, Teaching and
Learning
History
Latin American Studies
Classics
Comparative Law, Taxation
Tourism, Recreation, and Sport
Management
Linguistics
English
Classics
Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematics, Teaching and Learning
Decision and Information Sciences,
Management







I FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION


Course Prefixes, Titles and Academic Units


PREFIX TITLE


ACADEMIC UNIT


PREFIX TITLE


ACADEMIC UNIT


MAP Mathematics Applied
MAR Marketing
MAS Mathematics: Algebraic
Structures
MAT Mathematics
M C B I.. .. I .. .
MHF Mathematics: History
and Foundations
MHS Mental Health Services
MMC Mass Communication
MTG Mathematics: Topology
and Geometry
MUC Music: Composition
MUE Music Education
MUG Music: Conducting
MUH Music: History
MUL Music Literature
MUN Music Performance
MUR Music Religious
MUS Music Research
MUT Music: Theory
MVK Applied Music: Keyboard
MVO Applied Music: Other
MVS Applied Music: Strings
MVV Applied Music: Voice
NEM Nematology
NGR Nursing, Graduate
OCP Physical Oceanography


Ornamental Horticulture
Occupational Therapy
Public Administration
Process Biology
I, II i. 1. I .. I 1. i y
Genetics/Physiology)


PCO Psychology for Counseling
PET Physical Education Theory




PGY Photography
PHA Pharmacy






PHC Public Health Concentration




PHH Philosophy, History of


Mathematics
Marketing
Mathematics

Mathematics
. i .. I l. .- and Cell Science
Mathematics

Counselor Education, Psychology
Mass Communication
Mathematics

Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Music
Entomology and Nematology
Nursing
Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering
Horticultural Science
Occupational Therapy
Political Science
Botany, Forest Resources and
Conservation, Genetics,
Horticultural Science,
Interdisciplinary Ecology,
.. .. I and Cell Science,
Plant Molecular and Cellular
Biology, Zoology
Psychology
Applied Physiology and
Kinesiology; Clinical Investigation;
Health Education and Behavior;
Tourism, Recreation, and Sport
Zoology
Genetics; Medicinal Chemistry;
Pharmaceutical Sciences;
Pharmaceutics; Pharmacodynamics;
Pharmacology and Therapeutics;
Pharmacy Health Care
Administration
Clinical Investigation, Epidemiology
and Health Policy Research, Health
Education and Behavior, Public
Health
Philosophy


Philosophy
Philosophers and Schools
Physical Therapy
Physics
Physics (Continued)
Packaging Sciences


PLP Plant Pathology
PLS Plant Science
PMA Pest Management
POS Political Science
POT Political Theory
POW Portuguese Literature
(Writings)
PPE Personality
PSB Psychobiology
PSY Psychology
PUP Public Policy
PUR Public Relations
QMB Quantitative Methods
in Business
RCS Rehabilitation Counseling
Services
RED Reading Education
REE Real Estate

REL Religion
RMI Risk Management
and Insurance
RSD Rehabilitation Science
Doctorate
RTV Radio: Television
SCE Science Education
SDS Student Development
Services
SOP Social Psychology
SOS Soil Science
SPA Speech Pathology and
Audiology
SPC Speech Communication
SPN Spanish Language
SPS School Psychology
SPW Spanish Literature (Writings)
SSE Social Studies Education
STA Statistics



SUR Surveying and Related Areas
SYA Sociological Analysis
SYD Sociology of Demography/
Area Studies/Sociological
Minorities
SYO Social Organization
SYP Social Processes


Philosophy
Philosophy
Rehabilitation Science
Physics
Physics
Agricultural and Biological
Engineering
Plant Pathology
Agronomy; Horticultural Science
Entomology and Nematology
Political Science
Political Science
Romance Languages and Literatures

Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
Political Science
Mass Communication
Decision and Information Sciences,
Marketing
Rehabilitation Counseling

Teaching and Learning
Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate;
Real Estate
Religion
Finance, Insurance, and Real Estate

Rehabilitation Science

Mass Communication
Teaching and Learning
Counselor Education

Psychology
Soil and Water Science
Communication Sciences and
Disorders
English
Romance Languages and Literatures
Educational Psychology
Romance Languages and Literatures
Teaching and Learning
Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering, Genetics, Public
Health, Statistics
Forest Resources and Conservation
Sociology
Sociology



Sociology
Sociology






COURSE PREFIXES I


Course Prefixes, Titles and Academic Units


PREFIX TITLE


ACADEMIC UNIT


PREFIX TITLE


ACADEMIC UNIT


TAX Taxation
THE Theatre Studies and
General Resources
TPA Theatre Production
and Administration
TPP Theatre Performance and
Performance Training
TSL Teaching English as a
Second Language


Accounting
Theatre and Dance

Theatre and Dance

Theatre and Dance

Linguistics, Teaching and Learning


TTE Transportation Engineering Civil and Coastal Engineering
URP Urban and Regional Planning Architecture, Urban and Regional
Planning
VME Veterinary Medicine Graduate Public Health, Veterinary Medical
Sciences
WIS Wildlife Science Veterinary Medical Sciences,
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
WST Women's Studies Women's Studies
ZOO Zoology Genetics, Zoology






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
70

Accounting

Warrington College of Business Administration

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Director: G. A. McGill. Fisher Eminent Scholars: J. S.
Demski; J. Michael Cook. Deloitte and Touche Professor:
D. A. Snowball. Ernst and Young Professor: W. R. Knechel.
Professors: B. B. Ajinkya; J. L. Kramer. PriceWaterhouse
Coopers Associate Professor: G. M. McGill. Associate
Professors: S. K. Asare; J. V. Boyles; S. S. Kramer. Assistant
Professors: H. Lin; J. Tucker.

The Fisher School of Accounting offers graduate work leading
to the Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) degree with a major
in accounting and the Ph.D. degree with a major in business
administration and an accounting concentration. Complete
descriptions of the requirements for these degrees are provided in
the General Information section of this catalog.
Students in the Master of Accounting degree program are able
to design and individualized plan of study including courses in
the areas of financial accounting, auditing, taxation, and cost
and managerial accounting. A joint program leading to the Juris
Doctor and Master of Accounting degrees also is offered by
the Fisher School of Accounting and College of Law. Specific
details for the M.Acc., M.Acc./J.D., and Ph.D. programs will be
supplied by the Fisher School of Accounting upon request.
The M.Acc. and the Ph.D. accounting programs require
admission standards of at least the following: A combined
verbal and quantitative score of 1200 on the Graduate Record
Examination (GRE), or a score of 550 on the Graduate
Management Admission Test (GMAT). Admission to the M.Acc.
or Ph.D. accounting graduate programs cannot be granted until
scores are received.
Information on minimum GPA standards for admission to
the M.Acc. program may be obtained from the office of the
Associate Director. International students must submit a TOEFL
score of at least 570 with a minimum of 60 on the first section,
55 on the second section, and 55 on the third section, and a sat-
isfactory GMAT or GRE score.
Combined-degree program: The recommended curriculum
to prepare for a professional career in accounting is the 3/2 five-
year program with a joint awarding of the Bachelor of Science in
Accounting and Master of Accounting degrees upon completion
of the 150-hour program. The entry point into the 3/2 program
is the beginning of the senior year.
Students who have already completed an undergraduate
degree in accounting may enter the one-year M.Acc. degree
program which requires satisfactory completion of 34 hours
of course work. A minimum of 20 credits must be in graduate
level courses; a minimum of 18 credits must be in graduate level
accounting courses. The remaining credits are selected from
recommended elective courses that vary by area of specializa-
tion. Students are cautioned to seek early advisement since many
graduate courses are offered only once a year.
Requirements for the Ph.D. degree include a core of courses
in mathematical methods, statistics, and economic theory; one
or two supporting fields selected by the student; and a major
field of accounting. Students are expected to acquire teaching
experience as part of the Ph.D. degree program. Grants-in-aid
will be awarded for this teaching. International students must


submit a Test of Spoken English (TSE) test score of at least
220 along with satisfactory GMAT/GRE and TOEFL scores in
order to obtain a teaching appointment. Students are expected
to enroll in ACG 6940 for a minimum of three credits. Program
requirements include fulfillment of a research skill area and a dis-
sertation on an accounting-related topic.
Co-major: The School offers a co-major program in
conjunction with the Department of Statistics leading to the
Doctor of Philosophy degree in business administration-
accounting and statistics. For information on this program,
consult the School's graduate coordinator.
ACG 5065: Financial and Managerial Accounting (3) Prereq:
Designed for MBA students. Financial statement analysis including
techniques, cash flow, and impact of accounting principles.
Management control systems: planning, budgeting, reporting,
analysis, and performance evaluation.
ACG 5075: Managerial Accounting (2) Prereq: ACG 5005.
Introduction for prospective managers. Primary emphasis on
management control systems.
ACG 5226: Mergers and Acquisitions and Consolidated
Statements (2) Prereq: ACG 4133C. 7AC standing. Reporting
of business combinations, equity method of accounting for
investments in stocks, and issues concerning consolidated
financial statements.
ACG 5385: Advanced Accounting Analysis for the
Controllership Function (3) Prereq: ACG 4353C; 7AC standing.
A study of planning and control as they relate to management
of organizations. Draws from cases and journals to integrate
managerial accounting concepts.
ACG 5505: Financial Reporting for Governmental and Not-
for-Profit Organizations (2) Prereq: ACG 4133C, 7AC standing.
Reporting by state and local governmental organizations and
not-for-profit entities.
ACG 5637: Auditing I (4) Prereq: C grade or better in ACG
4133C and in ACG 4352C. Introduction to auditing and
assurance services. Decision-making process, research, and
auditing standards and procedures, with emphasis on ethics,
legal liability, internal control, audit evidence, testing, and intro-
duction to statistical sampling and EDP auditing.
ACG 5815: Accounting Institutions and Professional
Literature (2) Prereq: ACG 4133C, 5637, 7AC standing. Private
and public sector accounting institutions and their respective
professional literature. Research techniques for addressing
accounting issues emphasized through case assignments.
ACG 6136: Accounting Concepts and Financial Reporting
(2) Prereq: ACG 5815, 7AC standing. Theoretical frameworks
essential to explore structure, features, and limitations of
accounting and financial reporting.
ACG 6207: Accounting Issues in Financial Risk Management
(2) Prereq: ACG 5815, 5226, 7AC standing. Overview of risk
management, financial instruments used in risk management,
and related accounting issues and practices.
ACG 6255: International Accounting Issues (2) Prereq: ACG
5815, 5226, 7ACstanding. Overview of international accounting
and financial reporting practices in foreign jurisdictions and
comparisons of financial reporting requirements between United
States and selected foreign countries.
ACG 6265: International Accounting and Taxation (2) Prereq:
ACG 2021C or 5005; not open to students majoring in accounting.
Introduction to international accounting and tax concepts from
a financial statement user's perspective.
ACG 6387: Strategic Costing (2) Prereq: graduate standing.






AFRICAN STUDIES I


Strategic view of design and use of an organization's internal
accounting system.
ACG 6635: Issues in Audit Practice (2) Prereq: ACG 5815,
5226, 7ACstanding. In-depth discussion of fundamental
concepts underlying audit practice, including introduction to
current topics in auditing, advanced audit methods, and trends
in auditing practice.
ACG 6657: Auditing and Corporate Governance (2) Prereq:
ACG 5226, 5815, 7AC standing. Concepts of corporate
governance including regulation and practice. Overview of
corporate governance mechanisms and introduction to economic
foundation for auditing; linkages among governance, risk
management and assurance; and essential attributes of auditing
such as independence.
ACG 6695: Computer Assurance and Control (2) Prereq: ACG
5637, 7AC standing. Concepts of risk, control, and assurance
in environments with advanced information technology.
Technology based audit tools and techniques.
ACG 6835: Interdisciplinary Considerations in Accounting
Theory Development (3) Developments in related disciplines,
such as economics, law, and behavioral sciences, analyzed for
their contribution to accounting thought.
ACG 6845: Accounting and Analytical Methods (3) Utilization
of logic, including mathematics, in formulation of alternative
accounting valuation models and in clarification of accounting
concepts.
ACG 6888: Foundations of Measurement (2) Prereq: graduate
standing. Foundations of measurement: whether measure exists,
uniqueness properties if it does exist, and implementation issues.
Measures of income, of value, of preference, and of risk.
ACG 6905: Individual Work in Accounting (1-4; max: 7)
Prereq: approval of graduate coordinator. Reading and research in
areas of accounting.
ACG 6935: Special Topics in Accounting (1-4; max: 8) Prereq:
consent of associate director.
ACG 6940: Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ACG 7887: Research Analysis in Accounting (3) Prereq: ACG
7886. Analysis of accounting research and presentation of
student research project results. Financial accounting, managerial
accounting, auditing, taxation, management information
systems, and information economics.
ACG 7939: Theoretical Constructs in Accounting (3) Prereq:
ACG 7886. Emerging theoretical issues that directly impact
research and development of thought in accounting. Theory
construction and verification, information economics, and
agency theory constitute subsets of this course.
ACG 7979: Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who
have been accepted for a doctoral program. Not appropriate for
students who have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
ACG 7980: Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
TAX 5005: Introduction to Federal Income Taxation (4)
Prereq: C grade or better in ACG 3482C. Concepts and appli-
cations for all types of taxpayers. Influence of taxation on
economic decisions, basic statutory provisions relevant to
determining taxable gross income, allowable deductions, tax
computations, recognition or nonrecognition of gains and losses
on property transactions, and characterization of gains and
losses.
TAX 5065: Tax Professional Research (2) Prereq: TAX5005,
7AC standing. Use of professional tax literature and technology


for problem solving. Case-based to provide experience in dealing
with unstructured situations encountered in professional tax
practice. Both problem identification and resolution emphasized.
TAX 6015: Taxation of Business Entities I (2) Prereq: TAX
5065, 7AC standing. First of three-course sequence examining
taxation of corporations, S corporations, partnerships, and
other business entities. In addition to basic taxation of business
entities, tax planning and comparisons of taxation across entity
forms emphasized.
TAX 6016: Taxation of Business Entities II (2) Prereq: TAX
6015, 7ACstanding. Continuation of TAX 6015.
TAX 6017: Taxation of Business Entities III (2) Prereq: TAX
6016, 7ACstanding. Continuation of TAX 6016.
TAX 6526: Advanced International Taxation (2) Prereq: TAX
5065, 7AC standing. Expansion of introduction to international
tax, addressing more complex concepts encountered by U.S.
multinationals operating abroad. U.S. taxation of foreign persons
with U.S. activities included.
TAX 6726: Executive Tax Planning (2) Prereq: TAX5065, 7AC
standing. Unique economic and tax planning scenarios faced by
highly compensated executives throughout their working lives
and as they face retirement and death.
TAX 6877: Multijurisdictional Taxation (2) Prereq: TAX 5065,
7AC standing. Tax issues involved when business enterprises
operate in multiple taxing jurisdictions. Principles of both multi-
state and international income taxation (and their overlap).


African Studies

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Director: L. Villalon. Assistant Director: T. Leedy.
Distinguished Professors: G. Hyden; L. Guilette; J. W.
Jones; P. K. Nair. Distinguished Service Professors: S. Berg;
C. Davis. Professors: F. Baldwin; A. Bamia (Emeritus); P.
Basler; M. Binford; K. Boote; M. Burridge; B. Cailler; K.
Campbell; S. Cohn; T. Crisman; R. H. Davis (Emeritus);
H. Der-Houssikian (Emeritus); R. Emerson; E. P. Gibbs;
D. Foster; J. Frosch; D. Haman; P. E. Hildebrand; R. Holt;
S. Jacobson; C. Kiker; R. Lemarchand (Emeritus); P.
Magnarella; G. McClellan; L. McDowell; W. Nagan; P.
Nkedi-Kizza; K. Nunn; T. Oakland; D. Peters; R. Poynor;
F. Putz; M. Reid; P. Schmidt; J. Seale; L. Sollenberger; N.
Smith; S. Smith; A. Spring; L. White. Associate Professors:
G. Barnes; S. Brandt; M. Brown; B. Child; D. Cohen;
L. Crook; A. Goldman; L. Guion; M. Leslie; B. McDade;
F. McLaughlin; C. Mulligan; D. Smith; J. Southworth.
Assistant Professors: A. Akinyemi; M. Alas-Brun; A. Amoko;
J. Bonzongo; C. Bwenge; B. Chalfin; H. Dilger; J. Essegbey;
R. Gilbert; A. Hachimi; A. Kane; G. Kiker; S. Langwick; R.
Makopondo; M. Matondo; J. Meert; S. O'Brien; T. Palmer; E.
Potsdam; V. Rovine; A. Sow; B. Thapa.

The Center for African Studies offers the Certificate
in African Studies for master's and doctoral students in
conjunction with disciplinary degrees. Graduate courses on
Africa or with African content are available in the Colleges,
Schools, or Departments of Agricultural and Life Sciences,
Anthropology, Art and Art History, Botany, Economics,






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
72
Education, English, Food and Resource Economics, Forest
Resources and Conservation, Geography, History, Journalism
and Communications, Law, Linguistics, Music, Political Science,
and Sociology.
A description of the Certificate Program in African Studies
may be found in the section Special Programs. Listings of courses
may be found in individual departmental descriptions or may be
obtained from the Director, 427 Grinter Hall.
AFS 5061: Africana Bibliography (1) Survey of advanced
reference, specialized research tools (including variety of
electronic databases, published paper indexes, and bibliogra-
phies), and methods for graduate-level research in all disciplines
of African area studies.
AFS 6060: Research Problems in African Studies (3)
Interdisciplinary seminar on creating individual research designs
and preparing funding proposals for research in Africa.
AFS 6905: Individual Work (1-3; max: 9)


Agricultural and Biological

Engineering

Colleges of Engineering and Agricultural and
Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Chair: W. D. Graham. Associate Chair and Graduate
Coordinator: K. L. Campbell. Distinguished Professor: J. W.
Jones. Professors: M. 0. Balaban; H. W. Beck; B. J. Boman;
R. A. Bucklin; K. L. Campbell; K. V. Chau; W. D. Graham;
D. Z. Haman; P. H. Jones; W. M. Miller; J. W. Mishoe; R. A.
Nordstedt; A. R. Overman; M. Salyani; J. K. Schueller; A. A.
Teixeira; F. S. Zazueta. Associate Professors: M. D. Dukes;
J. F. Earle; J.P. Emond; C. J. Lehtola; R. Munoz-Carpena; M.
T. Talbot; B. A. Welt. Assistant Professors: T. F. Burks; M.
J. Correll; R. Ehsani; J. Judge; G. A. Kiker; W. S. Lee; K. L.
Migliaccio; P. C. Pullammanappallil; S. Shukla. Assistant
Scientists: C. W. Fraisse; K. T. Ingram; J. D. Jordan; W. A.
Porter. Senior Lecturer: J. D. Leary. Lecturer: A. E. Turner.

The degrees of Master of Science, Master of Engineering,
Doctor of Philosophy, and Engineer are offered with graduate
programs in agricultural and biological engineering through the
College of Engineering. The Master of Science and Doctor of
Philosophy degrees in agricultural and biological engineering
are offered in the area of agricultural operations management
and applied science through the College of Agricultural and
Life Sciences. Complete descriptions of the requirements for
the M.E., M.S., Engineer, and Ph.D. degrees are provided
in the General Information section of this catalog. Additional
information can be found on the graduate studies pages on the
department website at www.agen.ufl.edu. Refer to the Graduate
Student Manual link for specific admission requirements.
A combined B.S./M.S. program allows up to 12 graduate
credits to be double counted toward fulfillment of both degrees.
Please check the Undergraduate Catalog or contact the graduate
coordinator for qualifications and details. A 30-credit, 3-semester
non-thesis master degree program is also available to students
interested in completing the requirements in one year.
The Master of Science, Master of Engineering, and Doctor of


Philosophy degrees are offered in the following areas of research:

Agricultural Production
Includes development and application of precision agriculture
concepts and tools, pesticide application, robotics and
other machine systems and environmental control systems.
Applications to space agriculture are included in cooperation
with NASA at Kennedy Space Center.

Biological Engineering
Includes post-harvest operations, plant biotechnology, process
microbiology, food process engineering, environmental biotech-
nology and packaging science.

Information Systems
Includes development and application of remote sensing,
communications, mathematical modeling, environmental
decision analysis and expert systems techniques to biological and
agricultural systems.

Land and Water Resources
Includes soil-water-plant relations, irrigation, water quality,
watershed hydrology, BMP and TMDL studies, hydrologic
modeling, ecological restoration, waste management, ecological
and risk modeling and water reuse.
Students also may choose to participate in interdisciplinary
concentrations in hydrologic sciences, geographic information
sciences, particle science and technology, and interdisciplinary
ecology.
The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the agri-
cultural operations management area of specialization provide
for scientific training and research in technical agricultural
management. Typical plans of study focus on advanced training
in environmental systems management, production systems
management, construction and process management and
technical sales management.
For students with basic science degrees, the Doctor of
Philosophy program with a specialization in applied sciences
through the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences provides
advanced training in problem-solving capabilities, interdis-
ciplinary research, and methods for applying science to real-
world problems and issues. Typical emphasis is on (1) the use
of engineering methods and approaches, such as mathemati-
cal modeling, optimization, and information technologies,
in application of science to problems of various spatial and
temporal scales, and (2) an interdisciplinary experience in
research at the doctoral level.
The requirements for a master's degree normally take 2 years
to complete. The length of time required for the Doctor of
Philosophy degree depends, in part, on the research topic but
normally takes 3 to 4 years.
ABE 5015: Empirical Models of Crop Growth and Yield
Response (3) Prereq: permission of instructor. Analytical models
useful for engineering design and management decisions,
including water reuse. Emphasis on analytical functions.
Modeling strategy based on patterns of data, functional relation-
ships, connections among various factors, consistency among
data sets, and mathematical beauty.
ABE 5032: Programming and Interfacing High-Performance
Microcontrollers (3) Prereq: experience in programming. Not
available for students with credit in ESI 4161 and EEL 4744C.









Design of high-performance, embedded, microcontroller-based
control systems with emphasis on integrating hardware, software,
and applications interfacing. Hands-on experiments illustrate
and reinforce principles.
ABE 5152: Electro-Hydraulic Circuits and Controls (2) Prereq:
EML 3100, EGM 3400, 3520. Engineering analysis, design, and
experimentation of electro-hydraulic circuits and systems. Design
of hydraulic circuits, fluid power system components, hydraulic
actuator analysis, servo and proportional valve performance, and
electro-hydraulic control theory and applications.
ABE 5332: Advanced Agricultural Structures (3) Design
criteria for agricultural structures including steady and unsteady
heat transfer analysis, environmental modification, plant and
animal physiology, and structural systems analysis.
ABE 5442: Advanced Agricultural Process Engineering (3)
Engineering problems in handling and processing agricultural
products.
ABE 5643C: Biological Systems Modeling (3) Prereq: MAC
2312. Introduction to concepts and methods of process-based
modeling of biological systems; physiological, populational, and
agricultural applications.
ABE 5646: Biological and Agricultural Systems Simulation
(3) Prereq: MAC 2312, CGS 3460 or CIS 3020. Numerical
techniques for continuous system models using FORTRAN.
Introduction to discrete simulation. Application of simulation
and sensitivity analysis with examples relating to crops, soil,
environment, and pests.
ABE 5653: Rheology and Mechanics of Agricultural and
Biological Materials (3) Prereq: MAC 2313, PHY2048, CHM
2045, or consent of instructor. Relation of biophysical and
biochemical structure to theological and mechanical behavior of
biological materials in solid, liquid, and granular form; methods
for measuring material properties governing these behaviors.
ABE 5663: Applied Microbial Biotechnology (3) Prereq: general
biology and organic chemistry or permission of instructor. Principles
of microbial biotechnology with emphasis on application of
microorganisms for industrial processes, e.g., energy, environ-
mental, food, pharmaceutical, and chemical.
ABE 5707C: Agricultural Waste Management (3) Prereq:
4 or higher classification. Engineering analysis and design of
systems for the collection, storage, treatment, transport, and
utilization of livestock and other agricultural organic wastes
and wastewaters. Field trips to operating systems and laboratory
evaluation of materials and processes.
ABE 5815C: Food and Bioprocess Engineering Design (4)
Engineering design of unit process operations employed in agro/
food, pharmaceutical, and biological industries including steril-
ization/pasteurization, radiation, freezing, drying, evaporation,
fermentation, distillation.
ABE 6031: Instrumentation in Agricultural Engineering
Research (3) Principles and application of measuring
instruments and devices for obtaining experimental data in agri-
cultural engineering research.
ABE 6035: Advanced Remote Sensing: Science and Sensors (3)
Prereq: MAP 2302. To develop understanding of remote sensing
theory and system using information obtained from visible/
near infrared, thermal infrared, and microwave regions of EM
spectrum.
ABE 6252: Advanced Soil and Water Management
Engineering (3) Physical and mathematical analysis of problems
in infiltration, drainage, and groundwater hydraulics.
ABE 6254: Simulation of Agricultural Watershed Systems


AGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
73
(3) Prereq: CWR 4111 and working knowledge of FORTRAN.
Characterization and simulation of agricultural watershed
systems including land and channel phase hydrologic processes
and pollutant transport processes. Investigation of the structure
and capabilities of current agricultural watershed computer
models.
ABE 6262C: Remote Sensing in Hydrology (3) Prereq: ABE
6035. To develop practical understanding of remote sensing
applications to hydrology using observations in different regions
of EM spectrum. Seminar style with emphasis on literature
review and presentation.
ABE 6615: Advanced Heat and Mass Transfer in Biological
Systems (3) Prereq: CGS 2425, ABE 3612C. Analytical and
numerical technique solutions to problems of heat and mass
transfer in biological systems. Emphasis on nonhomogeneous,
irregularly shaped products with respiration and transpiration.
ABE 6644: Agricultural Decision Systems (3) Computerized
decision systems for agriculture. Expert systems, decision support
systems, simulations, and types of applications in agriculture.
ABE 6905: Individual Work in Agricultural and Biological
Engineering (1-4; max: 6) Special problems in agricultural
engineering.
ABE 6910: Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ABE 6931: Seminar (1; max: 2) Preparation and presenta-
tion of reports on specialized aspects of research in agricultural
engineering and agricultural operations management. S/U.
ABE 6933: Special Topics in Agricultural and Biological
Engineering (1-4; max: 6) Lectures, laboratory, and/or special
projects.
ABE 6940: Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ABE 6971: Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ABE 6972: Research for Engineer's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ABE 6974: Nonthesis Project (1-6; max: 6) In-depth project.
S/U.
ABE 6986: Applied Mathematics in Agricultural and
Biological Engineering (3) Mathematical methods, including
regression analysis, graphical techniques, and analytical and
numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations,
relevant to agricultural engineering.
ABE 7979: Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who
have been accepted for a doctoral program. Not appropriate for
students who have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
ABE 7980: Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
AOM 5315: Advanced Agricultural Operations Management
(3) Prereq: AOM 4455; CGS 2531 or equivalent or consent of
instructor. The functional and economic applications of machine
monitoring and robotics. Analysis of farm machinery systems
reliability performance. Queuing theory, linear programming,
and ergonomic considerations for machine systems optimization.
AOM 5334C: Agricultural Chemical Application Technology
(3) Equipment and methods used to apply pesticides in
agriculture. Emphasis on techniques to avoid misapplication and
pesticide drift.
AOM 5431: GIS and Remote Sensing in Agriculture and
Natural Resources (3) Prereq: working knowledge of computer or
permission ofinst ructor. Principles and applications of geographic
information systems (GIS) and global positioning system (GPS)
technologies supporting land use/cover assessment, agricultural
production, and natural resources conservation.
AOM 5435: Advanced Precision Agriculture (3) Principles and






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
74
applications of technologies supporting precision farming and
natural resource data management planning. Global positioning
systems (GPS), geographic information systems (GIS), variable
rate technologies (VRT), data layering of independent variables,
automated guidance, Internet information access, computer
software management.
AOM 6905: Individual Work in Agricultural Operations
Management (1-6; max: 6) Special problems.
AOM 6932: Special Topics in Agricultural Operations
Management (1-6; max: 6) Lectures, laboratory, and /or special
projects.
CWR 6536: Stochastic Subsurface Hydrology (3) Prereq: senior-
level course in probability and statistics, calculus through
tial equations, soil physics, and/or subsurface hydrology. Stochastic
modeling of subsurface flow and transport including geostatis-
tics, time series analysis, Kalman filtering, and physically based
stochastic models.
PKG 5002: Advanced Packaging, Society, and the
Environment (3) Evolution of modern society and its relation-
ship to packaging, technology, and both real and popular envi-
ronmental concerns.
PKG 5003: Advanced Distribution and Transport Packaging
(3) Containment, protection, and preservation related to trans-
porting and distributing packaging products. Methods for
efficient scheduling and directing transport and delivery of
packages.
PKG 5006: Advanced Packaging Principles (3) Prereq:
chemistry, physics, or biology. Modern lab instruments and
procedures employed for packaging used to solve problems from
packaging industry.
PKG 5007: Advanced Packaging Materials (3) Major
packaging materials, forms, and strategies. Specific issues related
to packaging composition and form.
PKG 5105: Advanced Consumer Products Packaging (3)
Major packaging methods, materials, forms, and strategies used
for consumer products. Packaging plan with associated mock-
ups for proposed consumer product prepared as specific team
projects.
PKG 5206C: Advanced Package Decoration (3) Major
decoration methods used for packaging. Student teams create
original graphic designs and execute designs on 200 containers.
PKG 5256C: Advanced Analytical Packaging Methods
(3) Materials, uses, functions, and production processes of
packaging. Historical, societal, and technological drivers of
packaging.
PKG 6100: Advanced Computer Tools for Packaging (3)
Label design, bar code technology, spreadsheets, visual basic
programming, 3D package design, and distribution efficiency
analysis.
PKG 6905: Individual Work in Packaging (1-6; max: 6)
Special problems in packaging sciences.
PKG 6932: Special Topics in Packaging Sciences (1-6; max: 6)
Lectures, laboratory, and/or special projects.


Agricultural Education and

Communication

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences


Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Chair: E. W. Osborne. Graduate Coordinator: N. T. Place.
Professors: L. R. Arrington; J. G. Cheek; G. D. Israel; E. W.
Osborne. Associate Professors: J. E. Dyer; T. A. Irani; N. T.
Place; R. D. Rudd; R. W. Telg. Assistant Professors: M. J.
Kistler; B. E. Myers; S. G. Washburn.

The Department of Agricultural Education and
Communication offers major work for the degrees of Doctor of
Philosophy and Master of Science, as well as a distance-delivered
Master of Science degree. The requirements for each degree are
described in the General Information section of this catalog.
The Doctor of Philosophy degree program is primarily
designed to prepare graduates for academic positions in teaching,
research, and extension within the realm of Agricultural
Education and Communication. In addition, graduates
may obtain positions in administration, human resource
management, or training and development. There are four
areas of specialization: agricultural communication, agricultural
education, extension education, and leadership development.
Doctoral candidates develop an individual program of study
that provides a comprehensive knowledge of teaching and
learning processes. Furthermore, this degree program is research
and theory-based with the focus on research opportunities
and experiences that enhance the depth and breadth of the
candidate's prior learning opportunities.
Students in the agricultural communication specialization
develop strong skills/application in media writing, production,
campaign strategies and/or Web design/desktop publishing.
Graduates become prepared for professional communication
careers in or dealing with agriculture and agribusiness related to
public value, positioning and marketing. The doctoral program
in agricultural education is a research-oriented degree that
has a primary focus of preparing candidates to assume faculty
positions in colleges or university teacher education programs.
Graduates of the extension education specialization acquire
depth in the teaching and learning processes, gaining experience
in the design, implementation, and evaluation of nonformal
education programs. Moreover, students choose between a
domestic or international focus in regards to coursework and
research, which prepares them for careers in the Cooperative
Extension Service, outreach education, and/or international
agencies. Finally, the leadership development specialization
focuses on leadership theory and measurement, critical and
creative thinking, and leadership in cross-cultural settings.
Graduates are prepared for educational leadership, training, and
outreach positions in agricultural extension, community and
governmental agencies.
The Master of Science degree includes four curriculum spe-
cializations in the graduate program. The agricultural com-
munication specialization prepares students for professional
communication careers in or dealing with agriculture, agribusi-
ness, or natural resources and provides a foundation for further
study at the doctoral level. It is intended primarily for students
who enter with a bachelor's degree in journalism, agricultural
journalism, advertising, broadcasting, public relations, or related
fields. The agricultural leadership education specialization is
designed to prepare students for educational leadership, training,
and outreach positions in agricultural, extension, community,
and governmental agencies. The agricultural extension specializa-
tion is designed to enhance the careers of those employed in the
Cooperative Extension Service, including family and consumer
sciences, agriculture, 4-H, and other related areas. Students gain









valuable knowledge and experience in designing, implementing,
and evaluating educational programs. The agricultural education
specialization gives the student tremendous depth in the teaching
and learning process. Students can be certified to teach in the
state of Florida through this program.
The Distance Delivered Master of Science program is specifi-
cally designed to meet the needs of practicing extension county
agents and middle/high school agriscience teachers. All courses
are offered via Web delivery and the program takes approxi-
mately two and a half years to complete. The course schedule
and content are tailored to best meet the needs of practicing
educators and a written final exam and project are required in
lieu of a thesis.
A prospective graduate student need not have majored in
agricultural education and communication as an undergradu-
ate. However, students with an insufficient background in either
agricultural education or technical agriculture will need to
include some basic courses in these areas in their program.
The Department offers a combined bachelor's/master's
program. Contact the graduate coordinator for information.
AEE 5032: Agricultural Media Writing (3) Prereq: AEE 5541.
Varied media writing assignments: feature stories, news releases,
and video.
AEE 5037: Agricultural Media Production (3) Prereq: AEE
5541. Variety of agricultural media production assignments.
Agricultural websites and publication development.
AEE 5060: Public Opinion and Agricultural and Natural
Resource Issues (3) Public opinion measurement and agenda
setting. Media treatment, public opinion, and public relations/
public information activity regarding issues affecting agricultural
production and trade.
AEE 5073: Agriculture, Resources, People, and the
Environment: A Global Perspective (3) Interdependence
in global context. Necessity of cultivating life-long global
perspective.
AEE 5206: Instructional Techniques in Agricultural and Life
Sciences (3) Effective use of instructional materials and methods
with emphasis on application of visual and nonvisual techniques.
AEE 5301: Professional Skill Development in Agriscience
Education I (1-3; max: 9) Prereq: teaching experience.
Development and enhancement of technical agricultural and
scientific knowledge and skills by professional agriscience
teachers.
AEE 5415: Critical and Creative Thinking in Problem Solving
and Decision Making (3) Critical and creative thinking skills
applied to agricultural, life sciences, and natural resources
problem solving and decision making.
AEE 5454: Leadership Development for Extension and
Community Nonprofit Organizations (3) Application of
concepts related to developing leaders for organizing and
maintaining extension and community nonprofit organizations.
AEE 5541: Communication and Instructional Technologies
in Agricultural and Life Sciences (3) Planning and production
of written and visual instructional and communication materials
for programs in agricultural and life sciences. Major instructional
project or communication campaign required.
AEE 5805: Professional Skill Development in Agriscience
Education II (1-3; max: 9) Prereq: AEE 5300. Advanced level
of development and enhancement of technical agriculture
and scientific knowledge and skills by professional agriscience
educators.
AEE 6229: Laboratory Instruction: Theory and Practice (3)
Research and theoretical foundations that underlie the aspects


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION AND COMMUNICATION
75
of planning, management, teaching, evaluation, safety, and
facility design will be discussed within the context of laboratory
instruction.
AEE 6300: Methodology of Planned Change (3) Processes by
which professional change agents influence the introduction,
adoption, and diffusion of technological changes. Applicable to
those who are responsible for bringing about change.
AEE 6316: From America to Zimbabwe: An Overview of
International Extension Systems (3) Various extension models
and delivery systems, extension partners; linkages and issues
affecting extension internationally. Field trip.
AEE 6325: History and Philosophy of Agricultural Education
(3) Analysis of evolving concepts and philosophies. Emphasis on
history, legislation, and principles underlining organization and
practice. Participation in field experience required.
AEE 6426: Development of a Volunteer Leadership Program
(3) Identification, recruitment, training, retention, and
supervision of volunteer leaders.
AEE 6512: Program Development in Extension Education (3)
Concepts and processes drawn from the social sciences that are
relevant to the development of extension education programs.
AEE 6540: Agricultural and Natural Resources
Communications Theory and Strategies (3) Communication
theory and concepts as they apply to important agricultural/
natural resources issues.
AEE 6542: Teaching and Learning Theory: Applications in
Agricultural Education (3) Prereq: AEE 5206. Contemporary
and foundational theory and research on teaching and learning.
AEE 6552: Evaluating Programs in Extension Education (3)
Concepts and research drawn from the social sciences relevant to
evaluating youth and adult extension programs.
AEE 6611: Agricultural and Extension Adult Education (3)
Concepts and principles related to design, implementation, and
evaluation of education programs for adults.
AEE 6704: Extension Administration and Supervision
(3) Principles and practices for effective administration and
supervision of the cooperative extension service program at the
county and state levels.
AEE 6767: Research Strategies in Agricultural Education and
Communication (3) Application of principles, practices, and
strategies for conducting behavioral research in agricultural and
natural resource professions.
AEE 6905: Problems in Agricultural and Extension Education
(1-3; max: 8) Prereq: Consent of department chair. For advanced
students to select and study a problem related to agricultural
and/or extension education.
AEE 6910: Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AEE 6912: Nonthesis Research in Agricultural and Extension
Education (1-3; max: 6) Library and workshop related to
methods in agricultural and extension education, including study
of research work, review of publications, development of written
reports.
AEE 6933: Seminar in Agricultural Education and
Communication (1; max: 3) Exploration of current topics and
trends.
AEE 6935: Seminar: Distance Education Issues and
Applications (1) Forum for presentation and discussion of
latest in distance education practice, application, and research,
focusing on mechanisms and logistics supporting distance
education development in secondary, higher education, and
corporate settings.
AEE 6940: Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
76
AEE 6945: Practicum in Agricultural Education and
Communication (1-3; max: 6) Supervised experience
appropriate to student's professional and academic goals.
AEE 6971: Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
AEE 7979: Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who
have been accepted for a doctoral program. Not appropriate for
students who have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
AEE 7980: Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
ALS 5032: Teaching in Colleges of Agricultural and Life
Sciences (3) Prereq: graduate standing. Theories, principles, and
practices associated with effective teaching and learning in higher
education.


Agriculture: General

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Interim Dean: W. H. Smith.

The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences offers academic
programs and grants advanced degrees in 17 departments and
the Schools of Forest Resources and Conservation, and Natural
Resources and Environment. These academic units are all a
part of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS).
Additional components of IFAS include 16 research centers
located throughout the state and cooperative extension offices in
each of the 67 counties of the state.
The following courses are offered under the supervision of
the office of the dean by an interdisciplinary faculty and deal
with material of concern to two or more IFAS academic units.
The courses are also open to students of other colleges, with the
permission of the course instructor.
ALS 5036: Contemporary Issues in Science (2) A study
of current issues in science as it relates to students pursuing
scientific careers. Discussion topics will focus on issues of
graduate education, funding for science, job markets, scientific
research ethics, publication, and job expectations S/U.
ALS 5106: Food and the Environment (3) Relationship
between food production and consumption and environmen-
tal quality. Scientific merits of controversies about impact of
food production on environment and of different production
strategies and practices. Biodiversity, water quality, soil resources,
ecological economics, and energy use in food production. Taught
interactively on Internet in even-numbered years.
ALS 5364C: Molecular Techniques Laboratory (2) Current
protocols in molecular biology techniques.
ALS 5905: Individual Study (1-4; max: 6) Supervised study or
research not covered by other courses.
ALS 5932: Special Topics (1-4; max: 6)
ALS 6046: Grant Writing (2) Prereq: admitted to doctoral
program. Preparation, submission, and management of
competitive grants, including operations of national review
panels and finding sources of extramural funding.
ALS 6921: Colloquium on Plant Pests of Regulatory
Significance (1; max: 3) Prereq: Students must be in PPRAM
certificate program. On-going colloquium series involving
information on important emerging plant pests. S/U.
ALS 6925: Integrated Plant Medicine (4) Prereq: All core courses
for DPM degree. Review and synthesis of the principles of plant-


problem prevention, diagnosis, and management.
ALS 6930: Graduate Seminar (1; max: 4) Topics in agriculture
and/or natural resources. S/U option.
ALS 6931: Plant Medicine Program Seminar (1; max: 3)
Prereq: Intended for DPM students or by consent of instructor. On-
going seminar series involving presentations on plant-health
management. S/U.
ALS 6942: Principles of Plant Pest Risk Assessment and
Management (3) Prereq: Intended for students in PPRAM
certificate program. The process of plant pest risk estimation and
how mitigation strategies are developed and implemented.
ALS 6943: Internship in Plant Pest Risk Assessment and
Management (1-10; max: 15) Prereq: Intended for students in
PPRAM certificate program. Internships conducted with personnel
involved in plant pest risk assessment and management. S/U.
BCH 5045: Graduate Survey of Biochemistry (3) Prereq:
inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biology. Introduction to
plant, animal, and microbial biochemistry for graduate students
who have not had biochemistry. Integration and regulation
of biochemical processes stressed; limited discussion of some
biochemical techniques.


Agronomy

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Chair: J. M. Bennett. Graduate Coordinator: D. S. Wofford.
Professors: L. H. Allen, Jr.; R. D. Barnett; J. M. Bennett;
K. J. Boote; B. J. Brecke; P. S. Chourey; D. L. Colvin; R.
N. Gallaher; D. W. Gorbet; W. T. Haller; J. C. Joyce; R. S.
Kalmbacher; K. A. Langeland; P. Mislevy III; R. P. Nair; P. L.
Pfahler; H. L. Popenoe; G. M. Prine; K. H. Quesenberry; D.
G. Shilling; T. R. Sinclair; R. L. Smith; L. E. Sollenberger; R.
K. Stocker; D. L. Sutton; J. C. V. Vu; S. H. West; E. B. Whitty;
D. S. Wofford; D. L. Wright. Associate Professors: M. B.
Adjei; A. S. Blount; A. M. Fox; M. Gallo; G. E. McDonald;
M. D. Netherland; M. J. Williams. Assistant Professors: F.
Altpeter; K. L. Buhr; J. A. Ferrell; C. Gray; R. A. Gilbert; K. E.
Kenworthy; C. R. Rainbolt; J. M. Scholberg; B. A. Sellers; R.
G. Shatters; B. L. Tillman. Assistant Scientist: I. V. Ezenwa.

The Department offers the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy
and Master of Science (thesis and nonthesis option) in
agronomy with specialization in crop ecology, crop nutrition and
physiology, crop production, weed science, genetics, cytogenet-
ics, or plant breeding. Complete descriptions of the requirements
for the M. S. and Ph.D. degrees are provided in the General
Information section of this catalog.
Graduate programs emphasize the development and
subsequent application of basic principles in each specializa-
tion to agronomic plants in Florida and throughout the tropics.
The continuing need for increased food supplies is reflected in
departmental research efforts. When compatible with a student's
program and permitted by prevailing circumstances, some thesis
and dissertation research may be conducted wholly or in part in
one or more of several tropical countries.
A science background with basic courses in mathematics,
chemistry, botany, microbiology, and physics is required of new
graduate students. In addition to graduate courses in agronomy,






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
76
AEE 6945: Practicum in Agricultural Education and
Communication (1-3; max: 6) Supervised experience
appropriate to student's professional and academic goals.
AEE 6971: Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
AEE 7979: Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who
have been accepted for a doctoral program. Not appropriate for
students who have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
AEE 7980: Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
ALS 5032: Teaching in Colleges of Agricultural and Life
Sciences (3) Prereq: graduate standing. Theories, principles, and
practices associated with effective teaching and learning in higher
education.


Agriculture: General

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Interim Dean: W. H. Smith.

The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences offers academic
programs and grants advanced degrees in 17 departments and
the Schools of Forest Resources and Conservation, and Natural
Resources and Environment. These academic units are all a
part of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS).
Additional components of IFAS include 16 research centers
located throughout the state and cooperative extension offices in
each of the 67 counties of the state.
The following courses are offered under the supervision of
the office of the dean by an interdisciplinary faculty and deal
with material of concern to two or more IFAS academic units.
The courses are also open to students of other colleges, with the
permission of the course instructor.
ALS 5036: Contemporary Issues in Science (2) A study
of current issues in science as it relates to students pursuing
scientific careers. Discussion topics will focus on issues of
graduate education, funding for science, job markets, scientific
research ethics, publication, and job expectations S/U.
ALS 5106: Food and the Environment (3) Relationship
between food production and consumption and environmen-
tal quality. Scientific merits of controversies about impact of
food production on environment and of different production
strategies and practices. Biodiversity, water quality, soil resources,
ecological economics, and energy use in food production. Taught
interactively on Internet in even-numbered years.
ALS 5364C: Molecular Techniques Laboratory (2) Current
protocols in molecular biology techniques.
ALS 5905: Individual Study (1-4; max: 6) Supervised study or
research not covered by other courses.
ALS 5932: Special Topics (1-4; max: 6)
ALS 6046: Grant Writing (2) Prereq: admitted to doctoral
program. Preparation, submission, and management of
competitive grants, including operations of national review
panels and finding sources of extramural funding.
ALS 6921: Colloquium on Plant Pests of Regulatory
Significance (1; max: 3) Prereq: Students must be in PPRAM
certificate program. On-going colloquium series involving
information on important emerging plant pests. S/U.
ALS 6925: Integrated Plant Medicine (4) Prereq: All core courses
for DPM degree. Review and synthesis of the principles of plant-


problem prevention, diagnosis, and management.
ALS 6930: Graduate Seminar (1; max: 4) Topics in agriculture
and/or natural resources. S/U option.
ALS 6931: Plant Medicine Program Seminar (1; max: 3)
Prereq: Intended for DPM students or by consent of instructor. On-
going seminar series involving presentations on plant-health
management. S/U.
ALS 6942: Principles of Plant Pest Risk Assessment and
Management (3) Prereq: Intended for students in PPRAM
certificate program. The process of plant pest risk estimation and
how mitigation strategies are developed and implemented.
ALS 6943: Internship in Plant Pest Risk Assessment and
Management (1-10; max: 15) Prereq: Intended for students in
PPRAM certificate program. Internships conducted with personnel
involved in plant pest risk assessment and management. S/U.
BCH 5045: Graduate Survey of Biochemistry (3) Prereq:
inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biology. Introduction to
plant, animal, and microbial biochemistry for graduate students
who have not had biochemistry. Integration and regulation
of biochemical processes stressed; limited discussion of some
biochemical techniques.


Agronomy

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Chair: J. M. Bennett. Graduate Coordinator: D. S. Wofford.
Professors: L. H. Allen, Jr.; R. D. Barnett; J. M. Bennett;
K. J. Boote; B. J. Brecke; P. S. Chourey; D. L. Colvin; R.
N. Gallaher; D. W. Gorbet; W. T. Haller; J. C. Joyce; R. S.
Kalmbacher; K. A. Langeland; P. Mislevy III; R. P. Nair; P. L.
Pfahler; H. L. Popenoe; G. M. Prine; K. H. Quesenberry; D.
G. Shilling; T. R. Sinclair; R. L. Smith; L. E. Sollenberger; R.
K. Stocker; D. L. Sutton; J. C. V. Vu; S. H. West; E. B. Whitty;
D. S. Wofford; D. L. Wright. Associate Professors: M. B.
Adjei; A. S. Blount; A. M. Fox; M. Gallo; G. E. McDonald;
M. D. Netherland; M. J. Williams. Assistant Professors: F.
Altpeter; K. L. Buhr; J. A. Ferrell; C. Gray; R. A. Gilbert; K. E.
Kenworthy; C. R. Rainbolt; J. M. Scholberg; B. A. Sellers; R.
G. Shatters; B. L. Tillman. Assistant Scientist: I. V. Ezenwa.

The Department offers the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy
and Master of Science (thesis and nonthesis option) in
agronomy with specialization in crop ecology, crop nutrition and
physiology, crop production, weed science, genetics, cytogenet-
ics, or plant breeding. Complete descriptions of the requirements
for the M. S. and Ph.D. degrees are provided in the General
Information section of this catalog.
Graduate programs emphasize the development and
subsequent application of basic principles in each specializa-
tion to agronomic plants in Florida and throughout the tropics.
The continuing need for increased food supplies is reflected in
departmental research efforts. When compatible with a student's
program and permitted by prevailing circumstances, some thesis
and dissertation research may be conducted wholly or in part in
one or more of several tropical countries.
A science background with basic courses in mathematics,
chemistry, botany, microbiology, and physics is required of new
graduate students. In addition to graduate courses in agronomy,









the following courses in related areas are acceptable for graduate
credits as part of the student's major: ABE 5643C: Biological
and Agricultural Systems Analysis; ABE 5646: Biological and
Agricultural Systems Simulation; ANS 6452: Principles of
Forage Quality Evaluation; ANS 6715: The Rumen and Its
Microbes; BOT 5225C: Plant Anatomy; BOT 6516: Plant
Metabolism; BOT 6566: Plant Growth and Development; HOS
6201: Breeding Perennial Cultivars; HOS 6231: Biochemical
Genetics of Higher Plants; HOS 6242: Genetics and Breeding
of Vegetable Crops; HOS 6345: Environmental Physiology of
Horticultural Crops; PCB 5307C: Limnology; PCB 6356C:
Ecosystems of the Tropics; PCB 6555: Quantitative Genetics;
SOS 6136: Soil Fertility.
The Department offers a combined bachelor's /master's
program. Contact the graduate coordinator for information.
AGR 5215C: Integrated Field Crop Science (3) Intensive intro-
duction to practical field crop production and management of
common, as well as under-exploited, field crops. Offered ever
summer A semester.
AGR 5230C: Grassland Agroecosystems (4) Comprehensive
overview of planted and native grassland ecosystems in Florida
emphasizing their growth, species diversity, management, and
utilization by ruminant animals. Offered every spring semester.
AGR 5266C: Field Plot Techniques (3) Prereq: STA 3023.
Techniques and procedures employed in the design and analysis
of field plot, greenhouse, and laboratory research experiments.
Application of research methodology, the analysis and interpreta-
tion of research results. Offered every fall semester.
AGR 5277C: Tropical Crop Production (3; max: consent
of instructor.) Prereq: consent of instructor. The ecology and
production practices of selected crops grown in the tropics.
AGR 5307: Molecular Genetics for Crop Improvement (2)
Prereq: AGR 3303. Overview of molecular genetics and plant
transformation methodologies used in crop improvement.
Offered every spring semester.
AGR 5321C: Genetic Improvement of Plants (3) Prereq: AGR
3303. Genetic basis for crop improvement including methods for
improving crop yield, pest resistance, and adaptability. Emphasis
on manipulating genetic variability in self- and cross-pollinate,
annual and perennial crop plants. Offered every fall semester.
AGR 5444: Ecophysiology of Crop Production (3) Prereq: AGR
3005 or equivalent. Physiological, ecological, and environmental
responses that impact growth, development, and yield formation
of cultivated crops. Offered spring semester.
AGR 5511: Crop Ecology (3) Prereq: AGR 4210, BOT3503,
PCB 3043C, or equivalent. Relationships of ecological factors and
climatic classifications to agroecosystems, and crop modeling of
the major crops. Offered Spring semester.
AGR 5515: Medicinal Plant Research (3) Research on selected
medicinal plants of eastern USA, including plant nutrition,
ecology, and medicinal properties. Field trips to identify and
collect specimens supplement laboratory exercises. Offered
summer A semester.
AGR 6233C: Tropical Pasture and Forage Science (4) Prereq:
AGR 4231C and ANS 5446 or consent of instructor. Potential
of natural grasslands of tropical and subtropical regions.
Development of improved pastures and forages and their
utilization in livestock production. Offered fall semester in odd-
numbered years.
AGR 6237C: Research Techniques in Forage Evaluation
(3) Prereq: or coreq: STA 6166. Experimental techniques for
field evaluation of forage plants. Design of grazing trials and
procedures for estimating yield and botanical composition in


AGRONOMY
77
the grazed and ungrazed pasture. Offered summer C semester in
odd-numbered years.
AGR 6311: Population Genetics (2) Prereq: AGR 3303,
STA 6166. Application of statistical principles to biological
populations in relation to gene frequency, zygotic frequency,
mating systems, and the effects of selection, mutation and
migration on equilibrium populations. Offered spring semester
in even-numbered years.
AGR 6322: Advanced Plant Breeding (3) Prereq: AGR 3303,
4231, 6311, and STA 6167. Theory and use of biometrical
genetic models for analytical evaluation of qualitative and quan-
titative characteristics, with procedures applicable to various
types of plant species. Offered spring semester in even numbered
years.
AGR 6325L: Plant Breeding Techniques (1; max: 2) Prereq:
AGR 3303 or equivalent; coreq: AGR 6322. Examination of
various breeding techniques used by agronomic and horticul-
tural crop breeders in Florida. Field and lab visits to active plant
breeding programs, with discussion led by a specific breeder
each week. Hands-on experience in breeding programs. Offered
spring semester in odd-numbered years.
AGR 6353: Cytogenetics (3) Prereq: AGR 3303. Genetic
variability with emphasis on interrelationships of cytologic
and genetic concepts. Chromosome structure and number,
chromosomal aberrations, a pomixis, and application of
cytogenetic principles. Offered fall semester in odd-numbered
years.
AGR 6422C: Environmental Crop Nutrition (3) Prereq: BOT
3503. Design of cost-effective and environmentally sound crop
nutrient management strategies. Diagnostic nutrient analysis,
nutrient uptake, BMPs, and sustainable agriculture. Offered
every fall semester.
AGR 6442C: Physiology of Agronomic Plants (4) Prereq: BOT
3503. Yield potentials of crops as influenced by photosynthetic
efficiencies, respiration, translocation, drought, and canopy
architecture. Plant response to environmental factors. Offered
every spring semester.
AGR 6905: Agronomic Problems (1-5; max: 8) Special topics
for classroom, library, laboratory, or field studies of agronomic
plants.
AGR 6910: Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AGR 6932: Topics in Agronomy (1-3; max: 8) Critical review
of selected topics in specific agronomic areas.
AGR 6933: Graduate Agronomy Seminar (1; max: 3) Current
literature and agronomic developments.
AGR 6940: Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
AGR 6971: Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
AGR 7979: Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who
have been accepted for a doctoral program. Not appropriate for
students who have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
AGR 7980: Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
PLS 5632C: Integrated Weed Management (3) Overview of
weed science principles and practices, with particular emphasis
on strategies for southeastern cropping systems. Situations
unique to the State of Florida. Offered every fall semester.
PLS 5652: Advanced Weed Science (3) Prereq: PLS 4601.
Classification, mode of action, principles of selectivity, and plant
responses to herbicides. Weed, crop, environmental, and pest
management associations in developing herbicide programs.
Focus on practical principles. Offered fall semester in odd-
numbered years.






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
78
PLS 6623: Weed Ecology (3) Prereq: PCB 3043C, PLS 4601, or
equivalent. Characteristics of weedy species. Ecological principles
emphasizing interactions of weeds with their environment
and neighboring plants, in crop and various noncrop habitats.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
PLS 6655: Plant/Herbicide Interaction (3) Prereq: PLS 4601
and BOT3503. Herbicide activity on plants: edaphic and envi-
ronmental influences, absorption and translocation, response
of specific physiological and biochemical processes as related
to herbicide mode of action. Offered spring semester in odd-
numbered years.


Anatomy and Cell Biology

College of Medicine

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Chair: S. P. Sugrue. Graduate Coordinator: D. Liao.
Haskell Hess Professor: B. Burke. Professors: N. Chegini;
W. A. Dunn; C. Feldherr; L. Larkin; P. Linser; W. S. May;
K. Rarey; L. Romrell; G. Shaw; S. Sugrue; C. Tisher; R.
Wallace. Associate Professors: J.P. Aris; E. Chan; M.Cohn;
T. G. Hollinger; C. Leeuwenburgh; D. Liao; P. LuValle;
K. Madsen; S. Narayan; K. Selman. Courtesy Associate
Professor: P. D. Shirk. Assistant Professors: X. Deng; L.S.
Holliday; A. Ishov; S. Kaushal; L. Kornberg; E. Laywell; L.
Notterpec; M. Segal; L. Xiao.

The Graduate Faculty of the Department of Anatomy and
Cell Biology participates in the interdisciplinary program (IDP)
in medical sciences, leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree,
with specialization in one of the six advanced concentration
areas of the IDP (see Medical Sciences). Departmental areas
of research associated with the IDP focus on topical problems
in cell biology, developmental biology, and molecular biology.
Laboratory research is supported by funding from the National
Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, state
agencies, and private foundations. The Department is committed
to provide an excellent intellectual environment for students who
wish to pursue graduate studies. In addition to courses associated
with the IDP, the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
offers the courses listed below.
GMS 6061: The Nucleus (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent of
instructor. Cell biology of the nucleus. Offered in old-numbered
years.
GMS 6062: Protein Trafficking (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent
of instructor. Movement of proteins in cell. Offered in even-
numbered years.
GMS 6063: Cellular Aging (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent of
instructor. Recent developments in the field of aging.
GMS 6064: Tumor Biology (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent of
instructor. Current understanding of molecular basis of cancer.
Offered in odd-numbered years.
GMS 6421: Cell Biology (4) Prereq: undergraduate biochemistry
or cell biology or consent of instructor; taught in conjunction with 1st
year IDP core course. Fundamental mechanisms of cell functions,
specializations, and interactions that account for the organization
and activities of basic tissues.
GMS 6609: Advanced Gross Anatomy (2-4; max: 6) Regional
and specialized anatomy of the human body taught by


laboratory dissection, conferences, and demonstrations.
GMS 6635: Organization of Cells and Tissues (2) Prereq: GMS
6001 or consent of instructor. Structural and functional aspects.
GMS 6642: Morphogenesis: Organ Systems I (2) Prereq: GMS
6635, second-year IDP student. Skin, respiratory, lymphatics, and
special sense.
GMS 6643: Morphogenesis: Organ Systems II (2) Prereq: GMS
6642, second-year IDP student. GI, kidney, endocrine, male and
female reproduction.
GMS 6644: Apoptosis (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent of
instructor. Modern view of molecular mechanisms of tumor
development. Offered in even-numbered years.
GMS 6690: Molecular Cell Biology Journal Club (1; max: 12)
Faculty-student discussion of research papers and topics.
GMS 6691: Special Topics in Cell Biology and Anatomy (1-4;
max: 10) Readings in recent research literature of anatomy and/
or applied disciplines including cell, developmental, and repro-
ductive biology.
GMS 6692: Research Conference in Anatomy and Cell
Biology (1; max: 12) Research reports and discussions of current
research by graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers. S/U.
GMS 6970: Individual Study (1-3; max: 8) Supervised study in
areas not covered by other graduate courses.


Animal Sciences

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Chair: F. G. Hembry. Assistant Chairman and Graduate
Coordinator: J. H. Brendemuhl. Professors: J. H.
Brendemuhl; W. E. Brown; W. C. Buhi; M. J. Burridge; S. W.
Coleman; M. A. Elzo; M. J. Fields; K. N. Gelatt; E. P. Gibbs;
R. N. Gronwall; P. J. Hansen; F. G. Hembry; D. D. Johnson;
T. T. Marshall; L. R. McDowell; R. D. Miles; R. 0. Myer; R.
P. Natzke; T. A. Olson; D. C. Sharp III; C. R. Staples; A. I.
Webb; D. W. Webb. Associate Professors: A. Adesogan; J.
D. Arthington; K. C. Bachman; J. N. Bacus; L. Badinga; G.
D. Butcher; C. C. Chase; E. L. Johnson; D. R. Sloan; S. H.
TenBroeck; S. K. Williams; J. V. Yelich. Assistant Professors:
J. Carter; A. De Vries; A. Ealy; M. Hersom; T. Houser; S.
Johnson; K. Moore; D. G. Riley; T. Thrift; L. Warren.

The Department of Animal Sciences offers the following
degrees: Master of Agriculture, Master of Science, and Doctor
of Philosophy in animal sciences with emphasis in beef or dairy
cattle or equine. Complete descriptions of the requirements for
these degrees are provided in the General Information section of
this catalog.
The following specializations are available: breeding and
genetics, management, nutrition (nutritional physiology,
nutrient metabolism, and feedstuff utilization), physiology (envi-
ronmental, lactational, and reproductive), molecular biology
(embryology, endocrinology, and genetics), meat science (meat
processing, meat quality, and food safety). Students may also
complete the Ph.D. degree through the interdisciplinary con-
centration in animal molecular and cell biology (AMCB). A
student may work on a problem covering more than one area of
study. Animal resources (beef cattle, dairy cattle, horses, swine,
sheep, and laboratory animals) are available for use in various






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
78
PLS 6623: Weed Ecology (3) Prereq: PCB 3043C, PLS 4601, or
equivalent. Characteristics of weedy species. Ecological principles
emphasizing interactions of weeds with their environment
and neighboring plants, in crop and various noncrop habitats.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
PLS 6655: Plant/Herbicide Interaction (3) Prereq: PLS 4601
and BOT3503. Herbicide activity on plants: edaphic and envi-
ronmental influences, absorption and translocation, response
of specific physiological and biochemical processes as related
to herbicide mode of action. Offered spring semester in odd-
numbered years.


Anatomy and Cell Biology

College of Medicine

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Chair: S. P. Sugrue. Graduate Coordinator: D. Liao.
Haskell Hess Professor: B. Burke. Professors: N. Chegini;
W. A. Dunn; C. Feldherr; L. Larkin; P. Linser; W. S. May;
K. Rarey; L. Romrell; G. Shaw; S. Sugrue; C. Tisher; R.
Wallace. Associate Professors: J.P. Aris; E. Chan; M.Cohn;
T. G. Hollinger; C. Leeuwenburgh; D. Liao; P. LuValle;
K. Madsen; S. Narayan; K. Selman. Courtesy Associate
Professor: P. D. Shirk. Assistant Professors: X. Deng; L.S.
Holliday; A. Ishov; S. Kaushal; L. Kornberg; E. Laywell; L.
Notterpec; M. Segal; L. Xiao.

The Graduate Faculty of the Department of Anatomy and
Cell Biology participates in the interdisciplinary program (IDP)
in medical sciences, leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree,
with specialization in one of the six advanced concentration
areas of the IDP (see Medical Sciences). Departmental areas
of research associated with the IDP focus on topical problems
in cell biology, developmental biology, and molecular biology.
Laboratory research is supported by funding from the National
Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, state
agencies, and private foundations. The Department is committed
to provide an excellent intellectual environment for students who
wish to pursue graduate studies. In addition to courses associated
with the IDP, the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
offers the courses listed below.
GMS 6061: The Nucleus (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent of
instructor. Cell biology of the nucleus. Offered in old-numbered
years.
GMS 6062: Protein Trafficking (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent
of instructor. Movement of proteins in cell. Offered in even-
numbered years.
GMS 6063: Cellular Aging (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent of
instructor. Recent developments in the field of aging.
GMS 6064: Tumor Biology (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent of
instructor. Current understanding of molecular basis of cancer.
Offered in odd-numbered years.
GMS 6421: Cell Biology (4) Prereq: undergraduate biochemistry
or cell biology or consent of instructor; taught in conjunction with 1st
year IDP core course. Fundamental mechanisms of cell functions,
specializations, and interactions that account for the organization
and activities of basic tissues.
GMS 6609: Advanced Gross Anatomy (2-4; max: 6) Regional
and specialized anatomy of the human body taught by


laboratory dissection, conferences, and demonstrations.
GMS 6635: Organization of Cells and Tissues (2) Prereq: GMS
6001 or consent of instructor. Structural and functional aspects.
GMS 6642: Morphogenesis: Organ Systems I (2) Prereq: GMS
6635, second-year IDP student. Skin, respiratory, lymphatics, and
special sense.
GMS 6643: Morphogenesis: Organ Systems II (2) Prereq: GMS
6642, second-year IDP student. GI, kidney, endocrine, male and
female reproduction.
GMS 6644: Apoptosis (1) Prereq: GMS 6001 or consent of
instructor. Modern view of molecular mechanisms of tumor
development. Offered in even-numbered years.
GMS 6690: Molecular Cell Biology Journal Club (1; max: 12)
Faculty-student discussion of research papers and topics.
GMS 6691: Special Topics in Cell Biology and Anatomy (1-4;
max: 10) Readings in recent research literature of anatomy and/
or applied disciplines including cell, developmental, and repro-
ductive biology.
GMS 6692: Research Conference in Anatomy and Cell
Biology (1; max: 12) Research reports and discussions of current
research by graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers. S/U.
GMS 6970: Individual Study (1-3; max: 8) Supervised study in
areas not covered by other graduate courses.


Animal Sciences

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Chair: F. G. Hembry. Assistant Chairman and Graduate
Coordinator: J. H. Brendemuhl. Professors: J. H.
Brendemuhl; W. E. Brown; W. C. Buhi; M. J. Burridge; S. W.
Coleman; M. A. Elzo; M. J. Fields; K. N. Gelatt; E. P. Gibbs;
R. N. Gronwall; P. J. Hansen; F. G. Hembry; D. D. Johnson;
T. T. Marshall; L. R. McDowell; R. D. Miles; R. 0. Myer; R.
P. Natzke; T. A. Olson; D. C. Sharp III; C. R. Staples; A. I.
Webb; D. W. Webb. Associate Professors: A. Adesogan; J.
D. Arthington; K. C. Bachman; J. N. Bacus; L. Badinga; G.
D. Butcher; C. C. Chase; E. L. Johnson; D. R. Sloan; S. H.
TenBroeck; S. K. Williams; J. V. Yelich. Assistant Professors:
J. Carter; A. De Vries; A. Ealy; M. Hersom; T. Houser; S.
Johnson; K. Moore; D. G. Riley; T. Thrift; L. Warren.

The Department of Animal Sciences offers the following
degrees: Master of Agriculture, Master of Science, and Doctor
of Philosophy in animal sciences with emphasis in beef or dairy
cattle or equine. Complete descriptions of the requirements for
these degrees are provided in the General Information section of
this catalog.
The following specializations are available: breeding and
genetics, management, nutrition (nutritional physiology,
nutrient metabolism, and feedstuff utilization), physiology (envi-
ronmental, lactational, and reproductive), molecular biology
(embryology, endocrinology, and genetics), meat science (meat
processing, meat quality, and food safety). Students may also
complete the Ph.D. degree through the interdisciplinary con-
centration in animal molecular and cell biology (AMCB). A
student may work on a problem covering more than one area of
study. Animal resources (beef cattle, dairy cattle, horses, swine,
sheep, and laboratory animals) are available for use in various









research programs. Nutrition, physiology, and meats laboratories
are available for detailed chemical and carcass quality evaluations
and excellent computer facilities are available. Special arrange-
ments may be made to conduct research at the various branch
agricultural experiment stations throughout Florida.
Departmental and program prerequisites for admission to
graduate study include a sound science background, with basic
courses in bacteriology, biology, mathematics, botany, and
chemistry. All courses in the animal sciences program area are
acceptable for graduate credit as part of the candidate's major.
In addition, the following courses also fulfill this requirement:
AEB 5326: Agribusiness Financial Management; AEB 6182:
Agricultural Risk Analysis and Decision Making; AEB 6385:
Management Strategies for Agribusiness Firms; AGR 6233C:
Tropical Pasture and Forage Science; AGR 6311: Population
Genetics; AGR 6353: Cytogenetics; BCH 6415: Advanced
Molecular and Cell Biology; ESI 6314: Deterministic Methods
in Operations Research; FOS 5225C: Principles in Food
Microbiology; FOS 6126C: Psychophysical Aspect of Foods;
FOS 6315C: Advanced Food Chemistry; FOS 6428C: Advanced
Food Processing; HUN 6245: Advanced Human Nutrition;
VME 5162C: Avian Diseases; and VME 5244: Physiology of
Mammals: Organ Systems.
The Department offers a combined bachelor's/master's
program. Contact the graduate coordinator for information.
ANS 5310C: Applied Ruminant Reproductive Management
(3) Prereq: ANS 3319C In-depth review of applied bovine repro-
ductive management; factors that affect the efficiency of repro-
duction (managerial, biological, and economical).
ANS 5446: Animal Nutrition (3) Prereq: ANS 3440, BCH 4024
or permission of instructor. Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, minerals,
and vitamins and their functions in the animal body. Offered
every fall semester.
ANS 5935: Reproductive Biology Seminar and Research
Studies (1; max: 4) Prereq: ANS 3319 or equivalent. Invited
speakers on wide range of topics. Student-faculty participation in
research projects. S/U
ANS 6281: Dairy Science Research Techniques (3) Prereq: STA
6167. Methods employed in research in specialized dairy fields;
genetics, nutrition, and physiology.
ANS 6288: Experimental Techniques and Analytical
Procedures in Meat Research (3) Experimental design,
analytical procedures; techniques; carcass measurements and
analyses as related to livestock production and meats studies.
ANS 6310: Experimental Embryology (4) Prereq: ANS 6751C,
BCH 5045. Fundamentals of embryology with emphasis on
mammals and current experimental approaches to embryo
research.
ANS 6313: Current Concepts in Reproductive Biology (2)
Prereq: ANS 3319 or equivalent; consent of instructor. Lectures
prepared by students and discussion of current review articles.
ANS 6449: Vitamins (3) Prereq: organic chemistry. Historical
development, properties, assays, and physiological effects.
Offered spring semester in even-numbered years.
ANS 6452: Principles of Forage Quality Evaluation (3) Prereq:
ANS 5446, AGR 4231C. Definition of forage quality in terms of
animal performance, methodology used in forage evaluation, and
proper interpretation of forage evaluation data. Offered spring
semester in even-numbered years.
ANS 6458: Advanced Methods in Nutrition Technology (3)
For graduate students but open to seniors by special permission.
Demonstrations and limited performance of procedures used in
nutrition research. Offered fall semester in even-numbered years.
ANS 6636: Meat Technology (3) Chemistry, physics, histology,


ANIMAL SCIENCES
79
bacteriology, and engineering involved in the handling,
processing, manufacturing, preservation, storage, distribution,
and utilization of meat.
ANS 6666L: Molecular and Cellular Research Methods (2)
Prereq: enrollment in AMCB concentration. Diversity of research
topics and laboratory techniques demonstrated. Short laboratory
rotations (3 to 6 weeks) with 3 scientists.
ANS 6702C: Advanced Physiology of Lactation (2)
ANS 6704: Endocrinology (4) Prereq: BCH 4024.
ANS 6706: Environmental Physiology of Domestic Animals
(3)
ANS 6711: Current Topics in Equine Nutrition and Exercise
Physiology (2) Equine science with emphasis on current topics
of interest.
ANS 6715: The Rumen and Its Microbes (3) Prereq: ANS
5446. Review and correlation of fundamental biochemical,
physiological, and bacteriological research upon which feeding
of ruminants is based. Experimental methodology of rumen
physiology and metabolism.
ANS 6717: Energy Metabolism (3) Prereq: ANS 5446; BCH
4024; 3025, permission of instructor.
ANS 6718: Nutritional Physiology of Domestic Animals (3)
Prereq: ANS 5446; introductory biochemistry course. Integration
of endocrine, biochemical, molecular control of nutritional
processes in domestic animals. Offered every fall semester.
ANS 6723: Mineral Nutrition and Metabolism (3)
Physiological effect of macro- and micro-elements, mineral inter-
relationships. Offered spring semester in odd-numbered years.
ANS 6745: Introduction to Statistical Genetics (2) Prereq: PCB
6555, STA 6167. Development and application of statistical
and quantitative genetics theory to selection and estimation of
genetic parameters.
ANS 6751C: Physiology of Reproduction (4) Prereq: ANS 3319
or permission of instructor. Conceptual relationship of hypothala-
mus, pituitary, and reproductive organs during estrous cycle and
pregnancy. Influence of exteroceptive factors and seasonal repro-
duction. Offered every fall semester.
ANS 6767: Molecular Endocrinology (3) Prereq: BCH 4024 or
equivalent or permission of instructor. Molecular basis of hormone
action and regulation, and emerging techniques in endocrine
system study; emphasis on molecular mechanisms of growth,
development, and reproduction.
ANS 6905: Problems in Animal Science (1-4; max: 8) H.
ANS 6910: Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANS 6932: Special Topics in Animal Science (1-3; max: 9)
New developments in animal nutrition and livestock feeding,
animal genetics, animal physiology, and livestock management.
ANS 6933: Graduate Seminar in Animal Science (1; max: 8)
ANS 6936: Graduate Seminar in Animal Molecular and Cell
Biology (1; max: 2) Seminar attendance and one-hour presenta-
tion on graduate research project.
ANS 6939: Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology Journal
Colloquy (1; max: 5) Critical evaluation, presentation and
discussion of recent scientific journal articles on a specified topic
in cellular and/or molecular biology. S/U.
ANS 6940: Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANS 6971: Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ANS 7979: Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who
have been accepted for a doctoral program. Not appropriate for
students who have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
ANS 7980: Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
80

Anthropology

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Interim Chair: K. Sassaman. Graduate Coordinator: G.
Murray. Distinguished Professor: M. Moseley. Distinguished
Research Professor: K. Deagan. Distinguished Service
Professor: P. Doughty (Emeritus). Professors: W. Baber; H.
R. Bernard; A. Burns; B. du Toit (Emeritus); F. Harrison; W.
Keegan; J. Kugelmass; M. Margolis; W. Marquardt; J.
Milanich; S. Milbrath; J. Moore; A. Oliver-Smith; B. Purdy
(Emerita); H. Safa (Emerita); M. Schmink; P. Schmidt;
C.K. Shih; A. Spring; 0. Von Mering (Emeritus); E. Wing
(Emerita). Associate Professors: S. Boinski; S. Brandt;
D. Daegling; A. Falsetti; S.Gillespie; M. Heckenberg; S.
Milbrath; C. Mulligan; G. Murray; K. Sassaman. Associate
Research Scientists: E. Guilette; D. McMillan. Assistant
Professors: P. Collings; B. Chalfin; J. Davidson; S. de France;
H. Dilger; K. Emery; A. Kane; J. Krigbaum; S. Langwick; A.
Oyuela-Caycedo; C.K. Shih; J. Stepp; M. Thomas-Houston;
M. Warren. Assistant Research Scientists: E. Guillette; D.
McMillan.

The Department of Anthropology offers graduate work
leading to the Master of Arts (thesis or non-thesis option)
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. UF requirements for these
degrees are provided in the General Information section of this
catalog and on the departmental website: http://web.anthro.
ufl.edu. Graduate training is offered in cultural anthropology,
archeology, and biological anthropology.
Students may opt for a general four-field track and an inter-
disciplinary track. The general track allows students more
exposure to the four subfields of anthropology, as well as a spe-
cialization within anthropology at the Ph.D. level. The interdis-
ciplinary alternative allows students to combine anthropology
with coursework and training in some outside discipline.
The department generally requires applicants to have a
minimum score of 1100 on the Graduate Record Examination
and a 3.2 overall grade point average based on a 4.0 system.
Previous work in anthropology is an asset but not a strict
requirement for admission. Potential applicants are urged to visit
the website, to familiarize themselves with the specializations
of our faculty, and to indicate in their application those faculty
with whom they might work. Barring special circumstances the
department restricts admission to applicants interested in the
Ph.D. Students who enter without an M.A. will generally work
for their M.A. on the way to the Ph.D. This requires either a
formally-defended thesis or written qualifying exams combined
with a high-quality paper or research report. With their adviser's
permission, they may opt to bypass the M.A.
All entering graduate students are required to take courses that
introduce them to all four traditional fields of anthropology as
practiced in the U.S.
Knowledge of a foreign language or of statistics may also be
required by the student's supervisory committee.
Students enrolled in the M.A. program who wish to continue
their studies for a Ph.D. must apply to the Department for cer-
tification. In most cases, candidates for the Ph.D. must achieve
competency in a language other than English. Entering students
who already have earned a master's degree may apply for direct
admission to the doctoral program.


New Students are admitted into the graduate program only
in the fall of each academic year. The deadline for receiving
completed applications for admission into the graduate program
is December 15, though the department encourages early appli-
cations.
ANG 5110: Archaeological Theory (3) Prereq: Proseminar in
Archaeology or permission of instructor; this course is not open to
students who have taken ANG 5110. Theoretical approaches
in social sciences and philosophies developed and applied in
anthropological archeology through the twentieth century into
the twenty-first. Relationship of archeology to anthropology.
ANG 5126: Zooarcheology (3) Prereq: consent of instructor.
Human use of animal resources, with emphasis on prehistoric
hunting and fishing practices. Origins of animal domestication.
ANG 5158: Florida Archeology (3) Survey of 12,000 years
of human occupation of Florida, including early hunters and
foragers, regional cultural developments, external relationships
with the Southeast and Caribbean regions, peoples of historic
period, and effects of European conquest. Not open to students
who have taken ANT 3157.
ANG 5162: Maya Archeoastronomy and Ethnoastronomy (3)
Focus on Maya cosmology, past and present with emphasis on
continuity of culture seen in specific astronomical concepts.
ANG 5164: The Inca and Their Ancestors (3) Evolution of the
Inca empire traced archeologically through earlier Andean states
and societies to the beginning of native civilization. Not open to
students who have taken ANT 3164.
ANG 5172: Historical Archeology (3) Prereq: ANT3141 or
consent of instructor. Methods and theoretical foundations of
historical archeology as it relates to the disciplines of anthro-
pology, history, historic preservation, and conservation.
Introduction to pertinent aspects of material culture during the
historic period.
ANG 5194: Principles of Archeology (3) Prereq: 1 course
in Methods of archeological inquiry and inter-
pretation, which include site identification and evaluation,
dating techniques, environmental reconstructions, subsistence,
technology, social and exchange systems, biological remains, and
archeological ethics. Not open to students who have taken ANT
4185.
ANG 5242: Fantastic Anthropology and Fringe Science
(3) Examination of paranormal and pseudoscientific theories
concerning human condition. Critical examination of fringe
science claims and their perpetuation in contemporary society.
ANG 5255: Rural Peoples in the Modern World (3) Historical
background and comparative contemporary study of peasant
and other rural societies. Unique characteristics, institutions, and
problems of rural life stressing agriculture and rural-urban rela-
tionships in cross-cultural perspective. Not open to students who
have taken ANT 4255.
ANG 5266: Economic Anthropology (3) Anthropological per-
spectives on economic philosophies and their behavioral bases.
Studies of production, distribution, and consumption; money,
savings, credit, peasant markets; and development in cross-
cultural context from perspectives of cultural ecology, Marxism,
formalism, and substantivism. Not open to students who have
taken ANT 4266.
ANG 5303: Women and Development (3) Influence of
development on women in rural and urban areas. Women's par-
ticipation in the new opportunities of modernization.
ANG 5310: The North American Indian (3) The peopling of
North America. The culture areas of North America. Unique
characteristics, institutions, and problems. Not open to students
who have taken ANT 4312.









ANG 5323: Peoples of Mexico and Central America (3) The
settlement and early cultures of the area with an emphasis on
the rise of the major culture centers. The impact of European
civilization on surviving Indians. Not open to students who have
taken ANT 4326.
ANG 5327: Maya and Aztec Civilizations (3) Civilizations in
Mesoamerica from the beginnings of agriculture to the time of
the coming of Europeans. Maya and Aztec civilizations as well
as the Olmec, Zapotec, and Teotihuacan cultures. Not open to
students who have taken ANT 3325.
ANG 5330: The Tribal Peoples of Lowland South America (3)
Survey of marginal and tropical forest hunters and gatherers and
horticulturalists of the Amazon Basin, Central Brazil, Paraguay,
Argentina, and other areas of South America. Social organiza-
tion, subsistence activities, ecological adaptations, and other
aspects of tribal life. Not open to students who have taken ANT
4338.
ANG 5331: Peoples of the Andes (3) The area-cotradition.
The Spanish Conquest and shaping and persistence of colonial
culture. Twentieth-century communities-their social land tenure,
religious, and value systems. Modernization, cultural pluralism,
and problems of integration. Not open to students who have
taken ANT 4337.
ANG 5336: The Peoples of Brazil (3) Ethnology of Brazil.
Historical, geographic, and socioeconomic materials and repre-
sentative monographs from the various regions of Brazil as well
as the contribution of the Indian, Portuguese, and African to
modern Brazilian culture. Not open to students who have taken
ANT 4336.
ANG 5340: Anthropology of the Caribbean (3) Transformation
of area through slavery, colonialism, and independence
movements. Contemporary political, economic, familial, folk-
religious, and folk-healing systems. Migration strategies and
future options. Not open to students who have taken ANT
4346.
ANG 5352: Peoples of Africa (3) Survey of the culture,
history, and ethnographic background of the peoples of Africa.
A basis for appreciation of current problems of acculturation,
nationalism, and cultural survival and change among African
peoples. Not open to students who have taken ANT 4352.
ANG 5354: The Anthropology of Modern Africa (3)
Continuity and change in contemporary African societies,
with special reference to cultural and ethnic factors in modern
nations. Not open to students who taken ANT 4354.
ANG 5395: Visual Anthropology (3) Prereq: basic knowledge
ofphotography or permission of instructor. Photography and film
as tools and products of social science. Ways of describing,
analyzing, and presenting behavior and cultural ideas through
visual means, student projects, and laboratory work with visual
anthropology. Not open to students who have taken ANT 3390.
ANG 5426: Kinship and Social Organization (3) Prereq: ANT
2402 or 2410. Property concepts, forms, and complexes. Tribal
patterns of government and social control. Not open to students
who have taken ANT 4426.
ANG 5464: Culture and Aging (3) Prereq: two, ANT
2410, SYG 2000, or introductory psychology course. Cross-cultural
perspectives of adult development and aging in traditional
and industrial society. Comparative assessment of culturally
mediated, life-cycle transformations into old age and health
related and human service policy issues. Not open to students
who have taken ANT 4464.
ANG 5467: Culture and Nutrition (3) Prereq: HUN3221. The


ANTHROPOLOGY
81
theory, methodology, and substantive material of nutritional
anthropology. Emphasis on cross-cultural bio-behavioral
patterns.
ANG 5485: Research Design in Anthropology (3) Examination
of empirical and logical basis of anthropological inquiry; analysis
of theory construction, research design, problems of data
collection, processing, and evaluation.
ANG 5486: Computing for Anthropologists (3) Prereq: ANG
5485 or consent of instructor. Practical introduction to computer.
Collecting, organizing, processing, and interpreting numerical
data on microcomputer. Data sets used correspond to partici-
pants' subfields.
ANG 5522: Human Rights Missions in Forensic Anthropology
(3) Preparation for fieldwork in forensic investigation of human
rights abuses and war crimes. Topics include review of current
targeted ethnic conflicts, logistics of fieldwork, consulting with
human rights groups, and scientific procedure.
ANG 5523: International Forensic Fieldwork in Human
Rights (3-6) Fieldwork in forensic investigation of human rights
abuses, ethnic cleansing, and war crimes. Excavation of mass
gravesites, lab work in human identification and trauma analysis,
and logistical support for team members.
ANG 5525: Human Osteology and Osteometry (3) Prereq:
ANT 3514 and consent of instructor. Human skeletal identifica-
tion for the physical anthropologist and archeologist. Techniques
for estimating age at death, race, and sex from human skeletal
remains. Measurement of human skeleton for comparative
purposes. Not open to students who have taken ANT 4525.
ANG 5546: Seminar: Human Biology and Behavior (3)
Prereq: consent of instructor. Social behavior among animals from
the ethological-biological viewpoint; the evolution of animal
societies; the relevance of the ethological approach for the study
of human development.
ANG 5620: Language and Culture (3) Principles and
problems of anthropological linguistics. The cross-cultural and
comparative study of language. Primarily concerned with the
study of non-Indo-European linguistic problems.
ANG 5621: Proseminar in Cultural and Linguistic
Anthropology (3) History and theory of subfields of cultural
and linguistic anthropology and their conceptual relationship
to each other. Emphasis on current issues and their historical
foundations.
ANG 5700: Applied Anthropology (3) Survey of history, theory
and practice of applying cultural anthropology to human issues
and problems. Applications to international development, peace
studies, health, education, agriculture, ethnic minority and
human rights issues. Case review, including aspects of planning,
consultancy work, evaluation research, and ethics.
ANG 5701: Seminar on Applied Anthropology (3) Prereq:
ANG 5700 or instructor' permission. Consideration of planned
socio-cultural and technological change and development in the
United States and abroad; special and cultural problems in the
transferral of technologies; community development and aid
programs. Comparative program evaluation.
ANG 5702: Anthropology and Development (3) An
examination of theories and development and their relevance to
the Third World, particularly Africa or Latin America. After this
microanalysis, microlevel development will be examined with
special reference to rural areas.
ANG 5711: Culture and International Business (3)
Anthropological and business concepts and literature in local
and global economies. Value, wealth, communication, business






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
82
practices, marketing, advertising, corporate organization, entre-
preneurship, multinationals, etc.
ANG 5824L: Field Sessions in Archeology (6) Prereq: 6 hours
of or permission of instructor. Excavation of archeo-
logical sites, recording data, laboratory handling and analysis of
specimens, and study of theoretical principles which underlie
field methods and artifact analysis. Not open to students who
have taken ANT 4124 or equivalent.
ANG 6034: Seminar in Anthropological History and Theory
(3) Theoretical principles and background of anthropology and
its subfields.
ANG 6091: Research Strategies in Anthropology (3) Prereq:
permission of instructor. Survey of techniques for preparing
research proposals and strategies for securing extramural funding
for thesis. Review of scientific epistemology, hypothesis specifica-
tion, and ethics. Proposal and curriculum vitae preparation.
ANG 6115: Problems in Caribbean Prehistory (3) Theories
and methods for study of prehistoric human societies. Case
studies drawn primarily from Caribbean islands.
ANG 6128: Lithic Technology (3) Flintworking techniques and
uses of stone implements for two million years. Emphasis on
stoneworking technology in prehistoric Florida.
ANG 6180: Seminar in Contemporary Methods (3; max: 9)
Collecting and analyzing research data. Focus on one method or
set of methods in any semester.
ANG 6186: Seminar in Archeology (3; max: 10) Selected topic.
ANG 6224: Painted Books of Ancient Mexico: Codices
of Aztecs, Mixtecs, and Mayas (3) Colonial period and
Precolumbian Codices of Mexico, with emphasis on painted
books recording history and calendars of Mixtecs, Aztecs, and
Mayas.
ANG 6261: Anthropology, Geographic Information System,
and Human Ecosystems (3) Sociocultural processes and interac-
tions in large scale spatial/ecosystems context.
ANG 6273: Legal Anthropology (3) Prereq: graduate standing.
Interrelationships between aspects of traditional and modern
legal systems and sociocultural, economic, and political forces
that impinge upon them. Methods of analysis, legal reasoning
crossculturally, pre-industrial and modern sociolegal systems.
ANG 6274: Principles of Political Anthropology (3) Problems
of identifying political behavior. Natural leadership in tribal
societies. Acephalous societies and republican structures.
Kingship and early despotic states. Theories of bureaucracy. Not
open to students who have taken ANT 4274.
ANG 6286: Seminar in Contemporary Theory (3; max:
10) Areas treated are North America, Central America, South
America, Africa, Oceania.
ANG 6303: Seminar in Gender and International
Development (3) Prereq: ANG 5303 recommended. Analyses of
academic and development concepts and projects in relation
to gender. Multi-, bilateral, and NGO agencies considered by
sector (health, agriculture, environment, education, political
empowerment, etc.). RRA, PRA, GAF methods.
ANG 6351: Peoples and Culture in Southern Africa (3)
Prehistoric times through first contacts by explorers to settlers;
the contact situation between European, Khoisan, and Bantu-
speaking; empirical data dealing with present political, economic,
social, and religious conditions.
ANG 6360: Ethnicity in China (3) Ethnic diversity and ethnic
relations in China. Multi-ethnic history of China; theories on
nationality and ethnicity; state and ethnicity; ethnic conflict and
political economy; gender and ethnic hierarchy.


ANG 6421: Landscape, Place, Dwelling (3) Contemporary
theoretical approaches and applications to the social construc-
tion of place and space from the macro-scale of landscape to the
micro-scale of dwelling. Emphasis on materiality of experience of
inhabiting space.
ANG 6461: Seminar in Molecular Anthropology (3) Prereq:
consent of instructor. Current applications of molecular data to
questions of human evolution and genetics, based on most
recent journal articles. Possible topics: emergence of modern
Homo sapiens and population movements.
ANG 6469: Molecular Genetics of Disease (3) Diseases range
from single-gene recessive defects (such as cystic fibrosis) to
complex diseases (such as alcoholism and diabetes). Detection
and treatments.
ANG 6478: Evolution of Culture (3) Prereq: ANT3141.
Theories of culture growth and evolution from cultural
beginnings to dawn of history. Major inventions of man and
their significance.
ANG 6511: Seminar in Physical Anthropology (3; max: 10)
Selected topic.
ANG 6514: Human Origins (3) Review of fossil record of
human evolution from Miocene to present. "Hands-on" seminar
in basics of hominid fossil record.
ANG 6547: Human Adaptation (3) Prereq: ANT 2511
or permission of instructor. An examination of adaptive
processes(cultural, physiological, genetic) in past and contempo-
rary populations.
ANG 6552: Primate Behavior (3) Prereq: one course in either
physical .' ,' or biology. Taxonomy, distribution, and
ecology of primates. Range of primate behavior for each major
taxonomic group explored.
ANG 6553: Primate Cognition (3) Evolution of cognition in
primate lineages. Behavioral, social, and phylogenetic influences
on cognitive processes. Theories of learning and imitation and
their impact on analysis of ecological and social decisions.
ANG 6555: Issues in Evolutionary Anthropology (3) Current
controversies in biological anthropology. Role of evolution-
ary theory in addressing problems of taxonomy, speciation,
systematics, selection, development, and adaptation in primate
and human evolution.
ANG 6583: Primate Functional Morphology (3) Practical
and theoretical approaches to functional morphology in living
and fossil primates. Biomechanical techniques. Problems of
functional inference in paleontological and archeological records.
ANG 6589: Behavioral Decisions Among Human and
Nonhuman Primates (3) Survey and synthesis of literature of
human and animal behavioral ecology to address theoretical
problems in social and behavioral decision-making. Strategies for
data collections and analysis.
ANG 6737: Medical Anthropology (3) Prereq: consent of
instructor. Theory of anthropology as applied to nursing,
medicine, hospital organization, and the therapeutic
environment. Instrument design and techniques of material
collection.
ANG 6740: Advanced Techniques in Forensic Anthropology
(3) Prereq: human osteology and forensic introduc-
tion. Hands on analysis and clinical diagnoses of human skeletal
remains. Analysis of human trauma and other demographic
techniques.
ANG 6750: Research Methods in Cognitive Anthropology (3)
Data collection including free lists, pile sorts, triad tests, paired
comparisons, rankings, and ratings. Consensus analysis, cluster
analysis, and multidimensional scaling.









ANG 6801: Ethnographic Field Methods (3) Methods of
collecting ethnographic data. Entry into the field; role and image
conflict. Participant observation, interviewing, content analysis,
photography and documents, data retrieval, analysis of data.
ANG 6823: Laboratory Training in Archeology (3) Prereq: an
introductory level archeology course. Processing of data recovered in
field excavations; cleaning, identification, cataloging, classifica-
tion, drawing, analysis, responsibilities of data reporting. Not
open to students who have taken ANT 4123 or equivalent.
ANG 6905: Individual Work (1-3; max: 10) Guided readings
on research in anthropology based on library, laboratory, or field
work.
ANG 6910: Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANG 6915: Research Projects in Social, Cultural, and Applied
Anthropology (1-3; max: 10) Prereq: consent of instructor. For
students undertaking directed research in supplement to regular
course work.
ANG 6917: Professions of Anthropology (3) Prereq: Required
of all graduate students. Organizations of the anthropologi-
cal profession in teaching and research. Relationship between
subfields and related disciplines; the anthropological experience;
ethics.
ANG 6930: Special Topics in Anthropology (1-3; max: 9)
Prereq: consent of instructor.
ANG 6940: Supervised Teaching (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
ANG 6945: Internship in Anthropology (1-8; max: 8) Prereq:
permission of graduate coordinator. Required of all students
registered in programs of applied anthropology. Students are
expected to complete 4-8 hours.
ANG 6971: Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
ANG 7979: Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who
have been accepted for a doctoral program. Not appropriate for
students who have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
ANG 7980: Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.


Applied Physiology and

Kinesiology

College of Health and Human Performance

Graduate Faculty 2006-2007
Chair: S. L. Dodd. Graduate Coordinator: C. M. Janelle.
Professors: R. W. Braith; J. A. Cauraugh; S. L. Dodd; S. K.
Powers. Associate Professors: P. A. Borsa; S. E. Borst; J.
W. Chow; H. A. Hausenblas; C. M. Janelle; R. A. Siders.
Assistant Professors: D.S. Criswell; P. R. Giacobbi Jr.; M.D.
Tillman; L. J. White.

A program leading to the Master of Science degree in applied
physiology and kinesiology (thesis and nonthesis options) is
offered by the Department. Areas of concentration for the
master's program include athletic training/sports medicine,
biomechanics, clinical exercise physiology, exercise physiology,
human performance, motor learning/control, and sport and
exercise psychology.
The thesis option provides the student with an opportunity to
study, conduct research, and prepare a thesis in an area of special
interest. The nonthesis option offers the student a specialization


APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY AND KINESIOLOGY
83
in a selected area of study, with additional work in other areas. A
comprehensive written and oral examination is required for this
option.
The Ph.D. program is offered through the College of Health
and Human Performance with concentrations in athletic
training/sport medicine, biomechanics, exercise physiology,
motor learning/control, and sport and exercise psychology. These
interdisciplinary concentrations blend concentrated course work
with research.
Athletic Training/Sport Medicine: This concentration
provides comprehensive academic preparation, research, and
clinical experience in the areas of injury prevention, assessment,
treatment, rehabilitation, and therapeutic modalities.
Biomechanics: The Ph.D. concentration in biomechanics
draws from the fields of exercise, engineering, medicine, and
manufacturing. The course work and training include kinematics
and kinetics of animal movement. Course work also includes
anatomy/kinesiology, biomechanics, engineering, medicine,
physical therapy, and statistics.
Exercise Physiology: This area of concentration is the
scientific study of how the various physiological systems of the
human body respond to physical activity. It is a multidisciplinary
field with strong ties to the basic life sciences and medicine, and
application to clinical, normal, and athletic populations.
Human Performance: This concentration merges a range
of specializations within the Department into a curriculum
that will provide educational experiences to graduate students
with an interest in studying the factors that determine human
performance in both athletic and nonathletic domains. This
flexible approach allows students to focus on specific areas of
sport or clinical applications that best meet their individual
interests. Human performance incorporates components such as
sport nutrition, exercise and sport psychology, motor behavior,
and the physiological bases of strength and conditioning which
are viable to clinical populations.
Motor Learning/Control: This interdisciplinary doctoral con-
centration draws upon experiences and a knowledge base in the
movement and sport sciences, cognitive sciences, and physical
therapy. Students are prepared to conduct research and provide
expertise in traditional motor performance and learning settings.
Sport and Exercise Psychology: This area of concentra-
tion provides the basis for understanding and influencing the
underlying attitudes, cognitions, and behaviors in both sport and
exercise settings. Given the development of sport and exercise
psychology as distinct fields that emphasize both science and
practice, course offerings are relevant to both fields.
Complete descriptions of the minimum requirements for
the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are
provided in the General Information section of this catalog.
APK 5125: Assessment in Exercise Science (3) Prereq: PET
3351 C or equivalent. Techniques and methodologies to assess
health and physical fitness.
APK 5400: Sport Psychology (3) Prereq: permission of instructor.
Survey of current research, learning processes, motivation,
performance intervention, strategies, group dynamics, history of
sport psychology, and other topics.
APK 6100: Clinical Anatomy for the Exercise Sciences (3)
Prereq: PET 2320C; 2350C; 3351C. Cadaver dissection and
lectures. Appreciation of clinical applications of anatomical
knowledge for those pursuing careers in exercise science fields.
APK 6110C: Physiological Bases of Exercise and Sport
Sciences (3) Application of fundamental concepts of human






FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION
84
physiology to programs of physical education and sports. Recent
research developments in sports physiology.
APK 6111L: Practicum in Exercise Physiology (3) Prereq: APK
6110C. Applied and experimental work emphasizing practical
problems.
APK 6115: Neuromuscular Adaptation to Exercise (3) Prereq:
APK 6110C. Description of neural and muscular function and
adaptation to acute and chronic exercise. Research developments
in neuromuscular adaptations to exercise.
APK 6120: Cardiopulmonary Pathologies (3) Prereq: PET
3350C, 3351C or equivalent. Lecture and laboratory study
of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of cardiac and
pulmonary systems. Attention to cardiopulmonary function in
diseased and stressed states. Emphasis on dysfunction, clinical
assessment, and rehabilitation of cardiopulmonary patient.
APK 6125: EKG Interpretation (3) Prereq: PET 2350C and
3351 C. Basic and intermediate electrocardiography including
cardiac function, lead systems, rate, axis, infarction, ischemia,
hypertrophy, and effects of cardiovascular drugs and exercise
on EKG. Particular attention to EKGs of diseased populations
during exercise.
APK 6130: Human Pathophysiology for the Exercise Sciences
(3) Prereq: PET 2320C; 2350C; 3351C. Macrotraumatic and
microtraumatic inflammatory processes, factors affecting inflam-
mation and healing, and role of exercise in controlling onset or
course of inflammatory response.
APK 6200: Planning Motor Actions (3) Prereq: permission
of instructor. Processes and mechanisms involved in planning
voluntary human motor actions. Variables that influence
movement planning and initiation.
APK 6205C: Nature and Bases of Motor Performance (3)
Principles relating to development of motor skill, with emphasis
on conditions affecting its development and retention in physical
education activities.
APK 6210: Controlling Motor Actions (3) Analysis of human
voluntary motor actions, including mechanisms and systems
involved in motor control.
APK 6220C: Biomechanics of Human Motion (3) Prereq: PET
2320C; MGF 1202 or MAC 1142. Application of principles of
statics, kinematics, and kinetics to kinesiological systems of the
human body in movement and sports skills.
APK 6225: Biomechanical Instrumentation (3) Prereq: APK
6220C. Overview of data collection and analysis tools. Hands-on
experience conducting projects using EMG, videography, and
force transducer technology.
APK 6300: Athletic Training Research and Technology I (3)
Current theory and practical application of techniques (cardio-
vascular testing, isokinetic strength testing, and EMG testing)
for understanding and design of research projects related to
athletic training/sports medicine.
APK 6305: Athletic Training Research and Technology II
(3) Prereq: NATA certified or eligible, or related degree/certifica-
tion. Current theory and practical application of techniques
(modalities in research, proprioception testing, and force plate
and balance testing) for understanding and design of research
projects related to athletic training/sports medicine.
APK 6310: Physical Assessment of Athletic Injuries (3)
Coreq: Designed for students who are NATA certified trainers.
Identification, evaluation, and management of acute athletic
injuries.
APK 6315: Rehabilitation and Modalities of Athletic Injuries
(3) Rehabilitation and therapeutic modalities in the field of


athletic training.
APK 6320: Seminar in Athletic Training (1-5; max: 5) Prereq:
NATA certification. Research topics or contemporary issues in
athletic training.
APK 6400: Performance Enhancement (3) Prereq: APK5400.
Mental and psychological techniques and strategies to improve
performance and achievement in sport and exercise.
APK 6405: Exercise Psychology (3) Overview of specialty.
Research evidence examined for psychological factors associated
with adapting and maintaining exercise program.
APK 6410: Seminar in Exercise Psychology (3) Prereq: APK
6405 or consent of instructor. Critical review of literature on
selected topic. Students design group research project and pilot
test.
APK 6415: Seminar in Sport Psychology: Current Topics (3)
Prereq: sport psychology course or permission of instructor. Discussion
of research topics, including contemporary issues and interests.
In-depth exploration of research and theory. Citation of practical
sport setting applications where appropriate.
APK 6900: Directed Independent Study (1-5; max: 12)
Individual research projects under faculty guidance.
APK 6910L: Supervised Research (1-5; max: 5) S/U.
APK 6940: Advanced Practicum in Exercise and Sport
Sciences (1-5; max: 10) On-site practical experience in field of
study.
APK 6970: Research for Master's Thesis (1-15) S/U.
APK 7100: Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology (3) Prereq: APK
6110C/6356L or equivalent. Basic mechanisms of cardiovascular
dynamics at rest and in response to exercise.
APK 7105: Exercise Metabolism (3) Prereq: APK 6110C/6356L
or equivalent. Energetics of environmental stress on cardiovascu-
lar, respiratory, metabolic, and muscle physiology as they pertain
to physical performance.
APK 7110: Exercise Metabolism (3) Prereq: APK 6110C or
equivalent. Principles of metabolic regulation during exercise;
effects of chronic exercise on muscle metabolism.
APK 7120: Pulmonary Function During Exercise (3) Prereq:
APK 6110C or equivalent. Regulation of pulmonary gas exchange
during exercise; acute and experimental procedures during
exercise.
APK 7124: Free Radicals in Aging, Exercise and Disease (3)
Prereq: CHM 2040, APK 6110C or consent of instructor. Free
radical biology and biochemistry. Free radical biology and bio-
chemistry dealing with aging, exercise, antioxidants, and diseases
of aging, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and neurodegenerative
diseases.
HLP 6515: Evaluation Procedures in Health and Human
Performance (3) Evaluation and interpretation of tests and
analysis of research data.
HLP 6535: Research Methods (3) Introduction to research
methodology and design.
HLP 6911: Research Seminar (1; max: 6) Research presenta-
tions by graduate students and faculty in the College. S/U.
HLP 7979: Advanced Research (1-12) Research for doctoral
students before admission to candidacy. Designed for students
with a master's degree in the field of study or for students who
have been accepted for a doctoral program. Not appropriate for
students who have been admitted to candidacy. S/U.
HLP 7980: Research for Doctoral Dissertation (1-15) S/U.
PET 5936: Current Topics in Exercise and Sport Sciences
(1-3; max: 9) Prereq: Consent of department chair. Offered,
upon request of students, to meet special interests inadequately
covered in other courses.




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